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Sample records for capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain

  1. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  2. Trigeminal ganglion neurons of mice show intracellular chloride accumulation and chloride-dependent amplification of capsaicin-induced responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Schöbel

    Full Text Available Intracellular Cl(- concentrations ([Cl(-](i of sensory neurons regulate signal transmission and signal amplification. In dorsal root ganglion (DRG and olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, Cl(- is accumulated by the Na(+-K(+-2Cl(- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1, resulting in a [Cl(-](i above electrochemical equilibrium and a depolarizing Cl(- efflux upon Cl(- channel opening. Here, we investigate the [Cl(-](i and function of Cl(- in primary sensory neurons of trigeminal ganglia (TG of wild type (WT and NKCC1(-/- mice using pharmacological and imaging approaches, patch-clamping, as well as behavioral testing. The [Cl(-](i of WT TG neurons indicated active NKCC1-dependent Cl(- accumulation. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A receptor activation induced a reduction of [Cl(-](i as well as Ca(2+ transients in a corresponding fraction of TG neurons. Ca(2+ transients were sensitive to inhibition of NKCC1 and voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCCs. Ca(2+ responses induced by capsaicin, a prototypical stimulus of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1 (TRPV1 were diminished in NKCC1(-/- TG neurons, but elevated under conditions of a lowered [Cl(-](o suggesting a Cl(--dependent amplification of capsaicin-induced responses. Using next generation sequencing (NGS, we found expression of different Ca(2+-activated Cl(- channels (CaCCs in TGs of mice. Pharmacological inhibition of CaCCs reduced the amplitude of capsaicin-induced responses of TG neurons in Ca(2+ imaging and electrophysiological recordings. In a behavioral paradigm, NKCC1(-/- mice showed less avoidance of the aversive stimulus capsaicin. In summary, our results strongly argue for a Ca(2+-activated Cl(--dependent signal amplification mechanism in TG neurons that requires intracellular Cl(- accumulation by NKCC1 and the activation of CaCCs.

  3. Facial pain: trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H

    1993-03-01

    Atypical facial pain is a loose term used to encompass a wide range of facial pain syndromes including those of dental and ear, nose and throat (ENT) aetiology. Often, it is associated with psychiatric conditions like depression and psychosomatic illnesses. This facial pain typically does not follow anatomical boundaries or its explainable by present day neurophysiological understanding. The pain is often constant with no remission and is aggravated by stress. Treatment is difficult and often directed to the psychiatric cause. Surgical treatment is contraindicated. Trigeminal neuralgia on the other hand, can be effectively treated. Pain in the trigeminal distribution is paroxysmal, precipitated by trigger factors and there is no pain in between attacks. The aetiology of trigeminal neuralgia is still unknown though current thinking is that there is a peripheral disturbance or damage with cerebral brainstem disinhibition of the trigeminal apparatus. This results in a paroxysmal discharge and reverberation of pain impulses when a trigger point is elicited. Therefore, anti-epileptic drugs like tegretol can be effective in controlling trigeminal neuralgia in the majority of patients, at least in the initial stages. For unknown reasons however, medical treatment either is not effective at all from the very beginning or fails after a few years. Surgery then becomes the only available therapeutic option. If the peripheral disturbance is due to an organic cause like a tumour, surgical approaches should be directed towards its removal. Often the pain will also resolve. If the trigeminal neuralgia is of the idiopathic variety, then the surgeon has a choice of either peripheral percutaneous retrogasserian ganglionectomies or central approaches like microvascular decompression and trigeminal tractotomy. PMID:8363331

  4. Effects of intra-fourth ventricle injection of crocin on capsaicin-induced orofacial pain in rats

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    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Crocin, a constituent of saffron and yellow gardenia, possesses anti-nociceptive effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intra-fourth ventricle injection of crocin in a rat model of orofacial pain. The contribution of opioid system was assessed using intra-fourth ventricle injection of naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Materials and Methods: A guide cannula was implanted into the fourth ventricle of brain in anesthetized rats. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous (s.c. injection of capsaicin (1.5 µg/20 µl into the right vibrissa pad. The time spent face rubbing/grooming was recorded for a period of 20 min. Locomotor activity was measured using an open-field test. Results: Intra-fourth ventricle injection of crocin (10 and 40 µg/rat and morphine (10 and 40 µg/rat and their co-administration (2.5 and 10 µg/rat of each suppressed capsaicin-induced orofacial pain. The analgesic effect induced by 10 µg/rat of morphine, but not crocin (10 µg/rat, was prevented by 20 µg/rat of naloxone pretreatment. The above-mentioned chemical compounds did not affect locomotor activity. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the injection of crocin into the cerebral fourth ventricle attenuates capsaicin-induced orofacial pain in rats. The anti-nociceptive effect of crocin was not attributed to the central opioid receptors.

  5. Pain. Part 7: Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurge, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is also known as 'tic douloureux' (in French, 'painful twitch'). It is a rare chronic facial pain syndrome, characterized by severe, brief, stabbing, 'electric shock-like 'recurrent pain attacks felt in one or more divisions of trigeminal nerve innervation areas. So intense is the elicited pain that TN has a significant effect on a sufferer's quality of life, rendering many patients unable to consider a future with the ongoing threat of recurrent pain. The aim of this article is to discuss the diagnosis and management of this disabling facial pain condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: As general medical practitioners may struggle differentiating TN from toothache, primary care dentists have an important role in excluding odontogenic cause of pain, diagnosing TN and referring patients to a facial pain clinic for further investigations and multidisciplinary team management. PMID:27188129

  6. Distinct BOLD fMRI Responses of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Sensation Reveal Pain-Related Brain Activation in Nonhuman Primates.

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    Abu Bakar Ali Asad

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of the adult population suffer from chronic pain that is not adequately treated by current therapies, highlighting a great need for improved treatment options. To develop effective analgesics, experimental human and animal models of pain are critical. Topically/intra-dermally applied capsaicin induces hyperalgesia and allodynia to thermal and tactile stimuli that mimics chronic pain and is a useful translation from preclinical research to clinical investigation. Many behavioral and self-report studies of pain have exploited the use of the capsaicin pain model, but objective biomarker correlates of the capsaicin augmented nociceptive response in nonhuman primates remains to be explored.Here we establish an aversive capsaicin-induced fMRI model using non-noxious heat stimuli in Cynomolgus monkeys (n = 8. BOLD fMRI data were collected during thermal challenge (ON:20 s/42°C; OFF:40 s/35°C, 4-cycle at baseline and 30 min post-capsaicin (0.1 mg, topical, forearm application. Tail withdrawal behavioral studies were also conducted in the same animals using 42°C or 48°C water bath pre- and post- capsaicin application (0.1 mg, subcutaneous, tail.Group comparisons between pre- and post-capsaicin application revealed significant BOLD signal increases in brain regions associated with the 'pain matrix', including somatosensory, frontal, and cingulate cortices, as well as the cerebellum (paired t-test, p<0.02, n = 8, while no significant change was found after the vehicle application. The tail withdrawal behavioral study demonstrated a significant main effect of temperature and a trend towards capsaicin induced reduction of latency at both temperatures.These findings provide insights into the specific brain regions involved with aversive, 'pain-like', responses in a nonhuman primate model. Future studies may employ both behavioral and fMRI measures as translational biomarkers to gain deeper understanding of pain processing and evaluate

  7. Measurement of Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain: Penn Facial Pain Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    Pain is a subjective experience that cannot be directly measured. Therefore, patient-reported outcome is one of the currently accepted methods to capture pain intensity and its impact on activities of daily living. This article focuses on five patient-reported outcomes that have been used to measure trigeminal neuralgia pain-Visual Analog Scale, numeric rating scale, Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and Penn Facial Pain Scale. Each scale is evaluated for its practicality, applicability, comprehensiveness, reliability, validity, and sensitivity to measuring trigeminal neuralgia pain. PMID:27324999

  8. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jason R; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  9. Identifying the Integrated Neural Networks Involved in Capsaicin-Induced Pain Using fMRI in Awake TRPV1 Knockout and Wild-Type Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Richard Yee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1. Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type versus knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain.

  10. Pain. Part 2a: Trigeminal Anatomy Related to Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara; Egbuniwe, Obi

    2015-04-01

    In order to understand the underlying principles of orofacial pain it is important to understand the corresponding anatomy and mechanisms. Paper 1 of this series explains the central nervous and peripheral nervous systems relating to pain. The trigeminal nerve is the 'great protector' of the most important region of our body. It is the largest sensory nerve of the body and over half of the sensory cortex is responsive to any stimulation within this system. This nerve is the main sensory system of the branchial arches and underpins the protection of the brain, sight, smell, airway, hearing and taste, underpinning our very existence. The brain reaction to pain within the trigeminal system has a significant and larger reaction to the threat of, and actual, pain compared with other sensory nerves. We are physiologically wired to run when threatened with pain in the trigeminal region and it is a 'miracle' that patients volunteer to sit in a dental chair and undergo dental treatment. Clinical Relevance: This paper aims to provide the dental and medical teams with a review of the trigeminal anatomy of pain and the principles of pain assessment.

  11. Early dexamethasone relieves trigeminal neuropathic pain.

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    Han, S R; Yeo, S P; Lee, M K; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2010-09-01

    The analgesic effects of dexamethasone on neuropathic pain have been controversial. The present study investigated the effects of dexamethasone on mechanical allodynia in rats with mal-positioned dental implants. Under anesthesia, the left mandibular second molar was extracted and replaced by a miniature dental implant to injure the inferior alveolar nerve. Nociceptive behavior was examined on each designated day after surgery. Mal-positioned dental implants significantly decreased air-puff thresholds both ipsilateral and contralateral to the injury site. Distinct mechanical hyperalgesia and cold and thermal hypersensitivity were also observed bilaterally. Daily administration of dexamethasone produced prolonged anti-allodynic effects (25 or 50 mg/kg, i.p.), but failed to reduce mechanical allodynia when it had already been established. Therefore, our findings provide that early treatment with dexamethasone is important in the treatment of nociceptive behavior suggestive of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:20581355

  12. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; car...

  13. [Orofacial pain - Trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy: Common features and differences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, V

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of a lesion or disease of the somatosensory system in the peripheral or central nervous system. Classical trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy are pain disorders which oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentists are confronted with in the differential diagnostics in routine daily practice. The etiopathogenesis of classical trigeminal neuralgia is attributable to pathological blood vessel-nerve contact in the trigeminal nerve root entry zone to the brain stem. The typical pain symptoms are characterized by sudden stabbing pain attacks. The pharmaceutical prophylaxis is based on the individually titrated administration of anticonvulsant drugs. The indications for interventional treatment are dependent on the course, response to drug treatment, resilience and wishes of the patient. The neuropathic mechanism of posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy originates from nerve damage, which leads to peripheral and central sensitization with lowering of the pain threshold and multiple somatosensory disorders. The prophylaxis consists of avoidance of excessive acute and long-lasting pain stimuli. Against the background of the biopsychosocial pain model, the treatment of posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy necessitates a multimodal, interdisciplinary concept. PMID:26815785

  14. Intraoral administration of botulinum toxin for trigeminal neuropathic pain.

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    Herrero Babiloni, Alberto; Kapos, Flavia P; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    This article presents 2 cases of different neuropathic trigeminal pain conditions treated with intraoral botulinum toxin injections. There is a growing body of evidence to support the use of this substance when administered subcutaneously in the treatment of neuropathic pain, such as in extraoral injections for trigeminal neuralgia. However, reports of intraoral submucosal administration are still lacking. In the 2 cases presented here, neuropathic pain was refractory to treatment with an important intraoral peripheral component, so onabotulinum toxin A was introduced as an adjuvant therapy. The technique, doses, and dilution are discussed. The patients reported significant reductions in pain frequency and intensity, with minimal side effects of temporary mucosal dryness and smile droopiness. The analgesic benefits of botulinum toxin may be utilized to address intraoral neuropathic pain. Further studies are needed to confirm safety and effectiveness in larger samples. PMID:27181448

  15. The influence of repetitive painful stimulation on peripheral and trigeminal pain thresholds.

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    Dirkwinkel, Monika; Gralow, Ingrid; Colak-Ekici, Reyhan; Wolowski, Anne; Marziniak, Martin; Evers, Stefan

    2008-10-15

    We were interested in how continuous painful stimulation which is performed as inurement exercises in some Asian martial arts influences sensory and pain perception. Therefore, we examined 15 Kung Fu disciples before and after a 14 day period with repetitive inurement exercises and measured sensory and pain thresholds and intensities in both the trigeminal and the peripheral (peroneal nerve) region. The results of the probands were compared to those of 15 healthy control subjects who were performing sports without painful stimulation during this period. The probands showed a significantly decreased trigeminal pain intensity after repetitive electrical stimulation whereas the control subjects did not show any changes of sensory or pain perception during the study period. This suggests a change of central sensitisation and inhibitory control mechanisms in the nociceptive spinal or cerebral pathways by inurement exercises. In addition, pain thresholds showed an (not significant) increase after the study period whereas the control subjects showed a significant decrease of pain thresholds. In summary, our pilot study suggests that inurement exercises, i.e. repetitive painful stimulation, over a period of 14 days might induce changes of pain perception resulting in trigeminal pain habituation and higher pain thresholds.

  16. Increased capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia in patients with multiple chemical sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger;

    2011-01-01

    in experimental pain models to provoke peripheral and central sensitization. In patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia and temporal summation were assessed as markers for abnormal central nociceptive processing together with neurogenic inflammation (flare).......the underlying cause of pathophysiological mechanisms triggering multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) remains disputed.Recently, alterations in the central nervous system, for example,central sensitization, similar to various chronic pain disorders, have been suggested. Capsaicin is used...

  17. MR volumetry of the trigeminal nerve in patients with unilateral facial pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to assess whether MRI can detect atrophy of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Materials and methods: a prospective MRI study was conducted in 39 patients (trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathy, or atypical facial pain) and 25 volunteers. Using a coronal orientation (T1 flash 3D; T2 CISS 3D), regions of interest were delineated in the cisternal part of the trigeminal nerve along the border of the nerve to calculate the volume of the nerve. The volume of the nerve was compared side-by-side in each patient (t-test, p < 0.05) and the volume difference compared between patients and volunteers. Results: the volume of the compromised trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was lower than on the contralateral healthy side, with the difference between healthy and compromised side statistically significant (p < 0.05). In all other patients and in all volunteers, no significant difference was found between the volume of the healthy and compromised nerve. The volume difference between the healthy and compromised side in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in all other patients and volunteers. Conclusion: atrophy of the trigeminal nerve caused by a nerve-vessel conflict can be detected by MRI. Only patients with trigeminal neuralgia show this unilateral atrophy. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the result of the nerve-vessel conflict and to determine the consequences of such a conflict. (orig.)

  18. TRPV4 is necessary for trigeminal irritant pain and functions as a cellular formalin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Kanju, Patrick; Fang, Quan; Lee, Suk Hee; Parekh, Puja K; Lee, Whasil; Moore, Carlene; Brenner, Daniel; Gereau, Robert W; Wang, Fan; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Detection of external irritants by head nociceptor neurons has deep evolutionary roots. Irritant-induced aversive behavior is a popular pain model in laboratory animals. It is used widely in the formalin model, where formaldehyde is injected into the rodent paw, eliciting quantifiable nocifensive behavior that has a direct, tissue-injury-evoked phase, and a subsequent tonic phase caused by neural maladaptation. The formalin model has elucidated many antipain compounds and pain-modulating signaling pathways. We have adopted this model to trigeminally innervated territories in mice. In addition, we examined the involvement of TRPV4 channels in formalin-evoked trigeminal pain behavior because TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons, and because we have recently defined TRPV4's role in response to airborne irritants and in a model for temporomandibular joint pain. We found TRPV4 to be important for trigeminal nocifensive behavior evoked by formalin whisker pad injections. This conclusion is supported by studies with Trpv4(-/-) mice and TRPV4-specific antagonists. Our results imply TRPV4 in MEK-ERK activation in TG sensory neurons. Furthermore, cellular studies in primary TG neurons and in heterologous TRPV4-expressing cells suggest that TRPV4 can be activated directly by formalin to gate Ca(2+). Using TRPA1-blocker and Trpa1(-/-) mice, we found that both TRP channels co-contribute to the formalin trigeminal pain response. These results imply TRPV4 as an important signaling molecule in irritation-evoked trigeminal pain. TRPV4-antagonistic therapies can therefore be envisioned as novel analgesics, possibly for specific targeting of trigeminal pain disorders, such as migraine, headaches, temporomandibular joint, facial, and dental pain, and irritation of trigeminally innervated surface epithelia.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 receptor expression in the rat trigeminal-vascular system and other brain structures involved in pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myren, Maja; Olesen, Jes; Gupta, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    receptors in both peripheral and central structures involved in pain transmission and perception in migraine: dura mater, cerebral arteries, trigeminal ganglion, trigeminal nucleus caudalis, periaqueductal grey, thalamus, hypothalamus, cortex, pituitary gland, hippocampus and cerebellum. In the trigeminal-vascular......, all four receptors are located in areas implicated in migraine supporting the possible involvement of PGE(2) in this disease....

  20. Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a type of chronic pain that affects your face. It causes extreme, sudden ... is probably a blood vessel pressing on the trigeminal nerve, one of the largest nerves in the ...

  1. Presentation of pain and nerve involvement in trigeminal neuralgia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine pain distribution and nerve involvement of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) patients at Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, Rawalpindi. Material and Methods: A one year cross sectional study from Feb 2009 to Feb 2010 of TN patients was conducted in oral and maxillofacial surgery department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, Rawalpindi. A detailed history of patients suffering from TN was taken followed by thorough extra-oral and intra-oral examination. The parameters analyzed included age of onset, gender, site of involvement, nerve branch involvement and clinical presentations. History and clinical features of already diagnosed cases with TN was included as such. Results: A total of 52 patients were included in the study. The patients had a mean age of 52.25 +- 14.82 years. The male to female ratio was 1:1.3. The mean age of onset was 48.5 +- 13.3 years. Right side was involved in 59.6% of the patients. V2 was most commonly involved nerve (59.6%), followed by V3 (53.8%) and V1 (13.7%). Forty six percent of patients gave history of extractions of teeth as a treatment for this condition. Forty two percent recalled or had previous medical records prescribed with antibiotics and pain killers. Conclusion: TN in our population is more frequent in females and with more right side involvement. Maxillary division is most commonly affected followed by the mandibular nerve. It is a rare disorder and most of these patients are inadequately diagnosed and treated. Keeping the disease in differential diagnosis of atypical pain without local pathology is advised. (author)

  2. The differential effect of trigeminal vs. peripheral pain stimulation on visual processing and memory encoding is influenced by pain-related fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K; Forkmann, K; Sinke, C; Gratz, M; Bitz, A; Bingel, U

    2016-07-01

    Compared to peripheral pain, trigeminal pain elicits higher levels of fear, which is assumed to enhance the interruptive effects of pain on concomitant cognitive processes. In this fMRI study we examined the behavioral and neural effects of trigeminal (forehead) and peripheral (hand) pain on visual processing and memory encoding. Cerebral activity was measured in 23 healthy subjects performing a visual categorization task that was immediately followed by a surprise recognition task. During the categorization task subjects received concomitant noxious electrical stimulation on the forehead or hand. Our data show that fear ratings were significantly higher for trigeminal pain. Categorization and recognition performance did not differ between pictures that were presented with trigeminal and peripheral pain. However, object categorization in the presence of trigeminal pain was associated with stronger activity in task-relevant visual areas (lateral occipital complex, LOC), memory encoding areas (hippocampus and parahippocampus) and areas implicated in emotional processing (amygdala) compared to peripheral pain. Further, individual differences in neural activation between the trigeminal and the peripheral condition were positively related to differences in fear ratings between both conditions. Functional connectivity between amygdala and LOC was increased during trigeminal compared to peripheral painful stimulation. Fear-driven compensatory resource activation seems to be enhanced for trigeminal stimuli, presumably due to their exceptional biological relevance. PMID:27015710

  3. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jürgens, Tim P; Reetz, Romy; May, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the ...

  4. Orofacial inflammatory pain affects the expression of MT1 and NADPH-d in rat caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus and trigeminal ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Huang; Hongwen He; Wenguo Fan; Yongliang Liu; Hongyu Zhou; Bin Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the role of melatonin in the trigeminal system, including the function of melatonin receptor 1. In the present study, adult rats were injected with formaldehyde into the right vibrissae pad to establish a model of orofacial inflammatory pain. The distribution of melatonin re-ceptor 1 and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase in the caudal spinal minal nucleus and trigeminal ganglion was determined with immunohistochemistry and mistry. The results show that there are significant differences in melatonin receptor 1 expression and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase expression in the trigeminal ganglia and caudal spinal nucleus during the early stage of orofacial inflammatory pain. Our findings sug-gest that when melatonin receptor 1 expression in the caudal spinal nucleus is significantly reduced, melatonin’s regulatory effect on pain is attenuated.

  5. TRPA1 mediates trigeminal neuropathic pain in mice downstream of monocytes/macrophages and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Benemei, Silvia; Materazzi, Serena; De Logu, Francesco; De Siena, Gaetano; Fusi, Camilla; Fortes Rossato, Mateus; Coppi, Elisabetta; Marone, Ilaria Maddalena; Ferreira, Juliano; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina

    2016-05-01

    Despite intense investigation, the mechanisms of the different forms of trigeminal neuropathic pain remain substantially unidentified. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel (encoded by TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to allodynia or hyperalgesia in some neuropathic pain models, including those produced by sciatic nerve constriction. However, the role of TRPA1 and the processes that cause trigeminal pain-like behaviours from nerve insult are poorly understood. The role of TRPA1, monocytes and macrophages, and oxidative stress in pain-like behaviour evoked by the constriction of the infraorbital nerve in mice were explored. C57BL/6 and wild-type (Trpa1(+/+)) mice that underwent constriction of the infraorbital nerve exhibited prolonged (20 days) non-evoked nociceptive behaviour and mechanical, cold and chemical hypersensitivity in comparison to sham-operated mice (P pain-like behaviours (both P stress by-products (hydrogen peroxide and 4-hydroxynonenal). Attenuation of monocyte/macrophage increase by systemic treatment with an antibody against the monocyte chemoattractant chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or the macrophage-depleting agent, clodronate (both P pain-like behaviours (all P neuropathic pain, pain-like behaviours are entirely mediated by the TRPA1 channel, targeted by increased oxidative stress by-products released from monocytes and macrophages clumping at the site of nerve injury. PMID:26984186

  6. The L-kynurenine signalling pathway in trigeminal pain processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Vecsei, L; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the kynurenine family of compounds, metabolites of tryptophan, has become an area of intensive research because of its neuroactive properties. Two metabolites of this family have become of interest in relation to migraine and pain processing.......In recent years the kynurenine family of compounds, metabolites of tryptophan, has become an area of intensive research because of its neuroactive properties. Two metabolites of this family have become of interest in relation to migraine and pain processing....

  7. Peripheral lidocaine, but not ketamine inhibit capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Hanne; Bach, Flemming Winther; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars;

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effect of the subcutaneous infiltration of ketamine, lidocaine and saline before injury on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in two separate, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover experiments. In experiment 1, 100...... micrograms capsaicin was injected intradermally in one volar forearm 10 min after the skin had been pretreated with lidocaine 20.0 mg in 2.0 ml or 0.9% saline 2.0 ml at the capsaicin injection site. In experiment 2, a similar capsaicin test was given 10 min after the skin had been pretreated with ketamine 5...... and brush stimuli, and areas of brush-evoked and punctate-evoked hyperalgesia. Lidocaine reduced all measures compared with placebo (P ketamine failed to change any measures. Pain scores and areas of hyperalgesia were not affected when the contralateral site was infiltrated with ketamine...

  8. Antinociceptive Effects of Botulinum Toxin Type A on Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, K Y; Kim, M J; Ju, J S; Park, S K; Lee, C G; Kim, S T; Bae, Y C; Ahn, D K

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) attenuates orofacial nociception. However, there has been no evidence of the participation of the voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) in the antinociceptive mechanisms of BoNT-A. This study investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effects of BoNT-A in a male Sprague-Dawley rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain produced by malpositioned dental implants. The left mandibular second molar was extracted under anesthesia, followed by a miniature dental implant placement to induce injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. Mechanical allodynia was monitored after subcutaneous injection of BoNT-A at 3, 7, or 12 d after malpositioned dental implant surgery. Subcutaneous injections of 1 or 3 U/kg of BoNT-A on postoperative day 3 significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia, although 0.3 U/kg of BoNT-A did not affect the air-puff threshold. A single injection of 3 U/kg of BoNT-A produced prolonged antiallodynic effects over the entire experimental period. Treatment with BoNT-A on postoperative days 7 and 12, when pain had already been established, also produced prolonged antiallodynic effects. Double treatments with 1 U/kg of BoNT-A produced prolonged, more antiallodynic effects as compared with single treatments. Subcutaneous administration of 3 U/kg of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the upregulation of Nav isoform 1.7 (Nav1.7) expression in the trigeminal ganglion in the nerve-injured animals. These results suggest that antinociceptive effects of BoNT-A are mediated by an inhibition of upregulated Nav1.7 expression in the trigeminal ganglion. BoNT-A is therefore a potential new therapeutic agent for chronic pain control, including neuropathic pain. PMID:27418174

  9. Positive allosteric modulation of GABA-A receptors reduces capsaicin-induced primary and secondary hypersensitivity in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Erichsen, Helle K; Brown, David T;

    2012-01-01

    GABA-A receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) mediate robust analgesia in animal models of pathological pain, in part via enhancing injury-induced loss of GABA-A-α2 and -α3 receptor function within the spinal cord. As yet, a lack of clinically suitable tool compounds has prevented this...... concept being tested in humans. Prior to assessing the efficacy of GABA-A receptor PAMs in a human volunteer pain model we have compared compounds capable of variously modulating GABA-A receptor function in comparable rat models of capsaicin-induced acute nocifensive flinching behaviour and secondary...

  10. Colocalized structural and functional changes in the cortex of patients with trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre F DaSilva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent data suggests that in chronic pain there are changes in gray matter consistent with decreased brain volume, indicating that the disease process may produce morphological changes in the brains of those affected. However, no study has evaluated cortical thickness in relation to specific functional changes in evoked pain. In this study we sought to investigate structural (gray matter thickness and functional (blood oxygenation dependent level - BOLD changes in cortical regions of precisely matched patients with chronic trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP affecting the right maxillary (V2 division of the trigeminal nerve. The model has a number of advantages including the evaluation of specific changes that can be mapped to known somatotopic anatomy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cortical regions were chosen based on sensory (Somatosensory cortex (SI and SII, motor (MI and posterior insula, or emotional (DLPFC, Frontal, Anterior Insula, Cingulate processing of pain. Both structural and functional (to brush-induced allodynia scans were obtained and averaged from two different imaging sessions separated by 2-6 months in all patients. Age and gender-matched healthy controls were also scanned twice for cortical thickness measurement. Changes in cortical thickness of TNP patients were frequently colocalized and correlated with functional allodynic activations, and included both cortical thickening and thinning in sensorimotor regions, and predominantly thinning in emotional regions. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, such patterns of cortical thickness suggest a dynamic functionally-driven plasticity of the brain. These structural changes, which correlated with the pain duration, age-at-onset, pain intensity and cortical activity, may be specific targets for evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  11. Effect of conditioned pain modulation on trigeminal somatosensory function evaluated by quantitative sensory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oono, Yuka; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Svensson, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to systematically investigate the effect of craniofacially evoked conditioned pain modulation on somatosensory function using a quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol applied to the trigeminal area in healthy humans. Pressure pain evoked by a mechanical compressive device was applied as conditioning stimulus (CS) in the craniofacial region, with a pain intensity of 5 on a visual analogue scale (VAS: 0-10 cm) (painful session) or with VAS score of 0 (control session). A full QST battery of 13 parameters was performed as test stimuli on the dominant-side cheek. The individual QST data from 11 men and 12 women were transformed into z scores, and the QST data and z scores were tested using analyses of variance. Analyses of variance of pressure pain threshold (PPT) data (log-transformed values and z scores) indicated significant session (P ≤ .003) and time (P effects with a session-time interaction (P effect of sex (P ≥ .053, effect size ≥ .166). The session-time interaction showed that the PPTs in the painful session were associated with significantly higher log-transformed PPT values and significantly lower z scores compared with the control session at the time point during CS (hypoalgesia) (P pain inhibitory mechanisms.

  12. Quantitative sensory testing in classical trigeminal neuralgia-a blinded study in patients with and without concomitant persistent pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Samaira; Maarbjerg, Stine; Reimer, Maren; Wolfram, Frauke; Olesen, Jes; Baron, Ralf; Bendtsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the third International Classification of Headache Disorders state that there should be no neurological deficits in patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) at clinical examination. However, studies demonstrating sensory abnormalities at bedside examination in TN patients have questioned this. Our aim was to examine whether TN patients without sensory abnormalities at neurological examination have sensory abnormalities at quantitative sensory testing (QST) and whether there were any QST differences between TN with and without concomitant persistent pain. Thirty-six TN patients were investigated with the standardized QST protocol by the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain. The investigators were blinded to presence of concomitant persistent pain and symptomatic side. Based on comparison to the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain controls, z scores were calculated to process frequency analyses and Z-profiles. We found increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side (47.2% vs 0%, P = 0.008), asymptomatic side (33.3% vs 0%, P = 0.011), and hand (36% vs 0%, P Trigeminal neuralgia patients with concomitant persistent pain tended to have higher mean z score values compared to TN with purely paroxysmal pain indicative of decreased detection thresholds. Trigeminal neuralgia patients with no sensory abnormalities at neurological examination had generalized subclinical hypoesthesia, which was more pronounced on the symptomatic side, and thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. This could indicate pain-induced hypoesthesia and sensitization induced by central mechanisms. PMID:26894914

  13. [Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, M Yu; Piradov, M A; Suanova, E T; Sineva, N A

    2015-01-01

    Review of literature on the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are presented. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias are primary headaches with phenotype consisting of trigeminal pain with autonomic sign including lacrimation, rhinorrhea and miosis. Discussed are issues of classification, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of this headache. Special attention is paid to cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT syndrome, hemicrania continua.

  14. Chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the medullary dorsal horn are involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhi-Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain in the trigeminal system is frequently observed in clinic, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In addition, the function of immune cells and related chemicals in the mechanism of pain has been recognized, whereas few studies have addressed the potential role of chemokines in the trigeminal system in chronic pain. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2-chemokine C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 signaling in the trigeminal nucleus is involved in the maintenance of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Methods The inferior alveolar nerve and mental nerve transection (IAMNT was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain. The expression of ATF3, CCL2, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and CCR2 were detected by immunofluorescence histochemical staining and western blot. The cellular localization of CCL2 and CCR2 were examined by immunofluorescence double staining. The effect of a selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. Results IAMNT induced persistent (>21 days heat hyperalgesia of the orofacial region and ATF3 expression in the mandibular division of the trigeminal ganglion. Meanwhile, CCL2 expression was increased in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH from 3 days to 21 days after IAMNT. The induced CCL2 was colocalized with astroglial marker GFAP, but not with neuronal marker NeuN or microglial marker OX-42. Astrocytes activation was also found in the MDH and it started at 3 days, peaked at 10 days and maintained at 21 days after IAMNT. In addition, CCR2 was upregulated by IAMNT in the ipsilateral medulla and lasted for more than 21 days. CCR2 was mainly colocalized with NeuN and few cells were colocalized with GFAP. Finally, intracisternal injection of CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 (1, 10 μg significantly attenuated IAMNT-induced heat hyperalgesia. Conclusion The data suggest that CCL2-CCR

  15. Reactivation of herpes zoster along the trigeminal nerve with intractable pain after facial trauma: a case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, K-C; Wang, Che-Chuan; Wang, Kai-Yuan; Liao, Yi-Chen; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2009-01-01

    We report the rare occurrence of herpes zoster reactivation after facial trauma. Herpes zoster appeared in painful groups of distended vesicles containing clear fluid on an erythematous base within the secondary division of the trigeminal nerve. The patient was treated with acyclovir (intravenous, 250 mg, every 8 hours) combined with topical steroids and anti-neuropathic pain medication. The zoster-associated neuralgia subsided gradually 1.5 months after diagnosis. We illustrate this unique c...

  16. Trigeminal Electrophysiology: a 2 × 2 matrix model for differential diagnosis between temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain

    OpenAIRE

    Chessa Giacomo; Frisardi Gianni; Sau Gianfranco; Frisardi Flavio

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain due to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) often has the same clinical symptoms and signs as other types of orofacial pain (OP). The possible presence of serious neurological and/or systemic organic pathologies makes differential diagnosis difficult, especially in early disease stages. In the present study, we performed a qualitative and quantitative electrophysiological evaluation of the neuromuscular responses of the trigeminal nervous system. Using the jaw jerk reflex (JJ...

  17. Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) injury induces chronic facial pain and susceptibility to anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D N; Kniffin, T C; Zhang, L P; Danaher, R J; Miller, C S; Bocanegra, J L; Carlson, C R; Westlund, K N

    2015-06-01

    Our laboratory previously developed a novel neuropathic and inflammatory facial pain model for mice referred to as the Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) model. Rather than inducing whole nerve ischemia and neuronal loss, this injury induces only slight peripheral nerve demyelination triggering long-term mechanical allodynia and cold hypersensitivity on the ipsilateral whisker pad. The aim of the present study is to further characterize the phenotype of the TIC injury model using specific behavioral assays (i.e. light-dark box, open field exploratory activity, and elevated plus maze) to explore pain- and anxiety-like behaviors associated with this model. Our findings determined that the TIC injury produces hypersensitivity 100% of the time after surgery that persists at least 21 weeks post injury (until the animals are euthanized). Three receptive field sensitivity pattern variations in mice with TIC injury are specified. Animals with TIC injury begin displaying anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box preference and open field exploratory tests at week eight post injury as compared to sham and naïve animals. Panic anxiety-like behavior was shown in the elevated plus maze in mice with TIC injury if the test was preceded with acoustic startle. Thus, in addition to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, the present study identified significant anxiety-like behaviors in mice with TIC injury resembling the clinical symptomatology and psychosocial impairments of patients with chronic facial pain. Overall, the TIC injury model's chronicity, reproducibility, and reliability in producing pain- and anxiety-like behaviors demonstrate its usefulness as a chronic neuropathic facial pain model.

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia and persistent trigeminal artery

    OpenAIRE

    Conforti, Renata; Parlato, Raffaele Stefano; De Paulis, Danilo; Cirillo, Mario; Marrone, Valeria; Cirillo, Sossio; Moraci, Aldo; Parlato, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) associated with asymptomatic left temporal cavernoma. Our patient presented unstable blood hypertension and the pain of typical trigeminal neuralgia over the second and third divisions of the nerve in the right side of the face. The attacks were often precipitated during physical exertion. MRI and Angio-MRI revealed the persistent carotid basilar anastomosis and occasionally left parietal cavernoma. After dr...

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Jensen, Troels S.; Scholz, Joachim; Sindou, Marc; Svensson, Peter; Zakrzewska, Joanna M.; Nurmikko, Turo

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an exemplary condition of neuropathic facial pain. However, formally classifying TN as neuropathic pain based on the grading system of the International Association for the Study of Pain is complicated by the requirement of objective signs confirming an underlying lesion or disease of the somatosensory system. The latest version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders created similar difficulties by abandoning the term symptomatic TN for manifestations caused by major neurologic disease, such as tumors or multiple sclerosis. These diagnostic challenges hinder the triage of TN patients for therapy and clinical trials, and hamper the design of treatment guidelines. In response to these shortcomings, we have developed a classification of TN that aligns with the nosology of other neurologic disorders and neuropathic pain. We propose 3 diagnostic categories. Classical TN requires demonstration of morphologic changes in the trigeminal nerve root from vascular compression. Secondary TN is due to an identifiable underlying neurologic disease. TN of unknown etiology is labeled idiopathic. Diagnostic certainty is graded possible when pain paroxysms occur in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve branches. Triggered paroxysms permit the designation of clinically established TN and probable neuropathic pain. Imaging and neurophysiologic tests that establish the etiology of classical or secondary TN determine definite neuropathic pain. PMID:27306631

  20. Capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the skin in patients with symptoms induced by odorous chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Helle; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Mosbech, Holger;

    2011-01-01

    Intradermal injection of capsaicin induces the axonal release of neuropeptides, vasodilatation and flare, e.g. neurogenic inflammation. The spatial profile of neurogenic inflammation in the skin has been studied in various experimental models. Polarization spectroscopy imaging introduced recently...

  1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    OpenAIRE

    Benoliel, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation.

  2. Peripheral Neuropathic Facial/Trigeminal Pain and RANTES/CCL5 in Jawbone Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Lechner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this study, we elucidate the possible causative role of chronic subclinical inflammation in jawbone of patients with atypical facial pain (AFP and trigeminal neuralgia (TRN in the local overexpression of the chemokine regulated on activation and normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/C-C motif ligand 5 CCL5. Neurons contain opioid receptors that transmit antipain reactions in the peripheral and central nervous system. Proinflammatory chemokines like RANTES/CCL5 desensitize μ-opioid receptors in the periphery sensory neurons and it has been suggested that RANTES modifies the nociceptive reaction. Materials and Methods. In 15 patients with AFP/TRN, we examined fatty degenerated jawbone (FDOJ samples for the expression of seven cytokines by multiplex analysis and compared these results with healthy jawbones. Results. Each of these medullary jawbone samples exhibited RANTES as the only highly overexpressed cytokine. The FDOJ cohort with AFP/TRN showed a mean 30-fold overexpression of RANTES compared to healthy jawbones. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, no other research has identified RANTES overexpression in silent inflamed jawbones as a possible cause for AFP/TRN. Thus, we hypothesize that the surgical clearing of FDOJ might diminish RANTES signaling pathways in neurons and contribute to resolving chronic neurological pain in AFP/TRN patients.

  3. ERK-GluR1 phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons is involved in pain associated with dry tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuka; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kubo, Asako; Chen, Jui Yen; Noma, Noboru; Batbold, Dulguun; Imamura, Yoshiki; Sessle, Barry J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dry mouth is known to cause severe pain in the intraoral structures, and many dry mouth patients have been suffering from intraoral pain. In development of an appropriate treatment, it is crucial to study the mechanisms underlying intraoral pain associated with dry mouth, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying pain related to dry mouth, the dry-tongue rat model was developed. Hence, the mechanical or heat nocifensive reflex, the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphorylated GluR1-IR immunohistochemistries, and the single neuronal activity were examined in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats. Results The head-withdrawal reflex threshold to mechanical, but not heat, stimulation of the tongue was significantly decreased on day 7 after tongue drying. The mechanical, but not heat, responses of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis nociceptive neurons were significantly enhanced in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells was also significantly increased in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis following noxious stimulation of the tongue in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The decrement of the mechanical head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWT) was reversed during intracisternal administration of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 inhibitor, PD98059. The trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neuronal activities and the number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells following noxious mechanical stimulation of dried tongue were also significantly decreased following intracisternal administration of PD98059 compared to vehicle-administrated rats. Increased number of the phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells was observed in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats, and the number of

  4. Downregulation of selective microRNAs in trigeminal ganglion neurons following inflammatory muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active regulation of gene expression in the nervous system plays an important role in the development and/or maintenance of inflammatory pain. MicroRNA (miRNA negatively regulates gene expression via posttranscriptional or transcriptional inhibition of specific genes. To explore the possible involvement of miRNA in gene regulation during inflammatory pain, we injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA unilaterally into the rat masseter muscle and quantified changes in neuron-specific mature miRNAs in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed significant, but differential, downregulation of mature miR-10a, -29a, -98, -99a, -124a, -134, and -183 in the ipsilateral mandibular division (V3 of the TG within 4 hr after CFA. In contrast, levels of tested miRNAs did not change significantly in the contralateral V3 or the ipsilateral ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the TG from inflamed rats, nor in the ipsilateral V3 of saline-injected animals. The downregulated miRNAs recovered differentially to a level equal to or higher than that in naive animals. Full recovery time varied with miRNA species but was at least 4 days. Expression and downregulation of some miRNAs were further confirmed by in situ hybridization of TG neurons that innervate the inflamed muscle. Although neurons of all sizes expressed these miRNAs, their signals varied between neurons. Our results indicate that miRNA species specific to neurons are quickly regulated following inflammatory muscle pain.

  5. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Chang Kyu; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications.

  6. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications. PMID:25368776

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent primitive trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-09-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications. PMID:25368776

  8. Trigeminal Electrophysiology: a 2 × 2 matrix model for differential diagnosis between temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chessa Giacomo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain due to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs often has the same clinical symptoms and signs as other types of orofacial pain (OP. The possible presence of serious neurological and/or systemic organic pathologies makes differential diagnosis difficult, especially in early disease stages. In the present study, we performed a qualitative and quantitative electrophysiological evaluation of the neuromuscular responses of the trigeminal nervous system. Using the jaw jerk reflex (JJ and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots (bR-MEPs tests, we investigated the functional and organic responses of healthy subjects (control group and patients with TMD symptoms (TMD group. Method Thirty-three patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD symptoms and 36 control subjects underwent two electromyographic (EMG tests: the jaw jerk reflex test and the motor evoked potentials of the trigeminal roots test using bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation. The mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values were computed for the EMG absolute values. The ratio between the EMG values obtained on each side was always computed with the reference side as the numerator. For the TMD group, this side was identified as the painful side (pain side, while for the control group this was taken as the non-preferred masticatory side (non-preferred side. The 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were also calculated. Results Analysis of the ratios (expressed as percentages between the values obtained on both sides revealed a high degree of symmetry in the bR-MEPs % in the control (0.93 ± 0.12% and TMD (0.91 ± 0.22% groups. This symmetry indicated organic integrity of the trigeminal root motor fibers and correct electrode arrangement. A degree of asymmetry of the jaw jerk's amplitude between sides (ipJJ%, when the mandible was kept in the intercuspal position, was found in the TMD group (0.24% ± 0.14% with a

  9. New insight into trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Truini, A.; Galeotti, F.; Cruccu, G.

    2005-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is universally considered the neuropathic facial pain most and best known in medical practice. We propose a short review on trigeminal neuralgia reporting its main clinical aspects, unsolved problems and highlighting differential diagnosis between classical and symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia.

  10. Neuralgias of the Trigeminal Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Allan S

    2000-01-01

    Practitioners are often presented with patients who complain bitterly of facial pain. The trigeminal nerve is involved in four conditions that are sometimes mixed up. The four conditions - trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain, postherpetic neuralgia and atypical facial pain - are discussed under the headings of clinical features, differential diagnosis, cause and treatment. This article should help practitioners to differentiate one from the other and to manage their care.

  11. Predictive Nomogram for the Durability of Pain Relief From Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with the durability of stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 446 of 777 patients with TN underwent SRS and had evaluable follow-up in our electronic medical records and phone interview records. The median follow-up was 21.2 months. The Barrow Neurologic Institute (BNI) pain scale was used to determine pre- and post-SRS pain. Dose-volume anatomical measurements, Burchiel pain subtype, pain quality, prior procedures, and medication usage were included in this retrospective cohort to identify factors impacting the time to BNI 4-5 pain relapse by using Cox proportional hazard regression. An internet-based nomogram was constructed based on predictive factors of durable relief pre- and posttreatment at 6-month intervals. Results: Rates of freedom from BNI 4-5 failure at 1, 3, and 5 years were 84.5%, 70.4%, and 46.9%, respectively. Pain relief was BNI 1-3 at 1, 3, and 5 years in 86.1%, 74.3%, and 51.3% of type 1 patients; 79.3%, 46.2%, and 29.3% of type 2 patients; and 62.7%, 50.2%, and 25% of atypical facial pain patients. BNI type 1 pain score was achieved at 1, 3, and 5 years in 62.9%, 43.5%, and 22.0% of patients with type 1 pain and in 47.5%, 25.2%, and 9.2% of type 2 patients, respectively. Only 13% of patients with atypical facial pain achieved BNI 1 response; 42% of patients developed post-Gamma Knife radiation surgery (GKRS) trigeminal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis revealed that post-SRS numbness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; P<.0001), type 1 (vs type 2) TN (HR, 0.6; P=.02), and improved post-SRS BNI score at 6 months (HR, 0.009; P<.0001) were predictive of a durable pain response. Conclusions: The durability of SRS for TN depends on the presenting Burchiel pain type, the post-SRS BNI score, and the presence of post-SRS facial numbness. The durability of pain relief can be estimated pre- and posttreatment by using our

  12. Predictive Nomogram for the Durability of Pain Relief From Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, John T., E-mail: johnthomas75@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Nida, Adrian M. [Biomedical Informatics Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Isom, Scott [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Section of Biostatistics, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Marshall, Kopriva [Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, John D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To determine factors associated with the durability of stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 446 of 777 patients with TN underwent SRS and had evaluable follow-up in our electronic medical records and phone interview records. The median follow-up was 21.2 months. The Barrow Neurologic Institute (BNI) pain scale was used to determine pre- and post-SRS pain. Dose-volume anatomical measurements, Burchiel pain subtype, pain quality, prior procedures, and medication usage were included in this retrospective cohort to identify factors impacting the time to BNI 4-5 pain relapse by using Cox proportional hazard regression. An internet-based nomogram was constructed based on predictive factors of durable relief pre- and posttreatment at 6-month intervals. Results: Rates of freedom from BNI 4-5 failure at 1, 3, and 5 years were 84.5%, 70.4%, and 46.9%, respectively. Pain relief was BNI 1-3 at 1, 3, and 5 years in 86.1%, 74.3%, and 51.3% of type 1 patients; 79.3%, 46.2%, and 29.3% of type 2 patients; and 62.7%, 50.2%, and 25% of atypical facial pain patients. BNI type 1 pain score was achieved at 1, 3, and 5 years in 62.9%, 43.5%, and 22.0% of patients with type 1 pain and in 47.5%, 25.2%, and 9.2% of type 2 patients, respectively. Only 13% of patients with atypical facial pain achieved BNI 1 response; 42% of patients developed post-Gamma Knife radiation surgery (GKRS) trigeminal dysfunction. Multivariate analysis revealed that post-SRS numbness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; P<.0001), type 1 (vs type 2) TN (HR, 0.6; P=.02), and improved post-SRS BNI score at 6 months (HR, 0.009; P<.0001) were predictive of a durable pain response. Conclusions: The durability of SRS for TN depends on the presenting Burchiel pain type, the post-SRS BNI score, and the presence of post-SRS facial numbness. The durability of pain relief can be estimated pre- and posttreatment by using our

  13. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  14. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels. PMID:25500807

  15. Trigeminal neuralgia and persistent trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Renata; Parlato, Raffaele Stefano; De Paulis, Danilo; Cirillo, Mario; Marrone, Valeria; Cirillo, Sossio; Moraci, Aldo; Parlato, Ciro

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) associated with asymptomatic left temporal cavernoma. Our patient presented unstable blood hypertension and the pain of typical trigeminal neuralgia over the second and third divisions of the nerve in the right side of the face. The attacks were often precipitated during physical exertion. MRI and Angio-MRI revealed the persistent carotid basilar anastomosis and occasionally left parietal cavernoma. After drug treatment of blood hypertension, spontaneous recovery of neuralgia was observed and we planned surgical treatment of left temporal cavernoma. PMID:22246457

  16. Capsaicin-induced changes in LTP in the lateral amygdala are mediated by TRPV1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Zschenderlein

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 channel is a well recognized polymodal signal detector that is activated by painful stimuli such as capsaicin. Here, we show that TRPV1 is expressed in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA. Despite the fact that the central amygdala displays the highest neuronal density, the highest density of TRPV1 labeled neurons was found within the nuclei of the basolateral complex of the amygdala. Capsaicin specifically changed the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP in the LA in brain slices of mice depending on the anesthetic (ether, isoflurane used before euthanasia. After ether anesthesia, capsaicin had a suppressive effect on LA-LTP both in patch clamp and in extracellular recordings. The capsaicin-induced reduction of LTP was completely blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor L-NAME and was absent in neuronal NOS as well as in TRPV1 deficient mice. The specific antagonist of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1, AM 251, was also able to reduce the inhibitory effect of capsaicin on LA-LTP, suggesting that stimulation of TRPV1 provokes the generation of anandamide in the brain which seems to inhibit NO synthesis. After isoflurane anesthesia before euthanasia capsaicin caused a TRPV1-mediated increase in the magnitude of LA-LTP. Therefore, our results also indicate that the appropriate choice of the anesthetics used is an important consideration when brain plasticity and the action of endovanilloids will be evaluated. In summary, our results demonstrate that TRPV1 may be involved in the amygdala control of learning mechanisms.

