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Sample records for capture cross-section measurements

  1. Measurements of neutron capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of measurement techniques for the neutron capture cross sections is presented. Sell transmission method, activation method, and prompt gamma-ray detection method are described using examples of capture cross section measurements. The capture cross section of 238U measured by three different prompt gamma-ray detection methods (large liquid scintillator, Moxon-Rae detector, and pulse height weighting method) are compared and their discrepancies are resolved. A method how to derive the covariance is described. (author)

  2. Neutron capture cross sections from Surrogate measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Scielzo N.D.; Dietrich F.S.; Escher J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The prospects for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear neutron-capture reactions from Surrogate measurements are investigated. Calculations as well as experimental results are presented that test the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation, which is employed in most analyses of Surrogate data. It is concluded that, in general, one has to go beyond this approximation in order to obtain (n,γ) cross sections of sufficient accuracy for most astrophysical and nuclear-energy applications.

  3. Neutron capture cross sections from Surrogate measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scielzo N.D.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The prospects for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear neutron-capture reactions from Surrogate measurements are investigated. Calculations as well as experimental results are presented that test the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation, which is employed in most analyses of Surrogate data. It is concluded that, in general, one has to go beyond this approximation in order to obtain (n,γ cross sections of sufficient accuracy for most astrophysical and nuclear-energy applications.

  4. Neutron capture cross section measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of currently-used techniques to measure neutron capture cross sections is presented. Measurements involving use of total absorption and Moxon-Rae detectors are based on low-resolution detection of the prompt γ-ray cascades following neutron captures. In certain energy ranges activation methods are convenient and useful. High resolution γ-ray measurements with germanium detectors can give information on the parameters of resonance capture states. The use of these techniques is described. (U.S.)

  5. Neutron capture cross sections from surrogate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prospects for determining cross sections for compound-nuclear neutron-capture reactions from Surrogate measurements are investigated. Calculations as well as experimental results are presented that test the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation, which is employed in most analyses of Surrogate data. The method is applied to the 155Gd(n,γ) reaction. It is concluded that, in general, one has to go beyond this approximation in order to obtain (n,γ) cross sections of sufficient accuracy for most astrophysical and nuclear-energy applications. (authors)

  6. Neutron-capture Cross Sections from Indirect Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Ressler, J J; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J

    2011-10-18

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions play an important role in models of astrophysical environments and simulations of the nuclear fuel cycle. Providing reliable cross section data remains a formidable task, and direct measurements have to be complemented by theoretical predictions and indirect methods. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  7. Measurement of neutron capture cross-sections for 164Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of 164Dy were measured in the neutron energy region of 10 to 90 keV using the 3-MV Pelletron accelerator of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Pulsed keV neutrons were produced from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction by bombarding a lithium target with the 1.5-ns bunched proton beam from the Pelletron accelerator. The incident neutron spectrum on a capture sample was measured by means of a TOF method with a 6Li-glass detector. Capture γ-rays were detected with a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) spectrometer, employing a TOF method. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to observed capture γ-ray pulse-height spectra to derive capture yields. The capture cross sections were obtained by using the standard capture cross sections of 197Au. The present results were compared with the previous measurements and the evaluated values of ENDF/B-VI

  8. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  9. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of 236U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe the 236U(n, γ) reaction cross section measurement at the GELINA white pulsed neutron source of the Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel. The sample was placed in the neutron beam at a flight station located at a nominal distance of 30 m from the neutron source. Neutron capture gamma rays were detected by two C6D6-based liquid scintillator gamma-ray detectors as a function of the neutron time-of-flight using the pulse height weighting technique. The pulse height weighting function has been derived from Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to mono-energetic gamma rays. The shape of the neutron flux was measured with a 10B chamber, placed about 60 cm upstream in the neutron beam. The capture yield in the resolved resonance region up to 3 keV has been derived and will be presented here. The analysis of the capture yield in terms of R-matrix resonance parameters is planned for the near future. (authors)

  10. Resonance parameters for measured keV neutron capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All available neutron capture cross sections in the keV region (∼ to 100 keV) have been fitted with resonance parameters. Capture cross sections for nuclides with reasonably well known average s-wave parameters, but no measured cross section, have been calculated and tabulated using p-and d- wave strength functions interpolated between fitted values. Several of these nuclides are of interest in the theory of slow nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in stars, and the product of cosmic abundance (due to the s-process) and capture cross section at 30 keV has been plotted versus mass number. (author)

  11. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on 238Pu at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed neutron capture measurement for 238Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the 238Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-(micro)m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 (micro)g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The 238Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 (micro)m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the 238Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without 238Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

  12. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

    2011-02-14

    The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

  13. Neutron capture and total cross-section measurements on fast reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture and total cross-sections of a series of nuclides in the mass range 46 to 62 have been measured at Harwell by the time-of-flight method. The capture cross-sections were measured for incident neutron energies from a few eV to 800 keV using the neutron booster target of the 45 MeV electron linac. High resolution total cross-section measurements were made with the transmission facility on the 160 MeV proton synchrocyclotron. The results of preliminary analyses of the data are presented on the capture cross-sections of Fe, 47Ti, and 49Ti and the total cross-sections of 56Fe, 58Ni and 60Ni. (author)

  14. Measurement of cross sections for electron capture and stripping by highly relativistic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have made the first measurements of the equilibrium charge state and cross sections for orbital electron capture and stripping of ions with Lorentz factor γ>10. We used gold ions from the AGS at Brookhaven with a mean kinetic energy of 10.8A GeV. The measurement of the cross section for electron capture is consistent with the prediction of radiative capture of Anholt and Becker, and with the Weizsaecker-Williams calculations of the vacuum capture cross section. The measurement of the cross section for stripping differs from the prediction of Anholt and Becker by a factor of 2.0. We set an upper limit for vacuum capture which constrains recent nonperturbative calculations

  15. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in {sup 13}C with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Renato; Carbonari, Artur W.; Terremoto, Luis A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: rsemmler@ipen.br; carbonar@ipen.br; laaterre@ipen.br; Goncalez, Odair L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados]. E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br

    2007-07-01

    Photoneutrons cross sections measurements of {sup 13}C have been obtained in energy interval between 5,3 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 - 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (2MW) research reactor. The sample have been irradiated inside a 4p geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm{sup 3}, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A methodology for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, have been used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma lines energies of the capture targets). The cross sections were compared with experimental data, reported by other authors, using different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed between in this work and reported in the literature. (author)

  16. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in 13C with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoneutrons cross sections measurements of 13C have been obtained in energy interval between 5,3 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 - 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (2MW) research reactor. The sample have been irradiated inside a 4p geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm3, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A methodology for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, have been used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma lines energies of the capture targets). The cross sections were compared with experimental data, reported by other authors, using different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed between in this work and reported in the literature. (author)

  17. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the following topics: 14 MeV pulsed neutron facility; detection and measurement system; 238U capture cross sections at 23 and 964 keV using photon neutron sources; capture cross sections of Au-197 at 23 and 964 keV; and yttrium nuclear cross section measurement

  18. Capture cross-section measurement at J-PARC: 61Ni case.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leong L.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 61Ni(n, γ cross-section has been measured at ANNRI, using the TOF method. ANNRI is an outstanding neutron facility based on spallation in MLF at J-PARC. In this cross-section measurement, we used HPGe detectors covering a substantial fraction of solid angle. In this paper, we focused the analysis on the capture rate to extract the corresponding cross-section. The dead-time correction, the overlapped neutrons correction and the background estimation were discussed.

  19. Capture cross section measurement analysis in the Californium-252 spectrum with the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute average capture cross sections of gold, thorium, tantalum, molybdenum, copper and strontium in 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were simulated for two types of experiment setups preformed by Z. Dezso and J. Csikai and by L. Green. The experiments were simulated with MCNP5 using cross section data from the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. The determination of neutron backscattering was calculated with the use of neutron flagging. Correction factors to experimentally measured values were determined to obtain average cross sections in a pure 252Cf spontaneous fission spectrum. Influence of concrete wall thickness, air moisture and room size on the average cross section was analyzed. Correction factors amounted to about 30%. Corrected values corresponding to average cross sections in a pure 252Cf spectrum were calculated for 197Au, 232Th, 181Ta, 98Mo, 65Cu and 84Sr. Average cross sections were also calculated with the RR-UNC software using IRDFF-v.1.05 and ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries. The revised average radiative capture cross sections are 75.5±0.1 mb for 197Au, 87.0±1.6 mb for 232Th , 98.0±4.5 mb for 181Ta, 21.2±0.5 mb for 98Mo, 10.3±0.3 mb for 63Cu, and 34.9±6.5 mb for 84Sr. - Highlights: • Average capture cross sections in 252Cf spontaneous fission spectrum were simulated. • Calculations were done using MCNP5 code and ENDF/B-VII.0 library. • Correction factors for self-shielding and room return effects were taken into account. • The revised average radiative capture cross sections for different materials are published

  20. A technique to measure the neutron capture cross-sections of krypton isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of noble gases an experimental technique was developed, where the probe material is irradiated in its liquid phase. To detect the capture gamma-rays a C6D6 liquid scintillator was constructed providing a defined sensitivity for capture events by applying an appropriate weighting function to the spectra. The capture cross-sections of natural Kr and 84Kr were measured relative to Au in the energy region between 5 keV and 240 keV. Values of Maxwellian averaged capture cross-sections at 5 keV <= kT <= 50 keV were derived, as they are needed for a quantitative understanding of the s-process of nucleosynthesis. By normalizing literature values of the isotopic cross-sections with the derived cross sections it was possible to determine the isotopic abundances produced in the s-process as well as the solar abundance of natural Kr. (orig.) 891 HSI/orig. 892 KN

  1. Measurements of neutron capture cross section of 237Np for fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross section of 237Np has been measured for fast neutrons supplied at the center of the core in the Yayoi reactor. The activation method was used for the measurement, in which the amount of the product 238Np was determined by γ-ray spectroscopy using a Ge detector. The neutron flux at the center of the core calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP was renormalized by using the activity of a gold activation foil irradiated simultaneously. The new convention is proposed in this paper to make possible a definite comparison of the integral measurement by the activation method using fast reactor neutrons with differential measurements using accelerator-based neutrons. 'Representative neutron energy' is defined in the convention at which the cross section deduced by the activation measurement has a high sensitivity. The capture cross section of 237Np corresponding to the representative neutron energy was deduced as 0.80±0.04 b at 214±9 keV from the measured reaction rate and the energy dependence of the cross section in the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. The deduced cross section of 237Np at the representative neutron energy agrees with the evaluated data of ENDF/B-VII.0, but is 15% higher than that of JENDL-3.3 and 13% higher than that of JENDL/AC-2008. (author)

  2. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Dance Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n ,γ ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n ,f ) resonance at En ,R=7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n ,γ ) cross section at the En ,R=2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4 % of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30 % lower than the evaluated data at En≈1 keV and are approximately 2 σ away from the previous measurement at En≈20 keV.

  3. FY07 LDRD Final Report Neutron Capture Cross-Section Measurements at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured neutron capture cross sections intended to address defense science problems including mix and the Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU), and provide details about statistical decay of excited nuclei. A major part of this project included developing the ability to produce radioactive targets. The cross-section measurements were made using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, the detector array called DANCE (The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for astrophysics and stockpile stewardship. DANCE is at the leading edge of neutron capture physics and represents a major leap forward in capability. The detector array was recently built with LDRD money. Our measurements are a significant part of the early results from the new experimental DANCE facility. Neutron capture reactions are important for basic nuclear science, including astrophysics and the statistics of the γ-ray cascades, and for applied science, including stockpile science and technology. We were most interested in neutron capture with neutron energies in the range between 1 eV and a few hundred keV, with targets important to basic science, and the s-process in particular. Of particular interest were neutron capture cross-section measurements of rare isotopes, especially radioactive isotopes. A strong collaboration between universities and Los Alamos due to the Academic Alliance was in place at the start of our project. Our project gave Livermore leverage in focusing on Livermore interests. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory did not have a resident expert in cross-section measurements; this project allowed us to develop this expertise. For many radionuclides, the cross sections for destruction, especially (n,γ), are not well known, and there is no adequate model that describes neutron capture. The modeling problem is significant because, at low energies where capture reactions are important, the neutron reaction

  4. FY07 LDRD Final Report Neutron Capture Cross-Section Measurements at DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Wilk, P; Becker, J; Wang, T

    2008-02-08

    We have measured neutron capture cross sections intended to address defense science problems including mix and the Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU), and provide details about statistical decay of excited nuclei. A major part of this project included developing the ability to produce radioactive targets. The cross-section measurements were made using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, the detector array called DANCE (The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for astrophysics and stockpile stewardship. DANCE is at the leading edge of neutron capture physics and represents a major leap forward in capability. The detector array was recently built with LDRD money. Our measurements are a significant part of the early results from the new experimental DANCE facility. Neutron capture reactions are important for basic nuclear science, including astrophysics and the statistics of the {gamma}-ray cascades, and for applied science, including stockpile science and technology. We were most interested in neutron capture with neutron energies in the range between 1 eV and a few hundred keV, with targets important to basic science, and the s-process in particular. Of particular interest were neutron capture cross-section measurements of rare isotopes, especially radioactive isotopes. A strong collaboration between universities and Los Alamos due to the Academic Alliance was in place at the start of our project. Our project gave Livermore leverage in focusing on Livermore interests. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory did not have a resident expert in cross-section measurements; this project allowed us to develop this expertise. For many radionuclides, the cross sections for destruction, especially (n,{gamma}), are not well known, and there is no adequate model that describes neutron capture. The modeling problem is significant because, at low energies where capture reactions are important, the neutron

  5. Measurement of resonance self-shielding factors of neutron capture cross section by 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance self-shielding factors fsub(c) of neutron capture cross section by 238U in the 20-100 keV energy range are measured. The method for determining the fsub(c) factor consists in measuring partial transmission and transmission in the total cross section at different 238U filter thickness. The fsub(c) factor values in the 46.5-100 and 21.5-46.5 keV energy ranges are equal to 0.89+-0.03 and 0.81+-0.04, respectively

  6. Prompt gamma-ray detectors for the measurement of neutron capture cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of current techniques for detecting prompt gamma-radiation as a means of measuring total capture cross-sections. The discussion is generally restricted to systems with low or moderate gamma-ray energy resolution. Three classes of detector are considered: (1) the total absorption type; (2) detectors with efficiency proportional to gamma-ray energy; and (3) detectors of low efficiency and known gamma-ray response. Particular attention is given to the problems of background from reactions which compete with neutron capture, and the sensitivity of capture detectors to scattered neutrons. The extraction of capture yields from observed data is briefly considered

  7. Measurement of neutron captured cross-sections in 1-2 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Young Sek; Kim, Jun Kon; Yang, Tae Keun [Korea Institutes of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The measurement of neutron captured reaction cross sections was performed to build the infra system for the production of nuclear data. MeV neutrons were produced with TiT target and {sup 3}T(p,n){sup 3}He reaction. The characteristics of TiT thin film was analyzed with ERD-TOF and RBS. The results was published at Journal of the Korea Physical Society (SCI registration). The energy, the energy spread and the flux of the produced neutron were measured. The neutron excitation functions of {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O were obtained to confirm the neutron energy and neutron energy spread. The neutron energy spread found to be 1.3 % at the neutron energy of 2.077 MeV. The {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}) reaction was performed to obtain the nerutron flux. The maximum neutron flux found to be 1 x 10{sup 8} neutrons/sec at the neutron energy of 2 MeV. The absolute efficiency of liquid scintillation detector was obtained in the neutron energy of 1 - 2 MeV. The fast neutron total reaction cross sections of Cu, Fe, and Au were measured with sample in-out method. Also the neutron captured reaction cross sections of {sup 63}Cu were measured with fast neutron activation method. The measurement of neutron total reaction cross sections and the neutron captured reaction cross sections with fast neutrons were first tried in Korea. The beam pulsing system was investigated and the code of calculating the deposition spectrums for primary gamma rays was made to have little errors at nuclear data. 25 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs. (Author)

  8. Measurement of neutron capture cross section of 232Th by activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the neutron-capture cross section by activation method of Esub(n)=350, 460 and 680 keV has been described. The measured values are 143 +- 12, 119 +- 9 and 128 +- 11 mb respectively. Neutrons were produced with the Trombay Van-de-Graaff accelerator using a liquid nitrogen cooled lithium metal target. A high-resolution Ge(Li) was employed for counting the 233Th activity. (auth.)

  9. New experimental validation of the pulse height weighting technique for capture cross-section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the pulse height weighting technique for the determination of neutron capture cross-sections is investigated. The technique is applied to measurements performed with C6D6 liquid scintillation detectors of two different types using capture samples of various dimensions. The data for well-known (n,γ) resonances are analyzed using weighting functions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental set-up. Several causes of systematic deviation are identified and their effect is quantified. In all the cases measured the reaction yield agrees with the standard value within 2%

  10. New experimental validation of the pulse height weighting technique for capture cross-section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Andriamonje, S.; Angelopoulos, A.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Bacri, C.O.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Beer, H.; Benlliure, J.; Berthier, B.; Berthomieux, E.; Boffi, S.; Borcea, C.; Boscolo-Marchi, E.; Bustreo, N.; Calvino, P.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carlson, P.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Coceva, C.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Cortina, D.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dababneh, S.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Lourenco, L.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Furman, W.I.; Giomataris, Y.; Goncalves, I.F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Ioannides, K.G.; Janeva, N.; Jericha, E.; Kaeppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karamanis, D.; Kelic, A.; Ketlerov, V.; Kitis, G.; Koehler, P.E.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Lacoste, V.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, M.I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Markov, S.; Marrone, S.; Martinez-Val, J.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Minguez, E.; Molina-Coballes, A.; Moreau, C.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papaevangelou, T.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perez-Parra, A.; Perlado, J.M.; Perrot, L.; Peskov, V.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Policarpo, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.M.; Radici, M.; Raman, S.; Rapp, W.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rejmund, F.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Savvidis, E.; Soares, J.C.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L. E-mail: jose.luis.tain@ific.uv.es; Tapia, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.M.N.; Terlizzi, R.; Terrani, M.; Tsangas, N.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin-Fernandez, D.; Vincente-Vincente, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.; Zanini, L

    2004-04-01

    The accuracy of the pulse height weighting technique for the determination of neutron capture cross-sections is investigated. The technique is applied to measurements performed with C{sub 6}D{sub 6} liquid scintillation detectors of two different types using capture samples of various dimensions. The data for well-known (n,{gamma}) resonances are analyzed using weighting functions obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental set-up. Several causes of systematic deviation are identified and their effect is quantified. In all the cases measured the reaction yield agrees with the standard value within 2%.

  11. Integral capture cross-section measurements in the CFRMF for LMFBR control materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integral capture-cross sections for separated isotopes of Eu and Ta are reported for measurements in the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF). These cross sections along with that measured in the CFRMF for 10B(n,α) provide an absolute standard for evaluating the relative reactivity worth of Eu2O3, B4C and Ta in neutron fields typical of an LMFBR core. Based on these measurements and for neutron fields characterized by the 235U:238U reaction rate spectral index ranging from 23 to 50, the infinitely dilute relative worth of Eu2O3 has been estimated to be 25 to 40 percent higher than that for B4C and 80 percent to 100 percent higher than that for Ta. 11 references

  12. Neutron Capture and Total Cross Section Measurements and Resonance Parameters of Gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) linac facility using metallic and liquid Gd samples. The liquid samples were isotopically-enriched in either 155Gd or 157Gd. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a multiplicity-type capture detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15- and 25-m flight stations with 6Li glass scintillation detectors. The multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY was used to extract resonance parameters. Among the significant findings are the following. The neutron width of the largest resonance in Gd, at 0.032 eV in 157Gd, has been measured to be (9 ± 1)% smaller than that given in ENDF/B-VI updated through release 8. The thermal (2200 m/s) capture cross section of 157Gd has been measured to be 11% smaller than that calculated from ENDF. The other major thermal resonance, at 0.025 eV in 155Gd, did not display a significant deviation from the thermal capture cross section given by ENDF. In the epithermal region, the analysis provided here represents the most extensive to date. Twenty eight new resonances are proposed and other resonances previously identified in the literature have been revisited. The assignment of resonances within regions of complicated structure incorporated the observations of other researchers, particularly on the six occasions where ENDF resonances are recommended to be removed. The poor match of the ENDF parameters to the current data is significant, and substantial improvement to the understanding of gadolinium cross sections is presented, particularly above 180 eV where the ENDF resolved region for 155Gd ends

  13. Neutron capture cross section measurements for 238U in the resonance region at GELINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. I.; Paradela, C.; Sirakov, I.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Gunsing, F.; Kim, G. N.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Lee, Y.-O.; Massarczyk, R.; Moens, A.; Moxon, M.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements were performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the 238U(n, γ) cross section in the resonance region. Experiments were carried out at a 12.5 and 60m measurement station. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied using C6D6 liquid scintillators as prompt γ-ray detectors. The energy dependence of the neutron flux was measured with ionisation chambers based on the 10B(n, α) reaction. The data were normalised to the isolated and saturated 238U resonance at 6.67 eV. Special procedures were applied to reduce bias effects due to the weighting function, normalization, dead time and background corrections, and corrections related to the sample properties. The total uncertainty due to the weighting function, normalization, neutron flux and sample characteristics is about 1.5%. Resonance parameters were derived from a simultaneous resonance shape analysis of the GELINA capture data and transmission data obtained previously at a 42m and 150m station of ORELA. The parameters of resonances below 500 eV are in good agreement with those resulting from an evaluation that was adopted in the main data libraries. Between 500 eV and 1200 eV a systematic difference in the neutron width is observed. Average capture cross section data were derived from the experimental capture yield in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 90 keV. The results are in good agreement with an evaluated cross section resulting from a least squares fit to experimental data available in the literature prior to this work. The average cross section data derived in this work were parameterised in terms of average resonance parameters and included in a least squares analysis together with other experimental data reported in the literature.

  14. Study for determining the correction parameters in neutron capture cross section measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine correction parameters to improve the accuracy in measurements of the neutron capture cross-section on filtered neutron beams at Dalat nuclear research reactor. Computer codes to calculate these factors for effect of resonance capture at low energy background, multi scattering, and shelf shielding have been developed based on the methods of Monte - Carlo, Neutron transmission and Unfolding. The calculated and experimental results of neutron background spectra for 53.9 keV and 148.3 keV filtered neutron beams and the correction factors for nuclei of 197Au, 139La, 191Ir, 193Ir, and 152Sm are reported. (author)

  15. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on 91Zr at J-PARC/MLF/ANNRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hori Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross section measurement on 91Zr was performed at neutron TOF beam line ANNRI installed at J-PARC/MLF. Prompt capture gamma rays from the sample were detected with an array of large Ge detectors at a distance of 21.5 m from the spallation neutron source by the time-of-fligh (TOF method. The neutron capture gamma-ray pulse-height spectra from the 182-eV p-wave resonance and the 292-eV s-wave resonance were obtained by gating on the TOF regions, respectively. Though the decay patterns of primary transitions from the capture state were quite different between resonances, the prominent characteristics common to both resonances was the very strong ground-state transition from the 935-keV state. Therefore, a ground-state transition method was applied to obtain the capture yield, so that the background components due to impurities were successfully eliminated. The preliminary result of the neutron capture cross section for 91Zr up to 5 keV is presented.

  16. Neutron transmission and capture cross section measurements for 241Am at the GELINA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonance parameters for neutron-induced reactions on 241Am below 110 eV have been determined. The parameters result from a resonance shape analysis of transmission and capture data measured at the time-of-flight facility GELINA, with the accelerator operating at a 50 Hz repetition rate. The transmission experiments were carried out at a 25 m station using a Li glass scintillator. The capture experiments were performed at a 12.5 m station by applying the total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique using a pair of C6D6 detectors. The normalization of the capture data was determined by a combined least squares adjustment of the transmission and capture data. From the adjusted resonance parameters a capture cross section of 749 ± 35 b for a neutron energy of 0.0253 eV and an average radiation width of Γγ = 42.0 meV for s-wave resonances were obtained. A missing-level analysis for s-wave neutron resonances within the statistical model results in compatible values with previous estimates. The neutron widths obtained in this work are approximately 22% larger compared to other experimental data and evaluated data libraries. Also the thermal capture cross section is larger than most of the recommended values. However, the resonance parameter file presented in this work is consistent with results of both integral experiments and of the experimentally determined resonance integrals. (authors)

  17. Measurements of Neutron Captured Cross Sections in 1 Mev ∼ 2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain nuclear reaction data with fast neutron, the optimum condition of KIGAM bunching system, characteristics of KIGAM prompt gamma-ray detecting system and that of two dimensional data taking system such as gamma-ray time of flight and pulse height were investigated by Institute of Korea Geoscience and Mineral Resource (KIGAM). The pulse beam with the repetition rate of 125 ns and the width of 2 ns less than was obtained by the optimum bunching conditions. Also response and weighting function of prompt gamma-ray detector were obtained by the compton suppressed detector. Gamma time of flight spectrum and pulse height spectrum were measured by the two parameter data taking system. Neutron total cross sections and capture cross sections on 197Au have been measured and are being analyzed

  18. On the direct measurement method of the capture neutron cross section by radioactive nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application possibility of multiplicity spectrometry for the measurement of direct capture neutron cross section by radioactive samples is considered. For the gamma-rays cascade registration on their space distribution in the multisection 4π-detector condition is introduced. It can be seen from calculation results of this condition with combination conditions of coincidence gamma-rays cascade in definite time interval and determined energy release in the detector sections which will lead to significant radiation background decrease from research sample radioactive radiation and it influence on registration system. Expected sensitivity for sample minimum quantity under cross section measurement on level 50 b consists approx 0,2 mg and sample specific activity approx 2 centre dot 1010Bk centre dot g-1

  19. Measurement of the 232thorium capture cross section at n-TOF-CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the context of nuclear power as a sustainable energy resource, a program of research is concentrated on a new nuclear fuel cycle based on thorium. The main advantage, as compared to the uranium cycle, is a lower production of minor actinides, of which the radiological impact on the long term constitutes a problem. At present, nuclear data libraries don't provide cross sections of a good enough quality, allowing more realistic calculations from simulations related to these reactors. The 232Th neutron capture cross section is an example. With the n-TOF collaboration, the measurement of this reaction was achieved in 2002 using two C6D6 detectors. The experimental area located at CERN, is characterized by an outstanding neutron energy resolution coupled to a high instantaneous neutron flux. The determination of the gamma-ray cascade detection efficiency, with a random behaviour, has been obtained by the use of weighting functions. These were deduced from Monte Carlo simulations with the code MCNP. Data extraction, reduction, and the description of the neutron flux have lead to the capture yield. In the resolved resonance region, the resonance parameters describing the cross section were deduced with the code SAMMY, using the R-matrix theory. In the unresolved resonance region, an uncertainty of 3,5% is found, and a comparison with recent measurements shows a good agreement. (author)

  20. Measurement of the fast neutron capture cross section of 238U relative to 235U(n,f)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capture cross section of 238U was measured using the activation technique and 235U(n,f) as a reference cross section. Capture events were measured by detection of two prominent γ-transitions in the decay of the 239U daughter nuclide, 239Np, employing a high resolution Ge(Li) detector. The system was calibrated with samples activated in a thermal neutron flux relative to the capture cross section of gold, and with an absolutely calibrated α-emitter, 243Am, which decays to 239Np. Cross section measurements were carried out in the neutron energy range from 30 keV to 3 MeV. Emphasis was on absolute values between 150 keV and 1 MeV where the 238U(n,γ) cross section and its cross section is small. Background from fission products was found to restrict the accuracy of the measured data at energies > 1.5 MeV

  1. Recent measurements of neutron capture cross sections in the fission product mass region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative capture cross sections for the separated isotopes of Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Pd, Cd, Ba, La, Ce, Pr and Nd in the energy range 3 to 200 keV were measured with high energy resolution at the 40 m station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Maxwellian averaged 30 keV cross sections and average resonance parameters derived from the analysis are tabulated. A strong dependence of the average radiative widths on neutron binding energy is noted. This leads to a pronounced even-odd disparity. Neutron strength functions reduce with decreasing binding energy along an isotopic chain owing to the decreasing density of doorway states at the binding energy. 16 references

  2. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral of radioactive Hf182

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockenhuber, C.; Bichler, M.; Wallner, A.; Kutschera, W.; Dillmann, I.; Käppeler, F.

    2008-04-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the radioactive isotope Hf182 (t1/2=8.9×106 yr) in the thermal and epithermal energy regions have been measured by activation at the TRIGA Mark-II reactor of the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in Vienna, Austria, and subsequent γ-ray spectroscopy of Hf183. High values for the thermal (kT=25 meV) cross section σ0=133±10 b and for the resonance integral I0=5850±660 b were found. Additionally, the absolute intensities of the main γ-ray transitions in the decay of Hf182 have been considerably improved.

  3. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of 234U in n-TOF at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate and reliable neutron capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. In particular, the accurate knowledge of 234U(n, γ) reaction cross section is required for the design and realization of nuclear power stations based on the thorium fuel cycle. We have measured the neutron capture cross section of 234U at the recently constructed neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN [2] in the energy range from 0.03 eV to 1 MeV with high accuracy due to a combination of features unique in the world: A high instantaneous neutron fluence and excellent energy resolution of the n-TOF facility, an innovative Data Acquisition System based on flash ADCs [3] and the use of a high performance 4Π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) as a detection device [4, 5], In this paper, we will describe the experimental apparatus including the various TAC components and its performance. We also will present results from the 234U(n, γ) measurement. A sample of 38.7 mg of 234U3O8 was pressed into a pellet and doubly encapsulated between Al and Ti foils which were 0.15 mm and 0.2 mm thick, respectively. Monte-Carlo simulations with GEANT4 [6] of the detector response have been performed. After the background subtraction and correction with dead time and pile-up, the capture yield from 0.03 eV up to 1.5 keV was derived. Preliminary analysis of the capture yield in terms of R-matrix resonance parameters is discussed. (authors)

  4. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurements in the KeV Energy Region at the Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of neutron capture cross sections in the keV energy region by the time-of-flight method has been continued for 20 years at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. The neutron capture cross sections of more than 70 nuclides have been determined. Neutrons are generated via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction using a proton beam from a Pelletron accelerator. Gamma rays from the neutron capture reaction are detected with an NaI(Tl) spectrometer. A pulse height weighting technique is used to deduce neutron capture cross sections from the pulse height spectra. The neutron capture experiment system is explained. (author)

  5. Neutron capture cross section measurement of I-129 with lead slowing-down spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, K

    2002-01-01

    Making use of the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method with an electron linear accelerator (linac) and of a lead slowing-down spectrometer (KULS), we have measured nuclear data of minor actinides (MAs) and/or long-lived fission products (LLFPs). In the present study, we have carried out the capture cross section measurement of sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I by the linac TOE method as a part of experimental series for LLFP. At first, the experimental data and the evaluated data (ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3.2, and JEF-2.2) of sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I have been reviewed. As a result, it has been found that the present status of the sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I data is not enough in quality and quantity. Secondly, by using the NaI-129 sample, the sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I(n,gamma) sup 1 sup 3 sup 0 I cross section has been measured from 0.004 eV to 10 keV relative to the sup 1 sup 0 B(n,alpha) reaction with a pair of C sub 6 D sub 6 scintillation detectors. After the background subtraction and the self-shielding correction, the cross section has been no...

  6. Filtered thermal neutron captured cross-sections measurements and decay heat calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a pure thermal neutron beam has been developed for neutron capture measurements based on the horizontal channel No.2 of the research reactor at the Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat. The original reactor neutron spectrum is transmitted through an optimal composition of Bi and Si single crystals for delivering a thermal neutron beam with Cadmium ratio (Rcd) of 420 and neutron flux (Φth) of 1.6x106 n/cm2.s. This thermal neutron beam has been applied for measurements of capture cross-sections for nuclide of 51V, 55Mn, 180Hf and 186W by the activation method relative to the standard reaction 197Au(n,g)198Au. In addition to the activities of neutron capture cross-sections measurements, the study on nuclear decay heat calculations has been also considered to be developed at the Institute. Some results on calculation procedure and decay heat values calculated with update nuclear database for 235U, 238U, 239Pu and 232Th are introduced in this report. (author)

  7. Differential cross section measurement of radiative capture of protons by nuclei 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The reaction 13C(p,γ )14N is the important one for the astrophysics, not only for nuclear synthesis of CNO elements, but and for nuclear synthesis of elements participating in subsequent combustion of helium [1]. The predominant yield of the reaction occurs at protons energies of less than 1 MeV. However, the clearness of the capture mechanism in this energy region is made difficult because of the superposition of the contribution of the low - energetical part of the resonance 1320 keV onto the cross section. Last experimental data for more wide energy region, informed in the work [1], and results of previous works, mentioned in that work, give reason for further continuation of the study of the reaction 13C(p,γ )14N. Measured data of the work [1] in the region of Eρ = (320 † 900) keV at the angles of 0o and 90o are obviously insufficient. In the present work measurements of differential cross sections of the reaction were carried out at protons energies Ep = 991, 558 and 365 keV, the accuracy is not worse then 10%. There was studied the most (from the astrophysical point of view) important process of protons capture by 13C nuclei onto the ground state of the 14N nucleus. The 13C (99%) targets, used in the experiment, were sprayed onto copper base. The target thickness was determined by incident protons energy losses in the target. The energy losses were clearly reflected in the corresponding spreading of transitions of radiation capture. The statement about the gamma-lines spreading is valid in this case, because energy losses in the target are here significantly more, than the energetical resolution of the detector. The peak width of the radiation capture gamma-line at half-height corresponds to energy losses of incident protons in the target. From the Table of brake values for protons in carbon [2] there was determined that the thickness of the target was 140 ± 5% μg/cm2. The upper part of gamma-lines in the spectrum repeats the course of

  8. Measurements of fast neutron capture and fission cross sections of minor actinide isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of 240Pu, 242Pu and 241Am were measured in the energy range from 10 to 250 keV, with 197Au and 238U as standards. The subthreshold fission cross sections of 240Pu and 241Am were determined relative to 235U in the energy range from 10 to 250 keV and 10 keV to 1 MeV, respectively. Continuous neutron spectra and in one case monoenergetic neutrons were produced by means of the Li(p,n) and T(p,n) reactions with the Karlsruhe 3-MV pulsed Van de Graaff accelerator. Capture events were detected by a Moxon Rae detector, and fission events, observed with a NE213 liquid scintillator. The high neutron flux available at flight paths as short as 50 to 135 mm allowed a statistical accuracy of 1 to 3% for most of the measured data together with a moderate energy resolution of 10 to 30 ns/m. An overall uncertainty between 5 and 10% was obtained in most of the measurements. A comparison is made to recent data of other authors and to evaluated files. 8 figures, 1 table

  9. Measurement of the radiative neutron capture cross section of 206Pb and its astrophysical implications

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C; Aerts, G; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, Panayiotis; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calviño, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Dolfini, R; Dridi, W; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Kölbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Gonçalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, M; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; Oshima, M; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2007-01-01

    The (n, gamma) cross section of 206Pb has been measured at the CERN n_TOF facility with high resolution in the energy range from 1 eV to 600 keV by using two optimized C6D6 detectors. In the investigated energy interval about 130 resonances could be observed, from which 61 had enough statistics to be reliably analyzed via the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY. Experimental uncertainties were minimized, in particular with respect to (i) angular distribution effects of the prompt capture gamma-rays, and to (ii) the TOF-dependent background due to sample-scattered neutrons. Other background components were addressed by background measurements with an enriched 208Pb sample. The effect of the lower energy cutoff in the pulse height spectra of the C6D6 detectors was carefully corrected via Monte Carlo simulations. Compared to previous 206Pb values, the Maxwellian averaged capture cross sections derived from these data are about 20% and 9% lower at thermal energies of 5 keV and 30 keV, respectively. These new results hav...

  10. Measurement of neutron capture and fission cross sections of 233U in the resonance region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekhanovich I.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of studies concerning new fuel cycles and nuclear wastes incineration experimental data of the α ratio between capture and fission cross sections of 233U reactions play an important role in the Th/U cycle. The safety evaluation and the detailed performance assessment for the generation IV nuclear-energy system based on 232Th cycle strongly depend on this ratio. Since the current data are scarce and sometimes contradictory, new experimental studies are required. The measurement will take place at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA at Geel, designed to perform neutron cross section measurements with high incident neutron-energy resolution. A dedicated high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC as fission fragment detector and six C6D6 liquid scintilators sensitive to γ-rays and neutrons will be used. The method, based on the IC energy response study, allowing to distinguish between gammas originating from fission and capture, in the resonance region, will be presented.

  11. Compilation of measured capture cross sections for JENDL-fission product nuclear data file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of experimental data of neutron capture cross section is reviewed on 38 fission product (FP) nuclides important for fast reactor calculations. Experimental data are compiled for 24 of the 38 FP nuclides in the energy region above 1 keV. Appendix I gives outlines of the experiments (neutron energy, number of data points, cross section, neutron source, experimental method, standard cross section, β- and γ-ray data etc.) in tables. Appendix II illustrates the compiled data of neutron capture cross section in figures. This work was made as a part of evaluation work of Fission Product Nuclear Data Working Group of Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The authors were supported under the contract with JAERI. (auth.)

  12. The 234U neutron capture cross section measurement at the n TOF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross-section of 234U has been measured for energies from thermal up to the keV region in the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF, based on a spallation source located at CERN. A 4π BaF2 array composed of 40 crystals, placed at a distance of 184.9 m from the neutron source, was employed as a total absorption calorimeter (TAC) for detection of the prompt γ-ray cascade from capture events in the sample. This text describes the experimental setup, all necessary steps followed during the data analysis procedure. Results are presented in the form of R-matrix resonance parameters from fits with the SAMMY code and compared to the evaluated data of Endf in the relevant energy region, indicating the good performance of the n-TOF facility and the TAC. (authors)

  13. The {sup 234}U neutron capture cross section measurement at the n TOF facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampoudis, C.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; A lvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, O.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    The neutron capture cross-section of {sup 234}U has been measured for energies from thermal up to the keV region in the neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF, based on a spallation source located at CERN. A 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array composed of 40 crystals, placed at a distance of 184.9 m from the neutron source, was employed as a total absorption calorimeter (TAC) for detection of the prompt {gamma}-ray cascade from capture events in the sample. This text describes the experimental setup, all necessary steps followed during the data analysis procedure. Results are presented in the form of R-matrix resonance parameters from fits with the SAMMY code and compared to the evaluated data of Endf in the relevant energy region, indicating the good performance of the n-TOF facility and the TAC. (authors)

  14. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA for {sup 233}U, {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Santos, G. Dos; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors have made use of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure the fission cross section of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range of 0.36 eV to {approximately} 700 keV. This paper reports integral data and average cross sections. In addition they measured the total neutron cross section of {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine, as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  15. Actinide Capture and Fission Cross Section Measurements Within the Mini-Inca Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The Mini-INCA project is devoted to precise description of the transmutation chain of Actinides within high thermal neutron fluxes. It uses the High Flux Reactor of ILL (Laue Langevin Institute) as an intense thermal neutron source to measure capture and fission cross sections. Two irradiation channels are dedicated for those measurements offering a diversity of fluxes ranging from pure thermal neutrons to 15% epithermal neutrons with intensities as high as 1*1015 n/cm2/s. Standard nuclear techniques for measurements, such as α and γ-spectroscopy of irradiated samples, have been extended in order to stand all constraints due to the irradiation in high fluxes. In particular new types of fission micro-chambers have been developed to follow online the evolution of one actinide and to measure its fission cross section in reference to 235U(n,F) standard reaction. This type of neutron detector will be used within the MEGAPIE target to on-line characterise the neutron flux and to study the potentiality of such target in terms of incineration. (author)

  16. 232Th, 233Pa, and 234U capture cross-section measurements in moderated neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Th-U cycle was studied through the evolution of a 100 μg 232Th sample irradiated in a moderated neutron flux of 8.01014 n/cm2/s, intensity close to that of a thermal molten salt reactor. After 43 days of irradiation and 6 months of cooling, a precise mass spectrometric analysis, using both TIMS and MC-ICP-MS techniques, was performed, according to a rigorous methodology. The measured thorium and uranium isotopic ratios in the final irradiated sample were then compared with integral simulations based on evaluated data; an overall good agreement was seen. Four important thermal neutron-capture cross-sections were also extracted from the measurements, 232Th (7.34±0.21 b), 233Pa (38.34±1.78 b), 234U (106.12±3.34 b), and 235U (98.15±11.24 b). Our 232Th and 235U results confirmed existing values whereas the cross-sections of 233Pa and 234U (both key parameters) have been redefined

  17. Measurement of capture cross sections of 238U on the filtered keV-neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capture cross sections for the 238U(n,γ) reaction were measured related to that of the 197Au(n,γ) reaction on the filtered keV-neutron beams at the Dalat reactor using the activation method. Radioactivities of samples after irradiation were measured with HPGe detectors (50 mm2 sensitive area, FWHM = 150 eV for 55Fe and 70 cc volume, FWHM = 2.5 keV at 1332 keV γ-transition of 60Co). The data obtained by the authors were compared with the evaluations in ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 and also with the results from recent experimental works. (author). 12 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  18. Measurement of radiative capture cross section on 238U at the nTOF CERN facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need of sources of energy different from fossil fuels is nowadays a crucial point. As the EU-SET Plan points out, it is necessary to investigate new concepts for nuclear systems to improve the sustainability of nuclear energy. These concepts cover from energy production, through both advanced light water reactors and fast reactors foreseen in generation IV, to minimization and discharge of nuclear waste through subcritical fast systems (ADS). Despite many previous measurements and recent efforts, the present knowledge of basic nuclear data is still inadequate to fulfill the precision and accuracy required for the design and development of these new technologies. In this context the Nuclear Energy Agency addresses the most relevant isotopes, decay data, nuclear reaction channels and energy ranges that have to be investigated in more detail in the NEA High Priority Request List. The measurement of 238U(n,g) reaction cross section falls within this list because of its importance for the security of operating light water reactors and the design of generation IV reactors. Even if the number of measurements present in the EXFOR database is large, inconsistencies are still present for the 238U capture cross section both in the low energy and in the unresolved resonance region. This uncertainty influences both fast and thermal reactor systems, and contributes to the uncertainty on Pu isotope density at the end of fuel cycles. As such, there is a proposal of three independent measurement of the 238U(n,g) cross section in order to reach the required precision of 2% within an energy range from few eV to hundreds of keV. One measurement was performed at the EC-JRC-IRMM facility GELINA, while the other two at the nTOF facility at CERN. Combined together they should lead to the desired accuracy. Here the preliminary results of the 238U(n,g) cross section measurement are presented, which was performed at nTOF with C6D6 scintillation detectors on April 2012 and covers an

  19. Measurement of the Thermal Neutron Capture Cross section of 237Np for the Study of Nuclear Transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Accurate nuclear data of minor actinides are required for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes. The 237Np is one of the most important minor actinides for this study because of its relatively large abundance in irradiated fuels. However, there are apparent discrepancies between the reported neutron capture cross sections of the 237Np for thermal neutrons. History on the measurements of the neutron capture cross section of 237Np for thermal neutrons is briefly presented first. Recent three data measured by a γ ray spectroscopic method are much smaller than those measured by other methods. To deduce the neutron capture cross section by an activation method with γ ray spectroscopy, the relevant γ-ray emission probabilities are used. These decay data could be an origin of the discrepancies on the neutron capture cross section of 237Np. To examine the hypothesis, we measured the relevant γ-ray emission probabilities of 233Pa and 238Np from the ratio of the emission rate to the activity. The obtained emission probabilities are used to correct the thermal neutron capture cross section of 237Np reported previously. The cross section is also independently determined by irradiating 237Np sample in the research reactor of Kyoto University and counting α rays emitted from 237Np and 238Pu with a Si detector. The measured emission probabilities of 233Pa and 238Np, and the neutron capture cross section of 237Np are compared with others from references. The results of the precise decay data explain the discrepancy on the neutron capture cross section of 237Np. Details of the experiments and results will be presented. (authors)

  20. Measurement of fast-neutron capture cross sections for 75As

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The cross sections of the 75As(n,γ)76As reaction were measured in the neutron energy range from 0.50 to 1.50 MeV by using the activation technique. Neutrons were produced via the T(p,n)3He reaction and the cross sections of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction were used to determine the absolute neutron flux. Present results are compared with existing measurements and evaluations.

  1. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in 9Be, 13C e 17O with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoneutron cross sections measurements of 9Be, 13C and 17O have been obtained in the energy interval between 1,6 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 a 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (5 MW) research reactor. The samples have been irradiated inside a 4π geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm3, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A inversion matrix methodology to solve inversion problems for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, was used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma line energies of the capture targets). The cross sections obtained at the energy values of the principal gamma lines were compared with experimental data reported by other authors, with have employed different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed among the experimental data in this work with reported in the literature. (author)

  2. Measurement of the effective thermal cross section of {sup 134}Cs by triple neutron capture reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Katoh, Toshio [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1998-03-01

    The effective thermal cross section ({sigma}{sub eff}) of the {sup 134}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 135}Cs reaction was measured by the activation method and the {gamma}-ray spectroscopic method in order to obtain fundamental data for research on the transmutation of nuclear wastes. The effective thermal cross section of the reaction {sup 134}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 135}Cs was found to be 140.6{+-}8.5 barns. (author)

  3. Neutron Capture Cross Sections for Radioactive Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, Anton; Bedrossian, Peter; Escher, Jutta; Scielzo, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Accurate neutron-capture cross sections for radioactive nuclei near or far away from the line of beta stability are crucial for understanding the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements. However, neutron-capture cross sections for short-lived radionuclides are difficult to measure due to the fact that the measurements require both highly radioactive samples and intense neutron sources. Essential ingredients for describing the γ decays following neutron capture are the γ-ray strength function and level densities. We will compare different indirect approaches for obtaining observables that can constrain Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations of capture cross sections. Specifically, we will consider photon scattering, transfer reactions, and beta-delayed neutron emission. Challenges that exist on the path to obtaining neutron-capture cross sections for reactions on isotopes far from stability will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Funding was provided via the LDRD-ERD-069 project.

