WorldWideScience

Sample records for capsizing

  1. Capsize of polarization in dilute photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Zhyrair; Hakhoumian, Arsen; Gasparian, Vladimir; Cuevas, Emilio

    2017-11-29

    We investigate, experimentally and theoretically, polarization rotation effects in dilute photonic crystals with transverse permittivity inhomogeneity perpendicular to the traveling direction of waves. A capsize, namely a drastic change of polarization to the perpendicular direction is observed in a one-dimensional photonic crystal in the frequency range 10 ÷ 140 GHz. To gain more insights into the rotational mechanism, we have developed a theoretical model of dilute photonic crystal, based on Maxwell's equations with a spatially dependent two dimensional inhomogeneous dielectric permittivity. We show that the polarization's rotation can be explained by an optical splitting parameter appearing naturally in Maxwell's equations for magnetic or electric fields components. This parameter is an optical analogous of Rashba like spin-orbit interaction parameter present in quantum waves, introduces a correction to the band structure of the two-dimensional Bloch states, creates the dynamical phase shift between the waves propagating in the orthogonal directions and finally leads to capsizing of the initial polarization. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  2. CASKCODES, Program CAPSIZE Scope KWIKDOSE for Shipping Cask Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CAPSIZE is an interactive program to rapidly determine the likely impact that proposed design objectives might have on the size and capacity of spent fuel casks designed to meet those objectives. 2 - Method of solution: Given the burnup of the spent fuel, its cooling time, the thickness of the internal basket walls, the desired external dose rate, and the nominal weight limit of the load cask, the CAPSIZE program will determine the maximum number of PWR fuel assemblies that may be shipped in a lead-, steel-, or uranium- shielded cask meeting those objectives. Using optimal packing arrangements and shielding requirements input by the user, SCOPE will design a cask to carry a single fuel assembly and then continue incrementing the number of assemblies until one or more of the design limits can no longer be met. KWIKDOSE queries the user for the number of PWR fuel assemblies in a cask, the type of cask and thickness of the shield. Upon getting the necessary input, KWIKDOSE prints out the total dose rate, 10 feet from the centerline of the cask, as a function of the burnup and cooling time of the spent fuel. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The restrictions are subject to the shielding requirements of the shipping cask

  3. The role of cooperative iceberg capsize during ice-shelf disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, W. G.; Burton, J. C.; Amundson, J. M.; Cathles, L. M.; Zhang, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    The physical processes responsible for the sudden, rapid collapse of Antarctic ice-shelves (Larsen B, in 2002; Wilkins, in 2008) are poorly understood. Observations are limited to a handful of satellite images. Thus we have undertaken a series of laboratory-scale experiments using a water-filled tank and "ice" made from buoyant plastic blocks to investigate these processes. Previous experiments have quantified how gravitational potential energy of single-iceberg capsize is converted to other forms of energy [described in Burton et al., submitted], including hydrodynamic forms that may feed back on the ice shelf to cause additional calving. The new experiments reported here examine the energetics of hydrodynamically coupled icebergs that exhibit collective behaviors qualitatively similar to features observed in satellite imagery. Our results suggest that there is a critical proximity at which icebergs will capsize in the same direction an overwhelming majority of the time (cooperative capsize), and a significant part of the gravitational potential energy is converted into translational kinetic energy. We speculate that the residual translational energy observed in our experiments may explain the significant expansion rate (~1 meter/second) of collapsing Antarctic ice-shelves. Burton, J. C., J. M. Amundson, D. S. Abbot, A. Boghosian, L. M. Cathles, S. Correa-Legisos, K. N. Darnell, N. Guttenberg, D. M. Holland, and D. R. MacAyeal. submitted. Laboratory investigations of iceberg-capsize dynamics, energy dissipation and tsunamigenesis. J. Geophys. Res.

  4. An attempt to define critical wave and wind scenarios leading to capsize in beam sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Choi, Ju-hyuck; Kristensen, Hans Otto Holmegaard

    2016-01-01

    for current new buildings with large superstructures. Thus it seems rea-sonable to investigate the possibility of capsizing in beam sea under the joint action of waves and wind using direct time domain simulations. This has already been done in several studies. Here it is combined with the First Order...

  5. Is ENSO related to 2015 Easter Star Capsized on the Yangtze River of China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    Natural disasters have profound effects on community security and economic damage of China's Hubei province. In June 1st, 2015, a cruise ship, Easter Star, capsized on Yangtze River in Hubei province with 442 died. What reason gives rise to such strong convection causing ship sunk? Based on the wind disasters of Hubei province happened in 1963-2015, this study analyzes their features bytime-series regression, and correlates them to global El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. The compared results demonstrated that the wind disasters shown an increasing tendency. There are two peaks corresponding to the strongest ENSO peaks during the past 50 years; each peak lasts two-three years. The facts demonstrated an essential linear relation between the ENSO phenomena and wind disasters in Hubei province. 2015 Easter Star capsized happened at current El Niño event in 2014-2015. We also observed that the historical wind disasters appeared in seasonal variation. Over 90% events concentrated in spring and summer; very few events happened in autumn and winter. Moreover, the disasters depend on the geographic conditions. Most disasters concentrated in four zones, named as Xingshan-Baokang, Xuanen, Wufeng-Yichang, Jingzhou-Gongan, in which Xingshan and Changyang are the two most density of zones. Yangtze River provides an air flowing conduct for strong convective winds. It can be concluded that the strong convection causing 2015 Easter Star capsized is related to current global ENSO phenomenon.Keywords: ENSO, wind disaster, time-series regression analysis, Easter Star, Yangtze River, Hubei Province,

  6. 46 CFR 160.151-17 - Additional requirements for design and performance of SOLAS A and SOLAS B inflatable liferafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... stability appendages on its underside to resist capsizing from wind and waves. These appendages must meet...). Means must be provided for identifying the liferaft with the name and port of registry of the ship to...

  7. Maritime Mass Rescue Interventions: Availability and Associated Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    cold to climb into a raft. PA/ Lady D Northwest Harbor, Baltimore, MD [Capsize, March 2004] Navy used bow ramp on the landing craft to lift the...everyone successfully into lifeboats or RIBs Crew did not inform passengers of lifeboat survival equipment. FA/ Pacific Glacier 135 nm NE of Dutch ...Marine Accident Report: Capsizing of U.S. Small Passenger Vessel Lady D, Northwest Harbor, Baltimore, Maryland, March 6, 2004. NTSB/MAR-06/01

  8. A Dynamic Model for Roll Motion of Ships due to Flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1999-01-01

    Because of the large undivided deck spaces, RoRo vessels are often sensitive to rapid capsizing due to sudden ingress of water. Following a high-energy damage, a rapidly increasing heeling moment is induced by the ingress of water, which generates a roll motion of the damaged vessel. If, addition......Because of the large undivided deck spaces, RoRo vessels are often sensitive to rapid capsizing due to sudden ingress of water. Following a high-energy damage, a rapidly increasing heeling moment is induced by the ingress of water, which generates a roll motion of the damaged vessel. If......, additionally, the car deck is flooded and/or the cargo is shifted, the heeling moment may exceed the residual restoring moment, which results in capsizing....

  9. Wind estimation around the shipwreck of Oriental Star based on field damage surveys and radar observations

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Zhiyong; Yao, Dan; Bai, Lanqiang; Zheng, Yongguang; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Kun; Tian, Fuyou; Wang, Mingjun

    2016-01-01

    Based on observational analyses and on-site ground and aerial damage surveys, this work aims to reveal the weather phenomena?especially the wind situation?when Oriental Star capsized in the Yangtze River on June 1, 2015. Results demonstrate that the cruise ship capsized when it encountered strong winds at speeds of at least 31?m?s?1 near the apex of a bow echo embedded in a squall line. As suggested by the fallen trees within a 2-km radius around the wreck location, such strong winds were lik...