  17. The human operculo-insular cortex is pain-preferentially but not pain-exclusively activated by trigeminal and olfactory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Lötsch

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence about the central nervous representation of pain in the brain suggests that the operculo-insular cortex is a crucial part of the pain matrix. The pain-specificity of a brain region may be tested by administering nociceptive stimuli while controlling for unspecific activations by administering non-nociceptive stimuli. We applied this paradigm to nasal chemosensation, delivering trigeminal or olfactory stimuli, to verify the pain-specificity of the operculo-insular cortex. In detail, brain activations due to intranasal stimulation induced by non-nociceptive olfactory stimuli of hydrogen sulfide (5 ppm or vanillin (0.8 ppm were used to mask brain activations due to somatosensory, clearly nociceptive trigeminal stimulations with gaseous carbon dioxide (75% v/v. Functional magnetic resonance (fMRI images were recorded from 12 healthy volunteers in a 3T head scanner during stimulus administration using an event-related design. We found that significantly more activations following nociceptive than non-nociceptive stimuli were localized bilaterally in two restricted clusters in the brain containing the primary and secondary somatosensory areas and the insular cortices consistent with the operculo-insular cortex. However, these activations completely disappeared when eliminating activations associated with the administration of olfactory stimuli, which were small but measurable. While the present experiments verify that the operculo-insular cortex plays a role in the processing of nociceptive input, they also show that it is not a pain-exclusive brain region and allow, in the experimental context, for the interpretation that the operculo-insular cortex splay a major role in the detection of and responding to salient events, whether or not these events are nociceptive or painful.

  18. The human operculo-insular cortex is pain-preferentially but not pain-exclusively activated by trigeminal and olfactory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Walter, Carmen; Felden, Lisa; Nöth, Ulrike; Deichmann, Ralf; Oertel, Bruno G

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence about the central nervous representation of pain in the brain suggests that the operculo-insular cortex is a crucial part of the pain matrix. The pain-specificity of a brain region may be tested by administering nociceptive stimuli while controlling for unspecific activations by administering non-nociceptive stimuli. We applied this paradigm to nasal chemosensation, delivering trigeminal or olfactory stimuli, to verify the pain-specificity of the operculo-insular cortex. In detail, brain activations due to intranasal stimulation induced by non-nociceptive olfactory stimuli of hydrogen sulfide (5 ppm) or vanillin (0.8 ppm) were used to mask brain activations due to somatosensory, clearly nociceptive trigeminal stimulations with gaseous carbon dioxide (75% v/v). Functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) images were recorded from 12 healthy volunteers in a 3T head scanner during stimulus administration using an event-related design. We found that significantly more activations following nociceptive than non-nociceptive stimuli were localized bilaterally in two restricted clusters in the brain containing the primary and secondary somatosensory areas and the insular cortices consistent with the operculo-insular cortex. However, these activations completely disappeared when eliminating activations associated with the administration of olfactory stimuli, which were small but measurable. While the present experiments verify that the operculo-insular cortex plays a role in the processing of nociceptive input, they also show that it is not a pain-exclusive brain region and allow, in the experimental context, for the interpretation that the operculo-insular cortex splay a major role in the detection of and responding to salient events, whether or not these events are nociceptive or painful. PMID:22496865

  19. INFLUENCE OF NMDA AND NON-NMDA ANTAGONISTS ON ACUTE AND INFLAMMATORY PAIN IN THE TRIGEMINAL TERRITORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Randunz, Vitor; Utiumi, Marco; Lange, Marcos Cristiano; Kowacs, Pedro André; Mulinari, Rogério Andrade; Oshinsky, Michael; Vital, Maria; Sereniki, Adriana; Fernandes, Artur Furlaneto; Silva, Lucas Leite e; Werneck, Lineu César

    2016-01-01

    NMDA and non-NMDA receptors are involved in spinal transmission of nociceptive information in physiological and pathological conditions. Our objective was to study the influence of NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists on pain control in the trigeminal system using a formalin-induced orofacial pain model. Motor performance was also evaluated. Male Rattus norvegicus were pre-treated with topiramate (T) (n=8), memantine (M) (n=8), divalproex (D) (n=8) or isotonic saline solution (ISS) (n=10) intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the formalin test. Formalin 2.5% was injected into the right upper lip (V2 branch) and induced two phases: phase I (early or neurogenic) (0–3 min) and phase II (late or inflammatory) (12–30 min). For motor behavior performance we used the open-field test and measured latency to movement onset, locomotion and rearing frequencies, and immobility time. Pre-treatment of animals with M and D only attenuated nociceptive formalin behavior for phase II. T increased locomotion and rearing frequencies and reduced immobility time. Treatment with M increased immobility time and with D reduced locomotion frequency. Our results showed that the NMDA antagonist (M) is more potent than the non-NMDA antagonists (D and T) in the control of pain in the inflammatory phase. The non-NMDA topiramate improved motor performance more than did D and M, probably because T has more anxiolytic properties. PMID:19099122

  20. Capsaicin-induced neurogenic inflammation in pig skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars J; Herskin, Mette S

    2014-01-01

    Topical capsaicin is a well-established model of experimental hyperalgesia. Its application to the study of animals has been limited to few species. The effect of topical capsaicin on hyperalgesia in porcine skin was evaluated as part of a study of inflammatory pain in the pig. Two experiments we...

  1. Intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, J K

    1988-01-01

    In 49 cases of trigeminal neuralgia seen at the Abingdon Pain Relief Unit, Oxfordshire, the average time between initial onset of pain and first referral to the unit was 9.8 years. The pattern of presentation and distribution was no different from previously published studies, indicating that the more intractable cases cannot be predicted at first presentation.

  2. Phα1β toxin prevents capsaicin-induced nociceptive behavior and mechanical hypersensitivity without acting on TRPV1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Junior, Celio J; Milano, Julie; Souza, Alessandra H; Silva, Juliana F; Rigo, Flávia K; Dalmolin, Geruza; Cordeiro, Marta N; Richardson, Michael; Barros, Alexandre G A; Gomez, Renato S; Silva, Marco A R; Kushmerick, Christopher; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-08-01

    Phα1β toxin is a peptide purified from the venom of the armed spider Phoneutria nigriventer, with markedly antinociceptive action in models of acute and persistent pain in rats. Similarly to ziconotide, its analgesic action is related to inhibition of high voltage activated calcium channels with more selectivity for N-type. In this study we evaluated the effect of Phα1β when injected peripherally or intrathecally in a rat model of spontaneous pain induced by capsaicin. We also investigated the effect of Phα1β on Ca²⁺ transients in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and HEK293 cells expressing the TRPV1 receptor. Intraplantar or intrathecal administered Phα1β reduced both nocifensive behavior and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by capsaicin similarly to that observed with SB366791, a specific TRPV1 antagonist. Peripheral nifedipine and mibefradil did also decrease nociceptive behavior induced by intraplantar capsaicin. In contrast, ω-conotoxin MVIIA (a selective N-type Ca²⁺ channel blocker) was effective only when administered intrathecally. Phα1β, MVIIA and SB366791 inhibited, with similar potency, the capsaicin-induced Ca²⁺ transients in DRG neurons. The simultaneous administration of Phα1β and SB366791 inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca²⁺ transients that were additive suggesting that they act through different targets. Moreover, Phα1β did not inhibit capsaicin-activated currents in patch-clamp recordings of HEK293 cells that expressed TRPV1 receptors. Our results show that Phα1β may be effective as a therapeutic strategy for pain and this effect is not related to the inhibition of TRPV1 receptors. PMID:23597507

  3. Non-Invasive Mapping of Human Trigeminal Brainstem Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Knudsen, Jamie; ANDERSON, Julie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2008-01-01

    The human trigeminal system mediates facial pain and somatosensory processing. The anatomic location of neuronal substrates and axonal pathways of the trigeminal system have previously been characterized with conventional in vitro methods. The present investigation implemented diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography to first segment the peripheral trigeminal circuitry; trigeminal nerve branches (ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular nerves), ganglion and nerve root. Subse...

  4. Effects of remote cutaneous pain on trigeminal laser-evoked potentials in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Pecoraro, Carla; Serpino, Claudia; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate heat pain thresholds and evoked potentials following CO(2) laser thermal stimulation (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs), during remote application of capsaicin, in migraine patients vs. non-migraine healthy controls. Twelve outpatients suffering from migraine without aura were compared with 10 healthy controls. The LEPs were recorded by 6 scalp electrodes, stimulating the dorsum of the right hand and the right supraorbital zone in basal condition, during the application of 3% capsaicin on the dorsum of the left hand and after capsaicin removal. In normal subjects, the laser pain and the N2-P2 vertex complex obtained by the hand and face stimulation were significantly reduced during remote capsaicin application, with respect to pre-and post-capsaicin conditions, while in migraine LEPs and laser pain were not significantly modified during remote painful stimulation. In migraine a defective brainstem inhibiting control may coexist with cognitive factors of focalised attention to facial pain, less sensitive to distraction by a second pain.

  5. MR volumetry of the trigeminal nerve in patients with unilateral facial pain; MR-Volumetrie des N. trigeminus bei Patienten mit einseitigen Gesichtsschmerzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B.; Fiebach, J.; Sartor, K.; Stippich, C. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, D.; Tronnier, V. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Purpose: to assess whether MRI can detect atrophy of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. Materials and methods: a prospective MRI study was conducted in 39 patients (trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathy, or atypical facial pain) and 25 volunteers. Using a coronal orientation (T1 flash 3D; T2 CISS 3D), regions of interest were delineated in the cisternal part of the trigeminal nerve along the border of the nerve to calculate the volume of the nerve. The volume of the nerve was compared side-by-side in each patient (t-test, p < 0.05) and the volume difference compared between patients and volunteers. Results: the volume of the compromised trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was lower than on the contralateral healthy side, with the difference between healthy and compromised side statistically significant (p < 0.05). In all other patients and in all volunteers, no significant difference was found between the volume of the healthy and compromised nerve. The volume difference between the healthy and compromised side in patients with trigeminal neuralgia was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in all other patients and volunteers. Conclusion: atrophy of the trigeminal nerve caused by a nerve-vessel conflict can be detected by MRI. Only patients with trigeminal neuralgia show this unilateral atrophy. Therefore, it is possible to demonstrate the result of the nerve-vessel conflict and to determine the consequences of such a conflict. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Studie wurde mit der Frage durchgefuehrt, ob die bei Patienten mit Trigeminusneuralgie durch einen Gefaess-Nerven-Konflikt bedingte Atrophie des Nervs magnetresonanztomographisch darstellbar ist. Methodik: 39 Patienten (Trigeminusneuralgie, Trigeminusneuropathie, atypischer Gesichtsschmerz) und 25 Probanden wurden prospektiv magnetresonanztomographisch untersucht. In koronaren T1- und T2-Gradientenechosequenzen wurde der zisternale Abschnitt des N. trigeminus mittels

  6. Evaluation of surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, K. S.; Keng, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a type of facial pain that is difficult to treat. The pain can be excruciating and debilitating. The wide range of treatments currently used for trigeminal neuralgia is ample evidence that there is no simple answer to how it should be managed. This review will evaluate the current surgical procedures used for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. A critical analysis of the evidence-based studies to date was done to evaluate and compare the efficacy of the different su...

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Somaza; Wendy Hurtado; Eglee Montilla; Jose Ghaleb

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded wi...

  8. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  9. Behavioral evidence for the differential regulation of p-p38 MAPK and p-NF-κB in rats with trigeminal neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Min K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the differential regulation of p-p38 MAPK or p-NF-κB in male Sprague-Dawley rats with inferior alveolar nerve injury resulting from mal-positioned dental implants. For this purpose, we characterized the temporal expression of p-p38 MAPK or p-NF-κB in the medullary dorsal horn and examined changes in nociceptive behavior after a blockade of p-p38 MAPK or p-NF-κB pathways in rats with trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results Under anesthesia, the left lower second molar was extracted and replaced with a mini dental implant to intentionally injure the inferior alveolar nerve. Western and immunofluorescence analysis revealed that p-p38 MAPK is upregulated in microglia following nerve injury and that this expression peaked on postoperative day (POD 3 through 7. However, the activation of p-NF-κB in astrocyte peaked on POD 7 through 21. The intracisternal administration of SB203580 (1 or 10 μg, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, on POD 3 but not on POD 21 markedly inhibits mechanical allodynia and the p-p38 MAPK expression. However, the intracisternal administration of SN50 (0.2 or 2 ng, an NF-κB inhibitor, on POD 21 but not on POD 3 attenuates mechanical allodynia and p-NF-κB expression. Dexamethasone (25 mg/kg decreases not only the activation of p38 MAPK but also that of NF-κB on POD 7. Conclusions These results suggest that early expression of p-p38 MAPK in the microglia and late induction of p-NF-κB in astrocyte play an important role in trigeminal neuropathic pain and that a blockade of p-p38 MAPK at an early stage and p-NF-κB at a late stage might be a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of trigeminal neuropathic pain.

  10. Behavioral evidence for the differential regulation of p-p38 MAPK and p-NF-κB in rats with trigeminal neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Min K; Han Seung R; Park Min K; Kim Min J; Bae Yong C; Kim Sung K; Park Jae S; Ahn Dong K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We investigated the differential regulation of p-p38 MAPK or p-NF-κB in male Sprague-Dawley rats with inferior alveolar nerve injury resulting from mal-positioned dental implants. For this purpose, we characterized the temporal expression of p-p38 MAPK or p-NF-κB in the medullary dorsal horn and examined changes in nociceptive behavior after a blockade of p-p38 MAPK or p-NF-κB pathways in rats with trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results Under anesthesia, the left lower secon...

  11. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist.This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain.Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways.Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders.It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal p...

  12. Historical characterization of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eboli, Paula; Stone, James L; Aydin, Sabri; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2009-06-01

    TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA IS a well known clinical entity characterized by agonizing, paroxysmal, and lancinating facial pain, often triggered by movements of the mouth or eating. Historical reviews of facial pain have attempted to describe this severe pain over the past 2.5 millennia. The ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates, Aretaeus, and Galen, described kephalalgias, but their accounts were vague and did not clearly correspond with what we now term trigeminal neuralgia. The first adequate description of trigeminal neuralgia was given in 1671, followed by a fuller description by physician John Locke in 1677. André described the convulsive-like condition in 1756, and named it tic douloureux; in 1773, Fothergill described it as "a painful affection of the face;" and in 1779, John Hunter more clearly characterized the entity as a form of "nervous disorder" with reference to pain of the teeth, gums, or tongue where the disease "does not reside." One hundred fifty years later, the neurological surgeon Walter Dandy equated neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve with trigeminal neuralgia.

  13. Ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation for atypical trigeminal neuralgia:a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Shibin; Ma, Xiaoliang; Li, Xiaoqin; Yuan, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Background Trigeminal neuralgia is an intense neuralgia involving facial areas supplied by trigeminal nerve. The pain is characterized by sudden onset, short persistence, sharp or lancinating. Trigeminal neuralgia commonly affects frontal areas, infraorbital or paranasal areas, mandibular areas and teeth. While Trigeminal neuralgia affecting merely the upper eyelid is rare. Here we report a case of atypical Trigeminal neuralgia confined to the upper eyelid. The patient was pain free during th...

  14. Percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy and neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve for the treatment of facial pain Rizotomia percutânea por radiofreqüência e a descompressão neurovascular do nervo trigêmeo no tratamento das algias faciais

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Manoel J; Silvia R.D.T. Siqueira; Gilberto M. de Almeida

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcomes of 354 radiofrequency rhizotomies and 21 neurovascular decompressions performed as treatment for 367 facial pain patients (290 idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, 52 symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia, 16 atypical facial pain, 9 post-herpetic neuralgia). METHOD: Clinical findings and surgery success rate were considered for evaluation. A scale of success rate was determined to classify patients, which considered pain relief and functional/sensorial deficits. RE...

  15. Neuralgia Trigeminal

    OpenAIRE

    Millyan Dewi Lubis

    2008-01-01

    Tujuan penulisan adalah untuk mengetahui lebih jauh mengenai neuralgia trigemial, meliputi defenisi, etiologi, gambaran klinis, cara mendiagnosa serta perawatan terhadap penyakit ini. Neuralgia trigeminal adalah kelainan berupa rasa nyeri ataupun rasa sakit yang khas, berupa rasa sakit yang menusuk, tajam pada daerah lintasan saraf trigeminal. Perawatan pada penyakit ini dilakukan karena kelainan ini tidak dapat sembuh sendiri. Ada banyak cara penanggulangan rasa sakit ini, mulai dari pemberi...

  16. Corticotrigeminal projections from the insular cortex to the trigeminal caudal subnucleus regulate orofacial pain after nerve injury via extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in insular cortex neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neuroplasticity alterations are implicated in the pathophysiology of chronic orofacial pain. However, the relationship between critical cortex excitability and orofacial pain maintenance has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated a top-down corticospinal descending pain modulation pathway from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC to the spinal dorsal horn that could directly regulate nociceptive transmission. Thus, we aimed to investigate possible corticotrigeminal connections that directly influence orofacial nociception in rats. Infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IoN-CCI induced significant orofacial nociceptive behaviors as well as pain-related negative emotions such as anxiety/depression in rats. By combining retrograde and anterograde tract tracing, we found powerful evidence that the trigeminal caudal subnucleus (Vc, especially the superficial laminae (I/II, received direct descending projections from granular and dysgranular parts of the insular cortex (IC. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, an important signaling molecule involved in neuroplasticity, was significantly activated in the IC following IoN-CCI. Moreover, in IC slices from IoN-CCI rats, U0126, an inhibitor of ERK activation, decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and reduced the paired-pulse ratio (PPR of Vc-projecting neurons. Additionally, U0126 also reduced the number of action potentials in the Vc-projecting neurons. Finally, intra-IC infusion of U0126 obviously decreased Fos expression in the Vc, accompanied by the alleviation of both nociceptive behavior and negative emotions. Thus, the corticotrigeminal descending pathway from the IC to the Vc could directly regulate orofacial pain, and ERK deactivation in the IC could effectively alleviate neuropathic pain as well as pain-related negative emotions in IoN-CCI rats, probably through this top-down pathway. These

  17. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO THE TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA THERAPEUTIC MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Khatuaeva, Aminat; Karpov, Sergey; Frantseva, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most widespread cases of prosopalgia characterized by a high intensiveness of pain attacks as well as by an exclusive resistance to different therapeutic methods. [2, 39-41; 3, 326-329]. Specific paroxysmal character of pain attacks in trigeminal neuralgia defines its therapy techniques. The first medication which gave a significant effect in the therapy of trigeminal neuralgia was Dilantin. Blom in 1973 was the first who used anticonvulsants for pain manage...

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia in an HIV patient

    OpenAIRE

    Hashmi, Mohammad A; Gautam Guha; Bibhuti Saha

    2010-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a painful condition affecting face. Its commonest cause is the tortuous vessels in prepontine cistern. There are other causes also, like brainstem lesions and mass lesions, as well as inflammatory causes. We present a case of an HIV patient with marked involvement of trigeminal nerves, which is a unique finding in immunocompromised patients.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia in an HIV patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A Hashmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a painful condition affecting face. Its commonest cause is the tortuous vessels in prepontine cistern. There are other causes also, like brainstem lesions and mass lesions, as well as inflammatory causes. We present a case of an HIV patient with marked involvement of trigeminal nerves, which is a unique finding in immunocompromised patients.

  20. Differences in individual susceptibility affect the development of trigeminal neuralgia☆

    OpenAIRE

    Duransoy, Yusuf Kurtuluş; Mete, Mesut; Akçay, Emrah; Selçuki, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome due to dysfunctional hyperactivity of the trigeminal nerve, and is characterized by a sudden, usually unilateral, recurrent lancinating pain arising from one or more divisions of the nerve. The most accepted pathogenetic mechanism for trigeminal neuralgia is compression of the nerve at its dorsal root entry zone or in its distal course. In this paper, we report four cases with trigeminal neuralgia due to an unknown mechanism after an intracranial interventio...

  1. Reproducibility of the capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow response as assessed by laser Doppler perfusion imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Schueren, B J; Hoon, J.N.; Vanmolkot, F H; van Hecken, A; Depre, M; Kane, S.A.; De Lepeleire, I; Sinclair, S R

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subjectCapsaicin rapidly produces local neurogenic inflammation (characterized by oedema and erythema) when locally administered to the human skin by binding to the TRPV1 receptor present on dermal sensory nerve endings.In nonhuman primates, a pharmacodynamic assay has been described and validated using capsaicin-induced dermal vasodilation measured by laser Doppler perfusion imaging to assess calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist activity.Laser Doppler p...

  2. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Capsaicin-Induced Apoptosis of Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengzhang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, main pungent ingredient of hot chilli peppers, has been shown to have anticarcinogenic effect on various cancer cells through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic effect of capsaicin on human pancreatic cancer cells in both in vitro and in vivo systems, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. In vitro, treatment of both the pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and SW1990 with capsaicin resulted in cells growth inhibition, G0/G1 phase arrest, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, a marker of the endoplasmic-reticulum-stress- (ERS- mediated apoptosis pathway, by specific siRNA attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis both in PANC-1 and SW1990 cells. Moreover, in vivo studies capsaicin effectively inhibited the growth and metabolism of pancreatic cancer and prolonged the survival time of pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor-induced mice. Furthermore, capsaicin increased the expression of some key ERS markers, including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, phosphoprotein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (phosphoPERK, and phosphoeukaryotic initiation factor-2α (phospho-eIF2α, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 and GADD153 in tumor tissues. In conclusion, we for the first time provide important evidence to support the involvement of ERS in the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells by capsaicin.

  3. Activation of the trigeminal α2-adrenoceptor produces sex-specific, estrogen dependent thermal antinociception and antihyperalgesia using an operant pain assay in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Subodh; Mokha, Sukhbir S

    2016-11-01

    Higher prevalence of several pain disorders in women and sexual dimorphism in G-protein coupled receptor-induced analgesia has been reported. We have previously shown that α2-adrenoceptor-induced antinociception is sex-specific and attenuated by estrogen in the female rat. However, this evidence was obtained using reflexive withdrawal-based nociceptive assays conducted on restrained animals that may not involve cerebral processing. Hence, we evaluated whether activation of the trigeminal α2-adrenoceptor produces sex-specific antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects in the orofacial region of the rat using a reward conflict-based operant paradigm in which animals must tolerate nociceptive thermal stimulation to be rewarded. Male and ovariectomized (OVX) Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted intracisternally with a PE10 cannula for drug injections. A group of OVX rats (OVX+E) was administered subcutaneously with estradiol 48h before the test. Effect of clonidine, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist, was determined on the operant pain assay using a fully automated Orofacial Pain Assessment Device. Number of spout licks, thermode contacts, and amount of reward intake were automatically recorded by the ANY-maze software. Using acute pain modeling, clonidine produced a dose-dependent increase in all three parameters in male and OVX groups, however, it was ineffective in the OVX+E group. Similarly, using inflammatory pain modeling, clonidine significantly increased these parameters in carrageenan-treated male and OVX groups but not in the OVX+E group. Thus, α2-adrenoceptor activation produces sex-specific antinociception and antihyperalgesia and estrogen attenuates these effects in female rats using an operant pain assay. These findings may help the discovery of effective analgesics for each sex. PMID:27506651

  4. Glial involvement in trigeminal central sensitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-feng XIE

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that trigeminal neurons exhibit central sensitization, an increase in the excitability of neurons within the central nervous system to the extent that a normally innocuous stimulus begins to produce pain after inflamma-tion or injury, and that glial activities play a vital role in this central sensitization. The involvement of glial cells in trigeminal central sensitization contains multiple mechanisms, including interaction with glutamatergic and purinergic receptors. A better understanding of the trigeminal central sensitization mediated by glial cells will help to find potential therapeutic targets and lead to developing new analge-sics for orofacial-specific pain with higher efficiency and fewer side-effects.

  5. [Trigeminal neuralgia associated with primitive trigeminal artery: report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokimura, H; Atsuchi, M; Kawasaki, T; Sato, E; Todoroki, K; Asakura, T; Fukushima, T

    1990-02-01

    Two cases of trigeminal neuralgia associated with the primitive trigeminal artery are reported. From 1981, the authors have treated 131 trigeminal neuralgia patients with microvascular decompression. Among them, we encountered two rare cases of trigeminal neuralgia associated with the primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and its variant (PTAV). Case 1 is a 74-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital due to pain of maxilla and mandible. We diagnosed her pain as trigeminal neuralgia. Preoperative angiogram showed the primitive trigeminal artery arising from the cavernous portion of the right internal carotid artery (ICA). She underwent a microvascular decompression operation. We found that her right trigeminal nerve was compressed by the right superior cerebellar artery (SCA) and the right anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). We transferred the offending arteries, and her pain disappeared. Case 2 is a 48-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital due to severe mandibular pain. We diagnosed his pain as trigeminal neuralgia, and he underwent a microvascular decompression operation. His left trigeminal nerve was found compressed by the left SCA and the AICA, and the AICA was arising from the direction of Meckel's cave. His severe pain disappeared completely after operation. Postoperative angiogram of his left ICA showed an aberrant artery arising from the cavernous portion of the ICA, to the region of the left AICA. This aberrant artery is a variant of PTA (PTAV). PTA and PTAV, the so called persistent congenital arteries, are said to accompany aneurysms and other vascular lesions, and affect hemodynamic stress.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2336149

  6. Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma of Petroclival Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Jurjević, Ante; Bralić, Marina; Bučuk, Mira; Tuškan-Mohar, Lidija; Čoklo, Miran; Bosnar, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by paroxysmal episodes of facial pain in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. It can occur in either sex but is most frequently seen in women aged 50–60 years. This article presents case of trigeminal neuralgia in a 55-year-old female patient caused by meningioma of petroclival localization. The article underscores the importance of neurologic and neuroradiologic examination in diagnosing and managing patients with facial pain conditions.

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia: report of 3 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orofacial pain can be caused by intracranial disorders or can be musculoskeletal, vascular, internal derangemental, and neurologic in origin. The neurologic pain is derived from structural and functional disorders of nerve, and the trigeminal neuralgia is the typical manifestation. Trigeminal neuralgia is known from centuries ago, and is one of the most common pains in human. We present our experience with three patients who have trigeminal neuralgia. The first case is a 50-year-old female who had no specific evidence radiographically. Second is a 50-year-old male with microvascular compression on right trigeminal nerve. The third case is a 60-year-old female who had a neoplasm in cerebellopontine angle with associated mass effect.

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia: report of 3 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geum Mee; Ki, Joo Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Orofacial pain can be caused by intracranial disorders or can be musculoskeletal, vascular, internal derangemental, and neurologic in origin. The neurologic pain is derived from structural and functional disorders of nerve, and the trigeminal neuralgia is the typical manifestation. Trigeminal neuralgia is known from centuries ago, and is one of the most common pains in human. We present our experience with three patients who have trigeminal neuralgia. The first case is a 50-year-old female who had no specific evidence radiographically. Second is a 50-year-old male with microvascular compression on right trigeminal nerve. The third case is a 60-year-old female who had a neoplasm in cerebellopontine angle with associated mass effect.

  9. Motor Cortex Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Facial, Upper Extremity, and Throat Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-22

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type I); Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type II); Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain; Trigeminal Deafferentation Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Types I and II, Involving the Upper Extremity); Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia; Upper Extremity Pain Due to Deafferentation of the Cervical Spine; Central Pain Syndromes

  10. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 contributes to inflammatory tongue pain via extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis and upper cervical spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ming-Gang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the orofacial region, limited information is available concerning pathological tongue pain, such as inflammatory pain or neuropathic pain occurring in the tongue. Here, we tried for the first time to establish a novel animal model of inflammatory tongue pain in rats and to investigate the roles of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling in this process. Methods Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA was submucosally injected into the tongue to induce the inflammatory pain phenotype that was confirmed by behavioral testing. Expression of phosphorylated ERK (pERK and mGluR5 in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc and upper cervical spinal cord (C1-C2 were detected with immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. pERK inhibitor, a selective mGluR5 antagonist or agonist was continuously administered for 7 days via an intrathecal (i.t. route. Local inflammatory responses were verified by tongue histology. Results Submucosal injection of CFA into the tongue produced a long-lasting mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia at the inflamed site, concomitant with an increase in the pERK immunoreactivity in the Vc and C1-C2. The distribution of pERK-IR cells was laminar specific, ipsilaterally dominant, somatotopically relevant, and rostrocaudally restricted. Western blot analysis also showed an enhanced activation of ERK in the Vc and C1-C2 following CFA injection. Continuous i.t. administration of the pERK inhibitor and a selective mGluR5 antagonist significantly depressed the mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in the CFA-injected tongue. In addition, the number of pERK-IR cells in ipsilateral Vc and C1-C2 was also decreased by both drugs. Moreover, continuous i.t. administration of a selective mGluR5 agonist induced mechanical allodynia in naive rats. Conclusions The present study constructed a new animal model of inflammatory tongue pain in rodents, and

  11. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyong Geun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Trigeminal neuralgia is defined as an episodic electrical shock-like sensation in a dermatomal distribution of the trigeminal nerve. When medications fail to control pain, various procedures are used to attempt to control refractory pain. Of available procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery is the least invasive procedure and has been demonstrated to produce significant pain relief with minimal side effects. Recently, linear accelerators were introduced as a tool for radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia beneath the already accepted gamma unit. Author have experienced one case with trigeminal neuralgia treated with linear accelerator. The patient was treated with 85 Gy by means of 5 mm collimator directed to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. The patient obtained pain free without medication at 20 days after the procedure and remain pain free at 6 months after the procedure. He didn't experience facial numbness or other side effects.

  12. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigeminal neuralgia is defined as an episodic electrical shock-like sensation in a dermatomal distribution of the trigeminal nerve. When medications fail to control pain, various procedures are used to attempt to control refractory pain. Of available procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery is the least invasive procedure and has been demonstrated to produce significant pain relief with minimal side effects. Recently, linear accelerators were introduced as a tool for radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia beneath the already accepted gamma unit. Author have experienced one case with trigeminal neuralgia treated with linear accelerator. The patient was treated with 85 Gy by means of 5 mm collimator directed to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. The patient obtained pain free without medication at 20 days after the procedure and remain pain free at 6 months after the procedure. He didn't experience facial numbness or other side effects

  13. Persistent trigeminal artery supply to an intrinsic trigeminal nerve arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhri, Omar; Heit, Jeremy J; Feroze, Abdullah H; Chang, Steven D; Dodd, Robert L; Steinberg, Gary K

    2015-02-01

    Infratentorial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) associated with the trigeminal nerve root entry zone are a known cause of secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The treatment of both TN and AVM can be challenging, especially if the AVM is embedded within the trigeminal nerve. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely supply these intrinsic trigeminal nerve AVM. We present a 64-year-old man with TN from a right trigeminal nerve AVM supplied by a PTA variant. The patient underwent microvascular decompression and a partial resection of the AVM with relief of facial pain symptoms. His residual AVM was subsequently treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). A multimodality approach may be required for the treatment of trigeminal nerve associated PTA AVM and important anatomic patterns need to be recognized before any treatment. Herein, we report to our knowledge the third documented patient with a posterior fossa AVM supplied by a PTA and the first PTA AVM presenting as facial pain. PMID:25070632

  14. [Update on the management of trigeminal neuralgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most severe facial pain syndromes. The annual incidence varies between 4-13% and has a significant effect on patient quality of life. The initial treatment of trigeminal neuralgia is pharmacological, and although other drugs have demonstrated efficacy, albeit in more limited form, carbamazepine is the only drug with sufficient level of evidence. When medical treatment fails, surgery should be considered and can opt for open surgery or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on current available evidence. PMID:26643391

  15. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day. PMID:24888770

  16. Treatment for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively studied on treatment effects of microvascular decompression (MVD) and Gamma knife surgery (GKS) for trigeminal neuralgia. Sixty seven patients underwent MVD and followed up for a median 64.5 months (range 9-188 months). The mean age was 59.8 years (range 33-83 years). Thirty-three patients underwent GKS and followed up for median 23.9 months (range 7-58 months). The mean age was 73.1 years (range 46-87 years). Patient outcomes were excellent in 48 of 67 patients (71.6%) after MVD and 10 of 33 patients (30.3%) after GKS, respectively. Overall, 91.0% of patients were free from pain after MVD, whereas 48.5% were free from pain after GKS. We believe that MVD should remain the primary operation for patients with trigeminal neuralgia if they are medically fit. Gamma knife surgery may provide benefit to elderly patients who can not undergo MVD under general anesthesia. (author)

  17. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, M; Goadsby, P J

    2016-01-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders characterised by lateralized symptoms: prominent headache and ipsilateral cranial autonomic features, such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea. The TACs are: cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT)/short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic features (SUNA) and hemicrania continua (HC). Their diagnostic criteria are outlined in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition-beta (ICHD-IIIb). These conditions are distinguished by their attack duration and frequency, as well as response to treatment. HC is continuous and by definition responsive to indomethacin. The main differential when considering this headache is chronic migraine. Other TACs are remarkable for their short duration and must be distinguished from other short-lasting painful conditions, such as trigeminal neuralgia and primary stabbing headache. Cluster headache is characterised by exquisitely painful attacks that occur in discrete episodes lasting 15-180 min a few times a day. In comparison, PH occurs more frequently and is of shorter duration, and like HC is responsive to indomethacin. SUNCT/SUNA is the shortest duration and highest frequency TAC; attacks can occur over a hundred times every day.

  18. Satellite glial cell P2Y12 receptor in the trigeminal ganglion is involved in lingual neuropathic pain mechanisms in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katagiri Ayano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R is involved in satellite glial cells (SGCs activation, indicating that P2Y12R expressed in SGCs may play functional roles in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms. However, the involvement of P2Y12R in orofacial neuropathic pain mechanisms is still unknown. We therefore studied the reflex to noxious mechanical or heat stimulation of the tongue, P2Y12R and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunohistochemistries in the trigeminal ganglion (TG in a rat model of unilateral lingual nerve crush (LNC to evaluate role of P2Y12R in SGC in lingual neuropathic pain. Results The head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the lateral tongue were significantly decreased in LNC-rats compared to sham-rats. These nocifensive effects were apparent on day 1 after LNC and lasted for 17 days. On days 3, 9, 15 and 21 after LNC, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-immunoreactive (IR cells significantly increased in the ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular branch regions of TG. On day 3 after LNC, P2Y12R expression occurred in GFAP-IR cells but not neuronal nuclei (NeuN-IR cells (i.e. neurons in TG. After 3 days of successive administration of the P2Y12R antagonist MRS2395 into TG in LNC-rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly decreased coincident with a significant reversal of the lowered head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue compared to vehicle-injected rats. Furthermore, after 3 days of successive administration of the P2YR agonist 2-MeSADP into the TG in naïve rats, the mean relative number of TG neurons encircled with GFAP-IR cells was significantly increased and head-withdrawal reflex thresholds to mechanical and heat stimulation of the tongue were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle-injected rats

  19. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the trigeminal vascular system and other brain structures related to pain in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Hay-Schmidt, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is considered to be a key mediator in the pathophysiology of migraine but the localisation of NO synthesizing enzymes (NOS) throughout the pain pathways involved in migraine has not yet been fully investigated. We have used quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting...

  20. Wallenberg’s syndrome and symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Ordás, Carlos M.; Cuadrado, María L.; Simal, Patricia; Barahona, Raúl; Casas, Javier; Matías-Guiu Antem, Jordi; Porta-Etessam, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia due to a brainstem infarction is said to be rare. However, facial pain is not uncommon in Wallenberg’s syndrome. Facial pain related to a Wallenberg’s syndrome may be either persistent of intermittent, and occasionally occurs in brief attacks. Here, we report a patient with a right lateral medullary infarction who started having first division trigeminal neuralgia 1 month after the stroke. The pain paroxysms were suppressed with gabapentin.

  1. The Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, Randall L.

    1987-01-01

    The etiology of trigeminal neuralgia has yet to be elucidated. Thus it is not surprising that no ideal treatment is currently available. The current treatment of choice is medical; Pharmacologic management should be tried to its fullest extent. Increasing dosages and using combination drug therapies are recommended before considering a surgical approach. If drug therapy does not alleviate the pain, a surgical approach may be indicated, although 100% effectivity is not expected. Until the true...

  2. Significance of neurovascular contact in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Wolfram, Frauke; Gozalov, Aydin;

    2015-01-01

    pain side in classical trigeminal neuralgia. Consecutive classical trigeminal neuralgia patients with unilateral symptoms were referred to 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging and included in a cross-sectional study. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated blindly and graded according to presence...

  3. Radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term results of trigeminal neuralgia following radiosurgery were reported. Current indications for radiosurgery are resistant to carbamazepine, medication, recurrent after neurovascular decompression, and high surgical risk due to advanced age or poor general medical condition. Radiosurgery was done under local anesthesia, targeting the root entry zone or the retrogasserian portion in the second treatment when neuralgia recurred. Higher maximum dose ranging from 70 to 90 Gy (mean 77.6 Gy) was delivered with a single shot of 4 mm-collimator. We treated 80 cases of typical trigeminal neuralgia including 36 men and 44 women, with the mean age of 64 years. With the mean follow-up period of 29 months, 78% of cases achieved excellent pain-relief and 87.6% after 2nd treatments. Complications were limited to facial dysesthesia and hypesthesia, and were seen in 17.5% of cases. No one showed an anesthesia dorolosa. In conclusion, radiosurgery with gamma-knife is safe and effective treatment for recurrent neuralgia, even for aged or high-risk patients, and is an alternative to microvascular decompression. (author)

  4. Percutaneous microballoon compression for trigeminal neuralgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-bing; MA Yi; ZOU Jian-jun; LI Xin-gang

    2007-01-01

    Background Percutaneous microballoon compression (PMC) for trigeminal neuralgia is an important therapeutic method. The aim of this study was to review the effects of PMC for trigeminal neuralgia in 276 patients.Methods From December 2000 to May 2003, 276 patients with trigeminal neuralgia were treated with PMC. The course of the disease ranged from 3 months to 38 years. Under the guidance of C-arm X-ray, 14# needle was placed into the foramen ovale using the classical Hakanson's technique. Fogarty balloon catheter was navigated into the Meckel's cave tenderly. A small amount of Omnipaque was slowly injected to inflate the balloon and compress the trigeminal ganglion for 3 to10 minutes.Results A total of 290 PMC were performed on the 276 patients. Among them, 252 had immediate relief from pain. The patients were followed up for a mean of 18.7 months (range, 4 to 32), 14 of them had a recurrence. Of the 14 patients, 12 were re-operated with PMC, and the pain was all controlled successfully.Conclusions PMC is an effective and technically simple method for trigeminal neuralgia. For older patients with trigeminal neuralgia, it may be the first choice.

  5. Osteoporosis in the Jawbones: A Correlative Factor of Primary Trigeminal Neuralgia?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; Wang, Hu; Liu, Na; Yang, Qianmei; Luo, En

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a neuropathic disorder of one or both of the trigeminal nerves, occurs most often in people over age 50. Extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like face pain in common activities greatly lowers quality of life. The precise cause of primary TN remains unknown, but it may be caused by vascular pressing on the trigeminal nerve in its root entry zone (REZ), demyelinization of trigeminal sensory fibers, or jawbone cavity. Accordingly, many treatments carry risks of ...

  6. Gamma knife treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effectiveness and limitations of Gamma Knife treatment for various kinds of trigeminal neuralgia (typical, atypical and mixed types) were analyzed from the data of 54 cases treated over the past 4 years. The mean patient age was 74 years (range 50 to 101 years). Forty five patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia, four patients with atypical facial pain and five patients with mixed type trigeminal neuralgia were evaluated. Isodose distribution determined with a 4 mm collimator was centered on the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve in 35 cases and centered on the retro-Gasserian trigeminal nerve in 19 cases. The maximum dose range used was 70 to 80 Gy. Median follow-up after radiosurgery was 21.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Typical trigeminal neuralgia treated at the root entry zone became pain free without medication in 53.6% (15/28), 78.6% (22/28) and 78.6% (22/28) of the patients after 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively, while, that treated at the retro-Gasserian nerve became pain free in 29.4% (5/17), 53.8% (7/13) and 70.0% (7/10) of the patients after 3, 6 and 8 months. No matter whether the target was the root entry zone or the retro-Gasserian nerve, 70 to 78% of patients became pain free without medication when examined at 8 to 12 months after radiosurgery. Facial hypesthesia including localized slight hypesthesia occurred in 13 to 20% of the patients at 12 to 24 months after radiosurgery, but no patients developed any other new neurological deficits or systemic complications. Patients with atypical trigeminal neuralgia did not respond well to this treatment. Further study is required to determine the optimal target and dose. Because of its noninvasive nature, radiosurgery is an attractive option for treatment of typical and mixed typed trigeminal pain, particularly in elderly patients and patients not amenable to the various surgical methods available for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. (author)

  7. Tractography delineates microstructural changes in the trigeminal nerve after focal radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Hodaie

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Focal radiosurgery is a common treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia (TN, a neuropathic facial pain condition. Assessment of treatment effectiveness is primarily clinical, given the paucity of investigational tools to assess trigeminal nerve changes. Since diffusion tensor imaging (DTI provides information on white matter microstructure, we explored the feasibility of trigeminal nerve tractography and assessment of DTI parameters to study microstructural changes after treatment. We hypothesized that trigeminal tractography provides more information than 2D-MR imaging, allowing detection of unique, focal changes in the target area after radiosurgery. Changes in specific diffusivities may provide insight into the mechanism of action of radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Five TN patients (4 females, 1 male, average age 67 years treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, 80 Gy/100% isodose line underwent 3Tesla MR trigeminal nerve tractography before and sequentially up to fourteen months after treatment. Fractional anisotropy (FA, radial (RD and axial (AD diffusivities were calculated for the radiosurgical target area defined as the region-of-interest. Areas outside target and the contralateral nerve served as controls. RESULTS: Trigeminal tractography accurately detected the radiosurgical target. Radiosurgery resulted in 47% drop in FA values at the target with no significant change in FA outside the target, demonstrating highly focal changes after treatment. RD but not AD changed markedly, suggesting that radiosurgery primarily affects myelin. Tractography was more sensitive than conventional gadolinium-enhanced post-treatment MR, since FA changes were detected regardless of trigeminal nerve enhancement. In subjects with long term follow-up, recovery of FA/RD correlated with pain recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: DTI parameters accurately detect the effects of focal radiosurgery on the trigeminal nerve, serving as an

  8. Transoval trigeminal cisternography and glycerol injection in trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, C; Smeets, P; Caemaert, J; Van de Velde, E

    1989-04-01

    In a series of 25 consecutive patients suffering from essential trigeminal neuralgia, transoval glycerol injection following Håkanson was performed in order to alleviate the pain attacks. This treatment proved to be successful in 76% of the patients. No major side-effects were reported. Authors stress the importance of a precise cisternography of Meckel's cave to ascertain the correct position of the needle, before injecting the glycerol. They discuss their mode of conducting the examination in using a conventional radiologic set-up. Transoval glycerol injection is a valuable interventional radiologic procedure and has to be taken into account as an alternative treatment of essential trigeminal neuralgia, especially when current therapeutic measures have failed. PMID:2788644

  9. Arteriovenous malformation in the cerebellopontine angle presenting as trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Figueiredo

    1989-03-01

    Full Text Available A case of arteriovenous malformation of the left cerebellopontine angle causing symptoms of ipsilateral trigeminal neuralgia is reported. Pain relief followed microsurgical removal of the malformation. The authors review the literature on the subject.

  10. Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: role of radiofrequency ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Dessy R Emril; Kok-Yuen Ho

    2010-01-01

    Dessy R Emril1 Kok-Yuen Ho21Neurology Department, Syiah Kuala University/Dr Zainoel Abidin Hospital, Banda Aceh, Indonesia; 2Pain Management Centre, Raffles Hospital, SingaporeAbstract: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neuropathic pain condition affecting the face. It has a significant impact on the quality of life and physical function of patients. Evidence suggests that the likely etiology is vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve leading to focal demyelination and aberrant neural disch...

  11. Anesthesia Dolorosa of Trigeminal Nerve, a Rare Complication of Acoustic Neuroma Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad Elahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesia dolorosa is an uncommon deafferentation pain that can occur after traumatic or surgical injury to the trigeminal nerve. This creates spontaneous pain signals without nociceptive stimuli. Compression of the trigeminal nerve due to acoustic neuromas or other structures near the cerebellopontine angle (CPA can cause trigeminal neuralgia, but the occurrence of anesthesia dolorosa subsequent to acoustic tumor removal has not been described in the medical literature. We report two cases of acoustic neuroma surgery presented with anesthesia dolorosa along the trigeminal nerve distribution. The patients’ pain was managed with multidisciplinary approaches with moderate success.

  12. Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia is defined as brief paroxysms of pain limited to the facial distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Drug therapy is considered to be the first-line of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Unfortunately, medical treatment does not always provide satisfactory pain relief for 25% of the patients. Moreover, the relief provided by drug therapy generally decreases over time, and increased dosages of these medications are limited because of side effects. In this case, patients can be offered several surgical approaches, such as percutaneous techniques (thermo-coagulation, micro-compression, glycerol injection) or microvascular decompression in the cerebello-pontine angle (Gardner-Jannetta's technique). In this indication, stereotactic radiosurgery, driven by teams using Gamma KnifeR, has shown promising efficacy and tolerance to allow this treatment being truly part of trigeminal neuralgia treatment. Technological progresses now allow performing radiosurgery with ballistic and dosimetric processes optimized with stereotactic radiosurgery dedicated linear accelerators. This procedure supports frame implantation to guarantee targeting accuracy in accordance of elevated dose distribution. This article on trigeminal neuralgia treatment will review the different medical and surgical therapeutic options and specify the contemporary place of stereotactic radiosurgery in the light of its clinical results and tolerance aspects. (authors)

  13. Radiosurgery for the management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS is a minimally invasive surgical approach for managing medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN. The goal of trigeminal neuralgia SRS is to eliminate or reduce the facial pain in order to improve the quality of life. Over the past 28 years, 1250 patients have undergone gamma knife SRS for TN at our institution. In our retrospective review of 503 patients who underwent SRS for management of refractory TN, 449 patients (89% experienced initial pain relief at a median latency of 1 month. At the one year mark, 73% patients were pain free (with or without medications and 80% had pain control. Repeat radiosurgery was performed for 193 patients (43%. At the one year mark, 26% of these patients were completely pain free and 78% were pain free with or without medications. The role of gamma Knife SRS in the management of medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia has evolved over the past two decades. SRS is a minimally invasive procedure and is associated with 60-90% rate of pain relief in patents with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Early intervention with SRS as the initial surgical procedure for management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia is associated with faster, better, and longer pain relief. As SRS is the least invasive procedure for TN, it is a good treatment option for patients with other high-risk medical conditions. SRS is an attractive alternative especially to those who do not want to accept the greater risk associated with other surgical procedures.

  14. Radiosurgery for the management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a minimally invasive surgical approach for managing medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The goal of trigeminal neuralgia SRS is to eliminate or reduce the facial pain in order to improve the quality of life. Over the past 28 years, 1250 patients have undergone gamma knife SRS for TN at our institution. In our retrospective review of 503 patients who underwent SRS for management of refractory TN, 449 patients (89%) experienced initial pain relief at a median latency of 1 month. At the one year mark, 73% patients were pain free (with or without medications) and 80% had pain control. Repeat radiosurgery was performed for 193 patients (43%). At the one year mark, 26% of these patients were completely pain free and 78% were pain free with or without medications. The role of gamma Knife SRS in the management of medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia has evolved over the past two decades. SRS is a minimally invasive procedure and is associated with 60-90% rate of pain relief in patents with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Early intervention with SRS as the initial surgical procedure for management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia is associated with faster, better, and longer pain relief. As SRS is the least invasive procedure for TN, it is a good treatment option for patients with other high-risk medical conditions. SRS is an attractive alternative especially to those who do not want to accept the greater risk associated with other surgical procedures. PMID:27381104

  15. Neurophysiological assessment of craniofacial pain

    OpenAIRE

    Galeotti, F.; Truini, A.; Cruccu, G.

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the diagnostic usefulness of neurophysiological testing in patients with craniofacial pain. Neurophysiological testing of trigeminal nerve function relies on trigeminal reflexes and laser–evoked potentials (LEPs). This review briefly describes the physiology of trigeminal reflexes and LEPs, reports normal values and highlights the neurophysiological abnormalities in the main clinical conditions.