  4. Measurement of the fast neutron capture cross section of /sup 238/U relative to /sup 235/U(n,f)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fawcett, L.R. Jr.; Poenitz, W.P.; Smith, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The capture cross section of /sup 238/U was measured using the activation technique and /sup 235/U(n,f) as a reference cross section. Capture events were measured by detection of two prominent ..gamma..-transitions in the decay of the /sup 239/U daughter nuclide, /sup 239/Np, employing a high resolution Ge(Li) detector. The system was calibrated with samples activated in a thermal neutron flux relative to the capture cross section of gold, and with an absolutely calibrated ..cap alpha..-emitter, /sup 243/Am, which decays to /sup 239/Np. Cross section measurements were carried out in the neutron energy range from 30 keV to 3 MeV. Emphasis was on absolute values between 150 keV and 1 MeV where the /sup 238/U(n,..gamma..) cross section and its cross section is small. Background from fission products was found to restrict the accuracy of the measured data at energies > 1.5 MeV.

  5. 12C+16O sub-barrier radiative capture cross-section measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutcheon D.A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a heavy ion radiative capture reaction between two light heavy ions, 12C and 16O, leading to 28Si. The present experiment has been performed below Coulomb barrier energies in order to reduce the phase space and to try to shed light on structural effects. Obtained γ-spectra display a previously unobserved strong feeding of intermediate states around 11 MeV at these energies. This new decay branch is not fully reproduced by statistical nor semi-statistical decay scenarii and may imply structural effects. Radiative capture cross-sections are extracted from the data.

  6. Experimental uncertainty estimation on the effective capture cross sections measured in the PROFIL experiments in Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A desire of increasing nuclear system safety and fuel depletion is directly translated by a better knowledge on nuclear data. PROFIL and PROFIL-2 experiments give integral information on capture and (n,2n) cross sections and cumulative fission yields for several isotopes (95Mo, 97Mo, 101Pd, 105Pd, 133Cs, 143Nd, 144Nd, 145Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 151Eu, 233U, 234U, 235U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 244Cm ...). Interpretation have been done many times in the past but without experimental uncertainty estimation. The cross section library JEFF-3.1.1, the covariance data base COMAC and the code system ERANOS-2.2 are used for this updated interpretation. This study is focusing on the uncertainty estimation on experimental values sensitive to capture cross sections. Three steps are required: the fluence scaling, the uncertainty propagation on the fluence and finally the uncertainty estimation on ratio variation of interest. This work is done with CONRAD using Bayesian adjustment and marginalization method. Mean C/E results and conclusions are identical to the previous interpretation. A fluence uncertainty of 1.4% is found for the two experimental pins of PROFIL-2 and 1.9% for PROFIL. Propagating this new information on the fluence to ratio variation of interest gives experimental uncertainties between 1% to 2.5% for the isotopes present in the experimental pins. One of the main results are for 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu capture cross sections: C/E are respectively equal to 1.03, 0.98, 0.97, 1.08 and 1.14 with an uncertainty lower than 2.5%. All the results will provide feedback on variance-covariance matrices for further works. (author)

  7. Design status of KOBRA for rare isotope production and direct measurements of radiative capture cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshoo, K.; Chae, H.; Park, J.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, Y. K.; Souliotis, G. A.; Hashimoto, T.; Akers, C.; Berg, G. P. A.; Choi, S.; Jeong, S. C.; Kato, S.; Kim, Y. K.; Kubono, S.; Lee, K. B.; Moon, C.-B.

    2016-06-01

    KOBRA (KOrea Broad acceptance Recoil spectrometer and Apparatus) facility being designed at Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea will be utilized to produce rare isotope beams by employing multi-nucleon transfer reactions at about 20 MeV/nucleon for studies of nuclear structure. KOBRA will also provide high suppression of beam induced background for direct measurements of radiative-capture cross sections in the astrophysical energy range. The present design status of the KOBRA facility is reported along with a brief introduction to the facility. We have studied the feasibility of production of 44Ti based on the present design of KOBRA as an example, and calculated the intensity of 44Ti secondary beam, to be about 105 particles per second, for 1 pnA 46Ti primary beam with a carbon target for a beam energy of 25 MeV/nucleon. A Monte Carlo simulation with a ray-tracing code has been performed to show that recoil products 66Se are well separated from a 65As beam by KOBRA for the 65As (p, γ)66Se reaction at a beam energy of 1 MeV/nucleon.

  8. Absolute measurements of the fast neutron capture cross section of 115In

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 115In(n,#betta#)/sup 116m1/In cross section has been absolutely determined at neutron energies of 23, 265 and 964 keV. These energies are the median neutron energies of the three photo-neutron sources. Sb-Be, Na-CD2 and Na-Be, utilized in this work. The measurements are independent of other cross section data except for corrections amounting to less than 10%. Independent determinations of the reaction rate, detector efficiency, neutron source strength, scalar flux and target masses were performed. Reaction rates were determined by beta counting of the /sup 116ml/In decay activity using a 4π gas flow proportional counter. Detector efficiency was measured using 4π#betta#-#betta# coincidence counting techniques and the foil absorber method of efficiency extrapolation for correction of complex decay scheme effects. Photoneutron source emission rates were determined by intercomparison with the NBS-II calibrated 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source in the University of Michigan Manganese Bath. The normalized scalar flux was calculated from the neutron emission angular distribution results of the Monte Carlo computer program used to model neutron and gamma transport in the source. Target mass determinations were made with a microbalance. Correction factors were applied for competing reaction activities, neutron scattering from experiment components, room-return induced activities, spectral effects in the manganese bath and the neutron energy spectra of the photoneutron sources. Experimental cross section results were normalized to the source median energy using energy spectra d cross section shape data. The absolute cross sections obtained for the 115In(n,#betta#)/sup 116ml/In reaction were 588 +- 12, 196 +- 4 and 200 +- 3 millibarns at 23, 265 and 964 keV, respectively

  9. Neutron capture cross section measurements for 197Au from 3.5 to 84 keV at GELINA

    OpenAIRE

    Massimi, C.; BECKER BJÖRN; Dupont, E.; Kopecky, Stefan; LAMPOUDIS CHRISTOS; Massarczyk, R.; Moxon, M.; PRONYAEV V. G; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Sirakov, I.; WYNANTS Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Cross section measurements have been performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the average capture cross section for 197Au in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 84 keV. Prompt gamma-rays, originating from neutron induced capture events, were detected by two C6D6 liquid scintillators. The sample was placed at about 13 m distance from the neutron source. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied. The energy de...

  10. MANTRA: Measuring Neutron Capture Cross Sections in Actinides with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Collon, P.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Nusair, O.; Nair, C.; Paul, M.; Kondev, F.; Chen, J.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2013-10-01

    With rising global energy needs, there is substantial interest in nuclear energy research. To explore possibilities for advanced fuel cycles, better neutron cross section data are needed for the minor actinides. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAsmutation) project will improve these data by measuring integral (n, γ) cross sections. The cross sections will be extracted by measuring isotopic ratios in pure actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Lab, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry(AMS) at the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). MANTRA presents a unique AMS challenge because of the goal to measure multiple isotopic ratios on a large number of samples. To meet these challenges, we have modified the AMS setup at ATLAS to include a laser ablation system for solid material injection into our ECR ion source. I will present work on the laser ablation system and modified source geometry, as well as preliminary measurements of unirradiated actinide samples at ATLAS. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. A measurement of actinide neutron transmutations with accelerator mass spectrometry in order to infer neutron capture cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, William K.

    Improved neutron capture cross section data for transuranic and minor actinides are essential for assessing possibilities for next generation reactors and advanced fuel cycles. The Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutation (MANTRA) project aims to make a comprehensive set of energy integrated neutron capture cross section measurements for all relevant isotopes from Th to Cf. The ability to extract these cross sections relies on the use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to analyze isotopic concentrations in samples irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The AMS measurements were performed at the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) and required a number of key technical developments to the ion source, accelerator, and detector setup. In particular, a laser ablation material injection system was developed at the electron cyclotron resonance ion source. This system provides a more effective method to produce ion beams from samples containing only 1% actinide material and offers some benefits for reducing cross talk in the source. A series of four actinide measurements are described in this dissertation. These measurements represent the most substantial AMS work attempted at ATLAS and the first results of the MANTRA project. Isotopic ratios for one and two neutron captures were measured in each sample with total uncertainties around 10%. These results can be combined with a MCNP model for the neutron fluence to infer actinide neutron capture cross sections.

  12. Measurement and analysis of the $^{243}$Am neutron capture cross section at the n_TOF facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, E; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Balibrea, J; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Calvino, F; Calviani, M; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Carrillo de Albornoz, A; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrant†, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Koelbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gonz alez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Ketlerov, V; Kerveno, M; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lossito, R; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marques, L; Marrone, S; Martınez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O’Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vicente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2014-01-01

    Background:The design of new nuclear reactors and transmutation devices requires to reduce the present neutron cross section uncertainties of minor actinides. Purpose: Reduce the $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section uncertainty. Method: The $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility at CERN with a BaF$_{2}$ Total Absorption Calorimeter, in the energy range between 0.7 eV and 2.5 keV. Results: The $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section has been successfully measured in the mentioned energy range. The resolved resonance region has been extended from 250 eV up to 400 eV. In the unresolved resonance region our results are compatible with one of the two incompatible capture data sets available below 2.5 keV. The data available in EXFOR and in the literature has been used to perform a simple analysis above 2.5 keV. Conclusions: The results of this measurement contribute to reduce the $^{243}$Am(n,$\\gamma$) cross section uncertainty and suggest that this cross section is underestimate...

  13. Total Cross Sections as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture: An Opportunity to Accurately Constrain (n,γ) Cross Sections for Nuclides Beyond the Reach of Direct Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Paul E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-05

    There are many (n,γ) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics and to nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current measurement techniques, and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In contrast, total neutron cross sections currently are feasible for many of these nuclides and provide almost all the information needed to accurately calculate the (n,γ) cross sections via the nuclear statistical model (NSM). I demonstrate this for the case of 151Sm; NSM calculations constrained using average resonance parameters obtained from total cross section measurements made in 1975, are in excellent agreement with recent 151Sm (n,γ) measurements across a wide range of energy. Furthermore, I demonstrate through simulations that total cross section measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10μg. Samples of this size should be attainable for many nuclides of interest. Finally, I estimate that over half of the radionuclides identified ∼20 years ago as having (n,γ) cross sections of importance to s-process nucleosynthesis studies (24/43) and radiochemical diagnostics (11/19), almost none of which have been measured, can be constrained using this technique.

  14. Absolute measurement of 115In capture cross section at 144 and 565 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section of 115In(n, γ) 116mIn reaction are measured at 144 keV and 565 keV neutron energy by activation technique. The neutron fluence is measured by using H2 and CH4 filled proportional counter. A 4πβ counter is used to determine the β activities of 116mIn. The efficiency of the β detector is determined by 4πβ-γ coincidence techniques. A Monte-Carlo program is used to calculate the effect for neutron scattering from target, sample and holder. The results are compared with others

  15. Neutron capture cross section measurements for {sup 197}Au from 3.5 to 84 keV at GELINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimi, C. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); Joint Research Centre - IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); INFN, Bologna (Italy); Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R. [Joint Research Centre - IRMM, European Commission, Geel (Belgium); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Issy-les-Moulineaux (France); Massarczyk, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Pronyaev, V. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Sirakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Moxon, M.

    2014-08-15

    Cross section measurements have been performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the average capture cross section for {sup 197}Au in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 84 keV. Prompt γ-rays, originating from neutron-induced capture events, were detected by two C{sub 6} D{sub 6} liquid scintillators. The sample was placed at about 13m distance from the neutron source. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied. The energy dependence of the neutron flux was measured with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber based on the {sup 10}B(n,α) reaction. The data have been normalized to the well-isolated and saturated {sup 197}Au resonance at 4.9 eV. Special care was taken to reduce bias effects due to the weighting function, normalization, dead time and background corrections. The total uncertainty due to normalization, neutron flux and weighting function is 1.0%. An additional uncertainty of 0.5% results from the correction for self-shielding and multiple interaction events. Fluctuations due to resonance structures have been studied by complementary measurements at a 30m flight path station. The results reported in this work deviate systematically by more than 5% from the cross section that is recommended as a reference for astrophysical applications. They are about 2% lower compared to an evaluation of the {sup 197}Au(n, γ) cross section, which was based on a least squares fit of experimental data available in the literature prior to this work. The average capture cross section as a function of neutron energy has been parameterized in terms of average resonance parameters. Maxwellian average cross sections at different temperatures have been calculated. (orig.)

  16. Neutron capture cross section measurements for 197Au from 3.5 to 84 keV at GELINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, C.; Becker, B.; Dupont, E.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Massarczyk, R.; Moxon, M.; Pronyaev, V.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sirakov, I.; Wynants, R.

    2014-08-01

    Cross section measurements have been performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the average capture cross section for 197Au in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 84 keV. Prompt γ-rays, originating from neutron-induced capture events, were detected by two C6 D6 liquid scintillators. The sample was placed at about 13m distance from the neutron source. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied. The energy dependence of the neutron flux was measured with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber based on the 10B(n,α) reaction. The data have been normalized to the well-isolated and saturated 197Au resonance at 4.9 eV. Special care was taken to reduce bias effects due to the weighting function, normalization, dead time and background corrections. The total uncertainty due to normalization, neutron flux and weighting function is 1.0%. An additional uncertainty of 0.5% results from the correction for self-shielding and multiple interaction events. Fluctuations due to resonance structures have been studied by complementary measurements at a 30m flight path station. The results reported in this work deviate systematically by more than 5% from the cross section that is recommended as a reference for astrophysical applications. They are about 2% lower compared to an evaluation of the 197Au(n, γ) cross section, which was based on a least squares fit of experimental data available in the literature prior to this work. The average capture cross section as a function of neutron energy has been parameterized in terms of average resonance parameters. Maxwellian average cross sections at different temperatures have been calculated.

  17. Neutron capture cross section measurement of $^{151}Sm$ at the CERN neutron Time of Flight Facility (nTOF)

    CERN Document Server

    Abbondanno, U; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortina-Gil, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Durán, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Kölbl, H; Furman, W; Gonçalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, Armando; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wissha, K

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of **1**5**1Sm(n, gamma)**1**5**2Sm (samarium) cross section showed improved performance of the new spallation neutron facility. It covered a wide energy range with good resolution, high neutron flux, low backgrounds and a favourable duty factor. The samarium cross section was found to be of great importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant stars. The combination of these features provided a promising basis for a broad experimental program directed towards application in astrophysics and advanced nuclear technologies. (Edited abstract)

  18. Neutron capture cross section measurement of Np-237 below 10 keV by linac time-of-flight method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Samyol; Yamamoto, Shuji; Cho, Hyun-Je; Yoshimoto, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Fujita, Yoshiaki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Ohkawachi, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2001-03-01

    The neutron capture cross section of {sup 237}Np has been measured in the energy region from 0.01 eV to 10 keV by using the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method with a 46 MeV electron linear accelerator (linac) at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). A pair of C{sub 6}D{sub 6} scintillation detectors, which was placed at a distance of 12.0 {+-} 0.02 m from the pulsed neutron source, was employed for the prompt capture gamma-ray measurement from the {sup 237}Np sample. The measured result has been normalized to the reference value of the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}){sup 238}Np reaction in ENDF/B-VI at 0.0253 eV. The existing experimental and the evaluated capture cross sections in ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.2 have been compared with the present measurement. For the neutron capture cross section of {sup 237}Np, the data by Weston et al. and the evaluated data are in good agreement with the present measurement. However, the data by Hoffman et al. are obviously lower in the relevant energy region. The data, which were measured before using a lead slowing-down spectrometer at KURRI, have been in good agreement with the data obtained by energy-broadening the present TOF measurement. (author)

  19. Determining neutron capture cross sections with the Surrogate Reaction Technique: Measuring decay probabilities with STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are sometimes difficult to measure due to target or beam limitations. For two-step reactions proceeding through an equilibrated intermediate state, an alternate 'surrogate reaction' technique [J.D. Cramer and H.C. Britt, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 41, 177 (1970), H.C. Britt and J.B. Wilhelmy, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 72, 222 (1979), W.Younes and H.C. Britt, Phys. Rev. C 67, 024610 (2003)] can be applicable, and is currently undergoing investigation at LLNL. Measured decay probabilities for the intermediate nucleus formed in a light-ion reaction can be combined with optical-model calculations for the formation of the same intermediate nucleus via the neutron-induced reaction. The result is an estimation for overall (n,γ/n/2n) cross sections. As a bench-mark, the reaction 92Zr(α, α'), surrogate for n+91Zr, was studied at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale. Particles were detected in the silicon telescope STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) and γ-ray energies measured with germanium clover detectors from the YRAST (Yale Rochester Array for SpecTroscopy) ball. The experiment and preliminary observations will be discussed

  20. Systematic measurements of proton- and alpha-capture cross sections relevant to the modelling of the p process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harissopulos, S. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Spyrou, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Zarkadas, Ch. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , 153.10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Becker, H.-W. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Rolfs, C. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Strieder, F. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Hammer, J.W. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Zell, K.-O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Brentano, P. von [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Julin, R. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Demetriou, P. [IAA, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Goriely, S. [IAA, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-25

    Several in-beam cross section measurements of proton- as well as {alpha}-capture reactions in the Se-Sb region have been carried out to obtain global input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach (HF) calculations. In total, 20 (p,{gamma}) and 7 ({alpha}, {gamma}) reactions were measured. We compare some of these results with Hauser-Feshbach calculations using various optical model potentials and nuclear level densities.

  1. Alpha capture reaction cross section measurements on Sb isotopes by activation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkulu, Z.; Özkan, N.; Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Fülöp, Zs; Güray, R. T.; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Török, Zs; Yalçin, C.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha induced reactions on natural and enriched antimony targets were investigated via the activation technique in the energy range from 9.74 MeV to 15.48 MeV, close to the upper end of the Gamow window at a temperature of 3 GK relevant to the γ-process. The experiments were carried out at the Institute for Nuclear Research, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA Atomki). 121Sb(α,γ)125I, 121Sb(α,n)124I and 123Sb(α,n)126I reactions were measured using a HPGe detector. In this work, the 121Sb(α,n)124 cross section results and the comparison with the theoretical predictions (obtained with standard settings of the statistical model codes NON-SMOKER and TALYS) were presented.

  2. Neutron capture cross section of $^{93}$Zr

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the neutron capture cross section of the radioactive isotope $^{93}$Zr. This project aims at the substantial improvement of existing results for applications in nuclear astrophysics and emerging nuclear technologies. In particular, the superior quality of the data that can be obtained at n_TOF will allow on one side a better characterization of s-process nucleosynthesis and on the other side a more accurate material balance in systems for transmutation of nuclear waste, given that this radioactive isotope is widely present in fission products.

  3. Measurement of the 232Th capture cross section in the energy region 5 keV-150 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 232Th(n,γ) neutron capture cross-section is of great importance for accelerator driven reactor (ADS) systems based on the Thorium-Uranium fuel cycle. An analysis of the required nuclear data, reveals that the status of the 232Th capture data is far from the requested 2 % uncertainty level. Recently 232Th average capture measurements, between 5-200 keV neutron energy, were performed at the FzK Karlsruhe (DE). A comparison of the measured averaged capture cross section with the evaluated data files shows a reasonable agreement in the neutron energy range above 15 keV. However, discrepancies of up to 40 % at lower neutron energies are observed. The same order of discrepancies is observed when comparing their results with the results obtained by Macklin et al. at ORELA. To clarify these discrepancies we measured at IRMM the average capture cross-section at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA). The measurements were performed at a 14.37 m flight-path using the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) method. The gamma rays, originating from the 232Th(n,γ) reaction, were detected by a pair of C6D6-based liquid scintillators applying a pulse-height weighting method. The neutron flux was measured with an ionisation chamber placed at 80 cm before the Thorium sample. This chamber has a cathode loaded with two back-to-back layers of about 40 μg/cm210B. The sample consisted of a metallic natural thorium disc of 8 cm diameter and 0.5 mm thick, corresponding to a thickness of 1.588 10-3 at/b. The background for the capture measurements consists of a time independent and time dependent component. The former, mainly produced by the radioactive decay of the sample, was deduced from measurements with a closed beam. The latter was measured by replacing the thorium sample with a 0.5 mm thick 208Pb sample of the same size. Such a Pb sample has practically the same scattering probability as the thorium sample and has a negligible capture yield. Therefore, the 208Pb run provides a good estimate of

  4. Measurement of fission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented on the recent progress in the experiment of fission cross section measurement, including recent activity in Japan being carried out under the project of nuclear data measurement. (author)

  5. Capture cross section measurements of 186,187,188Os at n-TOF: the resolved resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of 186,187,188Os have been measured at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility, n-TOF, in the neutron energy range from 1 eV up to 1 MeV. In this contribution, we report the results of the analysis of the resolved resonance region (RRR). Resonance parameters have been extracted from a full R-matrix fit of the capture yields with the SAMMY code. A statistical analysis has been performed and the related average resonance parameters are derived. This information is crucial for a complete understanding and modeling in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model of the capture and inelastic reaction channels, required for the evaluation of the stellar reaction rates of these isotopes. Maxwellian average cross sections for the range of temperatures relevant for s-process nucleosynthesis have been derived from the combined information of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. A brief account of the implications of this analysis in the estimation of the s-process component of the 187Os abundance and the related impact on the estimates of the time-duration of the galactic nucleosynthesis through the Re/Os clock is given. (authors)

  6. Capture cross section measurements of {sup 186,187,188}Os at n-TOF: the resolved resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K.; Mosconi, M.; Milazzo, P.M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Kappeler, F.; Mengoni, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; A lvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, H.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Moreau, C.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 186,187,188}Os have been measured at the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility, n-TOF, in the neutron energy range from 1 eV up to 1 MeV. In this contribution, we report the results of the analysis of the resolved resonance region (RRR). Resonance parameters have been extracted from a full R-matrix fit of the capture yields with the SAMMY code. A statistical analysis has been performed and the related average resonance parameters are derived. This information is crucial for a complete understanding and modeling in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model of the capture and inelastic reaction channels, required for the evaluation of the stellar reaction rates of these isotopes. Maxwellian average cross sections for the range of temperatures relevant for s-process nucleosynthesis have been derived from the combined information of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. A brief account of the implications of this analysis in the estimation of the s-process component of the {sup 187}Os abundance and the related impact on the estimates of the time-duration of the galactic nucleosynthesis through the Re/Os clock is given. (authors)

  7. Using the FMA for radiative capture cross-section measurements of interest to astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    We assessed the capability of the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) to study radiative capture reactions of astrophysical interest using inverse kinematics. Results from measurements on the {sup 1}H({sup 13}C,{sup 14}N){gamma} reaction show that the FMA is an ideal high-efficiency tool for these experiments, where the recoil ion is detected and identified at the FMA focal plane. Intermediate slits acting on energy/charge and mass/charge were introduced into the FMA, which reduced the scattered primary beam fraction at the focal plane to <10{sup -11}. A small gas ionization chamber was placed behind the position-sensitive focal-plane detector, followed by a Si detector. Measurements of mass/charge, energy loss, and residual energy of the transmitted ions were made, giving at least another two orders of magnitude separation of recoils from scattered beam. A new ionization detector operating in the same gas volume as the focal plane detector will provide even better separation by eliminating the need for two of the three windows used in the test measurement. At energies of {approximately} 0.5 MeV/nucleon, the recoil ions populate primarily a single charge state, resulting in a detection efficiency of > 50%. This will be particularly valuable for use with radioactive beams.

  8. Atlas of neutron capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes neutron capture cross sections in the range 10-5 eV - 20 MeV as evaluated and compiled in recent activation libraries. The selected subset comprise the (n,γ) cross sections for a total of 739 targets for the elements H (Z = 1, Z = 1) to Cm (Z = 96, A = 238) totaling 972 reactions. Plots of the point-wise data are shown and comparisons are made with the available experimental values at thermal energy, 30 keV and 14.5 MeV. 10 refs, 7 tabs

  9. Electron capture cross sections for stellar nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Giannaka, P G

    2015-01-01

    In the first stage of this work, we perform detailed calculations for the cross sections of the electron capture on nuclei under laboratory conditions. Towards this aim we exploit the advantages of a refined version of the proton-neutron quasi-particle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA) and carry out state-by-state evaluations of the rates of exclusive processes that lead to any of the accessible transitions within the chosen model space. In the second stage of our present study, we translate the above mentioned $e^-$-capture cross sections to the stellar environment ones by inserting the temperature dependence through a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution describing the stellar electron gas. As a concrete nuclear target we use the $^{66}Zn$ isotope, which belongs to the iron group nuclei and plays prominent role in stellar nucleosynthesis at core collapse supernovae environment.

  10. Terahertz radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar...

  11. Resonance capture cross section of 207Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Pol, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andrzejewski, J; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Assimakopoulos, P A; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Chepel, V; Cennini, P; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Dolfini, R; Dridi, W; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Kölbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Gonçalves, I; González-Romero, E M; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F K; Karamanis, D; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Köhler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; Oshima, M; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stéphan, C; Tagliente, G; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente6, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2006-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture cross section of 207Pb has been measured at the CERN neutron time of flight installation n_TOF using the pulse height weighting technique in the resolved energy region. The measurement has been performed with an optimized setup of two C6D6 scintillation detectors, which allowed us to reduce scattered neutron backgrounds down to a negligible level. Resonance parameters and radiative kernels have been determined for 16 resonances by means of an R-matrix analysis in the neutron energy range from 3 keV to 320 keV. Good agreement with previous measurements was found at low neutron energies, whereas substantial discrepancies appear beyond 45 keV. With the present results, we obtain an s-process contribution of 77(8)% to the solar abundance of 207Pb. This corresponds to an r-process component of 23(8)%, which is important for deriving the U/Th ages of metal poor halo stars.

  12. Radiative neutron capture cross sections on 176Lu at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, O.; Jandel, M.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) has been measured for a wide incident neutron energy range with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be (1912 ±132 ) b for one of the Lu natural isotopes, 176Lu. The resonance part was measured and compared to the Mughabghab's atlas using the R -matrix code, sammy. At higher neutron energies the measured cross sections are compared to ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and BRC evaluated nuclear data. The Maxwellian averaged cross sections in a stellar plasma for thermal energies between 5 keV and 100 keV were extracted using these data.

  13. Cross sections for neutron capture from surrogate measurements: An examination of Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations

    OpenAIRE

    Escher, Jutta E.; Dietrich, Frank S.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the renewed interest in the surrogate nuclear reactions approach, an indirect method for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, the prospects for determining (n, gamma) cross sections for deformed rare-earth and actinide nuclei are investigated. A nuclear-reaction model is employed to simulate physical quantities that are typically measured in surrogate experiments and used to assess the validity of the Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations, which are typically ...

  14. Neutron capture cross section measurements of $^{238}$U, $^{241}$Am and $^{243}$Am at n_TOF

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, P E; Plag, R

    The increase of the world energy demand and the need of low carbon energy sources have triggered the renaissance and/or enhancement of nuclear energy in many countries. Fundamental nuclear physics can contribute in a practical way to the sustainability and safety of the nuclear energy production and the management of the nuclear waste. There exists a series of recent studies which address the most relevant isotopes, decay data, nuclear reaction channels and energy ranges which have to be investigated in more detail for improving the design of different advanced nuclear systems [1] and nuclear fuel cycles [2]. In this proposal, we aim at the measurement of the neutron capture cross sections of $^{238}$U, $^{241}$Am and $^{243}$Am. All three isotopes are listed in the NEA High Priority Request List [37], are recommended for measurements [1] and play an important role in the nuclear energy production and fuel cycle scenarios. The measurements will provide as well valuable nuclear structure data necessary for the...

  15. Cross sections for neutron capture from surrogate measurements: An examination of Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Jutta E

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the renewed interest in the surrogate nuclear reactions approach, an indirect method for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, the prospects for determining (n, gamma) cross sections for deformed rare-earth and actinide nuclei are investigated. A nuclear-reaction model is employed to simulate physical quantities that are typically measured in surrogate experiments and used to assess the validity of the Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations, which are typically employed in the analysis of surrogate reactions. The expected accuracy of (n,gamma) cross sections extracted from typical surrogate measurements is discussed and limitations of the approximate methods are illustrated. Suggestions for moving beyond presently-employed approximations are made.

  16. Cross sections for neutron capture from surrogate measurements: An examination of Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by the renewed interest in the surrogate nuclear reactions approach, an indirect method for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, the prospects for determining (n,γ) cross sections for deformed rare-earth and actinide nuclei are investigated. A nuclear reaction model is employed to simulate physical quantities that are typically measured in surrogate experiments and used to assess the validity of the Weisskopf-Ewing and ratio approximations, which are typically employed in the analysis of surrogate reactions. The expected accuracy of (n,γ) cross sections extracted from typical surrogate measurements is discussed and limitations of the approximate methods are illustrated. Suggestions for moving beyond presently employed approximations are made.

  17. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, we outline the progress achieved in two distinct under the DOE-sponsored cross section project: the initial results obtained from the pulsed 14 MeV neutron facility, and a cooperative effort with Argonne National Laboratory in the measurement of fast neutron cross sections in yttrium. In the 14 MeV neutron laboratory, this year has seen the maturation of the project into one in which initial scattering measurements are now underway. We have improved the accelerator and ion source in several significant ways, so that neutron intensities have now been proven to be adequate for our series of elastic scattering angular distribution measurements outlined in our initial proposal of two years ago. We have successfully tested all components of the time-of-flight spectrometer and recorded initial neutron spectra from the ring targets that we have obtained for our first angular distribution measurements. Examples of the time-of-flight spectra that have been obtained are given later in this report. At the present time, the accelerator is operating with the highest degree of reliability that we have experienced since installing the pulsing system. Improvements made over the past year have not only increased the available neutron intensity, but also increased our capability to deal with inevitable component failures that require repair or replacement. The measurements carried out in conjunction with Argonne have contributed significantly to the available database on fast neutron interactions in yttrium. Results indicate that the cross section for the 89 Y(n,p)89Sr reaction is substantially higher than represented in ENDF/B-VI

  18. Measurement of cross sections of the 210Po production reaction by keV-neutron capture of 209Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of the 209Bi(n, γ)210gBi reaction were measured in the keV-neutron region, using an activation method with the detection of α rays from 210Po. Pulsed keV neutrons were generated from the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by a 1.5-ns bunched proton beam from the 3-MV Pelletron accelerator of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. The 209Bi samples were metallic bismuth evaporated on a gold backing. After sample irradiation, the 412-keV γrays from the gold backing were measured with on HPGe detector, and then the α rays from 210Po nuclei in the bismuth sample were measured with a Si surface barrier detector. The derived cross sections were 1.9±0.4 mb and 0.62±0.14 mb at the average neutron energies of 30 keV and 534 keV, respectively. The present value at 30 keV is in agreement with the previous measurement at 24 keV of Booth et al., but about a quarter of the evaluation of JENDL Activation cross section File. The present result at 534 keV is the first experimental one around 500 keV, and is about a half of the evaluation of JENDL Activation cross section File. (author)

  19. Neutron capture cross section measurements of Tc-99 and Rh at energies below 40 keV by linac time-of-flight method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Lee, Samyol; Yamamoto, Shuji; Yoshimoto, Takaaki; Fujita, Yoshiaki [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori, Osaka (Japan); Kim, Guinyun [Kyungpook National Univ., Center for High Energy Physics, Taegu (Korea); Lee, Youngseok [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang Accelerator Lab., Pohang (Korea); Chang, Jonghwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-08-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 99}Tc and Rh have been measured relative to the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) standard cross section at energies below about 40 keV by the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method using a 46 MeV electron linear accelerator (linac) at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). A pair of C{sub 6}D{sub 6} scintillation detectors has been used for the relative measurement of the {sup 99}Tc(n,{gamma}) cross section, and the result has been normalized to the reference cross section value (19.57b) at 0.0253 eV in ENDF/B-VI. A total energy absorption detector, which was composed of 12 pieces of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillators, was employed for the absolute capture cross section measurement of Rh. Both of the measured cross sections have been compared with the existing experimental data and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2. (author)

  20. Neutron capture cross section measurements of Tc-99 and Rh at energies below 40 keV by linac time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of 99Tc and Rh have been measured relative to the 10B(n,α) standard cross section at energies below about 40 keV by the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method using a 46 MeV electron linear accelerator (linac) at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). A pair of C6D6 scintillation detectors has been used for the relative measurement of the 99Tc(n,γ) cross section, and the result has been normalized to the reference cross section value (19.57b) at 0.0253 eV in ENDF/B-VI. A total energy absorption detector, which was composed of 12 pieces of Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillators, was employed for the absolute capture cross section measurement of Rh. Both of the measured cross sections have been compared with the existing experimental data and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI, JENDL-3.2 and JEF-2.2. (author)

  1. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of highly radioactive fissile nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Companis Iulia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of many actinides is complicated by the difficulty in separating capture γ-rays from the large fission-fragment prompt γ-ray background. For example, current estimates of the capture cross section of 233U show large discrepancies, with differences of more than 20%. To improve the accuracy of data, a new experimental set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the neutron-induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high-efficiency ionization chamber (IC. The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ–rays are distinguished from capture γ–rays by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied based on the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high accuracy. The performance of the IC during dedicated test experiments is presented, focusing on the determination of the detection efficiency.

  2. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of highly radioactive fissile nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companis, Iulia; Mathieu, Ludovic; Aïche, Mourad; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Heyse, Jan; Barreau, Gérard; Czajkowski, Serge; Ducasse, Quentin; Gunsing, Frank; Jurado, Beatriz; Kessedjian, Gregoire; Matarranz, Julie; Tsekhanovich, Igor

    2014-04-01

    The measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of many actinides is complicated by the difficulty in separating capture γ-rays from the large fission-fragment prompt γ-ray background. For example, current estimates of the capture cross section of 233U show large discrepancies, with differences of more than 20%. To improve the accuracy of data, a new experimental set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the neutron-induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high-efficiency ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays are distinguished from capture γ-rays by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied based on the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high accuracy. The performance of the IC during dedicated test experiments is presented, focusing on the determination of the detection efficiency.

  3. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of highly radioactive fissile nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of many actinides is complicated by the difficulty in separating capture γ-rays from the large fission-fragment prompt γ-ray background. For example, current estimates of the capture cross section of 233U show large discrepancies, with differences of more than 20%. To improve the accuracy of data, a new experimental set-up for the simultaneous measurement of the neutron-induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at the GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high-efficiency ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays are distinguished from capture γ-rays by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied based on the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high accuracy. The performance of the IC during dedicated test experiments is presented, focusing on the determination of the detection efficiency. (author)

  4. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of the s-only isotope 204Pb from 1 eV to 440 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Pol, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calvino, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Dolfini, R; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Koelbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Goncalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Kappeler, F; Karamanis, D; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P.M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; Oshima, M; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J.L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M.C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2007-01-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 204Pb has been measured at the CERN n_TOF installation with high resolution in the energy range from 1 eV to 440 keV. An R-matrix analysis of the resolved resonance region, between 1 eV and 100 keV, was carried out using the SAMMY code. In the interval between 100 keV and 440 keV we report the average capture cross section. The background in the entire neutron energy range could be reliably determined from the measurement of a 208Pb sample. Other systematic effects in this measurement could be investigated and precisely corrected by means of detailed Monte Carlo simulations. We obtain a Maxwellian average capture cross section for 204Pb at kT=30 keV of 79(3) mb, in agreement with previous experiments. However our cross section at kT=5 keV is about 35% larger than the values reported so far. The implications of the new cross section for the s-process abundance contributions in the Pb/Bi region are discussed.

  5. Capture cross section measurement of Np-237 below 1 keV with Lead Slowing-down Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhei; Cho, Hyun-Je; Yamamoto, Shuji; Yoshimoto, Takaaki; Fujita, Yoshiaki [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst; Ohkawachi, Yasushi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-03-01

    Making use of the Kyoto University Lead slowing-down Spectrometer (KULS) driven by a 46 MeV electron linear accelerator (linac) at the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI), the relative cross section for the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) reaction has been measured from 0.01 eV to 1 keV with energy resolution of about 40% (FWHM). The neutron flux/spectrum has been measured by a BF{sub 3} counter. The cross section of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) reaction in ENDF/B-VI was used as a reference one for the cross section measurement. The measured result has been normalized to the reference value of the {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}){sup 238}Np reaction in ENDF/B-VI at 0.0253 eV, and the measurement has been compared with the experimental and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3.2, whose data were broadened by the energy resolution of the KULS. (author)

  6. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 14 MeV Neutron Laboratory, we have continued the development of a facility that is now the only one of its kind in operation in the United States. We have refined the klystron bunching system described in last year's report to the point that 1.2 nanosecond pulses have been directly measured. We have tested the pulse shape discrimination capability of our primary NE 213 neutron detector. We have converted the RF sweeper section of the beamline to a frequency of 1 MHz to replace the function of the high voltage pulser described in last year's report which proved to be difficult to maintain and unreliable in its operation. We have also overcome several other significant experimental difficulties, including a major problem with a vacuum leak in the main accelerator column. We have completed additional testing to prove the remainder of the generation and measurement systems, but overcoming some of these experimental difficulties has delayed the start of actual data taking. We are now in a position to begin our first series of ring geometry elastic scattering measurements, and these will be underway before the end of the current contract year. As part of our longer term planning, we are continuing the conceptual analysis of several schemes to improve the intensity of our current pulsed beam. These include the provision of a duoplasmatron ion source and/or the provision of preacceleration bunching. Additional details are given later in this report. A series of measurements were carried out at the Tandem Dynamatron Facility involving the irradiation of a series of yttrium foils and the determination of activation cross sections using absolute counting techniques. The experimental work has been completed, and final analysis of the cross section data will be completed within several months

  7. Neutron capture cross section measurement for the 174Yb(n,γ)175Yb reaction at 0.0372 eV energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The 174Yb(n,γ)175Yb reaction cross section was measured at 0.0372 eV energy. • Neutron Diffraction Facility (NDF) was used to select the 0.0372 eV neutron energy. • Thin gold foils were used as neutron flux monitor via the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction. - Abstract: The neutron capture cross section for the 174Yb(n,γ)175Yb reaction at 0.0372 eV energy was measured using the activation of Ytterbium oxide (Yb2O3) target powder pressed in pellet and sandwiched between two thin gold foils used as neutron flux monitor, via the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reference reaction. The neutron irradiations were performed at the horizontal channel of Es-Salam nuclear research reactor and the capture cross section of σ ≈ (59.07 ± 2.3) b was measured for the first time at this energy after the correction for neutron self-shielding and gamma attenuation effects. The measured value was compared to the evaluated cross section reported in EAF-2010 nuclear data library. The thermal cross section was also determined at 0.0253 eV neutron energy and compared to those recommended by Mughabghab (2006) and Simonits et al. (1996)

  8. Measurements of neutron-induced capture and fission reactions on $^{235}$ U: cross sections and ${\\alpha}$ ratios, photon strength functions and prompt ${\\gamma}$-ray from fission

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the neutron-induced capture cross section of the fissile isotope $^{235}$U using a fission tagging set-up. This new set-up has been tested successfully in 2010 and combines the n_TOF 4${\\pi}$ Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) with MicroMegas (MGAS) fission detectors. It has been proven that such a combination of detectors allows distinguishing with very good reliability the electromagnetic cascades from the capture reactions from dominant ${\\gamma}$-ray background coming from the fission reactions. The accurate discrimination of the fission background is the main challenge in the neutron capture cross section measurements of fissile isotopes. The main results from the measurement will be the associated capture cross section and ${\\alpha}$ ratio in the resolved (0.3-2250 eV) and unresolved (2.25-30 keV) resonance regions. According to the international benchmarks and as it is mentioned in the NEA High Priority Request List (HPRL), the 235U(n,${\\gamma}$) cross section is of utmost impo...

  9. Measurement of neutron capture cross section of 75As in the energy range from 29 to 1100 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections for the 75As(n,γ)76As reaction were measured relatively to that of 197Au in neutron energy range from 29 to 1100 keV, using the activation technique. Neutrons were produced via the 7Li(p,n)7Be and T(p,n)3He reactions with a 2.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at Sichuan University. The activities after irradiation were measured with a calibrated high resolution HPGe detector. The errors of the measurements are 6.7%-7.8%. The experiment results were compared with existing data

  10. Neutron capture cross sections of 151,153Eu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross section of 151,153Eu nuclei was measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Neutrons were produced at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center and their energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The relative yield versus neutron incident energy from 0.1 eV to 2.0 keV for both 151Eu(n,) and 153Eu(n,) reactions was derived from events gated on the total energy and multiplicity measured by the DANCE array. The absolute cross section was determined by scaling the relative yield to the measured cross sections of well-known resonances. The shape of the yield curve agrees well with previous measurements in the resonance region for both 151Eu and 153Eu capture cross sections. New data are reported for neutron incident energies between 100 eV and 2.0 keV. The trend of data in the 0.3 keV to 2.0 keV region of neutron incident energy is consistent with the ENDF/BVI and the measurements of Macklin and Young. Crucial skills, acquired from these measurements in the early implementation of DANCE, are important to plan future experiments, which will yield results up to a few hundred keV neutron incident energy

  11. Measurement of neutron capture cross-section of the 71Ga(n, γ) 72Ga reaction at 0.0536 eV energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M. S.; Chowdhury, M. H.; Hossain, S. M.; Latif, Sk. A.; Hafiz, M. A.; Islam, M. A.; Zakaria, A. K. M.; Yunus, S. M.; Azharul Islam, S. M.

    2008-08-01

    The neutron capture cross-section for the 71Ga(n, γ) 72Ga reaction at 0.0536 eV energy was measured using activation technique based on TRIGA Mark-II research reactor. The 197Au(n, γ) 198Au monitor reaction was used to determine the effective neutron flux. Neutron absorption and γ-ray attenuation in gallium oxide pellet were corrected in determination of cross-section. The cross-section for the above reaction at 0.0536 eV amounts to 2.75 ± 0.14 b. As far as we know there are no experimental data available at our investigated energy. So far we are the first, who carried out experiment with 0.0536 eV neutrons for cross-section measurement. The present result is larger than that of JENDL-3.3, but consistent within the uncertainty range. The value of ENDF/B-VII is higher than this work. The result of this work will be useful to observe energy dependence of neutron capture cross-sections.

  12. Improved Actinide Neutron Capture Cross Sections Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, W.; Pardo, R. C.; Kondev, F. G.; Kondrashev, S.; Nair, C.; Nusair, O.; Palchan, T.; Scott, R.; Seweryniak, D.; Vondrasek, R.; Collon, P.; Paul, M.; Youinou, G.; Salvatores, M.; Palmotti, G.; Berg, J.; Maddock, T.; Imel, G.

    2014-09-01

    The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are developing a technique to inject solid material into the ECR with laser ablation. With laser ablation, we can better control material injection and potentially increase efficiency in the ECR, thus creating less contamination in the source and reducing cross talk. I will present work on the laser ablation system and preliminary results from our AMS measurements. The MANTRA (Measurement of Actinide Neutron TRAnsmutations) project will improve energy-integrated neutron capture cross section data across the actinide region. These data are incorporated into nuclear reactor models and are an important piece in understanding Generation IV reactor designs. We will infer the capture cross sections by measuring isotopic ratios from actinide samples, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL, with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ATLAS (ANL). The superior sensitivity of AMS allows us to extract multiple cross sections from a single sample. In order to analyze the large number of samples needed for MANTRA and to meet the goal of extracting multiple cross sections per sample, we have made a number of modifications to the AMS setup at ATLAS. In particular, we are

  13. Barrier Distributions and Systematics of Fusion- and Capture Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K; Wilczynski, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods of predicting ''capture'' cross sections, i.e. , cross sections for sticking of two colliding nuclei after overcoming the interaction barrier, are presented. Close links between the capture excitation functions and smearing of the interaction barrier are discussed. By using a new ''polynomial fit'' method of determining d sup 2 (E sigma)/dE sup 2 values, the barrier distributions have been directly deduced for several precisely measured fusion excitation functions found in the literature, and compared with results of standard ''point difference'' method. Existing data on near-barrier fusion- and capture excitation functions for about 50 medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems have been analyzed using a simple formula obtained assuming Gaussian shape of the barrier distribution. Systematics of the barrier distribution parameters, the mean barrier and width of the distribution, are presented and proposed to be used together with the closed-form ''error function formula'' for predicting unknown capture ...

  14. Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of Dy and Hf in the energy region from 0.003 eV to 50 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, H J; Yamanoto, S; Fujita, Y; Kim, G Y; Ko, I S; Cho, M H; Namkung, W; Chang, J H; Ko, S K

    1999-01-01

    The capture cross-sections of Dy and Hf were measured in the energy region from 0.003 eV to 50 keV by using the neutron time-of-flight method at the 46 MeV electron linear accelerator of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University. An assembly of Bi sub 4 Ge sub 3 O sub 1 sub 2 (BGO) scintillators, which was placed at a distance of 12.7 +- 0.02 m from the neutron source, was employed as a total absorption detector for the prompt capture gamma-ray measurement on the sample. In order to determine the neutron flux impinging on a capture sample, we used a Sm(n,gamma) reaction for thermal neutrons and the sup 1 sup 0 B(n,alpha gamma) reaction for neutrons from 0.003 eV to 50 keV. The absolute capture yield for the sample was obtained from the saturated resonance data at a large resonance of the sample. For the capture cross-section of Dy, the existing experimental data and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 are closed to the present result. For the Hf capture cross-section, the previous experimental ...