  10. Wind estimation around the shipwreck of Oriental Star based on field damage surveys and radar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhiyong; Yao, Dan; Bai, Lanqiang; Zheng, Yongguang; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Kun; Tian, Fuyou; Wang, Mingjun

    Based on observational analyses and on-site ground and aerial damage surveys, this work aims to reveal the weather phenomena-especially the wind situation-when Oriental Star capsized in the Yangtze River on June 1, 2015. Results demonstrate that the cruise ship capsized when it encountered strong winds at speeds of at least 31 m s -1 near the apex of a bow echo embedded in a squall line. As suggested by the fallen trees within a 2-km radius around the wreck location, such strong winds were likely caused by microburst straight-line wind and/or embedded small vortices, rather than tornadoes.

  11. On the Feasibility of Stabilizing Parametric Roll with Active Bifurcation Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    When parametric resonance occurs on a ship, large roll motion develops rapidly and severe damage on cargo is likely. Some vessels have even capsized in moderate seas for reasons believed to be parametric resonance. This paper revisits the analysis of parametric resonance and assess the possibility...

  12. The dynamic performance of narrow actively tilting vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauwelussen, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    The major advantage of a motorcycle with respect to a passenger car is the possibility of the driver to tilt during cornering and thereby maintaining stability whereas a passenger car will suffer from the risk of capsizing at high speed. This observation has motivated recently various manufacturers

  13. Nonlinear Container Ship Model for the Study of Parametric Roll Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Christian; Galeazzi, Roberto; Rodríguez, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Parametric roll is a critical phenomenon for ships, whose onset may cause roll oscillations up to 40, leading to very dangerous situations and possibly capsizing. Container ships have been shown to be particularly prone to parametric roll resonance when they are sailing in moderate to heavy head ...

  14. 76 FR 2313 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Bluefin Tuna Bycatch Reduction in the Gulf of Mexico Pelagic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ..., 2010, an explosion and subsequent fire damaged the Deepwater Horizon MC252 oil rig, which capsized and... Mediterranean stock. Therefore, management actions taken in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean are likely to... have significant effects on the West due to the fact that Eastern plus Mediterranean resource is much...

  15. The dynamic behaviour of man-wide vehicles with an automatic active tilting mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauwelussen, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The major advantage of a motorcycle with respect to a passenger car is the possibility of the driver to tilt during cornering and thereby maintaining stability whereas a passenger car will suffer from the risk of capsizing at high speed. This observation has lead Brink Dynamics to create and develop

  16. Wind and Current Forces Acting on Canadian Forces Ships During Tug Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    McTaggart and Sav- age [1] describe model tests conducted on a generic frigate model to determine wind forces influencing ship capsize. Van Manen and van ...Fn will be 0.06. Based on data presented by van Manen and van Oossanen [2], the fric- tional resistance coefficient will be approximately 0.002 and...Conference on Stability of Ships and Ocean Vehicles (Melbourne, Florida, 1994). 2. J.D. van Manen and P. van Oossanen, Principles of Naval Architecture, Volume

  17. A laboratory scale model of abrupt ice-shelf disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macayeal, D. R.; Boghosian, A.; Styron, D. D.; Burton, J. C.; Amundson, J. M.; Cathles, L. M.; Abbot, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    An important mode of Earth’s disappearing cryosphere is the abrupt disintegration of ice shelves along the Peninsula of Antarctica. This disintegration process may be triggered by climate change, however the work needed to produce the spectacular, explosive results witnessed with the Larsen B and Wilkins ice-shelf events of the last decade comes from the large potential energy release associated with iceberg capsize and fragmentation. To gain further insight into the underlying exchanges of energy involved in massed iceberg movements, we have constructed a laboratory-scale model designed to explore the physical and hydrodynamic interactions between icebergs in a confined channel of water. The experimental apparatus consists of a 2-meter water tank that is 30 cm wide. Within the tank, we introduce fresh water and approximately 20-100 rectangular plastic ‘icebergs’ having the appropriate density contrast with water to mimic ice. The blocks are initially deployed in a tight pack, with all blocks arranged in a manner to represent the initial state of an integrated ice shelf or ice tongue. The system is allowed to evolve through time under the driving forces associated with iceberg hydrodynamics. Digitized videography is used to quantify how the system of plastic icebergs evolves between states of quiescence to states of mobilization. Initial experiments show that, after a single ‘agitator’ iceberg begins to capsize, an ‘avalanche’ of capsizing icebergs ensues which drives horizontal expansion of the massed icebergs across the water surface, and which stimulates other icebergs to capsize. A surprise initially evident in the experiments is the fact that the kinetic energy of the expanding mass of icebergs is only a small fraction of the net potential energy released by the rearrangement of mass via capsize. Approximately 85 - 90 % of the energy released by the system goes into water motion modes, including a pervasive, easily observed seich mode of the tank

  18. ACSNI study group on human factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Organisational failures are now recognised as being as important as mechanical failures or individual human errors in causing major accidents such as the capsize of the Herald of Free Enterprise or the Pipa Alpha disaster. The Human Factors Study Group of the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations was set up to look at the part played by human factors in nuclear risk and its reduction. The third report of the Study Group considers the role played by organisational factors and management in promoting nuclear safety. Actions to review and promote a safety culture are suggested. Three main conclusions are drawn and several recommendations made. (UK)

  19. Risk assessment in maritime transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, C. Guedes; Teixeira, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    A review is presented of different approaches to quantify the risk in maritime transportation. The discussion of several accident statistics provides a global assessment of the risk levels and its differentiation in ship types and main types of ship losses. Early studies in the probability of ship loss by foundering and capsizing are reviewed. The approaches used to assess the risk of structural design are addressed. Finally a brief account is given of recent development of using formal safety assessments to support decision making on legislation applicable internationally to maritime transportation

  20. Life raft stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnofsky, M. I.; Barnett, J. H., Jr.; Harrison, F. L.; Marak, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An improved life raft stabilizer for reducing rocking and substantially precluding capsizing is discussed. The stabilizer may be removably attached to the raft and is defined by flexible side walls which extend a considerable depth downwardly to one another in the water. The side walls, in conjunction with the floor of the raft, form a ballast enclosure. A weight is placed in the bottom of the enclosure and water port means are provided in the walls. Placement of the stabilizer in the water allows the weighted bottom to sink, producing submerged deployment thereof and permitting water to enter the enclosure through the port means, thus forming a ballast for the raft.

  1. Inhomogeneous superconductivity in a ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontos, T.; Aprili, M.; Lesueur, J.; Genet, F.; Boursier, R.; Grison, X.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied a new superconducting state where the condensate wave function resulting from conventional pairing, is modified by an exchange field. Superconductivity is induced into a ferromagnetic thin film (F) by the proximity effect with a superconducting reservoir (S). We observed oscillations of the superconducting order parameter induced in F as a function of the distance from the S/F interface. They originate from the finite momentum transfer provided to Cooper pairs by the splitting of the spin up and down bands. We measured the superconducting density of states in F by tunneling spectroscopy and the Josephson critical current when F is coupled with a superconducting counter-electrode. Negative values of the superconducting order parameter are revealed by capsized tunneling spectra in F and a negative Josephson coupling (π-junction)

  2. Tribute to Dr Jacques Rogge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgois, Jan G; Dumortier, Jasmien; Callewaert, Margot

    2017-01-01

    'A tribute to Dr J. Rogge' aims to systematically review muscle activity and muscle fatigue during sustained submaximal quasi-isometric knee extension exercise (hiking) related to Olympic dinghy sailing as a tribute to Dr Rogge's merits in the world of sports. Dr Jacques Rogge is not only...... of invasive needle electromyography (EMG) during a specific sailing technique (hiking) on a self-constructed sailing ergometer. Hiking is a bilateral and multi-joint submaximal quasi-isometric movement which dinghy sailors use to optimize boat speed and to prevent the boat from capsizing. Large stresses...... are generated in the anterior muscles that cross the knee and hip joint, mainly employing the quadriceps at an intensity of 30-40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), sometimes exceeding 100% MVC. Better sailing level is partially determined by a lower rate of neuromuscular fatigue during hiking and for ≈60...