  16. Radiology of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT findings in ninty-nine patients with trigeminal neuralgia were reviewed. Brain tumors including three trigeminal neurinomas, three meningiomas, one epidermoid, one acoustic neurinoma, were found in eight cases as a cause of symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. Among seventy-nine patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, four cases had vascular decompression surgery because of the tortuous, ectatic or anomalous vertebrobasilar artery. Among the other seventy-five non-surgical cases, seventeen cases showed the tortuous and/or ectatic vertebrobasilar artery on CT, and this group of patients showed slightly higher recurrence rate of trigeminal neuralgia after nerve block or medication compared with other non-surgical patients. CT is thought to be a useful screening imaging modality for evaluation of patients with trigeminal neuralgia, and angiography is required for precise evaluation of the compressing vessels when surgical treatment is contemplated. (author)

  17. Trigeminal Neurotrophic Ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    El-Daly, Ahmed; Snyderman, Carl H.

    1997-01-01

    A 74 year-old female developed a trigeminal neurotrophic ulcer (TNU) 20 years following surgical ablation of the trigeminal nerve. The diagnosis of this unusual disorder is suggested when an ulcerative lesion develops. In the ala nasi in a patient with trigeminal sensory loss. A history of self-induced trauma to that area and some form of mental impairment further support the diagnosis.

  18. Small-fiber dysfunction in trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruccu, G.; Leandri, M.; Iannetti, G. D.;

    2001-01-01

    Background: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, results of clinical examination of sensory function are normal. Reflex and evoked potential studies have already provided information on large-afferent (non-nociceptive) function. Using laser-evoked potentials (LEP), the authors sought information...... was significantly longer than that of the age-matched controls. The nonpainful-side latency correlated significantly with the carbamazepine dose. Conclusions: LEP detect severe impairment of the nociceptive afferent system on the painful side of patients with idiopathic as well as symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia...

  19. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    OpenAIRE

    Premeshwar Niwant; Mukta Motwani; Sushil Naik

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic res...

  20. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  1. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  2. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:26270588

  3. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  4. Treatment of atypical trigeminal neuralgia with microvascular decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Jian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore the methods for achieving pain relief in patients with atypical trigeminal neuralgia (TN using microvascular decompression (MVD. Study Design and Settings: Retrospective study of 26 patients treated during the years 2000 to 2004. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients in whom vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve was identified by high definition magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA were treated with MVD for atypical TN in our department. Clinical presentations, surgical findings and clinical outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In this study, single trigeminal division was involved in only 2 patients (8% and two or three divisions in the other 24 patients (92%. Of prime importance is the fact that in 46.2% of the patients, several conflicting vessels were found in association. Location of the conflicts around the circumference of the trigeminal root was supero-medial to the root in 53.5%, supero-lateral in 30.8% and inferior in 15.7%. MVD for atypical TN resulted in complete pain relief in 50% of the patients with complete decompression, partial pain relief in 30.8% and poor pain relief or pain recurrence in 19.2% of the patients without complete decompression postoperatively. Conclusions: Complete decompression of the entire trigeminal root plays an important role in achieving pain relief in patients with atypical TN with MVD.

  5. [Trigeminal neuralgia in an elderly patient associated with a variant of persistent primitive trigeminal artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Ichiro; Motokawa, Tetsufumi; Umeno, Tetsuya; Morofuji, Yoichi; Takahata, Hideaki; Toda, Keisuke; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2011-09-01

    An 86-year-old woman presented with a 10-year history of right paroxysmal facial pain. The trigger zone was the right maxilla. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and MR cisternography sourse images showed an aberrant artery originating from the right internal carotid artery anastomosed to the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory (AICA) of the cerebellum, and it was closed at the root entry zone of trigeminal nerve. The patient underwent microvascular decompression (MVD), and her pain resolved after the operation. Most of the offending vessels that cause trigeminal neuralgia are the superior cerebellar artery (75-80%) and AICA. Although persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common type of persistent carotid-basilar anastomosis, trigeminal neuralgia associated with PTA or a PTA variant is very rare, and particularly, a PTA variant is an uncommon, anomalous, intracranial vessel. It is necessary to inspect MR imaging scans carefully prior to MVD surgery because they are frequently associated with intracranial aneurysms. During surgery, we must be careful not to injure the perforating arteries from the PTA variant. MVD for trigeminal neuralgia in elderly patients is effective if the patients can have a tolerate general anesthesia. However, when we plan surgery for elderly patients, we must take care that it does not to lead to unexpected complications. PMID:21878704

  6. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen

  7. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen.

  8. Neural proliferation and restoration of neurochemical phenotypes and compromised functions following capsaicin-induced neuronal damage in the nodose ganglion of the adult rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Rex Gallaher

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that neuronal numbers within adult nodose ganglia (NG were restored to normal levels 60 days following the capsaicin-induced destruction of nearly half of the neuronal population. However, the nature of this neuronal replacement is not known. Therefore, we aimed to characterize neural proliferation, neurochemical phenotypes, and functional recovery within adult rat NG neurons following capsaicin-induced damage. Sprague-Dawley rats received intraperitoneal injections of capsaicin or vehicle solution, followed by BrdU injections to reveal cellular proliferation. NG were collected at multiple times post-treatment (up to 300 days and processed for immunofluorescence, real-time RT-PCR, and dispersed cell cultures. Capsaicin-induced cellular proliferation, indicated by BrdU/Ki-67-labeled cells, suggests that lost neurons were replaced through cell division. NG cells expressed the stem cell marker, nestin, indicating that these ganglia have the capacity to generate new neurons. BrdU incorporation within beta-III tubulin-positive neuronal profiles following capsaicin suggests that proliferating cells matured to become neurons. NG neurons displayed decreased NMDAR expression up to 180 days post-capsaicin. However, both NMDAR expression within the NG and synaptophysin expression within the central target of NG neurons, the NTS, were restored to pre-injury levels by 300 days. NG cultures from capsaicin-treated rats contained bipolar neurons, normally found only during development. To test the functional recovery of NG neurons, we injected the satiety molecule, CCK. The effect of CCK on food intake was restored by 300 days post-capsaicin. This restoration may be due to the regeneration of damaged NG neurons or generation of functional neurons that replaced lost connections.

  9. Treatment of recurrent trigeminal neuralgia due to Teflon granuloma

    OpenAIRE

    Capelle, Hans-Holger; Brandis, Almuth; Tschan, Christoph A.; Krauss, Joachim K.

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent trigeminal neuralgia after microvascular decompression (MVD) may be due to insufficient decompression, dislocation of the implant to pad the neurovascular contact, or the development of granuloma. Here, we report on our experience with Teflon granuloma including its treatment and histopathological examination. In a series of 200 patients with trigeminal neuralgia MVD was performed with Teflon felt according to Jannetta’s technique. In three patients with recurrent facial pain Teflon...

  10. Radiosurgery for the management of refractory trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Niranjan; L. Dade Lunsford

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a minimally invasive surgical approach for managing medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The goal of trigeminal neuralgia SRS is to eliminate or reduce the facial pain in order to improve the quality of life. Over the past 28 years, 1250 patients have undergone gamma knife SRS for TN at our institution. In our retrospective review of 503 patients who underwent SRS for management of refractory TN, 449 patients (89%) experienced initial ...

  11. Conventional radiofrequency treatment in five patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Bovaira Forner, Maite; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel; Peñarrocha Diago, María; Calvo, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In trigeminal neuralgia, when drug treatment proves ineffective, other management options must be considered. In this context, conventional radiofrequency of Gasser’s ganglion is a safe and effective alternative. Material and Methods: We describe 5 patients with long-evolving trigeminal neuralgia subjected to conventional radiofrequency according to the Sweet technique, with a follow-up of two years. Results: Pain relief was complete after two months in all cases. One patient su...

  12. Percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy and neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve for the treatment of facial pain Rizotomia percutânea por radiofreqüência e a descompressão neurovascular do nervo trigêmeo no tratamento das algias faciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel J. Teixeira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcomes of 354 radiofrequency rhizotomies and 21 neurovascular decompressions performed as treatment for 367 facial pain patients (290 idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, 52 symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia, 16 atypical facial pain, 9 post-herpetic neuralgia. METHOD: Clinical findings and surgery success rate were considered for evaluation. A scale of success rate was determined to classify patients, which considered pain relief and functional/sensorial deficits. RESULTS: Radiofrequency rhizotomy was performed in 273 patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia and in all other patients, except for trigeminal neuropathy; neurovascular decompression was performed in 18 idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia patients; 100% idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, 96.2% symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia, 37.5% atypical facial pain and 88.9% post-herpetic neuralgia had pain relief. CONCLUSION: Both techniques for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia are usefull. Radiofrequency rhizotomy was also efficient to treat symptomatic facial pain, and post-herpetic facial pain, but is not a good technique for atypical facial pain.OBJETIVO: Determinar eficácia e achados pós-operatórios após 354 rizotomias por radiofreqüência e 21 descompressões neurovasculares como tratamento de 367 pacientes com dor facial (290 neuralgia idiopática do trigêmeo, 52 neuralgia sintomática do trigêmeo, 16 dor facial atípica, 9 neuralgia pós-herpética. MÉTODO: Achados clínicos e taxa de sucesso das cirurgias foram considerados para a avaliação. Uma escala avaliando alívio da dor e complicações sensoriais e funcionais foi utilizada para classificar os pacientes. RESULTADOS: A rizotomia por radiofreqüência foi realizada em 273 pacientes com neuralgia idiopática do trigêmeo e em todos os outros pacientes, exceto neuropatia trigeminal; descompressão neurovascular foi realizada em 18 pacientes com neuralgia idiopática do trigêmeo; 100% dos pacientes

  13. Identification of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery following the transposition technique for trigeminal neuralgia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is lancinating pain of a few seconds duration triggered by minor sensory stimuli such as speaking, chewing or even a breeze on the face. Vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve at the root entry zone and other vessels has been implicated in its cause. Despite the initial success of medical treatment in some cases, however, many patients become refractory over time and eventually require surgical intervention. This report describes a case involving a 62-year-old woman...

  14. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Pontocerebellar Angle Epidermoid Tumor: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammet Bahadır Yılmaz; Semra Yılmaz; Ayhan Tekiner

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is the most commonly seen craniofacial pain syndrome. Etiology of TN can be divided into classical (idiopathic and vascular compression) and symptomatic (tumor, demyelinating, and ischemic) types. Especially, symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia is seen with tumors located in the cerebellopontine angle. Epidermoid tumors comprise about 1% of all brain tumors and 5% of tumors located in the cerebellopontine angle. These tumors may present with trigeminal neuralgia due to ...

  15. Facial hypersensitivity and trigeminal pathology in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Kevin C; Paylor, John W; Webber, Christine A; Winship, Ian R; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is a well-recognized complication of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanisms underlying MS-related trigeminal neuropathic pain are poorly understood. This can be attributed, at least in part, to the lack of an animal model that exhibits trigeminal pathology similar to that described in MS. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model that is commonly used to study the pathophysiology of MS. We show here that mice with EAE exhibit increased sensitivity to air puffs applied to the whisker pad. The increased sensitivity to air puff stimulation is accompanied by T cell infiltration and glial activation at several points along the trigeminal primary afferent pathway. We also observe demyelination of the intra- and extra-pontine aspects of the trigeminal sensory root and the spinal trigeminal tract. This is the first study to show orofacial sensory disturbances and trigeminal demyelination in EAE. Collectively, our data suggest that EAE may be a useful model for understanding MS-related trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions such as trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26545087

  16. The place of peripheral neurectomy in the management of trigeminal neuralgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Freemont, A. J.; Millac, P

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and forty-six patients with trigeminal neuralgia were studied. Of 49 patients ultimately maintained pain-free by non-medical means, 26 underwent peripheral neurectomy. Twenty of these achieved excellent pain control in the longer term and 5 of the remaining 6 became more responsive to carbamazepine after operation. Seven patients required repeat neurectomies. Peripheral neurectomy is a useful and simple method of pain control in trigeminal neuralgia.

  17. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  18. Familial trigeminal neuralgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial trigeminal neuralgia is infrequent. A report of a couple and their son being afflicted by this malady is presented. The clinical features, radiological findings and surgical management are discussed and literature reviewed.

  19. Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: role of radiofrequency ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessy R Emril

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dessy R Emril1 Kok-Yuen Ho21Neurology Department, Syiah Kuala University/Dr Zainoel Abidin Hospital, Banda Aceh, Indonesia; 2Pain Management Centre, Raffles Hospital, SingaporeAbstract: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a neuropathic pain condition affecting the face. It has a significant impact on the quality of life and physical function of patients. Evidence suggests that the likely etiology is vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve leading to focal demyelination and aberrant neural discharge. Secondary causes such as multiple sclerosis or brain tumors can also produce symptomatic TN. Treatment must be individualized to each patient. Carbamazepine remains the drug of choice in the first-line treatment of TN. Minimally invasive interventional pain therapies and surgery are possible options when drug therapy fails. Younger patients may benefit from microvascular decompression. Elderly patients with poor surgical risk may be more suitable for percutaneous trigeminal nerve rhizolysis. The technique of radiofrequency rhizolysis of the trigeminal nerve is described in detail in this review.Keywords: interventional treatment, minimally invasive, pain management, radiofrequency rhizolysis, trigeminal neuralgia 

  20. Identification of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery following the transposition technique for trigeminal neuralgia: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A patient who presented with trigeminal neuralgia associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) is presented. A 62-year-old woman suffering from right orbital pain was admitted to the hospital. Medical treatment for three months was ineffective, and her neuralgia had deteriorated and gradually spread in the maxillary division. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the flow void signal attached to the right trigeminal nerve. Thus, microvascular decompression was performed. The superior cerebellar artery was the responsible artery, and it was transposed to decompress the trigeminal nerve. After this manoeuvre, an artery was identified running parallel to the trigeminal nerve toward Meckel’s cave. The artery, which turned out to be a PPTA, communicated with the basilar artery. The PPTA was carefully observed, and it was found not to be the artery causing the neuralgia because it did not compress the nerve at surgical observation. No additional procedure between the PPTA and the trigeminal nerve was performed. The patient’s symptom improved dramatically following surgery, and her postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography showed the PPTA. The findings in the present case suggest that transposition of the responsible artery effectively decompresses the root entry zone and assists in determining whether the PPTA is affecting the trigeminal nerve. PMID:22059208

  1. Identification of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery following the transposition technique for trigeminal neuralgia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A patient who presented with trigeminal neuralgia associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) is presented. A 62-year-old woman suffering from right orbital pain was admitted to the hospital. Medical treatment for three months was ineffective, and her neuralgia had deteriorated and gradually spread in the maxillary division. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the flow void signal attached to the right trigeminal nerve. Thus, microvascular decompression was performed. The superior cerebellar artery was the responsible artery, and it was transposed to decompress the trigeminal nerve. After this manoeuvre, an artery was identified running parallel to the trigeminal nerve toward Meckel's cave. The artery, which turned out to be a PPTA, communicated with the basilar artery. The PPTA was carefully observed, and it was found not to be the artery causing the neuralgia because it did not compress the nerve at surgical observation. No additional procedure between the PPTA and the trigeminal nerve was performed. The patient's symptom improved dramatically following surgery, and her postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography showed the PPTA. The findings in the present case suggest that transposition of the responsible artery effectively decompresses the root entry zone and assists in determining whether the PPTA is affecting the trigeminal nerve. PMID:22059208

  2. Uncommon Cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Tentorial Ossification over Trigeminal Notch

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Woo Bang; Kyung Ream Han; Seung Ho Kim; Won Ho Jeong; Eun Jin Kim; Jin Wook Choi; Chan Kim

    2015-01-01

    Ossification of the tentorium cerebelli over the trigeminal notch is rare, but it may cause compression of the trigeminal nerve, leading to trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We were unable to find any previously reported cases with radiological evaluation, although we did find one case with surgically proven ossification of the tentorium cerebelli. Here, we present a case of TN caused by tentorial ossification over the trigeminal notch depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomog...

  3. Gamma-knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma knife was installed at the PD Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, India, in January 1997. In the first year of gamma-knife radiosurgery to January 1998, we treated 110 patients, of whom six had medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Seven treatments were administered to this group of six patients (one had bilateral neuralgia). This report evaluates the effectiveness of radiosurgery treatment in these patients. The median age of the patients was 56 years and there were five males and one female. Following Leksell stereotactic frame fixation, a magnetic resonance imaging scan was done in all. The Leksell gamma plan was used for planning. A radiosurgery dose of 70-80 Gy was delivered to the trigeminal root entry zone, 2-4 mm anterior to the junction of the pons and trigeminal nerve with a single 4 mm collimator helmet. Complete pain relief was achieved in four patients. Two had partial relief. No patient developed any radiosurgery related morbidity during the follow-up period of 5-16 months. Radiosurgery seems to be an effective approach for medically or surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Gamma-knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, V.; Deopujari, C.E.; Misra, B.K.; Shetty, P.G.; Shroff, M.M.; Pendse, A.M. [PD Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, (India)

    1999-08-01

    Gamma knife was installed at the PD Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, India, in January 1997. In the first year of gamma-knife radiosurgery to January 1998, we treated 110 patients, of whom six had medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Seven treatments were administered to this group of six patients (one had bilateral neuralgia). This report evaluates the effectiveness of radiosurgery treatment in these patients. The median age of the patients was 56 years and there were five males and one female. Following Leksell stereotactic frame fixation, a magnetic resonance imaging scan was done in all. The Leksell gamma plan was used for planning. A radiosurgery dose of 70-80 Gy was delivered to the trigeminal root entry zone, 2-4 mm anterior to the junction of the pons and trigeminal nerve with a single 4 mm collimator helmet. Complete pain relief was achieved in four patients. Two had partial relief. No patient developed any radiosurgery related morbidity during the follow-up period of 5-16 months. Radiosurgery seems to be an effective approach for medically or surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 10 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Chemosensory properties of the trigeminal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Félix

    2011-01-19

    The capacity of cutaneous, including trigeminal endings, to detect chemicals is known as chemesthesis or cutaneous chemosensation. This sensory function involves the activation of nociceptor and thermoreceptor endings and has a protective or defensive function, as many of these substances are irritants or poisonous. However, humans have also developed a liking for the distinct sharpness or pungency of many foods, beverages, and spices following activation of the same sensory afferents. Our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemosensation in the trigeminal system has experienced enormous progress in the past decade, following the cloning and functional characterization of several ion channels activated by physical and chemical stimuli. This brief review attempts to summarize our current knowledge in this field, including a functional description of various sensory channels, especially TRP channels, involved in trigeminal chemosensitivy. Finally, some of these new findings are discussed in the context of the pathophysiology of trigeminal chemosensation, including pain, pruritus, migraine, cough, airway inflammation, and ophthalmic diseases. PMID:22778855

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has been employed for treating intractable pain such as trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and pain relief has been gained from the treatment, however, little is understood about the side effects of other sensitivities induced from GKS. We assessed ten patients (four men and six women; mean age 67 years) with TN who were investigated by questionnaire for symptoms and visual analog scale (VAS) of pain, and their threshold of touch sensation was examined using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, cold sensation and allodynia before and after GKS. MR and CT images were obtained after a Leksell head frame was applied to the head parallel to the trigeminal nerve. These images were uploaded to a computer system and retro-Gasserian area planned the target was correctly marked on the images of a computer in which gamma planning software was installed. All patients were irradiated with a maximum dose of 90 Gy at retro-Gasserian using a 4 mm collimator. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of VAS of pain was 8.5±1.3 and 8 patients had facial paresthesia before GKS. All patients experienced a significant reduction in pain without side effects such as effect on the peripheral nerves without 6 month after GKS. Allodynia, facial paresthesia or cold sensation numbness occurred in the patients before GKS disappeared according to complete pain relief. These results suggest that GKS is a safe and effective treatment for TN. (author)

  7. Effect of beam channel plugging on the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We studied the influence of using plugs for brainstem protection during gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with special emphasis on irradiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve, pain outcomes, and incidence of trigeminal dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A GKR procedure for TN using an anterior cisternal target and a maximum dose of 90 Gy was performed in 109 patients. For 49 patients, customized beam channel blocking (plugs) were used to reduce the dose delivered to the brainstem. We measured the mean and integrated radiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the clinical course of patients treated with and without plugs. Results: We found that blocking increases the length of trigeminal nerve exposed to high-dose radiation, resulting in a significantly higher mean dose to the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more of the patients with blocking achieved excellent pain outcomes (84% vs. 62%), but with higher incidences of moderate and bothersome trigeminal nerve dysfunction (37% mild/10% bothersome with plugs vs. 30% mild/2% bothersome without). Conclusions: The use of plugs to protect the brainstem during GKR treatment for TN increases the dose of irradiation delivered to the intracisternal trigeminal nerve root and is associated with an important increase in the incidence of trigeminal nerve dysfunction. Therefore, beam channel blocking should be avoided for 90 Gy-GKR of TN

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia. Review of recent reports and a proposal for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed recent reports related to trigeminal neuralgia. Radiological examination was not required, however, patient interview and physical examination were necessary for diagnosis alone. Considering that many patients were referred by oral-dental surgeons, trigeminal neuralgia is likely to be a disorder commonly encountered by these specialists. They play an important role in the diagnosis of it. The differential diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is important in order to initiate appropriate treatment. The patients with trigeminal neuralgia are usually treated with Tegretol at first. When Tegretol therapy is not applicable or proved to be less effective, the patients undergo other therapy, that are surgical therapy, gamma knife radiosurgery, and trigeminal nerve block. In the treatment of the patients with trigeminal neuralgia, the medical cooperation within neurosurgeons, oral-dentist surgeons, neurologists, and pain clinicians should be required. (author)

  9. Percutaneous Procedures for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Matthew T; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-07-01

    Three major percutaneous procedures are currently used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Percutaneous balloon compression, glycerol rhizotomy, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation interrupt afferent pain fibers by injury to the trigeminal nerve root or ganglion. Each is capable of offering immediate and durable pain relief. Each is associated with relatively low, but variable rates of complications. Patient heterogeneity, technical variation, and nonstandard outcomes plague the existing outcomes literature and limit comparisons of treatments. Rendering treatment selection a function of individual physician preference and practice patterns. Randomized, prospective trials are needed; in the meantime, percutaneous rhizotomy remains an excellent treatment for selected patients.

  10. Percutaneous Procedures for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Matthew T; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-07-01

    Three major percutaneous procedures are currently used to treat trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Percutaneous balloon compression, glycerol rhizotomy, and radiofrequency thermocoagulation interrupt afferent pain fibers by injury to the trigeminal nerve root or ganglion. Each is capable of offering immediate and durable pain relief. Each is associated with relatively low, but variable rates of complications. Patient heterogeneity, technical variation, and nonstandard outcomes plague the existing outcomes literature and limit comparisons of treatments. Rendering treatment selection a function of individual physician preference and practice patterns. Randomized, prospective trials are needed; in the meantime, percutaneous rhizotomy remains an excellent treatment for selected patients. PMID:27324995

  11. Trigeminal neuralgia--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türp, J C; Gobetti, J P

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to give a concise review of the diagnosis and management of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with particular emphasis on idiopathic TN and symptomatic TN. The clinical characteristics of both conditions are presented, and the suspected underlying etiologies are discussed. Because it is crucial for clinicians to be able to rule out pain unrelated to TN, a list of differential diagnoses is presented. The authors stress that the diagnosis of TN is made clinically; however, diagnostic imaging may be indicated in selected cases. Current pharmacological and neurosurgical options for the management of TN are discussed in detail. In light of the popularity of unconventional treatments in the United States, the value of acupuncture and homeopathy, both of which have been suggested by some authors for the treatment of TN, is critically assessed. PMID:11199681

  12. CT-Guided Trigeminal Neuralgia in MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalal Shokouhi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Multiple sclerosis has nonspecific"nsigns in MR images and clinic and also has pain,"none of the pain syndromes in MS cases is trigeminal"nneuralgia. 12 patients of our 38 trigeminal neuralgic"npatients etiology were known as MS cases. All of them"nwere young (20-40 years old."nIntroduction: Multiple sclerosis diagnosis is by clinic,"nMRI, CSF electrophoresis and evocked potensial tests."nImaging diagnostis is not suggestive and specific but in"nthis article we show imaging help not only in diagnosis"nalso in treatment of complications. Trigeminal neuralgia"nis the worse clinical condition in M.S patients and may"npush them to addiction or suicide."nMaterials and Methods: X-ray CT machine is used for"nguidance of L.P or coaxial 10cm needle with 22G, local"nanesthesia and ethanol injection. One time treatment"nmade for all patients and they were pain free after"ninterventional drug injection. 5-6 cc bupivicain 0.5%"nand 3-4cc ethanol 96% are used for treatment."nResults: All patients were pain free and very happy"nafter treatment. One of them had pain for 12 years"nand had tried all the other treatments with no good"nresponse. No complication was seen in our treatments."n15 to 20 minutes time is needed for each examination"nor treatment."nConclusion: Despite known MS cases and relative"ndrug therapies for patients it is not possible to treat"ntrigeminal paint except using interventional therapy"nand CT-guidance is exactive and easy. There was"nno complication except irritation in the middle ear"nbecause of Eustachian tube compression by injected"nvolume of drugs

  13. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Junying, E-mail: jyli04@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  14. MR imaging in the evaluation of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigeminal neuralgai is a disorder with multiple causes that may be intrinsic or extrinsic to the trigeminal nerve. MR imaging was evaluated as a screening examination to differentiate between these causes. Twenty-three patients with a history of facial pain were studied by high-resolution MR imaging (1.5 T). Fourteen patients (61%) had normal MR studies, suggesting idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Nine patients (39%) showed abnormalities that included clival meningioma (one), multiple sclerosis (one), metastatic cervical carcinoma (one), enlargement of the nerve suggesting neuroma (two), and compression of the nerve by an ectatic posterior fossa vessel (four). MR imaging has proven to be a useful screening study for facial pain to identify those patients with a nonidiopathic cause that may be amenable to surgery or other therapy

  15. Penatalaksanaan Neuralgia Trigeminal Di Bidang Kedokteran Gigi

    OpenAIRE

    Sovy

    2008-01-01

    Neuralgia trigeminal atau tic douloureux merupakan gangguan yang sangat menyakitkan pada distribusi saraf trigeminal. Rasa sakitnya hampir sama dengan sakit gigi sehingga pasien dengan gangguan ini sering ditemukan oleh dokter gigi. Gambaran klinis neuralgia trigeminal khas yaitu rasa sakit paroksismal yang hebat, menusuk, seperti arus listrik, kebanyakan unilateral, dan berada pada distribusi saraf trigeminal. Trigeminal neuralgia dapat berupa idiopatik (primer) atau simtomatik (sekunde...

  16. The Effect of Low-level Laser Therapy on Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Falaki, Farnaz; Nejat, Amir Hossein; Dalirsani, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    The effect of low intensity laser radiation in the treatment of acute and chronic pain is now established in many studies. Tri-geminal neuralgia is a pain passes through nerve's branches and its trigger is located in skin or mucosa that could lead to pain with a trigger stimulus. The pain involved branches of trigeminal nerve that sometimes has patients to seek the treatment for several years. Nowadays different treatments are used for relief of pain that most of them cause tolerance and vari...

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, Alison R; Radatz, Matthias; Kemeny, Andras; Rowe, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is one of a number of recognised treatments for the management of trigeminal neuralgia refractory to drug therapy. The reported success of stereotactic radiosurgery in managing patients with trigeminal neuralgia varies in different units from 22 to 75%. This paper reports the outcomes of patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated at the National Centre for Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Sheffield, UK. The study reports the outcome of 72 patients treated consecutively between October 2004 and May 2008. Data were collected prospectively by a postal questionnaire sent to patients at 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. The median age was 65.6 years (39 males: 33 females). Fourteen patients had secondary trigeminal neuralgia (eight multiple sclerosis). Fifteen of the patients included in the study were receiving a second treatment (an initial treatment having improved their pain significantly for at least 6 months). All radiosurgical procedures were performed using a single 4 mm collimator isocenter covering the region of the dorsal root entry zone with a maximal radiation dose of 80 Gy. The percentage of patients defined as having an excellent outcome (pain free without medication) was 39% after 6 months, 36% after 12 months and 64% after 24 months. The percentage of patients who reported being very satisfied with treatment was 71% after 6 months, 57% after 12 months and 53% after 24 months. Half the patients with secondary trigeminal neuralgia were pain free without medication after treatment, and 60% of patients who underwent a second treatment were pain free. A new trigeminal sensory deficit was reported by 31% of patients after radiosurgical treatment.

  18. Identification of a Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery Following the Transposition Technique for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Kato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is lancinating pain of a few seconds duration triggered by minor sensory stimuli such as speaking, chewing or even a breeze on the face. Vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve at the root entry zone and other vessels has been implicated in its cause. Despite the initial success of medical treatment in some cases, however, many patients become refractory over time and eventually require surgical intervention. This report describes a case involving a 62-year-old woman who presented with right orbital pain provoked by, among others, exercise and cold. Medication proved to be ineffective and, after magnetic resonance imaging, microvascular decompression and surgical observation, the diagnosis became clearer. The case highlights the importance of preoperative imaging and careful intraoperative findings to determine whether variant arteries are responsible for trigeminal neuralgia.

  19. Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijo T George

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal artery is the commonest of the four primitive anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar system that may rarely persist in adults, with an angiographic incidence of 0.1 - 0.6%. We present the CT and MR angiograms of a patient who presented with a minor stroke and was detected to have this anomaly and briefly discuss the significance

  20. Magnetic Resonance in trigeminal neuralgia: Presentation of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by episodes of acute facial pain. lt can be caused by diverse pathologies that affect anyone of the segments of the V cranial nerve. Magnetic resonance is of choice when imaging studies are necessary. Three cases evaluated by this modality and confirmed by surgery are shown

  1. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) is the most frequently diagnosed type of facial pain. In idiopathic type of TGN it is caused by the neuro-vascular conflict involving trigeminal nerve. Microvascular decompression (MVD) aims at addressing this basic pathology in the idiopathic type of TGN. This study was conducted to determine the outcome and complications of patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD. Method: In a descriptive case series patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD were included in consecutive manner. Patients were diagnosed on the basis of detailed history and clinical examination. Retromastoid approach with craniectomy was used to access cerebellopontine angle (CP-angle) and microsurgical decompression was done. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Results: A total of 53 patients underwent MVD with mean age of 51.6±4.2 years and male predominance. In majority of cases (58.4 percentage) both Maxillary and Mandibular divisions were involved. Per-operatively superior cerebellar artery (SCA) was causing the neuro-vascular conflict in 33 (62.2 percentage) of the cases, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in 6 (11.3 percentage) cases, both CSA and AICA in 3 (5.6 percentage) cases, venous compressions in only 1 (1.8percentage) patient and thick arachnoid adhesions were seen in 10 (18.9 percentage) patients. Postoperatively, 33 (68 percentage) patients were pain free, in 14 (26.45 percentage) patients pain was significantly improved whereas in 3 (5.6 percentage) patients there was mild improvement in symptoms. Three (5.6 percentage) patients did not improve after the primary surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was encountered in 7 (13.2 percentage) patients post-operatively, 4 (7.5 percentage) patients developed wound infection and 1 (1.8 percentage) patient developed aseptic meningitis. Three (5.6 percentage) patients had transient VII nerve palsy while one patient developed permanent VII nerve palsy. Conclusion: MVD is a safe and

  2. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80–90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60–90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  3. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  4. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  5. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it

  6. Persistent trigeminal artery associated with trigeminal neuralgia: hypothesis of neurovascular compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) associated with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). From January 1998 to January 2004, 288 MRI scans of patients examined for trigeminal deficits were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed at 1.5 T. Scan protocols included cerebral TSE T2-weighted imaging, contrast enhanced SE T1-weighted imaging and thin-section 3D T2-weighted imaging of the temporal bones, 3D TOF pre- and postcontrast MR angiography. TN was defined as episodes of intense stabbing, electric shock-like pain in areas of the face supplied by the trigeminal branches. Neurovascular compression (NVC) was assumed to be present if the patient showed clinical features of TN, if there was contact between an artery and the trigeminal nerve on the affected side, and if other pathology had been excluded. The prevalence and confidence intervals were calculated (95% CI of the prevalence was based on the exact binomial distribution). Of 288 patients, 136 matched the criteria for TN. In this series a PTA was detected in three patients, which in all patients was on the same side as the TN. The prevalence of a PTA in patients presenting with TN was 2.2% (CI 0.005-0.06). Previous studies have shown PTA as an incidental finding in 0.1-0.6% of cerebral angiograms. The prevalence of a PTA in patients with TN was 2.2%. With respect to the clinical significance, a PTA has to be considered in TN and the diagnosis of a PTA can easily be made using MR imaging/angiography. (orig.)

  7. Persistent trigeminal artery associated with trigeminal neuralgia: hypothesis of neurovascular compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondt, Bert-Jan de [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Stokroos, Robert [University Hospital Maastricht, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Casselman, Jan [AZ St. Jan, Department of Radiology, Bruges (Belgium)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) associated with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). From January 1998 to January 2004, 288 MRI scans of patients examined for trigeminal deficits were retrospectively evaluated. MRI was performed at 1.5 T. Scan protocols included cerebral TSE T2-weighted imaging, contrast enhanced SE T1-weighted imaging and thin-section 3D T2-weighted imaging of the temporal bones, 3D TOF pre- and postcontrast MR angiography. TN was defined as episodes of intense stabbing, electric shock-like pain in areas of the face supplied by the trigeminal branches. Neurovascular compression (NVC) was assumed to be present if the patient showed clinical features of TN, if there was contact between an artery and the trigeminal nerve on the affected side, and if other pathology had been excluded. The prevalence and confidence intervals were calculated (95% CI of the prevalence was based on the exact binomial distribution). Of 288 patients, 136 matched the criteria for TN. In this series a PTA was detected in three patients, which in all patients was on the same side as the TN. The prevalence of a PTA in patients presenting with TN was 2.2% (CI 0.005-0.06). Previous studies have shown PTA as an incidental finding in 0.1-0.6% of cerebral angiograms. The prevalence of a PTA in patients with TN was 2.2%. With respect to the clinical significance, a PTA has to be considered in TN and the diagnosis of a PTA can easily be made using MR imaging/angiography. (orig.)

  8. Pain relief can be painful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Bindra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular nerve block is periodically used procedure used to treat neuralgic pain in the distribution of trigeminal nerve. It is a commonly performed block in outpatient settings at our institute. We present a case of an elderly edentulous patient with trigeminal neuralgia who suffered recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation following mandibular nerve block. The patient presented with complaints of severe pain, inability to close mouth, and eat food since 2 days. Anterior closed reduction of TMJ resulted in reduction of joint and immediate pain relief. However, the maneuver failed due to recurrent dislocation of the joint. A Barton dressing was applied to prevent another dislocation. This was followed by autologous blood injection into the joint. This case focuses on the preponderance of clinical evaluation and accentuates the need for additional forethought to be taken during pain procedures, particularly in the geriatric population.

  9. Gamma Knife Surgery in Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Amparo; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) represents a safe, effective, and relatively durable noninvasive treatment option for patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and recurrent TN. By one year's time, 75% to 90% of patients will have obtained pain relief, defined as Barrow Neurological Institute grades I to IIIB. Similar rates have been demonstrated for patients undergoing a second GKS for recurrent TN. Predictors of durability of GKS in TN include type I TN, post-GKS Barrow Neurological Institute score, and the presence of post-Gamma Knife facial numbness. PMID:27324996

  10. Dofetilide induced trigeminal neuralgia

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    Hayan Al Maluli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-arrhythmic medications are uncommonly used due to their pro-arrhythmic effect. However, just like any other class of medication, they can cause idiosyncratic reactions that may or may not be related to their mechanism of action. Those reactions can be severe enough to warrant discontinuation of a successful therapeutic intervention. In this case, we present a case of trigeminal neuralgia caused by dofetilide.

  11. MRI volumetry for the preoperative diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Bodo; Schindler, Markus; Haehnel, Stefan; Sartor, Klaus; Stippich, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology, Medical Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, Dirk; Tronnier, Volker [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    To assess whether quantitative measuring methods can help improve the reliability of MRI-based evaluations of the pathological role of a neurovascular conflict between an artery and the trigeminal nerve. In a prospective study, magnetic resonance images were obtained from 62 patients with unilateral facial pain and 50 healthy test subjects. In coronal T1- and T2-weighted sequences volume measurements were performed by regions of interest and compared intraindividually (healthy versus affected side in the patient populations and right versus left side in the group of test subjects) and on the basis of the different clinical pictures (t test for dependent and independent samples, p<0.05). In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, the affected nerve showed a smaller volume than the trigeminal nerve on the healthy side (p<0.001). Such a volume difference was noted neither in the other patients nor in the healthy test subjects. Quantitative MRI measurements allow a pathological neurovascular conflict to be distinguished from a nonpathological condition where an artery is in close proximity to the trigeminal nerve. The measured volume difference between the healthy and the affected nerve in patients with neuralgia is indicative of trigeminal nerve atrophy resulting from damage to the nerve. (orig.)

  12. MRI volumetry for the preoperative diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess whether quantitative measuring methods can help improve the reliability of MRI-based evaluations of the pathological role of a neurovascular conflict between an artery and the trigeminal nerve. In a prospective study, magnetic resonance images were obtained from 62 patients with unilateral facial pain and 50 healthy test subjects. In coronal T1- and T2-weighted sequences volume measurements were performed by regions of interest and compared intraindividually (healthy versus affected side in the patient populations and right versus left side in the group of test subjects) and on the basis of the different clinical pictures (t test for dependent and independent samples, p<0.05). In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, the affected nerve showed a smaller volume than the trigeminal nerve on the healthy side (p<0.001). Such a volume difference was noted neither in the other patients nor in the healthy test subjects. Quantitative MRI measurements allow a pathological neurovascular conflict to be distinguished from a nonpathological condition where an artery is in close proximity to the trigeminal nerve. The measured volume difference between the healthy and the affected nerve in patients with neuralgia is indicative of trigeminal nerve atrophy resulting from damage to the nerve. (orig.)

  13. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Kollndorfer

    Full Text Available Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type.

  14. Same same but different. Different trigeminal chemoreceptors share the same central pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Kowalczyk, Ksenia; Frasnelli, Johannes; Hoche, Elisabeth; Unger, Ewald; Mueller, Christian A; Krajnik, Jacqueline; Trattnig, Siegfried; Schöpf, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal trigeminal sensations are important in everyday life of human beings, as they play a governing role in protecting the airways from harm. Trigeminal sensations arise from the binding of a ligand to various sub-types of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels located on mucosal branches of the trigeminal nerve. Which underlying neural networks are involved in the processing of various trigeminal inputs is still unknown. To target this unresolved question fourteen healthy human subjects were investigated by completing three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning sessions during which three trigeminal substances, activating varying sub-types of chemoreceptors and evoking different sensations in the nose were presented: CO2, menthol and cinnamaldehyde. We identified similar functional networks responding to all stimuli: an olfactory network, a somatosensory network and an integrative network. The processing pathway of all three stimulants was represented by the same functional networks, although CO2 evokes painful but virtually odorless sensations, and the two other stimulants, menthol and cinnamaldehyde are perceived as mostly non painful with a clear olfactory percept. Therefore, our results suggest a common central processing pathway for trigeminal information regardless of the trigeminal chemoreceptor and sensation type.

  15. [Surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia--neurovascular decompression established by Jannetta].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isu, T; Abe, H; Nakagawa, Y; Mitsumori, K; Nakagawa, T; Sakuragi, M; Tsuru, M; Ito, T

    1985-01-01

    The etiology of trigeminal neuralgia has been unknown. However, recently, trigeminal neuralgia is believed to be caused by vascular cross compression at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve. Posterior cranial fossa approach for the neurovascular decompression was enhanced by Jannetta et al. They emphasized that the pain was relieved by surgery. In this report, we will discuss the operative findings and results in a series of 8 patients who have undergone neurovascular decompression. The postoperative progress in all of these patients was excellent and relieved of the pain. There was neither mortality nor any significant complication. We stress that the neurovascular decompression surgery is now well justified as the definite treatment for the trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:3988235

  16. TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA: AN OVERVIEW OF LITERATURE WITH EMPHASIS ON MEDICAL MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamimul Hasan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a complex human psycho-physiological experience. Neuralgic pain is produced by a change in neurological structure or function rather than by the excitation of pain receptors that causes nociceptive pain. Neuralgic pain follows the path of a nerve that may give rise to the sensation of tooth pain which often is a diagnostic dilemma for dentist. Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the trigeminal nerve that causes episodes of unilateral intense, stabbing, electric shock like pain in the areas of the face supplied by trigeminal nerve-lips, eyes, nose, scalp, forehead, upper and lower jaw. TN is not fatal, but is universally considered to be one of the most painful afflictions known. An early and accurate diagnosis is mandatory, as therapeutic interventions can reduce or eliminate pain attacks. Treatment of this debilitating condition may be varied, ranging from medical management to surgical interventions. This article deals about the etio-pathogenesis, clinical characterstics, diagnosis and treatment strategies for trigeminal neuralgia.

  17. Structure and function of trigeminal primary sensory neurons after peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bongenhielm, Ulf

    1999-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to branches of the trigeminal nerve are common during surgical procedures in the jaws and teeth, and as the repercussion of facial fractures or certain pathologies. A portion of these patients are left with disturbed sensory functions, and some with unpleasant abnormal sensations, including pain. The trigeminal nerve branches have unique characteristics, both in terms of their fibre compositions and their anatomical relationships. It is therefore importan...

  18. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Reyes M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marcela Romero-Reyes, James M Uyanik Orofacial and Head Pain Service, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Radiology and Medicine, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures. Orofacial pain (OFP can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Keywords: pain, orofacial, neuropathic, TMD, trigeminal, headache

  19. Pain modality- and sex-specific effects of COMT genetic functional variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfer, Inna; Segall, Samantha K; Lariviere, William R; Smith, Shad B; Dai, Feng; Slade, Gary D; Rashid, Naim U; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R; Liu, Qian; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2013-08-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamine neurotransmitters involved in a number of physiological functions, including pain perception. Both human and mouse COMT genes possess functional polymorphisms contributing to interindividual variability in pain phenotypes such as sensitivity to noxious stimuli, severity of clinical pain, and response to pain treatment. In this study, we found that the effects of Comt functional variation in mice are modality specific. Spontaneous inflammatory nociception and thermal nociception behaviors were correlated the most with the presence of the B2 SINE transposon insertion residing in the 3'UTR mRNA region. Similarly, in humans, COMT functional haplotypes were associated with thermal pain perception and with capsaicin-induced pain. Furthermore, COMT genetic variations contributed to pain behaviors in mice and pain ratings in humans in a sex-specific manner. The ancestral Comt variant, without a B2 SINE insertion, was more strongly associated with sensitivity to capsaicin in female vs male mice. In humans, the haplotype coding for low COMT activity increased capsaicin-induced pain perception in women, but not men. These findings reemphasize the fundamental contribution of COMT to pain processes, and provide a fine-grained resolution of this contribution at the genetic level that can be used to guide future studies in the area of pain genetics.

  20. Persistent Pain after Dental Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to cover post surgical trigeminal neuropathy and other conditions related to chronic trigeminal pain not specifically covered elsewhere in this series. Is estimated to occur in 4–5% of patients overall, considerably less compared with other site surgeries. Due to the high volume surgery undertaken in this region chronic post surgical pain remains common. Relatively few clinicians are aware of this condition and as a result it is frequently poorly managed. PMID:26526800

  1. Persistent Pain after Dental Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to cover post surgical trigeminal neuropathy and other conditions related to chronic trigeminal pain not specifically covered elsewhere in this series.Is estimated to occur in 4–5% of patients overall, considerably less compared with other site surgeries.Due to the high volume surgery undertaken in this region chronic post surgical pain remains common.Relatively few clinicians are aware of this condition and as a result it is frequently poorly managed.

  2. A Novel Case of Resolved Postherpetic Neuralgia with Subsequent Development of Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    E. Lee Nelson; Villavicencio, Alan T.; Sigita Burneikiene; Kristen Ayres; Alexander Mason; Sharad Rajpal

    2013-01-01

    A 72-year-old female patient is presented, who was diagnosed with herpes zoster along the left ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve with associated cutaneous vesicles. The patient subsequently developed postherpetic neuralgia in the same dermatome, which, after remission, transformed into paroxysmal trigeminal pain. The two different symptom sets, with the former consistent with PHN and the later consistent with trigeminal neuralgia, were unique to our practice and the literature.

  3. A Novel Case of Resolved Postherpetic Neuralgia with Subsequent Development of Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mason

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old female patient is presented, who was diagnosed with herpes zoster along the left ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve with associated cutaneous vesicles. The patient subsequently developed postherpetic neuralgia in the same dermatome, which, after remission, transformed into paroxysmal trigeminal pain. The two different symptom sets, with the former consistent with PHN and the later consistent with trigeminal neuralgia, were unique to our practice and the literature.

  4. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Chul-Kyu Park

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient r...

  5. Activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin induces functional Kinin B1 receptor in rat spinal cord microglia

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    Talbot Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinin B1 receptor (B1R is upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxydative stress, which are enhanced by transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 activation. To examine the link between TRPV1 and B1R in inflammatory pain, this study aimed to determine the ability of TRPV1 to regulate microglial B1R expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn, and the underlying mechanism. Methods B1R expression (mRNA, protein and binding sites was measured in cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord in response to TRPV1 activation by systemic capsaicin (1-50 mg/kg, s.c in rats pre-treated with TRPV1 antagonists (capsazepine or SB-366791, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, or vehicle. B1R function was assessed using a tail-flick test after intrathecal (i.t. injection of a selective B1R agonist (des-Arg9-BK, and its microglial localization was investigated by confocal microscopy with the selective fluorescent B1R agonist, [Nα-bodipy]-des-Arg9-BK. The effect of i.t. capsaicin (1 μg/site was also investigated. Results Capsaicin (10 to 50 mg/kg, s.c. enhanced time-dependently (0-24h B1R mRNA levels in the lumbar spinal cord; this effect was prevented by capsazepine (10 mg/kg, i.p.; 10 μg/site, i.t. and SB-366791 (1 mg/kg, i.p.; 30 μg/site, i.t.. Increases of B1R mRNA were correlated with IL-1β mRNA levels, and they were significantly less in cervical and thoracic spinal cord. Intrathecal capsaicin (1 μg/site also enhanced B1R mRNA in lumbar spinal cord. NAC (1 g/kg/d × 7 days prevented B1R up-regulation, superoxide anion production and NF-kB activation induced by capsaicin (15 mg/kg. Des-Arg9-BK (9.6 nmol/site, i.t. decreased by 25-30% the nociceptive threshold at 1 min post-injection in capsaicin-treated rats (10-50 mg/kg while it was without effect in control rats. Des-Arg9-BK-induced thermal hyperalgesia was blocked by capsazepine, SB-366791 and by antagonists/inhibitors of B1R (SSR240612, 10 mg/kg, p

  6. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain. PMID:26520849

  7. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia with special reference to delayed recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya, T; Wakisaka, S; Kinoshita, K

    1990-07-01

    Thirty-five patients with trigeminal neuralgia underwent microvascular decompression. Complete remission was obtained in 33 patients, while one was fair and another unchanged postoperatively. The clinical and operative findings were reviewed, analyzing the direction of vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve and the distribution of pain in the peripheral regions. There were some weak correlations between the direction of vascular compression and the distribution of pain. Neuralgia in the region of second branch of the trigeminal nerve (V2) or in the regions of V2 and third branch of the nerve (V3) was caused by compression from the ventral or ventro-rostral direction, in the region of first branch of the nerve from the ventro-caudal direction, and in the V3 region from the ventral, rostral, and dorsal directions of the nerve in general. In two patients who had had complete remission after first operation, trigeminal neuralgia recurred. They had typical intermittent painful attacks with a background of continuous dull pain or painful dysesthesia caused by Ivalon sponges inserted between the nerve and the offending vessel. Complete remission was again obtained after removal of these sponge pieces. We would like to stress continuous dull pain or painful dysesthesia in cases of delayed recurrence as indicators for re-exploration. PMID:1701856

  8. Eugenol Inhibits the GABAA Current in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Hoon Lee; Jee Youn Moon; Sung Jun Jung; Jin Gu Kang; Seung Pyo Choi; Jun Ho Jang

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol has sedative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects, but also serves as an irritant through the regulation of a different set of ion channels. Activation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on sensory neurons leads to the stabilization of neuronal excitability but contributes to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined the effect of eugenol on the GABA-induced current in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons and in human embryonic kidney (HE...