  15. [Fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From its inception, the Nuclear Data Project at the University of Michigan has concentrated on two major objectives: (1) to carry out carefully controlled nuclear measurements of the highest possible reliability in support of the national nuclear data program, and (2) to provide an educational opportunity for students with interests in experimental nuclear science. The project has undergone a successful transition from a primary dependence on our photoneutron laboratory to one in which our current research is entirely based on a unique pulsed 14 MeV fast neutron facility. The new experimental facility is unique in its ability to provide nanosecond bursts of 14 MeV neutrons under conditions that are ''clean'' and as scatter-free as possible, and is the only one of its type currently in operation in the United States. It has been designed and put into operation primarily by graduate students, and has met or exceeded all of its important initial performance goals. We have reached the point of its routine operation, and most of the data are now in hand that will serve as the basis for the first two doctoral dissertations to be written by participating graduate students. Our initial results on double differential neutron cross sections will be presented at the May 1993 Fusion Reactor Technology Workshop. We are pleased to report that, after investing several years in equipment assembly and optimization, the project has now entered its ''data production'' phase

  16. Recent fission cross section standards measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasson, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    The /sup 235/U(n,f) reaction is the standard by which most neutron induced fission cross sections are determined. Most of these cross sections are derived from relatively easy ratio measurements to /sup 235/U. However, the more difficult /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section measurements require the use of advanced neutron detectors for the determination of the incident neutron fluence. Examples of recent standard cross section measurements are discussed, various neutron detectors are described, and the status of the /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section standard is assessed. 23 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Recent fission cross section standards measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 235U(n,f) reaction is the standard by which most neutron induced fission cross sections are determined. Most of these cross sections are derived from relatively easy ratio measurements to 235U. However, the more difficult 235U(n,f) cross section measurements require the use of advanced neutron detectors for the determination of the incident neutron fluence. Examples of recent standard cross section measurements are discussed, various neutron detectors are described, and the status of the 235U(n,f) cross section standard is assessed. 23 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Capture cross-section of threading dislocations in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study the effect of film stress on capture cross-section of interacting threads. ► Capture cross-section area diverges near film channeling stress. ► Thread interactions are much more likely when local stress is near critical stress. - Abstract: The capture cross section for annihilation of two threads with opposite Burgers vectors moving on orthogonal slip planes in a thin film is examined using a numerical model. The initial configurations of threads that lead to annihilation are mapped out for a range of applied film stresses. The area of the region of initial configurations that lead to annihilation at a given stress and thickness is the capture cross-section. The size of the capture cross-section is shown to be highly sensitive to the applied stress relative to the critical stress for dislocation motion imposed by the film thickness.

  19. Measurements of the 40Ar(n, γ41Ar radiative-capture cross section between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Bhike

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The 40Ar(n, γ41Ar neutron capture cross section has been measured between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV neutron energy using the activation technique. The data are important for estimating backgrounds in argon-based neutrino and dark-matter detectors and in the neutrino-less double-beta decay search GERDA, which uses liquid argon as cooling and shielding medium. For the first time the 40Ar(n, γ41Ar cross section has been measured for neutron energies above 1 MeV. Our results are compared to the evaluation ENDF/B-VII.1 and the calculated prediction TENDL-2013. The latter agrees very well with the present results.

  20. Measurements of the 40Ar(n, γ)41Ar radiative-capture cross section between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 40Ar(n, γ)41Ar neutron capture cross section has been measured between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV neutron energy using the activation technique. The data are important for estimating backgrounds in argon-based neutrino and dark-matter detectors and in the neutrino-less double-beta decay search GERDA, which uses liquid argon as cooling and shielding medium. For the first time the 40Ar(n, γ)41Ar cross section has been measured for neutron energies above 1 MeV. Our results are compared to the evaluation ENDF/B-VII.1 and the calculated prediction TENDL-2013. The latter agrees very well with the present results

  1. Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Sections of The Palladium Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured precise thermal neutron capture γ-ray cross sections σγ for all stable Palladium isotopes with the guided thermal neutron beam from the Budapest Reactor. The data were compared with other data from the literature and have been evaluated into the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF)[1]. Total radiative neutron capture cross-sections σ0 can be deduced from the sum of transition cross sections feeding the ground state of each isotope if the decay scheme is complete. The Palladium isotope decay schemes are incomplete, although transitions deexciting low-lying levels are known for each isotope. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Palladium thermal neutron capture de-excitation schemes using the computer code DICEBOX [2]. This program generates a level scheme where levels below a critical energy Ecrit are taken from experiment, and those above Ecrit are calculated by a random discretization of an a priori known level density formula ρ(E, Jπ). Level de-excitation branching intensities are taken from experiment for levels below Ecrit and the capture state, or calculated for levels above Ecrit assuming an a priori photon strength function and applying allowed selection rules and a Porter-Thomas distribution of widths. The calculated feeding to levels below Ecrit can then be normalized to the measured cross section deexciting those levels to determine the total radiative neutron cross-section σ0. In this paper we have measured σ0[102Pd(n,γ)] = 0.9 ± 0.3 b, σ0[104Pd(n,γ)] = 0.61 ± 0.11 b, σ0[105Pd(n,γ)] = 21.1 ± 1.5 b, σ0[106Pd(n,γ)] = 0.36 ± 0.05 b, σ0[108Pd(n,γ)(0)] = 7.6 ± 0.6 b, σ0[108Pd(n,γ)(189)] = 0.185 ± 0.011 b, and σ0[110Pd(n,γ)] = 0.10 ± 0.03 b. We have also determined from our statistical calculations that the neutron capture state in 107Pd is best described as 2+(60%)+3+(40%). Agreement with literature values was excellent in most cases. We found significant discrepancies between our results for 102

  2. Measurement of the generation ratio of 233U and the average radiation capture cross section of 232Th with 232ThO2 irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Thorium-Uranium cycle plays an important role in the future's power production technology. Nuclear data involved are urgently needed for engineering design and other purposes since there are obvious differences between the existing evaluated data. Macroscopic neutron integral experiment can be used as a good tool to survey the confusion. Purpose: Macroscopic neutron integral experiment based on radioactive method was carried out to measure the generation ratio of 233U nuclide and the average radiation capture cross section of 232Th while a ThO2 sample was irradiated by fast neutrons leakage from a fast critical facility. We expect that these data can be used as a reference for the research of Th-U cycle. Methods: Radiation capture reactions of 232Th nuclides occur when the nuclides are irradiated by neutrons. 233U nuclides will be generated after two cascade decays by emitting beta rays from the activation products, which are 233Th nuclides. The ThO2 sample was prepared as a slice of 20 mm×10 mm from 0.743 36-g ThO2 powders of 99.9% enriched. The neutron flux was measured by activation method which was 4.07x109 cm-2·s-1 at the sample's irradiation position while the facility worked at the power level of 180 watts. The leakage neutrons' energy distribution was calculated by MC method and it is very close to the fission spectrum with the averaged energy of 1.42 MeV. After irradiation and then a period of cooling time the gamma rays emitted from the sample were measured by an HPGe spectrometer which had been pre-calibrated. From these data the activity of 233Pa was calculated and then the generation ratio of 233U and the average radiation capture cross section of 232Th were calculated. The measured average radiation capture cross section was compared with the cross sections calculated based on the ENDFB-VH.1, CENDL-3.1, JENDL-4.0, BROND2.2 databases. Results: The measured generation ratio of 233U was 4.01×10-12 with an uncertainty of 6

  3. Neutron capture cross section on Lu isotopes at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array at the LANSCE spallation neutron source in Los Alamos has been used to measure neutron capture cross sections for 175Lu and 176Lu with neutron energies from thermal up to 100 keV. Both isotopes are of current interest for the s-process nucleosynthesis. 175Lu is an important waiting-point in the s-process and 176Lu is a sensitive s-process thermometer. Three targets were used to perform these measurements. One was a natural Lu foil of 31 mg/cm2 and the other two were isotopically enriched targets of 175Lu (99.8%, ∼1 mg/cm2 electro-deposited on Ti) and 176Lu (99.9%, ∼1 mg/cm2 mass separator deposited on aluminized mylar). The data analysis is in progress. Preliminary cross sections have been obtained by normalizing the data to the known thermal cross section. A comparison of these data with recent experimental data of K. Wisshak et al. and the evaluated data of ENDF B-VII will be presented.

  4. A new approach for precise measurements of keV neutron capture cross sections: The examples of 93Nb, 103Rh, and 181Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental method has been implemented for precise measurements of neutron capture cross sections in the energy range from 3 to 200 keV. Neutrons are produced via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction using a pulsed 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The neutron energy is determined by the time of flight technique using flight paths of less than 1 m. Capture events are detected with the Karlsruhe 4π Barium Fluoride Detector. This detector is characterized by a resolution in gamma-ray energy of 14% at 662 keV and 7% at 2.5 MeV, a time resolution of 500 ps, and a peak efficiency of 90% at 1 MeV. Capture events are registered with ≅ 95% probability above a gamma-ray threshold of 2.5 MeV. The combined effect of the relatively short primary flight path, the 10 cm inner radius of the detector sphere, and of the low capture cross section of BaF2 allows to discriminate the main background due to capture of sample scattered neutrons in the scintillator via time of flight, leaving part of the neutron energy range completely undisturbed. The high efficiency and good energy resolution for capture gamma-rays yields a further reduction of this background by using only the relevant energy channels for data evaluation. In the first measurements with the new detector, the neutron capture cross sections of 93Nb, 103Rh, and 181Ta were determined in the energy range from 3 to 200 keV relative to gold as a standard. The cross section ratios could be determined with overall systematic uncertainties of 0.7 to 0.8%; statistical uncertainties were less than 1% in the energy range from 20 to 100 keV, if the data are combined in 20 keV wide bins. The necessary sample masses were of the order of one gram. Further improvements with respect to sensitivity and accuracy are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given

  6. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te,124Te,125Te,126Te,128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial γ-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and γ intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given

  7. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2004-03-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  8. Anomalously large neutron capture cross sections: a random phenomenon?

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B V; Kerman, A K

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the existence of huge thermal neutron capture cross sections in several nuclei. The values of the cross sections are several orders of magnitude bigger than expected at these very low energies. We lend support to the idea that this phenomenon is random in nature and is similar to what we have learned from the study of parity violation in the actinide region. The idea of statistical doorways is advanced as a unified concept in the delineation of large numbers in the nuclear world. The average number of maxima per unit mass, $$ in the capture cross section is calculated and related to the underlying cross section correlation function and found to be $ = \\frac{3}{\\pi \\sqrt{2}\\gamma_{A}}$, where $\\gamma_{A}$ is a characteristic mass correlation width which designates the degree of remnant coherence in the system. We trace this coherence to nucleosynthesis which produced the nuclei whose neutron capture cross sections are considered here.

  9. Low energy charge capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report surveys the available data on charge capture from atomic H by partially and completely stripped light ions, and partially stripped heavy ions. The energy range is nominally between 3 and 200 eV, although the scarcity of data for many species has meant that these limits are not always observed. Analytical fits to the available data are given. General theoretical considerations are discussed, and some results on the molecular potential energy diagrams and low energy capture for the C4+ + H and Ni3+ + H systems are given. (author)

  10. Neutron Capture Cross Sections for the Weak s Process

    CERN Document Server

    Heil, M; Kaeppeler, F; Gallino, R; Pignatari, M; Uberseder, E

    2009-01-01

    In past decades a lot of progress has been made towards understanding the main s-process component that takes place in thermally pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. During this process about half of the heavy elements, mainly between 90=8Msolar) and is much less understood. A better characterization of the weak s component would help disentangle the various contributions to element production in this region. For this purpose, a series of measurements of neutron-capture cross sections have been performed on medium-mass nuclei at the 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator at FZK using the activation method. Also, neutron captures on abundant light elements with A<56 play an important role for s-process nucleosynthesis, since they act as neutron poisons and affect the stellar neutron balance. New results are presented for the (n,g) cross sections of 41K and 45Sc, and revisions are reported for a number of cross sections based on improved spectroscopic information.

  11. Thermal neutron capture cross-section measurements of 243Am and 242Pu using the new mini-INCA α- and γ-spectroscopy station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the Mini-INCA project, dedicated to the study of Minor Actinide transmutation process in high neutron fluxes, an α- and γ-spectroscopy station has been developed and installed at the High Flux Reactor of the Laue-Langevin Institut. This set-up allows short irradiations as well as long irradiations in a high quasi-thermal neutron flux and post-irradiation spectroscopy analysis. It is well suited to measure precisely, in reference to 59Co cross-section, neutron capture cross-sections, for all the actinides, in the thermal energy region. The first measurements using this set-up were done on 243Am and 242Pu isotopes. Cross-section values, at En=0.025eV, were found to be (81.8+/-3.6)b for 243Am and (22.5+/-1.1)b for 242Pu. These values differ from evaluated data libraries by a factor of 9% and 17%, respectively, but are compatible with the most recent measurements, validating by the way the experimental apparatus

  12. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of radioactive fissile nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Companis I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new experimental set-up for a simultaneous measurement of neutron induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission events detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC. The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an efficient array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays events are distinguished from capture events by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied with respect to the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high precision. Another important issue is the good separation between fission-fragment (FF and the high alpha pile-up. The performances of the IC during test experiments are presented, focusing in particular on the detection efficiency.

  13. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of radioactive fissile nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Companis, I.; Aïche, M.; Mathieu, L.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Heyse, J.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Ducasse, Q.; Gunsing, F.; Jurado, B.; Kessedjian, G.; Matarranz, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2013-12-01

    A new experimental set-up for a simultaneous measurement of neutron induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at GEel LINear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission events detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an efficient array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays events are distinguished from capture events by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied with respect to the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high precision. Another important issue is the good separation between fission-fragment (FF) and the high alpha pile-up. The performances of the IC during test experiments are presented, focusing in particular on the detection efficiency.

  14. Development of an experimental set-up for the measurement of neutron-induced fission and capture cross sections of radioactive fissile nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new experimental set-up for a simultaneous measurement of neutron induced capture and fission cross sections was designed, assembled and optimized. The measurements will be performed at Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA) neutron time-of-flight facility in Belgium, where neutron cross sections can be measured over a wide energy range with high energy resolution. The fission events detector consists of a dedicated multi-plate high efficiency fission ionization chamber (IC). The γ-rays produced in capture reaction are detected by an efficient array of C6D6 scintillators. Fission γ-rays events are distinguished from capture events by the anticoincidence signals from the IC and the C6D6 detectors. For the undetected fission events a correction has to be applied with respect to the efficiency of the IC that should be high and known with a high precision. Another important issue is the good separation between fission-fragment (FF) and the high alpha pile-up. The performances of the IC during test experiments are presented, focusing in particular on the detection efficiency. (authors)

  15. Thermal neutron capture cross-sections and neutron separation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal radiative neutron capture cross-sections have been re-evaluated as part of an ongoing project at the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory at Upton, New York, to update the Neutron Cross-sections compendia, Vol. 1, Parts A and B, Neutron Resonance Parameters and Thermal Capture Cross-sections, published by Academic Press in 1981 and 1984, respectively. Neutron separation energies are evaluated as part of an ongoing project at the Atomic Mass Data Center in Orsay, France. The adopted data are compared with new results derived from this evaluation

  16. Comparison of fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, T

    2003-01-01

    The fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides given in JENDL-3.3 are compared with other evaluated data and experimental data. The comparison was made for 32 nuclides of Th-227, 228, 229, 230, 233, 234, Pa-231, 232, 233, U-232, 234, 236, 237, Np-236, 237, 238, Pu-236, 237, 238, 242, 244, Am-241, 242, 242m, 243, Cm-242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247 and 248. Given in the present report are figures of these cross sections and tables of cross sections at 0.0253 eV and resonance integrals.

  17. Comparison of fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission and capture cross sections of minor actinides given in JENDL-3.3 are compared with other evaluated data and experimental data. The comparison was made for 32 nuclides of Th-227, 228, 229, 230, 233, 234, Pa-231, 232, 233, U-232, 234, 236, 237, Np-236, 237, 238, Pu-236, 237, 238, 242, 244, Am-241, 242, 242m, 243, Cm-242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247 and 248. Given in the present report are figures of these cross sections and tables of cross sections at 0.0253 eV and resonance integrals. (author)

  18. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A. [Fermilab

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrained by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.

  19. Critical analysis for nuclear data of thermal neutron capture cross section and the resonance integral from library based on neutron activation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For research reactor applications of neutron activation analysis, the evaluated neutron reaction cross sections and resonance integrals in some different libraries available were analyzed comparatively. In order to check these data, the thermal neutron capture cross section (σ0) and the resonance integral (I0) of 23Na(n, γ )24Na, 58Fe(n, γ) 59Fe, 59Co(n, γ )60Co, 27Al(n, γ )28Al, 109Ag(n, γ) 110mAg, 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 238U(n, γ )239U reactions from different libraries were used for comparative analysis with experimental measurements based on fundamental neutron activation equation. The targets were irradiated with neutrons in a research nuclear reactor 100 kW power, Triga Mark I. A high purity Ge detector was used for the gamma ray measurements of the irradiated samples. The evaluated results have been in general agreement with the current data according to different library sources. (author)

  20. Neutron Capture Cross Sections of 236U and 234U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate neutron capture cross sections of the actinide elements at neutron energies up to 1 MeV are needed to better interpret archived nuclear test data, for post-detonation nuclear attribution, and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments, DANCE, has unique capabilities that allow the differentiation of capture gamma rays from fission gamma rays and background gamma rays from scattered neutrons captured by barium isotopes in the barium fluoride scintillators. The DANCE array has a high granularity, 160 scintillators, high efficiency, and nearly 4-π solid angle. Through the use of cuts in cluster multiplicity and calorimetric energy the capture gamma-rays are differentiated from other sources of gamma rays. The preliminary results for the capture cross sections of 236U are in agreement with the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. The preliminary results for 234U lower are than ENDF/B-VI evaluation and are closer to older evaluations

  1. Electron-ion time-of-flight coincidence measurements of K-K electron-capture, cross sections for nitrogen, methane, ethylene, ethane, carbon dioxide, and argon (L-K) targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protons with energies ranging from 0.4 to 2.0 MeV were used to measure K-shell vacancy production cross sections for N2, CH4, C2H4, C7H6, and CO2 gas targets under single collision conditions. An electron-ion time-of-light coincidence technique was used to determine the ratio of the K-K electron capture cross section to the K-vacancy production cross section. These ratios were then combined to extract the K-K electron capture cross sections. Measurements were also made for protons of the same energy range but with regard to L-shell vacancy production and L-K electron capture for Ar targets. In addition, K-K electron capture cross sections were measured for 1.0-2.0 MeV He+ ions on CH4. The agreement among the present measurements, previously published measurements, and the ECPSSR theory is excellent for protons incident on N2, Ar, and CH4. The present measurements do indicate that there is a molecular dependence for the carbon atom K-K electron capture cross sections

  2. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-01

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  3. Intermediate structure in the 238U neutron capture cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent measurements of the 238U neutron capture cross section show large fluctuations in the unresolved resonance region. To test whether or not the observed long-range fluctuation of the neutron capture represent departures from the compound nuclear model, the Wald-Wolfowitz runs and correlation tests were applied to the 238U neutron capture data obtained at ORELA. The Wald-Wolfowitz runs test deals with the statistic, R, which is the number of unbroken sequences of data points above or below a given reference line. This statistic is to be compared with the expected value of runs E(R) +- sigma(R) arising from randomly distributed data. In the correlation test we have computed the first serial correlation coefficient of the data as well as its expected value and variance for a set of random data. In both tests one computes the probability, P, for the given statistical entity to depart from its expected value by more than epsilon standard deviations. Both tests confirm the presence of intermediate structure between 5 and 100 keV. The range of the structure far exceeds the width of the experimental resolution and level widths. 3 tables, 2 figures

  4. Resonance averaged channel radiative neutron capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to apply Lane amd Lynn's channel capture model in calculations with a realistic optical model potential, we have derived an approximate wave function for the entrance channel in the neutron-nucleus reaction, based on the intermediate interaction model. It is valid in the exterior region as well as the region near the nuclear surface, ans is expressed in terms of the wave function and reactance matrix of the optical model and of the near-resonance parameters. With this formalism the averaged channel radiative neutron capture cross section in the resonance region is written as the sum of three terms. The first two terms correspond to contribution of the optical model real and imaginary parts respectively, and together can be regarded as the radiative capture of the shape elastic wave. The third term is a fluctuation term, corresponding to the radiative capture of the compound elastic wave in the exterior region. On applying this theory in the resonance region, we obtain an expression for the average valence radiative width similar to that of Lane and Mughabghab. We have investigated the magnitude and energy dependence of the three terms as a function of the neutron incident energy. Calculated results for 98Mo and 55Mn show that the averaged channel radiative capture cross section in the giant resonance region of the neutron strength function may account for a considerable fraction of the total (n, γ) cross section; at lower neutron energies a large part of this channel capture arises from the fluctuation term. We have also calculated the partial capture cross section in 98Mo and 55Mn at 2.4 keV and 24 keV, respectively, and compared the 98Mo results with the experimental data. (orig.)

  5. Measurement cross sections for radioisotopes production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New radioactive isotopes for nuclear medicine can be produced using particle accelerators. This is one goal of Arronax, a high energy - 70 MeV - high intensity - 2*350 μA - cyclotron set up in Nantes. A priority list was established containing β- - 47Sc, 67Cu - β+ - 44Sc, 64Cu, 82Sr/82Rb, 68Ge/68Ga - and α emitters - 211At. Among these radioisotopes, the Scandium 47 and the Copper 67 have a strong interest in targeted therapy. The optimization of their productions required a good knowledge of their cross-sections but also of all the contaminants created during irradiation. We launched on Arronax a program to measure these production cross-sections using the Stacked-Foils' technique. It consists in irradiating several groups of foils - target, monitor and degrader foils - and in measuring the produced isotopes by γ-spectrometry. The monitor - natCu or natNi - is used to correct beam loss whereas degrader foils are used to lower beam energy. We chose to study the natTi(p,X)47Sc and 68Zn(p,2p)67Cu reactions. Targets are respectively natural Titanium foil - bought from Goodfellow - and enriched Zinc 68 deposited on Silver. In the latter case, Zn targets were prepared in-house - electroplating of 68Zn - and a chemical separation between Copper and Gallium isotopes has to be made before γ counting. Cross-section values for more than 40 different reactions cross-sections have been obtained from 18 MeV to 68 MeV. A comparison with the Talys code is systematically done. Several parameters of theoretical models have been studied and we found that is not possible to reproduce faithfully all the cross-sections with a given set of parameters. (author)

  6. Measurements of Fission Cross Sections of Actinides

    CERN Multimedia

    Wiescher, M; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M

    2002-01-01

    A measurement of the neutron induced fission cross sections of $^{237}$Np, $^{241},{243}$Am and of $^{245}$Cm is proposed for the n_TOF neutron beam. Two sets of fission detectors will be used: one based on PPAC counters and another based on a fast ionization chamber (FIC). A total of 5x10$^{18}$ protons are requested for the entire fission measurement campaign.

  7. Fusion cross sections measurements with MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Ugalde, C.; Paul, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. The interaction between exotic nuclei plays an important role for understanding the reaction mechanism of the fusion processes as well as for the energy production in stars. With the advent of radioactive beams new frontiers for fusion reaction studies have become accessible. We have performed the first measurements of the total fusion cross sections in the systems 10 , 14 , 15C + 12C using a newly developed active target-detector system (MUSIC). Comparison of the obtained cross sections with theoretical predictions show a good agreement in the energy region accessible with existing radioactive beams. This type of comparison allows us to calibrate the calculations for cases that cannot be studied in the laboratory with the current experimental capabilities. The high efficiency of this active detector system will allow future measurements with even more neutron-rich isotopes. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Argentina, Grant SJ10/39.

  8. Neutron capture cross-section measurement for the 186W(n,gamma)187W reaction at 0.0536eV energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, M S; Chowdhury, M H; Hossain, S M; Latif, Sk A; Hafiz, M A; Islam, M A; Zakaria, A K M; Azharul Islam, S M

    2008-09-01

    The thermal neutron-induced activation cross section for the (186)W(n,gamma)(187)W reaction was measured at 0.0536eV neutron energy using TRIGA Mark-II research reactor, Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au monitor reaction induced in a high-purity gold foil was used to determine the effective neutron beam intensity. The activities induced in sample and monitor foils were measured nondestructively by a high-resolution HPGe gamma-ray detector. The present experimental cross-section value is the first one at 0.0536eV. The obtained new cross section that amounts to 26.6+/-1.6b is 2% higher than the recently reported data in ENDF/B-VII and 5% lower than that of JENDL-3.3. PMID:18325774

  9. Measurements of neutron spallation cross section. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.; Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Imamura, M.; Nakao, N.; Shibata, S.; Uwamino, Y.; Nakanishi, N.; Tanaka, Su.

    1997-03-01

    Neutron spallation cross section of {sup 59}Co(n,xn){sup 60-x}Co, {sup nat}Cu(n,sp){sup 56}Mn, {sup nat}Cu(n,sp){sup 58}Co, {sup nat}Cu(n,xn){sup 60}Cu, {sup nat}Cu(n,xn){sup 61}Cu and {sup nat}Cu(n,sp){sup 65}Ni was measured in the quasi-monoenergetic p-Li neutron fields in the energy range above 40 MeV which have been established at three AVF cyclotron facilities of (1) INS of Univ. of Tokyo, (2) TIARA of JAERI and (3) RIKEN. Our experimental data were compared with the ENDF/B-VI high energy file data by Fukahori and the calculated cross section data by Odano. (author)

  10. Derivation of capture and reaction cross sections from experimental quasi-elastic and elastic backscattering probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We suggest simple and useful methods to extract reaction and capture (fusion) cross sections from the experimental elastic and quasi-elastic backscattering data.The direct measurement of the reaction or capture (fusion) cross section is a difficult task since it would require the measurement of individual cross sections of many reaction channels, and most of them could be reached only by specific experiments. This would require different experimental setups not always available at the same laboratory and, consequently, such direct measurements would demand a large amount of beam time and would take probably some years to be reached. Because of that, the measurements of elastic scattering angular distributions that cover full angular ranges and optical model analysis have been used for the determination of reaction cross sections. This traditional method consists in deriving the parameters of the complex optical potentials which fit the experimental elastic scattering angular distributions and then of deriving the reaction cross sections predicted by these potentials. Even so, both the experimental part and the analysis of this latter method are not so simple. In the present work we present a much simpler method to determine reaction and capture (fusion) cross sections. It consists of measuring only elastic or quasi-elastic scattering at one backward angle, and from that, the extraction of the reaction or capture cross sections can easily be performed. (author)

  11. Measurement of the {sup 232}thorium capture cross section at n-TOF-CERN; Mesure de la section efficace de capture neutronique du {sup 232}Th a n-TOF au CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aerts, G

    2005-09-01

    Within the context of nuclear power as a sustainable energy resource, a program of research is concentrated on a new nuclear fuel cycle based on thorium. The main advantage, as compared to the uranium cycle, is a lower production of minor actinides, of which the radiological impact on the long term constitutes a problem. At present, nuclear data libraries don't provide cross sections of a good enough quality, allowing more realistic calculations from simulations related to these reactors. The {sup 232}Th neutron capture cross section is an example. With the n-TOF collaboration, the measurement of this reaction was achieved in 2002 using two C{sub 6}D{sub 6} detectors. The experimental area located at CERN, is characterized by an outstanding neutron energy resolution coupled to a high instantaneous neutron flux. The determination of the gamma-ray cascade detection efficiency, with a random behaviour, has been obtained by the use of weighting functions. These were deduced from Monte Carlo simulations with the code MCNP. Data extraction, reduction, and the description of the neutron flux have lead to the capture yield. In the resolved resonance region, the resonance parameters describing the cross section were deduced with the code SAMMY, using the R-matrix theory. In the unresolved resonance region, an uncertainty of 3,5% is found, and a comparison with recent measurements shows a good agreement. (author)

  12. Measurements of neutron cross sections of radioactive waste nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio [Gifu College of Medical Technology, Seki, Gifu (Japan); Harada, Hideo; Nakamura, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu; Hatsukawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction cross sections of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements are required for research on nuclear transmutation methods in nuclear waste management. Important fission products in the nuclear waste management are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I because of their large fission yields and long half-lives. The present authors have measured the neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 99}Tc. The purpose of this study is to measure the neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of nuclides, {sup 129}I and {sup 135}Cs accurately. Preliminary experiments were performed by using Rikkyo University Reactor and JRR-3 reactor at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Then, it was decided to measure the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs by using the JRR-3 Reactor because this measurement required a high flux reactor. On the other hand, those of {sup 129}I were measured at the Rikkyo Reactor because the product nuclides, {sup 130}I and {sup 130m}I, have short half-lives and this reactor is suitable for the study of short lived nuclide. In this report, the measurements of the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs are described. To obtain reliable values of the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs(n, {gamma}){sup 136}Cs reaction, a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for the mass analysis of nuclide in the sample. A progress report on the cross section of {sup 134}Cs, a neighbour of {sup 135}Cs, is included in this report. A report on {sup 129}I will be presented in the Report on the Joint-Use of Rikkyo University Reactor. (author)

  13. Evaluation of the 232Th neutron capture cross section above 3 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This memo describes an evaluation of the 232Th neutron capture cross section in the neutron energy range from 3 keV to 20 MeV. Most existing differential measurements are reviewed, and some data are renormalized to current values of the standards. Several experimentally determined sets of average resonance parameters are also discussed. From 3 to 50 keV the evaluated cross section is described by a set of average statistical resonance parameters. Above 50 keV the evaluated capture cross section is a smooth curve which follows the trend of the most recent measurements. The evaluated capture cross section is compared with many measurements and uncertainty estimates are given

  14. Fission cross section measurements for minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fursov, B. [IPPE, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The main task of this work is the measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section for minor actinides of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 242m}Am, {sup 243,244,245,246,247,248}Cm. The task of the work is to increase the accuracy of data in MeV energy region. Basic experimental method, fissile samples, fission detectors and electronics, track detectors, alpha counting, neutron generation, fission rate measurement, corrections to the data and error analysis are presented in this paper. (author)

  15. Cross-section measurements for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of (n,p), (n,α) and (n,γ) cross sections for radioactive nuclei is of interest to both nuclear physics and astrophysics. For example, using these reactions, properties of levels in nuclei at high excitation energies, which are difficult or impossible to study using other reactions, can be investigated. Also, reaction rates for both big-bang and stellar nucleosynthesis can be obtained from these measurements. In the past, the large background associated with the sample activity limited these types of measurements to radioisotopes with very long half-lives. The advent of the low-energy, high-intensity neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE) has greatly increased the number of nuclei which can be studied. Examples of (n,p) measurements on samples with half lives as short as fifty-three days will be given. The nuclear physics and astrophysics to be learned from these data will be discussed. Additional difficulties are encountered when making (n,γ) rather than (n,p) or (n,α) measurements. However, with a properly-designed detector, and the high peak neutron intensities now available, (n,γ) measurements can be made for nuclei with half lives as short as several months. Progress on the Los Alamos (n,γ) cross-section measurement program for radioactive samples will be discussed. 39 refs., 7 figs

  16. A computer program for calculating effective capture cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FORTRAN program CPCS (Computer Program to analyze Capture TOF Spectra) was developed to deduce effective neutron capture cross sections from raw data obtained by a time-of-flight facility at the JAERI Electron Linear Accelerator. The data processing system for capture experiments consists of three stages, i.e. data acquisition, data handling (summing, listing, plotting, etc.), and data analysis (background determination, flux determination, normalization, etc.). In the three stages of processing, three respective computers are used; USC-3, FACOM U-200, and FACOM 230/75. CPCS is included in the stage of data analysis. A feature of this program is that the magnetic disk file is effectively used as INPUT/OUTPUT data storage interconnecting with other programs to determine neutron flux, to average calculated cross sections and to fit data with strength functions. This program is able to handle eight sets of TOF spectra with 8192 channels including channel block option simultaneously. Particular attention is paid to determine a precise background in the wide neutron energy range. (author)

  17. Neutron-induced capture cross sections via the surrogate reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surrogate reaction method is an indirect way of determining cross sections for nuclear reactions that proceed through a compound nucleus. This technique enables neutron-induced cross sections to be extracted for nuclear reactions on short-lived unstable nuclei that otherwise can not be measured. This technique has been successfully applied to determine the neutron-induced fission cross sections of several short-lived nuclei. In this work, we investigate whether this powerful technique can also be used to determine of neutron-induced capture cross sections. For this purpose we use the surrogate reaction 174Yb(3He, pγ)176Lu to infer the well known 175Lu(n, γ) cross section and compare the results with the directly measured neutron-induced data. This surrogate experiment has been performed in March 2010. The experimental technique used and the first preliminary results will be presented. (authors)

  18. Ion dipole capture cross sections at low ion and rotational energies - Comparison of integrated capture cross sections with reaction cross sections for NH3 and H2O parent-ion collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Canright, R. B., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The numerical capture cross section is calculated from the capture ratio, defined as the fraction of trajectories reaching a prescribed minimum separation of 3 A. The calculated capture cross sections for a rotational temperature of 77 K suggest large reaction cross sections in 80 K experiments for the large dipole-moment target, methyl cyanide.

  19. Measurements of minor actinides cross sections for transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing reactors produce two kinds of nuclear waste: the fission products and heavy nuclei beyond uranium called minor actinides (Americium and Curium isotopes). Two options are considered: storage in deep geological site and/or transmutation by fast neutron induced fission. These studies involve many neutron data. Unfortunately, these data bases have still many shortcomings to achieve reliable results. The aim of these measurements is to update nuclear data and complement them. We have measured the fission cross section of 243Am (7370 y) in reference to the (n,p) elastic scattering to provide new data in a range of fast neutrons (1-8 MeV). A statistical model has been developed to describe the reaction 243Am (n,f). Moreover, the cross sections from the following reactions have been be extracted from these calculations: inelastic scattering 243Am (n,n') and radiative capture 243Am (n,γ) cross sections. The direct measurements of neutron cross sections are often a challenge considering the short half-lives of minor actinides. To overcome this problem, a surrogate method using transfer reactions has been used to study few isotopes of curium. The reactions 243Am (3He, d)244Cm, 243Am (3He, t)243Cm and 243Am (3He, α)242Am allowed to measure the fission probabilities of 243,244Cm and 242Am. The fission cross sections of 242,243Cm (162,9 d, 28,5 y) and 241Am (431 y) have been obtained by multiplying these fission probabilities by the calculated compound nuclear neutron cross section relative to each channel. For each measurement, an accurate assessment of the errors was realized through variance-covariance studies. For measurements of the reaction 243Am(n,f), the analysis of error correlations allowed to interpret the scope of these measures within the existing measurements. (author)

  20. Theoretical challenges of determining low-energy neutron-capture cross sections via the Surrogate Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections for radiative neutron capture on unstable nuclei at low energies are difficult to calculate with high precision, and can be impossible to measure directly. It is therefore important to explore alternative methods. The prospects of one such method, the Surrogate Nuclear Reaction Technique, is currently being investigated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The purpose of this paper is to outline the strategy for combining the results from a surrogate experiment with theoretical calculations in order to extract the desired cross section

  1. (n,α) cross section measurement of gaseous sample using gridded ionization chamber. Cross section determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing a method of (n,α) cross section measurement using gaseous samples in a gridded ionization chamber (GIC). This method enables cross section measurements in large solid angle without the distortion by the energy loss in a sample, but requires a method to estimate the detection efficiency. We solve this problem by using GIC signals and a tight neutron collimation. The validity of this method was confirmed through the 12C(n,α0)9Be measurement. We applied this method to the 16O(n,α)13C cross section around 14.1 MeV. (author)

  2. (n,{alpha}) cross section measurement of gaseous sample using gridded ionization chamber. Cross section determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    We are developing a method of (n,{alpha}) cross section measurement using gaseous samples in a gridded ionization chamber (GIC). This method enables cross section measurements in large solid angle without the distortion by the energy loss in a sample, but requires a method to estimate the detection efficiency. We solve this problem by using GIC signals and a tight neutron collimation. The validity of this method was confirmed through the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be measurement. We applied this method to the {sup 16}O(n,{alpha}){sup 13}C cross section around 14.1 MeV. (author)

  3. Role of static deformation and compact orientation of target nucleus in measured fusion, fusion-fission and capture cross-sections of 244Pu+48Ca reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM), with deformations and orientation degrees of freedom of the incoming nuclei and of outgoing fragments included, is used to study the excitation functions of the "equatorial" compact hot fusion reaction 244Pu+48Ca→292114* (compact orientation angle θc=90° for 244Pu). Considering the higher multipole deformations up to hexadecapole deformation β4 and configurations with "compact" orientation θc, the model is shown to give a good description of the measured individual light-particle decay channels σxn, here x=3, 4 and 5, and other decay channels, the fusion-fission σff and quasi-fission σqf (equivalently, capture σcap) with in one parameter fitting, the neck length ΔR. The quasi-fission is also considered as a cold process with an elongated "polar" configuration. The xn-channel cross-sections for collisions between nuclei with static deformations at their respective compact orientations are shown to be much more than for the case of the nuclei taken to be spherical, signifying the increase in fusion threshold for an intermediate hot fusion reaction to be associated with the static deformation of the target nucleus and its orientation at the point of collision in its path toward the (spherical) compound nucleus. The shell effects in both the potential and kinetic energy (the mass parameters) terms of the Hamiltonian are shown to be important. The free parameter ΔR of the model is shown to depend strongly on limiting angular momentum, which in turn depends on the use of sticking or non-sticking moment of inertia for angular momentum effects. For the sticking moment of inertia, the evaporation residue (neutron emission) is shown to occur almost promptly (largest ΔR), followed by the competing (hot/cold) quasi-fission and ending finally with fusion-fission of hot compound nucleus. Different ΔR's (equivalently, relative separations) for the three processes means to predict that the processes ER, ff and qf happen

  4. Derivation of capture and reaction cross sections from experimental quasi-elastic and elastic backscattering probabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, V V; Antonenko, N V; Gomes, P R S

    2013-01-01

    The direct measurement of the reaction or capture (fusion) cross section is a difficult task since it would require the measurement of individual cross sections of many reaction channels, and most of them could be reached only by specific experiments. This would require different experimental set-ups not always available at the same laboratory and, consequently, such direct measurements would demand a large amount of beam time and would take probably some years to be reached. Because of that, the measurements of elastic scattering angular distributions that cover full angular ranges and optical model analysis have been used for the determination of reaction cross sections. This traditional method consists in deriving the parameters of the complex optical potentials which fit the experimental elastic scattering angular distributions and then of deriving the reaction cross sections predicted by these potentials. Even so, both the experimental part and the analysis of this latter method are not so simple. In the...

  5. Proton-deuteron radiative capture cross sections at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mehmandoost-Khajeh-Dad, A A; Amir-Ahmadi, H R; Bacelar, J C S; Berg, A M van den; Castelijns, R; van Garderen, E D; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kiš, M; Löhner, H; Messchendorp, J G; Wörtche, H J

    2011-01-01

    Differential cross sections of the reaction $p(d,^3{\\rm He})\\gamma$ have been measured at deuteron laboratory energies of 110, 133 and 180 MeV. The data were obtained with a coincidence setup measuring both the outgoing $^3$He and the photon. The data are compared with modern calculations including all possible meson-exchange currents and two- and three- nucleon forces in the potential. The data clearly show a preference for one of the models, although the shape of the angular distribution cannot be reproduced by any of the presented models.

  6. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Cross Section Measurements Using the ORELA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report for a research program which has been continuously supported by the AEC, ERDA, or USDOE since 1973. The neutron total and capture cross sections for n + 88Sr have been measured over the neutron energy range 100 eV to 1 MeV. The report briefly summaries our results and the importance of this work for nucleosynthesis and the optical model

  7. Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Structural Materials at ORELA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture experiments, using isotopically enriched and natural samples of chromium and titanium, were performed on flight paths 6 and 7 at the 40 m flight station of ORELA. The experimental data were acquired using a pair of deuterated benzene detectors employing the now well-established pulse-height-weighting technique. These data were complemented by new total cross-section measurements where no useful previous data were available.

  8. Radar Cross-section Measurement Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Borkar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Radar cross-section (RCS is an important study parameter for defence applications specially dealing with airborne weapon system. The RCS parameter guides the detection range for a target and is therefore studied to understand the effectiveness of a weapon system. It is not only important to understand the RCS characteristics of a target but also to look into the diagnostic mode of study where factors contributing to a particular RCS values are studied. This further opens up subject like RCS suppression and stealth. The paper discusses the RCS principle, control, and need of measurements. Classification of RCS in terms of popular usage is explained with detailed theory of RF imaging and inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR. The various types of RCS measurement ranges are explained with brief discussion on outdoor RCS measurement range. The RCS calibration plays a critical role in referencing the measurement to absolute values and has been described.The RCS facility at Reseach Centre Imarat, Hyderabad, is explained with some details of different activities that are carried out including RAM evaluation, scale model testing, and diagnostic imaging.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(2, pp.204-212, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.341

  9. Neutron capture cross-sections of krypton isotopes and their astrophysical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of noble gases a new experimental technique was developed using high pressure gas targets. By this technique, measurements on five krypton samples with different isotopic composition were performed by which the capture and the total cross sections between 5 and 200 keV were determined in the same experiment with good statistical accuracy. Values of Maxwellian averaged capture cross sections at 30 keV could be derived for the stable isotopes of krypton, as they are required for a quantitative understanding of the s-process of nucleosynthesis. From the systematics of this s-process it was possible to determine the original abundance of krypton in the solar system. The branching of the s-process at Se-79 allowed to determine the temperature of the s-process. A value of kT = 35 keV is adopted by this calculation. (orig.) 891 KBE/orig. 892 HIS

  10. Fast-neutron capture cross sections of importance in technological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the capture cross section of the major fertile nuclei, 238U and 232Th, leads to the consideration of these data. The 238U (n,γ) cross section is considered of priority as it is part of the 238U-239Pu cycle. Experimental techniques used in the measurements of these data are considered. Data measured more recently are compared with provisions made for the possible explanations of differing results. It is concluded that the 238U (n,γ) cross section is known with approx. 5% above 10 keV and fulfills the uncertainty limit for this cross section set to achieve design accuracy for k/sub eff/ and the breeding ratio above 500 keV. Below 500 keV, the present uncertainty falls short of the required 1.5 to 3.0% uncertainty. Specific recommendations are made to resolve existing discrepancies and data uncertainties. 84 references

  11. Surface State Capture Cross-Section at the Interface between Silicon and Hafnium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chien Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial properties between silicon and hafnium oxide (HfO2 are explored by the gated-diode method and the subthreshold measurement. The density of interface-trapped charges, the current induced by surface defect centers, the surface recombination velocity, and the surface state capture cross-section are obtained in this work. Among the interfacial properties, the surface state capture cross-section is approximately constant even if the postdeposition annealing condition is changed. This effective capture cross-section of surface states is about 2.4 × 10−15 cm2, which may be an inherent nature in the HfO2/Si interface.

  12. Corrections to nucleon capture cross sections computed in truncated Hilbert spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, B; Odell, D; Papenbrock, T; Platter, L

    2016-01-01

    Nucleon capture cross sections enter various astrophysical processes. The measurement of proton capture on nuclei at astrophysically relevant low energies is a challenge, and the precise theoretical computation in this long-wavelength regime requires us to understand the corrections due to finite Hilbert spaces. We derive extrapolation formulas that relate the infrared regularized capture amplitudes to the infinite basis limit and demonstrate their efficacy for proton-proton fusion. Our results are thus relevant to current calculations of few-body capture reactions such as proton-proton fusion or proton capture on the deuteron, and also open the way for a more precise understanding of nucleon capture on heavier nuclei.

  13. Updated thermal capture cross sections for Z=1-60 and the temperature dependence of the Wescott factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal radiative capture cross sections of the stable isotopes for elements Z=1-60 are re-evaluated by taking into consideration new measurements reported in the literature since the last publication of the Neutron Cross Section compendia. In addition, the temperature dependence of the Westcott factors for the capture cross section of 35Cl, 113Cd, 124Xe, and 157Gd are computed by adopting the most recent ENDF/B-VI release 7. (author)

  14. Motivation for the determination of the 244Cm effective neutron capture cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the effective neutron capture cross-section of 244Cm was tried, and the irradiation test of the 244Cm sample was performed for 1 cycle. Gamma- and alpha-rays measurements were performed to analyze the productions from the 244Cm(n,γ) and fission reactions. (author)

  15. Measurements and Application of Photofission Cross-section using Pulsed Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured total cross sections and neutron capture cross sections for natDy and natHf using the pulsed neutron facility in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). The neutron capture cross sections for 161,162,163,164Dy were measured at KURRI in the neutron energy region between 0.001 eV and several tens keV, and at the fast neutron facility in Tokyo Institute of Technology in the neutron energy region between 10 keV and 100 keV. We also measured the neutron capture cross sections and gamma multiplicity of 232Th at the IBR30 in Dubna, Russia

  16. Measurements of the neutron capture cross sections and incineration potentials of minor-actinides in high thermal neutron fluxes: Impact on the transmutation of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis comes within the framework of minor-actinide nuclear transmutation studies. First of all, we have evaluated the impact of minor actinide nuclear data uncertainties within the cases of 241Am and 237Np incineration in three different reactor spectra: EFR (fast), GT-MHR (epithermal) and HI-HWR (thermal). The nuclear parameters which give the highest uncertainties were thus highlighted. As a result of fact, we have tried to reduce data uncertainties, in the thermal energy region, for one part of them through experimental campaigns in the moderated high intensity neutron fluxes of ILL reactor (Grenoble). These measurements were focused onto the incineration and transmutation of the americium-241, the curium-244 and the californium-249 isotopes. Finally, the values of 12 different cross sections and the 241Am isomeric branching ratio were precisely measured at thermal energy point. (author)

  17. Neutron capture cross section of $^{25}$Mg and its astrophysical implications

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the neutron capture cross section of the stable $^{25}$Mg isotope. This experiment aims at the improvement of existing results for nuclear astrophysics.The measurement will be carried out under similar conditions as for the Mgexperiment that was completed at n_TOF during 2003. A metal $^{25}$Mg-enriched sample will be used in the proposed experiment instead of a MgO powder sample, which was used in the previous measurement and prevented us to minimize the uncertainty of the measured cross section. This experiment will be part of an ongoing study for a comprehensive discussion of the s-process abundances in massive stars.

  18. Neutron-induced capture cross sections of short-lived actinides with the surrogate reaction method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsing F.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of neutron-capture cross sections of short-lived nuclei is opening the way to understand and clarify the properties of many nuclei of interest for nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and particularly for transmutation of nuclear wastes. The surrogate approach is well-recognized as a potentially very useful method to extract neutron cross sections for low-energy compound-nuclear reactions and to overcome the difficulties related to the target radioactivity. In this work we will assess where we stand on these neutron-capture cross section measurements and how we can achieve the short-lived Minor Actinides nuclei involved in the nuclear fuel cycle. The CENBG collaboration applied the surrogate method to determine the neutron-capture cross section of 233Pa (T1/2 = 27 d. The 233Pa (n,γ cross section is then deduced from the measured gamma decay probability of 234Pa compound nucleus formed via the surrogate 232Th(3He,p reaction channel. The obtained cross section data, covering the neutron energy range 0.1 to 1 MeV, have been compared with the predictions of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. The importance of establishing benchmarks is stressed for the minor actinides region. However, the lack of desired targets led us to propose recently the 174Yb (3He,pγ reaction as a surrogate reaction for the (n,γ predetermined benchmark cross section of 175Lu. An overview of the experimental setup combining gamma ray detectors such as Ge and C6D6 in coincidence with light charged particles ΔE-E Telescopes will be presented and preliminary results will be discussed.