  3. Safe Maritime Autonomous Path Planning in a High Sea State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masahiro; Quadrelli, Marco; Huntsberger, Terrance L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a path planning method for sea surface vehicles that prevents capsizing and bow-diving in a high sea-state. A key idea is to use response amplitude operators (RAOs) or, in control terminology, the transfer functions from a sea state to a vessel's motion, in order to find a set of speeds and headings that results in excessive pitch and roll oscillations. This information is translated to arithmetic constraints on the ship's velocity, which are passed to a model predictive control (MPC)-based path planner to find a safe and optimal path that achieves specified goals. An obstacle avoidance capability is also added to the path planner. The proposed method is demonstrated by simulations.

  4. An Evidential Reasoning-Based CREAM to Human Reliability Analysis in Maritime Accident Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing; Yan, Xinping; Wang, Yang; Soares, C Guedes

    2017-10-01

    This article proposes a modified cognitive reliability and error analysis method (CREAM) for estimating the human error probability in the maritime accident process on the basis of an evidential reasoning approach. This modified CREAM is developed to precisely quantify the linguistic variables of the common performance conditions and to overcome the problem of ignoring the uncertainty caused by incomplete information in the existing CREAM models. Moreover, this article views maritime accident development from the sequential perspective, where a scenario- and barrier-based framework is proposed to describe the maritime accident process. This evidential reasoning-based CREAM approach together with the proposed accident development framework are applied to human reliability analysis of a ship capsizing accident. It will facilitate subjective human reliability analysis in different engineering systems where uncertainty exists in practice. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. Fuzzy Reasoning as a Base for Collision Avoidance Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    tanja brcko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the generally high qualifications of seafarers, many maritime accidents are caused by human error; such accidents include capsizing, collision, and fire, and often result in pollution. Enough concern has been generated that researchers around the world have developed the study of the human factor into an independent scientific discipline. A great deal of progress has been made, particularly in the area of artificial intelligence. But since total autonomy is not yet expedient, the decision support systems based on soft computing are proposed to support human navigators and VTS operators in times of crisis as well as during the execution of everyday tasks as a means of reducing risk levels.This paper considers a decision support system based on fuzzy logic integrated into an existing bridge collision avoidance system. The main goal is to determine the appropriate course of avoidance, using fuzzy reasoning.

  6. The Greek State’s Response to the Refugee Crisis and the Solidarity Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos Evangelinidis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Last year, Greece became the epicenter of attention not only for the newly elected SYRIZA government and the negotiations for a bail-out with creditors, but also for its role as the main border-crossing point for hundreds of thousands of refugees, coming from war zones in order to continue their journey towards central and northern Europe. The country, located ‘on the doorstep of Europe’, is on the frontline of Europe’s biggest immigration crisis since the Second World War. It is thus a ‘frontier’ state between European Union states and the various countries which refugees or immigrants leave to seek asylum and/or a viable livelihood elsewhere. Hundreds of people are attempting the short but dangerous crossing from Turkey to the Greek islands in unseaworthy, overcrowded vessels that often founder and capsize.

  7. Fatal occupational accidents in Danish fishing vessels 1989-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lise Hedegaard; Hansen, Henrik L; Jensen, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    training for all fishermen and improved safety measures are needed, especially in the underscored areas of sea disasters concerning small vessels and occupational accidents on big vessels. Better registration of time at risk for fishermen is needed to validate the effect of the safety measures......./capsizing due to stability changes in rough weather and collisions; 39 fatal occupational accidents mainly occurred on the larger inspection obligated trawlers during fishing. In the remaining 14 other fatal accidents, the main causal factors were difficult embarking/disembarking conditions by darkness...... in foreign ports and alcohol intoxication. In the period 1995-2005, the overall incidence rate was 10 per 10,000 fishermen per year with no down-going trend during that period. The fatal accident rates are still too high, despite the efforts to reduce the risk. Increased focus on regular and repeated safety...

  8. The utilization of natural gas in the electricity production through fuel cell; A utilizacao do gas natural na geracao distribuida atraves de celulas combustiveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi Junior, Paulo

    2004-07-01

    In function of the necessity of electric energy as input of vital importance for the development of the country, this work aims at to offer plus an energy alternative for Brazil. The exploitation of the natural gas reserves recently discovered can be made through modern methods that give as priority the distributed generation and the low ambient impact. All these aspects can be gotten with the use of fuel cell, working with the remodelled natural gas. Increased to the factor of a low ambient impact in the proper generation, the project suggests that the generating source can be located next the consumer, diminishing still more the problems generated for transmission lines, fuel transport, etc. The fuel cell has received a great attention in the international community and some models, some already in commercial period of training, they have shown excellent possibilities of capsize to be one of the future technologies in the generation of electric energy with low ambient impact. (author)

  9. Why does Bogota not have at least one metro line? And the reasons why it will probably not have one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar A. Alfonso Roa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the decision on the first metro line in Bogotá was first sketched out 75 years ago, the city still does not have it, but there is no academic reflection on the reasons for such delay. During this period, the physical and institutional capital dedicated to mobility has deteriorated to the point of capsizing the system of mass passenger transport. The result is visible in the substantial increase in unproductive travel time, traffic congestion, saturation of the fleet intended for collective mobility and personal insecurity to which users are exposed. This article supports the idea that in a metropolis of eight million people, with powerful infrastructure inflexibility, the layout of the priority metro line should be resolved in favor of connecting the most densely populated areas of the city, which would progressively solve investment lags and would provide increased ecological and financial sustainability of the system of mass transit.

  10. Sottotitolazione intralinguistica e inglese ‘lingua franca’: strategie di mediazione audiovisiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Luigi Iaia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – This chapter illustrates the results of a workshop held at the University of Salento, during an English-Italian Translation Course. A group of undergraduate students was asked to produce an intralingual translation for the subtitles of the video Capsized in Lampedusa – Fortress Italia, which deals with the situation in Lampedusa after a boat capsized in October 2013. The original video – available on YouTube – is subtitled into English for Vice News and, in a ‘role play’ exercise (Rosnow 1990, students were commissioned to adopt a type of English that could be directed at a wider international audience also including non-native English speakers. The contrastive analysis of the original and reformulated versions is designed to enquire into the influence and actualisation of the commissioner’s requests in the lexical, structural and functional features of target texts. The extent will also be explored, to which the type of English adopted in the alternative subtitles can be defined as a lingua-franca variation (Seidlhofer 2011, due to the inclusion of specific verb tenses and the selection of simplified syntactic structures (Seidlhofer 2004, aimed at facilitating the audience’s reception and accessibility to the semantic dimensions of the text. Finally, the analysis will also highlight the translators’ attempts to respect the temporal and spatial constraints of subtitles (Neves 2009, as well as the multimodal construction (Kress and van Leeuwen 2006 of audiovisual texts, which result in the use of condensation strategies (Gottlieb 2005; Pedersen 2011, thus proposing the new definition of audiovisual mediation.