  9. Epidermoid cyst in the cerebellopontine angle cistern presenting as trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 29-year-old male had been suffering from left trigeminal neuralgia one year prior to admission. Admission was prompted by the development of pain in the third division of the left trigeminal nerve. Physical and neurological examinations were not remarkable except for the facial pain. The orbicularis oculi reflex showed delayed latency of R1 on the affected side. CT scans performed pre- and post-contrast enhancement revealed a low density area in the left cerebellopontine angle cistern. Metrizamide CT cisternography clearly revealed the margin of the lesion as the contrast media did not enter into the low density area. A left suboccipital craniectomy was performed. The trigeminal nerve was surrounded by a thin-capsulated mass and cholesteatoma materials. Histological diagnosis was epidermoid cyst. Since this surgical procedure, the trigeminal neuralgia has not recurred for one year. Without objective neurological deficits, it is difficult to distinguish symptomatic trigeminal from idiopathic neuralgia. Therefore, minor change of the orbicularis oculi reflex should help in objectively detecting dysfunction of the trigeminal nerve. Metrizamide CT cisternography is also useful in diagnosis of cystic lesions. (author)

  10. Neuronavigation assisted decompression of trigeminal neuralgia caused by cerebellopontine angle osteoma

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    Iimura Yasushi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia (TN is usually caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root entry zone, but can be caused by other factors such as tumors, vascular disorders, and demyelination in multiple sclerosis. We present a rare case with a huge osteoma located on the cerebellopontine angle (CPA and causing TN. A 48-year-old woman presented with TN caused by a huge left CPA bone tumor. Surgery was performed by the lateral suboccipital approach under neuronavigation system guidance and regional decompression of the trigeminal nerve root entry zone was achieved. Intraoperative, neuro-navigation system was very useful for identification of the trigeminal nerve entry zone because normal anatomy had been obscured by the huge osteoma. Her pain disappeared completely immediately after surgery. The histological diagnosis was osteoma. TN is an expectative symptom of CPA tumors. Osteomas should be considered in patients with CPA tumors.

  11. Percutaneous micro-balloon compression for treatment of high risk idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and complications of percutaneous micro- balloon compression (PMC) of trigeminal ganglion for high risk idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: To analyze retrospectively the clinical data of 3053 cases of idiopathic trigeminal nemalgia, of which 804 cases were in high risk, who underwent PMC from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2007 in our department. Results: 833 procedures were performed on these 804 patients. The immediate effective rate was 97.3%; with recurrence rate of 6.8%, ipsilateral paresthesia incidence 3.7%; and no keratohelcosis with approximately 2/3 masticator, muscles weakness and diplopia 0.2%. Mean follow-up time was 36 months. Conclusions: PMC procedure is very effective for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia especially in high risk patients, and especially prefer for the pain involved the first branch neuralgia. (authors)

  12. Functional and structural assessment of patients with and without persistent pain after thoracotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springer, J S; Karlsson, P; Madsen, C S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent pain is frequent after thoracotomy, with a reported prevalence of up to 60%. It remains unclear why some patients develop pain, whereas others do not. We therefore examined patients with and without pain after thoracotomy to identify pathophysiological contributors to...... sensory testing according to the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain, measurement of capsaicin-evoked flare response, intradermal nerve density as determined by skin biopsies and laser- and heat-evoked potentials. RESULTS: Bedside testing revealed evoked pain in 16 of 20 patients....... SIGNIFICANCE: Evoked pain is more frequent in patients with pain. Assessment of intradermal nerve density, capsaicin-induced flare response and contact and laser heat-evoked potentials revealed no differences between pain patients and pain-free patients....

  13. Role of Botulinum Toxin Type-A (BTX-A) in the Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Verma

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a clinical condition characterized by paroxysmal attacks of severe and electric shock-like pain along the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. Various medicinal or surgical modalities have been employed in the past with variable success. Newer methods were tried in search of permanent cure or long-lasting pain relief. The purpose of this paper is to present the review of the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin type-A (BTX-A) in...

  14. Thirty-Two Cases of Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated with Acupuncture plus Chinese Traditional Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiangmei; Suo Yunxi; Chen Zhengqiu

    2006-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal neuralgia refers to the kind of pain occurring in the distribution areas of the trigeminal nerves. The pain attacking periodically is so intense like either knife-cutting or electric stroke. However,no abnormality is found in the patients when the attack ceases. By means of acupuncture plus Chinese traditional drugs, the authors had treated 32cases of the disease from March of 1999 to March of 2003, and its effect is compared with that of carbamazepine in 29 cases. A report follows.

  15. Trigeminal evoked potentials in patients with symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia due to intracranial mass lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Sundaram P; Hegde A; Chandramouli B; Das B

    1999-01-01

    Trigeminal evoked potentials (TEP) were recorded by electrical stimulation of the lips in 7 patients with symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia due to CT proved mass lesions involving the trigeminal nerve. All the patients showed TEP abnormalities on the affected side. Chronic compression and irritation of the trigeminal nerve may be responsible for these changes. The results obtained were compared with other similar studies and TEP abnormalities observed in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. As all...

  16. Resolution of trigeminal neuralgia by coil embolization of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner, Travis R; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Davis, Brandon J; Khan, Imad S; Ghiassi, Mayshan; Ghiassi, Mahan; Singer, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare anastomosis between the carotid artery and basilar artery. While most PTAs are asymptomatic, lateral variants can occasionally compress the trigeminal nerve and precipitate trigeminal neuralgia. Aneurysms of the PTA are exceptionally rare in the literature and have not previously been associated with trigeminal neuralgia. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA causing trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent coil embol...

  17. Percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression : experience in 40 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Forty patients of trigeminal neuralgia were treated with percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression. Symptoms had been present since six months to twenty years. The age ranged between 23 years and 73 years. All the patients had immediate relief from pain. Two had already undergone trigeminal cistern rhizolysis. One patient had foramen ovale stenosis. After the procedure, all the patients had mild to moderate degree of ipsilateral facial sensory loss which included buccal mucosa and anterior 2/3rd of the tongue. Facial dysaesthesia (anaesthesia dolorosa was seen in only one case, who had mild involvement lasting one week. Thirty patients had altered taste sensation, probably due to general somatic sensory loss. Five patients had herpes perioralis. In this study group, two patients had already undergone microvascular decompression. All the patients were followed for a period ranging from one to eighteen months. Balloon compression technique seems to be better than injection of alcohol, glycerol or radio frequency lesion. Recurrence of pain was noted in 3 patients after one year.

  18. Pathological laughter in a patient with trigeminal neurinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado André G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 47-year-old woman with a long history of anxiety and a more recent history of shock-like facial pain and episodes of laughter without any motivation. She could not explain the laughing bursts and did not have a sense of mirth preceding it. On neurological examination she presented a VI nerve palsy and trigeminal hypoesthesia (V2 and V3 on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging exhibited a large cystic lesion on the right middle fossa causing significant compression on the brain stem. A frontoorbitozygomatic and pretemporal combined approach was performed. During intra and extradural exploration a large tumor was found on the trigeminal nerve. The whole lesion was resected, revealing to be a neurinoma on pathological exhamination. She maintained a VI nerve palsy but had complete remission of the unmotivated laughing episodes during the one year follow up.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia post-styloidectomy in Eagle syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackett John

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Eagle syndrome is a condition characterized by an elongated (>3cm styloid process with associated symptoms of recurrent facial or throat pain. In this report we present a case of Eagle syndrome exhibiting the typical findings of glossopharyngeal nerve involvement, as well as unusual involvement of the trigeminal nerve. Notably, this patient developed a classical trigeminal neuralgia post-styloidectomy. Case presentation A 68-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 25-year history of dull pain along the right side of her throat, lateral neck, and jaw. Her symptoms were poorly controlled with medication until 15 years ago when she was diagnosed with Eagle syndrome, and underwent a manual fracture of her styloid process. This provided symptomatic relief until 5 years ago when the pain recurred and progressed. She underwent a styloidectomy via a lateral neck approach, which resolved the pain once again. However, 6 months ago a new onset of triggerable, electric shock-like facial pain began within the right V1 and V2 distributions. Conclusions Eagle syndrome is distressing to patients and often difficult to diagnose due to its wide variability in symptoms. It is easily confused with dental pain or temporomandibular joint disorder, leading to missed diagnoses and unnecessary procedures. Pain along the jaw and temple is an unusual but possible consequence of Eagle syndrome. An elongated styloid process should be considered a possible etiology of dull facial pain in the trigeminal distributions, in particular V3.

  20. Resolution of trigeminal neuralgia by coil embolization of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Davis, Brandon J; Khan, Imad S; Ghiassi, Mayshan; Ghiassi, Mahan; Singer, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare anastomosis between the carotid artery and basilar artery. While most PTAs are asymptomatic, lateral variants can occasionally compress the trigeminal nerve and precipitate trigeminal neuralgia. Aneurysms of the PTA are exceptionally rare in the literature and have not previously been associated with trigeminal neuralgia. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA causing trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent coil embolization of the aneurysm which relieved her symptoms. We propose embolization as a viable therapeutic option for the resolution of trigeminal neuralgia when the condition is secondary to irritation by the high velocity pulsatile flow of an aneurysm. PMID:23625680

  1. Resolution of trigeminal neuralgia by coil embolization of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Ehtesham, Moneeb; Davis, Brandon J; Khan, Imad S; Ghiassi, Mayshan; Ghiassi, Mahan; Singer, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    The persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare anastomosis between the carotid artery and basilar artery. While most PTAs are asymptomatic, lateral variants can occasionally compress the trigeminal nerve and precipitate trigeminal neuralgia. Aneurysms of the PTA are exceptionally rare in the literature and have not previously been associated with trigeminal neuralgia. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA causing trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent coil embolization of the aneurysm which relieved her symptoms. We propose embolization as a viable therapeutic option for the resolution of trigeminal neuralgia when the condition is secondary to irritation by the high velocity pulsatile flow of an aneurysm. PMID:24610143

  2. Gamma knife radiosurgery for medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) has been generally considered as a viable therapeutic option for the management of medically refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We reviewed our experience with GKS in patients with TN. Between Feb 1996 and May 2006. 77 patients with medical refractory idiopathic TN were treated using GKS. Thirty-six patients who had undergone other previous procedures, previous GKS, or had brain stem lesion, atypical symptoms, were excluded from this study. Pain improvement was achieved in 38 of the patients with TN (pain response rate 92.7 %). Twenty-three patients were pain free and 15 had reduced pain. There were no serious complications. We think that GKS is an effective treatment option for patients with medical refractory idiopathic TN. (author)

  3. Combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine analgesic block of the peripheral trigeminal branches for trigeminal neuralgia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Di Stani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN is treated predominantly by pharmacotherapy but side effects and unsuccessful occurs. The current study was carried out to evaluate the therapeutic effect of combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine block. Thirteen patients with CTN managed with pharmacotherapy were recruited and assigned either to no additional treatment (Group I or to additional analgesic block (Group II. The primary endpoint was the reduction in the frequency of pain episodes in a month assessed at 30 and 90 days. Comparisons of measurements of pain, general health and depression scales were secondary endpoints. The results from the follow-up visits at 30 and 90 days showed the Group II to have larger reduction in the frequency of pain and exhibited a bigger improvement in the scores of the pain, general health and depression scales. The results from this preliminary study suggest a clinical benefit of the combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine block.

  4. Combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine analgesic block of the peripheral trigeminal branches for trigeminal neuralgia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stani, Fabrizio; Ojango, Christine; Dugoni, Demo; Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Masala, Salvatore; Delfini, Roberto; Bruti, Gianluca; Simonetti, Giovanni; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Ruggeri, Andrea Gennaro

    2015-08-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is treated predominantly by pharmacotherapy but side effects and unsuccessful occurs. The current study was carried out to evaluate the therapeutic effect of combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine block. Thirteen patients with CTN managed with pharmacotherapy were recruited and assigned either to no additional treatment (Group I) or to additional analgesic block (Group II). The primary endpoint was the reduction in the frequency of pain episodes in a month assessed at 30 and 90 days. Comparisons of measurements of pain, general health and depression scales were secondary endpoints. The results from the follow-up visits at 30 and 90 days showed the Group II to have larger reduction in the frequency of pain and exhibited a bigger improvement in the scores of the pain, general health and depression scales. The results from this preliminary study suggest a clinical benefit of the combination of pharmacotherapy and lidocaine block.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

  6. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias: A review of recent diagnostic, therapeutic and pathophysiological developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Lambru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs are a group of primary headache disorders that are characterized by strictly unilateral trigeminal distribution pain occurring in association with ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. This group includes cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. These disorders are very painful, often considered to be some of the most painful conditions known to mankind, and consequently are highly disabling. They are distinguished by the frequency of attacks of pain, the length of the attacks and very characteristic responses to medical therapy, such that the diagnosis can usually be made clinically, which is important because it dictates therapy. The management of TACs can be very rewarding for physicians and highly beneficial to patients.

  7. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a sponta...

  8. MRI as an Essential Diagnostic Approach for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Kedarnath, N. S.; Shruthi, R

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a well recognised disorder frequently reported to the dentist. The diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is primarily based on history and clinical criteria. The clinical findings do not differentiate idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia from symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. We describe a case of cliviopetrosal meningioma presenting as trigeminal neuralgia and discuss the importance of magnetic resonance imaging as an essential diagnostic approach when trigeminal neuralgia occ...

  9. Evaluation of trigeminal neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify anatomical characteristics of neurovascular compression associated with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods: Fifty patients with TN (23 of 50 patients underwent microvascular decompression) and 50 patients without facial pain underwent 3.0 T MRI scanning for analysis of 50 trigeminal nerves ipsilateral to TN symptoms, 50 contralateral to TN symptoms, and 100 in asymptomatic patients. MRI sequences included balanced fast-field echo and 3D MR angiography. Images were fused and reconstructed into virtual cisternoscopy images to determine the degree (severity of compression was defined as follows: 1=no compression; 2 =compressed by a vein; 3 =contacted by an artery; 4 =indented by an artery; and 5 =nerve displaced or distorted by an artery) and site of neurovascular compression (the point of each offending vascular structure: proximal was defined as located in 1/3 length of the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve near root entry zone; the place of superior was defined as above the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve). Reconstructed MPR images were used to measure nerve length and cross sectional area. The chi-square test was used for all 2 × 2 contingency tables. The t-test was used for dependent samples. The Logistic regression was used for prediction of occurrence of the event of TN. Results: Twenty-three of 50 patients with TN underwent microvascular decompression, which confirmed predicted neurovascular relationships in all cases, and 21 of 23 patients were pain free after the operation. The incidence of neurovascular compression on asymptomatic nerves (no. of level 1=79, level 2=5, level 3 =8, level 4 =8), on nerves contralateral to TN symptoms (no. of level 1=27, level 2 =6, level 3 =9, level 4 =8), and on nerves ipsilateral to TN symptoms (no. of level 1=4, level 2 =12, level 3 =12, level 4 =7, level 5 =15) was 21.0% (21/100), 46.0% (23/50), and 92.0% (46/50), respectively. The difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic

  10. MR imaging of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-four patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) were evaluated with MR imaging. Vascular contact at the proximal portion of the preganglionic segment (PGS) of the trigeminal nerve and deformity of the PGS was observed on the affected side in 97% and 62% of patients, respectively. Nonsurgical treatments were effective in 11 of the 13 patients without deformed PGS, but they failed to control trigeminal neuralgia in 8 of 21 patients with deformed PGS. This paper suggests that MR imaging could be used in the clinical assessment of trigeminal neuralgia before treatment

  11. Percutaneous microsphere compression for the treatment of bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous microsphere compression (PMC) in treating bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia and to discuss the optimal contralateral operation time after one side trigeminal neuralgia was treated with PMC. Methods: From Dec.2000 to Aug. 2009 PMC was performed in 74 patients with bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the pain-relieving degree the therapeutic effect was evaluated. Complete disappearance of pain was regarded as the criteria of a successful procedure. According to the recovery of mastication function of the operated side, the operation time for the contralateral side was decided. Results: A total of 145 PMC procedures were carried out in 74 patients,including three repeated operations in 3 cases due to recurrent pain after initial PMC. The postoperative instant effective rate was 96.5%. The recurrence rate was 2.1% during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (ranged 1-7 years). Of the 74 patients, bilateral PMC was accomplished in 68, and among them 57 patients received the contralateral operation within 1-3 months after the initial procedure was finished. Conclusion: Percutaneous microsphere compression is a quite effective treatment for bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia. Usually, PMC for the contralateral side can be considered to perform in 1-3 months after the initial procedure. (authors)

  12. Chemosensory properties of murine nasal and cutaneous trigeminal neurons identified by viral tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mettenleiter Thomas C

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatosensation of the mammalian head is mainly mediated by the trigeminal nerve that provides innervation of diverse tissues like the face skin, the conjunctiva of the eyes, blood vessels and the mucouse membranes of the oral and nasal cavities. Trigeminal perception encompasses thermosensation, touch, and pain. Trigeminal chemosensation from the nasal epithelia mainly evokes stinging, burning, or pungent sensations. In vitro characterization of trigeminal primary sensory neurons derives largely from analysis of complete neuronal populations prepared from sensory ganglia. Thus, functional properties of primary trigeminal afferents depending on the area of innervation remain largely unclear. Results We established a PrV based tracing technique to identify nasal and cutaneous trigeminal neurons in vitro. This approach allowed analysis and comparison of identified primary afferents by means of electrophysiological and imaging measurement techniques. Neurons were challenged with several agonists that were reported to exhibit specificity for known receptors, including TRP channels and purinergic receptors. In addition, TTX sensitivity of sodium currents and IB4 binding was investigated. Compared with cutaneous neurons, a larger fraction of nasal trigeminal neurons showed sensitivity for menthol and capsaicin. These findings pointed to TRPM8 and TRPV1 receptor protein expression largely in nasal neurons whereas for cutaneous neurons these receptors are present only in a smaller fraction. The majority of nasal neurons lacked P2X3 receptor-mediated currents but showed P2X2-mediated responses when stimulated with ATP. Interestingly, cutaneous neurons revealed largely TTX resistant sodium currents. A significantly higher fraction of nasal and cutaneous afferents showed IB4 binding when compared to randomly chosen trigeminal neurons. Conclusion In conclusion, the usability of PrV mediated tracing of primary afferents was demonstrated

  13. [Neurosurgical treatment of pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, J

    1981-12-12

    Chronic pain may be considered a disease and its treatment a necessity. Neurosurgical treatment of chronic pain is justified in cases where conservative treatment is no longer effective or causes excessive side effects. The new percutaneous methods involve no stress, minimal risk and short hospitalization. Destructive neurosurgical procedures are mainly used for cancer pain, with the exception of trigeminal neuralgia. Non-destructive neurostimulating methods to control pain are well on the way to achieving their optimum clinical potential and preserve the integrity of the nervous system. PMID:7330647

  14. Percutaneous high-frequency selective rhizotomy in the trigeminal neuralgia therapy in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Tyurnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare symptom of multiple sclerosis affecting the disability. Multiple sclerosis related trigeminal neuralgia has been attributed to a demyelinating lesion in the pons. When the adequate pain drug-relieve therapy is not possible or when the patient becomes refractory to the treatment or can not continue pharmacological treatment because of the side effects, surgical intervention, including percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy is being discussed. Literature review and the data upon the efficiency and safety of this neurosurgical treatment in 16 patients with multiple sclerosis have been analyzed. Percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy has been proved to be a safe, reproducible and effective method of the symptomatic surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in patients with multiple sclerosis in cases of the intolerance/inefficiency of the pharmacological therapy.

  15. Current advances in orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Wang, Yan; Jian, Fan; Liao, Li-Na; Yang, Xin; Lai, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic pain is an inflammatory pain that is initiated by orthodontic force-induced vascular occlusion followed by a cascade of inflammatory responses, including vascular changes, the recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells, and the release of neurogenic and pro-inflammatory mediators. Ultimately, endogenous analgesic mechanisms check the inflammatory response and the sensation of pain subsides. The orthodontic pain signal, once received by periodontal sensory endings, reaches the sensory cortex for pain perception through three-order neurons: the trigeminal neuron at the trigeminal ganglia, the trigeminal nucleus caudalis at the medulla oblongata and the ventroposterior nucleus at the thalamus. Many brain areas participate in the emotion, cognition and memory of orthodontic pain, including the insular cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. A built-in analgesic neural pathway-periaqueductal grey and dorsal raphe-has an important role in alleviating orthodontic pain. Currently, several treatment modalities have been applied for the relief of orthodontic pain, including pharmacological, mechanical and behavioural approaches and low-level laser therapy. The effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief has been validated, but its effects on tooth movement are controversial. However, more studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of other modalities. Furthermore, gene therapy is a novel, viable and promising modality for alleviating orthodontic pain in the future. PMID:27341389

  16. Trigeminal Neuropathy in Sjogren′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuropathy is the most common CNS disorder in Sjogren′s syndrome. It is believed to be caused by vasculitis. Unless this is recognised, a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is often made. The therapeutic response to steroids is unpredictable. There are two subgroups - those with associated collagen disorders and those only with the sicca syndrome.

  17. An Open Study of Botulinum-A Toxin Treatment of Idiopathic Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN is a unilateral, recurrent, sharp facial pain disorder that is limited to the distribution of divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BTX-A for alleviating the frequency and severity of TN pain. Materials and Methods: This trial was performed as a before and after study. We treated 31 patients (15 male and 16 female with mean age of 52 year old that their diagnosis was made at least 4.5 years before. We injected BTX-A in various parts of face and particularly in the origin of mandibular and maxillary branches of trigeminal nerve. Injection volume was determined by the necessity and pain intensity measured with visual analog scale up to 100U. Patients were evaluated before and after the injection and were followed after week, and each month, for a three months period. Other related variables were recorded such as: toxin complications, pain status variations by brushing, chewing, cold weather and patient’s satisfaction with their therapy. Results: showed that after injection, pain intensity and frequency decreased after tooth brushing, chewing and cold weather (P

  18. Bilateral persistent primitive trigeminal arteries associated with trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, B; Yang, S; Sung, J; Lee, S

    2013-03-01

    Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses (PCVBA) include the primitive trigeminal artery (PTA), the primitive otic artery (POA), the primitive hypoglossal artery and proatlantal arteries (ProAs). The PTA is the most commonly seen of these accounting for approximately 80-85% of PCVBAs. The PTA which connects the internal carotid artery (ICA) to the basilar artery (BA) may occasionally connect to the superior or posterior inferior cerebellar arteries without interposition to the BA. It is then referred to as a persistent trigeminal artery variant (PTAV), an anomalous carotid-cerebellar anastomosis. Bilateral occurrence of PTA is extremely rare. During vertebral artery (VA) development the anterior radicular artery of segment C1 from the proatlantal artery of Padget evolves into the intradural component of the VA (V4 segment) plus a short extradural segment (distal V3 segment). Agenesis of a single anterior radicular artery of ProA results in the absence of one distal VA associated with an unremarkable contralateral VA and the BA. Absence or hypoplasia of the terminal portion of one VA is a commonly observed anatomic variant. However, absence of the terminal portions of both VAs is exceptional. A rare case of bilateral PTAs is presented with unilateral PTA and a contralateral PTAV causing trigeminal neuralgia. Furthermore, the bilateral PTAs were associated with the absence of the proximal portion of the BA in addition to the bilateral lack of a distal VA. This finding comes as a logical consequence of the developmental anatomy of the vertebrobasilar junction and is consistent with the assumed congenital nature of the anatomic variant. PMID:22113402

  19. Pain relief clinical effect of carbamazepine combined nursing intervention on patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia%卡马西平联合护理干预对缓解原发性三叉神经痛患者疼痛的临床效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜玉娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effect pain relief with carbamazepine combined nursing intervention on patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.Method:76 cases of patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia from February 2012 to October 2014 were randomly divided into the control group and the observation group,with 38 cases in each group.The control group were given carbamazepine treatment orally,the starting quantity was 0.1 g/time,3 times/d,gradually increasing doses to 0.4~0.6 g according to the situation of the pain,and gradually reduced after the pain controlled.The observation group were treated with targeted nursing intervention on the basis of the treatment above,including daily life care,medication nursing,psychological counseling,pain nursing,continuous treatment for 30 days.The patients' pain,changes of the SAS scores and SDS scores of the two groups were observed and the clinical treatment effective rate were compared.Results:The pain of the two groups were alleviated after treatment,VAS scores were reduced,that of the observation group were lower than that of the control group,the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05).The anxiety,depression and other negative emotions of the two groups after treatment were improved,the SAS scores and SDS scores were significantly decreased,that of the observation group were lower than that of the control group,the differences were statistically significant(P<0.05).The effective rate of the observation group 92.1% was obviously higher than that of the control effectiveness 73.6% ,the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion:Carbamazepine combined nursing intervention could reduce the pain symptoms of patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia effectively and improve the patient's negative emotions and improve the treatment enthusiasm and confidence in clinical,worthy of clinical promotion.%目的:观察用卡马西平联合护理干预对缓解原发性三叉神经痛患者疼

  20. Microstructural abnormalities in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia revealed by multiple diffusion metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate microstructural tissue changes of trigeminal nerve (TGN) in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by multiple diffusion metrics, and correlate the diffusion indexes with the clinical variables. Methods: 16 patients with TN and 6 healthy controls (HC) were recruited into our study. All participants were imaged with a 3.0 T system with three-dimension time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DTI-sequence. We placed regions of interest over the root entry zone of the TGN and measured fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The mean values of FA, MD, AD and RD were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient, and to HC values. The correlation between the side-to-side diffusion metric difference and clinical variables (disease duration and visual analogy scale, VAS) was further explored. Results: Compared with the unaffected side and HC, the affected side showed significantly decreased FA and increased RD; however, no significant changes of AD were found. A trend toward significantly increased MD was identified on the affected side comparing with the unaffected side. We also found the significant correlation between the FA reduction and VAS of pain (r = −0.55, p = 0.03). Conclusion: DTI can quantitatively assess the microstructural abnormalities of the affected TGN in patients with TN. Our results suggest demyelination without significant axonal injury is the essential pathological basis of the affected TGN by multiple diffusion metrics. The correlation between FA reduction and VAS suggests FA as a potential objective MRI biomarker to correlate with clinical severity

  1. Microstructural abnormalities in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia revealed by multiple diffusion metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Beijing Key laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China); Li, Jiping [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Duan, Yunyun; Zhang, Mo [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Yongjie [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhang, Yuqing, E-mail: yuqzhang@sohu.com [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Objective: To investigate microstructural tissue changes of trigeminal nerve (TGN) in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by multiple diffusion metrics, and correlate the diffusion indexes with the clinical variables. Methods: 16 patients with TN and 6 healthy controls (HC) were recruited into our study. All participants were imaged with a 3.0 T system with three-dimension time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DTI-sequence. We placed regions of interest over the root entry zone of the TGN and measured fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The mean values of FA, MD, AD and RD were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient, and to HC values. The correlation between the side-to-side diffusion metric difference and clinical variables (disease duration and visual analogy scale, VAS) was further explored. Results: Compared with the unaffected side and HC, the affected side showed significantly decreased FA and increased RD; however, no significant changes of AD were found. A trend toward significantly increased MD was identified on the affected side comparing with the unaffected side. We also found the significant correlation between the FA reduction and VAS of pain (r = −0.55, p = 0.03). Conclusion: DTI can quantitatively assess the microstructural abnormalities of the affected TGN in patients with TN. Our results suggest demyelination without significant axonal injury is the essential pathological basis of the affected TGN by multiple diffusion metrics. The correlation between FA reduction and VAS suggests FA as a potential objective MRI biomarker to correlate with clinical severity.

  2. Identification and biological characterization of 6-aryl-7-isopropylquinazolinones as novel TRPV1 antagonists that are effective in models of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Andrew J; Bevan, Stuart; Christiansen, Martin; Copp, Prafula; Davis, Andrew; Davis, Clare; Dyson, Alex; Dziadulewicz, Edward K; Edwards, Lee; Eggelte, Hendrikus; Fox, Alyson; Gentry, Clive; Groarke, Alex; Hallett, Allan; Hart, Terance W; Hughes, Glyn A; Knights, Sally; Kotsonis, Peter; Lee, Wai; Lyothier, Isabelle; McBryde, Andrew; McIntyre, Peter; Paloumbis, George; Panesar, Moh; Patel, Sadhana; Seiler, Max-Peter; Yaqoob, Mohammed; Zimmermann, Kaspar

    2006-01-26

    Vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1, TRPV1) is a cation-selective ion channel that is expressed on primary afferent neurons and is upregulated following inflammation and nerve damage. Blockers of this channel may have utility in the treatment of chronic nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Here, we describe the optimization from a high throughput screening hit, of a series of 6-aryl-7-isopropylquinazolinones that are TRPV1 antagonists in vitro. We also demonstrate that one compound is active in vivo against capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia and in models of neuropathic and nociceptive pain in the rat. PMID:16420034

  3. Early therapeutic effects of cyberknife radiosurgery on trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Seong Kwon; Choi, Byung Ock; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Young Nam; Jang, Ji Sun [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We evaluated whether Cyberknife radiosurgery is an effective and safe method of therapy for medically intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 26 patients, who failed to surgery or were not suitable candidates for invasive intervention and were treated by Cyberknife radiosurgery between March 2004 and May 2005. Radiosurgery doses of 60 {approx} 64 Gy were delivered to the 80% isodose line prescribed to an 6 mm length of the nerve, sparing the most proximal 3 mm away from the trigeminal nerve root entry zone (median dose: 64 Gy). Follow-up period was 3 {approx} 15 months (median follow-up period: 9 months) Preliminary results from a cohort of 26 patients undergoing Cyberknife radiosurgery for TN showed that pain relief was achieved in 50% (13/26) of patients within the first 24 hrs after treatment. At last follow-up, 96.2% (25/26) of patients reported early pain relief within 7 days. Treatment failure developed in 2 of 26. Poor response occurred in one patient and relapse was observed in the other patient. 3 patients had hypoesthesia (11.5%), which was the only complication observed with any of our patients. With these results, authors assumed that Cyberknife radiosurgery for TN could be one of safe and effective therapeutic methods.

  4. Early therapeutic effects of cyberknife radiosurgery on trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated whether Cyberknife radiosurgery is an effective and safe method of therapy for medically intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 26 patients, who failed to surgery or were not suitable candidates for invasive intervention and were treated by Cyberknife radiosurgery between March 2004 and May 2005. Radiosurgery doses of 60 ∼ 64 Gy were delivered to the 80% isodose line prescribed to an 6 mm length of the nerve, sparing the most proximal 3 mm away from the trigeminal nerve root entry zone (median dose: 64 Gy). Follow-up period was 3 ∼ 15 months (median follow-up period: 9 months) Preliminary results from a cohort of 26 patients undergoing Cyberknife radiosurgery for TN showed that pain relief was achieved in 50% (13/26) of patients within the first 24 hrs after treatment. At last follow-up, 96.2% (25/26) of patients reported early pain relief within 7 days. Treatment failure developed in 2 of 26. Poor response occurred in one patient and relapse was observed in the other patient. 3 patients had hypoesthesia (11.5%), which was the only complication observed with any of our patients. With these results, authors assumed that Cyberknife radiosurgery for TN could be one of safe and effective therapeutic methods

  5. Keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression for primary trigeminal neuralgia:a report of 23 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-ge CHENG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the surgical technique,effects,and complications of keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression for primary trigeminal neuralgia.Methods The craniotomy with a keyhole incision above postauricular hairline followed by microvascular decompression was performed in 23 patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.Dissection of intracranial part of trigeminal nerve under microscope was done to search for the offending vessels,which were thereby freed and between which and the root entry zone(REZ of trigeminal nerve the Teflon grafts were placed.Effects and complications were observed in follow-up,ranging from 1 month to 2 years.Results Out of 23 patients who were all found compression in REZ of trigeminal nerves by the offending vessels in operation,disappearance of symptoms post-surgery was found in 22 cases,face numbness on the surgical side in 3 cases and no effects in 1 case.Recurrence of pain was not observed in patients who had initially benefited from the surgery at the follow-up.Conclusion The keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression is safe and effective for primary trigeminal neuralgia,in which accurate technique during operation plays a vital role in the decrease of complications and the outcome post-surgery.

  6. The connection of monocytes and reactive oxygen species in pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Hackel

    Full Text Available The interplay of specific leukocyte subpopulations, resident cells and proalgesic mediators results in pain in inflammation. Proalgesic mediators like reactive oxygen species (ROS and downstream products elicit pain by stimulation of transient receptor potential (TRP channels. The contribution of leukocyte subpopulations however is less clear. Local injection of neutrophilic chemokines elicits neutrophil recruitment but no hyperalgesia in rats. In meta-analyses the monocytic chemoattractant, CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1; MCP-1, was identified as an important factor in the pathophysiology of human and animal pain. In this study, intraplantar injection of CCL2 elicited thermal and mechanical pain in Wistar but not in Dark Agouti (DA rats, which lack p47(phox, a part of the NADPH oxidase complex. Inflammatory hyperalgesia after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA as well as capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia and capsaicin-induced current flow in dorsal root ganglion neurons in DA were comparable to Wistar rats. Macrophages from DA expressed lower levels of CCR2 and thereby migrated less towards CCL2 and formed limited amounts of ROS in vitro and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE in the tissue in response to CCL2 compared to Wistar rats. Local adoptive transfer of peritoneal macrophages from Wistar but not from DA rats reconstituted CCL2-triggered hyperalgesia in leukocyte-depleted DA and Wistar rats. A pharmacological stimulator of ROS production (phytol restored CCL2-induced hyperalgesia in vivo in DA rats. In Wistar rats, CCL2-induced hyperalgesia was completely blocked by superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase or tempol. Likewise, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin reduced CCL2-elicited hyperalgesia but not CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. In summary, we provide a link between CCL2, CCR2 expression on macrophages, NADPH oxidase, ROS and the development CCL2-triggered hyperalgesia, which is different from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. The study

  7. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  8. Progesterone produces antinociceptive and neuroprotective effects in rats with microinjected lysophosphatidic acid in the trigeminal nerve root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Min

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our present study, we studied the role of demyelination of the trigeminal nerve root in the development of prolonged nociceptive behavior in the trigeminal territory. Results Under anesthesia, the Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted onto a stereotaxic frame and 3 μL of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, 1 nmol was injected into the trigeminal nerve root to produce demyelination. This treatment decreased the air-puff thresholds, persisted until postoperative day 130, and then returned to the preoperative levels 160 days after LPA injection. The LPA-treated rats also showed a significant hyper-responsiveness to pin-prick stimulation. We further investigated the antinociceptive and neuroprotective effects of progesterone in rats undergoing demyelination of the trigeminal nerve root. Progesterone (8, 16 mg/kg/day was administered subcutaneously, beginning on the operative day, for five consecutive days in the LPA-treated rats. Treatment with progesterone produced significant early anti-allodynic effects and delayed prolonged anti-allodynic effects. The expression of protein zero (P0 and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22 were significantly down-regulated in the trigeminal nerve root on postoperative day 5 following LPA injection. This down-regulation of the P0 and PMP22 levels was blocked by progesterone treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that progesterone produces antinociceptive effects through neuroprotective action in animals with LPA-induced trigeminal neuropathic pain. Moreover, progesterone has potential utility as a novel therapy for trigeminal neuropathic pain relief at an appropriate managed dose and is therefore a possible future treatment strategy for improving the recovery from injury.

  9. Overview and History of Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Smruti K; Liu, James K

    2016-07-01

    Although the symptoms associated with trigeminal neuralgia have been well documented, the root cause of this disease initially eluded most surgeons. Although early remedies were haphazard because of a lack of understanding about the condition, near the 20th century both medical and procedural therapies were established for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. These treatments include a variety of medications, chemoneurolysis, radiofrequency lesioning, percutaneous ablative procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery, and open rhizotomy and microvascular decompression. This report recounts the history of trigeminal neuralgia, from its earliest descriptions to the historical evolution of nonsurgical and surgical therapies. PMID:27324994

  10. Trigeminal neuromas: Assessment of MRI and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report four cases of trigeminal neuroma. One of the patients had von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis with plexiform neurofibromas of the branches of the trigeminal nerve. MRI provided more information than CT as regards the spread of tumor: extension to the mandibular and maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve was well demonstrated on sagittal and coronal sections. This examination yielded an accurate census of the intraocular plexiform neurofibromas and allowed a correct preoperative diagnosis to be obtained. With Gd-DOTA, better definition of the outline of the tumours and of cystic components was obtained. However, CT was better for demonstration of bone erosions. (orig.)

  11. Trigeminal neuromas: Assessment of MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beges, C.; Revel, M.P.; Gaston, A.; Brugieres, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France)); Meder, J.F. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Sainte Anne, Paris (France)); Martin, N. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France))

    1992-06-01

    We report four cases of trigeminal neuroma. One of the patients had von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis with plexiform neurofibromas of the branches of the trigeminal nerve. MRI provided more information than CT as regards the spread of tumor: extension to the mandibular and maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve was well demonstrated on sagittal and coronal sections. This examination yielded an accurate census of the intraocular plexiform neurofibromas and allowed a correct preoperative diagnosis to be obtained. With Gd-DOTA, better definition of the outline of the tumours and of cystic components was obtained. However, CT was better for demonstration of bone erosions. (orig.).

  12. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  13. Bilateral persistent trigeminal arteries with unilateral trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus fistula. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-09-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  14. Refractory trigeminal neuralgia treatment outcomes following CyberKnife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A handful of studies have reported outcomes with CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS) for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. However, the follow-up has been short with no minimum follow-up required and have included patients with short duration of symptoms. Here we report our institutional experience on patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year and a median follow-up of 28 months (mean 38.84 months). Twenty-five patients with medically and surgically intractable TN received CKRS with a mean marginal radiation dose of 64 Gy applied to an average isodose line of 86% of the affected trigeminal nerve. Follow-up data were obtained by clinical examination and telephone questionnaire. Outcome results were categorized based on the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain scale with BNI I-III considered to be good outcomes and BNI IV-V considered as treatment failure. BNI facial numbness score was used to assess treatment complications. A large proportion of patients (42.9%) reported pain relief within 1 month following CKRS treatment. The mean time to recurrence of severe pain was 27.8 months (range 1–129 months). At median follow-up of 28 months (mean 38.84 months), actuarial rate of freedom from severe pain (BNI ≥ III) was 72%. At last follow-up 2 (8%) patients had freedom from any pain and no medications (BNI I) and the majority (48%) had some pain that was adequately controlled with medications. Seven patients (28%) had no response to treatment and continued to suffer from severe pain (BNI IV or V). Patient’s diabetic status and overall post-treatment BNI facial numbness scores were statistically significant predictors of treatment outcomes. CKRS represents an acceptable salvage option for with medically and/or surgically refractory patients. Even patients with severely debilitating symptoms may experience significant and sustained pain relief after CKRS. Particularly, CKRS remains an attractive option in patients who are not good surgical candidates or possibly

  15. Intramuscular and intradermal injection of capsaicin: a comparison of local and referred pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Svensson, Peter; Gottrup, Hanne;

    2000-01-01

    ), and one intradermal injection (i.d.): capsaicin 100 microg/20 microl. Local and referred pain intensities and areas were assessed from 0 to 60 min after injection. Intradermal capsaicin produced more intense local pain than i.m. capsaicin in the first min (skin: 68+/-6, muscle: 51+/-6 mm VASxmin, P...The present study compared capsaicin-induced muscle and skin pain in humans. Twelve healthy subjects received, in a randomised, balanced order, 3 intramuscular (i.m.) injections into the brachioradial muscle: capsaicin 100 microg/1 ml, capsaicin 100 microg/20 microl or 1 ml solvent (Tween 80....... The model with identical noxious stimulation of muscle and skin may be suitable for the study of differences in deep and superficial pain as seen in the clinic....

  16. Does increased nerve length within the treatment volume improve trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery? a prospective double-blind, randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increasing the nerve length within the treatment volume for trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery would improve pain relief. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia were randomized to undergo retrogasserian gamma knife radiosurgery (75 Gy maximal dose with 4-mm diameter collimators) using either one (n=44) or two (n=43) isocenters. The median follow-up was 26 months (range 1-36). Results: Pain relief was complete in 57 patients (45 without medication and 12 with low-dose medication), partial in 15, and minimal in another 15 patients. The actuarial rate of obtaining complete pain relief (with or without medication) was 67.7%±5.1%. The pain relief was identical for one- and two-isocenter radiosurgery. Pain relapsed in 30 of 72 responding patients. Facial numbness and mild and severe paresthesias developed in 8, 5, and 1 two-isocenter patients vs. 3, 4, and 0 one-isocenter patients, respectively (p=0.23). Improved pain relief correlated with younger age (p=0.025) and fewer prior procedures (p=0.039) and complications (numbness or paresthesias) correlated with the nerve length irradiated (p=0.018). Conclusions: Increasing the treatment volume to include a longer nerve length for trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery does not significantly improve pain relief but may increase complications

  17. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6–153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with

  18. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); College of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kano, Hideyuki [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Niranjan, Ajay [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Flickinger, John C., E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up {>=}6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age

  19. Selective percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia:report on 1860 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴承远; 孟凡刚; 徐淑军; 刘玉光; 王宏伟

    2004-01-01

    @@Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain as "a sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing, recurrent pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the fifth cranial nerve".1 The incidence rate is about three to five cases per year per 100000 persons and increases with age.2 In our hospital, percutaneous radiofrequency therapy was performed on 1860 patients with TN from June 1986 to April 2003, and percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency therapy on 579 cases. Among this group of patients, X-ray, 3-D CT, and navigational localization of the oval foramen were performed on 42 cases. The indications, techniques, and results are reported here.

  20. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Waleed; Delashaw, Johnny; Mohammed, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is the largest of the fetal carotid-basilar anastomotic arteries, and it persists for the longest embryonic period. The artery usually involutes after the development of the posterior communicating artery. The exact causes of persistence of this primitive vessel into adulthood are not completely clear. Angiographic and anatomical descriptions of the various persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) configurations and their relation to the remainder of the cerebrovascular tree and the other surrounding structures have been reported. Persistent trigeminal artery can be associated with many other vascular anomalies and disorders including aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations and carotid-cavernous fistulae. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and angiographic features of this persistent embryonic arterial channel is of utmost importance when making therapeutic decisions and embarking on surgical or endovascular intervention for any pertinent pathological condition. We review the embryology, angiographic features, microsurgical anatomy and associated vascular anomalies and disorders of the persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:22843453

  1. The effect of local vs remote experimental pain on motor learning and sensorimotor integration using a complex typing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancey, Erin; Murphy, Bernadette A; Andrew, Danielle; Yielder, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Recent work demonstrated that capsaicin-induced acute pain improved motor learning performance; however, baseline accuracy was very high, making it impossible to discern the impact of acute pain on motor learning and retention. In addition, the effects of the spatial location of capsaicin application were not explored. Two experiments were conducted to determine the interactive effects of acute pain vs control (experiment 1) and local vs remote acute pain (experiment 2) on motor learning and sensorimotor processing. For both experiments, somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) amplitudes and motor learning acquisition and retention (accuracy and response time) data were collected at baseline, after application, and after motor learning. Experiment 1: N11 (P Experiment 2: The P25 SEP peak decreased in the local group after application of capsaicin cream (P attention to the body part used in motor learning, contributing to our understanding of how the location of pain impacts somatosensory processing and the associated motor learning. PMID:27023419

  2. Salvage Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Surgically Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with surgically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treated with rescue gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with typical TN received salvage GKRS between 1997 and 2002 at the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI). All patients had recurrent pain following at least one prior surgical intervention. Prior surgical interventions included percutaneous destructive procedures, microvascular decompression (MVD), or GKRS. Thirty-one (39%) had undergone at least two prior procedures. The most common salvage dose was 80 Gy, although 40-50 Gy was typical in patients who had received prior radiosurgery. Pain outcome was assessed using the BNI Pain Intensity Score, and quality of life was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Results: Median follow-up after salvage GKRS was 5.3 years. Actuarial analysis demonstrated that at 5 years, 20% of patients were pain-free and 50% had pain relief. Pain recurred in patients who had an initial response to GKRS at a median of 1.1 years. Twenty-eight (41%) required a subsequent surgical procedure for recurrence. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model suggested that the strongest predictor of GKRS failure was a history of prior MVD (p=0.029). There were no instances of serious morbidity or mortality. Ten percent of patients developed worsening facial numbness and 8% described their numbness as 'very bothersome.' Conclusions: GKRS salvage for refractory TN is well tolerated and results in long-term pain relief in approximately half the patients treated. Clinicians may reconsider using GKRS to salvage patients who have failed prior MVD.

  3. Effect of radiation dose on the outcomes of gamma knife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia: A multi-factor analysis

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    Xinjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze the effect of different radiation variables on the outcomes of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN. Materials and Methods: Seventy-three patients with refractory TN were treated with a maximum dose of 75-90 Gy using either one (n = 41 or two (n = 32 isocenters and were intensively followed up. The integrated dose delivered to the trigeminal nerve root within the prepontine cistern and the nerve root volume was calculated using the Gamma-Plan system. Relationships between the clinical outcomes and radiation variables were statistically analyzed using a combination of Fisher′s exact test and multivariate analyses. Results: At their last follow up, 21 patients (28.8%, 22 patients (30.1%, 19 patients (26%, 6 patients (8.2%, and 5 patients (6.8% had Grade I-V pain outcomes, respectively, and the average mean dose delivered to the trigeminal nerve root, average integrated dose (mJ and nerve root volume in prepontine cistern were 45.29 Gy, 4,26 mJ, and 98.47 mm 3 , respectively. The pain relief rate was not significantly improved by a higher amount of integrated dose received by the trigeminal nerve root in prepontine cistern, however, incidence of trigeminal nerve toxicity was increased (P = 0.005. Conclusions: Our limited results suggested that a higher integrated dose might increase the incidence of trigeminal nerve toxicity with no significant benefits in pain relief when the maximal doses were within 75-90 Gy. The protocol for increasing radiation variables such as longer nerve exposure length and higher maximal dose is not recommended as a routine approach and more randomized studies with large number of cases would be required to verify the best treatment strategy of gamma knife radiosurgery for TN.

  4. Botulinum toxin type-A effect as a preemptive treatment in a model of acute trigeminal pain: a pre-clinical double-blind and placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Juliato Piovesan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate if botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A had a preemptive antinociceptive effect in a formalin-induced orofacial pain model (FT. To test this hypothesis, male Rattus norvegicus were injected with isotonic saline solution 0.9% or BoNT/A administered as a 40 μl bolus, lateral to their nose, at 24 hours, 8, 15, 22, 29 or 36 days pre-FT. The procedures were repeated 42 days later. Influence on motor activity was assessed through the open-field test. Pain scores corresponded to the time spent rubbing and flicking the injected area. Animals pre-treated with BoNT/A at the first protocol (8 days subgroup showed reduced inflammatory scores (p=0.011. For the other groups no significant results were observed at any phase. Motor activity was similar in both groups. BoNT/A showed to be effective preventing inflammatory pain up to eight days after the first treatment, an effect not reproduced on the second dose administration.

  5. Facial herpes zoster infection precipitated by surgical manipulation of the trigeminal nerve during exploration of the posterior fossa: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Nassir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of herpes zoster infection (shingles precipitated by surgical manipulation of the trigeminal nerve root during an attempted microvascular decompression procedure. The pathogenesis of this phenomenon, as well as the importance and role of prophylactic acyclovir in its management, are discussed. Case presentation A 54-year-old Caucasian man with a classical long-standing left-sided V2 and V3 division primary trigeminal neuralgia refractory to medical management, underwent posterior fossa exploration for microvascular decompression via a standard retromastoid craniectomy. The patient had immediate and complete relief from pain. Three days after the operation, he developed severely painful vesicles with V2 and V3 dermatomal distribution. Rather than the classical paroxysmal, lancinating type of trigeminal neuralgia, the pain experienced by the patient was of a constant burning nature. A clinical diagnosis of herpes zoster (shingles was made after smear confirmation from microbiological testing. The patient was commenced on antiviral treatment with acyclovir. His vesicular rash and pain gradually subsided over the next two weeks. He remains asymptomatic one year later. Conclusions Postoperative shingles precipitated by trigeminal nerve manipulation during surgery for trigeminal neuralgia can be a distressing and demoralizing experience for the patient. A careful preoperative history, early recognition, and prompt antiviral therapy is necessary.