  19. Neutron-induced capture cross sections of short-lived actinides with the surrogate reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of neutron-capture cross sections of short-lived nuclei is opening the way to understand and clarify the properties of many nuclei of interest for nuclear structure physics, nuclear astrophysics and particularly for transmutation of nuclear wastes. The surrogate approach is well-recognized as a potentially very useful method to extract neutron cross sections for low-energy compound-nuclear reactions and to overcome the difficulties related to the target radioactivity. In this work we will assess where we stand on these neutron-capture cross section measurements and how we can achieve the short-lived Minor Actinides nuclei involved in the nuclear fuel cycle. The CENBG collaboration applied the surrogate method to determine the neutron-capture cross section of 233Pa (T1/2=27 d). The 233Pa(n,γ) cross section is then deduced from the measured gamma decay probability of 234Pa compound nucleus formed via the surrogate 232Th(3He,p) reaction channel. The obtained cross section data, covering the neutron energy range 0.1 to 1 MeV, have been compared with the predictions of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. The importance of establishing benchmarks is stressed for the minor actinides region. However, the lack of desired targets led us to propose recently the 174Yb (3He,pγ) reaction as a surrogate reaction for the (n,γ) predetermined benchmark cross section of 175Lu. An overview of the experimental setup combining gamma ray detectors such as Ge and C6D6 in coincidence with light charged particles ΔE-E Telescopes will be presented and preliminary results will be discussed. (authors)

  20. Absolute measurements of neutron cross sections. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the photoneutron laboratory, we have completed a major refurbishing of experimental facilities and begun work on measurements of the capture cross section in thorium and U-238. In the 14 MeV neutron experimental bay, work continues on the measurement of 14 MeV neutron induced reactions of interest as standards or because of their technological importance. First results have been obtained over the past year, and we are extending these measurements along the lines outlined in our proposal of a year ago

  1. Neutron-induced capture cross sections via the surrogate reaction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surrogate reaction method is an indirect way of determining cross sections for nuclear reactions that proceed through a compound nucleus. In this method, the compound nucleus is produced via an alternative (surrogate) reaction and its decay (by fission, gamma or neutron emission) is measured in coincidence with the outgoing appropriate charged particle. This technique has enabled neutron-induced cross sections to be extracted for nuclear reactions on short-lived nuclei that otherwise could not be measured. The CENBG collaboration has successfully applied this technique to determine the neutron-induced fission cross sections of several short-lived nuclei such as 233Pa, 242,243Cm and 241Am. These data are very important for the development of the Th/U cycle and for minor actinide transmutation. We currently investigate whether this powerful technique can also be used to determine the neutron-induced capture cross sections. For this purpose we will use the surrogate reaction 174Yb(3He,pγ)176Lu to infer the well known 175Lu(n,γ) cross section and compare the results with the directly measured neutron-induced data. The experimental set-up and the first results will be presented. We will also discuss our future plans to use the surrogate method for extracting actinides (n,γ) cross sections. (authors)

  2. Measurement of the Neutron Capture Cross Sections of $^{233}$U, $^{237}$Np, $^{240,242}$Pu, $^{241,243}$Am and $^{245}$Cm with a Total Absorption Calorimeter at n_TOF

    CERN Multimedia

    Beer, H; Wiescher, M; Cox, J; Rapp, W; Embid, M; Dababneh, S

    2002-01-01

    Accurate and reliable neutron capture cross section data for actinides are necessary for the poper design, safety regulation and precise performance assessment of transmutation devices such as Fast Critical Reactors or Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The goal of this proposal is the measurement of the neutron capture cross sections of $^{233}$U, $^{237}$Np, $^{240,242}$Pu, $^{241,243}$Am and $^{245}$Cm at n_TOF with an accuracy of 5~\\%. $^{233}$U plays an essential role in the Th fuel cycle, which has been proposed as a safer and cleaner alternative to the U fuel cycle. The capture cross sections of $^{237}$Np,$^{240,242}$Pu, $^{241,243}$Am and $^{245}$Cm play a key role in the design and optimization of a strategy for the Nuclear Waste Transmutation. A high accuracy can be achieved at n_TOF in such measurements due to a combination of features unique in the world: high instantaneous neutron fluence and excellent energy resolution of the facility, innovative Data Acquisition System based on flash ADCs and t...

  3. Determining neutron-capture cross sections via the surrogate reaction technique

    CERN Document Server

    Forssén, C; Escher, J; Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K

    2007-01-01

    Indirect methods play an important role in the determination of nuclear reaction cross sections that are hard to measure directly. In this paper we investigate the feasibility of using the so-called surrogate method to extract neutron-capture cross sections for low energy compound-nuclear reactions in spherical and near-spherical nuclei. We present the surrogate method and develop a statistical nuclear-reaction simulation to explore different approaches to utilize surrogate reaction data. We assess the success of each approach by comparing the extracted cross sections with a predetermined benchmark. In particular, we employ regional systematics of nuclear properties in the 34 <= Z <= 46 region to calculate (n,gamma) cross sections for a series of Zr isotopes, and to simulate a surrogate experiment and the extraction of the desired cross section. We identify one particular approach that may provide very useful estimates of the cross section, and we discuss some of the limitations of the method. General r...

  4. Neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectra of 138Ba in the keV-neutron energy region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katabuchi T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross sections and the capture γ-ray spectra of 138Ba were measured in the astrophysically important energy region. Measurements were made at neutron energies from 15 to 80 keV. The neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight method. The γ-ray spectra showed that the primary transition pattern strongly depended on the incident neutron energy. The neutron capture cross sections were derived by the pulse height weighting technique. The present cross section values were compared with evaluated cross section data and previous measurements.

  5. Neutron total and capture cross section measurements and resonance parameter analysis of tungsten from 0.01 eV to 200 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, C.J.; Block, R.C.; Slovacek, R.E.; Overberg, M.E.; Moretti, B.E. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Environmental and Energy Engineering Dept.; Burke, J.A.; Leinweber, G.; Drindak, N.J. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-06-15

    Natural tungsten metal was measured using neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Gaerttner Laboratory linear accelerator to determine the tungsten resonance parameters. Three separate measurements were performed: transmission, capture, and self-indication. Previous measurements did not employ all three experiment types and used less sophisticated methods. The current work improves on the published tungsten data base and reduces resonance parameter uncertainties.

  6. Measurements of the {sup 40}Ar(n, γ){sup 41}Ar radiative-capture cross section between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhike, Megha, E-mail: megha@tunl.duke.edu [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Fallin, B.; Tornow, W. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2014-09-07

    The {sup 40}Ar(n, γ){sup 41}Ar neutron capture cross section has been measured between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV neutron energy using the activation technique. The data are important for estimating backgrounds in argon-based neutrino and dark-matter detectors and in the neutrino-less double-beta decay search GERDA, which uses liquid argon as cooling and shielding medium. For the first time the {sup 40}Ar(n, γ){sup 41}Ar cross section has been measured for neutron energies above 1 MeV. Our results are compared to the evaluation ENDF/B-VII.1 and the calculated prediction TENDL-2013. The latter agrees very well with the present results.

  7. Measurement of the neutron-capture cross section of 76Ge and 74Ge below 15 MeV and its relevance to 0νββ decay searches of 76Ge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Bhike

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The neutron radiative-capture cross section of 76Ge was measured between 0.4 and 14.8 MeV using the activation technique. Germanium samples with the isotopic abundance of ∼86%Ge76 and ∼14%Ge74 used in the 0νββ searches by the GERDA and Majorana Collaborations were irradiated with monoenergetic neutrons produced at eleven energies via the H3(p,nHe3, H2(d,nHe3 and H3(d,nHe4 reactions. Previously, data existed only at thermal energies and at 14 MeV. As a by-product, capture cross-section data were also obtained for 74Ge at neutron energies below 8 MeV. Indium and gold foils were irradiated simultaneously for neutron fluence determination. High-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy was used to determine the γ-ray activity of the daughter nuclei of interest. For the 76Ge total capture cross section the present data are in good agreement with the TENDL-2013 model calculations and the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluations, while for the Ge74(n,γGe75 reaction, the present data are about a factor of two larger than predicted. It was found that the Ge74(n,γGe75 yield in the High-Purity Germanium (HPGe detectors used by the GERDA and Majorana Collaborations is only about a factor of two smaller than the Ge76(n,γGe77 yield due to the larger cross section of the former reaction.

  8. Thermal neutron capture cross sections for 16,171,18O and 2H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, R. B.; Revay, Zs.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal neutron capture γ -ray spectra for 16,17,18O and 2H have been measured with guided cold neutron beams from the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) reactor and the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) on natural and O,1817 enriched D2O targets. Complete neutron capture γ -ray decay schemes for the 16,17,18O(n ,γ ) reactions were measured. Absolute transition probabilities were determined for each reaction by a least-squares fit of the γ -ray intensities to the decay schemes after accounting for the contribution from internal conversion. The transition probability for the 870.76-keV γ ray from 16O(n ,γ ) was measured as Pγ(871 )=96.6 ±0.5 % and the thermal neutron cross section for this γ ray was determined as 0.164 ±0.003 mb by internal standardization with multiple targets containing oxygen and stoichiometric quantities of hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon whose γ -ray cross sections were previously standardized. The γ -ray cross sections for the O,1817(n ,γ ) and 2H(n ,γ ) reactions were then determined relative to the 870.76-keV γ -ray cross section after accounting for the isotopic abundances in the targets. We determined the following total radiative thermal neutron cross sections for each isotope from the γ -ray cross sections and transition probabilities; σ0(16O )=0.170 ±0.003 mb; σ0(17O )=0.67 ±0.07 mb; σ0(18O )=0.141 ±0.006 mb; and σ0(2H )=0.489 ±0.006 mb.

  9. Neutron capture on (94)Zr: Resonance parameters and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliente, G; Fujii, K; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calvino, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Duran, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Goncalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Jericha, E; Kappeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M.T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stephan, C; Tain, J.L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M.C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes play an important role in nucleosynthesis studies. The s-process reaction flow between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes passes through the neutron magic nucleus (90)Zr and through (91,92,93,94)Zr, but only part of the flow extends to (96)Zr because of the branching point at (95)Zr. Apart from their effect on the s-process flow, the comparably small isotopic (n, gamma) cross sections make Zr also an interesting structural material for nuclear reactors. The (94)Zr (n, gamma) cross section has been measured with high resolution at the spallation neutron source n_TOF at CERN and resonance parameters are reported up to 60 keV neutron energy.

  10. Impact of Thorium Capture Cross Section Uncertainty on the Thorium Utilized ADS Reactivity Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Thanh Mai Vu; Takanori Kitada

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the researches on fast neutron spectrum system utilized thorium fuel are widely conducted. However, the recent thorium cross section libraries are limited compared to uranium cross section libraries. The impact of thorium cross section uncertainty on thorium fuel utilized accelerator driven system (ADS) reactivity calculation is estimated in this study. The uncertainty of the keff caused by 232Th capture cross section of JENDL-4.0 is about 1.3%. The uncertainty of JENDL-4.0 is neede...

  11. Re/Os cosmochronometer: measurement of neutron cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental work is devoted to the improved assessment of the Re/Os cosmochronometer. The dating technique is based on the decay of 187Re (t1/2=41.2 Gyr) into 187Os and determines the age of the universe by the time of onset of nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis mechanisms, which are responsible for the 187Re/187Os pair, provide the possibility to identify the radiogenic fraction of 187Os exclusively by nuclear physics considerations. Apart from its radiogenic component, 187Os can be synthesized otherwise only by the s process, which means that this missing fraction can be reliably determined and subtracted by proper s-process modeling. On the other hand, 187Re is almost completely produced by the r process. The only information needed for the interpretation as a cosmic clock is the production rate of 187Re as a function of time. The accuracy of the s-process calculations that are needed to determine the nucleosynthetic abundance of 187Os depends on the quality of the neutron capture cross sections averaged over the thermal neutron spectrum at the s-process sites. Laboratory measurements of these cross sections have to be corrected for the effect of nuclear levels, which can be significantly populated at the high stellar temperatures during the s process. The neutron capture cross sections of 186Os, 187Os and 188Os have been measured at the CERN n TOF facility in the range between 0.7 eV and 1 MeV. From these data, Maxwellian averaged cross sections have been determined for thermal energies from 5 to 100 keV with an accuracy around 4%, 3%, and 5% for 186Os, 187Os, and 188Os, respectively. Since, the first excited state in 187Os occurs at 9.75 keV, the cross section of this isotope requires a substantial correction for thermal population of low lying nuclear levels. This effect has been evaluated on the basis of resonance data derived in the (n, γ) experiments and by an improved measurements of the inelastic scattering cross section for the first excited

  12. Re/Os cosmochronometer: measurement of neutron cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, M.

    2007-12-21

    This experimental work is devoted to the improved assessment of the Re/Os cosmochronometer. The dating technique is based on the decay of {sup 187}Re (t{sub 1/2}=41.2 Gyr) into {sup 187}Os and determines the age of the universe by the time of onset of nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis mechanisms, which are responsible for the {sup 187}Re/{sup 187}Os pair, provide the possibility to identify the radiogenic fraction of {sup 187}Os exclusively by nuclear physics considerations. Apart from its radiogenic component, {sup 187}Os can be synthesized otherwise only by the s process, which means that this missing fraction can be reliably determined and subtracted by proper s-process modeling. On the other hand, {sup 187}Re is almost completely produced by the r process. The only information needed for the interpretation as a cosmic clock is the production rate of {sup 187}Re as a function of time. The accuracy of the s-process calculations that are needed to determine the nucleosynthetic abundance of {sup 187}Os depends on the quality of the neutron capture cross sections averaged over the thermal neutron spectrum at the s-process sites. Laboratory measurements of these cross sections have to be corrected for the effect of nuclear levels, which can be significantly populated at the high stellar temperatures during the s process. The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 186}Os, {sup 187}Os and {sup 188}Os have been measured at the CERN n TOF facility in the range between 0.7 eV and 1 MeV. From these data, Maxwellian averaged cross sections have been determined for thermal energies from 5 to 100 keV with an accuracy around 4%, 3%, and 5% for {sup 186}Os, {sup 187}Os, and {sup 188}Os, respectively. Since, the first excited state in {sup 187}Os occurs at 9.75 keV, the cross section of this isotope requires a substantial correction for thermal population of low lying nuclear levels. This effect has been evaluated on the basis of resonance data derived in the (n, {gamma

  13. High resolution neutron total and capture cross-sections in separated isotopes of copper (6365Cu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution neutron total and capture cross section measurements have been performed on separated isotopes of copper (6365Cu). Measurements for capture cross section were made from about 1 keV to a few hundreds of keV. The total cross section measurements were made in the energy interval of approximately 10 keV to 150 keV. The resulting capture data have been analyzed by a generalized least square peak fitting computer code in the energy interval of 2.5 keV to 50 keV. Photon strengths are determined using the data up to approximately 250 keV. The resulting total cross section data have been analyzed by area-analysis on the transmission values and by R-matrix multilevel code on cross section values. Average s- and p-wave level spacing and s- and p-wave strength function values are determined. From the resonance parameters thus obtained, by the analysis, statistical distribution is studied for s- and p-wave level spacings and reduced neutron widths. A comparison has been made for adjacent level spacings with the theoretical predictions of level repulsion (of same J/sup π/) by Wigner considering levels with various spin states separately for s-wave resonances where confident spin assignment has been possible. Reduced neutron widths are compared with the Porter-Thomas distribution. Optical model formulated by Feshbach, Porter and Weiskopf describes the neutron-nucleus interaction. A comparison has been made between experimentally determined values of the s- and p-wave strength functions and that obtainable from optical model calculations, thereby determining the appropriate optical model parameters. The experimental arrangement, pertinent theoretical discussion, and the processes of data reduction and the analyses along with the comparison of the previously reported results with the present work are presented in detail

  14. Production of a 44 Ti target and its cross section of thermal neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the production of a 44 Ti target was carried out aiming the determination of its thermal neutron capture cross-section. With this purpose, the cross-section of the reaction 45 Sc(p,2 n) 44 Ti was determined in the energies 16-, 18-, 20-22- and 45 MeV. The cross-section of the reactions (p,n) 45 Ti, (p,pn) 44m Sc, (p,pn) 44g Sc and (p,p2n)43 Sc were also measured. The results in the low energy region are in good agreement with a previous work by McGee et al. On the other hand, the cross-section at 45 MeV is different from McGee's result and indicates the existence of an abnormal behavior of the excitation function at higher energies. Furthermore, a radiochemical separation method was developed in order to eliminate Sc from the 44 Ti target which was irradiated with neutrons. It was possible to determine an upper limit for the cross-section of the reaction 44 Ti (n, γ) of 4 x 103 b. At last, it is presented a discussion of the results obtained and their possible astrophysical implications. (author)

  15. 102Pd(n, γ) Cross Section Measurement Using DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross section of the proton rich nucleus 102Pd was measured with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The target was a 2 mg Pd foil with 78% enriched 102Pd. It was held by a 0.9 μm thick Mylar bag which was selected after comparing different thicknesses of Kapton and Mylar for their scattering background. To identify the contribution of the other Pd isotopes the data of a natural Pd sample was compared to the data of the 102Pd enriched sample. A 12C sample was used to determine the scattering background. The 102Pd(n, γ) rate is of importance for the p-process nucleosynthesis

  16. Spin-resolved electron capture cross sections for C5+-H collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X. Y.; Liu, L.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.

    2015-10-01

    The charge transfer process in C5+-H collisions has been theoretically studied using the two-center atomic orbital close-coupling method in the energy interval from 0.1 to 300 keV u-1. The interaction of active electron with the projectile ion is represented by model potentials different for the singlet and triplet systems of C4+(1snl) states. The results of the present calculations are compared with other theoretical results and experimental measurements and good agreement is obtained for the total spin-averaged cross sections in the overlapping energy range. For the spin-resolved cross sections, we found that the present total and n-shell electron capture cross sections are also in good agreement with the results of other theoretical studies in the overlapping energy range for both the singlet and triplet cases. Good overall agreement has been obtained with the results of other authors for the nl-state-selective cross sections, except for the capture to 3p and 4p singlet states at the low collision energies.

  17. Neutron capture cross section of $^{90}$Zr Bottleneck in the s-process reaction flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliente, G; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C; Aerts, G; Abbondanno, U; Alvarez, H; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, Panayiotis; Audouin, L; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Bečvář, F; Berthoumieux, E; Bisterzo, S; Calviño, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapiço, C; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, Enrico; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillman, I; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Durán, I; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Furman, W; Gallino, R; Gonçalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Gramegna, F; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martínez, A; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Köhler, P; Kossionides, E; Krtička, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, Heinz; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Paradela, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rubbia, Carlo; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, J; Sarchiapone, L; Savvidis, I; Stéphan, C; Taín, J L; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarín, D; Vincente, M, C; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2008-01-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes have important implications in nuclear astrophysics and for reactor design. The small cross section of the neutron magic nucleus 90Zr, which accounts for more than 50% of natural zirconium represents one of the key isotopes for the stellar s-process, because it acts as a bottleneck in the neutron capture chain between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes. The same element, Zr, also is an important component of the structural materials used in traditional and advanced nuclear reactors. The (n,γ) cross section has been measured at CERN, using the n_TOF spallation neutron source. In total, 45 resonances could be resolved in the neutron energy range below 70 keV, 10 being observed for the first time thanks to the high resolution and low backgrounds at n_TOF. On average, the Γγ widths obtained in resonance analyses with the R-matrix code SAMMY were 15% smaller than reported previously. By these results, the accuracy of the Maxwellian averaged cross section f...

  18. Measurements of Neutron Induced Cross Sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.

    1999-09-20

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and the fission cross sections of 233U in the energy range from 0.36 eV to ~700 keV. We report average fission and total cross sections. Also, we measured the neutron total cross sections of 27Al and Natural chlorine as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  19. Neutron capture cross section measurement of Pr in the energy region from 0.003 eV to 140 keV by linac time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section of the Pr(n, γ) reaction has been measured in the energy region from 0.003 eV to 140 keV by the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method with a 46-MeV electron linear accelerator (linac) of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KURRI). An assembly of Bi4Ge3O12(BGO) scintillators was employed as a total energy absorption detector for the prompt capture γ-ray measurement from the sample. In order to determine the neutron flux impinging on the capture sample, a plug of 10B powder sample was used. The measured result was compared with the previous experimental and the evaluated data. (author)

  20. Measurement of the fission cross section of 238Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fission cross sections of 238Pu have been measured from 0.1 eV to 80 keV energy range using the Rensselaer Intense Neutron Spectrometer. The cross sections were normalized to the 235U ENDF/B-V data broadened to the resolution of the Rensselaer Intense Neutron Spectrometer system. The fission areas and widths were determined for the resolved low-energy resonances. The ENDF/B-V fission cross sections for the 238Pu isotope are, in general, not in good agreement with the measured cross sections and a new evaluation is recommended. The observations of structure in the unresolved fission cross sections is suggestive of the existence of intermediate structure. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Fast neutron cross section measurements: First year progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress on the project has generally followed the schedule included in the three year grant proposal of a year ago. In the 14 MeV Neutron Laboratory, we have completed the last of our current set of activation cross section measurements, and have moved into the phase of rebuilding our accelerator to produce pulses of one nanosecond width. This renovation has required extensive changes in the laboratory, including the relocation of the 150 kV accelerator to a balcony overlooking the main part of the Neutron Bay. We have procured and installed a 900 bending magnet, and are currently fabricating the major components of the beam pulsing system. We expect that the fabrication work will be completed near the end of the current contract year, and intend to move into initial testing of the system shortly after the start of the second contract year. In the Photoneutron Laboratory, we have demonstrated the feasibility of a series of radiochemical separations that are an essential part of our effort to carry out measurements of the U-238 capture cross section. We have also demonstrated the accuracy of a new technique to calibrate our gamma detector efficiency using alpha particle spectrometry. We are now fabricating the uranium targets for this experiment and expect that first year irradiations will take place within the next several months

  2. Neutron activation cross section measurements and evaluations in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of 28 reactions have been measured by the activation method since 1995 in CIAE. At the same time the cross sections of 40 reactions which we have measured since 1989 have been compiled and evaluated. A brief description of experimental measurement of activation cross sections is given. The data measured after 1995 by ourselves are listed in Table 4 and our evaluations for 40 reactions are listed in Table 5, respectively. A graphical intercomparison with available experimental data isi given in appendix. (author)

  3. Partial neutron capture cross sections of actinides using cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear waste needs to be characterized for its safe handling and storage. In particular long-lived actinides render the waste characterization challenging. The results described in this thesis demonstrate that Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGAA) with cold neutrons is a reliable tool for the non-destructive analysis of actinides. Nuclear data required for an accurate identification and quantification of actinides was acquired. Therefore, a sample design suitable for accurate and precise measurements of prompt γ-ray energies and partial cross sections of long-lived actinides at existing PGAA facilities was presented. Using the developed sample design the fundamental prompt γ-ray data on 237Np, 241Am and 242Pu were measured. The data were validated by repetitive analysis of different samples at two individual irradiation and counting facilities - the BRR in Budapest and the FRM II in Garching near Munich. Employing cold neutrons, resonance neutron capture by low energetic resonances was avoided during the experiments. This is an improvement over older neutron activation based works at thermal reactor neutron energies. 152 prompt γ-rays of 237Np were identified, as well as 19 of 241Am, and 127 prompt γ-rays of 242Pu. In all cases, both high and lower energetic prompt γ-rays were identified. The most intense line of 237Np was observed at an energy of Eγ=182.82(10) keV associated with a partial capture cross section of σγ=22.06(39) b. The most intense prompt γ-ray lines of 241Am and of 242Pu were observed at Eγ=154.72(7) keV with σγ=72.80(252) b and Eγ=287.69(8) keV with σγ=7.07(12) b, respectively. The measurements described in this thesis provide the first reported quantifications on partial radiative capture cross sections for 237Np, 241Am and 242Pu measured simultaneously over the large energy range from 45 keV to 12 MeV. Detailed uncertainty assessments were performed and the validity of the given uncertainties was demonstrated. Compared

  4. 63Ni (n ,γ ) cross sections measured with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Göbel, K.; Heftrich, T.; Jandel, M.; Käppeler, F.; Lederer, C.; Kivel, N.; Korschinek, G.; Krtička, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ostermöller, J.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Schumann, D.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wallner, A.

    2015-10-01

    The neutron capture cross section of the s -process branch nucleus 63Ni affects the abundances of other nuclei in its region, especially 63Cu and 64Zn. In order to determine the energy-dependent neutron capture cross section in the astrophysical energy region, an experiment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed using the calorimetric 4 π BaF2 array DANCE. The (n ,γ ) cross section of 63Ni has been determined relative to the well-known 197Au standard with uncertainties below 15%. Various 63Ni resonances have been identified based on the Q value. Furthermore, the s -process sensitivity of the new values was analyzed with the new network calculation tool NETZ.

  5. Neutron capture cross sections of $^{70,72,73,74,76}$ Ge at n_TOF EAR-1

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the (n;$\\gamma$ ) cross sections of the isotopes $^{70;72;73;74;76}$Ge. Neutron induced reactions on Ge are of importance for the astrophysical slow neutron capture process, which is responsible for forming about half of the overall elemental abundances heavier than Fe. The neutron capture cross section on Ge affects the abundances produced in this process for a number of heavier isotopes up to a mass number of A = 90. Additionally, neutron capture on Ge is of interest for low background experiments involving Ge detectors. Experimental cross section data presently available for Ge (n;$\\gamma$ ) are scarce and cover only a fraction of the neutron energy range of interest. (n;$\\gamma$ ) cross sections will be measured in the full energy range from 25 meV to about 200 keV at n TOF EAR-1.

  6. A method for measuring light ion reaction cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental procedure for measuring reaction cross-sections of light ions in the energy range 20-50 MeV/nucleon, using a modified attenuation technique, is described. The detection method incorporates a forward detector that simultaneously measures the reaction cross-sections for five different sizes of the solid angle in steps from 99.1% to 99.8% of the total solid angle. The final reaction cross-section values are obtained by extrapolation to the full solid angle

  7. Measurements of fission cross-sections. Chapter 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steps involved in the measurement of fission cross sections are summarized and the range of techniques available are considered. Methods of fission detection are described with particular emphasis on the neutron energy dependent properties of the fission process and the details of fragment energy loss which can lead to energy-dependent changes in detector efficiency. Selected examples of fission cross-section measurements are presented and methods of data reduction, storage, analysis and evaluation, are examined. Finally requested accuracies for fission cross section data are compared to estimated available accuracies. (U.K.)

  8. Impact of Thorium Capture Cross Section Uncertainty on the Thorium Utilized ADS Reactivity Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Mai Vu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the researches on fast neutron spectrum system utilized thorium fuel are widely conducted. However, the recent thorium cross section libraries are limited compared to uranium cross section libraries. The impact of thorium cross section uncertainty on thorium fuel utilized accelerator driven system (ADS reactivity calculation is estimated in this study. The uncertainty of the keff caused by 232Th capture cross section of JENDL-4.0 is about 1.3%. The uncertainty of JENDL-4.0 is needed to be enhanced to provide more reliable results on reactivity calculation for the fast system. The impact of uncertainty of  232Th capture cross section of ENDF/B-VII is small (0.1%. Therefore, it will cause no significant impact of the thorium cross section library on the thorium utilized ADS design calculation.

  9. Neutron inelastic cross section measurements for 24Mg

    OpenAIRE

    OLACEL A.; Borcea, C.; DESSAGNE Philippe; Kerveno, M.; NEGRET A.; PLOMPEN Arjan

    2014-01-01

    The gamma production cross sections from the neutron inelastic scattering on 24Mg were measured for neutron energies up to 18 MeV at GELINA (Geel Linear Accelerator), the neutron source operated by EC-JRC-IRMM, Belgium. The level cross section and the total inelastic cross section were determined. We used the GAINS (Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering) spectrometer with 7 large volume HPGe detectors placed at 110◦ and 150◦ with respect to the beam direction. The neutron flux was dete...

  10. Recent capture cross section data from ORELA above 2.6 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture by natural rhodium (103Rh) and enriched stable isotopes of ruthenium (100 to 104) and palladium (104 to 110) were measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron facility. Average pure isotope cross sections from three to several hundred keV were derived. The neutron flux shape was determined relative to ENDF/B V standard 6Li(n,α) and 235U(n,f) cross sections below and above 70 keV respectively. Strength functions were adjusted to fit the data by least squares. The 101Ru fission product would appear to cause less poisoning than 105Pd or 103Rh in plutonium fueled fast reactors. 7 references

  11. Recent capture cross section data from ORELA above 2.6 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture by natural rhodium (103Rh) and enriched stable isotopes of ruthenium (100 to 104) and palladium (104 to 110) were measured at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron facility. Average pure isotope cross sections from three to several hundred keV were derived. The neutron flux shape was determined relative to ENDF/B V standard 6Li(n,α) and 235U(n,f) cross sections below and above 70 keV respectively. Strength functions were adjusted to fit the data by least squares. The 101Ru fission product would appear to cause less poisoning than 105Pd or 103Rh in plutonium fueled fast reactors

  12. Measurement of fusion cross section with neutron halo nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion cross sections of 11Be, 10Be and 9Be have been measured on 209Bi target at 30-70MeV. Due to the neutron halo effect of 11Be, a large enhancement or suppression of the fusion cross section around the Coulomb barrier was theoretically predicted. Comparing the excitation function of 11Be with 10Be at near the Coulomb barrier region, no significant difference has been observed. ((orig.))

  13. Measurement of distribution density of total neutron cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems of energy resolutions together with difficulties of multilevel analysis make desirable the application of the statistical approach to the description of total cross-section irregularities for intermediate and fast neutrons. Total neutron cross-section probability distributions were found from the analysis of the transmission nonexponentiality. The results for intervals adopted in reactor calculations are compared with recommended values and with those found from high resolution measurements

  14. Macroscopic cross section measurements in materials by neutron radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroscopic cross-section of materials play an important role in the study of material properties. Number of materials are used for shielding against penetrating radiation like X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons and exhibit different attenuation cross-sections. Neutron radiography technique is a multi discipline non-destructive technique with a large number of applications. The technique was applied to study and analyze the behavior of different shielding materials against thermal neutrons. Samples as step wedges of graphite, copper, brass and acrylic etc. were fabricated. The test samples were exposed to a beam of thermal neutrons at neutron radiography facility and the transmittance of neutrons through different materials was measured. Gamma-ray contribution and scattered radiation were subtracted from the observed neutron intensities to calculate the neutron macroscopic cross-section. Calculated values of the macroscopic cross-section were compared with the values given in the literature. (author)

  15. High Energy Measurement of the Deuteron Photodisintegration Differential Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elaine Schulte

    2002-05-01

    New measurements of the high energy deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section were made at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. Two experiments were performed. Experiment E96-003 was performed in experimental Hall C. The measurements were designed to extend the highest energy differential cross section values to 5.5 GeV incident photon energy at forward angles. This builds upon previous high energy measurements in which scaling consistent with the pQCD constituent counting rules was observed at 90 degrees and 70 degrees in the center of mass. From the new measurements, a threshold for the onset of constituent counting rule scaling seems present at transverse momentum approximately 1.3 GeV/c. The second experiment, E99-008, was performed in experimental Hall A. The measurements were designed to explore the angular distribution of the differential cross section at constant energy. The measurements were made symmetric about 90 degrees

  16. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 55Mn from Reich-Moore Analysis of Recent Experimental Neutron Transmission and Capture Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL; Guber, Klaus H [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL; Arbanas, Goran [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of 55Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S0 = (3.90 0.78) x 10-4 and S1 = (0.45 0.08) x 10-4. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S2 = 1.0 x 10-4. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components.

  17. Technical study on cross section measurement with Al activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of Al activation relative measurement of cross section has been studied. The cross sections of 27Al(n,α)24Na have been measured in 13.4 MeV to 14.7 MeV. The PD-300 accelerator offered D-T neutron source. The distance from sample to Tritium target is 20 cm. It spent 5 h to radiate sample with neutron. The intensity of neutron source is monitored by the α-particles from the T(d, n) 4He reaction. The induced neutron energy is determined using ratio of Nb(n,2n) and Zr(n,2n) cross section. The activated gamma ray is measured using GEM60P HPGe detector. The results of 27Al(n, α)24Na cross sections are compared with the nuclear data standard, and the deviation is less than 1%. It showed that the method of Al activation relative measurement of cross section is credible. (authors)

  18. Group neutron fission and radiative-capture cross-sections for transactinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is made between evaluations of radiative-capture and fission cross-sections for the isotopes 236U, 237Np, 238Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 242Cm and 244Cm, and group cross-sections for use in fast-reactor calculations are recommended. Group cross-sections obtained from the HEDL graphical data (evaluation for ENDF/B-V) are shown for 234U, 236Pu, 237Pu, 242Pu, 244Pu, sup(242m)Am, 241Cm, 243Cm and 248Cm. Group cross-sections for 32 isotopes from the ENDL-76 library files are also given. In choosing recommended cross-sections, account was taken of the extent of agreement with experimental data where these are available, the extent to which the cross-sections are documented and the extent to which they have been calculated from a theoretical model. The reliability of evaluations is discussed. An attempt is made to evaluate the error in single-group cross-sections averaged over a typical fast-reactor spectrum. Conclusions are drawn from a study of the literature on the current status of experimental and theoretical research on transactinide cross-sections, and from the spread of the different evaluation data. Finally, the situation with respect to the integral experiments which can be used for correcting transactinide cross-sections is discussed. (author)

  19. Total cross-section measurements progress in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Mulvey, J H

    2013-01-01

    Total Cross-Section Measurements discusses the cross-sectional dimensions of elementary hadron collisions. The main coverage of the book is the resonance and high energy area of the given collision. A section of the book explains in detail the characteristic of a resonance region. Another section is focused on the location of the high energy region of collision. Parts of the book define the meaning of resonance in nuclear physics. Also explained are the measurement of resonance and the identification of the area where the resonance originates. Different experimental methods to measure the tota

  20. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section with ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinghaus, Frank; Schmitz, Simon; Tapprogge, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: ATLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The study of the ZZ production has an excellent potential to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model, where Z boson pairs can be produced via non-resonant processes or via Higgs decays. A deviation from the Standard Model expectation for the ZZ production cross section would be an indication for new physics. This could manifest itself in so called triple gauge couplings via ZZZ or ZZγ, which the Standard Model forbids at tree level. The measurement of the ZZ production cross section is based on an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collision data at √(s) = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector in 2012. Measurements of differential cross sections as well as searches for triple gauge couplings have been performed. This talk presents the measurement and analysis details of the ZZ production in the ZZ → 4l channel.

  1. The thermal neutron capture cross section of the radioactive isotope $^{60}$Fe

    CERN Document Server

    Heftrich, T; Dressler, R; Eberhardt, K; Endres, A; Glorius, J; Göbel, K; Hampel, G; Heftrich, M; Käppeler, F; Lederer, C; Mikorski, M; Plag, R; Reifarth, R; Stieghorst, C; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Slavkovská, Z; Sonnabend, K; Wallner, A; Weigand, M; Wiehl, N; Zauner, S

    2015-01-01

    50% of the heavy element abundances are produced via slow neutron capture reactions in different stellar scenarios. The underlying nucleosynthesis models need the input of neutron capture cross sections. One of the fundamental signatures for active nucleosynthesis in our galaxy is the observation of long-lived radioactive isotopes, such as $^{60}$Fe with a half-life of $2.60\\times10^6$ yr. To reproduce this $\\gamma$-activity in the universe, the nucleosynthesis of $^{60}$Fe has to be understood reliably. A $^{60}$Fe sample produced at the Paul-Scherrer-Institut was activated with thermal and epithermal neutrons at the research reactor at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universit\\"at Mainz. The thermal neutron capture cross section has been measured for the first time to $\\sigma_{\\text{th}}=0.226 \\ (^{+0.044}_{-0.049})$ b. An upper limit of $\\sigma_{\\text{RI}} < 0.50$ b could be determined for the resonance integral. An extrapolation towards the astrophysicaly interesting energy regime between $kT$=10 keV and 100 ke...

  2. Top quark pair cross section measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the latest results in the measurement of the top-quark pair production cross section obtained with data collected by the CMS detector at LHC accelerator. The analyses are performed in the dilepton, single lepton and full hadronic decay modes. Additionally to the inclusive measurements of $\\mathrm{\\sigma_{\\mathrm{t\\bar{t}}}}$ at 7, 8 and 13$\\mathrm{\\;TeV}$, the CMS collaboration provides for the first time the cross section at 5.02$\\mathrm{\\;TeV}$. Results are confronted with the latest and most precise theoretical calculations.

  3. Measurement of charm and beauty dijet cross sections in photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement of charm and beauty dijet photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The positron data of the years 1999 and 2000 are analysed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 56.8 pb-1. Events are selected with two or more jets of transverse momentum ptjet1(2)>11(8) GeV in the central range of pseudo-rapidity -0.9jet1(2)γobs. Taking into account the theoretical uncertainties, the charm cross sections are consistent with a QCD calculation in next-to-leading order, while the predicted cross sections for beauty production are somewhat lower than the measurement. (orig.)

  4. Recent integral cross section validation measurements at the ASP facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, L.W., E-mail: lee.packer@ccfe.ac.uk [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hughes, S. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Gilbert, M.; Lilley, S.; Pampin, R. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Recent results of integral cross section measurements at ASP obtained using high purity elemental are detailed. • Details of the data processing tools and method are included which allows to preserve reaction product decay information. • C/E plots for measurements taken for number of reactions and the European Activation File 2010 cross section evaluation. • New integral data included for Ti-46(n,p)Sc-46m. -- Abstract: This work presents new integral data measured at the ASP 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility at Aldermaston in the UK, which has recently become available for fusion-related work through the CCFE materials programme. Measurements of reaction products from activation experiments using elemental foils were carried out using gamma spectrometry in a high efficiency, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and associated digital signal processing hardware. Following irradiation and rapid extraction to the measurement cell, gamma emissions were acquired with both energy and time bins. Integral cross section and half-life data have been derived from these measurements. Selected integral cross section values are presented from the measurement campaigns. Details of the data processing approach and outputs generated are highlighted for measurement of the {sup 186}W(n,2n){sup 185m}W reaction—a selected short-lived reaction resulting from W foil irradiations; C/E results are reported along with the associated uncertainties and compared using the SAFEPAQ-II tool against existing available data.

  5. Measurement of the cross sections of the minor transactinium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of neutron cross sections of the minor transactinium isotopes performed since the 1975 IAEA meeting on transactinium isotope nuclear data are reviewed. Some of the recent developments in experimental techniques are briefly described. As two specific examples measurements on 241Am and 230Th(n,f) are discussed in some detail

  6. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Carnelli, P. F. F.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-06-01

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  7. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work

  8. The 233Pa fission cross-section measurement and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    233Pa is a conspicuous example of strongly discrepant data in the accepted nuclear data evaluations. The precise knowledge of the neutron-induced reaction cross-section of this highly β-active nuclide (T1/2 = 27.0 d) is essential for the successful implementation of the thorium-based fuel cycle in advanced nuclear applications. The reactions involving 233Pa are responsible for the balance of nuclei as well as the average number of prompt fission neutrons in a contemplated reactor scenario. In an IAEA report, it is stated that there is a need to know the 233Pa(n, f) cross-section with an accuracy of 20%. The different evaluated neutron data libraries show, however, a difference of a factor of two for this cross-section. It has previously been deemed not feasible to measure this reaction directly due to its short half-life, high radioactivity and the in-growth of the daughter product 233U. Hence, the entries in the neutron libraries are based on theoretical predictions, which explains the large discrepancies. As reported recently the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233Pa has been measured for the first time directly with mono-energetic neutrons from 1.0 to 3.0 MeV at the Van-de-Graaff facility of the IRMM. In the meantime, during two further measurement campaigns, the energy range has been extended up to 8.5 MeV. The experimental results will be presented together with recent model calculations of the fission cross-section applying the statistical model code STATIS, which improve the cross-section evaluation up to the second chance fission threshold. (authors)

  9. Measurement of MA fission cross sections at YAYOI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkawachi, Yasushi; Ohki, Shigeo; Wakabayashi, Toshio [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    Fission cross section ratios of minor actinide nuclides (Am-241, Am-243) relative to U-235 in the fast neutron energy region have been measured using a back-to-back (BTB) fission chamber at YAYOI fast neutron source reactor. A small BTB fission chamber was developed to measure the fission cross section ratios in the center of the core at YAYOI reactor. Dependence of the fission cross section ratios on neutron spectra was investigated by changing the position of the detector in the reactor core. The measurement results were compared with the fission cross sections in the JENDL-3.2, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 libraries. It was found that calculated values of Am-241 using the JENDL-3.2, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 data are lower by about 15% than the measured value in the center of the core (the neutron average energy is 1.44E+6(eV)). And, good agreement can be seen the measured value and calculated value of Am-243 using the JENDL-3.2 data in the center of the core (the neutron average energy is 1.44E+6)(eV), but calculated values of Am-243 using the ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2.2 data are lower by 11% and 13% than the measured value. (author)

  10. Precision measurement of cross sections by isomer ratio method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of determining the cross sections of isomer states measuring the ratio of yields of ground and isomer states (or σm/σg cross section ratio) by γ spectroscopy methods is investigated. Isomer ratio (IR) for 185Re(γ, n)184mgRe, 181Ta(α, n)184mgRe, 82Se(γ, n)81mSe and 39K(γ, n)38mgK reactions are studied. The IR determination error makes up several per cents. 6 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Angular distribution effect on the integrated cross section for radiative capture of 14 MeV neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Cvelbar, F; Vidmar, T

    1999-01-01

    In the past, many reported integrated cross sections for the 14 MeV neutron radiative capture were measured at 90 deg. relative to the neutron beam direction and multiplied by 4 pi, so as to obtain a measure of the angle-integrated cross sections. In such a procedure, an isotropic angular distribution of gamma-rays is assumed. We calculated this distribution using the consistent direct-semi-direct model, in which the need for the model-free parameters has been eliminated. The result is that the a sub 1 Legendre polynomial, averaged over the bound state transitions, is practically zero (distribution is forward-backward symmetric) and that the a sub 2 coefficient is a smooth function of the mass number with the values between -0.4 and -0.6, indicating anisotropy of the distribution. Reported integrated cross sections are therefore for about 20% to 30% too high relative to the properly angle integrated cross sections.

  12. Measurement of antiproton-proton cross sections at low momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis describes an experiment which serves for the study of the antiproton-proton interaction at laboratory momenta between 150 MeV/c and 600 MeV/c. The arrangement permits the measurement of differential cross sections of the elastic scattering and the charge-exchange reaction as well as the cross section of the annihilation into charged and neutral pions. By the availability of an intense beam with low momentum uncertainty from the LEAR storage ring for low energy antiprotons at CERN a clear improvement of the measurement accuracy compared to earlier experiments at separated antiproton beams can be reached. A prototype of the antineutron calorimeter used for the measurement of the angular distribution of the charge-exchange reaction was subjected to a careful test in a separated beam. The results were compared with the results of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the antineutron detection. The cross sections measured in two beam periods in November and December 1983 are consistent with the published data in the hitherto available momentum range above about 350 MeV/c. Especially in the cross section of the annihilation into charged pions a statistically significant signal at a mass of 1937 MeV/c2 appears. However further measurements are necessary to study all systematic causes of errors. (orig.)

  13. Determination of Pb total photonuclear absorption cross section in the Δ resonance range by measurement of photoneutrons cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photonuclear absorption cross section of Pb, σ(TOT:Esub(γ), is studied in the 145-440 MeV Δ resonance range using a quasi-monochromatic photon beam obtained by monoenergetic positon in-flight annihilation. This study is deduced of the cross section measurement for at least j neutron emission σsup(j))Esub(γ). The cross sections of reactions with 1 or 0 neutron are evaluated as the same values as the experimental errors. The variation of the photonuclear absorption cross section for a nuclear σ(TOT:Esub(γ)/A is mass independent for A<=4-6. It seems that the damping between σ(TOT:Esub(γ)/A and the cross section of the free nucleon is caused by the Fermi movement of the nucleons. In conclusion: it seems that the excitation of the nucleus in the Δ resonance region is produced on free nucleons and there are no collective states

  14. Non-statistical effects in the radiative capture cross sections of the neodymium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of the stable neodymium isotopes have been measured with high energy resolution in the keV region at the 40 m station of ORELA. Average resonance parameters are extracted for s-wave resonances. Significant positive correlations are found between gamma-n-0 and gamma-gamma for all isotopes. The magnitude of the observed correlation coefficient, particularly for 142Nd (rho = 0.9), cannot be explained in terms of valence neutron capture and additional mechanisms are discussed. The average s-wave radiative widths for the odd-A isotopes are markedly greater than for the even-A isotopes, while the p-wave radiative width for 142Nd is considerably less than the s-wave width. (author)

  15. Measurement, calculation and evaluation of photon production cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting proceedings were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: Experimental measurement and techniques (3 papers), calculation of photon cross-sections (9 papers), and evaluation (2 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Single top cross section and properties measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Komm, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Single top quarks can be produced via the t, tW, and s channel. Studying these processes provides a test of the theory of electroweak interactions involving heavy quarks. Recent results on cross section and property measurements in pp collisions by the CMS collaboration at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV are reviewed.

  17. Thermal neutron capture cross sections resonance integrals and g-factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal radiative capture cross sections and resonance integrals of elements and isotopes with atomic numbers from 1 to 83 (as well as 232Th and 238U) have been re-evaluated by taking into consideration all known pertinent data published since 1979. This work has been undertaken as part of an IAEA co-ordinated research project on 'Prompt capture gamma-ray activation analysis'. Westcott g-factors for radiative capture cross sections at a temperature of 300K were computed by utilizing the INTER code and ENDF-B/VI (Release 8) library files. The temperature dependence of the Westcott g-factor is illustrated for 113Cd, 124Xe and 157Gd at temperatures of 150, 294 and 400K. Comparisons have also been made of the newly evaluated capture cross sections of 6Li, 7Li, 12C and 207Pb with those determined by the k0 method. (author)

  18. The neutron capture cross section of the ${s}$-process branch point isotope $^{63}$Ni

    CERN Multimedia

    Neutron capture nucleosynthesis in massive stars plays an important role in Galactic chemical evolution as well as for the analysis of abundance patterns in very old metal-poor halo stars. The so-called weak ${s}$-process component, which is responsible for most of the ${s}$ abundances between Fe and Sr, turned out to be very sensitive to the stellar neutron capture cross sections in this mass region and, in particular, of isotopes near the seed distribution around Fe. In this context, the unstable isotope $^{63}$Ni is of particular interest because it represents the first branching point in the reaction path of the ${s}$-process. We propose to measure this cross section at n_TOF from thermal energies up to 500 keV, covering the entire range of astrophysical interest. These data are needed to replace uncertain theoretical predicitons by first experimental information to understand the consequences of the $^{63}$Ni branching for the abundance pattern of the subsequent isotopes, especially for $^{63}$Cu and $^{...