  11. Ocean wave generation by collapsing ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macayeal, D. R.; Bassis, J. N.; Okal, E. A.; Aster, R. C.; Cathles, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    The 28-29 February, 2008, break-up of the Wilkins Ice Shelf, Antarctica, exemplifies the now-familiar, yet largely unexplained pattern of explosive ice-shelf break-up. While environmental warming is a likely ultimate cause of explosive break-up, several key aspects of their short-term behavior need to be explained: (1) The abrupt, near-simultaneous onset of iceberg calving across long spans of the ice front margin; (2) High outward drift velocity (about 0.3 m/s) of a leading phalanx of tabular icebergs that originate from the seaward edge of the intact ice shelf prior to break-up; (3) Rapid coverage of the ocean surface in the wake of this leading phalanx by small, capsized and dismembered tabular icebergs; (4) Extremely large gravitational potential energy release rates, e.g., up to 3 × 1010 W; (5) Lack of proximal iceberg-calving triggers that control the timing of break-up onset and that maintain the high break-up calving rates through to the conclusion of the event. Motivated by seismic records obtained from icebergs and the Ross Ice Shelf that show hundreds of micro- tsunamis emanating from near the ice shelf front, we re-examine the basic dynamic features of ice- shelf/ocean-wave interaction and, in particular, examine the possibility that collapsing ice shelves themselves are a source of waves that stimulate the disintegration process. We propose that ice-shelf generated surface-gravity waves associated with initial calving at an arbitrary seed location produce stress perturbations capable of triggering the onset of calving on the entire ice front. Waves generated by parting detachment rifts, iceberg capsize and break-up act next to stimulate an inverted submarine landslide (ice- slide) process, where gravitational potential energy released by upward movement of buoyant ice is radiated as surface gravity waves in the wake of the advancing phalanx of tabular icebergs. We conclude by describing how field research and remote sensing can be used to test the

  12. Bergy Bit and Melt Water Trajectories in Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland Observed by the Expendable Ice Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Carlson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Icebergs and bergy bits makes up a significant component of the total freshwater flux from the Greenland Ice Sheet to the ocean. Observations of iceberg trajectories are biased toward larger icebergs and, as a result, the drift characteristics of smaller icebergs and bergy bits are poorly understood. In an attempt to fill this critical knowledge gap, we developed the open-source EXpendable Ice TrackEr (EXITE. EXITE is a low-cost, satellite-tracked GPS beacon capable of high-resolution temporal measurements over extended deployment periods (30 days or more. Furthermore, EXITE can transform to a surface drifter when its host iceberg capsizes or fragments. Here we describe basic construction of an EXITE beacon and present results from a deployment in Godthåbsfjord (SW Greenland in August 2016. Overall, EXITE trajectories show out-fjord surface transport, in agreement with a simple estuarine circulation paradigm. However, eddies and abrupt wind-driven reversals reveal complex surface transport pathways at time scales of hours to days.

  13. YACHTING CLUB

    CERN Document Server

    YACHTING CLUB

    2010-01-01

    INTERNAL RAGATTE - BEST EVER ! If you missed Internal Regatta III on Sunday 11 July, you missed one of the best we can recall! The winds were about perfect, fairly stable Bf 2 with periodic gusts higher and the resulting capsizes to keep crews concentrating. It was extremely hot but we ran the usual three heats for keelboats and a record four for dinghies, catamarans - where there was another record, surely: a total of 11 boats in that class, of which three privately owned by members. And a final record: we calculate five boats were competing in their first-ever regatta. Results on the webpage. Surprisingly for those who remember regattas of a couple of years back, only three keelboats competed, so there would have been plenty of scope for less experienced members to come along regardless and probably find themselves a place. It is also noteworthy that the keelboat winner was Andrea Messina with an - ummm, may I say - less experienced crew himself! We hope this win bodes well for his forthcoming Transl&am...

  14. The cardiovascular work of competitive dinghy sailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, F; Rodio, A; Madaffari, A; Ercolani, L; Marchetti, M

    1999-12-01

    Hiking is the special manoeuvre, which the dinghy sailor uses to counterbalance the capsizing effect of the wind on the boat. In the present research the work required of the heart by this exercise was studied in the laboratory using a boat simulator. Seven Laser male sailors selected from those in the first places in the junior national rank participated in this study. Their endurance, at different levels of isometric hiking efforts, was measured. Energy expenditure due to hiking was estimated from measurements of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide elimination and blood lactate concentration. The cardiac load was evaluated by measuring blood pressure using the conventional method and heart rate measured by electrocardiography. Cardiac output was measured using the CO2 re-breathing method. Left ventricular work was then calculated as cardiac output multiplied by mean arterial pressure. The most relevant result was that, while whole body cost of hiking was relatively low (about 1 IO2 min-1), the power of the heart was very significant: cardiac output almost doubled with respect to that at rest and arterial mean pressure rose from 12.5 kPa (rest) to 18.5 kPa (hiking). Thus, left ventricular power rose from 1.2 Watt to 3.2 Watt, which is a typical cardiovascular response to muscular isometric contraction. These results assume relevance when a person's eligibility for sailing sports is evaluated.

  15. YACHTING CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    YACHTING CLUB

    2010-01-01

    The Dinghy weekend A recent full weekend was run for dinghies: thanks to dedicated help from regular dinghy sailors and teachers, a lot of people overcame their uncertainty or lack of knowledge about dinghies, getting wet, what the gennaker actually does (and why it’s different from a spinnaker), and had good fun. Our trusty Surveillance boat put in a lot of hours (and petrol!) ensuring no-one came to any harm, thanks Christian (pictured) and Rob. It has to be admitted, winds were not, errr, challenging, for most of that weekend: we old salts know that as soon as the weather gets hot, winds abandon us until the autumn. That is a slight exaggeration but remains fact-based - like the old chestnut that if Mont Blanc is wearing a hat of clouds, it’ll rain soon! It was still wet-suit weather, for safety and because voluntary capsizes were on the programme - until you have done a few, you do not overcome a natural fear of them and they are an integral part of sailing a small dinghy compe...

  16. Dr. S. Donald (Don) Stookey (1915-2014): Pioneering Researcher and Adventurer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, George H.

    2016-07-01

    Don Stookey, the father of glass-ceramics, was a pioneer in inducing and understanding internal nucleation phenomena in glass. His early work on dense opal glasses and photosensitive precipitation of gold and silver in glass led to an amazing series of inventions: Fotalite, a photosensitive opal, chemically machined Fotoform and Fotoceram, and TiO2-nucleated Pyroceram products including missile nosecones and oven-proof cookware. He received a basic patent on glass-ceramics, which was contested and affirmed in court. Don was able to demonstrate a clear photochromic glass that showed reversible darkening for thousands of cycles. This material became a fixture in the ophthalmic industry. He went on to invent a full-color polychromatic glass, capable of yielding a permanent patterned and monolithic stained glass. In his life outside science, Don chaired an interfaith group that founded a home for the elderly in Corning. He was also a wilderness enthusiast, surviving a plane crash in the Arctic and two boat capsizings. Even in his later years, he continued fishing off the coast of Florida and on Lake Ontario and went solo on a trip to the Patagonian Andes. Don Stookey was a special person by any measure: an unassuming optimist, eminent scientist and inventor, adventurer, and a beloved family man. Introduction

  17. Lake tourism fatalities: a 46-year history of death at Lake Powell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2018-05-01

    This study investigates tourist mortality at Lake Powell over a 46-year period. To date no comprehensive long-term investigation examining the relationship between the lake environment and tourist mortality exists. A retrospective study was conducted of all tourist fatalities between 1959 and 2005. There were 351 fatal incidents resulting in 386 deaths between 1959 and 2005. Over the 46-year period, the average number of fatalities was 8.4 (±5.26) per year. Out of all fatalities, 282 were classified as accidental, 80 were classified as natural deaths, 13 were suicides and 5 were classified as homicides. Males accounted for 80% of fatalities and tourists aged 20-29 years and 10-19 years accounted for 36% of all fatalities. The highest number of fatalities was recorded in July (74), May (64), August (63) and June (59). Out of all accidental deaths, boating (29%) and swimming (22%) were the most common pre-death activities. High winds capsizing boats and carbon monoxide poisoning from boat engines were common factors contributing to 31 boating fatalities. Fatigue and exhaustion contributed to 22 swimming deaths. Recreational boating and swimming account for over half of all accidental deaths. Tourists visiting Lake Powell for recreational purposes should be informed of the risks associated with the lake environment.

  18. The breakup of large tabular icebergs - direct observations and theoretical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, P.

    2013-12-01

    Peter Wadhams and Till Wagner Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics (DAMTP), University of Cambridge. We review the factors governing the stability, dynamics and decay of icebergs and describe areas where current models are inadequate. These include questions such as draft changes in capsizing icebergs; iceberg trajectory modelling; the melt rate of the ice underside and ways of reducing it; and wave-induced flexure and its role in the break-up of tabular icebergs. In July 2012 the authors worked on a very large (42 sq km) tabular iceberg in Baffin Bay, which had calved from the Petermann Glacier in NW Greenland. We measured incoming swell spectrum and the iceberg response; also the role of buoyancy forces due to erosion of a waterline wave cut and the creation of an underwater ram. The iceberg broke up while we were on it, allowing an instrumental measurement of the calving event. The experiments were included in the BBC-2 film 'Operation Iceberg' shown on Nov 1 2012 and repeated on Nov 18. We conclude that two processes interacted in the break-up event: increased bending stress due to buoyancy of underwater rams; and direct flexural strain due to incidence of ocean swell. Implications for icebergs in the open sea are estimated.