  6. Efficacy of peripheral streptomycin injection in the treatment of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the efficacy of peripheral streptomycin injection in relieving the pain of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of Study: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry Rawalpindi, from 1st June 2006 to 31st December 2007. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia were selected. They received five consecutive injections of streptomycin 1g in 3 ml of 2% Lignocaine (Septodont) with 1: 100,000 adrenaline at one week interval. Follow up was carried out at one, two and six months after the last injection. Results: Age ranged from 15-78 years (mean 44.67). Male to female ratio was 1:1.14. Right side of the face was involved in 70% and left side in 30% cases. Mandibular division of trigeminal nerve was involved in 43.3% and maxillary division in 40% of the cases. In the rest both maxillary and mandibular divisions were involved. Pain was significantly decreased from baseline to 1 month (p < 0.001). The level of pain was increased a bit but the increase was significant at two months (p = 0.006) and at 6 months (p = 0.020). Conclusion: Best treatment modality for this devastating disease is yet to evolve. Within the confines of the study it can be stated that efficacy combined with low post treatment morbidity makes streptomycin a useful treatment option. (author)

  7. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Cerebellopontine Angle Arteriovenous Malformation Treated With Gamma Knife Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işik, Semra; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Yilmaz, Baran; Toktaş, Zafer Orkun; Akakin, Akin; Kiliç, Türker

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a facial pain syndrome characterized as sudden onset and lightening-like sensation over somatosensorial branch(es) of fifth cranial nerve. Rarely, some underlying diseases or disorders could be diagnosed, such as multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, and vascular malformations. The authors present a 47-year-old man with trigeminal neuralgia over left V2 and V3 dermatomes. He had a previous transarterial embolization and long use of carbamazepine with partial response to treatment. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was planned. A marginal dose of 15 Gy was given to 50% isodose line. His pain was relieved by GKR in 1.5 years. Treatment of posterior fossa arteriovenous malformations causing trigeminal neuralgia, with GKR has a very limited use in the literature. It, however, is obvious that success rate as pain relief, in a very challenging field of functional neurosurgery, is satisfactory. Large series, however, are in need to make a more comprehensive statement about efficacy and safety of the procedure in these pathologies. PMID:26674920

  8. Epidermoid cyst in the cerebellopontine angle cistern presenting as trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnostic values of the orbicularis oculi reflex and metrizamide CT cisternography - case report -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi; Goya, Tomokazu; Kinoshita, Kazuo (Miyazaki Medical College, Miyazaki (Japan)); Fukui, Masashi

    1983-05-01

    This 29-year-old male had been suffering from left trigeminal neuralgia one year prior to admission. Admission was prompted by the development of pain in the third division of the left trigeminal nerve. Physical and neurological examinations were not remarkable except for the facial pain. The orbicularis oculi reflex showed delayed latency of R/sub 1/ on the affected side. CT scans performed pre- and post-contrast enhancement revealed a low density area in the left cerebellopontine angle cistern. Metrizamide CT cisternography clearly revealed the margin of the lesion as the contrast media did not enter into the low density area. A left suboccipital craniectomy was performed. The trigeminal nerve was surrounded by a thin-capsulated mass and cholesteatoma materials. Histological diagnosis was epidermoid cyst. Since this surgical procedure, the trigeminal neuralgia has not recurred for one year. Without objective neurological deficits, it is difficult to distinguish symptomatic trigeminal from idiopathic neuralgia. Therefore, minor change of the orbicularis oculi reflex should help in objectively detecting dysfunction of the trigeminal nerve. Metrizamide CT cisternography is also useful in diagnosis of cystic lesions.

  9. Osteoporosis in the jawbones: a correlative factor of primary trigeminal neuralgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Wang, Hu; Liu, Na; Yang, Qianmei; Luo, En

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN), a neuropathic disorder of one or both of the trigeminal nerves, occurs most often in people over age 50. Extreme, sporadic, sudden burning or shock-like face pain in common activities greatly lowers quality of life. The precise cause of primary TN remains unknown, but it may be caused by vascular pressing on the trigeminal nerve in its root entry zone (REZ), demyelinization of trigeminal sensory fibers, or jawbone cavity. Accordingly, many treatments carry risks of adverse effects, recurrence, and complications. TN and osteoporosis have similar high-risk populations and a common influential factor - emotional stress - is also closed related to primary TN for calcitonin gene-related peptide and calcitonin. Jawbone cavity, which is a possible pathogenesis of TN, may be another form of jawbone osteoporosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that osteoporosis in jaws could be a correlative factor of primary TN. If this hypothesis is verified, it may suggest specific new ideas for the early preventive treatment of primary TN. PMID:25141822

  10. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gocmen, Rahsan; Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed.

  11. Effect of image uncertainty on the dosimetry of trigeminal neuralgia irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Our objective was to quantify the uncertainty in localization of the trigeminal nerve (TGN) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) and to determine the effect of this uncertainty on gamma-knife dose delivery. Methods: An MR/CT test phantom with 9, 0.6-mm diameter, copper rings was devised. The absolute ring positions in stereotactic space were determined by the angiographic module of the LGP software. The standard deviation, σ, in the difference between the absolute and MR-measured or CT-measured coordinates of the rings was determined. The trigeminal nerve in 52 previously treated patients was contoured and expanded by 1σ and 2σ margins to model the uncertainty in the location of the nerve. For gamma-knife treatment, a single isocenter was used and was located at the distal cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve root. Irradiation methods included a 4-mm collimator, 90 Gy to isocenter and a 4 and 8-mm collimator, 70 Gy to isocenter. A patient outcome survey that sampled pain relief and morbidity was done. Results: The MR coordinate σ was 0.7 mm left-right, 0.8 mm anterior-posterior, and 0.6 mm superior-inferior, and the CT coordinate σ was 0.4 mm left-right, 0.2 mm anterior-posterior, and 0.2 mm superior-inferior. A 45% higher dose line covered the TGN with the 4 and 8-mm method. No significant increase in pain reduction or morbidity occurred. Conclusions: The uncertainty of target location by MRI is more than twice that found in CT imaging. The 4 and 8-mm collimator method covers the trigeminal root cross section with a higher isodose line than does the 4-mm method. This higher dose did not significantly reduce pain or increase morbidity

  12. Secondary chronic cluster headache due to trigeminal nerve root compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjåset, Christer; Russell, M B; Russell, M Bjørn

    2010-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman had a gradual onset of chronic headache located in the right temporal region and a burning sensation in the root of the tongue which over a year evolved into chronic cluster headache with a milder chronic headache in-between the severe cluster headache attacks. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root on the pain side. Neurosurgery microvascular decompression relieved the patient's chronic cluster headache, the chronic intermittent headache and the burning tongue sensation. The effect was persistent at a 1 year follow-up. Patients with atypical symptoms of cluster headache should be examined with cerebral MRI angiography of arteries and veins to exclude symptomatic causes. PMID:20384588

  13. An immunocytochemical investigation of human trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, D; Hill, R G; Edvinsson, L;

    2002-01-01

    5-HT1D (but not 5-HT1B)-receptor immunoreactivity (i.r.) can be detected on trigeminal fibres within the spinal trigeminal tract of the human brainstem. The present study used immunohistochemical and morphometric techniques to determine the proportions of trigeminal fibres expressing substance P,...

  14. Eugenol Inhibits ATP-induced P2X Currents in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hai Ying; Lee, Byung Ky; Kim, Joong Soo; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2008-01-01

    Eugenol is widely used in dentistry to relieve pain. We have recently demonstrated voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channels as molecular targets for its analgesic effects, and hypothesized that eugenol acts on P2X3, another pain receptor expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG), and tested the effects of eugenol by whole-cell patch clamp and Ca2+ imaging techniques. In the present study, we investigated whether eugenol would modulate 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-induced currents in rat TG neurons and P2X3-e...

  15. Intractable trigeminal neuralgia: A single institution experience in 26 patients treated with stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, severe pain can persist, or recur despite aggressive medical management and open surgery. Recently, Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used with promising results. We report on our series of 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Materials and Methods: Between 1991 and 1995, 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia were treated at our institution using stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Medical management had failed in all cases. In addition, 13 patients underwent a total of 20 open surgeries, with transient, or no pain relief. There were 19 females, and 7 males. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 87 years, with a median of 74 years. All patients were treated with a 201 source Cobalt-60 Gamma Knife unit. All patients underwent placement of the Leksell frame, followed by MRI scanning and computer treatment planning. The target in all patients was the fifth cranial nerve root entry zone into the brainstem. Twenty-five patients received between 64.3 to 70 Gy prescribed to Dmax in one shot. One patient received 120 Gy to Dmax in one shot. The 4 mm collimator was used in 22 cases, and the 8 mm in 4 cases. Follow-up ranged from 5 to 55 months, with a median of 19 months. Complete resolution (CR) of pain was scored when the patient reported being pain free off all medication. Partial resolution (PR) was scored when the patient reported > 50% pain reduction after Gamma Knife treatment. Results: At last follow-up, 84.6% ((22(26))) reported CR or PR of pain after Gamma Knife treatment. Forty-two percent ((11(26))) of patients reported CR, and 42%((11(26))) reported PR of pain. There was a dose response. In patients receiving < 70 Gy, 25% ((3(12))) reported CR, while 57% ((8(14))) of those receiving ≥ 70 Gy reported CR. Complications occurred in two (8%) patients. One patient developed transient numbness of the face after 70 Gy, and a second patient

  16. Surgical Options for Atypical Facial Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimpour, Shervin; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-07-01

    Atypical neuropathic facial pain is a syndrome of intractable and unremitting facial pain that is secondary to nociceptive signaling in the trigeminal system. These syndromes are often recalcitrant to pharmacotherapy and other common interventions, including microvascular decompression and percutaneous procedures. Herein, the authors present two other viable approaches (nucleus caudalis dorsal root entry zone lesioning and motor cortex stimulation), their indications, and finally a possible treatment algorithm to consider when assessing patients with atypical facial pain. PMID:27325003

  17. Long-Term Results for Trigeminal Schwannomas Treated With Gamma Knife Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Toshinori, E-mail: h-toshi@komakihp.gr.jp; Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is considered the desirable curative treatment for trigeminal schwannomas. However, complete resection without any complications remains challenging. During the last several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a minimally invasive treatment modality. Information regarding long-term outcomes of SRS for patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas is limited because of the rarity of this tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control and functional outcomes in patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with SRS, specifically with gamma knife surgery (GKS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with GKS were evaluated. Of these, 2 patients (4%) had partial irradiation of the tumor, and 34 patients (64%) underwent GKS as the initial treatment. The median tumor volume was 6.0 cm{sup 3}. The median maximum and marginal doses were 28 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 98 months. On the last follow-up image, 7 patients (13%) had tumor enlargement, including the 2 patients who had partial treatment. Excluding the 2 patients who had partial treatment, the actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 90% and 82%, respectively. Patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle had significantly lower PFS rates. If those patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle are excluded, the actuarial 5- and 10-year PFS rates increased to 95% and 90%, respectively. Ten percent of patients had worsened facial numbness or pain in spite of no tumor progression, indicating adverse radiation effect. Conclusions: GKS can be an acceptable alternative to surgical resection in patients with trigeminal schwannomas. However, large tumors that compress the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle should be surgically removed first and then

  18. Long-Term Results for Trigeminal Schwannomas Treated With Gamma Knife Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Surgical resection is considered the desirable curative treatment for trigeminal schwannomas. However, complete resection without any complications remains challenging. During the last several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a minimally invasive treatment modality. Information regarding long-term outcomes of SRS for patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas is limited because of the rarity of this tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control and functional outcomes in patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with SRS, specifically with gamma knife surgery (GKS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with GKS were evaluated. Of these, 2 patients (4%) had partial irradiation of the tumor, and 34 patients (64%) underwent GKS as the initial treatment. The median tumor volume was 6.0 cm3. The median maximum and marginal doses were 28 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 98 months. On the last follow-up image, 7 patients (13%) had tumor enlargement, including the 2 patients who had partial treatment. Excluding the 2 patients who had partial treatment, the actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 90% and 82%, respectively. Patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle had significantly lower PFS rates. If those patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle are excluded, the actuarial 5- and 10-year PFS rates increased to 95% and 90%, respectively. Ten percent of patients had worsened facial numbness or pain in spite of no tumor progression, indicating adverse radiation effect. Conclusions: GKS can be an acceptable alternative to surgical resection in patients with trigeminal schwannomas. However, large tumors that compress the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle should be surgically removed first and then

  19. Rizotomia trigeminal por radiofrequência para tratamento da neuralgia do trigêmeo: resultados e modificação técnica Trigeminal radiofrequency rhizotomy for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: results and technical modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Gusmão

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a eficácia da rizotomia trigeminal por radiofrequência no tratamento da neuralgia essencial do trigêmeo em 135 pacientes e propor modificação da técnica para guiar a punção do forame oval. Cento e um (74,8% pacientes foram tratados com apenas um procedimento cirúrgico e os 34 (25,2% restantes necessitaram dois procedimentos. O tempo de avaliação pós-operatória variou de 6 meses a 15 anos. O alívio das crises de dor no pós-operatório imediato ocorreu em 131 (97,0% pacientes. Após a realização do primeiro procedimento, houve recorrência em 33 (24,5% pacientes. As complicações incluíram diminuição do reflexo corneano (4,4%, paresia do masseter (2,2%, disestesia dolorosa (1,5% e anestesia dolorosa (0,7%. A rizotomia trigeminal por radiofrequência constitui procedimento minimamente invasivo, de baixo risco e com alta eficácia. O uso da fluoroscopia por tomografia computadorizada torna a punção do forame oval mais fácil, rápida e precisa.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radiofrequency trigeminal rhizotomy in treating 135 patients harboring trigeminal neuralgia, and to introduce a technical modification to guide the puncture of the foramen ovale. A hundred and one (74.8% patients were treated with a single surgical procedure whereas the 34 (25.2% remaining patients required two procedures. Follow-up ranges from 6 months to 15 years. Pain relief in the immediate postoperative was achieved in 131 (97.0% patients. After the initial procedure, recurrence happened in 33 (24.5% patients. The complications included decrease corneal reflex (4.4%, masseter paresis (2.2%, painful dysesthesia (1.5% and anesthesia dolorosa (0.7%. The radiofrequency trigeminal rizhotomy is a low risk, highly effective and minimally invasive procedure. The use of the computerized tomography guided fluoroscopy turns foramen ovale's puncture easier, fast and precise.

  20. A Gain-of-Function Mutation in Nav1.6 in a Case of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Brian S; Zhao, Peng; Dib-Hajj, Fadia B; Morisset, Valerie; Tate, Simon; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a debilitating pain disorder characterized by episodic unilateral facial pain along the territory of branches of the trigeminal nerve. Human pain disorders, but not TN, have been linked to gain-of-function mutations in peripheral voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9). Gain-of-function mutations in NaV1.6, which is expressed in myelinated and unmyelinated central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system neurons and supports neuronal high-frequency firing, have been linked to epilepsy but not to pain. Here, we describe an individual who presented with evoked and spontaneous paroxysmal unilateral facial pain and carried a diagnosis of TN. Magnetic resonance imaging showed unilateral neurovascular compression, consistent with pain in areas innervated by the second branch of the trigeminal nerve. Genetic analysis as part of a phase 2 clinical study in patients with TN conducted by Convergence Pharmaceuticals Ltd revealed a previously undescribed de novo missense mutation in NaV1.6 (c.A406G; p.Met136Val). Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings show that the Met136Val mutation significantly increases peak current density (1.5-fold) and resurgent current (1.6-fold) without altering gating properties. Current-clamp studies in trigeminal ganglia (TRG) neurons showed that Met136Val increased the fraction of high-firing neurons, lowered the current threshold and increased the frequency of evoked action potentials in response to graded stimuli. Our results demonstrate a novel NaV1.6 mutation in TN, and show that this mutation potentiates transient and resurgent sodium currents and leads to increased excitability in TRG neurons. We suggest that this gain-of-function NaV1.6 mutation may exacerbate the pathophysiology of vascular compression and contribute to TN. PMID:27496104

  1. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  2. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Lo, Anthony T., E-mail: tonyho22003@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R. [Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  3. TRIGEMINAL NEVRALJİ VE TEDAVİ YÖNTEMLERİ

    OpenAIRE

    Apaydın, Ayşegül

    2012-01-01

    Anahtar sözcükler:Bu makalede orofasial bölgede şiddetli ve ani ağrı krizleri ile kendini gösteren Trigeminal nevralji trigeminal nevralji anlatıldı. Et-yolojisi ile ilgili teoriler, klasik belirtiler açıklandı. Tanısı ve tedavisi konusunda üzerinde durulması gereken noktalar belirtilerek, son yıllarda kullanılan tedavi yöntemleri anlatıldı. İlaç tedavisi, sinir blokajı, cerrahi tedavi yöntemleri kıyaslanarak tartışıldı.Key Words : Trigemital neuralgiaIn this article, trigeminal neuralgia cha...

  4. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Laurinda Lemos1,2, Carlos Alegria3, Joana Oliveira3, Ana Machado2, Pedro Oliveira4, Armando Almeida11Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS, School of Health Sciences, Campus de Gualtar, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; 2Hospital Center of Alto Ave, Unit of Fafe, Fafe, Portugal; 3Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital São Marcos; 4Products and Systems Engineering, Campus de Azurém, University of Minho, Guimarães, PortugalAbstract: In idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN the neuroimaging evaluation is usually normal, but in some cases a vascular compression of trigeminal nerve root is present. Although the latter condition may be referred to surgery, drug therapy is usually the first approach to control pain. This study compared the clinical outcome and direct costs of (1 a traditional treatment (carbamazepine [CBZ] in monotherapy [CBZ protocol], (2 the association of gabapentin (GBP and analgesic block of trigger-points with ropivacaine (ROP (GBP+ROP protocol, and (3 a common TN surgery, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (MVD protocol. Sixty-two TN patients were randomly treated during 4 weeks (CBZ [n = 23] and GBP+ROP [n = 17] protocols from cases of idiopathic TN, or selected for MVD surgery (n = 22 due to intractable pain. Direct medical cost estimates were determined by the price of drugs in 2008 and the hospital costs. Pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS and number of pain crises; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sickness Impact Profile, and satisfaction with treatment and hospital team were evaluated. Assessments were performed at day 0 and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. All protocols showed a clinical improvement of pain control at month 6. The GBP+ROP protocol was the least expensive treatment, whereas surgery was the most expensive. With time, however, GBP+ROP tended to be the most and MVD the least expensive. No sequelae resulted in any patient after drug

  5. MRI analysis of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia by magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA). Methods: MRTA images of 235 asymptomatic trigeminal nerves and 147 symptomatic trigeminal nerves were analyzed by two radiologists who were blinded to the clinical findings. Judgment was made on if there were some vessels close to the trigeminal nerve. The diameter of the offending vessel, the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve were also recorded at the same time. Group t-test and Chi-Square test were used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and forty-two trigeminal nerves of all 382 nerves can be detected offending vessels on MRTA images, 111 of 242 trigeminal nerves were asymptomatic, the rest 131 were symptomatic. Statistical analysis indicated that the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons in symptomatic group (the median is 2 mm) was shorter than that in the asymptomatic group (the median is 4 mm) (P<0.01). In 89.3% cases (117/131) of the symptomatic group the angle between the vessel and the nerve is larger than 45 degree, but only in 67.6% cases (75/111) in the asymptomatic group the angle is larger than 45 degree. That means significant difference is between the two groups (P<0.01). Vessel-nerve compression can be seen in 1 case of asymptomatic group (0.4%, 1/235) and 45 eases in symptomatic group (30.6%, 45/147). The vessel-nerve compression rate of the symptomatic group was much higher than that of the asymptomatic group (P<0.01). Conclusion: MR is a useful tool to evaluate the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. The distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve are related to the onset of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. (authors)

  6. Intraoperative visualisation of the trigeminal cistern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous retrogassarian glycerol rhizotomy has passed the test of time as an immediately effective and reliable method for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. X-ray-assisted puncture of the trigeminal cistern and contrast-enhanced intraoperative visualisation techniques are absolute requirements of this surgical measure and invariably precede any further steps taken by the surgeon. The use of state-of-the-art fluoroscopic methods ensures that ample information is even obtained from the images of the base-of-scull region. (orig.)

  7. MR imaging of persistent primitive trigeminal artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Araki, Yutaka; Ono, Yukihiko; Ishida, Osamu [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Mabuchi, Nobuhisa

    1997-02-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery is the most common anomaly of the primitive carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses. We reviewed MR images and MR angiographies of 11 patients with primitive trigeminal artery. In 8 of the 11 cases, PTA were identified with conventional long TR spin-echo images. In 8 of 11 cases, a hypoplastic basilar trunk associated with PTA was seen on both MR images and MR angiographies. In 7 of 11 cases, a hypoplasia or agenesis of the ipsilateral posterior communicating artery was seen on MR angiographies. (author)

  8. TREATMENT OF 25 CASES OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA WITH ABDOMINAL ACUPUNCTURE THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xue-qing; YE Shu-ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal Neuralgia is often found in female between 40 - 60 years old, marked by sudden severe pain on the face (a feeling of knife cutting, electric shock), and it is characterized by sudden, paroxysmal and periodical attack and triggered by touch). The attack usually lasts for 1 to 2 minutes with different intervals. The patient's life quality can be seriously affected. It is mainly treated with orally taken drugs in western internal department but without satisfactory result, and with local closing therapy in surgical department. The problem may reoccur half a year later in most patients complicated with facial paralysis, so western medicine is not likely to be accepted by the patients. The author has tried to apply abdominal acupuncture in the treatment of 25 cases of trigeminal neuralgia with good effect. The result is as follows.

  9. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, A H; Joe, C L; Davoodi, A; Takechi, K; Carstens, M I; Carstens, E

    2014-06-20

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA)-1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42 °C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue.

  10. Benign chronic orofacial pain. Clinical criteria and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, S F

    1983-09-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain-dysfunction syndrome are the most common benign orofacial pain disorders. Because orofacial pain can arise from many sources and can be exacerbated by emotional stress, diagnosis is complex. Primary trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux) is characterized by severe paroxysms of pain often initiated by stimuli applied to trigger zones. Atypical facial neuralgia is a more loosely defined collection of orofacial neuralgias with variable distribution of pain and age of onset. Treatment (ie, pharmacologic and surgical procedures, nerve blocks, alcohol injection) is often based on the theoretical biases of clinicians. The most common clinical findings in TMJ pain-dysfunction syndrome are localized facial pain, mandibular dysfunction, and joint sounds. Therapy includes use of drugs to relieve pain and relax muscles, elimination of occlusal discrepancies, and surgical procedures. Psychologic referral is usually considered a last resort. PMID:6889199

  11. [Trigeminal-cavernous fistula. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Franco, Jorge; Sánchez Olivera, Carlos; Saavedra Andrade, Rafael; Sandoval Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Persistent primitive trigeminal artery is a rare anatomical variant resulting from the absence of obliteration of the embryonic trigeminal artery. The shunt between the persistent primitive trigeminal artery and the cavernous sinus is called trigeminal-cavernous fistula. We report the case of a woman with a trigeminal-cavernous fistula secondary to head trauma who was treated by transarterial embolization. PMID:24108341

  12. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Clas Linnman; David Borsook

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain p...

  13. Trigeminal neuroplasticity underlies allodynia in a preclinical model of mild closed head traumatic brain injury (cTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Golam; Hou, Jiamei; Tsuda, Shigeharu; Nelson, Rachel; Sinharoy, Ankita; Wilkie, Zachary; Pandey, Rahul; Caudle, Robert M; Neubert, John K; Thompson, Floyd J; Bose, Prodip

    2016-08-01

    Post-traumatic headache (PTH) following TBI is a common and often persisting pain disability. PTH is often associated with a multimodal central pain sensitization on the skin surface described as allodynia. However, the particular neurobiology underlying cTBI-induced pain disorders are not known. These studies were performed to assess trigeminal sensory sensitization and to determine if sensitization measured behaviorally correlated with detectable changes in portions of the trigeminal sensory system (TSS), particularly trigeminal nucleus, thalamus, and sensory cortex. Thermal stimulation is particularly well suited to evaluate sensitization and was used in these studies. Recent advances in the use of reward/conflict paradigms permit use of operant measures of behavior, versus reflex-driven response behaviors, for thermal sensitization studies. Thus, to quantitate facial thermal sensitization (allodynia) in the setting of acute TBI, the current study utilized an operant orofacial pain reward/conflict testing paradigm to assess facial thermal sensitivity in uninjured control animals compared with those two weeks after cTBI in a rodent model. Significant reductions in facial contact/lick behaviors were observed in the TBI animals using either cool or warm challenge temperatures compared with behaviors in the normal animals. These facial thermal sensitizations correlated with detectable changes in multiple levels of the TSS. The immunohistochemical (IHC) studies revealed significant alterations in the expression of the serotonin (5-HT), neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), norepinephrine (NE), and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the caudal trigeminal nucleus, thalamic VPL/VPM nucleus, and sensory cortex of the orofacial pain pathways. There was a strong correlation between increased expression of certain IHC markers and increased behavioral markers for facial sensitization. The authors conclude that TBI-induced changes observed in the TSS are consistent with the expression

  14. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neetu, Soni; Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26678753

  15. Therapeutic cranial nerve irradiation: results from a multi-center dose response study of radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: We performed a multi-institution study to evaluate the technique, dose-selection parameters, and results of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of trigeminal neuralgia. We hypothesized that MRI-stereotactic targeting of the trigeminal nerve and irradiation with a single 4 mm isocenter, 2-4 mm anterior to the brainstem, could be a safe and effective treatment for this disorder. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients at five centers had radiosurgery using a single 4 mm isocenter targeted at the root entry zone. All patients had typical trigeminal neuralgia. The mean patient age was 70 years, (range, 40-87). Thirty-two patients had undergone prior surgery, and the mean number of procedures performed was 2.8 (range, 1-7). Eighteen patients (36%) had not had prior surgery before radiosurgery. Maximum radiosurgery doses included 60 Gy (n=8), 65 Gy (n=3), 70 Gy (n=27), 75 Gy (n=2), 80 Gy (n=6) and 90 Gy (n=4). All patients were discharged within 24 hours and were studied in regard to the degree of pain relief, latency interval to pain relief, sensory loss, and the need for further therapy. Mean follow-up after radiosurgery was 9.2 months (range, 2-26 months). Results: At last follow-up, 25 patients (50%) had excellent control (pain-free), 17 (34%) had good control (50-90% relief), and 8 (16%) had failed (see Figure). The median time to pain relief was one month. We identified an actuarial response rate of 53% for complete pain relief at seven months, and 93% for pain reduction (50-100% relief). At 18 months, these results declined to 48% and 77% respectively. A significantly greater proportion of patients receiving a radiosurgery maximum dose of ≥ 70 Gy achieved complete pain relief (63% vs. 18%) and >50% pain reduction (96% vs. 80%) than those with doses <70 Gy. Patients without prior surgery had significantly better outcomes in univariate testing. Three patients (6%) developed increased facial paresthesiae after radiosurgery

  16. Trigeminal Neuralgia due to Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuilker Knoner Campos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented a case of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, a rare condition characterized by enlargement, tortuosity, or elongation of intracranial arteries. Dolichoectatic vessels can cause dysfunction of cranial nerves through direct vascular compression. The relationships of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia with the particularities of neurovascular conflict and images findings are discussed.

  17. Trigeminal Neuralgia due to Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuilker Knoner Campos; André Accioly Guasti; Benjamin Franklin da Silva; José Antonio Guasti

    2012-01-01

    We presented a case of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, a rare condition characterized by enlargement, tortuosity, or elongation of intracranial arteries. Dolichoectatic vessels can cause dysfunction of cranial nerves through direct vascular compression. The relationships of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia with the particularities of neurovascular conflict and images findings are discussed.

  18. Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy in a poodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Aparicio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A seven years old, male poodle is examined presenting acute mandible paralysis (dropped jaw, drooling and difficulty for the apprehension and chewing; not evidence of an other alteration of cranial nerves. The muscular biopsy rules out a myositisof masticatory muscles. The disorder is resolved completely in 3 weeks confirming diagnosis of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy.

  19. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE RAT MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LIEM, RSB; COPRAY, JCVM; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    The subcellular morphology of the mesencephalic trigeminal (Me5) nucleus in the rat was studied by transmission electron microscopy. Most neurons in the thin rostral as well as in the major caudal part of Me5 appeared as large (40-50-mu-m), round-to ovoid-shaped unipolar cells. A few neurons (estima

  20. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery - case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegel, W.

    1983-03-01

    The trigeminal artery is the most frequently persistent embryonic anastomosis of the carotido-basilar circle, considered to be of no clinical significance, detected only casually. However there have been reports in the relevant literature describing the pathological significance of this anastomosis in some cases.

  1. CT-guided percutaneous adriamycin injection blocking foramen ovale in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the technique and clinical value of CT-guided percutaneous adriamycin injection blocking foramen ovale in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: Sixty-three patients (24 males, 39 females; the age ranged from 43 to 77 years with a mean of 59) with trigeminal neuralgia were treated with percutaneous adriamycin injection by CT-guided foramen ovale blocking therapy. All the patients were diagnosed with typical symptoms and had been treated by medicine, and 38 of them were also treated by other operation approaches (27 by chemical medicine blocking, 7 by radiofrequency thermocoagulation, and 4 by microvascular decompression). Results: All patients were successfully treated by CT-guided adriamycin blocking therapy. Adriamycin (0.2-0.5 ml) was slowly and fractionally injected when the tip was ascertained in ganglion of foramen ovale. Instant total pain relief was obtained in 61 cases (96.8%), obvious pain relief in 1 and slight relief in 1. After the initial procedure, pain relief rate at 6 and 12 months was 84.1% and 79.4% , respectively. No serious complications occurred. Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous foramen ovale blocking therapy was a precise, non-painful, highly effective, mini-traumatic, and safe treatment, and it was also an alternative treatment to classic technique. (authors)

  2. Anodic or cathodic motor cortex stimulation for pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.; Manola, L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective. In motor cortex stimulation (MCS) for central and trigeminal pain Resume leads are placed epidurally over the motor and sensory cortex. Several bipolar combinations are used to identify the cortical target corresponding to the painful body segment. The cathode giving the largest motor r

  3. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montano N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Montano,1 Giulio Conforti,1 Rina Di Bonaventura,1 Mario Meglio,2 Eduardo Fernandez,1 Fabio Papacci1 1Institute of Neurosurgery, Catholic University, Rome, 2Institute of Neurosurgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy Abstract: Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN. Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that

  4. Capsaicin receptor immunoreactivity in the human trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Mingyan; Uddman, Rolf; Tajti, Janos;

    2002-01-01

    ) in the human trigeminal ganglion (TG). In addition, RT-PCR confirmed the presence of VR1 mRNA in the human TG. It has been hypothesized that TG neuronal cell bodies are the source of capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and hence co-localization experiments were performed....... Around 10% of the VR1 receptor-ir is expressed on neurons that contain CGRP-ir (ten among 74) in the human TG, indicating that capsaicin may act through the VR1 receptor to modulate the release of CGRP and in turn to modulate pain. We observed that 8% of the VR1 receptor-ir neuronal cell bodies contain...... and protons, and therefore it is suggested as a molecular integrator of chemical and physical stimuli that elicit pain. In the present study, indirect immunofluorescence detected a small number of neurons that are VR1 receptor immunoreactive (ir) (171 versus 1038 or 16% of all neuronal cell bodies...

  5. Treatments’ Outcomes of Patients Suffered from Trigeminal Neuralgia in Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Faryabi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Trigeminal neuralgia (TN presents with a shooting pain in maxillofacial region which compels the involved patients to visit many medical and dental physicians to relieve the pain. Hence, assessing the outcomes of different treatment modalities may help the patients and their clinicians choose a suitable practical method of treatment. Purpose: The study was aimed to evaluate the outcomes of different treatments of TN and to determine which surgical or non-surgical treatment is better for controlling the pain. Materials and Method: This study included 42 patients with trigeminal neuralgia. A questionnaire was completed for each patient in order to evaluate the pain control status of patients’ treatment with non-surgical (pharmaceutical and surgical modalities. The questionnaire consisted of questions on an datasheet, concerning the duration of involvement with the condition, type and dose of the medication(s used, the surgical technique administrated, patient satisfaction with the treatment modality and the intensity and frequency of the pain if present. The purpose of the study and the necessary information regarding the questions of the data sheet was given in detail to the patients for a careful completion of the ques-tionnaires. Data was analyzed by adopting t-test using SPSS software. Results: The results showed that the patients treated with pharmaceutical modalities had relatively lower improvement rate than those treated with surgery combined with medication (p< 0.035. Carbamazepine was the most consumed medication for pain control and the microvascular decompression was the most performed surgical method in patients. Conclusion: Although medication therapy alone was less effective than surgery combined with medication, both treatment modalities were significantly effective in controlling the pain of patients.

  6. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Amanda H.; Joe, Christopher L.; Davoodi, Auva; Takechi, Kenichi; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E.

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive TRPA1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked ...

  7. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    OpenAIRE

    Frisardi, Gianni; Iani, Cesare; Sau, Gianfranco; Frisardi, Flavio; Leonardis, Carlo; Lumbau, Aurea Maria Immacolata; Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Staderini, Enrico Maria; Chessa, Giacomo Innocenzo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods: Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcrania...

  8. Radiology of trigeminal neuralgia; With special reference to CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Shunichi; Kishikawa, Takashi; Kudo, Sho (Saga Medical School, Saga (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-05-01

    CT findings in ninty-nine patients with trigeminal neuralgia were reviewed. Brain tumors including three trigeminal neurinomas, three meningiomas, one epidermoid, one acoustic neurinoma, were found in eight cases as a cause of symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. Among seventy-nine patients with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, four cases had vascular decompression surgery because of the tortuous, ectatic or anomalous vertebrobasilar artery. Among the other seventy-five non-surgical cases, seventeen cases showed the tortuous and/or ectatic vertebrobasilar artery on CT, and this group of patients showed slightly higher recurrence rate of trigeminal neuralgia after nerve block or medication compared with other non-surgical patients. CT is thought to be a useful screening imaging modality for evaluation of patients with trigeminal neuralgia, and angiography is required for precise evaluation of the compressing vessels when surgical treatment is contemplated. (author).

  9. Pain Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction Types of Pain Pain Assessment Pain Treatments Integrative Pain Therapy Pain Management Recommendations References September 04, 2016 Pain Assessment Effective pain management begins with a comprehensive ...

  10. Capsaicin induced cough in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, M.; Mister, R; Pearson, M.; Calverley, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Cough is a common and troublesome symptom in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (CFA) but the mechanisms responsible are not known. The cough threshold to inhaled capsaicin is increased in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) where lung volumes are increased, but the relationship between cough response and symptom intensity has not been studied in CFA where lung volumes are reduced.
METHODS—Capsaicin challenge tests were performed on 15 subject...

  11. Long-Term Outcome of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Treatment of Typical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the long-term outcomes of patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS). Patients and Methods: A total of 62 consecutive patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia were treated with GKRS between 1998 and 2004. Of the 62 patients, 2 were lost to follow-up; the remaining 60 patients were followed for >12 months. The mean prescribed maximal dose was 79.7 Gy (range, 75-80), using a 4-mm shot. Results: Of the 60 patients, 48 were followed for >4 years. An additional 3 patients, followed for 70 years correlated with a favorable outcome in terms of pain recurrence after radiosurgery (hazard ratio, 0.125; 95% confidence interval, 0.016-0.975; p = .047) on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: GKRS seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia considering the initial response rate; however, fewer than one-half of patients might continue to benefit from GKRS after long-term follow-up. Elderly patients might be good candidates for radiosurgery considering the long-term durability of efficacy.

  12. Surgical treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia through small incision behind the ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-jie XIE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 3000 cases with primary trigeminal neuralgia were treated in our department from October 2005 to November 2013 by microvascular decompression or partial amputation of the sensory branch of trigeminal nerve. The clinical cure rate reached 98.66% (2863 cases, and the effective rate was 0.55% (16 cases, ineffective rate 0.45% (13 cases. The recurrence rate was about 0.35% (10 cases. The main postoperative complication was intracranial hypotension syndrome (40.50% , 1215 cases, which disappeared 2 or 3 d later. The other serious complications included encephaledema (1.40%, 42 cases, cerebral hemorrhage (0.20%, 6 cases and ischemic stroke (0.07%, 2 cases. In conclusion, microvascular decompression is an effective and safe operation method in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia, and most patients' pain can be eliminated or alleviated after surgery. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.016

  13. Primary care incidence and treatment of four neuropathic pain conditions: A descriptive study, 2002–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Dawn

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between 1992 and 2001 the UK general practice incidence of post-herpetic neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia declined, whilst the incidence of painful diabetic neuropathy increased. The most common first line treatments were compound analgesics. As therapeutic options have subsequently changed, this study presents updated data on incidence and prescribing patterns in neuropathic pain. Methods A descriptive analysis of the epidemiology and prescription treatment at diagnosis of incident post-herpetic neuralgia (n = 1,923; trigeminal neuralgia (1,862; phantom limb pain (57 and painful diabetic neuropathy (1,444 using computerised UK general practice records (THIN: May 2002 to July 2005. Results Primary care incidences per 100,000 person years observation of 28 (95% confidence interval (CI 27–30 for post-herpetic neuralgia, 27 (95%CI 26–29 for trigeminal neuralgia, 0.8 (95%CI 0.6–1.1 for phantom limb pain and 21 (95%CI 20–22 for painful diabetic neuropathy are reported. The most common initial treatments were tricyclic antidepressants (post-herpetic neuralgia or antiepileptics (trigeminal neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy and opioid analgesics (phantom limb pain. The mean number of changes before a stable drug regimen was 1.2 to 1.5 for trigeminal neuralgia, painful diabetic neuropathy and post-herpetic neuralgia, and 2.4 for phantom limb pain. Conclusion The incidence of phantom limb pain and post-herpetic neuralgia are decreasing whilst painful diabetic neuropathy plateaued and trigeminal neuralgia remained constant. Despite more frequent use of antidepressants and antiepileptics for first line treatment, as opposed to conventional non-opioid analgesics, changes to therapy are common before a stable regimen is reached.

  14. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout m...

  15. Severe Radiation Necrosis Successfully Treated With Bevacizumab in an Infant with Low-Grade Glioma and Tumor-Associated Intractable Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay Smiley, Natasha; Alden, Tord; Hartsell, William; Fangusaro, Jason

    2016-09-01

    We present a unique case of radiation necrosis in a child with brain stem low-grade glioma (LGG) presenting with trigeminal neuralgia. Despite extensive therapies, severe pain persisted. She received proton beam radiation with significant improvement. However, she developed radiation necrosis and hydrocephalus. Despite surgical correction of hydrocephalus, the patient remained critically ill. She was treated with dexamethasone and bevacizumab with rapid clinical improvement. Subsequent MRIs revealed almost complete resolution of the necrosis. This case illustrates the successful treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with radiation and a rare case of radiation necrosis in an LGG successfully treated with bevacizumab and dexamethasone. PMID:27187113

  16. Case report: successful treatment of a patient with trigeminal neuropathy using ziconotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Eberhard Albert

    2010-04-01

    A 50-year-old female patient with chronic neuropathic pain in the distribution of the second branch of the trigeminal nerve was unsuccessfully treated over several years. Intrathecal therapy with ziconotide was administered at an initial dose of 0.33 microg/d, which was gradually increased by 0.7 microg/d. Subjective pain on the numeric rating scale was reduced from 9/10 to 3-4/10 at a dose of 6.3 microg/d. Long-term treatment was continued at a ziconotide concentration of 12.5 microg/mL and a daily dose of 3.9 microg/d by a SynchroMed Infusion System (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). Pain reduction was maintained in the follow-up observation period over 5 months. PMID:20142352

  17. MRI 3D CISS– A Novel Imaging Modality in Diagnosing Trigeminal Neuralgia – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besta, Radhika; Shankar, Y. Uday; Kumar, Ashwini; Prakash, S. Bhanu

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) is considered as one of the most painful neurologic disorders affecting oro-facial region. TN is often diagnosed clinically based on the patients complete history of pain (severity, duration, episodes etc), relief of pain on test dose of Carbamazepine, regional block of long acting anaesthetic. However, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important and confirmatory role in showing Neuro Vascular Conflict (NVC) which is the commonest causative factor for TN. This article reviews the effectiveness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state (3D-CISS) MRI in diagnosing the exact location, degree of neurovascular conflict responsible for classical as well as atypical TN and possible pre-treatment evaluation and treatment outcome. PMID:27135019

  18. MRI 3D CISS- A Novel Imaging Modality in Diagnosing Trigeminal Neuralgia - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besta, Radhika; Shankar, Y Uday; Kumar, Ashwini; Rajasekhar, E; Prakash, S Bhanu

    2016-03-01

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN) is considered as one of the most painful neurologic disorders affecting oro-facial region. TN is often diagnosed clinically based on the patients complete history of pain (severity, duration, episodes etc), relief of pain on test dose of Carbamazepine, regional block of long acting anaesthetic. However, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) plays an important and confirmatory role in showing Neuro Vascular Conflict (NVC) which is the commonest causative factor for TN. This article reviews the effectiveness of three-dimensional constructive interference in steady-state (3D-CISS) MRI in diagnosing the exact location, degree of neurovascular conflict responsible for classical as well as atypical TN and possible pre-treatment evaluation and treatment outcome. PMID:27135019

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia--a prospective systematic study of clinical characteristics in 158 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Gozalov, Aydin; Olesen, Jes;

    2014-01-01

     = .043. It affected solely the second and/or third trigeminal branch in 109 (69%) while the first branch alone was affected in only 7 (4%). Notably, 78 (49%) had concomitant persistent pain in addition to paroxysmal stabbing pain. Autonomic symptoms were present in 48 (31%). Patients who had...... not undergone surgery for TN had sensory abnormalities in 35 (29%). CONCLUSIONS: This, the first study in a series of papers focusing on the clinical, radiological, and etiological aspects of TN, revealed that the symptomatology of TN includes a high percentage of concomitant persistent pain, autonomic symptoms......, and sensory abnormalities. These findings offer new insights to the prevailing clinical impression of the clinical characteristics in TN....

  20. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias: paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT/SUNA, and hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J; Cittadini, Elisabetta; Cohen, Anna S

    2010-04-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders that include cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing/cranial autonomic features (SUNCT/SUNA). Hemicrania continua (HC) is often included with this group, although the second edition of The International Classification of Headache Disorders did not link the entities. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias are generally characterized by relatively short-lasting attacks of severe pain and lateralized associated features including the pain, cranial autonomic symptoms, and where present, migrainous symptoms, such as photophobia. Paroxysmal hemicrania has intermediate duration and intermediate attack frequency. Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing has the shortest attack duration and the highest attack frequency. Hemicrania continua has a continuous pain with exacerbations that can include cranial autonomic symptoms as part of the phenotype. The syndromes share much in their pathophysiology and investigation paths; however, their treatment is distinct, so that the accurate differentiation is important for optimal management.

  1. Trigeminal perineural spread of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornik, Alejandro; Rosenblum, Jordan; Biller, Jose [Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Medical Center, Chicago (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A 55-year-old man had a five-day history of 'pins and needles' sensation on the left chin. Examination showed decreased pinprick sensation on the territory of the left mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium showed enhancement involving the left mandibular branch. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a left kidney mass diagnosed as renal carcinoma following nephrectomy. The 'numb-chin' syndrome heralds or accompanies systemic malignancies. Trigeminal perineural spread has been well-documented in head and neck neoplasms, however, to our knowledge, it has not been reported in renal neoplasms. (author)

  2. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation rhizotomy for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia after microvascular decompression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Liang-wen; LIU Yu-guang; WU Cheng-yuan; XU Shu-jun; ZHU Shu-gan

    2011-01-01

    Background Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a well accepted surgical treatment strategy for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) with satisfying long-term outcome.However,considerable recurrent patients need more effective management.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of radiofrequency thermocoagulation rhizotomy (RTR) on patients with recurrent TN after MVD.Methods Totally 62 cases of recurrent TN after MVD undergoing RTR from January 2000 to January 2010 were retrospectively evaluated.Based on surgical procedures undertaken,these 62 cases were classified into two subgroups:group A consisted of 23 cases that underwent traditional RTR by free-hand; group B consisted of 39 cases that underwent RTR under the guidance of virtual reality imaging technique or neuronavigation system.The patients in group Awere followed up for 14 to 70 months (mean,40±4),and those in group B were followed up for 13 to 65 months (mean,46±7).Kaplan-Meier analyses of the pain-free survival curves were used for the censored survival data,and the log-rank test was used to compare survival curves of the two groups.Results All patients in both groups A and B attained immediate pain relief after RTR.Both groups attained good pain relief rate within the first two years of follow-up:92.3%,84.6% and 82.6%,69.6% respectively (P >0.05).After 2 years,the virtual reality or neuronavigation assisted RTR group (group B) demonstrated higher pain relief rates of 82.5%,76.2% and 68.8% at 3,4 and 5 years after operation respectively,while those in group A was 57.2%,49.6%,and 36.4% (P <0.05).Low levels of minor complications were recorded,while neither mortalities nor significant morbidity was documented.Conclusions RTR was effective in alleviating the pain of TN cases suffering from unsuccessful MVD management.With the help of virtual reality imaging technique or neuronavigation system,the patients could attain better long-term pain relief.