  19. Measurement of inclusive jet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C; Andrieu, B; Anthonis, T; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Bähr, J; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Beglarian, A; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boudry, V; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Burrage, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Chekelian, V; Clarke, D; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Davidsson, M; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R A; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C A; Dingfelder, J; Dixon, P; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Ferron, S; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Grab, C; Grabskii, V; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Grindhammer, G; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Heinemann, B; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Hengstmann, S; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Hildebrandt, M; Hilgers, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A V; Ibbotson, M; Issever, C; Jacquet, M; Jaffré, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, C; Johnson, D P; Jones, M A S; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Karschnick, O; Katzy, J; Keil, F; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kiesling, C; Kjellberg, P; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Koutov, A; Kroseberg, J; Krüger, K; Kuhr, T; Lamb, D; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebailly, E; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Lobodzinski, B; Loginov, A; Loktionova, N A; Lubimov, V; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lytkin, L; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Mohrdieck, S; Mondragón, M N; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nix, O; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panassik, V; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Phillips, J P; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Potachnikova, I; Povh, B; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, Terence; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V N; Specka, A E; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Chechelnitskii, S; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Turney, J E; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vasilev, S; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vichnevski, A; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wiesand, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Wobisch, M; Woerling, E E; Wünsch, E; Wyatt, A C; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zomer, F; Zur Nedden, M

    2003-01-01

    Inclusive jet cross sections are measured in photoproduction at HERA using the H1 detector. The data sample of e+ p -> e+ + jet + X events in the kinematic range of photon virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 and photon-proton centre-of-mass energies 95 < W_gammap < 285 GeV represents an integrated luminosity of 24.1 pb^-1. Jets are defined using the inclusive k_T algorithm. Single- and multi-differential cross sections are measured as functions of jet transverse energy E_T^jet and pseudorapidity \\eta^jet in the domain 5 < E_T^jet < 75 GeV and -1 < \\eta^jet < 2.5. The cross sections are found to be in good agreement with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations corrected for fragmentation and underlying event effects. The cross section differential in E_T^jet, which varies by six orders of magnitude over the measured range, is compared with similar distributions from p pbar colliders at equal and higher energies.

  20. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  1. Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A careful new measurement of the 238U(n,γ) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4π calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF2 crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm2 depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

  2. Measurement of the 238U neutron-capture cross section and gamma-emission spectra from 10 eV to 100 keV using the DANCE detector at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, A J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keksis, A L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vieira, D J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, J M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jandel, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, R C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rundberg, R S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kawano, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chyzh, A [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Baramsai, B [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Wu, C Y [LLNL; Mitchell, G E [NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV; Becker, J A [LLNL; Krticka, M [CHARLES UNIV

    2010-01-01

    A careful new measurement of the {sup 238}U(n,{gamma}) cross section from 10 eV to 100 keV has been made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE. DANCE is a 4{pi} calorimetric scintillator array consisting of 160 BaF{sub 2} crystals. Measurements were made on a 48 mg/cm{sup 2} depleted uranium target. The cross sections are in general good agreement with previous measurements. The gamma-ray emission spectra, as a function of gamma multiplicity, were also measured and compared to model calculations.

  3. Mid-IR Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Alrefae, Majed Abdullah

    2013-05-01

    Laser diagnostics are fast-response, non-intrusive and species-specific tools perfectly applicable for studying combustion processes. Quantitative measurements of species concentration and temperature require spectroscopic data to be well-known at combustion-relevant conditions. Absorption cross-section is an important spectroscopic quantity and has direct relation to the species concentration. In this work, the absorption cross-sections of basic hydrocarbons are measured using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, tunable Difference Frequency Generation laser and fixed wavelength helium-neon laser. The studied species are methane, methanol, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, ethanol, propylene, propane, 1-butene, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, and n-heptane. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer is used for the measurements of the absorption cross-sections and the integrated band intensities of the 13 hydrocarbons. The spectral region of the spectra is 2800 – 3400 cm-1 (2.9 – 3.6 μm) and the temperature range is 673 – 1100 K. These valuable data provide huge opportunities to select interference-free wavelengths for measuring time-histories of a specific species in a shock tube or other combustion systems. Such measurements can allow developing/improving chemical kinetics mechanisms by experimentally determining reaction rates. The Difference Frequency Generation (DFG) laser is a narrow line-width, tunable laser in the 3.35 – 3.53 μm wavelength region which contains strong absorption features for most hydrocarbons due to the fundamental C-H vibrating stretch. The absorption cross-sections of propylene are measured at seven different wavelengths using the DFG laser. The temperature range is 296 – 460 K which is reached using a Reflex Cell. The DFG laser is very attractive for kinetic studies in the shock tube because of its fast time response and the potential possibility of making species-specific measurements. The Fixed wavelength

  4. Titanium-I: fast neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy averaged total neutron cross sections are measured from approximately 1.0 to 4.5 MeV with few percent statistical accuracies. Differential elastic neutron scattering angular distributions are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at incident neutron energy intervals of less than or equal to 0.2 MeV. Differential cross sections for the inelastic neutron excitation of ''states'' at 158 +- 26, 891 +- 8, 984 +- 15, 1428 +- 39, 1541 +- 30, 1670 +- 80, 2007 +- 8, 2304 +- 22, 2424 +- 16, and 2615 +- 10 keV are measured for incident neutron energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Additional ''states'' are observed at approximately 2845 and 3009 keV. An energy-averaged optical-statistical model is deduced from the measured values and the implications of its use in the context of the strong fluctuating structure is discussed

  5. C+C Fusion Cross Sections Measurements for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaraz-Calderon S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total fusion cross section of carbon isotopes were obtained using the newly developed MUSIC detector. MUSIC is a highly efficient, active target-detector system designed to measure fusion excitation functions with radioactive beams. The present measurements are relevant for understanding x-ray superbursts. The results of the first MUSIC campaign as well as the astrophysical implications are presented in this work.

  6. Measurement of Charmonium Production Cross Section at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Frosini, M

    2010-01-01

    The great abundance of charmonium states, collected from the start up of LHC, allows to study its production mechanism. In particular the total and differential $J/\\psi$ production cross section are measured in the transverse momentum range [0;10] GeV/$c$ and in the pseudorapidity range $y \\in$ [2.5;4]. The measurements are performed disentagling the prompt (direct production in $pp$ collisions and feed down from excited charmonium states) and delayed ($b$-hadron decays products) component.

  7. Inclusive jet cross-section measurement at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2007-05-01

    The CDF Collaboration has measured the inclusive jet cross section using 1992-93 collider data at 1.8 TeV. The CDF measurement is in very good agreement with NLO QCD predictions for transverse energies (E{sub T}) below 200 GeV. However, it is systematically higher than NLO QCD predictions for E{sub T} above 200 GeV.

  8. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of U{sup 234} in n-TOF at CERN for Generation IV nuclear reactors; Mesure de la section efficace de capture neutronique de l'{sup 234}U a n-TOF au CERN pour les reacteurs nucleaires de generation 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dridi, W

    2006-11-15

    Accurate and reliable neutron capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. In particular, the accurate knowledge of U{sup 234}(n,{gamma}) reaction cross section is required for the design and realization of nuclear power plants based on the thorium fuel cycle. We have measured the neutron capture cross section of U{sup 234}, with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} Total Absorption Calorimeter, at the recently constructed neutron time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN in the energy range from 0.03 eV to 1 MeV. Monte-Carlo simulations with GEANT4 and MCNPX of the detector response have been performed. After the background subtraction and correction with dead time and pile-up, the capture yield from 0.03 eV up to 1.5 keV was derived. The analysis of the capture yield in terms of R-matrix resonance parameters is discussed. We have identified 123 resonances and measured the resonance parameters in the energy range from 0.03 eV to 1.5 keV. The mean radiative width <{gamma}{sub {gamma}}> is found to be (38.2 {+-} 1.5) meV and the mean spacing parameter is (11.0 {+-} 0.2) eV, both values agree well with recommended values.

  9. Theoretical neutron-capture cross sections for r-process nucleosynthesis in the $^{48}$Ca region

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T; Kratz, K -L; Balogh, W; Oberhummer, H

    2015-01-01

    We calculate neutron capture cross sections for r-process nucleosynthesis in the $^{48}$Ca region, namely for the isotopes $^{40-44}$S, $^{46-50}$Ar, $^{56-66}$Ti, $^{62-68}$Cr, and $^{72-76}$Fe. While previously only cross sections resulting from the compound nucleus reaction mechanism (Hauser-Feshbach) have been considered, we recalculate not only that contribution to the cross section but also include direct capture on even-even nuclei. The level schemes, which are of utmost importance in the direct capture calculations, are taken from quasi-particle states obtained with a folded-Yukawa potential and Lipkin-Nogami pairing. Most recent deformation values derived from experimental data on $\\beta$-decay half lives are used where available. Due to the consideration of direct capture, the capture rates are enhanced and the "turning points" in the r-process path are shifted to slightly higher mass numbers. We also discuss the sensitivity of the direct capture cross sections on the assumed deformation.

  10. Preliminary study of the α ratio measurement, ratio of the neutron capture cross section to the fission one for 233U, on the PEREN platform. Development and study of the experimental setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Producing nuclear energy in order to reduce anthropic CO2 emission and to meet high energy demand, implies three conditions to the nuclear plants of the IV. generation: safety improvements, radioactive waste minimization, and fuel breeding for a sustainable use of the resources. The Thorium fuel cycle used in Molten Salt Reactors seems promising. Many numerical studies based on probabilistic codes are carried out in order to analyse the behaviour of such reactors. Nevertheless, one of the most important parameters is badly known: the alpha ratio of 233U, ratio of the neutron capture cross section to fission one for 233U. This key-parameter is necessary to calculate the breeding ratio and thus, the deployment capacities of those reactors. This Ph-D thesis was intended to prepare a precise measurement of the alpha ratio of 233U between 1 eV and 10 keV. Preliminary measurements have been performed on the experimental platform PEREN. This experimental environment is composed of a lead slowing-down time spectrometer associated with an intense pulsed neutron generator. Capture and fission rates are measured thanks to eight scintillators with their photomultipliers, surrounding a fission chamber. A software analysis sets the coincidence rate between the scintillators. In order to understand perfectly the experimental setup, preliminary tests using a 235U fission chamber have been done. This experiment resulted in a very low signal to background ratio (1 %). The background coming from the scintillators themselves seriously handicapped the measurement. Another series of experiment has been done with scintillators 5 times thinner. Nevertheless, the signal to background ratio should still be increased to measure the capture of 235U. To make sure that the experimental setup has totally been understood, we made many comparisons between experimental results and simulations. Two simulation codes were mainly used: MCNP and GEANT4. We paid special attention to quantify the

  11. Measured and evaluated neutron cross sections of elemental bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron total cross sections of elemental bismuth are measured with broad resolution from 1.2 to 4.5 MeV to accuracies of approx. = 1%. Neutron-differential-elastic-scattering cross sections of bismuth are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at incident neutron energy intervals of approx.< 0.2 MeV over the scattered-neutron angular range approx. = 20 to 160 deg. Differential neutron cross sections for the excitation of observed states in bismuth at 895 +- 12, 1606 +- 14, 2590 +- 15, 2762 +- 29, 3022 +- 21, and 3144 +- 15 keV are determined at incident neutron energies up to 4.0 MeV. An optical-statistical model is deduced from the measured values. This model, the present experimental results, and information available elsewhere in the literature are used to construct a comprehensive evaluated nuclear data file for elemental bismuth in the ENDF format. The evaluated file is particularly suited to the neutronic needs of the fusion-fission hybrid designer. 87 references, 10 figures, 6 tables

  12. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed

  13. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (ria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyer, M. A.; Moody, K. J.; Wild, J. F.; Patin, J. B.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Stoyer, N. J.; Harris, L. J.

    2003-10-01

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  14. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, M A; Moody, K J; Wild, J F; Patin, J B; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, N J; Harris, L J

    2002-11-19

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  15. Fully hadronic ttbar cross section measurement with ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bertella, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The top quark pair production cross section in the fully hadronic final state is characterized by a six jet topology, two of which could be identified as originating from a b-quark using ATLAS b-tagging algorithms. Compared to other decay channels, this final state presents an advantageous larger branching ratio; on the other hand it suffers from a very large QCD multi-jet background, generally difficult to estimate from Monte Carlo simulation and therefore evaluated using data-driven techniques. It is essential, to efficiently trigger on these fully hadronic ttbar events, to use dedicated triggers. An overview of the analysis for ttbar production cross section measurement in the fully hadronic final state and the state-of-the-art of the b-jet trigger performance estimation are presented in this contribution.

  16. Measurement of the cross-sections of radioactive Ba isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive Ba isotopes are produced in the interaction of 60 MeV/u 18O with 232Th. Ba is separated from thorium and complex reaction product mixture by BaCl2 precipitation and purified. 133Ba is used as the tracer to determine chemical yield of Ba. The Ba fraction is measured by off-line gamma-ray spectroscopy. The formation cross-sections of the individual Ba isotope is calculated from the intensities of gamma-ray peaks of each Ba isotope as well as relative nuclear data. The results show the n-deficient Ba isotopes still have higher formation cross-sections under the conditions of intermediate energy projectile and thick targets

  17. Fully hadronic ttbar cross section measurement with ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bertella, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The top quark pair production cross section in the fully hadronic final state is characterized by a six jet topology, two of which could be identified as originating from a b-quark using ATLAS b-tagging algorithms. Compared to other decay channels, this final state presents an advantageous larger branching ratio; on the other hand it suffers from a very large QCD multi-jet background, generally difficult to estimate from Monte Carlo simulation and therefore evaluated using data-driven techniques. The analysis is performed using 36pb-1 of pp collisions produced at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The observed upper limit is set at 261 pb at 95% confidence level, where the expected Standard Model cross-section for the ttbar process is 165+11-16 pb. In the future, when the LHC luminosity increases, it is essential, to efficiently trigger on these fully hadronic ttbar events, to use dedicated triggers. An overview of the analysis for ttbar production cross section measurement in the fully hadronic f...

  18. New measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ cross section at n_TOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerendegui-Marco J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of MOX fuel (mixed-oxide fuel made of UO2 and PuO2 in nuclear reactors allows substituting a large fraction of the enriched Uranium by Plutonium reprocessed from spent fuel. With the use of such new fuel composition rich in Pu, a better knowledge of the capture and fission cross sections of the Pu isotopes becomes very important. In particular, a new series of cross section evaluations have been recently carried out jointly by the European (JEFF and United States (ENDF nuclear data agencies. For the case of 242Pu, the two only neutron capture time-of-flight measurements available, from 1973 and 1976, are not consistent with each other, which calls for a new time-of flight capture cross section measurement. In order to contribute to a new evaluation, we have perfomed a neutron capture cross section measurement at the n_TOF-EAR1 facility at CERN using four C6D6 detectors, using a high purity target of 95 mg. The preliminary results assessing the quality and limitations (background, statistics and γ-flash effects of this new experimental data are presented and discussed, taking into account that the aimed accuracy of the measurement ranges between 7% and 12% depending on the neutron energy region.

  19. Radiochemical determination of the neutron capture cross sections of {sup 241}Am irradiated in the JMTR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, N.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Hata, K.; Kohno, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross section {sigma}{sub 0} and Resonance integral I{sub 0} of {sup 241}Am leading to the production of {sup 242m}Am and {sup 242g}Am were measured by radiochemical method. The cross sections obtained in this study are {sigma}{sub 0}=60.9 {+-} 2.6 barn, I{sub 0}=213 {+-} 13 barn for {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}){sup 242m}Am and {sigma}{sub 0}=736 {+-} 31 barn, I{sub 0}=1684 {+-} 92 barn for {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}){sup 242g}Am. (author)

  20. Neutron Induced Capture Cross Sections for Ir-191 and Ir-193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Lee, Young Ouk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The neutron induced cross sections are calculated on Ir- 191 and Ir-193 from 10 keV up to 20 MeV, on (n, tot), (n, n), (n, n'), (n, {gamma}), (n, p), (n, {alpha}), (n, 2n), (n, 3n), (n, np) and (n, n{alpha}) reactions. Iridium emits intense gamma rays. Specially, Ir-192 is the major gamma ray source material and widely used in the several areas: material assay, nondestructive testing and medical treatment. For the purpose of the above utilization, Ir-192 is mainly produced in the isotopic production nuclear reactor by the neutron capture process from Ir-191. Using threshold reaction with high energy of neutron, Ir-192 can be produced from Ir-194 by the process of the neutron capture and decay as well. Ir- 191 and Ir-193 have 37.3 % and 62.7 % respectively in the natural abundance. Ir-191 and 193 are stable isotopes. Ir-192 has 73.8 days half-life at ground state and 1.45 months at 56.7 keV meta stable state. Ir-192 has the beta decay to produce Pt-192 and the electron capture to produce Os-192. The major emitted gamma rays are 604 keV, 316 keV and 468 keV from the ground state decay. ENDF/B-VI has fairly recent evaluation on Ir-191 and Ir-193, evaluated in 1995 and distributed in 1997 (by R.Q.Wright, ORNL). From 2 to 20 MeV, the capture data was obtained by renormalizing the natural iridium capture to the Macklin data of Ir-191 at 2 MeV energy. ENDF/B-VI has the (n, 2n), (n, 3n), (n, p) and (n, a) cross section data unchanged from the BROND natural iridium evaluation. The evaluations consisted of an optical model potential search followed by a complete nuclear reaction model calculation and a validation for the experimental data. Nuclear reaction cross sections were calculated using the recently released Empire-II code. The direct capture model enhances the capture cross section in the preequilibrium energy region, and the width fluctuation correction influences on the capture and inelastic scattering cross sections in the equilibrium energy region. The

  1. Photoneutron cross sections measured by Saclay and Livermore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differences between the Saclay and Livermore photoneutron cross sections are discussed. It is shown that the differences between Saclay and Livermore (γ,n) and (γ,2n) cross sections arise from the neutron multiplicity sorting. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Covariances on 99Tc and 129I in the keV Energy Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Neutron capture cross sections and covariances on radioactive 99Tc and 129I have been required for developing environmental load-reducing technology. Their evaluation was performed by using nuclear reaction calculation code CCONE and Baysian code KALMAN with data assumed on the basis of measured data. The obtained total and capture cross sections are in good agreement with the measured data. The resulting uncertainties of capture cross section were 12-18% and 20-29% for 99Tc and 129I, respectively, in the keV energy region.

  3. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C e {sup 17}O with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays; Medidas das secoes de choque de fotoneutrons do {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C e {sup 17}O com radiacao gama de captura de neutrons termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Renato

    2006-07-01

    Photoneutron cross sections measurements of {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O have been obtained in the energy interval between 1,6 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 a 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (5 MW) research reactor. The samples have been irradiated inside a 4{pi} geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm{sup 3}, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A inversion matrix methodology to solve inversion problems for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, was used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma line energies of the capture targets). The cross sections obtained at the energy values of the principal gamma lines were compared with experimental data reported by other authors, with have employed different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed among the experimental data in this work with reported in the literature. (author)

  4. Neutron capture cross sections of the krypton isotopes and the s-process branching at 79Se

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The input data for an analysis of the s-process branching at 79Se have been significantly improved. The neutron capture cross sections for the stable krypton isotopes (except 86Kr) were measured between 3 and 240 keV neutron energy. In addition, statistical model calculations of the (n,γ)-cross sections for all isotopes involved in this branching were performed. With these data and with other experimental results from literature a recommended set of Maxwellian average cross sections was established in the mass region 77< A<85. The relevant decay parameters of the involved unstable nuclei and the parameters for the s-process model are discussed as well. On this basis the following aspects are investigated: the temperature during s-process, the decomposition into s- and r-process contributions and the solar krypton abundance. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of Beauty Particle Lifetimes and Hadroproduction Cross-Section

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose an experimental search for beauty particles produced in fixed target hadronic interactions. The essential feature of the proposed experimental technique is the use of two specially designed pieces of hardware~-~a high precision ``decay detector'' and a fast secondary vertex trigger processor. If these devices perform to our expectations, we should be able to obtain sufficient data sample to address several important physics issues, including measurements of the lifetimes of charged and neutral B~mesons, the B~hadroproduction cross-section, and possibly B$^0$- $ \\bar{B} ^0 $ mixing.

  6. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a 6 He nuclear radioactive beam (β emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction 6 + 209 Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  7. Neutron cross section measurements for graphites and polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total neutron cross sections at 0,05 eV were determined for national, american, japanese and french graphites with the neutron crystal spectrometer installed at the Argonaut reactor of the IEN-CNEN-RJ. It is defined a boron equivalent for each graphite sample. In order that the dynamics and structural properties of calcined Bakelites could be determined, neutron frequency spectra and scattering laws were measured with the neutron time-of-flight and beryllium arrangement at IEA-R1 reactor of the IPEN-CNEN-SP. (author)

  8. Neutron Cross Sections Measurements for Light Elements at ORELA and their Application in Nuclear Criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to measure neutron total and capture cross sections of aluminium, natural chlorine and silicon in the energy range from 100 eV to ∼600 keV. ORELA is the only high power white neutron source with excellent time resolution and ideally suited for these experiments still operating in the USA. These measurements were carried out to support the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program. Concerns about the use of existing cross section data in the nuclear criticality calculations using Monte Carlo codes and benchmarks have been a prime motivator for the new cross section measurements. More accurate nuclear data are not only needed for these calculations but also serve as input parameters for s-process stellar models

  9. Measurement of the neutron capture cross section of the fissile isotope $^{235}$U with the CERN n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter and a fission tagging based on micromegas detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mendoza, E; Cano-Ott, D; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Becvár, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kawano, T; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krticka, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lampoudis, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Stetcu, I; Sabaté, M; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T; Zugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Actual and future nuclear technologies require more accurate nuclear data on the (n, $\\gamma$) cross sections and $\\alpha$-ratios of fissile isotopes. Their measurement presents several difficulties, mainly related to the strong fission $\\gamma$-ray background competing with the weaker $\\gamma$-ray cascades used as the experimental signature of the (n, $\\gamma$) process. A specific setup has been used at the CERN n_TOF facility in 2012 for the measurement of the (n,$\\gamma$ ) cross section and $\\alpha$- ratios of fissile isotopes and used for the case of the $^{235}$U isotope. The setup consists in a set of micromegas fission detectors surrounding $^{235}$U samples and placed inside the segmented BaF$_2$ Total Absorption Calorimeter.

  10. Measurement of the Neutron Capture Cross Section of the Fissile Isotope 235U with the CERN n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter and a Fission Tagging Based on Micromegas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Balibrea, J; Cano-Ott, D; Guerrero, C; Berthoumieux, E; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kawano, T; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lampoudis, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Massimi, C; Meaze, M; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Stetcu, I; Sabaté, M; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    Current and future nuclear technologies require more accurate nuclear data on (n,γ) cross sections and the α-ratios of fissile isotopes. Their measurement presents several difficulties, mainly related to the strong fission γ-ray background competing with the weaker γ-ray cascades used as the experimental signature of the (n,γ) process. A specific setup was used at the CERN n_TOF facility in 2012 for the measurement of the (n,γ) cross section and α-ratios of fissile isotopes and used for the case of the 235U isotope. The setup consists of a set of micromegas fission detectors surrounding the 235U samples all placed inside a segmented BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter.

  11. A measurement of the Z cross-section at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Keaveney, James Michael

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, recorded 37.66 pb$^{-1}$ of 7 TeV proton collision data in 2010. In this thesis, the total cross section and the differential cross section as a function of boson rapidity of the Z $\\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ process are measured using 16.5 pb$^{-1}$ of this data. The precise testing of the Standard Model and reduction of uncertainty on Parton Distribution Functions constitute the primary motivations of these measurements. A scheme to select Z $\\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays has been developed and was justified using simulation. The application of this scheme to the data yielded 830 candidates for the signal process. The events were used to estimate tracking, muon identification and trigger efficiencies with an overall efficiency of 0.71 $\\pm$ 0.04. Three main background sources have been identified: the semi-leptonic decays of beauty and charm quarks, the Z $\\to \\tau^+ \\tau^-$ process where both tau leptons decay to muons and the mis-identifi...

  12. Cross section measurements of fast neutrons with isotopes of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross section were measured for the reactions 196Hg(n,2n)195Hgmg, 198Hg(n,2n)197Hgmg, 204Hg(n,2n)203Hg, 198Hg(n,p)198Aug and 199Hg(n,p)199Au over the neutron energy range of 7.6 - 12.5 MeV. Quasi monoenergetic neutrons were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction using a deuterium gas target at the Julich variable energy compact cyclotron CV 28. Use was made of the activation technique in combination with high-resolution HPGe-detector gamma ray spectroscopy. All the data were measured for the first time over the investigated energy range. The transition from the present low- energy data to the literature data around 14 MeV is generally good. Nuclear model calculations using the codes STAPRE and EMPIRE-2.19 which employ the statistical and precompound model formalisms were undertaken to describe the formation of both the isomeric and ground states of the products. The total reaction cross section of a particular channel is reproduced fairly well by the model calculations, with STAPRE giving slightly better results

  13. Micromegas detector for $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section measurement at n_TOF

    CERN Multimedia

    The present proposal is a consequence of the successful tests performed in 2011 related to the Letter of Intent CERN-INTC-2010-023/I-092. The main goal of this proposal is a first (n,$\\alpha$) cross section measurement with the Micromegas detector presently running at n_TOF for monitoring purposes and fission cross section measurements. The $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section is of interest in astrophysics mainly due to the origin of $^{36}$S which is still an open question. $^{33}$S is also of interest in medical physics since it has been proposed as a possible/alternative cooperating target to boron neutron capture therapy. Important discrepancies between previous measurements of $^{33}$S(n,$\\alpha$) cross section and especially between the resonance parameters are found in the literature. We propose to measure the (n,$\\alpha$) cross section of the stable isotope $^{33}$S in the energy range up to 300 keV covering the astrophysical range of interest. The possibility of increasing this energy range will be st...

  14. Proton capture cross sections on neutron-magic 144Sm at astrophysically relevant energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, N.; Hayashi, K.; Ueno, S.; Yatsu, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Takahashi, N.

    2016-02-01

    Background: The p nuclei, which are not produced by neutron capture processes, are present with a typical isotopic abundance of 0.01%-0.3%. Abundance decreases with an increase in atomic number. However, the neutron-magic isotopes of 92Mo and 144Sm exhibit unusually large abundances in comparison. A combination of proton and α -particle capture reactions and neutron emission reactions are key to understanding this issue. Currently, complex network calculations do not have access to much experimental data, and hence require theoretically predicted reaction rates in order to estimate final abundances produced in nucleosynthesis. Purpose: Few experimental cross sections of (p ,γ) reactions on heavy nuclides with mass numbers of 130-150 have been reported. The 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu reaction is the main destruction pathway for the nucleosynthesis of the 144Sm nuclide. In the present paper, experimental cross sections of the 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu reaction at a range including astrophysically relevant energies for the p process were determined to compare with theoretical predictions using the Hauser-Feshback statistical model. Methods: The 144Sm was deposited on a high-purity Al foil with the molecular plating method. Stacks consisting of Ta degrader foils, 144Sm targets, and Cu foils used as flux monitors were irradiated with 14.0-MeV proton beams. The 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu cross sections were determined from the 145Eu activities and the proton fluence estimated from the 65Zn activity in the Cu monitor foil. The proton energies bombarded on each 144Sm target were estimated using srim2013. Results: We determined the 144Sm(p ,γ )145Eu cross sections at proton energies between 2.8 and 7.6 MeV. These energies encompass nucleosynthesis temperatures between 3 and 5 GK. The cross sections at energies higher than 3.8 MeV agreed well with theoretically predicted cross sections using talys using the generalized superfluid (GS) model for level densities. However, calculations using non

  15. Optimising neutron polarisers--measuring a single cross-section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, D.J.; Cussen, L.D. E-mail: lcu@ansto.gov.au

    2002-09-01

    This article is part of a series of works exploring the optimisation of neutron polarisation analysis measurements. It deals with measurements of individual spin flip and non-spin flip neutron scattering cross-sections. An instrumental quality factor is presented. The optimum effective thickness for gaseous spin polarised {sup 3}He transmission filters is derived and presented. Cu{sub 2}MnAl Heusler alloy polarising monochromators and supermirror devices are considered using the quality factor. Absolute comparisons are made between these different types of polarisers. The effect of instrumental background is calculated for a wide range of experimental situations. Even very small backgrounds can have a very large effect on the quality of measurements achievable indicating that great attention must be paid to background reduction on polarisation analysis instruments.

  16. Optimising neutron polarisers--measuring a single cross-section

    CERN Document Server

    Goossens, D J

    2002-01-01

    This article is part of a series of works exploring the optimisation of neutron polarisation analysis measurements. It deals with measurements of individual spin flip and non-spin flip neutron scattering cross-sections. An instrumental quality factor is presented. The optimum effective thickness for gaseous spin polarised sup 3 He transmission filters is derived and presented. Cu sub 2 MnAl Heusler alloy polarising monochromators and supermirror devices are considered using the quality factor. Absolute comparisons are made between these different types of polarisers. The effect of instrumental background is calculated for a wide range of experimental situations. Even very small backgrounds can have a very large effect on the quality of measurements achievable indicating that great attention must be paid to background reduction on polarisation analysis instruments.

  17. The effects of ablation on the cross section of planetary envelopes at capturing planetesimals

    OpenAIRE

    Benvenuto, Omar Gustavo; Brunini, Adrián

    2008-01-01

    We explore the cross section of giant planet envelopes at capturing planetesimals of different sizes. For this purpose we employ two sets of realistic planetary envelope models (computed assuming for the protoplanetary nebula masses of 10 and 5 times the mass of the minimum mass solar nebula), account for drag and ablation effects and study the trajectories along which planetesimals move. The core accretion of these models has been computed in the oligarchic growth regime [Fortier, A., Benven...

  18. Neutron-capture cross sections of the tungsten isotopes 182W, 183W, 184W, and 186W from 2.6 to 2000 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron-capture cross sections of four stable tungsten isotopes were measured as a function of energy by time of flight at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. The resolution achieved, ΔE/E about 1/750 FWHM, has allowed the analysis of several hundred resonance peaks at energies a few kiloelectron volts above the neutron-binding energy. Strength functions were fitted to the average cross sections up to about 100 keV, and average cross sections were extended with less precision from 100 to 2000 keV. The capture cross section of natural tungsten was calculated from measurements for individual isotopes. Compound nucleus calculations have been made with deformed optical model parameters for comparison with experimental cross sections

  19. Measurements of interaction cross sections and radii of He isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary beams of 3He,4He,6He, and 8He were produced through the projectile fragmentation of 800MeV/nucleon 11B primary. Interaction cross sections(σ sub(I)) of all He isotopes on Be, C, and Al targets were measured by a transmission-type experiment. The interaction radii of He isotopes, R(He)=√σ sub(I)/π-R(T) where R(T) is of the target nucleus, have been deduced from the present σ sub(I) and the known σ sub(I) of 4He+4He and 12C+12C reactions; R(3He)=1.59+-0.06, R(4He)=1.40+-0.05, R(6He)=2.21+-0.06, and R(8He)=2.52+-0.06 in fm. (author)

  20. Measurements and analysis of the {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I neutron capture and total cross sections; Mesure et analyses des sections efficaces neutroniques totales et de capture radiative des iodes 127 et 129 de 0.5 eV a 100keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguere, G

    2005-07-01

    Most of the experimental work on the interaction of neutrons with matter has focused on materials important to reactor physics and reactor structures. By comparison, the corresponding data for minor actinides or long-lived fission products are poor. A significant demand has developed for improved neutron cross-section data of these little-studied nuclides due to the surge of interest in the transmutation of nuclear waste. With 400 kg of {sup 129}I produced yearly in the reactors of the EU countries and a very long {beta}{sup -} half-life of 1.57 x 10{sup 7} years, iodine requires disposal strategies that will isolate this isotope from the environment for long periods of time. Therefore, {sup 129}I is potentially a key long-lived fission product for transmutation applications, since {sup 129}I transmutes in {sup 130}I after a single neutron capture and decays to {sup 130}Xe with a 12.36 h half-life. Accurate capture cross sections would help to reduce uncertainties in waste management concepts. For that purpose, Time-Of-Flight measurements covering the [0.5 eV-100 keV] energy range have been carried out at the 150 MeV pulsed neutron source GELINA of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). Two types of experiments have been performed at the IRMM, namely capture and transmission experiments. They are respectively related to the neutron capture and total cross sections. Since the PbI{sub 2} samples used in this work contain natural and radioactive iodine, extensive measurements of {sup 129}I have been carried out under the same experimental conditions as for the {sup 129}I. The data reduction process was performed with the AGS system, and the resonance parameters were extracted with the SAMMY and REFIT shape analysis codes. In a last step, the parameters have been converted into ENDF-6 format and processed with the NJOY code to produce point-wise and multigroup cross sections, as well as MCNP and ERANOS libraries. (author)

  1. Study of the surrogate-reaction method applied to neutron-induced capture cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutoux, G. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Jurado, B., E-mail: jurado@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Meot, V.; Roig, O. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mathieu, L.; Aieche, M.; Barreau, G.; Capellan, N.; Companis, I.; Czajkowski, S.; Schmidt, K.-H. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Burke, J.T. [LLNL, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bail, A.; Daugas, J.M.; Faul, T.; Morel, P.; Pillet, N.; Theroine, C. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Derkx, X. [GANIL, 14076 Caen (France); Serot, O. [CEA-Cadarache, DEN/DER/SPRC/LEPh, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); and others

    2012-06-12

    Gamma-decay probabilities of {sup 173}Yb and {sup 176}Lu have been measured using the surrogate reactions {sup 174}Yb({sup 3}He,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 173}Yb* and {sup 174}Yb({sup 3}He,p{gamma}){sup 176}Lu*, respectively. For the first time, the gamma-decay probabilities have been obtained with two independent experimental methods based on the use of C{sub 6}D{sub 6} scintillators and Germanium detectors. Our results for the radiative-capture cross sections are several times higher than the corresponding neutron-induced data. To explain these differences, we have used our gamma-decay probabilities to extract rather direct information on the spin distributions populated in the transfer reactions used. They are about two times wider and the mean values are 3 to 4 Planck-Constant-Over-Two-Pi higher than the ones populated in the neutron-induced reactions. As a consequence, in the transfer reactions neutron emission to the ground and first excited states of the residual nucleus is strongly suppressed and gamma-decay is considerably enhanced.

  2. Study of the surrogate-reaction method applied to neutron-induced capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-decay probabilities of 173Yb and 176Lu have been measured using the surrogate reactions 174Yb(3He,αγ)173Yb* and 174Yb(3He,pγ)176Lu*, respectively. For the first time, the gamma-decay probabilities have been obtained with two independent experimental methods based on the use of C6D6 scintillators and Germanium detectors. Our results for the radiative-capture cross sections are several times higher than the corresponding neutron-induced data. To explain these differences, we have used our gamma-decay probabilities to extract rather direct information on the spin distributions populated in the transfer reactions used. They are about two times wider and the mean values are 3 to 4 ℏ higher than the ones populated in the neutron-induced reactions. As a consequence, in the transfer reactions neutron emission to the ground and first excited states of the residual nucleus is strongly suppressed and gamma-decay is considerably enhanced.

  3. The capture cross sections of the neon isotopes and the s-process neutron balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of the three stable neon isotopes have been measured by the time-of-flight method in the energy range from 5 to 200 keV, using hydrogen free fast liquid scintillator detectors and the Maier-Leibnitz pulse height weighting technique. As a result it was found that neutron absorption by the light elements, from 20Ne to 56Fe, is dominated not by 22Ne but by 25Mg. The condition that as many neutrons should be produced as are absorbed has led to the conclusion that at least 80% of the 22Ne must undergo the (α,n) reaction, which implies that less than 20% can undergo the (α,γ) reaction. Therefore the (α,n) reaction rate must be at least 4 times faster than the (α,γ) rate. An inspection of these reaction rates as a function of temperature shows that this condition can be satisfied only for T > 3.2 108 K, or kT > 28 keV. (orig./HSI)

  4. A CVD diamond detector for (n,α) cross-section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel detector based on the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond technology has been developed in the framework of this PhD, for the experimental determination of (n,α) cross-sections at the neutron time-of-flight facility n⎽TOF at CERN. The 59Ni(n,α)56Fe cross-section, which is relevant for astrophysical questions as well as for risk-assessment studies in nuclear technology, has been measured in order to validate the applicability of the detector for such experiments. The thesis is divided in four parts. In the introductory part the motivation for measuring (n,α) cross-sections, the experimental challenges for such measurements and the reasons for choosing the CVD diamond technology for the detector are given. This is followed by the presentation of the n⎽TOF facility, an introduction to neutron-induced nuclear reactions and a brief summary of the interaction of particles with matter. The CVD diamond technology and the relevant matters related to electronics are given as well in this first part of the thesis. The second part is dedicated to the design and production of the Diamond Mosaic-Detector (DM-D) and its characterization. The 59Ni(n,α)56Fe cross-section measurement at n⎽TOF and the data analysis are discussed in detail in the third part of the thesis, before the summary of the thesis and an outlook to possible future developments and applications conclude the thesis in the forth part. In this work, the Diamond Mosaic-Detector, which consist of eight single-crystal (sCVD) diamond sensors and one 'Diamond on Iridium' (DOI) sensor has proven to be well suited for (n,α) cross-section measurements for 1 MeV < Eα < 22 MeV. The upper limit is given by the thickness of the sensors, d = 150 μm, while the lower limit is dictated by background induced by neutron capture reactions in in-beam materials. The cross-section measurement was focussed on the resonance integral of 59Ni(n,α)56Fe at En = 203 eV, with the aim of clarifying the

  5. Neutron capture cross sections of /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu from 3 to 2200 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture by enriched stable isotopes of europium was measured as a function of energy by time of flight at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelertor. Deformed optical model and reaction theory calculations using the published total cross section for natural europium and low-energy resonance parameters were made to compare with the present data. Maxwellian average capture at kT = 30 keV was calculated as (3.40 +- 0.14) b for /sup 151/Eu and (2.48 +- 0.10) b for /sup 153/Eu

  6. Capture cross section and gamma-ray spectrum calculations for medium-weight nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-peak, energy-dependent Breit-Wigner model of the E1 gamma-ray strength function was applied to nuclei from As to Rh, to predict their neutron capture cross sections and capture gamma-ray spectra. A consistent set of model parameters was obtained in this mass region to describe the step in the low-energy tail of the E1 strength function. This step allows agreement with photonuclear data at high energies, the correct GAMMA/sub gamma/ to be obtained for agreement with neutron capture cross-section data, and the calculation of the observed hardness in the capture gamma-ray spectra. For nuclei at or near the closed, N = 50 shell, however, the double-peak assumption breaks down. In these cases, good results are still obtained if the same set of model parameters is applied, except that the E1 strength function is formulated in terms of the first, narrower peak. 8 figures

  7. Surrogate ratio methodology for the indirect determination of neutron capture cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative γ-decay probabilities of the 162Dy to 161Dy and 162Dy to 164Dy residual nuclei, produced using light-ion-induced direct reactions, were measured as a function of excitation energy using the CACTUS array at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The external surrogate ratio method (SRM) was used to convert these relative γ-decay probabilities into the 161Dy(n,γ) cross section in an equivalent neutron energy range of 130-560 keV. The directly measured 161Dy(n,γ) cross section, obtained from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF/B-VII.0), was compared to the experimentally determined surrogate 161Dy(n,γ) cross section obtained using compound-nucleus pairs with both similar (162Dy to 164Dy) and dissimilar (162Dy to 161Dy) nuclear structures. A γ-ray energy threshold was identified, based upon pairing gap parameters, that provides a first-order correction to the statistical γ-ray tagging approach and improves the agreement between the surrogate cross-section data and the evaluated result.

  8. Measurements of the gravitational collision cross section of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has long been recognized that the evolution of high concentrations of aerosols is strongly influenced by coagulation due to settling (gravitational coagulation). It has also been known that the models currently in use for this process are based on simple estimations and lack a firm theoretical/experimental basis. The problem of gravitational coagulation has, however, been studied extensively, theoretically, and recently, expressions useful in large computer programs have also become available. Experimental studies of the gravitational coagulation, however, have been based either on similitude (steel/aluminum spheres in glycerine) or integral experiments, and these do not provide the correct basis for verification of the theoretical results. The authors have therefore carried out new experimental measurements of the gravitational collision cross section by using an electrodynamic balance. An aerosol particle is suspended in the balance, a measured stream of monodisperse particles flows over the particle, and the increase is measured in the suspended particle size in a given time interval by using the drag force and instability method

  9. Neutron Capture Cross Sections of Zr and La: Probing Neutron Exposure and Neutron Flux in Red Giant Stars

    CERN Multimedia

    Kitis, G; Wiescher, M; Dahlfors, M; Soares, J

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the neutron capture cross sections of $^{139}$La, of $^{93}$Zr (t$_{1/2}$)=1.5 10$^{6}$ yr), and of all the stable Zr isotopes at n_TOF. The aim of these measurements is to improve the accuracy of existing results by at least a factor of three in order to meet the quality required for using the s-process nucleosynthesis as a diagnostic tool for neutron exposure and neutron flux during the He burning stages of stellar evolution. Combining these results with a wealth of recent information coming from high-resolution stellar spectroscopy and from the detailed analysis of presolar dust grains will shed new light on the chemical history of the universe. The investigated cross sections are also needed for technological applications, in particular since $^{93}$Zr is one of the major long-lived fission products.

  10. Measurement of molecular stopping cross sections of vaporous sulfur compounds and calculation of the atomic stopping cross section of sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular stopping cross sections of hydrogen sulfide, methyl sulfide, methyl disulfide, carbon disulfide, ethylene sulfide, proplene sulfide, trimethylene sulfide, thiophene, and sulfur hexafluoride have beem measured for 0.3--2.0 MeV He+ ions. It is shown that the bond order correlation for the third period element sulfur is qualitatively in agreement with its second row counterpart, oxygen, but that the stopping cross-section dependence on bond order is considerably less (approx. =5% in sulfur compared to approx. =17% in oxygen). In the energy region where the stopping contribution of the valence electrons is largest, the atomic stopping cross sections of sulfur for double-bonded, ring-structured, and single-bonded compounds decrease in the order epsilon/sub DB/(S)>epsilon/sub RING/(S)>epsilon/sub SB/(S), a trend consistent with that observed for oxygen and carbon. The experimental results suggest a minimum d-orbital involvement in SF6 and reveal a lower peak energy E/sub peak/ and width delta when S exists in the compound than when C, O, or F are present

  11. Cross Section Measurements at LANSCE for Defense, Science and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Ronald O.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. Highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.

  12. Radiative proton capture cross sections in the mass range 40-54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dipti; Dutta, Saumi; Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Proton capture cross sections in the energy range of astrophysical interest for mass region 40-54 have been calculated in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with the reaction code talys1.6. The density-dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction folded with target radial matter densities from the relativistic mean field approach is used to obtain the semimicroscopic optical potential. A definite normalization of potential well depths has been used over the entire mass region. The (p ,γ ) rates of some reactions, important in the astrophysical scenario, are calculated using the potential in the relevant mass region.

  13. Radiative proton capture cross sections in the mass range $40-55$

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Dipti; Gangopadhyay, G; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Proton capture cross sections in the energy range of astrophysical interest for mass region 40-54 have been calculated in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism with reaction code TALYS1.6. The density dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction folded with target radial matter densities from relativistic mean field approach is used to obtain the semi-microscopic optical potential. A definite normalization of potential-well depths has been used over the entire mass region. The $(p,\\gamma)$ rates of some reactions, important in the astrophysical scenario, are calculated using the potential in the relevant mass region.

  14. Measurement of the stellar (n,γ) cross section of the shortlived radioactive isotope 147Pm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During helium burning in the red giant phase of stellar evolution, nuclei with A>60 are produced by the slow neutron capture process (s-process). Starting from the iron group isotopes, the synthesis path works along the valley of beta stability by subsequent neutron captures and beta decays. An important feature of the s-process is the occurence of branchings in this path whenever unstable isotopes with half-lives comparable to the typical neutron capture time scale of about one year are encountered. The analysis of the corresponding abundance patterns can be used to derive estimates for the stellar neutron flux, temperature, and density. Quantitative branching analyses require reliable (n,γ) cross sections for the branch point nuclei. This report presents the first ever measured (n,γ) cross section for the branch point 147Pm (t1/2=2.6 yr) in the neutron energy range 1n7Li(p,n)7Be reaction that allowes to simulate a quasi-stellar neutron spectrum. To this end, the rf gas discharge ion source and optical components of the Karlsruhe 3.75 Van de Graaff accelerator were revised. Last but not least, the radiation hazard of the 147Pm sample (180 GBq) had to be accounted for. In addition of the measurements on 147Pm, the stellar (n,γ) cross section on its stable daughter, 147Sm was also determined, mainly in order to verify the experimental technique with Moxon-Rae detectors. (orig.)