  19. AN UNHEARD CALL FOR BRIDGING ETHICS AND GOVERNANCE: SAVE THE PLANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Chandra Shil

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The awakening call of the twenty first century is to bring discipline in corporate behavior and attitude. The global financial crisis that gallops the whole economic system posits an unbeatable challenge before the society and demands a careful revisit of corporate routine to revamp trust and confidence on corporate affairs. Capitalism has accepted its inability to drag down the voluminous attitude of people who live in professional edge and isolate themselves from the mass on the ground of their superiority in terms of power, skill, and trust. Then the president of US had acknowledged that this was the biggest crisis that US economy faced after the 1929 stock market debacle. That crisis resulted stringent regulations to control Wall Street which is the Securities Act 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act 1934. This crisis also results Sarbanes Oxley Act 2002. Both of these two events have good similarities, sanctioning too much freedom and independence, capsizing the market gaps, destroying the whole system and confidence, and finally facing the rude destiny.

  20. Modeling of Ship Roll Dynamics and Its Coupling with Heave and Pitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the dynamic behavior of ships navigating in severe environmental conditions it is imperative to develop their governing equations of motion taking into account the inherent nonlinearity of large-amplitude ship motion. The purpose of this paper is to present the coupled nonlinear equations of motion in heave, roll, and pitch based on physical grounds. The ingredients of the formulation are comprised of three main components. These are the inertia forces and moments, restoring forces and moments, and damping forces and moments with an emphasis to the roll damping moment. In the formulation of the restoring forces and moments, the influence of large-amplitude ship motions will be considered together with ocean wave loads. The special cases of coupled roll-pitch and purely roll equations of motion are obtained from the general formulation. The paper includes an assessment of roll stochastic stability and probabilistic approaches used to estimate the probability of capsizing and parameter identification.

  1. A Simple Laboratory Scale Model of Iceberg Dynamics and its Role in Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J. C.; MacAyeal, D. R.; Nakamura, N.

    2011-12-01

    Lab-scale models of geophysical phenomena have a long history in research and education. For example, at the University of Chicago, Dave Fultz developed laboratory-scale models of atmospheric flows. The results from his laboratory were so stimulating that similar laboratories were subsequently established at a number of other institutions. Today, the Dave Fultz Memorial Laboratory for Hydrodynamics (http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~nnn/LAB/) teaches general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans to hundreds of students each year. Following this tradition, we have constructed a lab model of iceberg-capsize dynamics for use in the Fultz Laboratory, which focuses on the interface between glaciology and physical oceanography. The experiment consists of a 2.5 meter long wave tank containing water and plastic "icebergs". The motion of the icebergs is tracked using digital video. Movies can be found at: http://geosci.uchicago.edu/research/glaciology_files/tsunamigenesis_research.shtml. We have had 3 successful undergraduate interns with backgrounds in mathematics, engineering, and geosciences perform experiments, analyze data, and interpret results. In addition to iceberg dynamics, the wave-tank has served as a teaching tool in undergraduate classes studying dam-breaking and tsunami run-up. Motivated by the relatively inexpensive cost of our apparatus (~1K-2K dollars) and positive experiences of undergraduate students, we hope to serve as a model for undergraduate research and education that other universities may follow.

  2. Social relationship changes in victim families due to a social disaster: Experiences of student victims' families in the South Korean Sewol ferry disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Mi; Jeong, Ansuk; Ha, Jung Hee; Kim, Eun Young

    2017-01-01

    The Sewol ferry incident on April 16, 2014 in South Korea claimed the lives of 304 individuals, including about 250 high school students on a school trip. The majority of South Korean citizens were watching live updates on the capsized Sewol ferry, anxiously watching on TV how the vessel fully sunk over time. They were desperately hoping for the rescue of the survivors inside. However, their anxiety had become shock, anger, and helplessness, and the disaster has become a daunting, collective trauma, not just to the victims and their families, but also to the citizens who were exposed only through the media. In this study, we interviewed victims' families two years after the incident. We explored how they have experienced changes in their social relationships. We conducted semi-structured interviews of 54 family members of the student victims. We qualitatively examined the data applying a thematic analysis. Changes in their social relationships were largely divided into the relationships in the proximal environment and the relationships in distal environments. The former included subcategories such as immediate family, coworkers, friends, relatives, survived students and their parents, and concepts corresponding to each subcategory. The latter involved subcategories such as neighbors, other citizens, the victims' family committee, government, and society, and concepts subject to each subcategory. Based on these findings, rehabilitation plans for trauma victims and their families should take into account the significant changes in their social relationships and the further consequences of those changes.

  3. Social relationship changes in victim families due to a social disaster: Experiences of student victims’ families in the South Korean Sewol ferry disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young

    2017-01-01

    The Sewol ferry incident on April 16, 2014 in South Korea claimed the lives of 304 individuals, including about 250 high school students on a school trip. The majority of South Korean citizens were watching live updates on the capsized Sewol ferry, anxiously watching on TV how the vessel fully sunk over time. They were desperately hoping for the rescue of the survivors inside. However, their anxiety had become shock, anger, and helplessness, and the disaster has become a daunting, collective trauma, not just to the victims and their families, but also to the citizens who were exposed only through the media. In this study, we interviewed victims’ families two years after the incident. We explored how they have experienced changes in their social relationships. We conducted semi-structured interviews of 54 family members of the student victims. We qualitatively examined the data applying a thematic analysis. Changes in their social relationships were largely divided into the relationships in the proximal environment and the relationships in distal environments. The former included subcategories such as immediate family, coworkers, friends, relatives, survived students and their parents, and concepts corresponding to each subcategory. The latter involved subcategories such as neighbors, other citizens, the victims’ family committee, government, and society, and concepts subject to each subcategory. Based on these findings, rehabilitation plans for trauma victims and their families should take into account the significant changes in their social relationships and the further consequences of those changes. PMID:29216210

  4. Social relationship changes in victim families due to a social disaster: Experiences of student victims' families in the South Korean Sewol ferry disaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Cho

    Full Text Available The Sewol ferry incident on April 16, 2014 in South Korea claimed the lives of 304 individuals, including about 250 high school students on a school trip. The majority of South Korean citizens were watching live updates on the capsized Sewol ferry, anxiously watching on TV how the vessel fully sunk over time. They were desperately hoping for the rescue of the survivors inside. However, their anxiety had become shock, anger, and helplessness, and the disaster has become a daunting, collective trauma, not just to the victims and their families, but also to the citizens who were exposed only through the media. In this study, we interviewed victims' families two years after the incident. We explored how they have experienced changes in their social relationships. We conducted semi-structured interviews of 54 family members of the student victims. We qualitatively examined the data applying a thematic analysis. Changes in their social relationships were largely divided into the relationships in the proximal environment and the relationships in distal environments. The former included subcategories such as immediate family, coworkers, friends, relatives, survived students and their parents, and concepts corresponding to each subcategory. The latter involved subcategories such as neighbors, other citizens, the victims' family committee, government, and society, and concepts subject to each subcategory. Based on these findings, rehabilitation plans for trauma victims and their families should take into account the significant changes in their social relationships and the further consequences of those changes.

  5. The Intriguing Tsunami of 19 March 2017 in the Persian Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, R.; Salaree, A.; Okal, E.