  3. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life. PMID:25190337

  4. THE EFFECT OF EXPRESSION OF CONNEXIN 40 IN TRIGEMINAL GANGLION AND PAIN THRESHOLD FOLLOWING ELECTRICAL STIMULATION ON SUPERLOR SAGITTAL SINUS%电刺激硬脑膜对三叉神经节连接蛋白40表达和痛阈的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志奎; 薛刘军; 叶青; 刘沙; 刘欣; 武文卉; 万琪

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨三叉神经节中连接蛋白40在偏头痛发作中的临床意义.方法:将健康成年SD大鼠随机分为假手术组、对照组、实验Oh组、实验12h组、实验24h组、实验48h组,采用电刺激大鼠上矢状窦区硬脑膜模型.应用免疫荧光和Western blot技术观察各组三叉神经节连接蛋白40表达,应用von frey纤维丝测定大鼠眼周皮肤的痛觉阈值.结果:免疫荧光显示实验Oh组、实验12h组、实验24h组连接蛋白40的表达均高于假手术组、对照组和实验48h组,于12h达表达高峰(P<0.05).各组左右侧无统计学差异(P>0.05).Western blot显示实验Oh组、实验12h组、实验24h组连接蛋白40的表达均高于假手术组、对照组及实验48h组(P<0.05).各组左右侧无统计学差异(P>0.05),于12h达表达高峰.Von Frey纤维丝测定显示实验组大鼠实验前1h、实验刺激后2h、12h、24h、48h左、右眼周皮肤的痛觉阈值呈先下降后上升的趋势,于12h达低点,48h基本恢复正常.结论:电刺激大鼠上矢状窦区硬脑膜可上调三叉神经节连接蛋白40的表达,降低大鼠面部的痛觉阈值,增强面部的痛觉敏化,表明连接蛋白40在偏头痛的发生及发展中可能起到一定作用.%Objective: To investigate the role of connexin 40 of trigeminal ganglion in migraine attack. Methods: Healthy adult SD rats were randomly divided into sham surgery group, control group, experimental group which according to different investigate time following the stimulation of rat dual matter adjacent to the superior sagittal sinus to divided into four subgroups. The changes in expression of connexin 40 of each group using immunofluorescence technique and Western blot analysis were observed. The pain threshold of periorbital skin using von Frey hair to monitor was also evaluated. Results: Immunofluorescence showed that the connexin 40 expression of experimental 0 h group, experimental 12 h group, experimental 24 h group

  5. Aortic arch vessel anomalies associated with persistent trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Foroughi, Amin Abolhasani

    2012-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and persistent trigeminal artery that is the most common of the four anomalous carotid-basilar anastomoses are repeatedly reported in the literature as separate entities. Herein we report a previously undescribed variant including the coexistence of persistent trigeminal artery, truncus bicaroticus and direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch. PMID:22542381

  6. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Analysis of a multi institutional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-institutional study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Eleven hundred and thirty-five patients at 39 centers were analyzed. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients had undergone percutaneous nerve block and 173 patients had undergone microvascular decompression (MVD) prior to GKRS. GKRS was performed for 69.4% of patients targeted at the nerve root entry zone (REZ) and for 20.4% of patients targeted at the retrogasserian region (RGR). The target dose of the GKRS used in the current study varied from 70 to 90 Gy (mean: 77.8 Gy). The median follow-up period after GKRS was 21.1 months (range 1 to 125 months). Six hundred and eighty-nine patients (66%) responded with excellent or good control (pain free), 157 (15%) obtained fair control (more than 50% relief), and 192 (19%) experienced treatment failure. After 3 years, 64% of cases were pain free and 80% had more than 50% pain relief. After 4 years, 37 patients underwent additional GKRS, 36 MVD and 36 percutaneous nerve block. Tolerable hypoesthesia or paresthesia occurred in 129 patients (11%), whereas bothersome symptoms developed in 8 patients (1%). But no patient developed deafferentation pain. Nine patients (1%) complained of dry eye, but no other abnormalities of the cornea and conjunctiva were found on ophthalmological examination. Higher maximum radiosurgical dose was associated with a significantly greater factor of complete pain relief (p=0.0101). GKRS is a safe and effective alternative treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, and is a minimally invasive treatment. In addition it provided benefit to a patient population unwilling or unable to undergo more invasive surgical approaches. (author)

  7. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R; Eliav, Eli

    2015-10-01

    Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  8. Glutamate dysregulation in the trigeminal ganglion: a novel mechanism for peripheral sensitization of the craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, J C; Cairns, B E; Dong, X D; Kumar, U; Somvanshi, R K; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Gazerani, P

    2014-01-01

    In the trigeminal ganglion (TG), satellite glial cells (SGCs) form a functional unit with neurons. It has been proposed that SGCs participate in regulating extracellular glutamate levels and that dysfunction of this SGC capacity can impact nociceptive transmission in craniofacial pain conditions. This study investigated whether SGCs release glutamate and whether elevation of TG glutamate concentration alters response properties of trigeminal afferent fibers. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess glutamate content and the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)1 and EAAT2 in TG sections. SGCs contained glutamate and expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2. Potassium chloride (10 mM) was used to evoke glutamate release from cultured rat SGCs treated with the EAAT1/2 inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)ben zoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA) or control. Treatment with TFB-TBOA (1 and 10 μM) significantly reduced the glutamate concentration from 10.6 ± 1.1 to 5.8 ± 1.4 μM and 3.0 ± 0.8 μM, respectively (pTFB-TBOA, whereas mechanical sensitization was only sensitive to APV. Antidromic invasion of muscle afferent fibers by electrical stimulation of the caudal brainstem (10 Hz) or local anesthesia of the brainstem with lidocaine did not alter glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. These findings provide a novel mechanism whereby dysfunctional trigeminal SGCs could contribute to cranial muscle tenderness in craniofacial pain conditions such as migraine headache. PMID:24144624

  9. Magnetic resonance tomographic angiography: diagnostic value in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of MRI, MR angiography and MR tomographic angiography (MRTA) was used to study the relationship of the root exit zone of the trigeminal nerve to surrounding vascular structures in seven patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and ten patients with no evidence at a lesion in this region. MRTA is the technique for showing the relationship between vessels, cranial nerves and brain stem. MRTA clearly demonstrated the presence of a vessel at the root exit zone of the trigeminal nerve in all patients with TN. In the ten other patients, examination of 20 trigeminal nerves revealed that only one nerve (5%) was in contact with a vessel at the root exit zone. This study supports vascular compression of trigeminal nerves as a cause of TN, and demonstrates the value of MRTA as noninvasive technique for demonstrating compression. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance tomographic angiography: diagnostic value in trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umehara, F. [Third Dept. of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan); Kamishima, K. [Div. of Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan); Kashio, N. [Third Dept. of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan); Yamaguchi, K. [Div. of Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan); Sakimoto, T.; Osame, M. [Third Dept. of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima Univ. (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A combination of MRI, MR angiography and MR tomographic angiography (MRTA) was used to study the relationship of the root exit zone of the trigeminal nerve to surrounding vascular structures in seven patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and ten patients with no evidence at a lesion in this region. MRTA is the technique for showing the relationship between vessels, cranial nerves and brain stem. MRTA clearly demonstrated the presence of a vessel at the root exit zone of the trigeminal nerve in all patients with TN. In the ten other patients, examination of 20 trigeminal nerves revealed that only one nerve (5%) was in contact with a vessel at the root exit zone. This study supports vascular compression of trigeminal nerves as a cause of TN, and demonstrates the value of MRTA as noninvasive technique for demonstrating compression. (orig.)

  11. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: the initial experience of the Barrow Neurological Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy and complications of Gamma Knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) Gamma Knife facility has been operational since March 17, 1997. A total of 557 patients have been treated, 89 for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This report includes the first 54 TN patients with follow-up exceeding 3 months. Patients were treated with Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) in uniform fashion according to two sequential protocols. The first 41 patients received 35 Gy prescribed to the 50% isodose via a single 4-mm isocenter targeting the ipsilateral trigeminal nerve adjacent to the pons. The dose was increased to 40 Gy for the remaining 13 patients; however, the other parameters were unvaried. Outcome was evaluated by each patient using a standardized questionnaire. Pain before and after RS was scored as level I-IV per our newly-developed BNI pain intensity scoring criteria (I: no pain; II: occasional pain, not requiring medication; III: some pain, controlled with medication; IV: some pain, not controlled with medication; V: severe pain/no pain relief). Complications, limited to mild facial numbness, were similarly graded by a BNI scoring system. Results: Among our 54 TN patients, 52 experienced pain relief, BNI score I in 19 (35%), II in 3 (6%), III in 26 (48%), and IV in 4 (7%). Two patients (4%) reported no relief (BNI score V). Median follow-up was 12 months (range 3-28). Median time to onset of pain relief was 15 days (range 0-192), and to maximal relief 63 days (range 0-253). Seventeen (31%) noted immediate improvement (≤ 24 h). Prior to RS, all patients were on pharmacologic therapy felt to be optimal or maximal. Twenty-two (41%) were able to stop medications entirely (BNI score I or II). Another 16 (30%), with BNI Score III relief, decreased medication intake by at least 50%. Patients with classical TN pain symptoms were more likely to stop medications than those with

  12. Trigeminal neuralgia: how often are trigeminal nerve-vessel contacts found by MRI in normal volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess prospectively how often contacts are found between the trigeminal nerve and arteries or veins in the perimesencephalic cistern via MRI in normal volunteers. Materials and methods: 48 volunteers without a history of trigeminal neuralgia were examined prospectively (MRI at 1.5T; T2-CISS sequence, coronal orientation, 0.9 mm slice thickness). Two radiologists decided by consensus whether there was a nerve-vessel contact in the perimesencephalic cistern. Results: In 27% of the volunteers, no contact was found between the trigeminal nerve and regional vessels, while in 73%, such a contact was present. In 61% of the cases, the offending vessel was an artery, in 39%, it was a vein. In 2 volunteers, a deformation of the nerve was noted. Conclusion: Contrary to what has been suggested by retrospective studies, the majority of normal volunteers, if studied prospectively, do show a contact between the trigeminal nerve and local vessels. A close proximity between the nerve and regional vessels is thus normal and is not necessarily proof of a pathological nerve-vessel conflict. (orig.)

  13. Efficacy and Quality of Life Outcomes in Patients With Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Treated With Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess efficacy and quality of life (QOL) outcomes associated with gamma-knife radiosurgery (GK-RS) in treating atypical trigeminal neuralgia (ATN) compared with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN). Methods and Materials: Between September 1996 and September 2004, 35 cases of ATN were treated with GK-RS. Patients were categorized into two groups: Group I comprised patients presenting with ATN (57%); Group II consisted of patients presenting with CTN then progressing to ATN (43%). Median prescription dose 75 Gy (range, 70-80 Gy) was delivered to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. Treatment efficacy and QOL improvements were assessed with a standardized questionnaire. Results: With median follow-up of 29 months (range, 3-74 months), 72% reported excellent/good outcomes, with mean time to relief of 5.8 weeks (range, 0-24 weeks) and mean duration of relief of 62 weeks (range, 1-163 weeks). This rate of pain relief is similar to rate achieved in our previously reported experience treating CTN with GK-RS (p = 0.36). There was a trend toward longer time to relief (p = 0.059), and shorter duration of relief (p = 0.067) in patients with ATN. There was no difference in rate of, time to, or duration of pain relief between Groups I and II. Of the patients with ATN, 88% discontinued or decreased the use of pain medications. Among the patients with sustained pain relief, QOL improved an average of 85%. Conclusion: This is the largest reported GK-RS experience for the treatment of ATN. Patients with ATN can achieve rates of pain relief similar to those in patients with CTN. Further follow-up is necessary to assess adequately the durability of response

  14. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain' most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of 'orofacial pain' are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of 'orofacial pain' remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of 'atypical odontalgia'. 'Atypical odontalgia' is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. 'Atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia' can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in 'atypical orofacial pain' and 'atypical odontalgia'. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain. PMID:26464604

  15. Insular cortex representation of dynamic mechanical allodynia in trigeminal neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Pedro; Dieb, Wisam; Hafidi, Aziz; Voisin, Daniel L; Dallel, Radhouane

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical allodynia is a widespread symptom of neuropathic pain for which mechanisms are still poorly understood. The present study investigated the organization of dynamic mechanical allodynia processing in the rat insular cortex after chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (IoN-CCI). Two weeks after unilateral IoN-CCI, rats showed a dramatic bilateral trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia. Light, moving stroking of the infraorbital skin resulted in strong, bilateral upregulation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation (pERK-1/2) in the insular cortex of IoN-CCI animals but not sham rats, in whose levels were similar to those of unstimulated IoN-CCI rats. pERK-1/2 was located in neuronal cells only. Stimulus-evoked pERK-1/2 immunopositive cell bodies displayed rostrocaudal gradient and layer selective distribution in the insula, being predominant in the rostral insula and in layers II-III of the dysgranular and to a lesser extent, of the agranular insular cortex. In layers II-III of the rostral dysgranular insular cortex, intense pERK also extended into distal dendrites, up to layer I. These results demonstrate that trigeminal nerve injury induces a significant alteration in the insular cortex processing of tactile stimuli and suggest that ERK phosphorylation contributes to the mechanisms underlying abnormal pain perception under this condition.

  16. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbay, Sami H.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.; Gupta, Punita; O' Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Riesenburger, Ron [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X{sup 2}=7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  17. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X2=7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  18. The Neuropharmacology of Cluster Headache and other Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alfredo; Antonaci, Fabio; Ramusino, Matteo Cotta; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headaches including cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Another form, hemicrania continua (HC), is also included this group due to its clinical and pathophysiological similarities. CH is the most common of these syndromes, the others being infrequent in the general population. The pathophysiology of the TACs has been partly elucidated by a number of recent neuroimaging studies, which implicate brain regions associated with nociception (pain matrix). In addition, the hypothalamic activation observed in the course of TAC attacks and the observed efficacy of hypothalamic neurostimulation in CH patients suggest that the hypothalamus is another key structure. Hypothalamic activation may indeed be involved in attack initiation, but it may also lead to a condition of central facilitation underlying the recurrence of pain episodes. The TACs share many pathophysiological features, but are characterised by differences in attack duration and frequency, and to some extent treatment response. Although alternative strategies for the TACs, especially CH, are now emerging (such as neurostimulation techniques), this review focuses on the available pharmacological treatments complying with the most recent guidelines. We discuss the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the currently used drugs. Due to the low frequency of most TACs, few randomised controlled trials have been conducted. The therapies of choice in CH continue to be the triptans and oxygen for acute treatment, and verapamil and lithium for prevention, but promising results have recently been obtained with novel modes of administration of the triptans and other agents, and several other treatments are currently under study. Indomethacin is extremely effective in PH and HC, while antiepileptic drugs (especially lamotrigine) appear to be

  19. Differential Effects of NGF and NT-3 on Embryonic Trigeminal Axon Growth Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Ulupinar, Emel; Jacquin, Mark F.; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) on trigeminal axon growth patterns. Embryonic (E13–15) wholemount explants of the rat trigeminal pathway including the whisker pads, trigeminal ganglia, and brainstem were cultured in serum-free medium (SFM) or SFM supplemented with NGF or NT-3 for 3 days. Trigeminal axon growth patterns were analyzed with the use of lipophilic tracer DiI. In wholemount cultures grown in SFM, trigeminal axon projectio...

  20. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-ping

    2013-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of...

  1. Astrocytes are involved in trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia: potential role of D-serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieb, W; Hafidi, A

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of study on the neuronal processing of pain, mechanisms underlying enhanced pain states after injury remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent changes play a critical role in triggering central sensitization in neuropathic pain. These receptors are regulated at the glycine site through a mandatory endogenous co-agonist D-serine, which is synthesized by astrocytes. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine whether astrocytes are involved, through D-serine secretion, in dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) obtained after chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-IoN) in rats. Two weeks after CCI-IoN, an important reaction of astrocytes was present in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as revealed by an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in allodynic rats. In parallel, an increase in D-serine synthesis, which co-localized with its synthesis enzyme serine racemase, was strictly observed in astrocytes. Blocking astrocyte metabolism by intracisternal delivery of fluorocitrate alleviated DMA. Furthermore, the administration of D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO), a D-serine-degrading enzyme, or that of L-serine O-sulfate (LSOS), a serine racemase inhibitor, significantly decreased pain behavior in allodynic rats. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are involved in the modulation of orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain via the release of the gliotransmitter D-serine.

  2. Facial Pain Update: Advances in Neurostimulation for the Treatment of Facial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniam, Rajivan; Kaye, Alan David; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    Craniofacial pain, including trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain, and persistent idiopathic facial pain, is difficult to treat and can have severe implications for suffering in patients afflicted with these conditions. In recent years, clinicians have moved beyond treating solely with pharmacological therapies, which are generally not very effective, and focused on new interventional pain procedures. These procedures have evolved as technology has advanced, and thus far, early results have demonstrated efficacy in small patient cohorts with a variety of craniofacial pain states. Some of the most promising interventional pain procedures include peripheral nerve field stimulation, high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. This review focuses on a better understanding of craniofacial pain and emerging interventional pain therapies. With the advent of newer miniature wireless devices and less invasive implantation techniques, this should allow for more widespread use of neurostimulation as a therapeutic modality for treating craniofacial pain. Larger studies should assist in best practice strategies vis-à-vis traditional pharmacological therapies and emerging interventional pain techniques. PMID:26896948

  3. Percutaneous balloon compression for primary trigeminal neuralgia in patients older than 80 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanfeng Du; Qiao Gu; Dingbo Yang; Xiaoqiao Dong; Quan Du; Hao Wang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been demonstrated that the incidence of trigeminal neuralgia in elderly patients is higher and thus, neurosurgeons often encounter elderly patients with this disorder.However, for those with poor basic condition, the optimal surgical treatment remains controversial.In this study, the authors aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) for primary trigeminal neuralgia in elderly patients older than 80 years.Methods: From September 2009 to March 2013, a total of 68 patients older than 80 years underwent PBC, and a retrospective study of the clinical data of these patients was performed.Results: After PBC, pain relief was immediate in 66 (97.0 %) patients, 1 (1.5 %) patient had no pain relief, and 1 (1.5 %) patient had some pain that could be controlled with medication.With a mean length of follow-up of 40.1 months, ranging from 24 to 66 months after surgery, 55 (80.9 %) patients were still pain free.Of the 11 patients with recurrence, 9 cases had mild recurrence and 2 cases suffered severe recurrence.The mean time to recurrence was 18.9 months (1-64 months).Postoperative morbidity included common side effects such as facial numbness in 66 (97.1%) patients, masseter muscle weakness in 19 (27.9 %) patients, paresthesia in 7 (10.3 %) patients, and diplopia secondary to abducens nerve weakness in 1 (1.5 %) patient.No corneal anesthesia, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or other serious surgical complications occurred in this study.Conclusions: In this study, the authors reviewed data on a cohort of patient older than 80 years.The PBC procedure has advantages in that it is minimally invasive, safe, effective, and could be performed under general anesthesia.This makes it an optimized choice for elderly patients.

  4. Hemicrania continua. Unquestionably a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Maurice B

    2013-05-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a well-known primary headache. The present version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders lists HC in the "other primary headaches" group. However, evidence has emerged demonstrating that HC is a phenotype that belongs to the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias together with cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), and short-lasting, unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. This is supported by a common general clinical picture - paroxysmal, fluctuating, unilateral, side-locked headaches located to the ocular, frontal, and/or temporal regions, accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic dysfunctions including for example, tearing and conjunctival injection. Apart from the remarkable clinical similarities, the absolute and incomparable effect of indomethacin in HC parallels the effect of this drug in PH, suggesting a shared core pathogenesis. Finally, neuroimage findings demonstrate a posterior hypothalamic activation in HC similarly to cluster headache, PH, and short-lasting, unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. Taken together, data indicate that HC is certainly a type of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia that should no longer be placed in a group of miscellaneous primary headache disorders.

  5. The diagnostic value of MR examination in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microneurovascular compression may produce symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia. MR examination in T-1 weighted SE, sagittal and coronal images, in slice thickness less than 3 mm, is a valuable method to demonstrate neurovascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia. Authors defined microneurovascular compression syndrome when the 5. nerve was in contact with a vessel in root entry zone. 13 patients with clinical symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia were examined, 6 of them presented MR symptoms of neurovascular compression. The operative treatment was evaluated in 2 patients (with absence of pre-operative symptoms was achieved following microvascular decompression all patients who had surgery. (author)

  6. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurus Marques de Almeida Holanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  7. Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery: An Unusual Cause of Vascular Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications.

  8. Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery: An Unusual Cause of Vascular Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Arundeep; Jana, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications. PMID:24459596

  9. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: an unusual cause of vascular tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Ananya; Arora, Arundeep; Jana, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications. PMID:24459596

  10. Does nociceptin play a role in pain disorders in man?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Hanne; Hommel, Kristine; Uddman, Rolf;

    2002-01-01

    Nociceptin-immunoreactive cellbodies were detected in the human trigeminal ganglion, while no such fibers were identified in the temporal artery or in dermal tissue from the neck region. In four healthy subjects receiving nociceptin into the temporal muscle in an open labeled design no pain was d...

  11. Сhanges of eeg correlation dimension by trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly P. Omelchenko

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the nonlinear analysis of brain bioelectric activity by trigeminal neuralgia. Paid attention to the comparison of patient’s and health people’s EEG correlation dimension.

  12. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Maurus Marques de Almeida Holanda; Normando Guedes Pereira Neto; Gustavo de Moura Peixoto; Rayan Haquim Pinheiro Santos

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery an...

  13. Digital subtraction angiography of a persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Unlü, Ercüment; Cağli, Bekir; Ozdemir, Hüseyin; Demir, M Kemal

    2010-09-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery variants are described as cerebellar arteries that directly originate from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. This has been observed in 0.18% of cerebral catheter angiograms. On the other hand, a persistent trigeminal artery variant feeding both the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory is very rare. We present this uncommon anomalous artery along with digital subtraction angiography findings and discuss its clinical significance in light of the literature. PMID:19821254

  14. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  15. 继发于脑积水的三叉神经痛%Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to hydrocephalus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘江; 于炎冰; 赵曙虹; 张黎; 赵奎明; 徐晓利; 刘红举; 张哲; 袁越

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics,pathogenesis,surgical treatment and efficacy of rare trigeminal neuralgia secondary to hydrocephalus.Methods Five patients with trigeminal neuralgia secondary to hydrocephalus were analyzed retrospectively from January 2009 to July 2013.The MRI of brain showed hydrocephalus with Chiari's malformation in 1 case,and significant expansion of the lateral ventricle accompanying with normal morphology of the fourth ventricle in the other four cases.All patients underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting (VPs).Results Trigeminal neuralgia was completely disappeared in these five patients:the facial pain disappeared immediately in 2 patients and disappeared after 3 days with VPs in 3 patients.There was no surgical complication.During follow-up,the ventricular system returned to normal,without recurrence of trigeminal neuralgia.Conclusions Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to hydrocephalus was rare.Surgical treatment of hydrocephalus might be the first choice of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia with hydrocephalus.%目的 探讨临床少见的继发于幕上脑积水的三叉神经痛的发病机制、临床特点、治疗方式和疗效.方法 回顾性分析2009年1月2013年7月中日友好医院收治的5例继发于脑积水的三叉神经痛患者,其中1例脑积水合并Chiari's畸形,另4例头颅MRI示幕上脑室系统明显扩张而第四脑室形态基本正常,均行脑室-腹腔分流术.结果 本组5例患者术后三叉神经痛症状完全消失,2例患者脑室腹腔分流术后面部疼痛立即消失,另3例患者面部疼痛均在3d之内消失,无手术并发症.随访期间所有患者脑室系统均恢复正常,三叉神经痛症状无复发.结论 继发于脑积水的三叉神经痛临床上罕见,对于合并脑积水的三叉神经痛患者可首先进行脑积水的外科治疗.

  16. Aetiology and Pathogenesis of Trigeminal Neuralgia: a Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintautas Sabalys

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of present paper was to discuss issues related to trigeminal neuralgia with strong emphasis on the aetiology and pathogenesis of this problem. Material and Methods: An electronic search of 5 databases (1965 - Oct 2012 and a hand search of peer-reviewed journals for relevant articles were performed. In addition, experience acquired from treating 3263 patients in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, were also summarized. Results: Generally, aetiological factors can be classified into 3 most popular theories that were based on: 1 Related to other disease, 2 Direct injury to the trigeminal nerve, and 3 Propagates the polyetiologic origin of the disease. In addition, two pathogenesis mechanisms of trigeminal neuralgia were proposed. First: the peripheral pathogenetic mechanism that is often induced by progressive dystrophy around the peripheral branches of the trigeminal nerve. Second, central pathogenetic mechanism which often triggered by peripheral pathogen that causes long-lasting afferent impulsation and the formation of a stable pathologic paroxysmal type irritation focus on the central nerve system (CNS. Conclusions: Patients with susceptive trigeminal neuralgia should be examined carefully by specialists who have expertise in assessing and diagnosing of possible pathological processes and be able to eliminate the contributing factors so the trigeminal neuralgia can be properly managed.

  17. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by the vertebral artery associated with primitive trigeminal artery and agenesis of the internal carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, M; Kameyama, S; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, R

    1998-06-01

    A 69-year-old female presented with trigeminal neuralgia caused by tortuous vertebrobasilar artery associated with primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and agenesis of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery (ICA). Left vertebral angiography showed marked elongation of the left vertebral artery and filling of the left ICA via the PTA. Bone window computed tomography suggested agenesis of the left ICA. Intraoperative findings showed that the vertebrobasilar junction had compressed the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve. The neuralgia improved immediately after microvascular decompression. There has been no recurrence for 20 months. Trigeminal neuralgia may be caused by a tortuous vertebrobasilar system due to hemodynamic stress associated with PTA and agenesis of the ICA. PMID:9689822

  18. Eugenol inhibits the GABAA current in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Jee Youn; Jung, Sung Jun; Kang, Jin Gu; Choi, Seung Pyo; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol has sedative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects, but also serves as an irritant through the regulation of a different set of ion channels. Activation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on sensory neurons leads to the stabilization of neuronal excitability but contributes to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined the effect of eugenol on the GABA-induced current in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor α1β2γ2 subtype using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit mRNA and protein in the TG and hippocampus. Eugenol decreased the amplitude ratio of the GABA-induced current to 27.5 ± 3.2% (p eugenol inhibited GABA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. Application of eugenol also decreased the GABA response in the presence of a G-protein blocker. Eugenol pretreatment with different concentrations of GABA resulted in similar inhibition of the GABA-induced current in a non-competitive manner. In conclusion, eugenol inhibits the GABA-induced current in TG neurons and HEK 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor in a reversible, dose-dependent, and non-competitive manner, but not via the G-protein pathway. We suggest that the GABAA receptor could be a molecular target for eugenol in the modulation of nociceptive information.

  19. Diagnostic and therapeutic errors in trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and hemicrania continua: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Michele; Tassorelli, Cristina; Allena, Marta; Nappi, Giuseppe; Sjaastad, Ottar; Antonaci, Fabio

    2013-02-18

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and hemicrania continua (HC) are relatively rare but clinically rather well-defined primary headaches. Despite the existence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria (The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition - ICHD-II) and several therapeutic guidelines, errors in workup and treatment of these conditions are frequent in clinical practice. We set out to review all available published data on mismanagement of TACs and HC patients in order to understand and avoid its causes. The search strategy identified 22 published studies. The most frequent errors described in the management of patients with TACs and HC are: referral to wrong type of specialist, diagnostic delay, misdiagnosis, and the use of treatments without overt indication. Migraine with and without aura, trigeminal neuralgia, sinus infection, dental pain and temporomandibular dysfunction are the disorders most frequently overdiagnosed. Even when the clinical picture is clear-cut, TACs and HC are frequently not recognized and/or mistaken for other disorders, not only by general physicians, dentists and ENT surgeons, but also by neurologists and headache specialists. This seems to be due to limited knowledge of the specific characteristics and variants of these disorders, and it results in the unnecessary prescription of ineffective and sometimes invasive treatments which may have negative consequences for patients. Greater knowledge of and education about these disorders, among both primary care physicians and headache specialists, might contribute to improving the quality of life of TACs and HC patients.

  20. Feasibility of Multiple Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgeries for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy C. Jones

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for trigeminal neuralgia (TN must be customized for the individual patient, and physicians must be aware of the medical, surgical, and radiation treatment modalities to prescribe optimal treatment courses for specific patients. The following case illustrates the potential for gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS to be repeated multiple times for the purpose of achieving facial pain control in cases of TN that have been refractory to other medical and surgical options, as well as prior GKRS. The patient described failed to achieve pain control with initial GKRS, as well as medical and surgical treatments, but experienced significant pain relief for a period of time with a second GKRS procedure and later underwent a third procedure. Only a small subset of patients have reportedly undergone more than two GKRS for TN; thus, further research and long-term clinical followup will be valuable in determining its usefulness in specific clinical situations.

  1. The Perception and Endogenous Modulation of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Ossipov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is often perceived an unpleasant experience that includes sensory and emotional/motivational responses. Accordingly, pain serves as a powerful teaching signal enabling an organism to avoid injury, and is critical to survival. However, maladaptive pain, such as neuropathic or idiopathic pain, serves no survival function. Genomic studies of individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain or paroxysmal pain syndromes considerable increased our understanding of the function of peripheral nociceptors, and especially of the roles of voltage-gated sodium channels and of nerve growth factor (NGF/TrkA receptors in nociceptive transduction and transmission. Brain imaging studies revealed a “pain matrix,” consisting of cortical and subcortical regions that respond to noxious inputs and can positively or negatively modulate pain through activation of descending pain modulatory systems. Projections from the periaqueductal grey (PAG and the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM to the trigeminal and spinal dorsal horns can inhibit or promote further nociceptive inputs. The “pain matrix” can explain such varied phenomena as stress-induced analgesia, placebo effect and the role of expectation on pain perception. Disruptions in these systems may account for the existence idiopathic pan states such as fibromyalgia. Increased understanding of pain modulatory systems will lead to development of more effective therapeutics for chronic pain.

  2. Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery, a Feasible Alternative to the Frame-Based Technique for the Treatment of Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Andrew E; Thomas, Andrew S; Reed, Aaron D; Skinner, William K

    2016-01-01

    Classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) causes severe facial pain. Several treatment options exist for classic TN refractory to medical therapy, including stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Most studies in the medical literature used a frame-based SRS technique. Improvements in linear accelerator-based treatment systems and image guidance have led to the use of frameless SRS as a safe and feasible alternative to the frame-based technique for the treatment of refractory TN. We present a case of refractory TN successfully treated with frameless SRS. PMID:27186453

  3. Where to locate the isocenter? The treatment strategy for repeat trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how the spatial relationship between the isocenters of the first and second radiosurgeries affects the overall outcome. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study on 40 patients who had repeat gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Only one 4-mm isocenter was applied in both first and second radiosurgeries, with a maximum radiation dose of 75 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. The MR scan of the first radiosurgery was registered to that of the second radiosurgery by a landmark-based registration algorithm. The spatial relationship between the isocenter of the first and the second radiosurgeries was thus determined. The investigating parameters were the distance between the isocenters of the two separate radiosurgeries and isocenter proximity to the brainstem. The outcome end points were pain relief and dysesthesias. The median follow-up for the repeat radiosurgery was 28 months (range, 6-51 months). Results: Pain relief was complete in 11 patients, nearly complete (≥90%) in 7 patients, partial (≥50%) in 8 patients, and minimal (<50%) or none in another 14 patients. The mean distance between the two isocenters was 2.86 mm in the complete or nearly complete pain relief group vs. 1.93 mm in the others. Farther distance between isocenters was associated with a trend toward better pain relief (p 0.057). The proximity of the second isocenter to the brainstem did not affect pain relief, and neither did placing the second isocenter proximal or distal to the brainstem compared with the first one. Three patients developed moderate dysesthesias (score of 4 on a 0-10 scale), and 2 other patients developed more significant dysesthesias (score of 7) after the second radiosurgery. Dysesthesias related neither to distance between isocenters nor to which isocenter was closer to the brainstem. Conclusions: Image registration between MR scans of the first and second radiosurgeries helps target delineation

  4. THE USE OF PROTECTOR MADE OF REPEREN IN MICROVASCULAR DECOMPRESSION OF TRIGEMINAL NERVE

    OpenAIRE

    Sheludyakov А.Y.; Tikhomirov S.Е.; Stupak Y.А.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time there was used an isolating protector made of Reperen aiming to resolve a neurovascular conflict between superior cerebellar artery and trigeminal nerve root — a leading cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

  5. The Use of Protector Made of Reperen in Microvascular Decompression of Trigeminal Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheludyakov А.Y.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time there was used an isolating protector made of Reperen aiming to resolve a neurovascular conflict between superior cerebellar artery and trigeminal nerve root — a leading cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

  6. EFNS guidelines on pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attal, Nadine; Cruccu, G; Haanpää, M;

    2006-01-01

    for the efficacy of tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin and opioids, with a large number of class I trials, followed by topical lidocaine (in PHN) and the newer antidepressants venlafaxine and duloxetine (in PPN). A small number of controlled trials were performed in central pain, trigeminal...... neuralgia, other peripheral neuropathic pain states and multiple-aetiology neuropathic pains. The main peripheral pain conditions respond similarly well to tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin, and pregabalin, but some conditions, such as HIV-associated polyneuropathy, are more refractory. There are too...

  7. NEURAL PATHWAYS OF TRIGEMINAL PROPRIOCEPTIVE AFFERENTS COORDINATE ORAL MOTOR BEHAVIORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Pifu; Zhang Jingdong; Li Jishuo

    2003-01-01

    Neural pathways and synaptic connections from the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Vme) neurons to the cranial motor nuclei were studied in the rat using double labelling methodologies of intracellular Neurobiotin staining combined with retrograde horseradish peroxidase (HRP) transport, anterograde biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) tracing combined with retrograde HRP transport, and a dual fluorescent labelling of BDA anterograde combined tracing with Cholera Toxin B (CTB) retrograde transport. Direct projections and synapses were demonstrated from Vme neuronal boutons to motoneurons (MNs) of the trigeminal motor nucleus (Vmo), the hypoglossal nucleus (Ⅻ) and the ambiguus nucleus (Amb). Indirect projections and pathways from Vme neurons to the cranial motor nuclei including Vmo, Ⅻ, the facial nucleus (Ⅶ) and the cervical spinal cord (C1~5) were seen to relay on their premotor neurons. The premotor neurons of above cranial motor nuclei were overlapped in bilateral premotor neuronal pool including the parvocellular reticular formation (PCRt) and its alpha division (PCRtA), the dorsomedial part of the spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis (Vodm), and interpolaris (Vidm), the medullary reticular nucleus dorsal division (MdD), the supratrigeminal region (Vsup) and the dorsomedial part of the principal trigeminal sensory nucleus (Vpdm).Synapses between Vme neuronal boutons and Vmo and Ⅻ MNs and Ⅻ premotor neurons were predominantly asymmetric.There were four types of synaptic organizations, i.e. synaptic convergence; synaptic divergence presynaptic inhibition and afferent feedforward inhibition seen between Vme boutons and Vmno, Ⅻ MNs and between Vme boutons and Ⅻ premotor neurons.The results of present studies have demonstrated direct pathways from the trigeminal proprioceptive afferents to Vmo, Ⅻ and Amb MNs, and indirect pathways from the trigeminal proprioceptive afferents to bilateral Vmno, Ⅻ, Ⅶ and C1~s via their premotor neurons. It provides

  8. Dosimetric analysis of trigeminal nerve, brain stem doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CyberKnife radiosurgery treatment of Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is performed as a non-invasive image guided procedure. The prescription dose for TN is very high. The brainstem is the adjacent critical organ at risk (OAR) which is prone to receive the very high target dose of TN. The present study is to analyze the dose distribution inside the tiny trigeminal nerve target and also to analyze the dose fall off in the brain stem. Seven TN cases treated between November 2010 and January 2012 were taken for this study retrospectively. The treatment plans were analyzed for target dose conformity, homogeneity and dose coverage. In the brainstem the volume doses D1% and D2% were taken for analyzing the higher doses in the brain stem. The dose fall off was analyzed in terms of D5% and D10%. The mean value of maximum dose within the trigeminal nerve target was 73.5±2.1 Gy (P=0.0007) and the minimum dose was 50.0±4.1Gy (P=0.1315). The mean conformity index was 2.19 and the probable reason could be the smallest CyberKnife collimator of 5mm used in the treatment plan. The mean D1%, of the brainstem was 10.5±2.1Gy(P=0.5316) and the mean value of the maximum point dose within the brainstem was 35.6±3.8Gy. This shows the degree of dose fall off within the brainstem. Though the results of the present study are showing superior sparing of brain stem and reasonable of target coverage, it is necessary to execute the treatment plan with greater accuracy in CyberKnife as the immobilization is noninvasive and frameless. (author)

  9. Unilateral Trigeminal Mandibular Motor Neuropathy Caused by Tumor in the Foramen Ovale

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Kyung Seok; Chung, Jae-Myun; Jeon, Beom S.; Park, Seong-Ho; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2006-01-01

    Pure trigeminal motor neuropathy is characterized by trigeminal motor weakness without signs of trigeminal sensory or other cranial nerve involvement. We describe a 63-year-old woman with progressive weakness and atrophy of the left masticatory muscles. She had no sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of pure trigeminal motor neuropathy was made on the basis of clinical and electrophysiologic studies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed enhancement of the enlarged mandibular branch ...

  10. Bilateral trigeminal nerve recurrence of non-hodgkin lymphoma revealed with FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilateral trigeminal nerve involvement is a rare presentation of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The trigeminal nerve, also called the fifth cranial nerve, leaves the brainstem and exits the base of the skull to supply sensation to the face. In this case, we present a case of a 63-year-old male patient with a history of NHL and a more recent history of headache and trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent PET/CT demonstrating bilateral increased FDG uptake in trigeminal nerves

  11. Cellular Localization of Aquaporin-1 in the Human and Mouse Trigeminal Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Junying; Tan, Meiyun; Gu, Minxia; Marshall, Charles; Ding, Jiong; Hu, Gang; Xiao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies reported that a subpopulation of mouse and rat trigeminal neurons express water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). In this study we make a comparative investigation of AQP1 localization in the human and mouse trigeminal systems. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence results showed that AQP1 was localized to the cytoplasm and cell membrane of some medium and small-sized trigeminal neurons. Additionally, AQP1 was found in numerous peripheral trigeminal axons of humans and mice. ...

  12. Perineural tumour spread from colon cancer, an unusual cause of trigeminal neuropathy - a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Kavitha; George, Thomas; El Beltagi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Malignant trigeminal neuralgia due to perineural spread along the branches of the trigeminal nerve, is known to commonly occur secondary to squamous cell carcinomas, lymphomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas in the head and neck region. Rarely metastases to the trigeminal nerve have been reported in breast cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer. To the best of our knowledge trigeminal neuropathy due to skull base metastases and perineural spread along the maxillary (V2) and mandibular (V3) br...

  13. Directional specificity and patterning of sensory axons in trigeminal ganglion–whisker pad cocultures

    OpenAIRE

    Gunhan-Agar, Emine; Haeberle, Adam; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2000-01-01

    In the rodent trigeminal pathway, trigeminal axons invade the developing whisker pad from a caudal to rostral direction. We investigated directional specificity of embryonic day (E). 15 rat trigeminal axons within this peripheral target field using explant cocultures. E15 trigeminal axons readily grow into the same age whisker pad explants and form follicle-related patterns along a caudal to rostral direction. They also can grow into this target from its lateral aspects. In contrast, they are...

  14. Bilateral trigeminal nerve recurrence of non-hodgkin lymphoma revealed with FDG PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Sabire; Sağer, Sait; Şen, Feyza; Halac, Metin

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral trigeminal nerve involvement is a rare presentation of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The trigeminal nerve, also called the fifth cranial nerve, leaves the brainstem and exits the base of the skull to supply sensation to the face. In this case, we present a case of a 63-year-old male patient with a history of NHL and a more recent history of headache and trigeminal neuralgia. The patient underwent PET/CT demonstrating bilateral increased FDG uptake in trigeminal nerves.

  15. A retrospective study of 72 cases diagnosed with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia in indian populace

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Sunil; Mittal, Hitesh-Chander; Sachdeva, Akash; Verma, Ajay; Dhupar, Vikas; Dhupar, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Context: Trigeminal neuralgia is as a chronic, debilitating condition, which can have a major impact on quality of life. There are few reports of trigeminal neuralgia in oriental populations. Objectives: To evaluate the retrospective data of the patients diagnosed with idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia and to understanding the disorder in the Indian populace. Methods: The retrospective data of 72 patients with typical idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia regarding age of onset, gender, site of invol...

  16. CT-only planning for Gamma Knife radiosurgery in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: methodology and outcomes from a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) has been established as a safe and effective treatment option for trigeminal neuralgia. Some patients have contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the standard stereotactic imaging used for GKRS treatment planning. Computerized tomography (CT) imaging may be used as an alternative in this scenario. We sought to evaluate the outcomes of our patients treated using this technique. Between August 2001 and November 2009, 19 patients with trigeminal neuralgia were treated with GKRS using CT-only planning. The course of the trigeminal nerve was determined based upon anatomical landmarks when the nerve was not directly visualized on the treatment-planning CT. Median dose used was 90 Gy (range 85–90 Gy). Follow-up data based on Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain score and toxicity were obtained using electronic medical records and by telephone interview. With median follow-up time of 18 months (range 4–36 months), improvement in quality of life after GKRS was reported in 17 of 19 patients. Freedom from BNI IV-V pain relapse was 82% at 24 months. By 3 months post-GKRS, 50% of patients were able to discontinue medications completely. Three patients reported numbness after GKRS; none of these patients described bothersome numbness. Use of contrast did not affect treatment outcome (P = 0.31). Stereotactic CT-only treatment planning of GKRS for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia is feasible and safe. Further studies are necessary to determine if the long-term durability of pain relief is comparable to that of MRI-based GKRS planning.

  17. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation for primary trigeminal neuralgia in older and younger patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui Lai; Jiaxiang Ni; Baishan Wu; Mingwei He; Liqiang Yang; Jianning Yue; Yuna Guo

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the immediate and long-term clinical efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radiofrequency thermocoagulation for primary trigeminal neuralgia (RTPTN) in 852 patients includ-ing 502 patients aged ≥ 60 years and 350 patients aged < 60 years. After discharge, the incidence of complications was 1.0% and 0.9% in patients aged ≥ 60 years and patients aged < 60 years, respectively. Over 3-year follow-up after CT-guided RTPTN, 96.8% of the patients aged ≥ 60 years and 98.6% of the patients aged < 60 years were completely pain-free, and there was no significant difference between these two age brackets. In addition, there were no significant differences in quality of life scores and numbness scores between these two age brackets. These findings suggest that CT-guided RTPTN is a safe and effective method and is recommended for older and poor-risk patients.

  18. Implications of the persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcalá-Cerra Gabriel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA is the most common of the embryologicanastomoses between internal carotid artery (ICA and the vertebro-basilar system,which can be found in the adult age. It usually is found as an incidental discovery instudies of cerebral vasculature.Clinical case: It is presented a 71 years-old patient with arterial hypertension in regular treatment, who had been presented headache of mild intensity associated tooccasional vertigos and paresthesias in the right corporal side since three years ago.Neurological exam was normal. In the cerebral magnetic resonance, an image withempty of signal was observed in the prepontine cistern. The cerebral angiography withcontrast allowed observing aberrant artery that connected the posterior loop of theintracavernous segment of the ICA with the basilar artery (BA.Conclusion: The detection of vascular anomalies and especially of the PTA is veryimportant in the preoperative planning for the injuries of middle cranial fossa, sellar andparasellar region. The PTA can be associated to some neurological disorders or to otheranatomical vascular variations. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2013;4(1:147-151RESUMEN:Introducción: la arteria trigeminal persistente (ATP es la más común de las anastomosisembriológicas entre la arteria carótida interna (ACI y el sistema vertebro-basilar,que puede ser encontrada en la edad adulta. Suele ser encontrada como un hallazgoincidental en estudios de la vasculatura cerebral.Caso clínico: paciente de 71 años de edad, hipertenso arterial en tratamiento regular,quien desde hacía tres años presentaba cefalea de leve intensidad, asociada a vértigosocasionales y disestesias del lado derecho corporal. Examen neurológico normal.En resonancia magnética cerebral se observó imagen con vacío de señal en cisternaprepontina. Angiografía cerebral con contraste permitió observar arteria aberrante quecomunicaba el asa posterior del segmento intracavernoso de la ACI

  19. Loss of inhibition by brain natriuretic peptide over P2X3 receptors contributes to enhanced spike firing of trigeminal ganglion neurons in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenkova, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) play an important role in pain pathologies, including migraine. In trigeminal neurons, P2X3Rs are constitutively downregulated by endogenous brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). In a mouse knock-in (KI) model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 with upregulated calcium CaV2.1 channel function, trigeminal neurons exhibit hyperexcitability with gain-of-function of P2X3Rs and their deficient BNP-mediated inhibition. We studied whether the absent BNP-induced control over P2X3Rs activity in KI cultures may be functionally expressed in altered firing activity of KI trigeminal neurons. Patch-clamp experiments investigated the excitability of wild-type and KI trigeminal neurons induced by either current or agonists for P2X3Rs or transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors. Consistent with the constitutive inhibition of P2X3Rs by BNP, sustained pharmacological block of BNP receptors selectively enhanced P2X3R-mediated excitability of wild-type neurons without affecting firing evoked by the other protocols. This effect included increased number of action potentials, lower spike threshold and shift of the firing pattern distribution toward higher spiking activity. Thus, inactivation of BNP signaling transformed the wild-type excitability phenotype into the one typical for KI. BNP receptor block did not influence excitability of KI neurons in accordance with the lack of BNP-induced P2X3R modulation. Our study suggests that, in wild-type trigeminal neurons, negative control over P2X3Rs by the BNP pathway is translated into tonic suppression of P2X3Rs-mediated excitability. Lack of this inhibition in KI cultures results in a hyperexcitability phenotype and might contribute to facilitated trigeminal pain transduction relevant for migraine. PMID:27346147

  20. Receptor systems mediating c-fos expression within trigeminal nucleus caudalis in animal models of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsikostas, D D; Sanchez del Rio, M

    2001-03-01

    In intracranial structures unmyelinated C- and Adelta-fibers of the trigeminal nerve transmit pain stimuli from meninges to the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C). Peripheral nerve endings surround meningeal vessels (the so-called trigeminovascular system) and contain vasoactive neuropeptides (calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P and neurokinin A). Activation of the trigeminovascular system promotes a meningeal sterile inflammatory response through the release of neuropeptides by peripheral endings. Orthodromic conduction along trigeminovascular fibers transmits information centrally with induction of immediate early c-fos gene within post-synaptic Sp5C neurons, as a marker of neuronal activity within central nociceptive pathways. In laboratory animals the system is activated by either electrical stimulation of the TG, chemical stimulation of the meninges, electrical or mechanical stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus or by induction of cortical spreading depression. All these techniques induce c-fos within Sp5C and are used as a rodent/feline model of vascular headache in humans. Up-to-date there is evidence that at least ten receptors (5-HT(1B), 5-HT(1D), 5-HT(lF), 5-HT(2B), NK-1, GABA(A), NMDA, AMPA, class III metabotropic glutamate receptors, and opioids mu receptors) modulate c-fos expression within Sp5C. These receptors represent potential targets for anti-migraine drugs as shown by triptans (5-HT(1B/1D/1F)) and ergot alkaloids (5-HT(1A1B/1D/1F)). This review discusses the importance of c-fos expression within Sp5C as a marker of cephalic nociception, the different cephalic pain models that induce c-fos within Sp5C, the receptors involved and their potential role as targets for anti-migraine drugs.

  1. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  2. CT and MRI diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of CT and MRI on intracranial trigeminal schwannoma. Methods: CT and MRI findings of 16 patients with intracranial trigeminal schwannoma confirmed by pathology were analyzed retrospectively, including 9 case of CT, 8 case of MRI. Results: Intracranial trigeminal schwannoma was divided into three types: posterior cranial fossa type (4 cases), middle cranial fossa type (3 cases), and transcranianial fossa type (9 cases). CT features of the tumors included mixed density, no calcification, petrous apex bone resorption or destruction (n=4). The tumors demonstrated as low-signal intensity on MR T1-weighted images, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection. Cystic degeneration was occurred in 6 cases, with ring-like enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection. Conclusion: CT and MRI can accurately show the tumor site, shape, internal structure and enhancement performance. CT and MRI have a great diagnostic and differential diagnostic value in intracranial trigeminal schwannoma. MRI is better than CT in qualitative diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma. (authors)

  3. Medication Treatment Efficacy and Chronic Orofacial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T; Padilla, Mariela; Dionne, Raymond

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pain in the orofacial region has always been a vexing problem for dentists to diagnose and treat effectively. For trigeminal neuropathic pain, there are 3 medications (gabapentinoids, tricyclic antidepressants, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) to use plus topical anesthetics that have therapeutic efficacy. For chronic daily headaches (often migraine in origin), 3 prophylactic medications have reasonable therapeutic efficacy (β-blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, and antiepileptic drugs). The 3 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for fibromyalgia (pregabalin, duloxetine, and milnacipran) are not robust, with poor efficacy. For osteroarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have therapeutic efficacy and when gastritis contraindicates them, corticosteriod injections are helpful. PMID:27475515

  4. Glycerol rhizotomy versus gamma knife radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: An analysis of patients treated at one institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been treated with a variety of minimally invasive techniques, all of which have been compared with microvascular decompression. For patients not considered good surgical candidates, percutaneous retrogasserian glycerol rhizotomy (GR) and gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery are two minimally invasive techniques in common practice worldwide and used routinely at Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience. Using a common pain scale outcomes questionnaire, we sought to analyze efficacies and morbidities of both treatments. Methods and Materials: Between June 1994 and December 2002, 79 patients were treated with GR and 109 patients underwent GK for the treatment of TN. GR was performed with fluoroscopic guidance as an overnight inpatient procedure. GK was performed using a single 4-mm shot positioned at the root exit zone of the trigeminal nerve. Radiation doses of 70-90 Gy prescribed to the 100% isodose line were used. Treatment outcomes including pain response, pain recurrence, treatment failure, treatment-related side effects, and overall patient satisfaction with GK and GR were compared using a common outcomes scale. Using the Barrow Neurologic Institute pain scale, patients were asked to define their level of pain both before and after treatment: I, no pain and no pain medication required; I, occasional pain not requiring medication; IIIa, no pain and pain medication used; IIIb, some pain adequately controlled with medication; IV, some pain not adequately controlled with medication; and V, severe pain with no relief with medication. We used posttreatment scores of I, II, IIIa, and IIIb to identify treatment success, whereas scores of IV and V were considered treatment failure. Results were compiled from respondents and analyzed using SAS software. Statistical comparisons used log-rank test, univariate and multivariate logistic regression, Fisher's exact test, and Wilcoxon test with significance established at p < 0

  5. Comparison of evoked vs. spontaneous tics in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (tic doloureux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello-Lammens Matthew

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 53-year old woman with tic doloureaux, affecting her right maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve (V2, could elicit shooting pains by slightly tapping her teeth when off medication. The pains, which she normally rated as > 6/10 on a visual analog scale (VAS, were electric shock-like in nature. She had no other spontaneous or ongoing background pain affecting the region. Based on her ability to elicit these tics, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed while she produced brief shocks every 2 minutes on cue (evoked pain over a 20 min period. In addition, she had 1–2 spontaneous shocks manifested between these evoked pains over the course of functional image acquisition. Increased fMRI activation for both evoked and spontaneous tics was observed throughout cortical and subcortical structures commonly observed in experimental pain studies with healthy subjects; including the primary somatosensory cortex, insula, anterior cingulate, and thalamus. Spontaneous tics produced more decrease in signals in a number of regions including the posterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, suggesting that regions known to be involved in expectation/anticipation may have been activated for the evoked, but not spontaneous, tics. In this patient there were large increases in activation observed in the frontal regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex and the basal ganglia. Spontaneous tics showed increased activation in classic aversion circuitry that may contribute to increased levels of anxiety. We believe that this is the first report of functional imaging of brain changes in tic-doloureaux.