  15. Discussion on cross section measurement for DD-bar production around Ψ (3770)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We give a brief discussion on the measurement of the cross section for DD-bar production around the Ψ (3770) resonance, and point out a new calculation of the cross sections based on the absolute measurements. Compared with single tag and double tag analyses, the new calculation provides us with many more opportunities to perform the cross section measurement. (authors)

  16. Calculation of total cross sections for electron capture in collisions of Carbon ions with H(D,T)(1s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculations of total cross sections of electron capture in collisions of Cq+ with H(1s) are reviewed. At low collision energies, new calculations have been performed, using molecular expansions, to analyze isotope effects. The Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo method have been also applied to discuss the accuracy of previous calculations and to extend the energy range of the available cross sections

  17. The neutron capture cross sections of 186;187;188 Os and their application to Re/Os cosmochronometer

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Kaori; Mastinu, P; Milazzo, P M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is a fine determination of 186;187;188Os neutron capture cross sections, in order to remove principal nuclear physics uncertainties on the age of the universe determined using the Re/Os cosmochronometer. A general introduction including stellar nucleosynthesis, nuclear cosmochronometry,available neutron facilities and neutron reaction features is given. Dedicated measurements of the 186;187;188Os capture cross sections have been performed at the CERN neutron time-of- ight facility, n TOF, in the neutron energy range from 1 eV up to 1 MeV. The details of the measurement and the data treatment are reported. Using obtained capture yields, resolved resonance region analysis is completed. Resonance parameters have been extracted from a full R-matrix fit. A statistical analysis has been performed and the related averaged resonance parameters are derived. This information is crucial for a complete understanding and modelling in terms of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model of the capture and ...

  18. Density functional calculations of multiphonon capture cross sections at defects in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmparis, Georgios D.; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-01

    The theory of electron capture cross sections by multiphonon processes in semiconductors has a long and controversial history. Here we present a comprehensive theory and describe its implementation for realistic calculations. The Born-Oppenheimer and the Frank-Condon approximations are employed. The transition probability of an incoming electron is written as a product of an instantaneous electronic transition in the initial defect configuration and the line shape function (LSF) that describes the multiphonon processes that lead to lattice relaxation. The electronic matrix elements are calculated using the Projector Augmented Wave (PAW) method which yields the true wave functions while still employing a plane-wave basis. The LSF is calculated by employing a Monte Carlo method and the real phonon modes of the defect, calculated using density functional theory in the PAW scheme. Initial results of the capture cross section for a prototype system, namely a triply hydrogenated vacancy in Si are presented. The results are relevant for modeling device degradation by hot electron effects. This work is supported in part by the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT)'s Global Research Outreach (GRO) Program and by the LDRD program at ORNL.

  19. Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe17+ to Fe23+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Gu, M F; Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Scofield, J H

    2006-02-08

    The authors report the measurement of electron impact excitation cross sections for the strong iron L-shell 3 {yields} 2 lines of Fe XVIII through Fe XXIV at the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and a 6 x 6 pixel array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture through a sophisticated model analysis which results in the excitation cross section for 48 lines at multiple electron energies. They also studied the electron density dependent nature of the emission lines, which is demonstrated by the effective excitation cross section of the 3d {yields} 2p transition in Fe XXI.

  20. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guryn, W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from {radical}s = 50 GeV to {radical}s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions. In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 < {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 0.12 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, {sigma}{sub tot} and {sigma}{sub el}; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, {rho}; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium {vert_bar}t{vert_bar}-region, {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, and the s and {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin states {Delta}{sigma}{sub T}, the analyzing power, A{sub N}, and the transverse spin correlation parameter A{sub NN}. The behavior of the analyzing power A{sub N} at RHIC energies in the dip region of d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied. The relation of pp elastic scattering to the beam polarization measurement at RHIC is also discussed.

  1. 31Si(2.6 h)(n,γ)32Si cross section measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive 32Si was produced by double neutron capture in natural silicon. From a measurement of the isotopic ratio 32Si/30Si by means of accelerator mass spectrometry the neutron-capture cross section for radioactive 31Si (T1/2=2.622 h) was deduced to be 73±6 mb

  2. New Precision Measurements of the U235(n,γ) Cross Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Fowler, M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2012-11-01

    The neutron capture cross section of U235 was measured for the neutron incident energy region between 4 eV and 1 MeV at the DANCE facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center with an unprecedented accuracy of 2-3% at 1 keV. The new methodology combined three independent measurements. In the main experiment, a thick actinide sample was used to determine neutron capture and neutron-induced fission rates simultaneously. In the second measurement, a fission tagging detector was used with a thin actinide sample and detailed characteristics of the prompt-fission gamma rays were obtained. In the third measurement, the neutron scattering background was characterized using a sample of Pb208. The relative capture cross section was obtained from the experiment with the thick U235 sample using a ratio method after the subtraction of the fission and neutron scattering backgrounds. Our result indicates errors that are as large as 30% in the 0.5-2.5 keV region, in the current knowledge of neutron capture as embodied in major nuclear data evaluations. Future modifications of these databases using the improved precision data given herein will have significant impacts in neutronics calculations for a variety of nuclear technologies.

  3. Measuring Poverty Dynamics with Synthetic Panels Based on Cross-Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Hai-Anh; Lanjouw, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Panel data conventionally underpin the analysis of poverty mobility over time. However, such data are not readily available for most developing countries. Far more common are the"snap-shots"of welfare captured by cross-section surveys. This paper proposes a method to construct synthetic panel data from cross sections which can provide point estimates of poverty mobility. In contrast to traditional pseudo-panel methods that require multiple rounds of cross-sectional data to study poverty at th...

  4. Neutron capture cross-section studies of Tellurium isotopes for neutrinoless double beta decay applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The CUORE detector at Gran Sasso, aimed at searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te, employs an array of TeO2 bolometer modules. To understand and identify the contribution of muon and (α,n) induced neutrons to the CUORE background, fast neutron cature cross-section data of the tellurium isotopes 126Te, 128Te and 130Te have been measured with the activation method at eight different energies in the neutron energy range 0.5-7.5 MeV. Plastic pill boxes of diameter 1.6 cm and width 1 cm containing Te were irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons produced via the 3H(p,n)3He and 2H(d,n)3He reactions. The cross-sections were determined relative to the 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 115In(n,n')115m In standard cross sections. The activities of the products were measured using 60% lead-shielded HPGe detectors at TUNL's low background counting facility. The present results are compared with the evaluated data from TENDL-2012, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2 and JENDL-4.0, as well as with literature data.

  5. Thermal neutron capture and resonance integral cross sections of 45Sc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Duc Khue, Pham; Tien Thanh, Kim; Thi Hien, Nguyen; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Kwangsoo; Shin, Sung-Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Lee, Manwoo

    2015-11-01

    The thermal neutron cross section (σ0) and resonance integral (I0) of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been measured relative to that of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural scandium and gold foils without and with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness were irradiated with moderated pulsed neutrons produced from the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF). The induced activities in the activated foils were measured with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the counting losses caused by the thermal (Gth) and resonance (Gepi) neutron self-shielding, the γ-ray attenuation (Fg) and the true γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. In addition, the effect of non-ideal epithermal spectrum was also taken into account by determining the neutron spectrum shape factor (α). The thermal neutron cross-section and resonance integral of the 45Sc(n,γ)46Sc reaction have been determined relative to the reference values of the 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction, with σo,Au = 98.65 ± 0.09 barn and Io,Au = 1550 ± 28 barn. The present thermal neutron cross section has been determined to be σo,Sc = 27.5 ± 0.8 barn. According to the definition of cadmium cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the present resonance integral cross section has been determined to be Io,Sc = 12.4 ± 0.7 barn. The present results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  6. Measurement of 173Lu(n,γ) Cross Sections at DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, O.; Theroine, C.; Ebran, A.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Nortier, F. M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Taylor, W. A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    A highly gamma-radioactive target, 3.7 GBq, of 173Lu isotope was placed inside the DANCE array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) at Los Alamos to study the radiative neutron capture on an unstable isotope. The 173Lu element was produced by naturalHf(p,xn) reactions following by beta-decays at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF). Measurements of radiative neutron capture cross section on 173Lu were achieved at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source facility over the neutron energy range from thermal up to 1 keV. A special configuration was necessary to perform the experiment using the DANCE [1] array due to the high gamma activity of the target. We will report on the target production, the experiment and the results obtained for the radiative neutron capture on 173Lu. The radiative capture cross section was obtained for the first time on this unstable nucleus. Some resonances have been characterized. A comparison with a recent data evaluation is presented.

  7. Cross-section measurements of α+ 14N elastic scattering for He beam TOF-ERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic scattering cross-sections for α particles from nitrogen at a scattering angle of 83.6° were measured in the energy range of 2.0–5.4 MeV, and the nitrogen recoil cross-sections at a recoil angle of 40° were derived from the scattering cross-sections. Simultaneous measurements of scattering cross-sections at a scattering angle of 165° were also performed to validate the measurements. The obtained recoil cross-section data are essential for the quantitative examination of nitrogen through time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis with He beams

  8. Thermal neutron capture cross section and resonance integral of the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Do, Nguyen; Khue, Pham Duc; Thanh, Kim Tien; Hien, Nguyen Thi [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,10 Dao Tan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kim, Guinyun, E-mail: gnkim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sungchul [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young-Sik; Song, Tae-Yung; Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sung Gyun; Cho, Moo-Hyun [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Man Woo [Research Center, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan 619-953 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    The thermal neutron capture cross section (σ{sub 0}) and resonance integral cross section (I{sub 0}) of the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction have been measured relative to that of the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction by means of the activation method. High-purity natural lanthanum and gold foils were exposed to pulsed neutrons at the Pohang neutron facility. One set of foils was irradiated directly and a second set of foils was shielded with a cadmium cover of 0.5 mm thickness. The induced activities in the activated foils were measured by a γ-ray spectrometer based on a calibrated high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. In order to improve the accuracy of the experimental results the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor (α) was determined, and the corrections for the thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), the resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}), the γ-ray attenuation (F{sub g}) and the γ-ray coincidence summing effects were made. The thermal neutron cross-section for the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction has been determined to be 9.16 ± 0.36 barn, relative to the reference value of 98.65 ± 0.09 barn for the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction. By assuming the cadmium cut-off energy of 0.55 eV, the resonance integral cross section for the {sup 139}La(n,γ){sup 140}La reaction is 11.64 ± 0.69 barn, which is determined relative to the reference value of 1550 ± 28 barn for the {sup 197}Au(n,γ){sup 198}Au reaction. The measured results are compared with literature values and discussed.

  9. Emission probabilities of gamma rays from the decay of 233Pa and 238Np, and the thermal neutron capture cross section of 237Np

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the thermal neutron capture cross section of 237Np, the relevant γ emission probabilities of the 312-keV γ-ray from the decay of 233Pa and the 984-keV γ-ray from the decay of 238Np are deduced from the ratio of the emission rate to the activity. The emission rate and activity are measured with a Ge detector and a Si detector, respectively. The measured emission probability for 312-keV γ-ray is 41.6±0.9% and that for 984-keV γ-ray is 25.2±0.5%. The emission probabilities are used to correct the thermal neutron capture cross section of 237Np reported previously, and gives 168±6b. The neutron capture cross section is also determined as 169±6b by α-ray spectroscopic method. The measured emission probabilities and capture cross section are compared with others from references. By averaging these values deduced by different methods, the value of 169±4b is recommended as the thermal neutron capture cross section of 237Np for 2,200 m/s neutrons. (author)

  10. Neutron resonance parameters of {sup 55}Mn from Reich-Moore analysis of recent experimental neutron transmission and capture cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Guber, K.; Wiarda, D.; Arbanas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Tennessee 37831-6170 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of {sup 55}Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S{sub 0} = (3.90 +- 0.78) x 10{sup -4} and S{sub 1} = (0.45 +- 0.08) x 10{sup -4}. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S{sub 2} 1.0 x 10{sup -4}. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 +- 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components. (authors)

  11. Measurement of the effective cross section of a 1/v absorber for diffracted polychromatic neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective velocity and temperature for the neutron beam of the SNU-KAERI PGAA facility are determined by measuring the prompt γ-ray spectra for thin and thick 10B samples. Both the neutron flux and the γ-ray detection efficiency were set at minimum due to high neutron capture rate for the thick sample. The effective absorption cross section of 10B is obtained from the ratio of 10B peak count rates in both the spectra. The effective velocity and temperature of the neutron beam determined from the effective cross section are 2117 ± 21 m/s and 269 ± 5 K, respectively. These results are consistent with the values calculated from the neutron spectrum in 4%

  12. LENOS and BELINA Facilities for Measuring Maxwellian Averaged Cross Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro is one of the 5 laboratories of Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Italy; the one devoted to nuclear physics. The Lab has 4 accelerators: a 14 MV tandem, a 7 MV Van de Graaff, a 2 MV electrostatic and a superconductive linac. The electrostatic accelerators are able to accelerate ions up to Li, while the tandem and linac can accelerate heavy ions up to Ni. The smaller energy machines, namely the 7 MV (CN accelerator) and the 2 MV (AN2000 accelerator), are mostly devoted to nuclear physics applications. Within the CN accelerator, the neutron beam line for astrophysics (BELINA) is under development. The BELINA beam line will be devoted to the measurement of Maxwellian averaged cross section at several stellar temperatures, using a new method to generate the Maxwell-Boltzmann neutron spectra developed within the framework of the LENOS project. BELINA well characterized neutron spectra can also be used for validation of evaluated data as requested by the IRDFF CRP. The proposed new method deals with the shaping of the proton beam energy distribution by inserting a thin layer of material between the beam line and the lithium target. The thickness of the foil, the foil material and the proton energy are chosen in order to produce quasi-Gaussian spectra of protons that, impinging directly on the lithium target, produce the desired MBNS (Maxwell Boltzmann Neutron Spectra). The lithium target is a low mass target cooled by thin layer of forced water all around the beam spot, necessary to sustain the high specific power delivered to the target in CW (activation measurements). The LENOS method is able to produce MBNS with tuneable neutron energy ranging from 25 to 60 keV with high accuracy. Higher neutron energies up to 100 keV can be achieved if some deviation from MBNS is accepted. Recently, we have developed an upgrade of the pulsing system of the CN accelerator. The system has been tested already and works well

  13. Radar Cross Section measurements on the stealth metamaterial objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Fan, Kim; Strikwerda, Andrew C.; Zhang, Xi; Averitt, Richard D.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    have been realized in the form of thin, flexible metallized films of polyimide [1]. Here we apply a near-unity absorbing MM as a way to reduce the radar cross section of an object, and consider the real-life situation where the probe beam is significantly larger than the MM film and the object under...... investigation. We use a terahertz radar cross section (RCS) setup [2] for the characterization of the RCS of a real object covered with an absorbing MM film designed for high absorption in the THz frequency range, specifically at 0.8 THz. The results are in a form of 2D maps (sinograms), from which the RCS is...

  14. Neutron removal cross section as a measure of neutron skin

    OpenAIRE

    D. Q. Fang; Y. G. Ma; Cai, X. Z.(Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 201800, Shanghai, China); Tian, W.D.; Wang, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    We study the relation between neutron removal cross section ($\\sigma_{-N}$) and neutron skin thickness for finite neutron rich nuclei using the statistical abrasion ablation (SAA) model. Different sizes of neutron skin are obtained by adjusting the diffuseness parameter of neutrons in the Fermi distribution. It is demonstrated that there is a good linear correlation between $\\sigma_{-N}$ and the neutron skin thickness for neutron rich nuclei. Further analysis suggests that the relative increa...

  15. Multilevel analysis of the 233U and 235U capture and fission cross-sections and statistical properties of the Kapur-Peierls-type resonance parameters for the S-wave cross-sections of the fissile isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the 1966 Conference on Nuclear Data for Reactors, simultaneous measurements of the capture and fission cross-sections of 233U and 235U were presented. Those measurements have now been analysed with the multilevel formalism developed by Adler and Adler. To obtain consistent sets of resonance parameters the capture and fission data were least-square fitted simultaneously. This analysis was carried out to 60 eV for 233U and to 100 eV for 235U. The main purpose of this analysis was to provide a simple and precise analytical description of the very complex structure of the fission and capture cross-sections of 233U and 235U at low energy. Such an analytical description should be useful to calculate reaction rates in nuclear reactors and to compare experimental data taken with different energy resolutions or at different sample temperatures. For the low-energy resonances of 233U and 235U, the neutron width is always smaller, by at least two orders of magnitude, than the total width. Thus, the total cross-section, for those isotopes, can be approximated as the sum of the absorption cross-section and the potential scattering cross-section. Hence it is possible to compute the total cross-section from the resonance parameters obtained by fitting the fission and capture cross-sections. The total cross-section of 235U computed by this method is compared to the data from a transmission measurement done at Saclay, with the sample at 77 deg. K. The computed total cross-section of 233U is compared with transmission data obtained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Material Testing Reactor. Such comparisons between data obtained by different experimental techniques illustrate the internal consistency of the low-energy cross-sections of the two main uranium fissile isotopes. The physical interpretation of the resonance parameters is somewhat ambiguous, because such multilevel fits are by no means unique. This is particularly true for 233U since, for this nucleus, the

  16. Alpha induced reaction cross section measurements on 162Er for the astrophysical gamma process

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; Rauscher, T; Török, Zs; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z; Somorjai, E

    2014-01-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(a,g,)166Yb and 162Er(a,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m. = 16.09 down to Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(a,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(a,g)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (a,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the a-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted.

  17. Alpha induced reaction cross section measurements on 162Er for the astrophysical γ process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162Er(α,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m.=16.09 MeV down to Ec.m.=11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m.=12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (α,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the α-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted

  18. Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatorre; G. Imel; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Paul

    2010-01-01

    An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL’s Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A < 100, there has been recent progress in extending AMS to heavier isotopes – even to A > 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

  19. Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL's Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

  20. Extracting integrated and differential cross sections in low energy heavy-ion reactions from backscattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2016-07-01

    We suggest new methods to extract elastic (quasi-elastic) scattering angular distribution and reaction (capture) cross sections from the experimental elastic (quasi-elastic) backscattering excitation function taken at a single angle.

  1. Measurements and model calculations of the 110Cd(n,#betta#)/sup 111m/Cd cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross section for the 110Cd(n,#betta#)/sup 111m/Cd reaction has been measured in the energy 0.14 to 1.5 MeV by means of activation. Both natural cadmium and 110Cd- and 111Cd-enriched samples were used in the measurements in order to distinguish the capture activation reaction from the 111Cd(n,n')/sup 111m/Cd reaction, which becomes involved due to the presence of 111Cd in the samples. Optical, statistical and gamma-ray cascade model calculations were performed in order to explain the energy dependence of the capture activation cross section

  2. Estimating Reaction Cross Sections from Measured (Gamma)-Ray Yields: The 238U(n,2n) and 239Pu(n,2n) Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W

    2002-11-18

    A procedure is presented to deduce the reaction-channel cross section from measured partial {gamma}-ray cross sections. In its simplest form, the procedure consists in adding complementary measured and calculated contributions to produce the channel cross section. A matrix formalism is introduced to provide a rigorous framework for this approach. The formalism is illustrated using a fictitious product nucleus with a simple level scheme, and a general algorithm is presented to process any level scheme. In order to circumvent the cumbersome algebra that can arise in the matrix formalism, a more intuitive graphical procedure is introduced to obtain the same reaction cross-section estimate. The features and limitations of the method are discussed, and the technique is applied to extract the {sup 235}U (n,2n) and {sup 239}Pu(n,2n) cross sections from experimental partial {gamma}-ray cross sections, coupled with (enhanced) Hauser-Feshbach calculations.

  3. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guegan, Baptistse [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  4. Measurements of neutron cross sections for advanced nuclear energy systems at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagallo M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The n_TOF facility operates at CERN with the aim of addressing the request of high accuracy nuclear data for advanced nuclear energy systems as well as for nuclear astrophysics. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, important results have been obtained on neutron induced fission and capture cross sections of U, Pu and minor actinides. Recently the construction of another beam line has started; the new line will be complementary to the first one, allowing to further extend the experimental program foreseen for next measurement campaigns.

  5. Total and differential scattering cross section measurements for positrons and electrons colliding with inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total scattering cross sections have been measured in the same apparatus for low and intermediate energy positrons and electrons colliding with krypton and xenon using a beam transmission technique. The low energy positron measurements reveal a sudden increase in the cross sections in the vicinity of 7 eV and 5 eV for krypton and xenon, respectively, which correspond to the positronium formation thresholds. The intermediate energy positron- and electron-krypton measurements show a continuous decrease in the two cross sections from the maxima at about 10 eV and 30 eV for electrons and positrons, respectively. There is an indication of a gradual approach of the electron and positron scattering cross section at higher energies. The intermediate energy positron- and electron-xenon measurements show a continuous decrease in the cross sections above 40 eV and 10 eV, respectively. A sharper decrease has been observed for electron-xenon scattering measurement where the cross sections drop below the positron scattering cross sections between 40 eV and 90 eV. The two curves diverge above 100 eV and seem to be converging again at about 500 eV. Experimental apparatus has been constructed for measuring differential scattering cross sections from 150 to 1500 for positrons and electrons colliding with atoms and molecules. Preliminary differential scattering cross section measurements at 900 have been made for low energy electrons colliding with helium and argon. The electron-helium measurements show a continuous decrease in the cross section with energy. The electron-argon measurements show a peak in the cross section in the vicinity of 5 eV and a slow decrease in the cross section above 8 eV

  6. Measurement of reaction cross sections of fission products induced by DT neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Daisuke; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    With the view of future application of fusion reactor to incineration of fission products, we have measured the {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I reaction cross section by DT neutrons with the activation method. The measured cross section was compared with the evaluated nuclear data of JENDL-3.2. From the result, it was confirmed that the evaluation overestimated the cross section by about 20-40%. (author)

  7. Sensitivity coefficients for the 238U neutron-capture shielded-group cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the unresolved resonance region cross sections are represented with statistical resonance parameters. The average values of these parameters are chosen in order to fit evaluated infinitely dilute group cross sections. The sensitivity of the shielded group cross sections to the choice of mean resonance data has recently been investigated for the case of 235U and 239Pu by Ganesan and by Antsipov et al; similar sensitivity studies for 238U are reported

  8. Cross section measurement of 14N(p ,γ )15O in the CNO cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Görres, J.; deBoer, R. J.; Imbriani, G.; Best, A.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2016-05-01

    Background: The CNO cycle is the main energy source in stars more massive than our sun; it defines the energy production and the cycle time that lead to the lifetime of massive stars, and it is an important tool for the determination of the age of globular clusters. In our sun about 1.6% of the total solar neutrino flux comes from the CNO cycle. The largest uncertainty in the prediction of this CNO flux from the standard solar model comes from the uncertainty in the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction rate; thus, the determination of the cross section at astrophysical temperatures is of great interest. Purpose: The total cross section of the 14N(p ,γ )15O reaction has large contributions from the transitions to the Ex=6.79 MeV excited state and the ground state of 15O. The Ex=6.79 MeV transition is dominated by radiative direct capture, while the ground state is a complex mixture of direct and resonance capture components and the interferences between them. Recent studies have concentrated on cross-section measurements at very low energies, but broad resonances at higher energy may also play a role. A single measurement has been made that covers a broad higher-energy range but it has large uncertainties stemming from uncorrected summing effects. Furthermore, the extrapolations of the cross section vary significantly depending on the data sets considered. Thus, new direct measurements have been made to improve the previous high-energy studies and to better constrain the extrapolation. Methods: Measurements were performed at the low-energy accelerator facilities of the nuclear science laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. The cross section was measured over the proton energy range from Ep=0.7 to 3.6 MeV for both the ground state and the Ex=6.79 MeV transitions at θlab=0∘ , 45∘, 90∘, 135∘, and 150∘. Both TiN and implanted-14N targets were utilized. γ rays were detected by using an array of high-purity germanium detectors. Results: The excitation function as

  9. Extremely small hole capture cross sections in HfO2/HfxSiyOz/p-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, M. Y. A.; Johansson, M.; Engström, O.

    2007-05-01

    Defects in Al /HfO2/HfxSiyOz/p-Si capacitors have been characterized using thermally stimulated current at temperatures between 30 and 300K. The hole activation energy and capture cross section were extracted from the results. The authors observed shallow traps that move with changing the discharging voltage, giving rise to activation energies in the range 0.03-0.14eV. Postmetallization anneal passivated these traps and a deeper trap appears with a significantly lower shift with the discharging voltage. Very small apparent capture cross sections (capture cross section times tunneling probability) have been extracted (10-26-10-18cm2). Simulations agree very well with experimental data.

  10. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, John Leonard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haight, Robert Cameron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jandel, Marian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Donnell, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vieira, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Becker, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, Ching-Yen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krticka, Milan [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  11. Stroke Volume estimation using aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, S; Pretty, C G; Chiew, Y S; Pironet, A; Davidson, S; Desaive, T; Shaw, G M; Chase, J G

    2015-08-01

    Accurate Stroke Volume (SV) monitoring is essential for patient with cardiovascular dysfunction patients. However, direct SV measurements are not clinically feasible due to the highly invasive nature of measurement devices. Current devices for indirect monitoring of SV are shown to be inaccurate during sudden hemodynamic changes. This paper presents a novel SV estimation using readily available aortic pressure measurements and aortic cross sectional area, using data from a porcine experiment where medical interventions such as fluid replacement, dobutamine infusions, and recruitment maneuvers induced SV changes in a pig with circulatory shock. Measurement of left ventricular volume, proximal aortic pressure, and descending aortic pressure waveforms were made simultaneously during the experiment. From measured data, proximal aortic pressure was separated into reservoir and excess pressures. Beat-to-beat aortic characteristic impedance values were calculated using both aortic pressure measurements and an estimate of the aortic cross sectional area. SV was estimated using the calculated aortic characteristic impedance and excess component of the proximal aorta. The median difference between directly measured SV and estimated SV was -1.4ml with 95% limit of agreement +/- 6.6ml. This method demonstrates that SV can be accurately captured beat-to-beat during sudden changes in hemodynamic state. This novel SV estimation could enable improved cardiac and circulatory treatment in the critical care environment by titrating treatment to the effect on SV. PMID:26736434

  12. Measurement of the 242Pu(n,f cross section at n_TOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsinganis A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of neutron cross sections of various plutonium isotopes and other minor actinides is crucial for the design of advanced nuclear systems. The 242Pu(n,f cross sections were measured at the CERN n_TOF facility, taking advantage of the wide energy range (from thermal to GeV and the high instantaneous flux of the neutron beam. In this work, preliminary results are presented along with a theoretical cross section calculation performed with the EMPIRE code.

  13. Measurements of Electron Proton Elastic Cross Sections for 0.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on precision measurements of the elastic cross section for electron-proton scattering performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The measurements were made at 28 distinct kinematic settings covering a range in momentum transfer of 0.4 < Q2 < 5.5 (GeV/c)2. These measurements represent a significant contribution to the world's cross section data set in the Q2 range, where a large discrepancy currently exists between the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors extracted from previous cross section measurements and that recently measured via polarization transfer in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. This data set shows good agreement with previous cross section measurements, indicating that if a heretofore unknown systematic error does exist in the cross section measurements, then it is intrinsic to all such measurements

  14. Measurement of the 197Au(n,γ) cross section at n-TOF: towards a new standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different detectors and techniques are employed at n-TOF facility, at CERN, to improve the accuracy of the neutron capture cross section of 197Au(n,γ): a total absorption calorimeter and a set of C6D6. The accurate knowledge of this cross section is of great importance for all the (n,γ) reactions study. The neutron capture cross section and nuclear resonance parameters of the 197Au have been measured in the energy range of 1 eV to 1 KeV. The present work shows in average a good agreement with evaluated data libraries, although sizeable differences have been observed for some resonances. Two new resonances have also been discovered. The accuracy of the resonance partial widths has been improved and the main nuclear quantities such as the neutron strength function have been extracted. (authors)

  15. Measurement of the {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}) cross section at n-TOF: towards a new standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimi, C.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; A lvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganie, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    Two different detectors and techniques are employed at n-TOF facility, at CERN, to improve the accuracy of the neutron capture cross section of {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}): a total absorption calorimeter and a set of C{sub 6}D{sub 6}. The accurate knowledge of this cross section is of great importance for all the (n,{gamma}) reactions study. The neutron capture cross section and nuclear resonance parameters of the {sup 197}Au have been measured in the energy range of 1 eV to 1 KeV. The present work shows in average a good agreement with evaluated data libraries, although sizeable differences have been observed for some resonances. Two new resonances have also been discovered. The accuracy of the resonance partial widths has been improved and the main nuclear quantities such as the neutron strength function have been extracted. (authors)

  16. Photofission cross sections of U-233 and Pu-239 near threshold induced by gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photofission cross sections of U-233 and PU-239 have been studied using monochromatic photons produced by thermal neutron capture in several materials placed in a radial beam hole of the IEA-R1, 2 MW pool type research reactor, in the energy interval from 5.43 MeV to 9.72 MeV. The gamma flux incident on the samples were measured using a (3X3) inch. NaI(Tl) crystal. The photofission fragments were detected in MAKROFOL-KG (solid state nuclear track detector) etched 30 min. in a KOH (35%wt) solution at 600C. The efficiency of the detector was obtained using a Californium-252 calibrated source and its value was (0.4323 ± 3%). The tracks were counted by means of an automatic spark counting. Analyzing the photofission data we have observed similarities between the cross sections obtained for the two samples in comparison with other authors. A structure was also observed in the U-233 cross section near the energy of 7.23 MeW. Acoording to the liquid drop model the height of the simple fission barrier were determined: (5.6 ± 0.2) MeV and (5.7 ± 0.2) MeV for U-233 and Pu-239 respectively. The relative fissionability of the samples to U-238 were also determined in each excitation energy and showed to be energy independent: (2.12 +-0.25) for U-233, and (3.32+-0.41) for Pu-239. (author)

  17. Cross-sections for electron capture by multiply charged ions from hydrogen atoms and molecules and population of electronic states of created ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross-sections for single electron capture by alpha-particles and multiply charged ions Ne3+, Ne4+, Ar4+, Ar5+, Ar6+ from hydrogen atoms and molecules have been measured using registration of coincidences between incident and recoil ions after collision to separate this process. Population of different electronic states of ions with lower charges produced at single electron capture has been measured by collision spectroscopy method. Cross-sections for one electron capture by He2+, ArZ+ (Z = 6, 5, 4) and NeZ+ (Z = 3-4) have been measured in the kinetic energy range of incident multiply charged ions from 1xZ to 12xZ keV (Z is charge of multiply charged ions). Cross-sections for the population of electronic states at electron capture from H2 molecules have been measured in the velocity range from V = 1·107 cm/s to V5,5·107 cm/s (in the collision energy range 3.0xZ Kev - 21.0xZ KeV) at collisions of ArZ+ ions (Z=3-6) and NeZ+ (Z3-4). The double electron capture cross-sections at incident alpha-particles and hydrogen molecules collision have been measured in the energy range from 1 KeV up to 100 KeV (V=0, 235/2, 58·108 cm/s). Errors of measured values of cross-sections are ∼10-15% The results of the measurements are presented in Tables 1-8. (author)

  18. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  19. Measurement of cross sections for charge pickup by relativistic holmium ions on heavy targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured the cross section for nuclear charge pickup by relativistic holmium on several targets of larger atomic number than have been studied previously. We find that although measurements made with most of the targets are consistent with a peripheral geometric scaling, one target, silver, shows an anomalously high cross section

  20. Theoretical investigation of energy deposition and electron capture cross-sections for helium ion impact on formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of the work presented here is related to damage caused by energetic, charged particle radiation such as electrons, protons, and alpha particles to prebiotic matter such as that found in interstellar space. The calculations are carried out using an all electron, all nuclei, scheme that explicitly treats the electron-nuclear coupling. We present results for the no-capture, as well as the single and double electron capture probabilities, as well as for the 1s and 2l (l = s, p) contributions to the electron capture cross-sections of 3He2+ projectiles on formaldehyde molecules. We find that the summed cross-section peaks at 10 keV/amu, and has a plateau between 0.1 and 1 keV/amu. We also present preliminary results for the nuclear, ro-vibrational and electronic stopping cross-section. We find a large contribution to the electronic stopping cross-section and a maximum shifted towards higher energies in the nuclear stopping cross-section, when compared to SRIM results. We interpret this to be a consequence of molecular bonding

  1. Theoretical investigation of energy deposition and electron capture cross-sections for helium ion impact on formaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R. [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, FL 32611-8435 (United States); Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62251 (Mexico); Sabin, John R. [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, FL 32611-8435 (United States)]. E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu; Deumens, Erik [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, FL 32611-8435 (United States); Ohrn, Yngve [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, FL 32611-8435 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The subject of the work presented here is related to damage caused by energetic, charged particle radiation such as electrons, protons, and alpha particles to prebiotic matter such as that found in interstellar space. The calculations are carried out using an all electron, all nuclei, scheme that explicitly treats the electron-nuclear coupling. We present results for the no-capture, as well as the single and double electron capture probabilities, as well as for the 1s and 2l (l = s, p) contributions to the electron capture cross-sections of {sup 3}He{sup 2+} projectiles on formaldehyde molecules. We find that the summed cross-section peaks at 10 keV/amu, and has a plateau between 0.1 and 1 keV/amu. We also present preliminary results for the nuclear, ro-vibrational and electronic stopping cross-section. We find a large contribution to the electronic stopping cross-section and a maximum shifted towards higher energies in the nuclear stopping cross-section, when compared to SRIM results. We interpret this to be a consequence of molecular bonding.

  2. Direct measurement of the 22Ne(p,γ)23Na reaction cross section at LUNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Federico; LUNA Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction takes part in the NeNa cycle of hydrogen burning, influencing the production of the elements between 20Ne and 27Al in red giant stars, asymptotic giant stars and classical novae. The 22Ne(p,γ)27Na reaction rate is very uncertain because of a large number of tentative resonances in the Gamow window, where only upper limits were quoted in literature. A direct measurement of the 22Ne(p, γ)23Na reaction cross section has been carried out at LUNA using a windowless differential-pumping gas target with two high- purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. A new measurement with a 4π bismuth germanate (BGO) summing detector is ongoing. During the HPGe phase of the experiment the strengths of the resonances at 156.2 keV, 189.5 keV and 259.7 keV have been directly measured for the first time and their contribution to the reaction rate has been calculated. The decay scheme of the newly discovered resonances has been established as well and some improved upper limits on the unobserved resonances have been put. The BGO detector with its 70% γ-detection efficiency allows to measure the cross section at lower energy. In order to further investigate the resonances at 71 keV and 105 keV and the direct-capture component, the data taking is ongoing.

  3. Theoretical state-selective and total cross sections for electron capture from helium atoms by fully stripped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mančev, I.; Milojević, N.; Belkić, Dž.

    2015-03-01

    The four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation is used to compute cross sections for single electron capture from helium targets by fully stripped ions. The projectile ions are H+, He2+, Li3+, Be4+, B5+, C6+, N7+, O8+, and F9+. An extensive list of theoretical state-to-state cross sections in these collisions at energies ranging from 20 to 10 000 keV/amu is given. This list includes the state-selective cross sections Qnlm for each individual triple of the usual quantum numbers { n , l , m } of the final hydrogen-like states alongside Qnl and Qn for the pertinent sub-shells and shells where the respective summations over m and { l , m } have been carried out. The maximal value of the principal quantum number n was chosen to vary from 4 (H+) to 10 (F9+) so as to satisfy the condition n ≥ZP, where ZP is the nuclear charge of the projectile. Usually, the largest cross sections stem from those values of n that match the projectile charge (n =ZP) . The total cross sections for capture summed over all the quantum numbers { n , l , m } are also tabulated. The overall goal of this study is to fill in lacunae in the existing databases of charge exchange cross sections that are needed in several inter-disciplinary fields. For example, in particle transport physics, which is of utmost importance in such emerging branches as hadron therapy, these cross sections constitute a part of the multifaceted input data for stochastic simulations of energy losses of multiply charged ions in matter, including tissue. Other significant uses of the present data are anticipated in charge exchange diagnostics within thermonuclear research project as well as in applications covering the relevant parts of plasma physics and astrophysics.

  4. Measurements of electron-proton elastic cross sections for 0.4 2 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on precision measurements of the elastic cross section for electron-proton scattering performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The measurements were made at 28 unique kinematic settings covering a range in momentum transfer of 0.4 2 2. These measurements represent a significant contribution to the world's cross section data set in the Q2 range where a large discrepancy currently exists between the ratio of electric to magnetic proton form factors extracted from previous cross section measurements and that recently measured via polarization transfer in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

  5. A Measurement of Inclusive Quasielastic Electron Cross Sections at X > 1 and High Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment E89-008 measured inclusive electron scattering cross sections from different nuclei in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. Cross sections on the low energy loss side of the quasi-elastic peak (xBj > 1) are extracted for carbon, aluminum, iron and gold. The data cover four-momentum transfers squared of 0:97 to 5:73 GeV 2 =c 2 . The measured cross sections are compared to cross sections calculated using a microscopic spectral function. The cross section results are also analyzed in terms of the two scaling functions F (y) and f( psi ). For both the data is found to be independent of the momentum transfer (scaling of the first kind). For f( psi ) the data is in addition independent of the mass number A (scaling of the second kind) and thus exhibits superscaling properties

  6. Measurements of effective total macroscopic cross sections and effective energy of continuum beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisao [Rikkyo Univ., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Inst. for Atomic Energy

    1998-03-01

    Two practically useful quantities are introduced in this study to characterize a continuum neutron beam and to describe transmission phenomena of the beam in field of quantitative neutron radiography: an effective energy instead of a peak energy or a mean energy of the spectrum and an effective total macroscopic (ETM) cross section instead of a total macroscopic (TM) cross section defined at the monochromatic energy. The effective energy was evaluated by means of energy dependence of ETM cross section. To realize the method a beam quality indicator (BQI) has been proposed recently. Several effective energies were measured for non-filtered, filtered neutron beams, and outputs of neutron guide tubes in world by the BQI. A thermal neutron beam and three beams modulated by Pb filters with different thicknesses are studied to measure ETM cross sections for various materials and summarized in a table. Validity of the effective energy determined by the BQI is discussed relating with ETM cross sections of materials. (author)

  7. Measurement of alpha-induced reaction cross sections on erbium isotopes for γ process studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Török, Zs.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Halász, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Rauscher, T.

    2014-05-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162,164,166Er(α,n)165,167,169Yb reactions have been measured at MTA Atomki. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured between Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV and Ec.m. = 16.09 MeV just above the astrophysically relevant energy region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at T9 = 3 GK). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb, 164Er(α,n)167Yb and 166Er(α,n)169Yb reactions were studied between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV, Ec.m. = 13.17 and 16.59 MeV and Ec.m. = 12.68 and 17.08 MeV, respectively. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data for modeling the γ process which is thought to be responsible for the production of the proton-rich isotopes heavier than iron.

  8. Statistical tests for the detection of intermediate structure: Application to the structure of the 238U neutron capture cross section between 5 keV and 0.1 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent measurements of the 238U neutron capture cross section show a considerable amount of fluctuation between 5 and 100 keV. Statistical tests performed on the measured cross section suggest that the fluctuations are not compatible with the statistical model of nuclear reactions and imply the existence of intermediate structure, which is interpreted in terms of doorway states. The validity of the statistical tests used here is confirmed by numerical experiments with simulated cross sections generated by the Monte Carlo method, in accordance with the statistical method. The behavior of the capture cross section is compared to those of the subthreshold fission cross section and of the inelastic scattering cross section. The threshold anomaly at the opening of the inelastic channel at 45 keV is seen in the form of a rounded step

  9. Single and double electron capture cross sections in keV-collisions between fully stripped ions with helium atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ibaaz, Aicha; Dubois, Alain

    2015-01-01

    International audience We present cross section calculations for single-, double-capture, and double capture to auto-ionizing states occurring in the course of collisions between fully stripped ions Aq+ (q≤10) and helium atom at impact energies ranging from 0.25 to 625 keV/u. These calculations were performed by applying a semiclassical nonperturbative close coupling approach, based on the expansion of the scattering wave function into asymptotic bielectronic states with proper translation...

  10. Determination of the neutron resonance parameters for 206Pb and of the thermal neutron capture cross section for 206Pb and 209Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapter 1 describes the motivation of the measurements (accelerator driven systems, stellar nucleosynthesis, neutron induced reactions on 206Pb), the present status of the neutron capture data for 206Pb and 209Bi and the structure of this work. In Chapter 2 the basic reaction theory underlying this work is described. The neutron induced reaction mechanism and formalism are explained. The parameterisation of the cross section in terms of R-matrix theory is discussed and we put particular emphasis on the statistical behaviour of the resonance parameters and the impact of the angular distribution of gamma rays following neutron capture. The relation between experimental observables and the resonance parameters is discussed together with general comments related to resonance shape analysis. Chapter 3 is focused on the determination of resonance parameters for 206Pb. We performed high-resolution transmission and capture measurements at the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) facility GELINA of the IRMM at Geel (B) and determined the resonance parameters. For nuclei like 206Pb, where the total width is dominated by Γn, the capture area allows to determine G. Transmission measurements were carried out to determine Γn, and the statistical factor g of resonances. Before performing a Resonance Shape Analysis (RSA) on the transmission and capture data, we verified the neutron flux and resolution at GELINA. We also compared the characteristics of GELINA with those of the n-TOF facility at CERN. A special emphasis is placed on the total energy detection technique using C6D6 detectors. This technique was applied for the determination of the capture cross section. To reduce systematic bias effects on the capture cross section, the response of the detectors was determined by Monte Carlo simulations, which has been validated by experiments. Using these response functions the partial capture cross sections for individual resonances of 206Pb have been deduced, by unfolding the response of the C6D

  11. Measurement of 233U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for some threshold reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 233U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections for twelve threshold reactions were measured relative to the average cross section of 0.688 ± 0.040 mb for the 27Al(n,α)24Na reaction. The reference value was obtained by calculation using the energy dependent cross section in the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL) Dosimetry File and the Watt-type fission spectrum in ENDF/B-VI. General agreement was seen between the measured and the calculated fission-spectrum averaged cross sections. However, there exist discrepancies of more than 10% between the measured and the calculated average cross sections for the 24Mg(n,p)24Na, 47Ti(n,p)47Sc, and 64Zn(n,p)64Cu reactions. The tendencies in the calculated-to-measured ratios are similar to those for 235U fission spectrum-averaged cross sections the authors previously measured. The measured average cross sections were also applied for the spectrum adjustment of the 233U fission neutrons using the Neutron Unfolding Package Code (NEUPAC). The adjusted spectrum is close to the Watt-type fission spectrum of 233U within the uncertainties of the obtained spectrum, although there exist some fluctuations in the ratio spectrum of the adjusted to the Watt-type

  12. The neutron capture cross sections of 237Np(n,γ) and 240Pu(n,γ) and its relevance in the transmutation of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture cross sections of actinides are of great relevance for the Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and Generation-IV reactors. The neutron capture cross sections of 237Np and 240Pu in the range of 1 eV to 2 keV were measured at the n-TOF facility with a Total Absorption Calorimeter. The data have been analyzed with the SAMMY code. The corresponding covariance matrices have been generated. The final cross sections are presented and compared to the previously existing ones.The n-TOF 237Np σ(n,γ) is in agreement with the evaluated data files below 300 eV and its is lower by 10 to 15% up to 2 keV. This discrepancy with the evaluated data files is also observed in the capture cross section derived from the transmission measurements of Gressier et al. In the case of the 240Pu σ(n,γ), the n-TOF σ(n,γ) agrees within uncertainties with JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.1, except for a group of resonances around 800 eV. Endf/B-VII data are lower than n-TOF and the mentioned evaluations, with differences that increase with neutron energy up to 15-20 per cent

  13. The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}) and {sup 240}Pu(n,{gamma}) and its relevance in the transmutation of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, C.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapico, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    Neutron capture cross sections of actinides are of great relevance for the Transmutation of Nuclear Waste in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and Generation-IV reactors. The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 237}Np and {sup 240}Pu in the range of 1 eV to 2 keV were measured at the n-TOF facility with a Total Absorption Calorimeter. The data have been analyzed with the SAMMY code. The corresponding covariance matrices have been generated. The final cross sections are presented and compared to the previously existing ones.The n-TOF {sup 237}Np {sigma}(n,{gamma}) is in agreement with the evaluated data files below 300 eV and its is lower by 10 to 15% up to 2 keV. This discrepancy with the evaluated data files is also observed in the capture cross section derived from the transmission measurements of Gressier et al. In the case of the {sup 240}Pu {sigma}(n,{gamma}), the n-TOF {sigma}(n,{gamma}) agrees within uncertainties with JENDL-3.3 and JEFF-3.1, except for a group of resonances around 800 eV. Endf/B-VII data are lower than n-TOF and the mentioned evaluations, with differences that increase with neutron energy up to 15-20 per cent.

  14. (n, α) Cross-section measurement using a gaseous sample and a gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a method of (n, α) cross-section measurement using a gaseous sample in a gridded ionization chamber (GIC). This method enables us to measure the cross section of gaseous samples, such as C, O and N, with very large solid angle close to 4π without distortion due to energy loss in the sample. The detection efficiency, which is difficult to estimate for gaseous samples, was estimated by using GIC signals and tight neutron collimation. This method was verified through the 12C(n, α0)9Be cross-section measurement for 14.1 MeV neutrons

  15. Measurements of the Total, Elastic, Inelastic and Diffractive Cross Sections with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Trzebinski, Maciej; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main results of the total, elastic and inelastic cross sections measurements performed by the ATLAS ALFA detectors are presented. The independent inelastic cross section measurement done using Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators is also shown. Next, the single diffractive di-jet production and gap survival probability are briefly described. After the event selection, it was found that the diffractive component is needed for a more complete description of data. Finally, the exclusive lepton pair production analysis in electron and muon channels is also described. The measured cross sections were found to be consistent with the theory prediction.

  16. Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduced cross sections for e+p deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q2, were obtained in the region 0.13≤y≤0.75, where y denotes the inelasticity and 5≤Q2≤110 GeV2. The proton structure functions F2 and FL were extracted from the measured cross sections.