    2017-12-01

    On 19 March 2017, a surge from the Persian Gulf inundated significant parts of the Port of Dayyer on the southern coastlines of Iran. It, reportedly, capsized about 300 boats, caused $10 million of damage and resulted in one death and five people missing. Although a significant storm had preceded the surge, there were indications of calm weather during the event in some of the remaining footage which could play a critical role in reconstructing the tsunami by studying it as a meteorological phenomenon. Here, we are reporting the data from a field survey in the affected area which revealed a concentration of inundation along a 30 km stretch of coastline with run-ups reaching 3 m at 4 km west of Dayyer. In the absence of any major seismic event at or around the occurrence of the tsunami, we consider landslides as well as atmospheric phenomena as potential sources for the event. We use simultaneous hydrodynamic dipoles as landslide scenarios (e.g. Synolakis et al., 2002) and simulate water amplitudes close to the coastlines using the MOST algorithm (e.g. Titov & Synolakis, 1995). We also use the method by Platzman (1958) to model the surge as a meteotsunami. Our simulations suggest that the Dayyer tsunami was caused by a local system of atmospheric pressure gradient, as our landslide models fail to reproduce high amplitudes as documented in our field survey.

  6. Dr. S. Donald (Don Stookey: (1915-2014: Pioneering Researcher and Adventurer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Don Stookey was a special person by any measure: an unassuming optimist, eminent scientist and inventor, adventurer, and a beloved family man. Don Stookey, the father of glass-ceramics, was a pioneer in inducing and understanding internal nucleation phenomena in glass. His early work on dense opal glasses and photosensitive precipitation of gold and silver in glass led to an amazing series of inventions: Fotalite®, a photosensitive opal, chemically machined Fotoform® and Fotoceram®, and TiO2-nucleated Pyroceram™ products including missile nosecones and oven-proof cookware. He received a basic patent on glass-ceramics which was contested and affirmed in court.Don was able to demonstrate a clear photochromic glass that showed reversible darkening for thousands of cycles. This material became a fixture in the ophthalmic industry. He went on to invent a full-color polychromatic glass capable of yielding a permanent patterned and monolithic stained glass.In his life outside science, Don chaired an interfaith group that founded a home for the elderly in Corning. He was also a wilderness enthusiast, surviving a plane crash in the Arctic and two boat capsizings. Even In his later years, he continued fishing off the coast of Florida and on Lake Ontario, and went solo on a trip to the Patagonian Andes.

  7. Self Righting Life Raft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Givens Buoy Raft was designed and manufactured for inventor Jim Givens of Givens Marine Survival Co. Inc., by RPR Industries, Inc. The Raft consists of a canopied topside and an underwater hemispheric ballast chamber. It has a heavy ballast stabilization system, adopted from NASA technology, which negates the capsizing problem. A "flapper valve" admits large amounts of water to the hemisphere chamber providing ballast to keep the center of gravity constant; stabilization system compensates for changes in wave angle and weight shifting of raft occupants. Mr. Givens has an exclusive patent license for use of the NASA technology. Produced in various sizes, capacities range from six to 20 persons. Raft is housed in a canister, available in several configurations. A pull on a line triggers the automatic inflation process, which takes 12 seconds. The raft has been credited with saving 230 lives in the last five years. It has found wide acceptance with operators of fishing boats, pleasure craft and other vessels. The Coast Guard is purchasing the rafts for use on its rescue helicopters and the Navy has a development program to adapt the system. The Coast Guard last year announced a proposed amendment of its regulations that would require large ballast chambers on inflatable life rafts.

  8. Nonlinear Container Ship Model for the Study of Parametric Roll Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Holden

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Parametric roll is a critical phenomenon for ships, whose onset may cause roll oscillations up to +-40 degrees, leading to very dangerous situations and possibly capsizing. Container ships have been shown to be particularly prone to parametric roll resonance when they are sailing in moderate to heavy head seas. A Matlab/Simulink parametric roll benchmark model for a large container ship has been implemented and validated against a wide set of experimental data. The model is a part of a Matlab/Simulink Toolbox (MSS, 2007. The benchmark implements a 3rd-order nonlinear model where the dynamics of roll is strongly coupled with the heave and pitch dynamics. The implemented model has shown good accuracy in predicting the container ship motions, both in the vertical plane and in the transversal one. Parametric roll has been reproduced for all the data sets in which it happened, and the model provides realistic results which are in good agreement with the model tank experiments.

  9. 20 years ago offshore tragedy claimed 84 lives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2002-02-01

    This article commemorates the capsizing and sinking of the 'Ocean Ranger' submersible rigging in the Atlantic Ocean, 315 km east of St. John's, Newfoundland on February 15, 1982. The rig had a crew of 84 on board at the time of the accident. The winter storms and its subsequent effects took the lives of all crew members. Of the 84, 64 were Canadians; 56 were residents of Newfoundland. Their death created a powerful shock wave throughout the island. Autopsy results indicated that in all cases the cause of death was drowning while in a hypothermic condition. The hearing following the accident, which spread over 89 sitting days, interviewed 102 witnesses and examined 321 exhibits, found that a coincidence of severe storms conditions, rig design inadequacies, and lack of knowledgeable human intervention all played a role in the tragedy. Subsequently, the Commission issued a list of 66 recommendations aimed primarily at regulatory agencies to promote safer health and working conditions for persons employed in the offshore oil and gas environment.

  10. Laboratory experiments inform iceberg-calving forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathles, L. M.; Burton, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Globally detected glacial earthquakes are produced during cubic-kilometer scale calving events. The mechanism producing these earthquakes and the dependence of the seismic moment on iceberg size and glacial calving front geometry are not well established. We use a laboratory-scale model of the post-fracture calving process to measure aspects of the calving process not observable in nature. In our experiments, buoyant plastic blocks rest against against a force plate (glacial terminus) which measures both the total force and the torque exerted during the calving process. The blocks are gravitationally unstable, so that they will spontaneously capsize and rotate away from the terminus. We find that hydrodynamics are crucial when considering the coupling between the calving process and the solid earth. There is both a pushing contact force and a simultaneous pulling hydrodynamic force created by a reduced pressure along the terminus face. This suggests that a single couple force mechanism is a more appropriate mode for glacial earthquakes than the commonly used centroid single force model.

  11. Meteotsunamis in the Great Lakes and Investigation into the May 27, 2012 Event on Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E. J.; Bechle, A.; Wu, C. H.; Schwab, D. J.; Mann, G.

    2016-02-01

    Meteotsunami events have been documented in several countries around the world in the coastal ocean, semi-enclosed basins, and in the Great Lakes. In particular, investigations in the Great Lakes have raised the issue of dangers posed by enclosed basins due to the reflection and interaction of meteotsunami waves, in which the destructive waves can arrive several hours after the atmospheric disturbance has passed. This disassociation in time and space between the atmospheric disturbance and resultant meteotsunami wave can pose a significant threat to the public. In a recent event on May 27, 2012, atmospheric conditions gave rise to two convective systems that generated a series of waves in the meteotsunami band on Lake Erie. The resulting waves swept three swimmers a half-mile offshore, inundated a marina, and may have led to a capsized boat along the southern shoreline. Examination of the observed conditions shows that these events occurred at a time between the arrivals of these two storm systems when atmospheric conditions were relatively calm but water level displacements were at their greatest. In this work, we attempt to explain the processes that led to these conditions through a combination of atmospheric and hydrodynamic modeling and an analysis of the observed radial velocities associated with the meteotsunami-inducing front. Results from a high-resolution atmospheric model and hydrodynamic model reveal that the formation of these destructive waves resulted from a combination of wave reflection, focusing, and edge waves that impacted the southern shore of Lake Erie. This event illustrates the unique danger posed by temporal lags between the inducing atmospheric conditions and resulting dangerous nearshore wave conditions.