  6. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  8. Gamma-knife radiosurgery in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trigeminal nerve schwannomas account for 0.07 %-0.28 % of all intracranial tumors. Advances in skull base surgery have led to more aggressive resection of these tumors, but surgery may associated with development of new neurological deficits. In this report, we analyse the long-term results 15 patients with newly diagnosed or residual/recurrent trigeminal schwannoma who underwent gamma-knife treatment. During a mean 61 months of follow-up, MRI revealed reduction of tumor size in 13 and no size change in 2 patients. The tumor growth control rate was 100 % and only 1 patient had transient facial numbness and diplopia. For patients with small to moderate size trigeminal schwannomas, gamma-knife radiosurgery is associated with good tumor control and a minimal risk of adverse radiation effects. (author)

  9. Acupuncture for episodic cluster headache: a trigeminal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhoe, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Following evidence that acupuncture is clinically feasible and cost-effective in the treatment of headache, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends acupuncture as prophylactic treatment for migraine and tension headache. There has thus been expectation that other forms of headache should benefit also. Unfortunately, acupuncture has not generally been successful for cluster headache. This may be due to acupuncturists approaching the problem as one of severe migraine. In fact, cluster headache is classed as a trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. In this case report, episodic cluster headache is treated in the same way as has been shown effective for trigeminal neuralgia. Acupuncture is applied to the contralateral side at points appropriate for stimulating branches of the trigeminal nerve. Thus, ST2 is used for the infraorbital nerve, BL2 and Yuyao for the supratrochlear and supraorbital nerves, and Taiyang for the temporal branch of the zygomatic nerve. PMID:26846705

  10. Basilar Artery Aneurysm at a Persistent Trigeminal Artery Junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, G.B.; Conti, M.L.M.; Veiga, J.C.E.; Jory, M.; Souza, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The trigeminal artery is an anastomosis between the embryonic precursors of the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems, and may persist into adult life. The association of the persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) with cerebral aneurysm is well documented in the literature and, in general, aneurysms are located in the anterior circulation. We describe a patient who presented with a panencephalic Fisher III subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. Digital arteriography showed a saccular aneurysm in the middle third of the basilar artery, adjacent to the junction with a persistent trigeminal artery. She was submitted to endovascular treatment with embolization of the basilar artery aneurysm with coils. Aneurysms at the PTA junction with the basilar artery are rare. This paper describes a case of PTA associated with an aneurysm in the basilar artery at PTA junction and briefly reviews the literature. PMID:22005697

  11. Salvage Gamma Knife Radiosurgery after failed management of bilateral trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami B Raval

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of bilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN is 1-6% of total number of TN cases. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS is effective in treating unilateral TN; however, outcomes of bilateral TN treated by GKRS have not been well evaluated. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term GKRS outcomes of bilateral TN at our institution and compare with our published treatment outcomes of unilateral TN. Methods: Between 2000 and 2006, eight patients with bilateral TN were treated with GKRS. Data available on seven patients were collected. Facial pain outcomes were defined using the Barrow Neurological Institute pain intensity scale. Outcomes and toxicities were compared to published outcomes of unilateral TN patients treated with GKRS at our institution. Results: The incidence of bilateral TN in our series is 2.3%. Treatment outcomes were excellent in 5/14, good in 1/14, and poor in 8/14. Median follow-up time was 58 months. Median time-to-failure was 38 months. Pain control rate was 80% at 12 months and 65% at 36 months. Bothersome side effects were seen in 4/14 nerves treated. Compared with our long-term unilateral TN cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in outcome, time-to-failure, or rate of toxicity. Conclusion: Bilateral TN is rare, and effective treatment is crucial to improve the quality of life of those afflicted. Salvage GKRS is a reasonable treatment modality for individuals with bilateral TN.

  12. Trigeminal small-fibre dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostino, R.; Cruccu, G.; Iannetti, G. D.;

    2000-01-01

    potentials correlated with the severity of polyneuropathy (P diabetic polyneuropathy, We speculate that the primary cause could be segmental demyelination. (C......Objective: To investigate trigeminal small-fibre function in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: In 52 diabetic patients we studied the trigeminal laser evoked potentials after stimulation of the skin bordering the lower lip. In the 21 patients with the severest peripheral nerve damage we...... also studied the electrically evoked corneal reflex, Both responses are mediated by small myelinated afferents. Results: Laser evoked potentials had a longer mean latency and lower amplitude in diabetic patients than in normal subjects (P

  13. Intraoperative visualisation of the trigeminal cistern. Intraoperative Darstellung der Trigeminuszisterne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockermann, V.; Dieckmann, G. (Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. Funktionelle Neurochirurgie)

    1991-07-01

    Percutaneous retrogassarian glycerol rhizotomy has passed the test of time as an immediately effective and reliable method for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. X-ray-assisted puncture of the trigeminal cistern and contrast-enhanced intraoperative visualisation techniques are absolute requirements of this surgical measure and invariably precede any further steps taken by the surgeon. The use of state-of-the-art fluoroscopic methods ensures that ample information is even obtained from the images of the base-of-scull region. (orig.).

  14. Complete oculomotor palsy caused by persistent trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Domenico; Consoli, Domenico; Lanza, Pier Luigi; Plastino, Massimiliano; Nicoletti, Francesco; Ceccotti, Claudio

    2010-10-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the carotid and vertebro-basilar system. PTA is a pathophysiology phenomenon which has been implicated as a rare cause of cranial nerve dysfunction. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed a complete oculomotor nerve palsy caused by a persistent ecstatic trigeminal artery. Brain MRI and MRA studies documented a neurovascular conflict between the oculomotor nerve and a PTA. To the best of our knowledge there is no report about complete third cranial nerve palsy NC due to a PTA. A role of this rare vascular condition is discussed. PMID:20552240

  15. THIRTY-TWO CASES OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA TREATED BY MEDICATION PLUS MOXIBUSTION%药物结合艾灸治疗三叉神经痛32例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋利群

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 CLINICAL DATA In this series, all the 32 cases were outpatients except one. Of them, 10 cases were male and 22 cases female, ranging from 26 to 78 yeas in age and from 1 month to 12 years in the course of disease. Of the total, 18 cases had the pain involving the 2nd branch of the trigeminal nerves, 5 cases involving the 3rd branch, and 9 cases involving both the 2nd and 3rd branches. 25 cases had obvious trigger points, 6 cases were accompanied by twitching and flushed complexion. No cases were found to be positive indicated by the examination of the nervous system. They were all diagnosed as having primary trigeminal neuralgia.

  16. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-01

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  17. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Retrospective Multi-Institutional Examination of Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raj; Davis, Joanne; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purposes of this study are to assess the effectiveness of CyberKnife® stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in providing both initial and sustained pain relief for patients with both forms of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), assess potential prognostic factors, and examine treatment-related toxicities. Methods  The RSSearch(®) Patient Registry was screened for TN cases from July 2007 to June 2015. We evaluated initial pain relief achieved by examining changes in the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores following SRS. Prognostic factors relating to initial pain relief and the relationship between maximum dose (Dmax) and toxicity incidence were analyzed via univariate logistic regressions. We evaluated prognostic factors relating to sustained pain relief using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank analysis. Results  Our analysis included 125 TN1 patients and 38 TN2 patients with initial VAS scores ≥ 3 treated at 16 community radiotherapy centers. Median Dmax for both cohorts was 75 Gy with a larger range for TN1 cases (67.42 Gy - 110.29 Gy) as compared to TN2 cases (70.00 Gy - 78.48 Gy). At initial follow-up, mean VAS scores after SRS were significantly lower for TN1 and TN2 patients (p 75 Gy was not a predictor of toxicity incidence in TN1 cases (p = 0.597) but was significant for TN2 patients (p = 0.0009 following Fisher's exact test). Conclusions SRS is an effective treatment option for TN patients in community settings. Initial pain relief following SRS was achieved in a vast majority of TN patients with associated minor toxicities observed in less than 20% of all patients. PMID:27182468

  18. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  19. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central, objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain.

  20. Cupping for Treating Pain: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-In Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the evidence for or against the effectiveness of cupping as a treatment option for pain. Fourteen databases were searched. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs testing cupping in patients with pain of any origin were considered. Trials using cupping with or without drawing blood were included, while trials comparing cupping with other treatments of unproven efficacy were excluded. Trials with cupping as concomitant treatment together with other treatments of unproven efficacy were excluded. Trials were also excluded if pain was not a central symptom of the condition. The selection of studies, data extraction and validation were performed independently by three reviewers. Seven RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Two RCTs suggested significant pain reduction for cupping in low back pain compared with usual care (P < .01 and analgesia (P < .001. Another two RCTs also showed positive effects of cupping in cancer pain (P < .05 and trigeminal neuralgia (P < .01 compared with anticancer drugs and analgesics, respectively. Two RCTs reported favorable effects of cupping on pain in brachialgia compared with usual care (P = .03 or heat pad (P < .001. The other RCT failed to show superior effects of cupping on pain in herpes zoster compared with anti-viral medication (P = .065. Currently there are few RCTs testing the effectiveness of cupping in the management of pain. Most of the existing trials are of poor quality. Therefore, more rigorous studies are required before the effectiveness of cupping for the treatment of pain can be determined.

  1. Unilateral facial pain and lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakespeare, T.P.; Stevens, M.J. [Royal North Shore Hospital, Crows Nest, NSW (Australia)

    1996-02-01

    Facial pain in lung cancer patients may be secondary to metastatic disease to the brain or skull base. Since 1983 there have been 19 published reports of hemi-facial pain as a non-metastatic complication of lung carcinoma. This report describes an additional case in whom unilateral face pain preceded the diagnosis of lung cancer by 9 months. A clinical diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia was made after a normal brain CT scan. Later on the patient complained of global lethargy, weight loss and haemoptysis. A chest X-ray disclosed a 6 cm right hilar mass that was further defined with a whole body CT scan. The neural mechanism of the unilateral facial pain is discussed and the literature reviewed. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Stimulation of the greater occipital nerve increases metabolic activity in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and cervical dorsal horn of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, P J; Knight, Y E; Hoskin, K L

    1997-10-01

    Patients with primary headache syndromes often describe a distribution of pain that involves both frontal and occipital parts of the head. Such a distribution of pain does not respect the cutaneous sensory innervation of the head which would divide it into anterior (trigeminally innervated) and posterior (spinal nerve root innervated) regions. Studies of pain-producing intracranial structures, such as the superior sagittal sinus, have demonstrated that second order neurons as caudal as C2 are activated after either electrical or mechanical stimulation. For this study cats were anaesthetised with halothane (during surgery) and alpha-chloralose (60 mg/kg, i.p., then 20 mg/kg intravenous maintenance), paralysed (gallamine 6 mg/kg) and ventilated. The greater occipital nerve was isolated bilaterally and stimulated unilaterally using hook electrodes with stimuli of 100 V at 0.3 Hz. Metabolic activity in the caudal brain stem and upper cervical cord was measured using 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography and quantitative densitometry. Stimulation of the greater occipital nerve increased metabolic activity by 220% ipsilateral to stimulation and by a lesser amount contralaterally. Increases in metabolic activity were seen in the dorsal horn at the level of C1 and C2 as might be predicted from the cervical origin of the nerve. Neuronal activation appeared contiguous with the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and was in the same distribution as is seen when trigeminally-innervated structures are stimulated. These data suggest that the well recognised clinical phenomenon of pain at the front and back of the head and in the upper neck are likely to be a consequence of overlap of processing of nociceptive information at the level of the second order neurons. PMID:9414053

  3. Update on the challenges of treating trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obermann M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Obermann Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: Despite the multitude of treatment options currently available for trigeminal neuralgia, its management remains challenging in a considerable number of patients. The response to any particular treatment can be quite variable interindividually, and personalized treatment options are both resource-consuming and time-consuming. Anticonvulsant drugs, muscle relaxants, and neuroleptic agents are the preferred medical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Large placebo-controlled clinical trials are scarce, and no specific established substance has been developed for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Promising new treatment options currently in clinical evaluation are botulinum neurotoxin type A injections and CNV1014802, a novel sodium channel blocker that selectively blocks the Nav1.7 sodium channel. Patients who do not respond to medical therapy may be eligible for more invasive treatment options, such as percutaneous Gasserian ganglion techniques, gamma knife surgery, and microvascular decompression. Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, treatment, current, future, options, orphan drugs 

  4. MR diagnosis of hemifacial spasm and trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the MR findings and diagnostic value of neurovascular compression in patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS) and trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods: MR manifestations and operative results of 120 patients with hemifacial spasm and trigeminal neuralgia were reviewed retrospectively. Results: (1) 58 sides had vascular compression or contact at MR imaging in 126 sides of the facial nerves of 63 patients with hemifacial spasm, and 17 sides had uncertain vascular contact. 45 sides had vascular compression or contact at MR imaging in 114 sides of the trigeminal nerves of 57 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, and 12 sides had uncertain vascular contact. (2) Statistical results: The difference between the symptomatic sides and asymptomatic sides in HFS patients was statistically significant (χ2=31.66, P2=42.98, P<0.001). (3) The sensitivity, accuracy, and positive likelihood ratio of MR diagnosis of vascular compression or contact was 94%, 83%, and 1.88, respectively. Conclusion: MR had higher specificity and sensitivity in diagnosing neurovascular compression or contact, and it played an important role in demonstrating the relationship between the cisternal portion of the seventh and fifth cranial nerve and surrounding vascular structures

  5. The Influence of Trigeminal Stimulation on Children's Judgements of Odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, Trygg; Moskowitz, Linda

    Children's preference for odors, some of which presumably had marked trigeminal (noxious) effects, was assessed with the use of the method of pair comparison. Although the children, from 4 to 7 years old, were able to discriminate between the intensities of the odors, they were neither attracted nor repelled by them as much as the adults. In other…

  6. [Anaysis on acupoint selection rule of acupuncture for trigeminal neuralgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shengyu; Xu, Wen; Gao, Zhao; Dong, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics and rules of acupoint selection of acupuncture for trigeminal neuralgia were analyzed. By searching CNKI, VIP, WF, literature regarding acupuncture for trigeminal neuralgia from 1980 to 2013 was collected to establish an acupuncture prescription database. The data mining technology was applied to analyze the characteristics and rules of the acupoint selection. As a result, a total of 180 papers were included, involving 148 acupoints. It was found that the acupoints that had high frequency of selection included Hegu (LI 4), Xiaguan (ST 7), Fengchi (GB 20) and trigger points. The acupoints selected were distributed in 14 meridians, in which yangming meridian of hand-foot had a frequency of 41. 58%. The special acupoints including crossing points, yuan-primary points and five-shu points were widely used, accounting for 65. 9%. As for the branch of trigeminal nerve, the top-3 selected acupoints were Yangbai (GB 14), Yuyao (EX-HN 4), Cuanzhu (BL 2) in the first branch, Sibai (ST 2), Quanlian (SI 18), Yingxiang (LI 20) in the second branch, Jiache (ST 6), Xiaguan (ST 7), Dicang (ST 4) in the third branch. In conclusion, it is believed that the clinical treatment of trigeminal neural gia focuses on local acupoints in combination with nerve distribution-based acupoints and distal acupoints, also the special acupoints are emphasized. PMID:27348932

  7. Corpus callosum arteriovenous malformation with persistent trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Chandan B; Devi, B Indira; Somanna, Sampath; Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Dawn, Rose

    2011-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with an intracerebral haematoma secondary to a large corpus callosal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) with an associated persistent trigeminal artery, and was treated with Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery for the AVM. This report discusses the embryological basis, radiological features and various classifications of this rare vascular anomaly. PMID:21501055

  8. Mixed connective tissue disease presenting as trigeminal neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Edmondstone, W M; Price, D. K.; Shepherd, T. H.; Gooddy, W. W.

    1982-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with an isolated trigeminal neuropathy 13 months before developing myalgia and lymphadenopathy. The onset of Raynaud's phenomenon 2 months later suggested a diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and this was confirmed by high serum titres of speckled pattern antinuclear antibody, and antibody to ribonuclear protein.

  9. Comparison of P2X and TRPV1 receptors in ganglia or primary culture of trigeminal neurons and their modulation by NGF or serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullin Rashid

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultured sensory neurons are a common experimental model to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pain transduction typically involving activation of ATP-sensitive P2X or capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. This applies also to trigeminal ganglion neurons that convey pain inputs from head tissues. Little is, however, known about the plasticity of these receptors on trigeminal neurons in culture, grown without adding the neurotrophin NGF which per se is a powerful algogen. The characteristics of such receptors after short-term culture were compared with those of ganglia. Furthermore, their modulation by chronically-applied serotonin or NGF was investigated. Results Rat or mouse neurons in culture mainly belonged to small and medium diameter neurons as observed in sections of trigeminal ganglia. Real time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry showed upregulation of P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors after 1–4 days in culture (together with their more frequent co-localization, while P2X2 ones were unchanged. TRPV1 immunoreactivity was, however, lower in mouse ganglia and cultures. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch clamping showed functional P2X and TRPV1 receptors. Neurons exhibited a range of responses to the P2X agonist α, β-methylene-adenosine-5'-triphosphate indicating the presence of homomeric P2X3 receptors (selectively antagonized by A-317491 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. The latter were observed in 16 % mouse neurons only. Despite upregulation of receptors in culture, neurons retained the potential for further enhancement of P2X3 receptors by 24 h NGF treatment. At this time point TRPV1 receptors had lost the facilitation observed after acute NGF application. Conversely, chronically-applied serotonin selectively upregulated TRPV1 receptors rather than P2X3 receptors. Conclusion Comparing ganglia and cultures offered the advantage of understanding early adaptive changes of nociception

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author)

  11. Nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose, Ines; Fung, Simon; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H; Morales, Francisco R

    2005-04-11

    The present study was undertaken to determine the location of trigeminal and hypoglossal premotor neurons that express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the cat. Cholera toxin subunit b (CTb) was injected into the trigeminal (mV) or the hypoglossal (mXII) motor nuclei in order to label the corresponding premotor neurons. CTb immunocytochemistry was combined with NADPH-d histochemistry or nNOS immunocytochemistry to identify premotor nitrergic (NADPH-d(+)/CTb(+) or nNOS(+)/ CTb(+) double-labeled) neurons. Premotor trigeminal as well as premotor hypoglossal neurons were located in the ventro-medial medullary reticular formation in a region corresponding to the nucleus magnocellularis (Mc) and the ventral aspect of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRGc). Following the injection of CTb into the mV, this region was found to contain a total of 60 +/- 15 double-labeled neurons on the ipsilateral side and 33 +/- 14 on the contralateral side. CTb injections into the mXII resulted in 40 +/- 17 double-labeled neurons in this region on the ipsilateral side and 16 +/- 5 on the contralateral side. Thus, we conclude that premotor trigeminal and premotor hypoglossal nitrergic cells coexist in the same medullary region. They are colocalized with a larger population of nitrergic cells (7200 +/- 23). Premotor neurons in other locations did not express nNOS. The present data demonstrate that a population of neurons within the Mc and the NRGc are the source of the nitrergic innervation of trigeminal and hypoglossal motoneurons. Based on the characteristics of nitric oxide actions and its diffusibility, we postulate that these neurons may serve to synchronize the activity of mV and mXII motoneurons. PMID:15804497

  12. Computed tomography in the diagnosis of trigeminal neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of the CT scan into the neuroradiological field has, however, brought a significant improvement in the early detection of intracranial tumors, including trigeminal neurinoma. In our institution from 1976 to 1979, five cases of trigeminal neurinoma were diagnosed by means of the CT scan. Two of them were recurring tumors. All the patients except one with a recurring tumor were operated upon, and nearly total removals of the tumors were accomplished. The clinical features of the five cases were divided into two groups. One group showed only hearing loss or cerebellar ataxia, while the other group had apparent trigeminal nerve palsy. The CT finding of trigeminal neurinoma was that of a poorly defined mass with a variable absorption value occupying the middle or posterior fossa in the non-contrast CT scan. A distortion of the third and fourth ventricles was also seen in most cases. As for the density, the densities of three tumors were identical with that of the surrounding brain. A low density and a mixed density were found in the other two tumors. Following contrast infusion, the tumor appeared as a sharply marginated, high-density lesion which was contiguous with the tip of the petrous bone in 4 cases. In one case, peripheral rim enhancement was encountered and the central region retained a low density. No cystic component was found later upon surgery. As for the location, in two cases the tumor was found mostly in the posterior fossa, while the tumor occupied mainly the middle fossa in one case. In two cases, the tumor was seen in both middle and posterior fossae. It is concluded that the CT scan has great value in the diagnosis of trigeminal neurinoma and in the preoperative assessment of surgery. (J.P.N.)

  13. Women with chronic and episodic migraine exhibit similar widespread pressure pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palacios, Maria; Lima Florencio, Lidiane; Natália Ferracini, Gabriela;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate widespread pressure hyperalgesia in the trigemino-cervical and extra-trigeminal (distant pain-free) regions in women with episodic and chronic migraine. METHODS: Fifty-one women with episodic migraine, 52 women with chronic migraine, and 52 healthy women without headache...

  14. Neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of intractable trigeminal neuralgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shu-jun; ZHANG Wen-hua; CHEN Teng; WU Cheng-yuan; ZHOU Mao-de

    2006-01-01

    Background Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the trigeminal ganglion (PRTTG) is regarded as the first choice for most patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) because of its safety and feasibility. However,neuronavigator-guided PRTTG has been seldom reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of neuronavigator-guided PRTTG for the treatment of intractable TN.Methods Between January 2000 and December 2004, 54 patients with intractable TN were enrolled into this study and were randomly divided into two groups. The patients in navigation group (n=26) underwent PRTTG with frameless neuronavigation, and those in control group (n=28) received PRTTG without neuronavigation.Three months after the operation, the efficacy, side effects, and complications of the surgery were recorded. The patients in the control group were followed up for 10 to 54 months (mean, 34±5), and those in the navigation group were followed up for 13 to 58 months (mean, 36±7). Kaplan-Meier analyses of the pain-free survival curves were used for the censored survival data, and the log-rank test was used to compare survival curves of the two groups.Results The immediate complete pain-relief rate of the navigation group was 100%, whereas it was 95% in the control. The proportion of sustained pain-relief rates at 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure were 85%, 77%,and 62% in the navigation group, and 54%, 40%, and 35% in the control. Recurrences in the control group were more common than that in the navigation group. Annual recurrence rate in the first and second years were 15% and 23% in the navigation group, and 46%, 60% in the control group. No side-effect and complication was noted in the navigation group except minimal facial hypesthesia.Conclusion Neuronavigator-guided PRTTG is a safe and promising method for treatment of intractable TN with better short- and long-term outcomes and lower complication rate than PRTTG without neuronavigation.

  15. Managing iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injury: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, T; Yilmaz, Z

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the management of 216 patients with post-traumatic iatrogenic lingual nerve injuries (LNIs; n=93) and inferior alveolar nerve injuries (IANI; n=123). At initial consultation, 6% IANI and 2% LNI patients had undergone significant resolution requiring no further reviews. Reassurance and counselling was adequate management for 51% IANI and 55% LNI patients. Systemic or topical medication was offered as pain relief to 5% of patients. Additional cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) was offered to 8% of patients. Topical 5% lidocaine patches reduced pain and allodynia in 7% of IANI patients, most often used without any other form of management. A small percentage of IANI patients (4%) received a combination of therapies involving CBT, surgery, medication and 5% lidocaine patches. Exploratory surgery improved symptoms and reduced neuropathic area in 18 LNI and 15 IANI patients resulting in improved quality of life. In conclusion, the authors suggest a more diverse and perhaps holistic strategy for management of patients with iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injuries and recommend pragmatic assessment criteria for measurement of treatment success in these patients.

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer L. Elaimy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction by Leksell, Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS has become increasingly popular as a management approach for patients diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia (TN. For this reason, we performed a modern review of the literature analyzing the efficacy of GKRS in the treatment of patients who suffer from TN. For patients with medically refractory forms of the condition, GKRS has proven to be an effective initial and repeat treatment option. Cumulative research suggests that patients treated a single time with GKRS exhibit similar levels of facial pain control when compared to patients treated multiple times with GKRS. However, patients treated on multiple occasions with GKRS are more likely to experience facial numbness and other facial sensory changes when compared to patients treated once with GKRS. Although numerous articles have reported MVD to be superior to GKRS in achieving facial pain relief, the findings of these comparison studies are weakened by the vast differences in patient age and comorbidities between the two studied groups and cannot be considered conclusive. Questions remain regarding optimal GKRS dosing and targeting strategies, which warrants further investigation into this controversial matter.

  17. Characterising the Analgesic Effect of Different Targets for Deep Brain Stimulation in Trigeminal Anaesthesia Dolorosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Williams, Hugh P.; Javed, Shazia; Pickering, Anthony E.; Patel, Nikunj K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several deep brain stimulation (DBS) targets have been explored for the alleviation of trigeminal anaesthesia dolorosa. We aimed to characterise the analgesia produced from the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and centromedian-parafascicular (CmPf) nucleus using a within-subject design. Method We report a case series of 3 subjects implanted with PAG and CmPf DBS systems for the treatment of anaesthesia dolorosa. At follow-up, testing of onset and offset times, magnitude, and thermal and mechanical sensitivity was performed. Results The mean pain score of the cohort was acutely reduced by 56% (p effective at different stimulation frequencies and were not antagonistic in effect. Conclusion The mechanisms by which stimulation at these two targets produces analgesia are likely to be different. Certain pain qualities may respond more favourably to specific targets. Knowledge of onset and offset times for the targets can guide optimisation of stimulation settings. The use of more than one stimulation target may be beneficial and should be considered in anaesthesia dolorosa patients. PMID:27322524

  18. Patellofemoral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Kay M; Callaghan, Michael J; van Linschoten, Robbart

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain refers to pain behind or around the patella (also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome, anterior knee pain, runner's knee, and, formerly, chondromalacia patellae). Patellofemoral pain is common, accounting for 11-17% of all knee pain presentations to general practice.(1 2) While it typically occurs in physically active people aged Patellofemoral pain can be diagnosed in the clinic, and evidence based treatments can reduce pain and improve function, allowing patients to maintain a physically active lifestyle. PMID:26834209

  19. Intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia refractory to carbamazepine: a study protocol[ISRCTN33042138

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roewer Norbert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently reported successful treatment of patients with chronic pain syndromes using human pooled intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in a prospective, open-label cohort study. A randomised, placebo controlled, double blinded study is needed to confirm these results. We chose to study patients with carbamazepine resistant primary Trigeminal Neuralgia (rpTN, as these had responded particularly well to IVIG. A protocol involving the use of IVIG in rpTN is complex for three reasons: 1. The effect of IVIG does not follow simple dose-response rules; 2. The response pattern of patients to IVIG was variable and ranged between no effect at all and pain free remission between two weeks and >1 year; 3. TN is characterized by extremely severe pain, for which operative intervention is (if temporarily helpful in most patients. Design A placebo controlled, parallel, add-on model was developed and the primary outcome variable defined as the length of time during which patients remain in the study. Study groups are compared using Kaplan-Maier survival analysis. Patients record their response to treatment ("severe, moderate, slight, no pain". The study coordinator monitors pain diaries. Severe or moderate pain of three days duration will result in termination of the study for that patient. Conclusions This study design utilizes a method of survival analysis and is novel in chronic pain research. It allows for both early departure from the study and voluntary crossover upon non-response. It may be applicable to the analysis of IVIG efficacy in other chronic pain syndromes.

  20. Identification of compounds that contribute to trigeminal burn in aqueous ethanol solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinidou, Smaro; Peterson, Devin G

    2016-11-15

    The influence of carbonyl species on the trigeminal burn of distilled spirit model systems was investigated. Quantities of the intrinsic carbonyl compounds were significantly altered in 40% ethanol solutions using two methods; (1) increasing or decreasing the product pH, to induce hemiacetal formation and acetal stabilization or induce and stabilize carbonyl species such as aldehydes, respectively and (2) utilizing a sulfonyl hydrazine polymer treatment. Samples with reduced carbonyl concentrations had significantly lower perceived trigeminal burn intensity. Sensory recombination experiments revealed that addition of carbonyl compounds increased trigeminal burn perception in model systems; confirming the direct relationship between the concentration of carbonyl compounds and trigeminal burn. The strongest potentiators of the trigeminal response were carbonyl compounds octanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde and 2-heptanone suggesting the probability that carbonyl species such as saturated aldehydes and ketones act as agonists to activate nociceptors such as TRPV1 and TRPA1 and elicit trigeminal burn. PMID:27283693

  1. Application of Purified Botulinum Type A Neurotoxin to Treat Experimental Trigeminal Neuropathy in Rats and Patients with Urinary Incontinence and Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshizo Matsuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type A neurotoxin (NTX of Clostridium botulinum was purified by a simple procedure using a lactose gel column. The toxicity of this purified toxin preparation was retained for at least 1 year at −30°C by supplementation with either 0.1% albumin or 0.05% albumin plus 1% trehalose. When purified NTX was used to treat 49 patients with urinary incontinence caused by either refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity, 36 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms. These beneficial effects were also observed in cases of prostatic hyperplasia. The results obtained with NTX were similar to that of Botox. The effects of NTX on trigeminal neuralgia induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC in rats were also studied. Trigeminal ganglion neurons from ipsilateral to IoNC exhibited significantly faster onset of FM4-64 release than sham-operated contralateral neurons. Intradermal injection of NTX in the area of IoNC alleviated IoNC-induced pain behavior and reduced the exaggerated FM4-64 release in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

  2. Application of purified botulinum type a neurotoxin to treat experimental trigeminal neuropathy in rats and patients with urinary incontinence and prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuka, Yoshizo; Yokoyama, Teruhiko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Dwi Fatmawati, Ni Nengah; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Ohyama, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Kuboki, Takuo; Nagai, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Type A neurotoxin (NTX) of Clostridium botulinum was purified by a simple procedure using a lactose gel column. The toxicity of this purified toxin preparation was retained for at least 1 year at -30°C by supplementation with either 0.1% albumin or 0.05% albumin plus 1% trehalose. When purified NTX was used to treat 49 patients with urinary incontinence caused by either refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity, 36 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms. These beneficial effects were also observed in cases of prostatic hyperplasia. The results obtained with NTX were similar to that of Botox. The effects of NTX on trigeminal neuralgia induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC) in rats were also studied. Trigeminal ganglion neurons from ipsilateral to IoNC exhibited significantly faster onset of FM4-64 release than sham-operated contralateral neurons. Intradermal injection of NTX in the area of IoNC alleviated IoNC-induced pain behavior and reduced the exaggerated FM4-64 release in trigeminal ganglion neurons. PMID:22745637

  3. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the diagnosis of neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. A correlation of MRA and surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The published rates of operatively confirmed neurovascular compression as the cause for trigeminal neuralgia range from 10 % to nearly 100 %. High-definition magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in 27 consecutive patients (in 6 cases with 3D reconstructions) to show neurovascular compression preoperatively. The MRA findings were compared with the relationship between the Vth nerve and the surrounding vessels at surgery. In 23 patients MRA showed present neurovascular compression in accordance with surgical findings (18/27 in complete accordance of type and side of vessel, site and direction of compression). One woman had no neurovascular compression either on MRA or intraoperatively. One MRA prediction of neurovascular compression was false, and two results were false negative. The sensitivity of MRA was therefore 88.5 % but the specificity only 50 %, if surgical findings are the reference. In one patient with right trigeminal neuralgia MRA revealed bilateral neurovascular compression of the Vth nerves. Therefore, the overall specificity of MRA might be below 50 %. In one patient with multiple sclerosis, the decision to operate was markedly influenced by the clear finding of neurovascular compression on MRA. The patient has been free from trigeminal pain for 149 weeks after microvascular decompression. In 6 patients, 3D reconstructions of the MRA data were performed. The images helped in 3D visualisation of the operation, but did not yield new information about the nature of the vessels revealed, or the site, direction or side of the neurovascular compression. (orig.)

  4. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the diagnosis of neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. A correlation of MRA and surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boecher-Schwarz, H.G.; Bruehl, K.; Kessel, G.; Guenthner, M.; Perneczky, A.; Stoeter, P. [Neurosurgical Department, Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    1998-02-01

    The published rates of operatively confirmed neurovascular compression as the cause for trigeminal neuralgia range from 10 % to nearly 100 %. High-definition magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed in 27 consecutive patients (in 6 cases with 3D reconstructions) to show neurovascular compression preoperatively. The MRA findings were compared with the relationship between the Vth nerve and the surrounding vessels at surgery. In 23 patients MRA showed present neurovascular compression in accordance with surgical findings (18/27 in complete accordance of type and side of vessel, site and direction of compression). One woman had no neurovascular compression either on MRA or intraoperatively. One MRA prediction of neurovascular compression was false, and two results were false negative. The sensitivity of MRA was therefore 88.5 % but the specificity only 50 %, if surgical findings are the reference. In one patient with right trigeminal neuralgia MRA revealed bilateral neurovascular compression of the Vth nerves. Therefore, the overall specificity of MRA might be below 50 %. In one patient with multiple sclerosis, the decision to operate was markedly influenced by the clear finding of neurovascular compression on MRA. The patient has been free from trigeminal pain for 149 weeks after microvascular decompression. In 6 patients, 3D reconstructions of the MRA data were performed. The images helped in 3D visualisation of the operation, but did not yield new information about the nature of the vessels revealed, or the site, direction or side of the neurovascular compression. (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 25 refs.

  5. Neurovascular Pains: Implications of Migraine for the Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon

    OpenAIRE

    Nixdorf, Donald R.; Ana M Velly; Alonso, Aurelio A.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that migraine headaches are a common finding in the general population, often associated with a high degree of disability. Additionally, migraine has a reported co-morbidity with other medical conditions, most notably with chronic pains such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The pathophysiological mechanisms involved with migraine are suggestive of an increased and prolonged hyperexcitability to stimuli, especially within the trigeminal distribution. Sin...

  6. Morphometric Analysis of Embryonic Rat Trigeminal Neurons Treated With Different Neurotrophins

    OpenAIRE

    Ulupinar, Emel; ÜNAL, NEDIM; Erzurumlu, Reha S.

    2004-01-01

    In whole-mount explant cultures of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) with intact peripheral and brainstem targets, exogenous application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) leads to elongation and precocious arborization of embryonic trigeminal axons, respectively. In addition, neurotrophins play a major role in survival and differentiation of distinct classes of TG neurons. In the present study, we conducted morphometric analyses of trigeminal neurons exposed to exogenous NGF o...

  7. Altering Glypican-1 levels modulates canonical Wnt signaling during trigeminal placode development

    OpenAIRE

    Shiau, Celia E; Hu, Na; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Glypicans are conserved cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans expressed in a spatiotemporally regulated manner in many developing tissues including the nervous system. Here, we show that Glypican-1 (GPC1) is expressed by trigeminal placode cells as they ingress and contribute to trigeminal sensory neurons in the chick embryo. Either expression of full-length or truncated GPC1 in vivo causes defects in trigeminal gangliogenesis in a manner that requires heparan sulfate side chains. This l...

  8. Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by an Intraneural Spiral Trigeminocerebellar Artery: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    WAKUTA, Naoki; Abe, Hiroshi; NONAKA, Masani; Higashi, Toshio; UEBA, Tetsuya; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocerebellar artery (TCA) is a branch of the basilar artery that may have an intraneural course and may cause trigeminal neuralgia. We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia with right vertebral artery aneurysm caused by an intraneural TCA that compressed the trigeminal nerve in multiple places. We performed proximal trapping for the fusiform aneurysm with extra-intracranial bypass to preserve flow of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, followed by microvascular decompression ...

  9. Treatment resistant trigeminal neuralgia relieved with oral sumatriptan: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Moran JA; Neligan A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Treatment-resistant trigeminal neuralgia is a distressing condition, for both the patient and the treating doctor. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of trigeminal neuralgia successfully treated with oral sumatriptan in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Caucasian woman was prescribed opiate analgesia for management of her treatment-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. Given the possible harmful effects of initiating such a course of treatment, a specu...

  10. Persistent trigeminal artery: angio-tomography and angio-magnetic resonance finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trigeminal artery (TA) is the most common embryonic carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis to persist into adulthood. It typically extends from the internal carotid artery to the basilar artery. Persistent primitive arteries are usually found incidentally, but are often associated with vascular malformation, cerebral aneurysm and, in case of TA, with trigeminal neuralgia. We present one patient with TA as a cause of trigeminal neuralgia and in other three as an incidental finding, on TC and MR angiograms. (author)

  11. Persistent trigeminal artery: angio-tomography and angio-magnetic resonance finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Licia Pacheco; Nepomuceno, Lara A.M.; Coimbra, Pablo Picasso; Oliveira Neto, Sabino Rodrigues de [Hospital Geral de Fortaleza (HGF), CE (Brazil). Radiology Dept.], e-mail: licia_p@hotmail.com; Natal, Marcelo Ricardo C. [Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    The trigeminal artery (TA) is the most common embryonic carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis to persist into adulthood. It typically extends from the internal carotid artery to the basilar artery. Persistent primitive arteries are usually found incidentally, but are often associated with vascular malformation, cerebral aneurysm and, in case of TA, with trigeminal neuralgia. We present one patient with TA as a cause of trigeminal neuralgia and in other three as an incidental finding, on TC and MR angiograms. (author)

  12. Changes in the expression of voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in rat trigeminal ganglia following chronic constriction injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yuanyin; Wang, Liecheng; Wang, Xuxia

    2016-08-17

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), especially the tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav1.3 and Nav1.7, and the tetrodotoxin-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9, have been implicated in acute and chronic neuropathic pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of VGSC Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 after nerve injury and their roles in the development of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We used the infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury model of TN in the rat. The time course of changes in the mechanical pain threshold was examined. In addition, real-time PCR and double immunofluorescence staining of VGSC α subunits were used to evaluate messenger RNA and protein expression, respectively, in the trigeminal ganglion. Behavioral tests showed that the mechanical pain threshold decreased significantly 4-42 days after surgery and reached the lowest observed value by day 12. Compared with sham-operated controls, we found that trigeminal ganglion in rats subjected to an infraorbital nerve-chronic constriction injury showed upregulation of Nav1.3 and downregulation of Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 messenger RNA and protein levels. Our findings suggest that VGSC may participate in the regulation of TN. PMID:27327156

  13. [The role of open neurosurgery in the treatment of cancer pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, A

    1984-06-01

    After a brief foreword on the indication of open surgery in the treatment of neoplastic pain those procedures are detailed which are more effective and widely used: Posterior Rhizotomy, Cordotomy, Mediolongitudinal Mielotomy and Bulbar trigeminal tractotomy. Of each procedure main technical features, indications and complications are detailed. It is concluded that these techniques are still very useful in management of severe cancer pain. PMID:6588308

  14. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  15. Stereotactic radiosurgery for primary trigeminal neuralgia: state of the evidence and recommendations for future reports

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, B.; Hamlyn, P; Zakrzewska, J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify systematically all the studies reporting outcomes and complications of stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia and to evaluate them against predefined quality criteria.

  16. Solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension causing proptosis and vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sharma, Arvind; Singh, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slowly growing, well capsulated, benign tumors. Involvement of vestibular nerve is most commonly followed by trigeminal nerve. Trigeminal schwannoma is rare entity, and cystic degeneration with intraorbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma is even rarer. These tumors occur in fourth and fifth decades of life and patients have variable presentation depending on which cranial compartment is involved. Orbital schwannoma usually presents with proptosis with or without vision loss. We are reporting such a rare case of solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension through superior orbital fissure that was removed surgically.

  17. Solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension causing proptosis and vision loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sharma, Arvind; Singh, Jitendra

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are slowly growing, well capsulated, benign tumors. Involvement of vestibular nerve is most commonly followed by trigeminal nerve. Trigeminal schwannoma is rare entity, and cystic degeneration with intraorbital extension of trigeminal schwannoma is even rarer. These tumors occur in fourth and fifth decades of life and patients have variable presentation depending on which cranial compartment is involved. Orbital schwannoma usually presents with proptosis with or without vision loss. We are reporting such a rare case of solid cystic trigeminal schwannoma with intraorbital extension through superior orbital fissure that was removed surgically. PMID:27695572

  18. Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Safarpour, Delaram; Jabbari, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP), a common form of human pain, often poorly responds to analgesic medications. In this review the authors discuss the pathophysiology and conventional treatment of neuropathic pain and provide evidenced-based statements on the efficacy of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) in this form of pain. The level of efficacy for BoNT treatment in each category of NP is defined according to the published guidelines of the American Academy of Neurology. The data indicate that BoNT treatment (most of the literature is with onabotulinumtoxinA) is effective (level A evidence) in postherpetic neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia. It is probably effective (level B) in posttraumatic neuralgia and painful diabetic neuropathy. The data on complex regional pain syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, occipital neuralgia, and phantom limb pain are preliminary and await conduction of randomized, blinded clinical trials. Much remains to be learned about the most-effective dosage and technique of injection, optimum dilutions, and differences among BoNTs in the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26866499

  19. Herpes Zoster Infection Involving Mandibular Division of Trigeminal Nerve and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome with Meningitis in an Immunocompetent Patient: A Rare Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Vijayan; Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Kar, Suvrendu Sankar; Choudhury, Cankatika; Choudhary, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Herpes zoster is a unilateral painful vesicular cutaneous eruption caused by the reactivation of the Varicella zoster virus. It commonly affects the older people and immunocompromised individuals. The dermatomes from T3 to L3 are most frequently involved. Its three stages include prodromal stage, active stage and chronic stage. The common complications of the infection include post-herpetic neuralgia, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, Guillain-Barre syndrome, transverse myelitis and encephalomyelitis. This case report summarizes a very rare association of herpes zoster meningitis with the involvement of mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve. The patient improved with intravenous acyclovir and prednisolone treatment. PMID:27504334

  20. Analysis of trigeminal nerve disorders after oral and maxillofacial intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassemi Alireza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative sensory testing (QST is applied to evaluate somatosensory nerve fiber function in the spinal system. This study uses QST in patients with sensory dysfunctions after oral and maxillofacial surgery. Methods Orofacial sensory functions were investigated by psychophysical means in 60 volunteers (30 patients with sensory disturbances and 30 control subjects in innervation areas of the infraorbital, mental and lingual nerves. The patients were tested 1 week, 4 weeks, 7 weeks and 10 weeks following oral and maxillofacial surgery. Results QST monitored somatosensory deficits and recovery of trigeminal nerve functions in all patients. Significant differences (p Conclusion QST can be applied for non-invasive assessment of sensory nerve function (Aβ-, Aδ- and C-fiber in the orofacial region and is useful in the diagnosis of trigeminal nerve disorders in patients.

  1. Neuroradiological diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently excellent results have been reported with microvascular decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS). The neuroradiological diagnosis of TN and HFS. however, is not satisfactory. As a trial, we performed metrizamide CT cisternography (MCT) or gas CT cisternography (GCT) in order to reveal the nerve and the adjacent structures in the cisternal portion for preoperative diagnosis. MCT was performed in two patients with TN and in two patients with HFS, while GCT was performed in three patients with TN and in two patients with HFS. One case with TN was examined by both MCT and GCT. Therefore, the diagnostic value of MCT and GCT in TN or HFS has been evaluated in nine examinations in eight cases. MCT and GCT are both useful in delineating the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve, and the adjacent arteries. Therefore, it is possible thus to diagnose the vascular compressing point and the offending artery in patients with TN and HFS. (author)

  2. Neuroradiological diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Uchimura, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Yamagiwa, Osamu; Itagaki, Shinichi (Yamagata Univ. (Japan))

    1983-12-01

    Recently excellent results have been reported with microvascular decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and hemifacial spasm (HFS). The neuroradiological diagnosis of TN and HFS. however, is not satisfactory. As a trial, we performed metrizamide CT cisternography (MCT) or gas CT cisternography (GCT) in order to reveal the nerve and the adjacent structures in the cisternal portion for preoperative diagnosis. MCT was performed in two patients with TN and in two patients with HFS, while GCT was performed in three patients with TN and in two patients with HFS. One case with TN was examined by both MCT and GCT. Therefore, the diagnostic value of MCT and GCT in TN or HFS has been evaluated in nine examinations in eight cases. MCT and GCT are both useful in delineating the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve, and the adjacent arteries. Therefore, it is possible thus to diagnose the vascular compressing point and the offending artery in patients with TN and HFS.

  3. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  4. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Derksen, Carol; Saqqur, Maher; Khan, Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA). The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo. PMID:26933370

  5. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Derksen, Carol; Saqqur, Maher; Khan, Khurshid

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic carotid - basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA). The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo. PMID:26933370

  6. [Differential radiodiagnosis of odontogenic mandibular osteomyelitis accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solonskaia, N S; Zorina, I S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of radiation examination in 43 patients with clinical manifestations of mandibular osteomyelitis. In 13 of them, the disease was accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy. The radiation semiotics of the changes occurring in the mandibular bone and its adjacent soft tissues in different phases of osteomyelitis is described. Comparative analysis of orthopantomograms and the images obtained by multislice spiral computed tomography has revealed the advantage of the latter in identifying insignificant changes in bone tissue and damages to the mandibular canal. Ultrasound study is of more informative value in detecting soft tissue changes in this area. High-technology radiodiagnostic techniques play a leading role in the differentiation of odontogenic and non-odontogenic trigeminal neuropathies.

  7. Efficacy of stereotactic gamma knife surgery and microvascular decompression in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia: a retrospective study of 220 cases from a single center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zi-Feng; Huang, Qi-Lin; Liu, Hai-Peng; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A retrospective study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of stereotactic gamma knife surgery (GKS) and microvascular decompression (MVD) in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia (TN) at a single center. The study included the evaluation of clinical outcomes of pain relief and pain recurrence and complications associated with GKS and MVD. Methods The study included 202 patients with primary TN and was conducted between January 2013 and December 2014; about 115 patients were treated with GKS and 87 patients were treated with MVD. TN pain was evaluated using the Barrow Neurological Institute and the visual analog scale scoring systems. Preoperative magnetic resonance tomographic angiography was performed for all patients. Microscope-assisted MVD used the suboccipital retrosigmoid sinus approach. GKS targeted the trigeminal nerve root entry zone with a margin radiation dose of 59.5 Gy, and brainstem dose <12 Gy. Posttreatment follow-up was for 2 years. Results Postoperative Barrow Neurological Institute scores for patients treated with GKS and MVD were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.01). Reduction in postoperative pain following MVD (95.4% patients) was significantly greater than that following GKS (88.7% patients) (P<0.01). Postoperative visual analog scale scores of the MVD group were significantly reduced compared with those of patients treated with GKS at the same postoperative time points (P<0.01). Patients treated with GKS had a significantly increased rate of loss of corneal reflex compared with patients treated with MVD (P=0.002). Conclusion Both GKS and MVD are safe and effective first-line and adjunctive treatment options for patients with TN. The clinical outcomes of pain relief and reduction of pain recurrence were better with MVD. For GKS, this study showed that the optimal radiation therapeutic dose range was 70–90 Gy, but brainstem radiation protection is recommended. PMID:27555796

  8. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus.