  17. Deep inelastic cross-section measurements at large y with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aggarwal, R; Antonelli, S; Arslan, O; Aushev, V; Aushev, Y; Bachynska, O; Barakbaev, A N; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behr, J; Behrens, U; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bokhonov, V; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Brock, I; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Brzozowska, B; Bussey, P J; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Catterall, C D; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; D'Agostini, G; Dementiev, R K; Devenish, R C E; Dolinska, G; Drugakov, V; Dusini, S; Ferrando, J; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Gach, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gladilin, L K; Gogota, O; Golubkov, Yu A; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Grzelak, G; Gueta, O; Guzik, M; Hain, W; Hartner, G; Hochman, D; Hori, R; Ibrahim, Z A; Iga, Y; Ishitsuka, M; Iudin, A; Januschek, F; Kadenko, I; Kananov, S; Kanno, T; Karshon, U; Kaur, M; Kaur, P; Khein, L A; Kisielewska, D; Klanner, R; Klein, U; Kondrashova, N; Kononenko, O; Korol, Ie; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, A; Kotz, U; Kovalchuk, N; Kowalski, H; Kuprash, O; Kuze, M; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Libov, V; Limentani, S; Lisovyi, M; Lobodzinska, E; Lohmann, W; Lohr, B; Lohrmann, E; Longhin, A; Lontkovskyi, D; Lukina, O Yu; Maeda, J; Makarenko, I; Malka, J; Martin, J F; Mergelmeyer, S; Idris, F Mohamad; Mujkic, K; Myronenko, V; Nagano, K; Nigro, A; Nobe, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Olkiewicz, K; Onishchuk, Yu; Paul, E; Perlanski, W; Perrey, H; Pokrovskiy, N S; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M; Raval, A; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Ruspa, M; Samojlov, V; Saxon, D H; Schioppa, M; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schwartz, J; Shcheglova, L M; Shevchenko, R; Shkola, O; Singh, I; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Sola, V; Solano, A; Spiridonov, A; Stanco, L; Stefaniuk, N; Stern, A; Stewart, T P; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tassi, E; Temiraliev, T; Tokushuku, K; Tomaszewska, J; Trofymov, A; Trusov, V; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Turkot, O; Tymieniecka, T; Verbytskyi, A; Viazlo, O; Walczak, R; Abdullah, W A T Wan; Wichmann, K; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Zakharchuk, N; Zarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zenaiev, O; Zhautykov, B O; Zhmak, N; Zotkin, D S

    2014-01-01

    The reduced cross sections for $e^{+}p$ deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, $318$, $251$ and $225$ GeV. The cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken $x$ and the virtuality, $Q^2$, were obtained in the region $0.13\\ \\leq\\ y\\ \\leq\\ 0.75$, where $y$ denotes the inelasticity and $5\\ \\leq\\ Q^2\\ \\leq\\ 110$ GeV$^2$. The proton structure functions $F_2$ and $F_L$ were extracted from the measured cross sections.

  18. LHCb: Measurement of $J/\\psi$ production cross-section at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Zhang, Y

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the $J/\\psi$ production cross-section with the LHCb detector is presented. The cross-section is measured as a function of the $J/\\psi$ transverse momentum and rapidity, in the forward region. Contributions from prompt $J/\\psi$ and $J/\\psi$ from $b$ are measured separately. Prospects for measurements of the $J/\\psi$ polarisation with a full angular analysis are also shown.

  19. The State of the Art of Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-08

    The study of neutrino interactions has recently experienced a renaissance, motivated by the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments depend critically on an accurate models of neutrino interactions. These models have to predict not only the signal and background populations that oscillation experiments see at near and far detectors, but they must also predict how the neutrino's energy which enters a nucleus gets transferred to energies of the particles that leave the nucleus after the neutrino interacts. Over the past year there have been a number of new results on many different neutrino (and antineutrino) interaction channels using several different target nuclei. These results are often not in agreement with predictions extraolated from charged lepton scattering measurements, or even from predictions anchored to neutrino measurements on deuterium. These new measurements are starting to give the community the handles needed to improve the theoretical description of neutrino interactions, which ultimately pave the way for precision oscillation measurements. This report briefly summarizes recent results and points out where those results differ from the predictions based on current models.

  20. Resonance self-shielding corrections for activation cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pade approximations of the Doppler broadening function ψ(θ, x) have been used for the calculations of resonance self-shielding factors used in activation measurements. It is shown that this method of the calculations is effective from the point of view of fastness and accuracy. (author)

  1. Rapid and accurate broadband absorption cross-section measurement of human bodies in a reverberation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement methodology for polarization and angle of incidence averaged electromagnetic absorption cross-section using a reverberation chamber is presented. The method is optimized for simultaneous rapid and accurate determination of average absorption cross-section over the frequency range 1–15 GHz, making it suitable for use in human absorption and exposure studies. The typical measurement time of the subject is about 8 min with a corresponding statistical uncertainty of about 3% in the measured absorption cross-section. The method is validated by comparing measurements on a spherical phantom with Mie series calculations. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated with measurements of the posture dependence of the absorption cross-section of a human subject and an investigation of the effects of clothing on the measured absorption which are important considerations for the practical design of experiments for studies on human subjects. (paper)

  2. The $^{63}$Ni(n,$\\gamma$) cross section measured with DANCE

    CERN Document Server

    Weigand, M; Couture, A; Göbel, K; Heftrich, T; Jandel, M; Käppeler, F; Lederer, C; Kivel, N; Korschinek, G; Krticka, M; O'Donnell, J M; Ostermöller, J; Plag, R; Reifarth, R; Schumann, D; Ullmann, J L; Wallner, A

    2015-01-01

    The neutron capture cross section of the s-process branch nucleus $^{63}$Ni affects the abundances of other nuclei in its region, especially $^{63}$Cu and $^{64}$Zn. In order to determine the energy dependent neutron capture cross section in the astrophysical energy region, an experiment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed using the calorimetric 4$\\pi$ BaF$_2$ array DANCE. The (n,$\\gamma$) cross section of $^{63}$Ni has been determined relative to the well known $^{197}$Au standard with uncertainties below 15%. Various $^{63}$Ni resonances have been identified based on the Q-value. Furthermore, the s-process sensitivity of the new values was analyzed with the new network calculation tool NETZ.

  3. Measurement of photon production cross sections with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Terron, Juan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The production of prompt isolated photons at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD and can be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. The ATLAS collaboration has performed precise measurements of the inclusive production of isolated prompt photons in 20.3 /fb of data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV and in 6.4 /pb of data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13TeV, differential in both rapidity and the photon transverse momentum. The measurements are compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in QCD and with predictions of several MC generators.

  4. Recent capture cross-sections validation on 232Th from 0,1 eV to 40 keV and self-shielding effect evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on ADS, related new fuels and their ability for nuclear waste incineration leads to a revival of interest in nuclear cross-sections of many nuclides in a large energy range. Discrepancies observed between nuclear databases require new measurements in several cases. A complete measurement of such cross-sections including resonance resolution consists in an extensive beam time experiment associated to a long analysis. With a slowing down spectrometer associated to a pulsed neutron source, it is possible to determine a good cross-section profile in an energy range from 0.1 eV to 40 keV by making use of a slowing-down time lead spectrometer associated to a pulsed neutron source. These measurements performed at ISN (Grenoble) with the neutron source GENEPI requires only small quantities of matter (as small as 0.1 g) and about one day of beam by target. We present cross-section profile measurements and an experimental study of the self-shielding effect. A CeF3 scintillator coupled with a photomultiplier detects gamma rays from neutronic capture in the studied target. The neutron flux is also measured with a 233U fission detector and a 3He detector at symmetrical position to the PM in relation to the neutron source. Absolute flux values are given by activation of Au and W foils. The cross-section profiles can then be deduced from the target capture rate and are compared with very detailed MCNP simulations, which reproduce the experimental set-up and provide also capture rates and flux. The method is then applied to 232Th, of main interest for new fuel cycle studies, and is complementary to higher energy measurements made by D. Karamanis et al. (CENBG). Results obtained for three target thicknesses will be compared with simulations based on different data bases. Special attention will be paid to the region of unresolved resonances (>100 eV). (author)

  5. T anti-T Production at the Tevatron: Event Selection and Cross Section Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Dugan C.; /Simon Fraser U.

    2007-03-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron is currently the only collider capable of producing and studying top quarks. The dominant mechanism for top quark production at the Tevatron is t{bar t} production via the strong interaction. The precise measurement of the cross section of this process is a test of the QCD prediction. In Run II of the Tevatron it should be possible to achieve an experimental error on this cross section which is comparable or better than the current theoretical precision. This paper presents the basic event selection criteria for t{bar t} events at the Tevatron and the latest measurements of the t{bar t} cross section.

  6. Energy-dependent excitation cross section measurements of the diagnostic lines of Fe XVII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Scofield, J H; Boyce, K R; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Gu, M F; Kahn, S M; Szymkowiak, A E

    2006-06-30

    By implementing a large-area, gain-stabilized microcalorimeter array on an electron beam ion trap, the electron-impact excitation cross sections for the dominant x-ray lines in the Fe XVII spectrum have been measured as a function of electron energy establishing a benchmark for atomic calculations. The results show that the calculations consistently predict the cross section of the resonance line to be significantly larger than measured. The lower cross section accounts for several problems found when modeling solar and astrophysical Fe XVII spectra. PMID:16907303

  7. Measurement of the 232Th(n,f) subthreshold and near-subthreshold cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement of the 232Th(n,f) cross section for incident neutron energies between 100 eV and 1.6 MeV has been performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory electron linear accelerator. The weak subthreshold fission cross section found in this measurement confirms the model of a low first barrier in the triple-humped fission barrier which has been theoretically predicted for the (232Th+n) system. However, the appearance of a series of plateaus in the near-threshold fission cross section region presents a challenge to current barrier calculations in the 233Th compound nucleus

  8. 7Li neutron-induced elastic scattering cross section measurement using a slowing-down spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    Heusch M.; Ghetta V.; Chabod S.; Brissot R.; Billebaud A.; Méplan O.; Kessedjian G.; Liatard E.

    2010-01-01

    A new integral measurement of the 7Li neutron induced elastic scattering cross section was determined in a wide neutron energy range. The measurement was performed on the LPSC-PEREN experimental facility using a heterogeneous graphite-LiF slowing-down time spectrometer coupled with an intense pulsed neutron generator (GENEPI-2). This method allows the measurement of the integral elastic scattering cross section in a slowing-down neutron spectrum. A Bayesian approach coupled to Monte Carlo cal...

  9. Possible use of measurements to amend cross section tables (PUMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a companion paper, the RAM flux mapping procedure has been demonstrated. RAM combines theory and in-core detector flux measurements, thereby recognizing a difference between the two. Assuming that the RAM 'smoothed-out' flux distribution is exact, then the discrepancy with purely theoretical fluxes is due to inadequacies in the diffusion theory, homogenised core parameters. PUMA has been devised with the purpose of inferring adjustments in the homogenised core parameters from the theory vs. experiment flux discrepancy. This has been achieved by introducing influence functions. A thorough mathematical analysis shows that influence functions are not all linearly independent and that it is crucial to use the criticality equation in the equation set. Numerical examples are shown to demonstrate the procedure

  10. Possible use of measurements to amend cross section tables (PUMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a companion paper, the RAM flux mapping procedure has been demonstrated. RAM combines theory and in-core detector flux measurements, thereby recognizing a difference between the two. Assuming that the RAM ''smoothed-out'' flux distribution is exact, then the discrepancy with purely theoretical fluxes is due to inadequacies in the diffusion theory, homogenised core parameters. PUMA has been devised with the purpose of inferring adjustments in the homogenised core parameters from the theory vs. experiment flux discrepancy. This has been achieved by introducing influence functions similar to those defined by Buckler. A thorough mathematical analysis shows that influence functions are not all linearly independent and that it is crucial to use the criticality equation in the equation set. Numerical examples are shown to demonstrate the procedure

  11. Measurement of Prompt Photon Cross Sections in Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V; Asmone, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Chekelian, V; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Demirchyan, R; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dingfelder, J; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garutti, E; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Heuer, R D; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Katzy, J; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Koblitz, B; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kroseberg, J; Kuckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N A; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Milstead, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morozov, I; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C B; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D K; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ossoskov, G; Ozerov, D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pöschl, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Raicevic, N; Ratiani, Z; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkár, S; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H G; Zomer, F

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented on the photoproduction of isolated prompt photons, inclusively and associated with jets, in the gamma p center of mass energy range 142 4.5 GeV. They are measured differentially as a function of E_T^gamma, E_T^jet, the pseudorapidities eta^gamma and eta^jet and estimators of the momentum fractions x_gamma and x_p of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard process. In order to further investigate the underlying dynamics, the angular correlation between the prompt photon and the jet in the transverse plane is studied. Predictions by perturbative QCD calculations in next to leading order are about 30% below the inclusive prompt photon data after corrections for hadronisation and multiple interactions, but are in reasonable agreement with the results for prompt photons associated with jets. Comparisons with the predictions of the event generators PYTHIA and HERWIG are also presented.

  12. Measurement of the {Upsilon} cross section at D{Phi} using dimuons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alitti, J.; Chevalier, L.; Ducros, Y.; Lebrat, J.F.; Mangeot, P. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Abachi, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); DO Collaboration

    1995-12-31

    The D{Phi} experiment has measured the {Upsilon} differential cross section in pp-bar collisions at {radical} s = 1.8 TeV for |y{sup {Upsilon}}| < 0.7. We find the measured cross section to be a factor of five larger than the {Omicron}({alpha}{sup 3}{sub s}) QCD prediction for p{sup {Upsilon}}{sub {Tau}} > 5 GeV/c. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Cross-section evaluation utilizing integral reaction-rate measurements in fast neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of integral reaction-rate data for cross-section evaluation is reviewed. The subset of integral data considered comprises integral reaction rates measured for dosimeter, fission-product, and actinide-type materials irradiated in reactor dosimetry fast neutron benchmark fields and in the EBR-II. Utilization of these integral data for integral testing, multigroup cross-section adjustment and pointwise cross section adjustment is treated in some detail. Examples are given that illustrate the importance of considering a priori uncertainty and correlation information for these analyses. 3 figures, 3 tables

  14. Study of the molecular structure and dynamics of bakelite with neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structure and dynamics of calcined bakelite were studied with neutron transmission and scattering cross section measurements. The total cross sections determined were correlated with data obtained with infra-red spectroscopy, elemental analysis and other techniques to get the probable molecular formulae of bakelite. The total cross section determined showed a deviation smaller than 5% from the literature values. The frequency distribution as well as overall experimental results allowed to suggest a structural model like polycyclic hydrocarbons for bakelite calcined at 8000 C. (F.E.). 65 refs, 31 figs, 5 tabs

  15. Cross Sections for High-Energy Gamma Transitions from MeV Neutron Capture in 206Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture in Pb (radiogenic lead) in the energy range 1.5 to 8.5 MeV were recorded using time-of-flight techniques. The spectrometer was a Nal (Tl) crystal, 20.8 cm long and 22.6 cm in diameter. The spectra are dominated by gamma transitions to levels with large single-particle strength, in agreement with predictions of semi-direct capture theories. The theories predict enhancements of the direct capture cross section by a factor of 10 - 15 in the region of the giant dipole resonance. The observed enhancement is about 50

  16. ATLAS-ALFA measurements on the total cross section and diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Mortensen, Simon Stark; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the total pp cross section at the LHC at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV with the ALFA subdetector of ATLAS is presented in this talk. In a special run with $\\beta^*=90$ m beam optics corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 80 $\\text{mb}^{-1}$ the differential elastic cross section is measured in the range from $-t=0.0025\\text{ GeV}^2$ to $-t=0.38\\text{ GeV}^2$. The total cross section $\\sigma(pp\\rightarrow X)$ is extracted using the Optical Theorem by extrapolation of the differential elastic cross section to $t=0\\text{ GeV}^2$. Prospects for diffractive measurements using ALFA to detect the intact proton(s) is also discussed.

  17. Compilation of measurements and evaluations of nuclear activation cross sections for nuclear data applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross-sections of fifty-eight reactions of interest for nuclear technology applications have been measured by the activation method in our laboratory. For the same reactions, compilations and evaluations of available neutron activation cross-sections have been made. Table 1 lists all of the reactions included in the present work. A brief description of experimental measurements for activation cross-sections is given. The evaluation procedure is described. The collected data were modified as needed to account for recent revisions in nuclear constants and standard cross-sections. For each reaction, the data measured by ourselves and our evaluations are listed in Tables 3 and 4 respectively. A graphical intercomparison with available experimental data is given. References can be found for each investigated reaction. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Measurement of the $Z \\to \\tau\\tau$ Cross Section with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Archambault, John-Paul; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Atoian, Grigor; Aubert, Bernard; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Austin, Nicholas; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Bachy, Gerard; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Detlef; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beare, Brian; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Ben Ami, Sagi; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Benchouk, Chafik; Bendel, Markus; Benedict, Brian Hugues; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernardet, Karim; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Böser, Sebastian; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bona, Marcella; Bondarenko, Valery; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borroni, Sara; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Braem, André; Branchini, Paolo; Brandenburg, George; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Breton, Dominique; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodbeck, Timothy; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchanan, Norman; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Buira-Clark, Daniel; Bulekov, Oleg; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butin, François; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byatt, Tom; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cambiaghi, Mario; Cameron, David; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Caramarcu, Costin; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cataneo, Fernando; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Cevenini, Francesco; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Tingyang; Chen, Xin; Cheng, Shaochen; Cheplakov, Alexander; Chepurnov, Vladimir; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciba, Krzysztof; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciobotaru, Matei Dan; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Clifft, Roger; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collard, Caroline; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Michele; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conventi, Francesco; Cook, James; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Coura Torres, Rodrigo; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Silva, Paulo Vitor; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dannheim, Dominik; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Daum, Cornelis; Dauvergne, Jean-Pierre; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Dawson, John; Daya, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lotto, Barbara; De Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Oliveira Branco, Miguel; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dean, Simon; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Dehchar, Mohamed; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delpierre, Pierre; Delruelle, Nicolas; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dobson, Marc; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donega, Mauro; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dosil, Mireia; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Dowell, John; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Drasal, Zbynek; Drees, Jürgen; Dressnandt, Nandor; Drevermann, Hans; Driouichi, Chafik; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dubbs, Tim; Dube, Sourabh; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Dydak, Friedrich; Dzahini, Daniel; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckert, Simon; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edmonds, Keith; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrich, Thies; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Ely, Robert; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Eppig, Andrew; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fazio, Salvatore; Febbraro, Renato; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Woiciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Fellmann, Denis; Felzmann, Ulrich; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Ferland, Jonathan; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrer, Maria Lorenza; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filippas, Anastasios; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Steve; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Föhlisch, Florian; Fokitis, Manolis; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Joe; Fournier, Daniel; Foussat, Arnaud; Fowler, Andrew; Fowler, Ken; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallas, Manuel; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galyaev, Eugene; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gapienko, Vladimir; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garitaonandia, Hegoi; Garonne, Vincent; Garvey, John; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaumer, Olivier; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniel Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghez, Philippe; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Victoria; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilbert, Laura; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gilewsky, Valentin; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Göttfert, Tobias; Goldfarb, Steven; Goldin, Daniel; Golling, Tobias; Golovnia, Serguei; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonidec, Allain; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gorokhov, Serguei; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouanère, Michel; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grabski, Varlen; Grafström, Per; Grah, Christian; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenfield, Debbie; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grognuz, Joel; Groh, Manfred; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guarino, Victor; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Ambreesh; Gusakov, Yury; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Andrea; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hackenburg, Robert; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Hongguang; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Hatch, Mark; Hauff, Dieter; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawes, Brian; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Hazen, Eric; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Mathieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Hernandez, Carlos Medina; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Hershenhorn, Alon David; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hessey, Nigel; Hidvegi, Attila; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Daniel; Hill, John; Hill, Norman; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmes, Alan; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Homma, Yasuhiro; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horazdovsky, Tomas; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Horton, Katherine; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Houlden, Michael; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Howell, David; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Guang Shun; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Hughes-Jones, Richard; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurst, Peter; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Ichimiya, Ryo; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Idzik, Marek; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuri; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Imbault, Didier; Imhaeuser, Martin; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Ionescu, Gelu; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Ishii, Koji; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Itoh, Yuki; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jankowski, Ernest; Jansen, Eric; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jelen, Kazimierz; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Ge; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tegid; Jones, Tim; Jonsson, Ove; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joseph, John; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Kabachenko, Vasily; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kaiser, Steffen; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagoz, Muge; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karr, Kristo; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasmi, Azzedine; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keates, James Robert; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Kelly, Marc; Kennedy, John; Kenney, Christopher John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Ketterer, Christian; Keung, Justin; Khakzad, Mohsen; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Kholodenko, Anatoli; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Nikolai; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Peter; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kirsch, Guillaume; Kirsch, Lawrence; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kiyamura, Hironori; Kladiva, Eduard; Klaiber-Lodewigs, Jonas; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knobloch, Juergen; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kocnar, Antonin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kokott, Thomas; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollar, Daniel; Kollefrath, Michael; Kolya, Scott; Komar, Aston; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Kopikov, Sergey; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Koreshev, Victor; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotamäki, Miikka Juhani; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kreisel, Arik; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kundu, Nikhil; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuykendall, William; Kuze, Masahiro; Kuzhir, Polina; Kvasnicka, Ondrej; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Rémi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Landsman, Hagar; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larionov, Anatoly; Larner, Aimee; Lasseur, Christian; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorato, Antonia; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Lazarev, Alexandre; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; Lebel, Céline; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Leger, Annie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lellouch, Jeremie; Leltchouk, Mikhail; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lesser, Jonas; Lester, Christopher; Leung Fook Cheong, Annabelle; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levitski, Mikhail; Lewandowska, Marta; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhihua; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Lifshitz, Ronen; Lilley, Joseph; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipinsky, Lukas; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Shengli; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Lockwitz, Sarah; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Loken, James; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lupi, Anna; Lutz, Gerhard; Lynn, David; Lys, Jeremy; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magalhaes Martins, Paulo Jorge; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahalalel, Yair; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manjavidze, Ioseb; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Manz, Andreas; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marin, Alexandru; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Robin; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Andrew; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Franck Francois; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Philippe; Martin, Tim; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mathes, Markus; Matricon, Pierre; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maugain, Jean-Marie; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; May, Edward; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mazzoni, Enrico; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McLaren, Robert Andrew; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehdiyev, Rashid; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meinhardt, Jens; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Menot, Claude; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meuser, Stefan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Miele, Paola; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Miralles Verge, Lluis; Misiejuk, Andrzej; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitrofanov, Gennady; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Mohrdieck-Möck, Susanne; Moisseev, Artemy; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morais, Antonio; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morita, Youhei; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morone, Maria-Christina; Morozov, Sergey; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Muenstermann, Daniel; Muir, Alex; Munwes, Yonathan; Murakami, Koichi; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Nash, Michael; Nation, Nigel; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nebot, Eduardo; Nechaeva, Polina; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Silke; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Nesterov, Stanislav; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Niinikoski, Tapio; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolaev, Kirill; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Nordkvist, Bjoern; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nožička, Miroslav; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nyman, Tommi; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Ohshita, Hidetoshi; Ohska, Tokio Kenneth; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olcese, Marco; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Omachi, Chihiro; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pajchel, Katarina; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panes, Boris; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Panuskova, Monika; Paolone, Vittorio; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Peng, Haiping; Pengo, Ruggero; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Onne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Alan; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickford, Andrew; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Ping, Jialun; Pinto, Belmiro; Pirotte, Olivier; Pizio, Caterina; Placakyte, Ringaile; Plamondon, Mathieu; Plano, Will; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskach, Anatoly; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Porter, Robert; Posch, Christoph; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Pribyl, Lukas; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Price, Michael John; Prichard, Paul; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qian, Zuxuan; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radics, Balint; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Ramstedt, Magnus; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Ratoff, Peter; Rauscher, Felix; Rauter, Emanuel; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reichold, Armin; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Reljic, Dusan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Renkel, Peter; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richards, Alexander; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieke, Stefan; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robinson, Mary; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodier, Stephane; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rojo, Victoria; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romanov, Victor; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Maltrana, Diego; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rossi, Lucio; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckert, Benjamin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Gerald; Rühr, Frederik; Ruggieri, Federico; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rulikowska-Zarebska, Elzbieta; Rumiantsev, Viktor; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Runge, Kay; Runolfsson, Ogmundur; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Rust, Dave; Rutherfoord, John; Ruwiedel, Christoph; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Ryadovikov, Vasily; Ryan, Patrick; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Rzaeva, Sevda; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sandvoss, Stephan; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Takashi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Savva, Panagiota; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Says, Louis-Pierre; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scallon, Olivia; Scannicchio, Diana; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schäfer, Uli; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schlereth, James; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Silvia; Schuler, Georges; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedykh, Evgeny; Segura, Ester; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sevior, Martin; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaver, Leif; Shaw, Christian; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siebel, Anca-Mirela; Siegert, Frank; Siegrist, James; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Skvorodnev, Nikolai; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Sloan, Terrence; Sloper, John erik; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snuverink, Jochem; Snyder, Scott; Soares, Mara; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Sondericker, John; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sorbi, Massimo; Sosebee, Mark; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahl, Thorsten; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Stavropoulos, Georgios; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stevenson, Kyle; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockmanns, Tobias; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strube, Jan; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Sugimoto, Takuya; Suhr, Chad; Suita, Koichi; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sushkov, Serge; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Sviridov, Yuri; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Szeless, Balazs; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taga, Adrian; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanaka, Yoshito; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tappern, Geoffrey; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tatarkhanov, Mous; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terwort, Mark; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Thadome, Jocelyn; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thioye, Moustapha; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timmermans, Charles; Tipton, Paul; Tique Aires Viegas, Florbela De Jes; Tisserant, Sylvain; Tobias, Jürgen; Toczek, Barbara; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokunaga, Kaoru; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Guoliang; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torchiani, Ingo; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Traynor, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Trinh, Thi Nguyet; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trivedi, Arjun; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turlay, Emmanuel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tyrvainen, Harri; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Uhrmacher, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Underwood, David; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urkovsky, Evgeny; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Uslenghi, Massimiliano; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valenta, Jan; Valente, Paolo; Valentinetti, Sara; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; van der Graaf, Harry; van der Kraaij, Erik; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; Van Eijk, Bob; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; van Kesteren, Zdenko; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vandelli, Wainer; Vandoni, Giovanna; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Varela Rodriguez, Fernando; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varouchas, Dimitris; 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Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walbersloh, Jorg; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Joshua C; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Warsinsky, Markus; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Jens; Weber, Marc; Weber, Michele; Weber, Pavel; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wellenstein, Hermann; Wells, Phillippa; Wen, Mei; Wenaus, Torre; Wendler, Shanti; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; Wheeler-Ellis, Sarah Jane; Whitaker, Scott; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicek, Francois; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Catherine; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wunstorf, Renate; Wynne, Benjamin; Xaplanteris, Leonidas; Xella, Stefania; Xie, Song; Xie, Yigang; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Guofa; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamaoka, Jared; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Weiming; Yao, Yushu; Yasu, Yoshiji; Ybeles Smit, Gabriel Valentijn; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Riktura; Young, Charles; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zaets, Vassilli; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zajacova, Zuzana; Zalite, Youris; Zanello, Lucia; Zarzhitsky, Pavel; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zemla, Andrzej; Zendler, Carolin; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zenonos, Zenonas; Zenz, Seth; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhan, Zhichao; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zheng, Shuchen; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zieminska, Daria; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; Zolnierowski, Yves; Zsenei, Andras; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2011-01-01

    The Z to tau tau cross section is measured with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in four different final states determined by the decay modes of the tau leptons: muon-hadron, electron-hadron, electron-muon, and muon-muon. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb^(-1), at a proton-proton center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. Cross sections are measured separately for each final state in fiducial regions of high detector acceptance, as well as in the full phase space, over the mass region 66 - 116 GeV. The individual cross sections are combined and the product of the total Z production cross section and Z to tau tau branching fraction is measured to be 0.97 +/- 0.07(stat) +/- 0.06(syst) +/- 0.03(lumi), in agreement with NNLO calculations.

  19. Analysis of (n,2n) cross-section measurements for nuclei up to mass 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All suitable measurements of the energy dependence of (n,2n) cross sections of all isotopes up to mass 238 have been analyzed. The objectives were to display the quality of the measured data for each isotope and to examine the systematic dependence of the (n,2n) cross section upon N, Z, and A. Graphs and tables are presented of the ratio of the asymptotic (n,2n) and nonelastic cross section to the neutron-asymmetry parameter (N--Z)/A. Similar data are presented for the derived nuclear temperature, T, and level-density parameter, α, as a function of N, Z, and A. This analysis of the results of over 145 experiments on 61 isotopes is essentially a complete review of the current status of (n,2n) cross-section measurements

  20. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  1. Measurement of reaction cross sections of {sup 129}I induced by DT neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Daisuke; Murata, Isao; Takahashi, Akito [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The cross sections were measured for the {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I and {sup 129}I(n,{gamma}){sup 130}I reactions by DT neutrons, at OKTAVIAN facility of Osaka University, Japan. The foil activation method was used in the measurement. The sample was a sealed source of {sup 129}I, which was covered with a Cd foil. The irradiations were performed for 75 minutes to obtain the cross section of reaction producing {sup 128}I (T{sub 1/2}=24.99m) and 22 hours for the {sup 130}I (T{sub 1/2}=12.36h), respectively. The gamma-rays emitted from the irradiated sample were measured with a high purity Ge detector. The measured cross sections of {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I and {sup 129}I(n,{gamma}){sup 130}I reactions were 0.92{+-}0.11 barn and 0.013{+-}0.002 barn, respectively. For the {sup 129}I(n,2n){sup 128}I reaction, the evaluation of JENDL-3.2 overestimates cross section about 60% to the experimental result. However, especially for the {sup 129}I(n,{gamma}) reaction, the measured cross section may include the contribution from the neutrons in MeV region as well as epithermal ones. Also, the obtained cross section of the {sup 129}I(n,{gamma}){sup 130}I reaction was evaluated as an effective production cross section of {sup 130}I including {sup 129}I(n,{gamma}){sup 130m}I reaction. In order to remove the contribution from the epithermal and MeV region neutrons. A new method was proposed for the measurement of (n,{gamma}) reaction cross section. (author)

  2. Measurements of the Ultraviolet Fluorescence Cross Sections and Spectra of Bacillus Anthracis Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J.R.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of the ultraviolet autofluorescence spectra and absolute cross sections of the Bacillus anthracis (Ba) simulants Bacillus globigii (Bg), Bacillus megaterium (Bm), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Bacillus cereus (Bc) were measured. Fluorescence spectra and cross sections of pine pollen (Pina echinata) were measured for comparison. Both dried vegetative cells and spores separated from the sporulated vegetative material were studied. The spectra were obtained by suspending a small number (<10) of particles in air in our Single Particle Spectroscopy Apparatus (SPSA), illuminating the particles with light from a spectrally filtered arc lamp, and measuring the fluorescence spectra of the particles. The illumination was 280 nm (20 nm FWHM) and the fluorescence spectra was measured between 300 and 450 nm. The fluorescence cross section of vegetative Bg peaks at 320 nm with a maximum cross section of 5 X 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle while the Bg spore fluorescence peaks at 310 nm with peak fluorescence of 8 X 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Pine pollen particles showed a higher fluorescence peaking at 355 nm with a cross section of 1.7 X 10{sup -13} cm{sup 2}/sr-nm-particle. Integrated cross sections ranged from 3.0 X 10{sup -13} for the Bg spores through 2.25 X 10{sup -12} (cm{sup 2}/sr-particle) for the vegetative cells.

  3. Measurements of integral cross section ratios in two dosimetry benchmark neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a current interlaboratory effort devoted to the standardization of fuels and materials neutron dosimetry, the 103Rh(n,n')103mRh and 58Ni(n,p)58Co integral cross sections have been accurately measured relatively to the 115In(n,n')115m In cross section in the 235U thermal fission neutron spectrum and in the MOL-ΣΣ intermediate-energy standard neutron field. In this last neutron field, the data are related also to the 235U(n,f) cross section. The measurements are extensively documented and the results briefly compared to literature. Most noticeably, decisive support is provided for the selection of a specific 103Rh(n,n')103mRh differential-energy cross section among the existing, conflicting data. (author)

  4. Measurements of the effective thermal neutron absorption cross-section in multi-grain models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective macroscopic absorption cross-section Σaeff of thermal neutrons in a grained medium differs from the corresponding cross-section Σahom in the homogeneous medium consisting of the same components, contributing in the same amounts. The ratio of these cross-sections defines the grain parameter, G, which is a measure of heterogeneity of the system for neutron absorption. Heterogeneous models have been built as two- or three-component systems (Ag, Cu and Co3O4 grains distributed in a regular grid in Plexiglas, in various proportions between them). The effective absorption cross-section has been measured and the experimental grain parameter has been found for each model. The obtained values are in the interval 0.34 < G < 0.58, while G = 1 means the homogeneous material. (author)

  5. Cross Section Measurements for Some Elements Suited as Thermal Spectrum indicators: Cd, Sm, Gd and Lu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective cross sections of Cd, Sm, Gd and Lu have been measured by the oscillator technique in the spectrum of the central channel of the Swedish reactor R1. For Cd, Sm and Gd the 2200 m/s cross sections were deduced on the basis of Westcott's g and s factors. The values obtained were generally in agreement with other recent values obtained by integral methods, although a systematic trend indicated that the value Tn - Tm = 29 ± 10 deg C for the neutron spectrum, measured with a fast chopper, was slightly too high. A new value of Tn - Tm = 22.5 ± 3.5 deg C was deduced and new 2200 m/s cross sections were obtained by iteration. For natural Lu, the energy dependence of the cross section is not well known. Certain assumptions about the cross section function led to unreasonably high values for the 2200 m/s cross section. Complementary differential measurements of the cross sections of Cd, Sm and Gd were made with the Rl fast chopper. For Cd and Sm the 2200 m/s cross section thus obtained agreed within experimental error with those obtained from the integral measurements. For Gd, the chopper measured value was higher, confirming earlier findings and indicating that the Westcott g factor for Gd is too high. Cd: Integral meas. : σ(2200) = 2,390 ± 45 b; Differential meas. : σ(2200) = 2,445 ± 25 b; Sm: Integral meas. : σ(2200) = 5,880 ± 90 b; Differential meas. : σ(2200) = 5,740 ± 150 b; Gd: Integral meas. : σ(2200) 46,470 ± 550 b; Differential meas. : σ(2200) = 47,900 ± 700 b

  6. Evaluation of the fission and capture cross sections of 240Pu and 241Pu for ENDF/B-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since there were appreciable new data which were not available for ENDF/B-IV, new evaluations for 240Pu and 241Pu were carried out for ENDF/B-V. The evaluation of the fission and capture cross sections is reviewed and problem areas are discussed. The neutron energy range of concern was from 10-5 eV to 20 MeV. Significant changes were made over the entire neutron energy region because of the new experimental data available. The problems in the evaluations due to discrepancies in the nuclear data are emphasized, particularly the 1-eV resonance in 240Pu and the 0.3-eV resonance in 241Pu. The evaluation of the fission and capture cross sections for ENDF/B-V represents an improvement over the previous evaluation; however, there continues to be a need for accurate experimental data. 7 figures

  7. Status update on the NIFFTE high precision fission cross section measurement program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burgett, Eric [GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECH; Greife, Uwe [COLORADO SCHOOL OF THE MINES; Grimes, Steven [OHIO UNIV; Heffner, Michael D [LLNL; Hertel, Nolan E [GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECH; Hill, Tony [IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY; Isenhower, Donald [ABILENE CHRISTIN UNIV; Klay, Jennifer L [CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIV; Kornilov, Nickolay [OHIO UNIV; Kudo, Ryuho [CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIV; Loveland, Walter [OREGON STATE UNIV; Massey, Thomas [OHIO UNIV; Mc Grath, Chris [IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY; Pickle, Nathan [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Qu, Hai [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Sharma, Sarvagya [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Snyder, Lucas [COLORADO SCHOOL OF THE MINES; Thornton, Tyler [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Towell, Rusty S [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV; Watson, Shon [ABILENE CHRISTIAN UNIV

    2010-01-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) program has been underway for nearly two years. The program's mission is to measure fission cross sections of the primary fissionable and fissile materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U) as well as the minor actinides across energies from approximately 50 keV up to 20 MeV with an absolute uncertainty of less than one percent while investigating energy ranges from below an eV to 600 MeV. This basic nuclear physics data is being reinvestigated to support the next generation power plants and a fast burner reactor program. Uncertainties in the fast, resolved and unresolved resonance regions in plutonium and other transuranics are extremely large, dominating safety margins in the next generation nuclear power plants and power plants of today. This basic nuclear data can be used to support all aspects of the nuciear renaissance. The measurement campaign is utilizing a Time Projection Chamber or TPC as the tool to measure these cross sections to these unprecedented levels. Unlike traditional fission cross section measurements using time-of-flight and a multiple fission foil configurations in which fission cross sections in relation to that of {sup 235}U are performed, the TPC project uses time-of-flight and hydrogen as the benchmark cross section. Using the switch to hydrogen, a simple, smooth cross section that can be used which removes the uncertainties associated with the resolved and unresolved resonances in {sup 235}U.

  8. Status update on the NIFFTE high precision fission cross section measurement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) program has been underway for nearly two years. The program's mission is to measure fission cross sections of the primary fissionable and fissile materials (235U, 239Pu, 238U) as well as the minor actinides across energies from approximately 50 keV up to 20 MeV with an absolute uncertainty of less than one percent while investigating energy ranges from below an eV to 600 MeV. This basic nuclear physics data is being reinvestigated to support the next generation power plants and a fast burner reactor program. Uncertainties in the fast, resolved and unresolved resonance regions in plutonium and other transuranics are extremely large, dominating safety margins in the next generation nuclear power plants and power plants of today. This basic nuclear data can be used to support all aspects of the nuciear renaissance. The measurement campaign is utilizing a Time Projection Chamber or TPC as the tool to measure these cross sections to these unprecedented levels. Unlike traditional fission cross section measurements using time-of-flight and a multiple fission foil configurations in which fission cross sections in relation to that of 235U are performed, the TPC project uses time-of-flight and hydrogen as the benchmark cross section. Using the switch to hydrogen, a simple, smooth cross section that can be used which removes the uncertainties associated with the resolved and unresolved resonances in 235U.

  9. Pulse height effects in the measurement of U-233 fission cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial fission cross sections were calculated for different energy cuts in the fission fragment distribution. Statistically significant differences exist between different cuts. Some levels previously assumed to be single were split into two or more structures. It was concluded that fission cross sections are sensitive to pulse height bias and that level parameters calculated from biased measurements (when not all fragments are detected) may be in error. (2 figures) (U.S.)

  10. First measurement of the antiproton-nucleus annihilation cross section at 125 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Aghai-Khozani, H; Corradini, M; De Salvador, D; Hayano, R; Hori, M; Kobayashi, T; Leali, M; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Mascagna, V; Prest, M; Seiler, D; Soter, A; Todoroki, K; Vallazza, E; Venturelli, L

    2015-01-01

    The first observation of in-flight antiproton-nucleus annihilation at ∼130 keV obtained with the ASACUSA detector has demonstrated that the measurement of the cross section of the process is feasible at such extremely low energies Aghai-Khozani, H., et al., Eur. Phys. J. Plus 127, 55 (2012). Here we present the results of the data analysis with the evaluations of the antiproton annihilation cross sections on carbon, palladium and platinum targets at 125 keV.

  11. Transfer ionization cross-sections measured in collisions of highly charged argon ions with neon target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Xinwen(马新文); LIU; Huiping; (刘惠萍); CHEN; Ximeng; (陈熙萌); YANG; Zhihu; (杨治虎); SHEN; Ziyong; (申自勇); WANG; Youde; (王友德); YU; Deyang; (于得洋); CAI; Xiaohong; (蔡晓红); LIU; Zhaoyuan; (刘兆远)

    2003-01-01

    Multiple electron transfer processes are studied for Arq+ + Ne (q = 8, 9, 11, 12) collisions by using multi-parameter coincidence techniques. Various electron transfer processes are identified experimentally and the related cross-sections are measured. The dependence of transfer ionization cross-sections on the recoil charge states is compared with the results from the modified molecular classical overbarrier model. It is found that the modified model described the experimental results reasonably.

  12. Capture cross-section and rate of the 14C(, )15C reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of 15C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shubhchintak; Neelam; R Chatterjee

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the Coulomb dissociation of 15C on a Pb target at 68 MeV/u incident beam energy within the fully quantum mechanical distorted wave Born approximation formalism of breakup reactions. The capture cross-section and the subsequent rate of the 14C(, )15C reaction are calculated from the photodisintegration of 15C, using the principle of detailed balance. Our theoretical model is free from the uncertainties associated with the multipole strength distributions of the projectile.

  13. Molecular dynamical and structural studies for the bakelite by neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron reaction cross sections were determined by transmission and scattering measurements, to study the dynamics and molecular structure of calcined bakelites. Total cross sections were determined, with a deviation smaller than 5%, from the literature values, by neutron transmission method and a specially devised approximation. These cross sections were then correlated with data obtained with infra-red spectroscopy, elemental analysis and other techniques to get the probable molecular formulae of bakelite. Double differential scattering cross sections, scattering law values and frequency distributions were determined with 15% error using the neutron inelastic scattering method. The frequency distributions as well as the overall results from all experimental techniques used in this work allowed to suggest a structural model like polycyclic hydrocarbons, for calcined bakelite at 8000 C. (author)

  14. Measurement and calculation of the 233Pa fission cross-section for advanced fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy dependence of the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 233Pa has been measured directly for the first time from the fission threshold up to 8.5 MeV. This fission cross-section is a key ingredient in feasibility studies on fast reactors and accelerator driven systems based on the Th-U fuel cycle. The results are at strong variance with the existing evaluations. The new experimental data give lower cross-section values and resolve the question about the threshold energy. Additionally a new theoretical calculation of the reaction cross-section has been performed with the statistical model code STATIS, showing a very good agreement with the experimental data. (authors)

  15. Argon intermolecular potential from a measurement of the total scattering cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inversion method to obtain accurate intermolecular potentials from experimental total cross section measurements is presented. This method is based on the high energy Massey--Smith approximation. The attractive portion of the potential is represented by a multi-parameter spline function and the repulsive part by a Morse function. The best fit potential is obtained by a least squares minimization based on comparison of experimental cross sections with those obtained by a Fourier transform of the reduced Massey--Smith phase shift curve. An experimental method was developed to obtain the total cross sections needed for the above inversion procedure. In this technique, integral cross sections are measured at various resolutions and the total cross section is obtained by extrapolating to infinite resolution. Experimental results obtained for the Ar--Ar system are in excellent agreement with total cross sections calculated using the Barker-Fisher-Watts potential. Inversion of the data to obtain a potential distinguishable from the BFW-potential requires an extension of the method based on the Massey--Smith approximation to permit use of JWKB phase shifts and was not attempted

  16. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Electron Capture Cross-Sections in Ion-Ion Collisions at Approximately to MeV/amu: Application to ENA Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discovery by STEREO A/B of energetic neutral hydrogen is spurring an interest and need for reliable estimates of electron capture cross sections at few MeVs per nucleon as well as for multi-electron ions. Required accuracy in such estimates necessitates detailed and involved quantum-mechanical calculations or expensive numerical simulations. For ENA modeling and similar purposes, a semi-classical approach offers a middle-ground approach. Kuang's semiclassical formalism to calculate electron-capture cross sections for single and multi-electron ions is an elegant and efficient method, but has so far been applied to limited and specific laboratory measurements and at somewhat lower energies. Our goals are to test and extend Kuang s method to all ion-atom and ion-ion collisions relevant to ENA modeling, including multi-electron ions and for K-shell to K-shell transitions.

  17. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Calculating Electron Capture Cross Sections: A Space- Physics Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimates of electroncapture cross sections at energies relevant to the modeling of the transport, acceleration, and interaction of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in space (approximately few MeV per nucleon) and especially for multi-electron ions must rely on detailed, but computationally expensive, quantum-mechanical description of the collision process. Kuang's semi-classical approach is an elegant and efficient way to arrive at these estimates. Motivated by ENA modeling efforts for apace applications, we shall briefly present this approach along with sample applications and report on current progress.

  18. Study on coincidence measurement for 56Fe(n, χnγ) reaction cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When measuring (n, χnγ) partial γ-ray cross section of heavy fissionable nuclei, the technique of coincidence measurement was applied to depress Compton platform and background of energy spectrum. Five energy points of 56Fe(n, χnγ) cross sections were measured directly by two Clover detectors on 600 kV Cockcroff-Walton accelerator in CIAE, and then the offline data analysis at 1238.3 keV was performed by using the coincidence technique. The result is approximately the same as direct measurement result and the availability of the technique of coincidence measurement is proved. (authors)

  19. Neutron Radiative Capture Cross Section of 232Th in the Energy Range from 0.06 to 2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross section of 232Th has been measured relative to σ(n, γ) for 197Au and σ(n,f) for 235U in the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. Neutrons were produced by the 7Li(p,n) and T(p,n) reactions at the 4-MV Van de Graaff Accelerator of CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan. The activation technique was used, and the cross section was measured relative to the 197Au(n,γ) standard cross section up to 1 MeV. The characteristic gamma lines of the product nuclei 233Pa and 198Au were measured with a 40% high-purity germanium detector. Above this energy, the reaction 235U(n,f) was also used as a second standard, and the fission fragments were detected with a photovoltaic cell. The results, after applying the appropriate corrections, indicate that the cross sections are close to the JENDL-3 database values up to 800 keV and over 1.4 MeV. For energies in the intermediate range, our values are slightly lower than those from all the libraries

  20. tt¯ $tar t$ pair production cross section measurement at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Tae Jeong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of tt¯ $tar t$ pair production cross sections with an integrated luminosity of around 1 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV obtained with the ATLAS and CMS detectors are reported. The inclusive cross sections in dilepton (ee, eμ, μμ and μτ, lepton+jets (e, μ and all hadronic decay modes are measured. In addition to inclusive cross section measurement, the study of jet multiplicity with additional jets are also presented, which is important to constrain the initial state radiation. Measurement of the charge asymmetry at the LHC is also presented. All measurements are compatible with Standard Model predictions.

  1. Measurements of the W production cross sections in association with jets with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents cross sections for the production of a W boson in association with jets, measured in proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. With an integrated luminosity of $4.6 fb^{-1}$, this data set allows for an exploration of a large kinematic range, including jet production up to a transverse momentum of 1 TeV and multiplicities up to seven associated jets. The production cross sections for W bosons are measured in both the electron and muon decay channels. Differential cross sections for many observables are also presented including measurements of the jet observables such as the rapidities and the transverse momenta as well as measurements of event observables such as the scalar sums of the transverse momenta of the jets. The measurements are compared to numerous QCD predictions including next-to-leading-order perturbative calculations, resummation calculations and Monte Carlo generators.