  12. Nonlinear surge motions of a ship in bi-chromatic following waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyrou, Kostas J.; Themelis, Nikos; Kontolefas, Ioannis

    2018-03-01

    Unintended motions of a ship operating in steep and long following waves are investigated. A well-known such case is ;surf-riding; where a ship is carried forward by a single wave, an event invoking sometimes lateral instability and even capsize. The dynamics underlying this behavior has been clarified earlier for monochromatic waves. However, the unsteadiness of the phase space associated with ship behavior in a multichromatic sea, combined with the intrinsically strong system nonlinearity, pose new challenges. Here, current theory is extended to cover surging and surf-riding behavior in unidirectional bi-chromatic waves encountering a ship from the stern. Excitation is provided by two unidirectional harmonic wave components having their lengths comparable to the ship length and their frequencies in rational ratio. The techniques applied include (a) continuation analysis; (b) tracking of Lagrangian coherent structures in phase space, approximated through a finite-time Lyapunov exponents' calculation; and (c) large scale simulation. A profound feature of surf-riding in bi-chromatic waves is that it is turned oscillatory. Initially it appears as a frequency-locked motion, ruled by the harmonic wave component dominating the excitation. Transformations of oscillatory surf-riding are realized as the waves become steeper. In particular, heteroclinic tanglings are identified, governing abrupt transitions between qualitatively different motions. Chaotic transients, as well as long-term chaotic motions, exist near to these events. Some extraordinary patterns of ship motion are discovered. These include a counterintuitive low speed motion at very high wave excitation level; and a hybrid motion characterized by a wildly fluctuating velocity. Due to the quite generic nature of the core mathematical model of our investigation, the current results are believed to offer clues about the behavior of a class of nonlinear dynamical systems having in their modeling some analogy with

  13. Increased beta power in the bereaved families of the Sewol ferry disaster: A paradoxical compensatory phenomenon? A two-channel electroencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kuk-In; Shim, Miseon; Lee, Sang Min; Huh, Hyu Jung; Huh, Seung; Joo, Ji-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2017-11-01

    The Sewol ferry capsizing accident on South Korea's southern coast resulted in the death of 304 people, and serious bereavement problems for their families. Electroencephalography (EEG) beta frequency is associated with psychiatric symptoms, such as insomnia. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between frontal beta power, psychological symptoms, and insomnia in the bereaved families. Eighty-four family members of the Sewol ferry victims (32 men and 52 women) were recruited and their EEG was compared with that of 25 (13 men and 12 women) healthy controls. A two-channel EEG device was used to measure cortical activity in the frontal lobe. Symptom severity of insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, complicated grief, and anxiety were evaluated. The bereaved families showed a higher frontal beta power than healthy controls. Subgroup analysis showed that frontal beta power was lower in the individuals with severe insomnia than in those with normal sleep. There was a significant inverse correlation between frontal beta power and insomnia symptom in the bereaved families. This study suggests that increased beta power, reflecting the psychopathology in the bereaved families of the Sewol ferry disaster, may be a compensatory mechanism that follows complex trauma. Frontal beta power could be a potential marker indicating the severity of sleep disturbances. Our results suggest that sleep disturbance is an important symptom in family members of the Sewol ferry disaster's victims, which may be screened by EEG beta power. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  14. The Northern Rupture of the 1762 Arakan Meghathrust Earthquake and other Potential Earthquake Sources in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, S. H.; Seeber, L.; Steckler, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Dhaka as the tsunami or a seiche destroyed mud bamboo houses and capsized boats. The St. Martin's Island is believed to have been an unpopulated shoal before the 1762 earthquake. The presence of three uplifted terraces in the Teknaf coast suggest similar earthquakes of great magnitude have ruptured the Chittagong-Arakan coast in the historic past.

  15. The colors of icebergs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    Ordinary icebergs of meteoric glacier ice appear bluish-white, i.e. intermediate in color between the white of snow and the blue of pure ice, depending on the bubble content. However, clear dark bubble-free icebergs are occasionally seen in the Antarctic Ocean; they originate from freezing of seawater to the base of ice shelves. On parts of the Amery Ice Shelf, frozen seawater contributes up to one-third of the ice-shelf thickness. Many of the icebergs produced by the Amery are therefore composite icebergs; the upper part consists of meteoric glacier ice from snowfall, but the lower part is frozen seawater ("marine ice"). When these icebergs capsize, the marine ice is exposed to view; it can be accessed for study in springtime when the icebergs are embedded in shorefast sea ice. The marine ice varies in color from blue to green depending on the content of dissolved organic matter. The color is therefore an indicator of biological productivity in the seawater from which the ice froze. To infer processes at the ice-shelf base, these icebergs may be examined and cored for spectral reflectance, hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, organic matter, particles, and distribution of cracks and stripes. Seasonal and interannual variations may be quantified from samples collected along the marine ice-growth trajectory at the meteoric/marine-ice interface. The scale of small turbulent eddies at the ice-shelf base, which govern the transfer of heat between ocean and ice, can be inferred from the size of scallops in the iceberg surface (typically a few centimeters). Dark stripes within meteoric ice result from tension-cracks at the grounding line, forming basal crevasses that fill suddenly with seawater; their width, spacing, and salinity can give clues to processes at the grounding line. Results will be shown from icebergs sampled on Australian expeditions near Davis and Mawson stations. Marine ice is more readily accessed by sampling an iceberg than by drilling through an ice shelf

  16. Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) for an Underground Blowout Scenario in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, M.; Zulqarnain, M.

    2017-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations, involve the use of some of the cutting edge and challenging technologies of the modern time. These technological complex operations involves the risk of major accidents as well, which have been demonstrated by disasters such as the explosion and fire on the UK production platform piper alpha, the Canadian semi-submersible drilling rig Ocean Ranger and the explosion and capsizing of Deepwater horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico. By conducting Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA), safety of various operations as well as their associated risks and significance during the entire life phase of an offshore project can be quantitatively estimated. In an underground blowout, the uncontrolled formation fluids from higher pressure formation may charge up shallower overlying low pressure formations or may migrate to sea floor. Consequences of such underground blowouts range from no visible damage at the surface to the complete loss of well, loss of drilling rig, seafloor subsidence or hydrocarbons discharged to the environment. These blowouts might go unnoticed until the over pressured sands, which are the result of charging from higher pressure reservoir due to an underground blowout. Further, engineering formulas used to estimate the fault permeability and thickness are very simple in nature and may add to uncertainty in the estimated parameters. In this study the potential of a deepwater underground blowout are assessed during drilling life phase of a well in Popeye-Genesis field reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico to estimate the time taken to charge a shallower zone to its leak-off test (LOT) value. Parametric simulation results for selected field case show that for relatively high permeability (k = 40mD) fault connecting a deep over-pressured zone to a shallower low-pressure zone of similar reservoir volumes, the time to recharge the shallower zone up to its threshold LOT value is about 135 years. If the ratio of the

  17. Risks to offshore installations in Europe due to natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necci, Amos; Krausmann, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    contrast, in other parts of the world, and in particular in the Gulf of Mexico, tropical storms are likely to trigger severe direct damage to structures, resulting in platform capsizing, sinking or grounding. The in-depth analysis of the incident records also showed that the natural event was often just the triggering cause of the accident, which was frequently accompanied by contributing factors (e.g. corrosion, fatigue, wrong procedures, etc.). Under these circumstances, not only extreme storms, but also storms with moderate intensity can trigger incidents. Due to the high density of offshore structures and the unique environmental conditions promoting fatigue and corrosion, the North Sea is the area with the highest number of incidents recorded in Europe, as well as the area with the highest number of incidents at semi-submersible units in the world. About 4% of all reported global Natech events at offshore infrastructures involved casualties, and 2.6% for the European incident subset. Hazardous materials releases were documented for 21 events in Europe, resulting in fires and hydrocarbon spills polluting the sea. Furthermore, a surprisingly high number of severe events occurred during towing which highlights the impact of natural hazards on the safety of offshore transfer operations.

  18. Field Observations of Meteotsunami in Kami-koshiki Island, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, T.; Yamashiro, T.; Nishimura, N.