  9. Androgen receptor transcriptionally regulates μ-opioid receptor expression in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Seok; Zhang, Youping; Asgar, Jamila; Auh, Q-Schick; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y

    2016-09-01

    The involvement of testosterone in pain, inflammation, and analgesia has been reported, but the role of androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor for testosterone, is not well understood. We have previously shown that peripheral inflammation upregulates μ-opioid receptor (MOR) in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) in a testosterone-dependent manner. In this study, we hypothesized that testosterone regulates MOR expression via transcriptional activities of AR in TG. We first examined whether AR is co-expressed with MOR in TG neurons. Our immunohistochemical experiment revealed that AR staining is detected in neurons of all sizes in TG and that a subset of AR is expressed in MOR as well as in TRPV1-positive neurons. We identified the promoter region of the rat MOR gene contains putative AR binding sites. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that AR directly binds to these sites in TG extracts. We confirmed with luciferase reporter assay that AR activated the MOR promoter in response to androgens in a human neuroblastoma cell line (5H-5YSY). These data demonstrated that AR functions as a transcriptional regulator of the MOR gene activity. Finally, we showed that flutamide, a specific AR antagonist, prevents complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced upregulation of MOR mRNA in TG, and that flutamide dose-dependently blocks the efficacy of DAMGO, a specific MOR agonist, on CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Our results expand the knowledge regarding the role of androgens and their receptor in pain and analgesia and have important clinical implications, particularly for inflammatory pain patients with low or compromised plasma testosterone levels. PMID:27320211

  10. Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula of an Adult-Type Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery with Multiple Vascular Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  11. Direct carotid cavernous fistula of an adult-type persistent primitive trigeminal artery with multiple vascular variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Kwon, Do Hoon; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  12. Reactivation of trigeminal neuralgia following distraction osteogenesis in an 8-year-old child: Report of a unique case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is extremely rare in children. No concrete treatment protocols seem to be available for management of this condition in the pediatric population. Although trigeminal neuralgia may achieve remission, the possibility of reactivation of a hitherto quiescent condition cannot be ruled out. We present a case of pediatric trigeminal neuralgia following distraction osteogenesis of the mandible.

  13. Groin pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groin pain in men. The terms "groin" and "testicle" are sometimes used interchangeably. But what causes pain ... hernia. It may also involve pain in the testicles. Hernia : This problem occurs when there is a ...

  14. Eye pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  15. Wrist pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  16. Elbow pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  17. Heel pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  18. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  19. Efficacy of stereotactic gamma knife surgery and microvascular decompression in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia: a retrospective study of 220 cases from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai ZF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Feng Dai, Qi-Lin Huang, Hai-Peng Liu, Wei Zhang Department of Neurosurgery, Xinqiao Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Objectives: A retrospective study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of stereotactic gamma knife surgery (GKS and microvascular decompression (MVD in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia (TN at a single center. The study included the evaluation of clinical outcomes of pain relief and pain recurrence and complications associated with GKS and MVD.Methods: The study included 202 patients with primary TN and was conducted between January 2013 and December 2014; about 115 patients were treated with GKS and 87 patients were treated with MVD. TN pain was evaluated using the Barrow Neurological Institute and the visual analog scale scoring systems. Preoperative magnetic resonance tomographic angiography was performed for all patients. Microscope-assisted MVD used the suboccipital retrosigmoid sinus approach. GKS targeted the trigeminal nerve root entry zone with a margin radiation dose of 59.5 Gy, and brainstem dose <12 Gy. Posttreatment follow-up was for 2 years.Results: Postoperative Barrow Neurological Institute scores for patients treated with GKS and MVD were significantly improved compared with preoperative scores (P<0.01. Reduction in postoperative pain following MVD (95.4% patients was significantly greater than that following GKS (88.7% patients (P<0.01. Postoperative visual analog scale scores of the MVD group were significantly reduced compared with those of patients treated with GKS at the same postoperative time points (P<0.01. Patients treated with GKS had a significantly increased rate of loss of corneal reflex compared with patients treated with MVD (P=0.002.Conclusion: Both GKS and MVD are safe and effective first-line and adjunctive treatment options for patients with TN. The clinical outcomes of pain relief and reduction of pain recurrence were

  20. Persistent trigeminal artery: in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughen, John R; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Evans, Avery J; Jensen, Mary E

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with progressive brainstem infarction despite medical therapy. The patient was transferred to our institution for potential angioplasty of basilar stenosis. Imaging review demonstrated persistent trigeminal artery in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction. Persistent trigeminal arteries are commonly associated with an atretic basilar artery and interventional treatment can result in significant morbidity and mortality.

  1. BDNF promotes target innervation of Xenopus mandibular trigeminal axons in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishibashi Shoko

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal nerves consist of ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular branches that project to distinct regions of the facial epidermis. In Xenopus embryos, the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve extends toward and innervates the cement gland in the anterior facial epithelium. The cement gland has previously been proposed to provide a short-range chemoattractive signal to promote target innervation by mandibular trigeminal axons. Brain derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF is known to stimulate axon outgrowth and branching. The goal of this study is to determine whether BDNF functions as the proposed target recognition signal in the Xenopus cement gland. Results We found that the cement gland is enriched in BDNF mRNA transcripts compared to the other neurotrophins NT3 and NT4 during mandibular trigeminal nerve innervation. BDNF knockdown in Xenopus embryos or specifically in cement glands resulted in the failure of mandibular trigeminal axons to arborise or grow into the cement gland. BDNF expressed ectodermal grafts, when positioned in place of the cement gland, promoted local trigeminal axon arborisation in vivo. Conclusion BDNF is necessary locally to promote end stage target innervation of trigeminal axons in vivo, suggesting that BDNF functions as a short-range signal that stimulates mandibular trigeminal axon arborisation and growth into the cement gland.

  2. Persistent trigeminal artery: in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughen, John R; Starke, Robert M; Durst, Christopher R; Evans, Avery J; Jensen, Mary E

    2014-06-01

    We report a patient with progressive brainstem infarction despite medical therapy. The patient was transferred to our institution for potential angioplasty of basilar stenosis. Imaging review demonstrated persistent trigeminal artery in situ thrombosis and associated perforating vessel infarction. Persistent trigeminal arteries are commonly associated with an atretic basilar artery and interventional treatment can result in significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:24351576

  3. A rare cause of hyperprolactinemia: persistent trigeminal artery with stalk-section effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, G.; Baltacioglu, F.; Cimsit, C.; Akpinar, I.; Erzen, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Marmara University, Altunizade Istanbul (Turkey); Kilic, T.; Pamir, N. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Marmara University, Altunizade Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-04-01

    The primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal intersegmental arteries are fetal anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems in adults. We report a case of PTA compressing the left side of the pituitary gland and stalk, in a patient with elevated blood prolactin level. (orig.)

  4. SURVIVAL AND NEURITE FORMATION OF MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NEURONS OF THE RAT IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COPRAY, JCVM; LIEM, RSB

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the development and functional properties of single, isolated, rat mesencephalic trigeminal neurones, a cell-culture procedure was developed for these specific primary sensory neurones. Mesencephalic trigeminal neurones were isolated from the brainstem of 16-day-old rat embryos. Va

  5. A rare cause of hyperprolactinemia: persistent trigeminal artery with stalk-section effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal intersegmental arteries are fetal anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems in adults. We report a case of PTA compressing the left side of the pituitary gland and stalk, in a patient with elevated blood prolactin level. (orig.)

  6. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree......Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...

  7. Grading the intensity of nondental orofacial pain: identification of cutoff points for mild, moderate, and severe pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brailo V

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vlaho Brailo,1 Joanna M Zakrzewska2 1Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia; 2Facial Pain Unit, Division of Diagnostic, Surgical and Medical Sciences, Eastman Dental Hospital, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust/University College London, London, UK Background: When assessing pain in clinical practice, clinicians often label pain as mild, moderate, and severe. However, these categories are not distinctly defined, and are often used arbitrarily. Instruments for pain assessment use more sophisticated scales, such as a 0–10 numerical rating scale, and apart from pain intensity assess pain-related interference and disability. The aim of the study was to identify cutoff points for mild, moderate, and severe nondental orofacial pain using a numerical rating scale, a pain-related interference scale, and a disability measurement. Materials and methods: A total of 245 patients referred to the Facial Pain Unit in London were included in the study. Intensity and pain-related interference were assessed by the Brief Pain Inventory. Pain-related disability was assessed by the Chronic Graded Pain Scale. Average pain intensity (0–10 was classified into nine schemes with varying cutoff points of mild, moderate, and severe pain. The scheme with the most significant intergroup difference, expressed by multivariate analysis of variance, provided the cutoffs between mild, moderate, and severe pain. Results: The combination that showed the greatest intergroup differences for all patients was scheme 47 (mild 1–4, moderate 5–7, severe 8–10. The same combination provided the greatest intergroup differences in subgroups of patients with temporomandibular disorder and chronic idiopathic facial pain, respectively. Among the trigeminal neuralgia patients alone, the combination with the highest intergroup differences was scheme 48 (mild 1–4, moderate 5–8, severe 9–10. Conclusion: The cutoff points established in

  8. Osteopathic manipulative treatment for facial numbness and pain after whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genese, Josephine Sun

    2013-07-01

    Whiplash injury is often caused by rear-end motor vehicle collisions. Symptoms such as neck pain and stiffness or arm pain or numbness are common with whiplash injury. The author reports a case of right facial numbness and right cheek pain after a whiplash injury. Osteopathic manipulative treatment techniques applied at the level of the cervical spine, suboccipital region, and cranial region alleviated the patient's facial symptoms by treating the right-sided strain of the trigeminal nerve. The strain on the trigeminal nerve likely occurred at the upper cervical spine, at the nerve's cauda, and at the brainstem, the nerve's point of origin. The temporal portion of the cranium played a major role in the strain on the maxillary.

  9. Unusual fatal petrositis presenting as myofascial pain and dysfunction of the temporal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretan, Stefan; Duvoisin, Bernard; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    Petrositis is a rare and severe complication of acute otitis media and mastoiditis. Although the extension of the inflammatory process from the petrous apex to the adjacent Meckel cave can lead to trigeminal pain, an irritation of the trigeminal nerve roots resulting in acute or chronic hyperactivity of masticatory muscles has never been reported. We report here the unusual case of an 86-year-old man who presented with a handicapping myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome of the right temporal muscle as a heralding manifestation of an unusual form of petrositis. The patient progressively developed a retropharyngeal abscess, a right sphenoid sinusitis, and fatal meningitis. This case demonstrated that (1) myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome that does not respond to conventional treatments may suggest an unusual etiology and warrant further medical investigations and a detailed medical history and that (2) petrositis can manifest itself with atypical clinical symptoms and radiologic signs.

  10. Clinical analysis of linear accelerator radiosurgery for 42 cases with trigeminal neuralgia%X刀治疗三叉神经痛42例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈苏; 王如密; 王守森

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the treatment effect of linear accelerator radiosurgery (X knife) on trigeminal neuralgia and the complications. Methods Follow-up was conducted in 42 cases of trigeminal neuralgia treated with linear accelerator radiosurgery in our department, and their complications and degree of pain relief were recorded. Results Outcomes were excellent in 14 (33.3%), good in 22 (52.4%), effective in 4 (9.5%) and poor in 2 (4.8%). The mean time of pain relief was 2.1 months. Seven (16.7%) cases experienced increased facial paresthesia. Conclusion Linear accelerator radiosurgery is a precise and effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia.%目的 探讨直线加速器放射外科(X 刀)治疗三叉神经痛的疗效及其并发症.方法 回顾性分析我科收治的42例三叉神经痛患者的临床资料,均采用X刀治疗并随访疼痛缓解情况和并发症.结果 本组治疗效果为治愈14例(33.3%).显效22例(52.4%),有效4例(9.5%),无效2例(4.8%).疼痛缓解出现时间平均在2.1月之后.7例(16.7%)术后出现面部麻木.结论 X刀是一种精确而有效的治疗三叉神经痛的方法.

  11. Application of magnetic resonancetomographic angiography in treatment of trigeminal neuralgia with Adriamycin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Xu; Yong Zhang; Ni-Ka Chen; Lu-Ming Chen; Yang-Kui Ou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the application value of magnetic resonancetomographic angiography (MRTA) in the treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia with Adriamycin and to explore its pathogenesis.Methods:A total of 53 cases of primary trigeminal neuralgia without aberrant blood vessels oppressed trigeminal nerve were screened out by MRTA and was treated with Adriamycin. Another 62 former cases with primary trigeminal neuralgia treated by Adriamycin served as control. The treating efficacy and the recurrence rate of 3 and 6 months past were observed.Results:The efficacy of two groups after 14 d showed no difference. The recurrence rates of the observation group was significantly lower than the control on the both.Conclusions:The patients without trigeminal nerve oppressed by aberrant blood vessels by MRTA screening show low in recurrence rate and part of them seems to have self-healing mechanism.

  12. OnabotulinumtoxinA for trigeminal neuralgia: a review of the available data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Kowacs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia (TN patients may develop side effects from centrally acting drugs, have contraindications for neurosurgical procedures, or experience relapse during conventional therapies. OnabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT/A has been reported to be effective for TN, although this finding has been challenged. An overview of the available evidence based on a narrative/qualitative analysis of the literature is presented. About 90% of patients who receive BoNT/A show an improvement, a higher figure than that reported for the placebo effect of BoNT/A for other headaches. Tolerability of BoNT/A is good, and its few side-effects are transient. The articles reviewed were mainly case reports, case series and open-label trials; however, randomized controlled trials have endorsed the efficacy of BoNT/A for TN. This evidence, together with a better understanding of the analgesic mechanisms of BoNT/A and its proven efficacy in treating other pain syndromes, supports the use of this toxin as a therapeutic option for TN.

  13. Distinct development of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in platypus and echidna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    Both lineages of the modern monotremes have been reported to be capable of electroreception using the trigeminal pathways and it has been argued that electroreception arose in an aquatic platypus-like ancestor of both modern monotreme groups. On the other hand, the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex of the platypus is highly modified for processing tactile and electrosensory information from the bill, whereas the trigeminal sensory nuclear complex of the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) is not particularly specialized. If the common ancestor for both platypus and echidna were an electroreceptively and trigeminally specialized aquatic feeder, one would expect the early stages of development of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in both species to show evidence of structural specialization from the outset. To determine whether this is the case, we examined the development of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in the platypus and short-beaked echidna using the Hill and Hubrecht embryological collections. We found that the highly specialized features of the platypus trigeminal sensory nuclei (i.e. the large size of the principal nucleus and oral part of the spinal trigeminal nuclear complex, and the presence of a dorsolateral parvicellular segment in the principal nucleus) appear around the time of hatching in the platypus, but are never seen at any stage in the echidna. Our findings support the proposition that the modern echidna and platypus are derived from a common ancestor with only minimal trigeminal specialization and that the peculiar anatomy of the trigeminal sensory nuclei in the modern platypus emerged in the ornithorhynchids after divergence from the tachyglossids.

  14. Bloqueo de ganglio de Gasser con Radiofrecuencia lesión VS glicerol intragasseriano para neuralgia trigeminal The gasser ganglion blockade with radiofrequency vs intragasserian glycerol in the management of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hernández-Ruiz

    2008-04-01

    esto últimos dos periodos de seguimiento. La recidiva se presentó para el Grupo I en un 30.4%, para el Grupo II 62.8%, p:>0.01. La recidiva se presentó con un tiempo en meses promedio para el Grupo I de 8.2 y para el Grupo II de 6.4. La Necesidad de rebloqueo para el Grupo I fue del 21.7% mientras que para el Grupo II fue de 54.2%, p:Introduction and Objetive. In the trigeminal neuralgia at the moment don't exist a final treatment because of the different response at the miscellaneous handling, therefore is to the physician a challenge how to improve this entity. Several treatments are proponed in the management of this entity. We evaluated in our study two of this. Minor surgical Techniques are relatively simple in the hands of experienced Medical Specialist in Pain Medicine. We compare Gasserian Ganglion Blockade (GGB with radiofrequency lesión vs intragaserrian glycerol. Material and Methods. In a retrospective, observational, comparative longitudinal study. We studied a total of 58 patients with trigeminal idiopathic neuralgia who underwent to a Gasserian Ganglion Blockade (GGB. Were divided into 2 groups; patients in Group I (23 patients, with Radiofrequency lesión and Group II (35 patients with intragasserian glycerol, pain intensity was assessed using VAS, previous to the immediately procedure, each month, 6 to 12 months and 12 to 24 months. We evaluated the incidence and number of the need to performed the procedure again (GGB. The frequency of recurrence and the time interval in which it was evaluated, side and adverse effects are also evaluated. Results. No differences were observed between the two groups epidemiological. The branch trigeminal most affected in the Group I was V2-V3 52%, compared with Group II V2-V3 54.2%. Developments in the relief of pain was conducted by the scale of Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, with statistical analysis performed by Mann-Whitney-U test which was significant in the immediate assessment, with a p:0.01, Group I with VAS 0

  15. Antinociceptive effects of the selective CB2 agonist MT178 in inflammatory and chronic rodent pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Saponaro, Giulia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-06-01

    Cannabinoid CB(2) receptor activation by selective agonists has been shown to produce analgesic effects in preclinical models of inflammatory, neuropathic, and bone cancer pain. In this study the effect of a novel CB(2)agonist (MT178) was evaluated in different animal models of pain. First of all, in vitro competition binding experiments performed on rat, mouse, or human CB receptors revealed a high affinity, selectivity, and potency of MT178. The analgesic properties of the novel CB(2) agonist were evaluated in various in vivo experiments, such as writhing and formalin assays, showing a good efficacy comparable with that produced by the nonselective CB agonist WIN 55,212-2. A dose-dependent antiallodynic effect of the novel CB(2) compound in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy was found. In a bone cancer pain model and in the acid-induced muscle pain model, MT178 was able to significantly reduce mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose-related manner. Notably, MT178 failed to provoke locomotor disturbance and catalepsy, which were observed following the administration of WIN 55,212-2. CB(2) receptor mechanism of action was investigated in dorsal root ganglia where MT178 mediated a reduction of [(3)H]-d-aspartate release. MT178 was also able to inhibit capsaicin-induced substance P release and NF-κB activation. These results demonstrate that systemic administration of MT178 produced a robust analgesia in different pain models via CB(2) receptors, providing an interesting approach to analgesic therapy in inflammatory and chronic pain without CB(1)-mediated central side effects.

  16. Characterization of capsaicin induced responses in mice vas deferens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Gupta, Saurabh; Sørensen, Tinne;

    2011-01-01

    isolated preparations. The present study sets out to study and characterize the capsaicin as well as CGRP-induced responses in isolated mouse vas deferens. The effects of capsaicin and CGRP family of peptides were studied on electrically-induced twitch responses in the absence or presence of transient...... receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist and CGRP receptor antagonists. Twitch responses were attenuated by capsaicin (1nM-30nM) and CGRP family of peptides. The potency order was CGRP>intermedin-long (IMDL)~[Cys(Et)(2,7)]aCGRP~adrenomedullin (AM)>[Cys(ACM)(2,7)]a...

  17. Utility of Stellate Ganglion Block in Atypical Facial Pain: A Case Report and Consideration of Its Possible Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Harsha Shanthanna

    2013-01-01

    We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was...

  18. Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  19. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  20. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex and Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Dominga; Scuri, Rossana; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals). During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart, and brain and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is sequestered within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing. The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min) by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral levels, reducing the arterial blood pressure, and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activate the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension. Opposite effects, such as hypotension, and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone, were observed, when these responses were compared to those elicited by the diving reflex.

  1. Trigeminally induced cardiovascular reflex responses in spinalized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, S; Hotta, H; Suzuki, A; Umino, M

    2000-03-15

    The effects on cardiovascular functions of noxious stimulation to the orofacial areas innervated by trigeminal afferent nerves were analyzed in urethane-anesthetized, spinal cord-intact rats and in rats acutely spinalized at the second cervical level. In the spinal cord-intact rats, pinching of the upper lip produced increases in both heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Both responses were considered to be due to activation of sympathetic efferent nerves to the cardiovascular organs. Both responses were attenuated but did not disappear after spinalization at the C2 level. In spinalized rats, sympathetic preganglionic neurons emerging from the thoracolumbar spinal cord could not receive any neural influences from the brain. The HR response in the spinal rats was abolished after either bilateral vagotomy or intravenous injection of a peripherally acting muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, methylatropine. This suggests that the increase in HR was elicited via vagal cholinergic efferent fibers, probably by decreasing tonic activity of vagus nerves to the heart. In spinal rats, neither vagotomy nor cholinergic blockade affected the increase in MAP, but i.v. injection of the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist, OPC-21268, abolished the response of MAP. This suggests that the response of MAP was due to peripheral vasoconstriction elicited by vasopressin secreted from the posterior pituitary lobe. The present study demonstrated that, in rats acutely spinalized at the C2 level, noxious stimulation of orofacial areas innervated by the trigeminal nerve could produce reflex increases both in HR, by decreasing cholinergic vagal nerve activity to the heart, and blood pressure, by secreting vasopressin from the pituitary gland, even though sympathetic efferent innervation to the cardiovascular organs could not be directly affected by trigeminal afferent nerve excitation.

  2. Altered gray matter volume in primary trigeminal neuralgia:a voxel based morphometry MRI study%原发性三叉神经痛灰质体积变化的磁共振形态学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭林英; 朱文珍; 田甜; 杨时骐; 覃媛媛; 汤翔宇; 王剑; 张巨

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To detect whether there is gray matter volume (GMV) alteration and further analyze the involvement of central nervous system in pain processing in trigeminal neuralgia patients. Materials and Methods:Nineteen patients diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia and twenty-two age-matched, sex-matched normal volunteers as controls were recruited. T1-weighted 3D BRAVO sagittal images were obtained from all subjects. Voxel based morphometry(VBM) was used to identify GMV differences between patients and normal controls. The correlation between altered GMVs and disease duration as well as altered GMVs and pain intensity were also analyzed in trigeminal neuralgia patients. Results:Compared with normal controls, patients with trigeminal neuralgia had decreased GMV in left anterior cingulate as well as increased GMVs in right superior frontal gyrus, right insula, right putamen and bilateral cerebellum. Otherwise, we found a negative correlation between pain duration and altered GMV of the left anterior cingulate which is an important region for the development and maintenance of pain in trigeminal neuralgia. Conclusion:The altered GMV in central nervous system and the negative correlation between disease duration and altered GMV of the anterior cingulate may suggest that these central brain regions are extremely important for the development and maintenance of pain in trigeminal neuralgia, which reveals that exploring the central mechanisms of pain processing in trigeminal neuralgia may beneift new therapeutic methods in the future.%目的应用基于体素的形态学分析方法检测原发性三叉神经痛患者是否存在灰质体积改变,探索中枢神经系统在其疼痛处理中的作用。材料与方法对19例右侧三叉神经痛患者和22例年龄性别匹配的正常对照进行磁共振三维T1结构像扫描(3D-T1BRAVO),应用基于体素形态学分析(voxel-based morphometry,VBM)检测三叉神经痛患者全脑灰质体积的变化,探索

  3. Tactile information processing in the trigeminal complex of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexey N.; Tupitsyn, Anatoly N.; Makarov, Valery A.; Panetsos, Fivos; Moreno, Angel; Garcia-Gonzalez, Victor; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel

    2007-02-01

    We study mechanisms of information processing in the principalis (Pr5), oralis (Sp5o) and interpolaris (Sp5i) nuclei of the trigeminal sensory complex of the rat under whisker stimulation by short air puffs. After the standard electrophysiological description of the neural spiking activity we apply a novel wavelet based method quantifying the structural stability of firing patterns evoked by a periodic whisker stimulation. We show that the response stability depends on the puff duration delivered to the vibrissae and differs among the analyzed nuclei. Pr5 and Sp5i exhibit the maximal stability to an intermediate stimulus duration, whereas Sp5o shows "preference" for short stimuli.

  4. The zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonchi, Ali; Pashmini, Nazly; Guyuron, Bahman

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the site of emergence of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the temporalis muscle and to identify the number of its accessory branches and their locations. A pilot study, conducted on the same number of patients, concluded that the main zygomaticotemporal branch emerges from the deep temporal fascia at a point on average 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral palpebral commissure, commonly referred to as the lateral canthus. These measurements, however, were obtained after dissection of the temporal area, rendering the findings less reliable. The current study included 20 consecutive patients, 19 women and one man, between the ages of 26 and 85 years, with an average age of 47.6 years. Those who had a history of previous trauma or surgery in the temple area were excluded. Before the start of the endoscopic forehead procedure, the likely topographic site of the zygomaticotemporal branch was marked 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral orbital commissure on the basis of the information extrapolated from the pilot study. The surface mark was then transferred to the deeper layers using a 25-gauge needle stained with brilliant green. After endoscopic exposure of the marked site, the distance between the main branch of the trigeminal nerve or its accessory branches and the tattoo mark was measured in posterolateral and cephalocaudal directions. In addition, the number and locations of the accessory branches of the trigeminal nerve were recorded. On the left side, the average distance of the emergence site of the main zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the palpebral fissure was 16.8 mm (range, 12 to 31 mm) in the posterolateral direction and an average of 6.4 mm (range, 4 to 11 mm) in the cephalad direction. On the right side, the average measurements for the main branch were 17.1 mm (range, 15 to 21 mm) in the lateral direction and 6.65 mm (range, 5 to 11 mm) in the

  5. The zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonchi, Ali; Pashmini, Nazly; Guyuron, Bahman

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the site of emergence of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the temporalis muscle and to identify the number of its accessory branches and their locations. A pilot study, conducted on the same number of patients, concluded that the main zygomaticotemporal branch emerges from the deep temporal fascia at a point on average 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral palpebral commissure, commonly referred to as the lateral canthus. These measurements, however, were obtained after dissection of the temporal area, rendering the findings less reliable. The current study included 20 consecutive patients, 19 women and one man, between the ages of 26 and 85 years, with an average age of 47.6 years. Those who had a history of previous trauma or surgery in the temple area were excluded. Before the start of the endoscopic forehead procedure, the likely topographic site of the zygomaticotemporal branch was marked 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral orbital commissure on the basis of the information extrapolated from the pilot study. The surface mark was then transferred to the deeper layers using a 25-gauge needle stained with brilliant green. After endoscopic exposure of the marked site, the distance between the main branch of the trigeminal nerve or its accessory branches and the tattoo mark was measured in posterolateral and cephalocaudal directions. In addition, the number and locations of the accessory branches of the trigeminal nerve were recorded. On the left side, the average distance of the emergence site of the main zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the palpebral fissure was 16.8 mm (range, 12 to 31 mm) in the posterolateral direction and an average of 6.4 mm (range, 4 to 11 mm) in the cephalad direction. On the right side, the average measurements for the main branch were 17.1 mm (range, 15 to 21 mm) in the lateral direction and 6.65 mm (range, 5 to 11 mm) in the

  6. Painful tic convulsif syndrome due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Mittal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined clinical presentation of hemifacial spasm and ipsilateral trigeminal neuralgia is also known as painful tic convulsif (PTC. It is a rare condition and the most common cause is vascular compression. Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD is characterized by dilated and tortuous vertebral and basilar arteries. VBD is an uncommon and rarely reported cause of PTC. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, due to its inherent excellent contrast resolution, is an excellent modality for demonstrating the nerve compression by dilated and tortuous vessels seen in this condition. For this purpose, 3D MRI sequences are especially useful like constructive interference in steady state (CISS and MR angiography. Both of these have been reported to be helpful in the diagnosis of this condition. We report a case of PTC in which we were able to document facial and trigeminal nerve compression by VBD on MRI, using CISS and time-of-flight MR angiography.

  7. Dural neurogenic inflammation induced by neuropathic pain is specific to cranial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, B; Matak, I; Lacković, Z

    2014-05-01

    Up to now, dural neurogenic inflammation (DNI) has been studied primarily as a part of migraine pain pathophysiology. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated the occurrence of DNI in response to peripheral trigeminal nerve injury. In this report, we characterize the occurrence of DNI after different peripheral nerve injuries in and outside of the trigeminal region. We have used the infraorbital nerve constriction injury model (IoNC) as a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Greater occipital nerve constriction injury (GoNC), partial transection of the sciatic nerve (ScNT) and sciatic nerve constriction injury (SCI) were employed to characterize the occurrence of DNI in response to nerve injury outside of the trigeminal region. DNI was measured as colorimetric absorbance of Evans blue plasma protein complexes. In addition, cellular inflammatory response in dural tissue was histologically examined in IoNC and SCI models. In comparison to the strong DNI evoked by IoNC, a smaller but significant DNI has been observed following the GoNC. However, DNI has not been observed either in cranial or in lumbar dura following ScNT and SCI. Histological evidence has demonstrated a dural proinflammatory cell infiltration in the IoNC model, which is in contrast to the SCI model. Inflammatory cell types (lymphocytes, plasma cells, and monocytes) have indicated the presence of sterile cellular inflammatory response in the IoNC model. To our knowledge, this is the first observation that the DNI evoked by peripheral neuropathic pain is specific to the trigeminal area and the adjacent occipital area. DNI after peripheral nerve injury consists of both plasma protein extravasation and proinflammatory cell infiltration.

  8. Sodium channel Nav1.8 immunoreactivity in painful human dental pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate S

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 (SNS1/PN3 is expressed by nociceptors and may play a role in pain states. Methods Using specific antibodies for immunohistochemistry, we studied Nav1.8 – immunoreactivity in human dental pulp in relation to the neuronal marker neurofilament. Human tooth pulp was extracted from teeth harvested from a total of twenty-two patients (fourteen without dental pain, eight patients with dental pain. Results Fibres immunoreactive for Nav1.8, were significantly increased on image analysis in the painful group: median (range Nav1.8 to Neurofilament % area ratio, non-painful 0.059 (0.006–0.24, painful 0.265 (0.13–0.5, P = 0.0019. Conclusion Nav1.8 sodium channels may thus represent a therapeutic target in trigeminal nerve pain states.

  9. Long-term safety and efficacy of Gamma Knife surgery in classical trigeminal neuralgia: a 497-patient historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régis, Jean; Tuleasca, Constantin; Resseguier, Noémie; Carron, Romain; Donnet, Anne; Gaudart, Jean; Levivier, Marc

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is one of the surgical alternatives for the treatment of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of GKS in a large population of patients with TN with very long-term clinical follow-up. METHODS Between July 1992 and November 2010, 737 patients presenting with TN were treated using GKS. Data were collected prospectively and were further retrospectively evaluated at Timone University Hospital. The frequency and severity of pain, as well as trigeminal nerve function, were evaluated before GKS and regularly thereafter. Radiosurgery using the Gamma Knife (model B, C, 4C, or Perfexion) was performed with the help of both MR and CT targeting. A single 4-mm isocenter was positioned in the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve at a median distance of 7.6 mm (range 4-14 mm) anterior to the emergence of the nerve (retrogasserian target). A median maximum dose of 85 Gy (range 70-90 Gy) was prescribed. RESULTS The safety and efficacy are reported for 497 patients with medically refractory classical TN who were never previously treated by GKS and had a follow-up of at least 1 year. The median age in this series was 68.3 years (range 28.1-93.2 years). The median follow-up period was 43.8 months (range 12-174.4 months). Overall, 456 patients (91.75%) were initially pain free in a median time of 10 days (range 1-180 days). Their actuarial probabilities of remaining pain free without medication at 3, 5, 7, and 10 years were 71.8%, 64.9%, 59.7%, and 45.3%, respectively. One hundred fifty-seven patients (34.4%) who were initially pain free experienced at least 1 recurrence, with a median delay of onset of 24 months (range 0.6-150.1 months). However, the actuarial rate of maintaining pain relief without further surgery was 67.8% at 10 years. The hypesthesia actuarial rate at 5 years was 20.4% and at 7 years reached 21.1%, but remained stable until 14 years with a median delay of onset of 12

  10. Primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve: clinical and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reviewed the clinical and MRI findings in primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records, imaging and histological specimens of 10 patients with 11 primary tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We assessed whether tumour site, size, morphology or signal characteristics were related to symptoms and signs or histological findings. Histological proof was available for 8 of 11 tumours: six schwannomas and two plexiform neurofibromas. The other three tumours were thought to be schwannomas, because they were present in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 and followed the course of the trigeminal nerve. Uncommon MRI appearances were observed in three schwannomas and included a large intratumoral haemorrhage, a mainly low-signal appearance on T2-weighted images and a rim-enhancing, multicystic appearance. Only four of nine schwannomas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms, including two with large cystic components, one haemorrhagic and one solid tumor. Of the five schwannomas which did not cause any trigeminal nerve symptoms, two were large. Only one of the plexiform neurofibromas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms. Additional neurological symptoms and signs, not related to the trigeminal nerve, could be attributed to the location of the tumour in three patients. (orig.)

  11. Beneficial effects of botulinum toxin type A in trigeminal neuralgia Beneficio de la toxina botulínica tipo A en neuralgia del trigemino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zúñiga

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin has been thoroughly studied as a potential tool in the treatment of several pain syndromes. Therefore, we assessed the clinical effects of botulinum toxin type A injections in 12 patients with otherwise unresponsive idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Patients were infiltrated with 20-50 units of botulinum toxin in trigger zones. Those who presented with mandibular involvement were also infiltrated in the masseter muscle. The patients were assessed on a weekly basis using the Visual Analogic Scale for pain. Ten of our patients reported a significant benefit from botulinum toxin injections, with reduction or even disappearance of pain, and remained pain free for as long as 60 days. Our findings suggest that botulinum toxin may represent a useful therapeutic tool in the management of patients with this entity.La toxina botulínica ha sido estudiada en forma exhaustiva como una potencial herramienta en el tratamiento de múltiples síndromes dolorosos. Por lo tanto, evaluamos los efectos clínicos de la aplicación de toxina botulínica tipo A en 12 sujetos con neuralgia trigeminal idiopática resistente a manejo farmacológico. Se aplicaron en dichos sujetos entre 20 y 50 unidades de toxina botulínica tipo A en las zonas gatillo. Además se infiltró el músculo masetero en aquellos que presentaban involucro mandibular. Los sujetos fueron evaluados semanalmente con una escala visual análoga para dolor. Diez de los sujetos reportaron un beneficio significativo con el uso de toxina botulínica, con reducción e incluso desaparición del dolor, permaneciendo libres de dolor por un periodo de hasta 60 días. Nuestros hallazgos sugieren que la toxina botulínica puede representar una herramienta terapéutica útil en el manejo de pacientes con esta entidad.

  12. A medullary inhibitory region for trigeminal motoneurons in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, P; Pedroarena, C; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    1991-05-24

    The present report describes the effects on trigeminal motoneurons of stimulation of a circumscribed site within the parvocellular region of the medullary reticular formation. This medullary site was selected because anatomical studies have shown that premotor interneurons project from this site to the trigeminal motorpool. Electrical stimulation of this site induced IPSPs (PcRF-IPSPs) in jaw-closer motoneurons. A population of these IPSPs, recorded contralateral to the site of stimulation, exhibited latencies shorter than 1.5 ms (mean 1.16 +/- 0.08 SD). Their mean amplitude was 1.72 mV +/- 1.13 SD and their mean duration was 3.52 ms +/- 2.15 SD. We believe that these PcRF-IPSPs arose as the result of activation of a monosynaptic pathway. A comparable inhibitory input from this site to ipsilateral jaw-closer motoneurons and to both contra and ipsilateral digastric motoneurons was also observed. We therefore conclude that this medullary PcRF site contains premotor interneurons that are capable of postsynaptically inhibiting motoneurons that innervate antagonistic jaw muscles. PMID:1884229

  13. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  14. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica.

  15. The Role of Imaging for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Segmental Approach to High-Resolution MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeburg, Daniel P; Northcutt, Benjamin; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution MRI affords exquisite anatomic detail and allows radiologists to scrutinize the entire course of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve [CN] V). This article focuses first on the normal MRI appearance of the course of CN V and how best to image each segment. Special attention is then devoted to the role of MRI in presurgical evaluation of patients with neurovascular conflict and in identifying secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia, including multiple sclerosis. Fundamental concepts in postsurgical imaging after neurovascular decompression are also addressed. Finally, how imaging has been used to better understand the etiology of trigeminal neuralgia is discussed. PMID:27324998

  16. Congenital absence of the internal carotid artery diagnosed during investigation of trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital absence of the unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) was found in a patient during MR imaging examination for right trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance angiography showed complete absence of the right ICA and a large tortuous basilar artery (BA). The source images revealed a deformed right trigeminal nerve resulting from compression by the BA. Computed tomography of the skull base showed absence of the right carotid canal, suggesting agenesis of the right ICA. Longstanding hemodynamic stress may have caused the BA to become extremely tortuous, resulting in the trigeminal neuralgia. (orig.)

  17. Treatment of traumatic trigeminal-cavernous fistula by coil embolization and compression of carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xinjian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a traumatic cavernous fistula supplied by a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. The process of treatment was unique in this case. Fistula was subcompletely occluded by coiling from primitive trigeminal artery. Residual fistula was helped to form thrombosis by compression of the carotid artery with hand in the procedure. Long-term follow-up was satisfactory. Traumatic cavernous fistula supplied by a persistent primitive trigeminal artery could be treated by embolization and temporal compression of the parent artery might be useful for residual minimal fistula.

  18. Congenital absence of the internal carotid artery diagnosed during investigation of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, A; Sawada, A; Hirakawa, N; Totoki, T; Kudo, S

    2002-09-01

    Congenital absence of the unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) was found in a patient during MR imaging examination for right trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance angiography showed complete absence of the right ICA and a large tortuous basilar artery (BA). The source images revealed a deformed right trigeminal nerve resulting from compression by the BA. Computed tomography of the skull base showed absence of the right carotid canal, suggesting agenesis of the right ICA. Longstanding hemodynamic stress may have caused the BA to become extremely tortuous, resulting in the trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:12195492

  19. Congenital absence of the internal carotid artery diagnosed during investigation of trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Kudo, S. [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga (Japan); Hirakawa, N.; Totoki, T. [Department of Anesthesiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Congenital absence of the unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA) was found in a patient during MR imaging examination for right trigeminal neuralgia. Magnetic resonance angiography showed complete absence of the right ICA and a large tortuous basilar artery (BA). The source images revealed a deformed right trigeminal nerve resulting from compression by the BA. Computed tomography of the skull base showed absence of the right carotid canal, suggesting agenesis of the right ICA. Longstanding hemodynamic stress may have caused the BA to become extremely tortuous, resulting in the trigeminal neuralgia. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms; The efficacy of oblique sagittal view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masao; Nukui, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hajime; Kumagai, Hiroshi (Yamanashi Medical College, Tamaho (Japan)); Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou

    1991-06-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author).

  1. Pain Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... opiates such as morphine could relieve pain and chemist Felix Hoffmann developed aspirin from a substance in ... sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage.” TODAY Pain affects more Americans than ...

  2. [Oral pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benslama, Lotfi

    2002-02-15

    Pain, a major symptom of stomatological disease, usually leads to a specialist consultation. Most commonly it is caused by dental caries and differs in nature and in intensity according to the stage of disease: dentinitis, pulpitis, desmodontitis and dental abscess. Added to this is peridental pain and the pre- and post-operative pains related to these diseases. Almost all oral-maxillary pathology is painful, be it boney such as in osteomyelitis and fractures, mucosal in gingivo-stomatitis and aphthous ulcers, or tumourous. However, besides the "multidisciplinary" facial pains such as facial neuralgia and vascular pain, two pain syndromes are specific to stomatology: pain of the tempero-mandibular joint associated with problems of the bite and glossodynia, a very common somatic expression of psychological problems.

  3. Habituating pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajslev, Jeppe Zielinski Nguyen; Lund, Henrik Lambrecht; Møller, Jeppe Lykke;

    2013-01-01

    the industry reproduce physical strain and the habituation of pain as unquestioned conditions in construction work. The understanding of this mutual reinforcement of the necessity of physically straining, painful, high-paced construction work provides fruitful perspectives on the overrepresentation...

  4. Testicle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain include: Injury Infection or swelling of the sperm ducts ( epididymitis ) or testicles ( orchitis ) Twisting of the ... Cyst in the epididymis that often contains dead sperm cells ( spermatocele ) Fluid surrounding the testicle ( hydrocele ) Pain ...

  5. Breast pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  6. Technical considerations and outcome assessment in retrogasserian balloon compression for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Series of 901 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaissa Abdennebi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of our study was to describe the retrogasserian balloon compression (RGBC procedure with some personal tricks and to assess the long-term results. Methods: Between 1985 and 2012, 901 patients, suffering from refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TN, underwent RGBC procedure in our department. Concerning the surgical technique, the introducer was in close contact with the posterior extremity of the horizontal plate of the palatine bone and had the direction of the bisector of the angle clivus-superior edge of the petrous bone on an X-rays sagittal view. No metallic material was inserted intracranially. The balloon was inflated with 0.7 cc of contrast medium for 6 min. Results: At 1 month follow up, appreciable pain relief was obtained in 835 patients (92.7%. At 1 year, results were excellent in 605 patients (67.1%, satisfactory in 109 patients (12.1%, poor in 57 patients (6.3%, fair in 66 patients (7.3%, whereas recurrences were observed in the remaining 64 patients (7.2%. At mean follow up of 16,5 years, 559 (62% patients remained pain free. Twenty six patients (2,8% continued to experience severe pain. Recurrences occurred in two hundred and fifty patients (27,8%. Fifty two of them were operated on a third time and 22 underwent four procedures. Conclusion: RGBC is an appropriate and effective procedure for treatment of refractory TN, ensuring a long lasting pain relief predicted on three factors: pear shape of the balloon, its volume, and duration as mentioned earlier.

  7. Urination Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more often bad-smelling, bloody, or discolored urine (pee) fever or chills decreased appetite or activity irritability nausea or vomiting lower back pain or abdominal (belly) pain wetting accidents (in potty-trained kids) What to Do Call the doctor if your child has pain while urinating or can't ...

  8. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relaxation. Guided imagery for abdominal pain About self-hypnosis and kids See YourChild : Pain and Your Child or Teen for more detail ... how to help your baby cope with the pain of medical procedures, circumcision, and teething. ... Helping Kids YourChild : A Look at Biofeedback YourChild : ...

  9. Is peripheral alcohol injection of value in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia? An analysis of 100 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S A; Khan, M N; Shah, S F; Ghafoor, A; Khattak, A

    2011-04-01

    This retrospective study assessed the effectiveness and complications of peripheral alcohol injections in the management of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). 100 patients were analyzed who received 250 peripheral alcohol injections from June 2004 to January 2010. The duration of effect of alcohol blocks, the effect of repeated administration, and complications associated with alcohol injections were examined. The distal injection technique was applied. The branch of the nerve was identified and confirmed. After carefully anesthetizing the nerve with local anesthesia, 1-1.5 ml of absolute alcohol was injected depending on the nerve involved. Pain relief lasted for a mean of 14.13 ± 8.66 months. There was a fall in the duration of effect with subsequent injections. No serious complications were reported. Only 3% patients presented with non-neuralgic pain, swelling, burning sensation, trismus, dysesthesia, soreness, infection and the expected loss of sensation along the branch involved in TN. The combination of efficacy and reduced morbidity makes this procedure preferable for the treatment of TN. Alcohol injections are useful in those who are refractory to drug therapy, the elderly, medically compromised patients, unwilling to undergo neurosurgical procedures and in whom surgery is delayed for any reason. PMID:21168309

  10. Mind-Refreshing Acupuncture Therapy for Facial Spasm,Trigeminal Neuralgia and Stubborn Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正; 方桂梅

    2004-01-01

    @@ Facial spasm, trigeminal neuralgia and stubborn facial paralysis are commonly seen in clinic. The authors have obtained quite good therapeutic results for the above diseases by using the mind-refreshing acupuncture therapy. These are introduced in the following.

  11. Treatment resistant trigeminal neuralgia relieved with oral sumatriptan: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran JA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Treatment-resistant trigeminal neuralgia is a distressing condition, for both the patient and the treating doctor. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of trigeminal neuralgia successfully treated with oral sumatriptan in the literature. Case presentation A 51-year-old Caucasian woman was prescribed opiate analgesia for management of her treatment-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. Given the possible harmful effects of initiating such a course of treatment, a speculative therapeutic trial with oral sumatriptan was initiated with a successful outcome. Conclusion This case raises the hypothesis that oral sumatriptan may be an effective drug in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Further research is required to test this theory.

  12. Stereotactic radiotherapy for malignancies involving the trigeminal and facial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, K C; Zagar, T M; Brizel, D M; Yoo, D S; Hoang, J K; Chang, Z; Wang, Z; Yin, F F; Das, S K; Green, S; Ready, N; Bhatti, M T; Kaylie, D M; Becker, A; Sampson, J H; Kirkpatrick, J P

    2012-06-01

    Involvement of a cranial nerve caries a poor prognosis for many malignancies. Recurrent or residual disease in the trigeminal or facial nerve after primary therapy poses a challenge due to the location of the nerve in the skull base, the proximity to the brain, brainstem, cavernous sinus, and optic apparatus and the resulting complex geometry. Surgical resection caries a high risk of morbidity and is often not an option for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy are potential treatment options for patients with cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve. These techniques can deliver high doses of radiation to complex volumes while sparing adjacent critical structures. In the current study, seven cases of cancer involving the trigeminal or facial nerve are presented. These patients had unresectable recurrent or residual disease after definitive local therapy. Each patient was treated with stereotactic radiation therapy using a linear accelerator based system. A multidisciplinary approach including neuroradiology and surgical oncology was used to delineate target volumes. Treatment was well tolerated with no acute grade 3 or higher toxicity. One patient who was reirradiated experienced cerebral radionecrosis with mild symptoms. Four of the seven patients treated had no evidence of disease after a median follow up of 12 months (range 2-24 months). A dosimetric analysis was performed to compare intensity modulated fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (IM-FSRT) to a 3D conformal technique. The dose to 90% (D90) of the brainstem was lower with the IM-FSRT plan by a mean of 13.5 Gy. The D95 to the ipsilateral optic nerve was also reduced with IM-FSRT by 12.2 Gy and the D95 for the optic chiasm was lower with FSRT by 16.3 Gy. Treatment of malignancies involving a cranial nerve requires a multidisciplinary approach. Use of an IM-FSRT technique with a micro-multileaf collimator resulted in a lower dose to the brainstem, optic nerves and chiasm

  13. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  14. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  15. Transient receptor potential channels encode volatile chemicals sensed by rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Lübbert

    Full Text Available Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual's physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants, environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants. In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia.

  16. Intracranial stimulation of the trigeminal nerve in man. II. Reflex responses.

    OpenAIRE

    Cruccu, G.; Bowsher, D

    1986-01-01

    The reflex responses evoked by direct electrical stimulation of the intracranial portion of the trigeminal nerve have been studied in 16 subjects undergoing percutaneous retrogasserian thermocoagulation for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia affecting the second or third division. In the obicularis oculi muscle, early and late responses similar to the R1 and R2 components of the blink reflex were recorded. The former could be evoked only by stimulation of the second division and its latenc...

  17. Neuronavigation assisted decompression of trigeminal neuralgia caused by cerebellopontine angle osteoma

    OpenAIRE

    Iimura Yasushi; Saitou Rikizou; Abe Kazuhiro; Tsunoda Akira; Maruki Chikashi; Arai Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is usually caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root entry zone, but can be caused by other factors such as tumors, vascular disorders, and demyelination in multiple sclerosis. We present a rare case with a huge osteoma located on the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and causing TN. A 48-year-old woman presented with TN caused by a huge left CPA bone tumor. Surgery was performed by the lateral suboccipital approach under neuronavigation system guidance ...

  18. Isolated Bilateral Trigeminal Neuropathy in Sarcoidosis Presenting with Neurotrophic Corneal Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    L. Esakowit; M. Gupta; Lascaratos, G.; A. Syrogiannis

    2010-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease that may affect various organs. Nevertheless, involvement of the trigeminal nerve is exceedingly uncommon. This report presents a rare case of isolated bilateral trigeminal neuropathy presenting with neurotrophic corneal ulcers. The patient was treated with topical chloramphenicol and lubricants, as well as botulinum toxin injection to the upper eyelid to induce ptosis. Our case illustrates the importance of recognizing that bilateral corneal...

  19. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with cerebrovascular diseases and other cerebrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) is the most common permanent abnormal vascular anastomosis between carotid artery and basilar artery. PPTA is a rare cerebrovascular variation and is often associated with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Clinically, PPTA manifests itself in symptoms such as trigeminal neuralgia, oculomotor paralysis, abducens nerve paralysis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, etc. This paper aims to review 116 PPTA cases with CVD and other cerebrosis, which have ever been reported since 1983 in English or Chinese medical literature. (authors)

  20. Neuroimaging and clinical neurophysiology in cluster headache and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Lars; Sandrini, Giorgio; Perrotta, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Clinical neurophysiology and neuroimaging are two non-invasive approaches used to investigate the pathophysiological basis of primary headaches, including cluster headache (CH) and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Modern neuroimaging has revolutionized our understanding of the path......Clinical neurophysiology and neuroimaging are two non-invasive approaches used to investigate the pathophysiological basis of primary headaches, including cluster headache (CH) and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Modern neuroimaging has revolutionized our understanding...