  2. Cross-section-constrained top-quark mass measurement from dilepton events at the Tevatron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; DeCecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D

    2008-02-15

    We report the first top-quark mass measurement that uses a cross-section constraint to improve the mass determination. This measurement is made with a dilepton tt event candidate sample collected with the Collider Detector II at Fermilab. From a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.2 fb(-1), we measure a top-quark mass of 170.7(-3.9)(+4.2)(stat)+/-2.6(syst)+/-2.4(theory) GeV/c(2). The measurement without the cross-section constraint is 169.7(-4.9)(+5.2)(stat)+/-3.1(syst) GeV/c(2). PMID:18352461

  3. First measurements of the total and partial stellar cross section to the $s$-process branching-point $^{79}$Se

    CERN Document Server

    Dillmann, I; Käppeler, F; Fästermann, T; Knie, K; Korschinek, G; Poutivtsev, M; Rugel, G; Wallner, A; Rauscher, T

    2008-01-01

    Although $^{79}$Se represents an important branching in the weak s process, the stellar neutron capture cross sections to this isotope have not yet been measured experimentally. In this case, experimental data is essential for evaluating the important branching in the s-process reaction path at $^{79}$Se. The total cross section of $^{78}$Se at a stellar energy of kT = 25 keV has been investigated with a combination of the activation technique and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), since offline decay counting is prohibitive due to the long terrestrial half life of $^{79}$Se (2.80$\\pm$0.36 $\\times10^5$ y) as well as the absence of suitable $\\gamma$-ray transitions. The preliminary result for the total Maxwellian averaged cross section is $_{30 keV}$= 60.1$\\pm$9.6 mbarn, significantly lower than the previous recommended value. In a second measurement, also the partial cross section to the 3.92 min-isomer was determined via $\\gamma$-spectroscopy and yielded $_{30 keV}$(part.)= 42.0$\\pm$2.0 mbarn.

  4. Unpolarized neutral current e±p cross section measurements at the H1 experiment, HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the unpolarized inclusive neutral current reduced cross section in e±p scattering at a center of mass energy √(s) ≅ 319 GeV are presented. The data was collected by the H1 detector during the HERA II running phase, after the 2000 luminosity upgrade, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 145 pb-1 and 167 pb-1 for the e-p and e+p periods respectively. The cross section measurements were made for the negative four-momentum transfer squared range 65≤ Q2≤30000 GeV2 and Bjorken-x range 0.00085≤x≤0.65. Dedicated measurements at inelasticity y=0.75 and Q2≤800 GeV2 are also made. The details of the analysis are presented here. The cross section measurements presented here are found to agree with previously published data as well as predictions determined from various NLO QCD fits. Scaling violation of the F2 structure function as well differences between the e- and e+ cross sections at high Q2 due to the xF3 structure function have been observed. The cross sections in the range Q2≤800 GeV2 at inelasticity y=0.75 suggest non-zero values of the longitudinal structure function FL. (orig.)

  5. Measurement of proton-induced target fragmentation cross sections in carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, K.; Nishio, T.; Tanaka, S.; Tsuneda, M.; Sugiura, A.; Ieki, K.

    2016-02-01

    In proton therapy, positron emitter nuclei are generated via the target nuclear fragmentation reactions between irradiated proton and nuclei constituting a human body. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed with measurement of annihilation γ-rays from the generated positron emitter nuclei. To achieve the high accuracy of proton therapy, in vivo dosimetry, i.e., evaluation of the irradiated dose during the treatment is important. To convert the measured activity distribution to irradiated dose, cross-sectional data for positron emitter production is necessary, which is currently insufficient in the treatment area. The purpose of this study is to collect cross-sectional data of 12C (p , pn)11C and 12C (p , p 2 n)10C reactions between the incident proton and carbon nuclei, which are important target nuclear fragmentation reactions, to estimate the range and exposure dose distribution in the patient's body. Using planar-type PET capable of measuring annihilation γ-rays at high positional resolution and thick polyethylene target, we measured cross-sectional data in continuous wide energy range. The cross section of 12C (p , pn)11C is in good agreement with existing experimental data. The cross section of 12C (p , p 2 n)10C is reported for the first data in the low-energy range of 67.6-10.5 MeV near the Bragg peak of proton beam.

  6. Excitation Cross Section Measurement for n=3 to n=2 Line Emission in Fe{sup 20+} to Fe{sup 23+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Beiersdorfer, P; Scofield, J; Brown, G; Boyce, K; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Gu, M F; Kahn, S M

    2004-08-25

    Electron impact excitation cross sections have been measured for iron L-shell 3 {yields} 2 lines of FeXXI to FeXXIV at the EBIT-II electron beam ion trap using a crystal spectrometer and a 6 x 6-element array microcalorimeter. The cross sections were determined by direct normalization to the well established cross section of radiative electron capture and a summary of calculated energy dependent radiative recombination cross sections for electron capture into the ground state fine structure levels of Fe{sup 16+} to Fe{sup 23+} ions is given. The measurement results for 17 lines and their comparison with model calculations are presented. While agreement of the model calculations with experiment is good for most measured lines, significant discrepancies were found for a few lines, including the strongest line in Fe XXI.

  7. Neutron radiative capture cross-section of 232Th in the energy range from 0.06 to 2 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture cross-section of 232Th have been measured relative to σ(n,γ) for 197Au and σ(n,f) for 235U in the energy range from 60 keV to 2 MeV. Neutrons were produced by the 7Li(p,n) and T(p,n) reactions at the 4 MV Van de Graaff Accelerator of CEN/Bordeaux. The activation technique was used and the cross-section was measured relative to the 197Au(n,γ) standard cross-section up to 1 MeV. Above this energy, the reaction 235U(n,f) was also used as a second standard and the fission fragments were detected with a photovoltaic cell. The results after applying the appropriate corrections indicate that the cross-sections are close to the JENDL-3 database values up to 800 keV and over 1.4 MeV. For energies in the intermediate range, values are slightly lower to the ones from all the libraries. (author)

  8. Measurement of the Cross Section of W-boson pair production at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    The cross section of W-boson pair-production is measured with the L3 detector at LEP. In a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 629.4/pb, collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 189 to 209 GeV, 9834 four-fermion events with W bosons decaying into hadrons or leptons are selected. The total cross section is measured with a precision of 1.4 % and agrees with the Standard Model expectation. Assuming charged-lepton universality, the branching fraction for hadronic W-boson decays is measured to be: Br(W-->hadrons) = 67.50 +- 0.42 (stat.) +- 0.30(syst.) %, in agreement with the Standard Model. Differential cross sections as a function of the W- production angle are also measured for the semi-leptonic channels qqev and qqmv.

  9. Absorption cross-section measurements of methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Alrefae, Majed

    2014-09-01

    Mid-IR absorption cross-sections are measured for methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol over 2800-3400 cm-1 (2.9-3.6 μm) spectral region. Measurements are carried out using a Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with temperatures ranging 296-1100 K and pressures near atmospheric. As temperature increases, the peak cross-sections decrease but the wings of the bands increase as higher rotational lines appear. Integrated band intensity is also calculated over the measured spectral region and is found to be a very weak function of temperature. The absorption cross-sections of the relatively small fuels studied here show dependence on the bath gas. This effect is investigated by studying the variation of absorption cross-sections at 3.392 μm using a HeNe laser in mixtures of fuel and nitrogen, argon, or helium. Mixtures of fuel with He have the highest value of absorption cross-sections followed by Ar and N2. Molecules with narrow absorption lines, such as methane and methanol, show strong dependence on bath gas than molecules with relatively broader absorption features i.e. ethane and ethylene. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of Antiproton-proton Cross-Sections at Low Antiproton Momenta

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to measure four different cross sections in the momentum range 150~MeV/c to 600~MeV/c: 1)~~~~the differential elastic \\\\ \\\\ 2)~~~~the differential charge exchange\\\\ \\\\ 3)~~~~the annihilation into charged and neutral pions\\\\ \\\\ 4)~~~~and the total cross section via the optical theorem. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment allows one to search once again and with good precision for baryonium. Of special interest is the existence of the S-meson, for which a signal of about 20~MeV-mb was found in a 1981 experiment (performed in the East Hall).\\\\ \\\\ A second point of special interest is the momentum region below 300~MeV/c because the cross sections are basically unknown. We will be able to explore the momentum dependence of this region for the first time.\\\\ \\\\ The elastic cross section is measured by a cylindrical multiwire proportional chamber and a scintillator hodoscope placed around a scattering chamber under vacuum. The charge exchange cross section is measured by a ring of 32~anti-neutron detector...

  11. Absorption cross-section measurements of methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefae, Majed; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-09-01

    Mid-IR absorption cross-sections are measured for methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol over 2800-3400 cm-1 (2.9-3.6 μm) spectral region. Measurements are carried out using a Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with temperatures ranging 296-1100 K and pressures near atmospheric. As temperature increases, the peak cross-sections decrease but the wings of the bands increase as higher rotational lines appear. Integrated band intensity is also calculated over the measured spectral region and is found to be a very weak function of temperature. The absorption cross-sections of the relatively small fuels studied here show dependence on the bath gas. This effect is investigated by studying the variation of absorption cross-sections at 3.392 μm using a HeNe laser in mixtures of fuel and nitrogen, argon, or helium. Mixtures of fuel with He have the highest value of absorption cross-sections followed by Ar and N2. Molecules with narrow absorption lines, such as methane and methanol, show strong dependence on bath gas than molecules with relatively broader absorption features i.e. ethane and ethylene.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the midpoint algorithm in Run II at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Robert Craig; /Florida U.

    2006-12-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint jet clustering algorithm in five different rapidity regions. This is the first analysis which measures the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint algorithm in the forward region of the detector. The measurement is based on more than 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of Run II data taken by the CDF experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The results are consistent with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  13. The neutron capture cross section for 99Tc with Feshbach and Weisskopf model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmutation is one of the famous modes for the nuclear wastes management. It is based on the transformation of the radiotoxic element to the stable one by nuclear reaction.The most important fission product is technetium-99. The 99Tc were confirmed to have highest transmutation priorities in terms of transmutability and long-term radiological risk reduction Its transmutation under a neutron flux in an installation (transmuter) is the process of it artificial transformation into stable nuclides. The neutronic cross sections of the 99Tc (n,γ) 100Tc reaction are calculated with the Feshbach and Weisskopf model outside the resonance region. These values are compared to those evaluated from the nuclear data library ENDF/E IV. The introduction of the normalization factor is necessary to have closer values

  14. The neutron capture cross sections for 99Tc with Feshbach and Weisskopf model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The transmutation is one of the famous modes for the nuclear wastes management. It is based on the transformation of the radio-toxic element to the stable one by nuclear reaction. The most important fission products are technetium-99. The 99Tc were confirmed to have highest transmutation priorities in terms of transmutability and long-term radiological risk reduction. Its transmutation under a neutron flux in an installation (trans-muter) is the process of its artificial transformation into stable nuclides. The neutronic cross sections of the 99Tc(n,γ)100Tc reactions are calculated with the Feshbach and Weisskopf model outside the resonance region. These values are compared to those evaluated from the nuclear data library ENDF/B-IV. The introduction of normalization factor is necessary to have closer values

  15. The latest results on top quark pair cross-section measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The latest results on top quark pair production cross-section measurement in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\ TeV$ and $\\sqrt{s} = 8\\ TeV$ with the ATLAS detector are reported. The inclusive cross-section was measured with 4% of uncertainty using di-lepton e-mu events. The measurement of the differential cross-section as functions of various observables such as transverse momentum and rapidity of the top quark and invariant mass of the pseudo-top-quark pair system including the results in boosted topologies are also reported. These results are compared with the various generators such as Powheg, Alpgen and MC@NLO and the various PDF sets.

  16. Level Densities in the actinide region and indirect n,y cross section measurements using the surrogate method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedeking M.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Results from a program of measurements of level densities and gamma ray strength functions in the actinide region are presented. Experiments at the Oslo cyclotron involving the Cactus/Siri detectors and 232Th(d,x and 232Th(3He,x reactions were carried out to help answer the question of which level density model is the most appropriate for actinide nuclei, since it will have an impact on cross section calculations important for reactor physics simulations. A new technique for extracting level densities and gamma ray strength functions from particle-gamma coincidence data is proposed and results from the development of this technique are presented. In addition, simultaneous measurements of compound nuclear gamma decay probabilities have been performed for the key thorium cycle nuclei 233Th, 231Th and 232Pa up to around 1MeV above the neutron binding energy and have enabled extraction of indirect neutron induced capture cross sections for the 232Th, 231Pa and 230Th nuclei using the surrogate reaction method. Since the neutron capture cross section for 232Th is already well known from direct measurements a comparison provides a stringent test of the applicability of the surrogate technique in the actinide region.

  17. Level Densities in the actinide region and indirect n,y cross section measurements using the surrogate method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. N.; Gunsing, F.; Bernstein, L.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Thompson, I. J.; Guttormssen, M.; Larsen, A.-C.; Mansouri, P.; Renstrøm, T.; Rose, S. J.; Siem, S.; Wiedeking, M.; Wiborg, T.

    2012-02-01

    Results from a program of measurements of level densities and gamma ray strength functions in the actinide region are presented. Experiments at the Oslo cyclotron involving the Cactus/Siri detectors and 232Th(d,x) and 232Th(3He,x) reactions were carried out to help answer the question of which level density model is the most appropriate for actinide nuclei, since it will have an impact on cross section calculations important for reactor physics simulations. A new technique for extracting level densities and gamma ray strength functions from particle-gamma coincidence data is proposed and results from the development of this technique are presented. In addition, simultaneous measurements of compound nuclear gamma decay probabilities have been performed for the key thorium cycle nuclei 233Th, 231Th and 232Pa up to around 1MeV above the neutron binding energy and have enabled extraction of indirect neutron induced capture cross sections for the 232Th, 231Pa and 230Th nuclei using the surrogate reaction method. Since the neutron capture cross section for 232Th is already well known from direct measurements a comparison provides a stringent test of the applicability of the surrogate technique in the actinide region.

  18. Measurement of fast neutron induced fission cross section of minor-actinide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fuel cycles with recycled actinide, core characteristics are largely influenced by minor actinide (MA: Np, Am, Cm). Accurate nuclear data of MA such as fission cross section are required to estimate the effect of MA with high accuracy. In this study, fast neutron induced fission cross section of MA is measured using Dynamitron Accelerator in Tohoku University. The experimental method and the samples, which were developed or introduced during the last year, were improved in this fiscal year: (1) Development of a sealed fission chamber, (2) Intensification of Li neutron target, (3) Improvement of time-resolution of Time-of-Flight (TOF) electronic circuit, (4) Introduction of Np237 samples with large sample mass and (5) Introduction of a U235 sample with high purity. Using these improved tools and samples, the fission cross section ratio of Np237 relative to U235 was measured between 5 to 100 keV, and the fission cross section of Np237 was deduced. On the other hand, samples of Am241 and Am243 were obtained from Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) after investigating fission cross section of two americium isotopes (Am241 and Am 243) which are important for core physics calculation of fast reactors. (author)

  19. Macroscopic model of particles' capture by the elliptic cross-section collector in magnetic separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper, the forces and trajectories of paramagnetic and ferromagnetic particles that move in the surrounding of ferromagnetic capture element have been determined. The influence of flow speed of the medium on the width zone of particle capture by the collector have been analysed. In the considerations, spherical shape of the particle has been assumed

  20. Study on neutron capture cross sections using the filtered neutron beams of 55 keV and 144 keV at the Dalat reactor and related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this fundamental research project on nuclear physics in period of 2007, the neutron capture cross sections for the reactions of 146Nd (n,γ) 147Nd, 148Nd (n,γ) 149Nd, 150Nd (n,γ) 151Nd, 154Sm(n,γ) 155Sm, 181Ta (n,γ) 182Ta and total neutron cross section of 181Ta have been measured at the filtered neutron beams of 54 keV and 148 keV of the Dalat nuclear research reactor. The present results were compared with the previous measurements from EXFOR-2003, and the evaluated values of JENDL 3.3 and ENDF/B-6.8. Beside that development computer codes for exact analysis of the buildup and decay of fission products for time following a fission burst, for determination of correction parameters to improve the accuracy in measurements of the neutron capture cross-section on filtered neutron beams and for determination of characteristic parameters of monoenergetic neutron beams were also carried out. (author)

  1. Status report and measurement of total cross-sections at the Pohang Neutron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the status of the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target, and an 11-m time-of-flight path. It has been equipped with a four-position sample changer controlled remotely by a CAMAC data acquisition system, which allows simultaneous accumulation of the neutron time of flight spectra from 4 different detectors. It is possible to measure the neutron total cross-sections in the neutron energy range from 0.1 eV to 100 eV by using the neutron time of flight method. A 6LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 10.81±0.02 m. The background level was determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, Ta, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from Bremsstrahlung and those from neutron capture, we employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shapes. The present measurements are in general agreement with the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. The resonance parameters were extracted from the transmission data from the SAMMY fitting and compared with the previous ones. (author)

  2. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurements with the MINOS near detector

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Barnes, JR; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Devenish, N. E.; Falk, E.; Harris, P.G.; Hartnell, J.; et al, ...

    2010-01-01

    The energy dependence of the neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron inclusive charged-current cross sections and their ratio have been measured using a high-statistics sample with the MINOS Near Detector exposed to the NuMI beam from the Main Injector at Fermilab. Neutrino and antineutrino fluxes were determined using a low hadronic energy subsample of charged-current events. We report measurements of neutrino-Fe (antineutrinoFe) cross section in the energy range 3-50 GeV (5-50 GeV) with precisi...

  3. Measurement of neutron-induced charged-particle-emission reaction cross section using gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gridded ionization chamber (GIC) having large geometrical efficiency, ∼2π, has been developed for measurements of neutron-induced charged-particle emission cross sections. Test experiments proved the proper operation of GIC with complete charge collection even if the gas pressure was over 10 atm.. GIC was applied successfully to proton and α emission cross section measurements for nickel at the several MeV and 15 MeV incident neutron energies with the results in good agreement with the previous data and evaluations. The construction of GIC and the experimental technique are presented in this paper. (author)

  4. (n, α) cross section measurement of light nuclei using gridded ionization chamber and gaseous sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a measuring method of (n, α) cross section by using gaseous sample in a gridded ionization chamber. In this study, we measured the 12C(n, α0) and the 16O(n, α0), (n, α123) cross sections for En=11.5 and 12.8 MeV neutrons. We also deduced the 12C(n, xα) spectrum and analyzed the data by a kinematic calculation combined with the reaction data of the 12C(n, n'3α). (author)

  5. Double diffractive cross-section measurement in the forward region at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G; Atanassov, I; Avati, V; Baechler, J; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Bossini, E; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brucken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, FS; Catanesi, MG; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Deile, M; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; Garcia, F; Giani, S; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hilden, T; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrat, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, T; Lippmaa, E; Lokajivcek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Losurdo, L; Lucas-Rodriguez, F; Macri, M; Maki, T; Mercadante, A; Minafra, N; Minutoli, S; Nemes, F; Niewiadomski, H; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Osterberg, K; Palazzi, P; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Ruggiero, G; Saarikko, H; Scribano, A; Smajek, J; Snoeys, W; Sziklai, J; Taylor, C; Turini, N; Vacek, V; Vitek, M; Welti, J; Whitmore, J; Wyszkowski, P; Calicchio, M; Intonti, R A; Santroni, A; Ferretti, R; Covault, C; Doubek, M

    2013-01-01

    The first double diffractive cross-section measurement in the very forward region has been carriedout by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC with center-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV. By utilizingthe very forward TOTEM tracking detectors T1 and T2, which extend up to pseudo rapidity |$\\eta$|=6.5, a clean sample of double diffractive pp events was extracted. From these events, we measured the cross-section $\\sigma_{DD}$ = (116±25) mb for events where both diffractive systems have 4.7 < |$\\eta$|$_{min}$ < 6.5.

  6. Measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections of Pb and Bi at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of natPb and 209Bi have been measured relative to the 238U(n.f) cross section at energies 96 MeV for lead and 133 MeV for bismuth. The measurements were performed at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala using Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The results obtained are compared with other experimental data. The present state of the Bi standard recommended by IAEA is discussed. (author)

  7. Experimental Photoionization Cross-Section Measurements in the Ground and Metastable State Threshold Region of Se+

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, N C; Bilodeau, R C; Kilcoyne, A L D; Red, E C; Phaneuf, R A; Aguilar, A

    2010-01-01

    Absolute photoionization cross-section measurements are reported for Se+ in the photon energy range 18.0-31.0 eV, which spans the ionization thresholds of the 4S_{3/2} ground state and the low-lying 2P_{3/2,1/2} and 2D_{5/2,3/2} metastable states. The measurements were performed using the Advanced Light Source synchrotron radiation facility. Strong photoexcitation-autoionization resonances due to 4p-->nd transitions are seen in the cross-section spectrum and identified with a quantum-defect analysis.

  8. Measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section at 13TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Van Haevermaet, Hans

    2016-01-01

    A measurement of the inelastic proton-proton cross section at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV is presented. The analysis is performed using the CMS detector, in particular with information from forward calorimetry at pseudorapidities of 3.0 lt η lt 5.2 and -6.6 lt η lt -3.0. A visible cross section is measured in two different detector acceptances and finally extrapolated to the full inelastic phase space domain. The results are compared with those of other experiments, and with models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions.

  9. Cross section measurements for 40Ca(n,α)37Ar reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type DGIC (double-gridded ionization chamber) with a multi-parameter data acquisition and processing system is established for study of fast neutron induced (n,p), (n, α) reactions. The system is applied for the measurement of angular distribution at neutron energy of 4 MeV for 40Ca(n, α)37Ar and differential cross section and integral cross section at neutron energy of 5 MeV for 40Ca(n,α)37Ar. The measured results show that the reaction below the neutron energy of 5 MeV is mainly compound nucleus reaction mechanism

  10. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section using the full CDF II data set

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi Marchese; Margaroli, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    We present a measurement of the ZZ boson-pair production cross section in 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy ppbar collisions. We reconstruct final states incorporating four charged leptons or two charged leptons and two neutrinos from the full data set collected by the Collider Detector experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Combining the results obtained from each final state, we measure a cross section of 1.04(+0.32)(-0.25) pb, in good agreement with the standard model prediction at next-to-leading order in the strong-interaction coupling.

  11. Neutron total cross section measurements of gold and tantalum at the nELBE photoneutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaske, Roland; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd; Bemmerer, Daniel; Birgersson, Evert; Ferrari, Anna; Grosse, Eckart; Kempe, Mathias; Kögler, Toni; Marta, Michele; Massarczyk, Ralph; Matic, Andrija; Schramm, Georg; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Neutron total cross sections of $^{197}$Au and $^\\text{nat}$Ta have been measured at the nELBE photoneutron source in the energy range from 0.1 - 10 MeV with a statistical uncertainty of up to 2 % and a total systematic uncertainty of 1 %. This facility is optimized for the fast neutron energy range and combines an excellent time structure of the neutron pulses (electron bunch width 5 ps) with a short flight path of 7 m. Because of the low instantaneous neutron flux transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections are possible, that exhibit very different beam and background conditions than found at other neutron sources.

  12. Neutron total cross section measurements of gold and tantalum at the nELBE photoneutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaske, Roland; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd; Bemmerer, Daniel; Birgersson, Evert; Ferrari, Anna; Grosse, Eckart; Kempe, Mathias; Kögler, Toni; Marta, Michele; Massarczyk, Ralph; Matic, Andrija; Schramm, Georg; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Neutron total cross sections of 197 Au and nat Ta have been measured at the nELBE photoneutron source in the energy range from 0.1 - 10 MeV with a statistical uncertainty of up to 2 % and a total systematic uncertainty of 1 %. This facility is optimized for the fast neutron energy range and combines an excellent t ime structure of the neutron pulses (electron bunch width 5 ps) with a short flight path of 7 m. Because of the low instantaneous neutron flux transmission measurements of neutron total cross sections are possible, that exhibit very different beam and back ground conditions than found at other neutron sources.

  13. Precise measurement of neutrino and anti-neutrino differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanov, M.; Naples, D.; Boyd, S.; McDonald, J.; Radescu, V.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Avvakumov, S.; deBarbaro, L.; deBarbaro, P.; Bernstein, R.H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.; Drucker, R.B.; Fleming, B.T.; Frey, R.; /Pittsburgh U. /Cincinnati U. /Columbia U. /Fermilab /Kansas State U. /Northwestern

    2005-09-01

    The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab has obtained a unique high statistics sample of neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions using its high-energy sign-selected beam. We present a measurement of the differential cross section for charged-current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. Structure functions, F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and xF{sub 3}(x,Q{sup 2}), are determined by fitting the inelasticity, y, dependence of the cross sections. This measurement has significantly improved systematic precision as a consequence of more precise understanding of hadron and muon energy scales.

  14. Alternate technique for simultaneous measurement of photoionization cross-section of isotopes by TOF mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New measurements of photoionization cross-sections of the lithium isotopes are reported employing a Time of Flight -TOF- mass spectrometer in conjunction with an atomic beam apparatus. Using a two-step selective photoionization and saturation technique, we have simultaneously measured the photoionization cross-section of the 2p excited state of both the isotopes Li6 and Li7 as 15 ± 2.5 Mb and 18 ± 2.5 Mb where the corresponding number densities have been determined as N0 ∼ 5.3*1010 atoms/cm3 and N0 ∼ 6.2*1011 atoms/cm3 respectively. (authors)

  15. (n, {alpha}) cross section measurement of light nuclei using gridded ionization chamber and gaseous sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Saito, Keiichiro; Ibara, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Tetsuro; Sato, Jun; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a measuring method of (n, {alpha}) cross section by using gaseous sample in a gridded ionization chamber. In this study, we measured the {sup 12}C(n, {alpha}{sub 0}) and the {sup 16}O(n, {alpha}{sub 0}), (n, {alpha}{sub 123}) cross sections for En=11.5 and 12.8 MeV neutrons. We also deduced the {sup 12}C(n, x{alpha}) spectrum and analyzed the data by a kinematic calculation combined with the reaction data of the {sup 12}C(n, n`3{alpha}). (author)

  16. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; /Mexico U., CEN; Anderson, C.E.; /Yale U.; Bazarko, A.O.; /Princeton U.; Brice, S.J.; /Fermilab; Brown, B.C.; /Fermilab; Bugel, L.; /Columbia U.; Cao, J.; /Michigan U.; Coney, L.; /Columbia U.; Conrad, J.M.; /MIT; Cox, D.C.; /Indiana U.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-02-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  17. Measurement of the neutron-induced fission cross-section of 240,242Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are in high demand in the nuclear data community. In particular, highly accurate data are needed for the new Generation-IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross-sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. In this context accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives have also been measured. To minimise the total uncertainty on the fission cross-sections the detector efficiency has been studied in detail. Both isotopes have been measured using a twin Frisch-grid ionisation chamber (TFGIC) due to its superiority compared to other detector systems in view of radiation hardness, 2 x 2π solid angle coverage and very good energy resolution. (authors)

  18. Preparation of rock samples for measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of rock samples for the measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section in small cylindrical two-region systems by a pulsed technique is presented. Requirements which should be fulfilled during the preparation of the samples due to physical assumptions of the method are given. A cylindrical vessel is filled with crushed rock and saturated with a medium strongly absorbing thermal neutrons. Water solutions of boric acid of well-known macroscopic absorption cross-section are used. Mass contributions of the components in the sample are specified. This is necessary for the calculation of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section of the rock matrix. The conditions necessary for assuring the required accuracy of the measurement are given and the detailed procedure of preparation of the rock sample is described. (author)

  19. Total pion cross section measurements. Annual progress report, 1 January 1977--31 December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pion-nucleus total cross section runs were completed. The principal effort for the past year has been devoted to data analysis. The experiment was primarily designed to provide an accurate measurement of total cross section differences for pairs of isotopes. Data were published on neutron radii of calcium isotopes and on pion cross section measurements for aligned holmium. The π+- data to be published include targets and energies for 4He, 23 → 90 MeV; 12C, 13C, 23 → 240 MeV; 6Li, 7Li, 9Be, 10B, 11B, 43 → 215 MeV; 16O, 18O, 40Ca, 44Ca, 48Ca, 43 → 240 MeV; 45Sc, 51V, Al, Cu, Sn, Ho, Pb, 60 → 215 MeV

  20. Electron impact ionization cross section measurement of lithium-like barium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Vogel, D.A.; Marrs, R.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Levine, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-09-07

    The electron impact ionization cross section of Li-like Ba{sup 53+} has been measured at 22 keV using an electron beam ion trap. The measurement makes use of a novel technique, which is discussed in detail. We find a value somewhat higher than predicted by theory.

  1. First nondestructive measurements of power MOSFET single event burnout cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique to nondestructively measure single event burnout cross sections for N-channel power MOSFETs is presented. Previous measurements of power MOSFET burnout susceptibility have been destructive and thus not conducive to providing statistically meaningful burnout probabilities. The nondestructive technique and data for various device types taken at several accelerators, including the LBL Bevalac, are documented. Several new phenomena are observed

  2. Measurement of photoexcitation cross-sections of uranium by saturation method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M L Shah; R C Das; P K Mandal; D R Rathod; Vas Dev; K G Manohar; B M Suri

    2010-12-01

    We report the measurement of photoexcitation cross-sections of three first-step uranium transitions (0 → 16900.38 cm-1 , 0 → 17361.89 cm-1 and 620 → 17361.89 cm-1) using saturation method. These measurements were performed on a resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) set-up consisting of Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers, a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and high-temperature atomic vapour source. The uranium vapours were excited and photoionized by two-colour, three-photon photoionization scheme using Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser system. The resultant photoion signal was monitored as a function of dye laser fluence used for first step excitation to measure the excitation cross-section values. A new approach was adopted to overcome the large uncertainties associated with such measurements. With this approach the cross-section of transitions whose value is already reported in the literature was measured as a bench mark. By normalizing the measured value to the reported value, a scaling factor was derived. This scaling factor was used to scale up the cross-section values of other transitions measured by this method.

  3. Triaxiality as essential feature for electromagnetic strength, level density and neutron capture cross sections in heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable predictions for compound nuclear processes leading to nuclides outside the valley of stability are of importance for nuclear astrophysics as well as for the transmutation of nuclear waste. Assuming triaxiality in nearly all nuclei with A>70 a combined parameterization is presented for level density and photon strength. For the strength functions a fit to IVGDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians adding up to the TRK sum rule is used. Only two global fit-parameters are needed and a third one suffices to also describe level densities sufficiently well, if the significant collective enhancement due to the loss of axial symmetry is accounted for. Predicted level distances for the small spins reached by capture at the neutron threshold agree well to observations for more than 100 spin-0 target nuclei. Simultaneously derived neutron capture cross sections in the range of unresolved resonances are in accord to experimental findings as well as to Maxwellian averages (kT=30 keV) of neutron capture cross sections compiled recently for simulations of nuclear reactions in AGB-stars.

  4. (x, xn γ) reaction cross section measurements for (n,xn) reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of improvement of nuclear data bases for future nuclear reactor researches, we study (n,xn) reactions experimentally with the help of the (n,xn γ) technique. The experiments are performed at the GELINA facility which delivers a pulsed, white neutron beam. Several measurement campaigns have been performed on 235U, 232Th, 182,183,184,186W and 238U isotopes. The (n,xn γ) technique consists in detecting the γ radiations from the decay of the excited nucleus created by the (n,xn) reaction using Planar High-Purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Thus we can determine the γ production cross section. Up to now we can reach cross section uncertainties from 5 to 7% for neutron energies up to 9 MeV and 20% in the high neutron energy range. A compilation of all these experimental cross sections (mostly still preliminary) compared to theoretical predictions are discussed

  5. Measurements of the Charged Current Cross Sections with the ZEUS Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new measurement of the charged current cross section in e-p scattering is presented in the range of Q2 > 200 GeV2 , using the 1998 and 1999 data with an integrated luminosity of 16.4 pb-1. This cross section is compared to the preliminary charged current cross section in e+p scattering using the 1999 and 2000 data with an integrated luminosity of 61.0 pb-1, and to predictions of the Standard Model using PDFs extracted from fits to NC data. Finally, the mass of the W boson determined from a fit to dσ/dQ2 of the e-p scattering data is presented. (author)

  6. Measurement of the $Z/A$ dependence of neutrino charged-current total cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Konijn, J; Melzer, O; Oldeman, R G C; Pesen, E; Van der Poel, C A F J; Spada, F R; Visschers, J L; Güler, M; Serin-Zeyrek, M; Kama, S; Sever, R; Tolun, P; Zeyrek, M T; Armenise, N; Catanesi, M G; De Serio, M; Ieva, M; Muciaccia, M T; Radicioni, E; Simone, S; Bülte, A; Winter, Klaus; El-Aidi, R; Van de Vyver, B; Vilian, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Artamonov, A V; Brunner, J; Chizhov, M; Cussans, D G; Doucet, M; Fabre, Jean-Paul; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Litmaath, M; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Ricciardi, S; Rozanov, A; Saltzberg, D; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Arik, E; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Rondeshagen, D; Wolff, T; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Miyanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Ereditato, A; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Pistillo, C; Santorelli, R; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Nakamura, K; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Maslennikov, A L; Righini, P; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2003-01-01

    A relative measurement of total cross-sections is reported for polyethylene, marble, iron, and lead targets for the inclusive charged-current reaction nu_mu + N -> mu^- + X. The targets, passive blocks of ~100kg each, were exposed simultaneously to the CERN SPS wide-band muon-neutrino beam over a period of 18 weeks. Systematics effects due to differences in the neutrino flux and detector efficiency for the different target locations were minimised by changing the position of the four targets on their support about every two weeks. The relative neutrino fluxes on the targets were monitored within the same experiment using charged-current interactions in the calorimeter positioned directly downstream of the four targets. From a fit to the Z/A dependence of the total cross-sections a value is deduced for the effective neutron-to-proton cross-section ratio.

  7. Measurement of the Z/A dependence of neutrino charged-current total cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topasku, A; Dantzig, R V

    2003-01-01

    A relative measurement of total cross-sections is reported for polyethylene, marble, iron, and lead targets for the inclusive charged-current reaction nu submu + N -> mu sup - + X. The targets, passive blocks of propor to 100 kg each, were exposed simultaneously to the CERN SPS wide-band muon-neutrino beam over a period of 18 weeks. Systematic effects due to differences in the neutrino flux and detector efficiency for the different target locations were minimised by changing the position of the four targets on their support about every two weeks. The relative neutrino fluxes on the targets were monitored within the same experiment using charged-current interactions in the calorimeter positioned directly downstream of the four targets. From a fit to the Z/A dependence of the total cross-sections a value is deduced for the effective neutron-to-proton cross-section ratio. (orig.)

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF TOTAL CROSS SECTIONS FOR K—SHELL IONIZATION BY ELECTRON BOMBARDMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景文; 董志强; 等

    1994-01-01

    Cross sections for K-shell ionization have been measured at electron energies of 0.1-0.40MeV for Cu and Sn,and of 0.30MeV for Ag.The present results have been compared with theoretical calculations and previously reported experimental values.A great deal of experimental and theoretical work has been devoted in recent years to the study of the ionization cross sections of atoms or ions by electron impact[1-3],The importance of an accurate evaluation of these cross sections is evidenced by the wide variety of physical phenomana,the interpretations of which demand a knowledge of reaction rates for ionization by electron impact.Examples of such phenomena arise in the field of plamsa physics,in study of stellar atomospheres and the solar corona,in studies of gas discharges and of the passage of shock waves through gases,and in astrophysics.

  9. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin 10B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of 235U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of 235U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of 235U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF3 proportional counters. c) Mean number ν of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of ν for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) α reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author)

  10. Absolute measurement of $sup 235$U fission cross-section for 2200 m/sec neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcea, C.; Borza, A.; Buta, A.

    1973-12-31

    The results of an absolute fission cross-section measurement of /sup 235/ U are presented; the thermal neutrons were selected by the time-of-flight method. The principle of the method and the experimental apparatus are described. The method had the advantage of avoiding the use of an intermediate cross section in the neutron flux determination by choice of a B target thick enough to absorb all thermal neutrons. Target preparation, efficiency determination, corrections, etc., are reported. The value determined was 581.7 plus or minus 7.8 barns. (6 figures, 4 tables) (RWR)

  11. Absorption cross section measurements for 252Cf spontaneous fission neutrons (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absolute absorption cross sections have been measured for 232Th and 197Au for 252Cf spontaneous fission neutrons. Irradiations were performed in an exceptionally low mass source-foil arrangement, providing a ''pure'' spectrum with few corrections. Calibration of the activation detector was achieved by irradiating identical foils in the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Thermal Flux. A simple ratio technique was also used to obtain an independent estimate of the relative 232Th to 197Au integral cross sections, yielding a value in good agreement with that above. This technique was extended to 181Ta, 98Mo, and 63Cu. (5 tables, 3 figures) (U.S.)

  12. Measurement of charm and beauty dijet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA using the H1 vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement of charm and beauty dijet photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The lifetime signature of c- and b-flavoured hadrons is exploited to determine the fractions of events in the sample containing charm or beauty. Differential dijet cross sections for charm and beauty, and their relative contributions to the flavour inclusive dijet photoproduction cross section, are measured. Taking into account the theoretical uncertainties, the charm cross sections are consistent with a QCD calculation in next-to-leading order, the predicted cross sections for beauty production being somewhat lower than the measurement. (author)

  13. Measurement of the production cross-section of isolated photon pairs with the CMS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the comprehensive measurement of the inclusive production cross section of isolated prompt photon pairs with the CMS detector was presented. This result represents valuable input for the validation of perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) calculations and it sheds light on the important irreducible background to light Higgs boson searches in the di-photon channel. First, we developed a method to perform the discrimination of prompt isolated photons and non-prompt photons from jets, which constitute the main background of prompt photons analyses. As it is not possible to reject all this background by applying selection requirements on discriminating variables, a statistical method was chosen to perform the discrimination. It is based on a maximum likelihood fit on an electromagnetic isolation variable and was used to extract the number of prompt isolated photons from a sample of photon candidates. The new discrimination method, different with respect to previous methods in that it does not rely on simulation for the extraction of the pdfs of the discrimination fit, was then applied to the measurement of the differential inclusive production cross section of single photons versus the photon transverse energy. The spectrum measured by CMS with a different method was reproduced for photons in the barrel and the end-cap. The systematic uncertainty on the extraction of the pdfs was computed and found to be smaller than the ones of that measurement. Finally, the discrimination method was used to measure the inclusive production cross section of isolated prompt photon pairs. The differential cross section was measured as a function of four variables and with 36 pb-1 of data. The systematic uncertainties on the measurement have been estimated, they are dominated by the uncertainties on pdf extraction. The predicted integrated cross section was found to agree with the measurement and disagreements between the predicted and the measured spectra were

  14. Measurement of differential (n,xα) cross section using 4π gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carried out the measurements of high resolution α emission spectra of 58Ni and natNi between 4.5 and 6.5 MeV, and 12C(n,xα) cross section using a 4π gridded ionization chamber. In Ni measurement, overall energy resolution was improved to around 200 keV by optimizing a sample thickness and a neutron source width. Measured alpha spectra showed separate peaks corresponding to the ground and low-lying excited states of the residual nucleus (55Fe). These results were compared with another direct measurement and statistical model calculations. In 12C measurement, GIC was applied for (n,xα) reactions of light nuclei. This application is difficult to (n,xα) cross sections of light nuclei, because of the influences of large recoil energy and multi-body break-up. We developed new methods which eliminate the effects of recoil nuclei and multi-body break-up and applied them to 12C(n,xα) reaction at En=14.1 MeV. In our experiment, the 12C(n,α0)9Be angular differential cross section and 12C(n,n'3α) cross section were obtained. (author)

  15. High resolution measurements of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, C.; Semkova, V.; Bouland, O.; Dessagne, P.; Fernandez, A.; Gunsing, F.; Nästren, C.; Noguère, G.; Ottmar, H.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Romain, P.; Rudolf, G.; Somers, J.; Wastin, F.

    2010-06-01

    Measurements of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section have been performed at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Geel in the frame of a collaboration between the European Commission (EC) JRC and French laboratories from CNRS and the Commissariat à L’Energie Atomique (CEA) Cadarache. Raw material coming from the Atalante facility of CEA Marcoule has been transformed by JRC Karlsruhe into suitable Am241O2 samples embedded in Al2O3 matrices specifically designed for these measurements. The irradiations were carried out at the 7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator. The Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section was determined relative to the Al27(n,α)Na24 standard cross section. The measurements were performed in four sessions, using quasi-mono-energetic neutrons with energies ranging from 8 to 21 MeV produced via the H2(d,n)He3 and the H3(d,n)He4 reactions. The induced activity was measured by standard γ-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector. Below 15 MeV, the present results are in agreement with data obtained earlier. Above 15 MeV, these measurements allowed the experimental investigation of the Am241(n,2n) reaction cross section for the first time. The present data are in good agreement with predictions obtained with the talys code that uses an optical and fission model developed at CEA.

  16. Measurement of 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe cross section near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments were performed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to measure the cross section of the 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe reaction near threshold. Measurements were made at 6 different neutron energies and cover the 1 MeV energy range from threshold (13.64 MeV) to 14.64 MeV. The 54Fe(n,2n) cross section was measured relative to the 27Al(n,p)27Mg cross section to an accuracy of a few percent. These accurate cross-section measurements will be useful in calculating damage caused by 14 MeV D-T plasma neutrons in Fe and calculating the production of the long-lived 53Mn nuclei that account for much of the buildup of long-lived radioactivity in steel structures and other ferrous materials used in the construction of fusion reactors. They will also play an important part in a new method for measuring the plasma ion temperature of a D-T plasma

  17. Measurement of differential (n,x{alpha}) cross section using 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanami, Toshiya; Baba, Mamoru; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Kiyosumi, Takehide; Nauchi, Yasushi; Saito, Keiichiro; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawano, Toshihiko

    1997-03-01

    We carried out the measurements of high resolution {alpha} emission spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup nat}Ni between 4.5 and 6.5 MeV, and {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) cross section using a 4{pi} gridded ionization chamber. In Ni measurement, overall energy resolution was improved to around 200 keV by optimizing a sample thickness and a neutron source width. Measured alpha spectra showed separate peaks corresponding to the ground and low-lying excited states of the residual nucleus ({sup 55}Fe). These results were compared with another direct measurement and statistical model calculations. In {sup 12}C measurement, GIC was applied for (n,x{alpha}) reactions of light nuclei. This application is difficult to (n,x{alpha}) cross sections of light nuclei, because of the influences of large recoil energy and multi-body break-up. We developed new methods which eliminate the effects of recoil nuclei and multi-body break-up and applied them to {sup 12}C(n,x{alpha}) reaction at En=14.1 MeV. In our experiment, the {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}{sub 0}){sup 9}Be angular differential cross section and {sup 12}C(n,n`3{alpha}) cross section were obtained. (author)

  18. Cross-section measurements for electron-impact ionization of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Robert S.; Wetzel, Robert C.; Shul, Randy J.; Hayes, Todd R.

    1990-04-01

    Absolute electron-impact cross sections have been measured from 0 to 200 eV for single ionization of 16 atoms (Mg, Fe, Cu, Ag, Al, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb, Bi, S, Se, and Te) with an estimated accuracy of +/-10%. Combined with our recent measurements of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, F, Cl, Br, I, Ga, and In [Wetzel et al., Phys. Rev. A 35, 559 (1987); Hayes et al., ibid. 35, 578 (1987); Shul, Wetzel, and Freund, ibid. 39, 5588 (1989)], a set of 27 atomic single-ionization cross sections has now been measured with the same apparatus. In addition, cross sections are reported for double ionization of ten atoms and triple ionization of eight atoms. The measurements are made by crossing an electron beam with a 3-keV beam of neutral atoms, prepared by charge-transfer neutralization of a mass-selected ion beam. The critical measurement of absolute neutral beam flux is made with a calibrated pyroelectric crystal. The magnitudes of the single-ionization-peak cross sections decrease monotonically across rows of the periodic table from group IIIA (Al,Ga,In) to group VIIIA (Ar,Kr,Xe), varying much more than predicted by various empirical formulas and classical and quantum-mechanical theories.

  19. Estimation of (n,f) cross sections by measuring reaction probability ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper we introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P[236U(d,pf)]/P[238U(d,pf)], which serves as a surrogate for the known cross section ratio of 236U(n,f)/238U(n,f). In addition, the P[238U(d,d'f)]/P[236U(d,d'f)] ratio as a surrogate for the 237U(n,f)/235U(n,f) cross section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies

  20. Estimation of (n,f) Cross-Sections by Measuring Reaction Probability Ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron-induced reaction cross-sections on unstable nuclei are inherently difficult to measure due to target activity and the low intensity of neutron beams. In an alternative approach, named the 'surrogate' technique, one measures the decay probability of the same compound nucleus produced using a stable beam on a stable target to estimate the neutron-induced reaction cross-section. As an extension of the surrogate method, in this paper they introduce a new technique of measuring the fission probabilities of two different compound nuclei as a ratio, which has the advantage of removing most of the systematic uncertainties. This method was benchmarked in this report by measuring the probability of deuteron-induced fission events in coincidence with protons, and forming the ratio P(236U(d,pf))/P(238U(d,pf)), which serves as a surrogate for the known cross-section ratio of 236U(n,f)/238U(n,f). IN addition, the P(238U(d,d(prime)f))/P(236U(d,d(prime)f)) ratio as a surrogate for the 237U(n,f)/235U(n,f) cross-section ratio was measured for the first time in an unprecedented range of excitation energies.

  1. Pressure/cross-sectional area probe in the assessment of urethral closure function. Reproducibility of measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lose, G; Schroeder, T

    1990-01-01

    -pressure zone and distally in the urethra. The in vitro study showed that cross sectional areas of 13-79 mm2 were determined with a SD of 1.4 mm2. In vivo measurements revealed that the urethral parameters: elastance, hysteresis, pressure and power of contraction during coughing and squeezing were fairly...

  2. Measurement of the Drell-Yan Differential Cross Section with the CMS Detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Svyatkovskiy, Alexey

    This thesis describes precision measurements of electroweak interactions in a new energy regime and the application of these measurements to improve our understanding of the structure of the proton. The results are based on proton-proton collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV recorded with the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider during the first years of operation. Measurements of the differential Drell-Yan cross section in the dimuon and dielectron channels covering the dilepton mass range of 15 to 2000 GeV and absolute dilepton rapidity from 0 to 2.4 are presented. The Drell-Yan cross section in proton-proton collisions depends on empirical quantities known as parton distribution functions (PDFs) which parameterize the structure of the proton. In addition to the differential cross sections, the measurements of ratios of the normalized differential cross sections (double ratios) at √s = 7 an