    2012-12-01

    BACKGROUND Meteotsunami; atmospherically induced destructive ocean waves in the tsunami frequency band, are known in Japan by the local term "abiki", literally meaning "net-dragging waves" in Japanese. Large abiki occur in bays and harbors along the west coast of Kyushu almost every year during winter and early spring. On 24-25 February, 2009, Urauchi Bay, located on west coast of Kami-Koshiki Island on the southeast coast of Kyushu, was subjected to a destructive meteotsunami. In this event, a maximum sea surface height of 3.1 m was observed at the inner part of the bay. At least 18 boats capsized and eight houses were flooded. This event surpassed the previous record height for an abiki in Japan: 278 cm in Nagasaki Bay, also located west coast of Kyushu, in 1979. Generally, such an elongated inlet with narrow mouth as Urauchi bay provides calm water conditions even when offshore weather is stormy. Therefore, the area is regarded as a suitable place for the farming of large fish with a high market value. Possible damage to the extensive fish cage system as a result of meteotsunami events is of concern, especially because aquaculture is the main industry in the isolated islands. Forecasting of meteotsunami is a serious request from the local people. AIMS The objectives of the present study are to detect a meteotsunami event in Urauchi Bay and to clarify the meteorological and hydrodynamic conditions related to its occurrence. This work attempts to observe the whole process of a meteotsunami event: generation offshore, resonance while it propagates, and finally amplification in the bay. Observations were conducted over a period of 82 days; 12 January to 4 April, 2010, aiming to record large secondary oscillations. A comprehensive measuring system for sea level, current and barometric pressure fluctuations was deployed covering not only inside and near Urauchi Bay but also further offshore in the vicinity of Mejima in the East China Sea. MAIN RESULTS 1) Large

  19. La banque de données platform de l'Institut français du pétrole : un outil de base pour des études de risque Ifp's Platform Databank: a Basic Implement for Risk Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand A. R. V.

    2006-11-01

    having actually led to accidents. Such figures are very much appreciated in safety risk analysis. Several statistical results are given to illustrate PLATFORM's capacities. An analysis of activity at the time of the accident shows that most accidents occurred (in order during exploration drilling, during production, while rigs were under tow, while rigs were shut down during a storm, during development drilling, and during jacking-up or jacking-down for this type of mobile platform. In fact, 76. 6% of the accidents to jackups occurred either during towing (30. 9%, exploration drilling (27. 1% or jacking operations (18. 6%. Accidents to fixed platforms occurred predominantly during production (53%. The most frequent types of accident were found to be (in order blowouts, explosions or fires, damage to legs or mats often due to the sea floor, capsizing of the rig, gas kicks and structural cracks. But the major risk varied according to the type of platform : gas blowouts for submersibles, fire/explosions for fixed production platforms, capsizing for barges, sea floor accidents for jackups, gas kicks for drillships and semi-submersibles. A geographic analysis gives the Louisiana sector of the Gulf of Mexico a higher percentage of accidents (37% than the Texas sector (7. 5% or the Scottish North Sea (8%. This can easily be explained both by the relative importance of petroleum activity in the sector (especially barges and submersibles operating in swamps, lakes and deltas and by the comparable wealth of information made public in this region. A further analysis of the region shows more gas blowouts (28% than the world average (21% and, on the other hand, a chronological decrease in accidents linked to structural resistance, reflecting better rig design and reliability over the years. In general, statistics of accidents, correlated to offshore oil activity, show that accidents are decreasing in the Gulf of Mexico and in Persian Gulf, whereas there are more in the North Sea

  20. Nano-biomedical approaches of cancer therapy using carbon based and magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Alokita

    the higher accumulation EGF targeted SWCNTs to PANC-1 cells. In chapter 4, we have explored the multimodality of nanotechnology by using EGF-functionalized iron cored, carbon shelled (FeC) magnetic nanoprticle that can generate heat when exposed to radiofrequency (RF). This process called hyperthermia, which is an effective way to kill different cancer cells as cancer cells are most susceptible to heat increase beyond a threshold level compared to normal cells. By targeting the nanoparticles this process was made more efficient by selectively populating magnetic nanoparticles specifically in cancer cells only. Two different cells line, MCF-7 and PANC-1 were incubated with the magnetic nanopartilces for 24 hours followed by exposure to the RF (350KHz, 5kW) for 10 min. EB/AO and flow-cytometry were used to determine the apoptotic and necrotic cells. EGF targeted FeC was superior in apoptosis induction in both cell lines, while the untargeted nanoparticles showed little effect. The MCF-7 cells were more vulnerable to the targeted FeC nanoparticles compared to PANC-1 cells. Caspase-8 and caspase-3 assays were done to provide the involvement of these two capsizes in two different cell lines. To enhance the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drug, two FDA approved anticancer drugs doxorubicin and erlotinib were loaded on FeC nanoparticles (Chapter 5). The loading capacity was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. MTT assay was also used to determine the loaded and unloaded forms of drug. RF treatment was used to generate hyperthermia and which also helps in releasing the drug from nanoparticles. Flow-cytomertic detection of apoptosis showed above 90% cells died after combined hyperthermia and doxorubicin treatment. Graphene is a 2D carbon nanoparticle that has been proven to be an excellent carrier of chemotherapeutic drugs. In chapter 6, -COOH functionalized graphene (FG) was used to deliver a potent but extremely hydrophobic and water insoluble drug, parthenolide (PTL), to

  1. Evidence of stratabound liquefaction in the formation of fractured topographic margins, cone chains and pit catenas along the Martian Dichotomy Boundary and in Isidis Planitia, Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, C.; Balme, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    role in at least one mode of catena formation [2]. As well as presenting the morphological evidence for a genetic association between TPT and pit catenas, we present corroborative evidence that fluvial channel networks on Mars have in places increased in complexity through the linking of pits arranged in linear to arcuate arrays, culminating in a pseudo-branching channel network. Such systems do not occur at topographic margins and did not disintegrate into stepped crustal blocks. However, the scale of these channels and the volumes of liquid intermittently impounded in craters along these channel systems indicate that pit chains are associated with significant excess groundwater production leading to channelized flow, including catastrophic discharges when crater-impounded lakes along-flow were breached. Are the MDB and Isidis cone chains exhumed pit catenas and are the pits the surface expression of more deep-seated conduits? Do pit catenas indicate excess pore-water production, sufficient to link individual pits and dissect crustal blocks? Together, do these assemblages reflect the degradation of the MDB and Isidis margins and the subsequent stripping of adjacent low-lying plains? The crucial observations presented in this research (cone chains lying between crustal blocks, together with the morphometric similarities) are consistent with the interpretation of the cones and catenas having a common origin. Consequently, we hypothesise that the translated, back-rotated, tilted and capsized disposition of en echelon blocks is very reminiscent of the morphology produced during lateral spreading [3] associated with stratabound liquefaction below a low-gradient, rigid, insensitive surface. Significantly, such liquefaction events cause extensive, arcuate ground fractures along with the discharge of sediment-laden groundwater from the liquefiable substratum to the surface through pipes and conical boils confined within inter-block fractures. These conduits and their

  2. Editorial: Vada a bordo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Journalists report that the expression from the Italian coast guard officer: “Vada a bordo” to the captain of the capsized “Costa Concordia”, has taken a new and wider meaning. Initially captured from a radio communication between the coast guard officer overlooking the process and the captain, it now has become a clear message from the people to their leaders about assuming the leadership they are appointed to have. In Italy, the concrete backdrop is the financial crisis, as it is in many countries affected by the same trend: a hyperactive economy based on greed and turbo capitalism. Globally, it also addresses the inabilities demonstrated by the main economic actors to get to grips with topics like the global warming, pollution and poverty. In education there is a call for “getting back in command” in a quite parallel meaning. In the European and Western educational domain, the trend is to ask less and less about moral and ethics in schooling and upbringing, and to ponder “competencies”, “qualifications” and “employability”. The effects of the Bologna process and its subsequent agreements, declarations and policy documents, have been that the ethical and moral aspects of education have diminished. Words alluding to the social and ethical responsibility of higher education institutions are being filtered away from the rhetoric of curricula, programmes and projects. A new language of learning and learning outcomes is replacing the conventional. One of the silly effects is that the taxonomy of learning outcomes for programmes for BA, MA and PhD programmes often contains descriptions that are less academically demanding than for secondary school. The occurrence of terms like “critical thinking” is less prominent in higher education than of secondary schools in some instances. This development is so much in contrast to what the renown philosopher Ronald Barnett claim is the most challenging task for higher education: to