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Sample records for caprine arthritis encephalitis

  1. Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus: prevalence and risk factors in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, E; Hosri, C; Abi-Rizk, A

    2015-12-01

    An epidemiological survey, accompanied by a serological analysis,was conducted on samples taken from Lebanese goat herds in order to determine the prevalence of infection with the caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) in Lebanon. The results of the survey provided information on various livestock production, animal health and herd management factors. Serum samplesfrom 952 goats, including the local breeds (Baladi and Damascene) and imported breeds (Alpine and Saneen), were taken from 60 farms distributed throughout Lebanon and tested for the presence of anti-CAEV antibodies. The data obtained were analysed using a statistical model to assess CAEV infection risk factors in Lebanon. In total, 125 samples proved to be positive, representing a prevalence in selected individuals of 13.1% and in selected herds of 51.7%. The Bekaa region had the highest number of herds with seropositive goats (90% of herds); the level was lower in Mount Lebanon, the North and the South (54%, 34% and 33%, respectively). The prevalence in relation to the livestock production system was 70% in herds in intensive systems, 54% in semi-intensive systems and 45% in extensive systems. The indigenous breeds were more resistant and tolerant of CAEV than the imported breeds. This study confirms the presence of CAEV in Lebanese goat herds and identifies the different livestock production practices likely to favour the rapid spread of the virus. PMID:27044161

  2. Neutralizing antibody response of rabbits and goats to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Klevjer-Anderson, P; McGuire, T C

    1982-01-01

    Rabbits were immunized with purified caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus and examined for neutralizing activity. Analysis of virus-antiserum interaction at 37 degrees C demonstrated little loss of viral infectivity after incubation with heat-inactivated rabbit antiserum for 60 min. However, sensitization of virus (as assessed by the addition of complement) occurred almost immediately and was 95% complete after 10 min. The complement-dependent neutralizing activity was associated with the imm...

  3. Activation of small ruminant aortic endothelial cells after in vitro infection by caprine arthritis encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, C L; Greenland, T; Gounel, F; Balleydier, S; Mornex, J F

    2000-12-01

    Small ruminants infected by the lentiviruses caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), originally isolated from a goat, or maedi-visna virus, originally from sheep, typically develop an organising lymphoid infiltration of affected tissues. This could reflect modulation of the migration pattern of lymphocytes in infected animals. Possible active contribution by vascular endothelial cells was investigated using an in vitro model. Low-passage cultured ovine aortic endothelium proved susceptible to productive infection by CAEV without significant cytotoxicity. Infected endothelial cells maintained expression of endothelial markers, increased MHC class I antigen expression and initiated expression of the adhesion molecule VCAM -1 and, at a late stage, MHC class II antigens. Infected endothelial cells showed a two-fold increase in binding capacity for sheep peripheral blood leucocytes over uninfected controls. Such events could contribute to the tissue distribution of lymphoid cells and local immune responses in lentiviral infections of small ruminants. PMID:11124093

  4. Serological survey of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus infection in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Misako; Hayama, Yoko; Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Murakami, Kenji; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2016-04-01

    A serological survey of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection was conducted from September 2006 to February 2007 in Japan. A total of 857 serum samples were collected from 113 herds in 28 prefectures and were analyzed for the presence of CAEV antibodies using agar gel immunodiffusion test. The seroprevalence of CAEV infection at the herd and animal levels was 15.0% (17/113) and 10.0% (86/857), respectively. Large farms with more than 10 goats and with animals for dairy and breeding purposes had higher seroprevalence (P<0.05). The results of this study provide useful information to consider effective control programs against CAEV infection in Japan. PMID:26498401

  5. First results on small ruminant brucellosis and tuberculosis and caprine arthritis-encephalitis in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderot de Cardona, Kristina; De Gracia Scanapieco, Abelardo; Braun, Peggy G

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a first-time study performed in El Salvador on the presence or absence of antibodies to three important animal diseases in small ruminants. The work was conducted in the west and central departments of the country, selecting 42 and 43 cantons with an existing sheep and goat population, respectively. Serum samples were collected from 396 sheep and 335 goats and tested for seropositivity to Brucella (B.) spp. The specimens from goats were also tested for antibodies to caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) virus. Four (1 %) sheep and none of the goats were seropositive by Rose Bengal test. All animals were negative by indirect ELISA (iELISA) for B. abortus. All animals were negative by iELISA for CAE. A total of 383 sheep and 330 goats underwent the single intradermal cervical tuberculin (SICT) test for tuberculosis. Seventy (18 %) sheep and 43 (13 %) goats reacted to the SICT test. Those reactors were subjected to the single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test, and one (0.3 %) goat was deemed to be a positive reactor. No mycobacteria were diagnosed in concluding analyses, and further studies are considered necessary to determine the prevalence of the investigated diseases. Additionally, it is recommended that small ruminants should be included in the national eradication program on bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis to prevent potential reservoirs.

  6. First results on small ruminant brucellosis and tuberculosis and caprine arthritis-encephalitis in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderot de Cardona, Kristina; De Gracia Scanapieco, Abelardo; Braun, Peggy G

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a first-time study performed in El Salvador on the presence or absence of antibodies to three important animal diseases in small ruminants. The work was conducted in the west and central departments of the country, selecting 42 and 43 cantons with an existing sheep and goat population, respectively. Serum samples were collected from 396 sheep and 335 goats and tested for seropositivity to Brucella (B.) spp. The specimens from goats were also tested for antibodies to caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) virus. Four (1 %) sheep and none of the goats were seropositive by Rose Bengal test. All animals were negative by indirect ELISA (iELISA) for B. abortus. All animals were negative by iELISA for CAE. A total of 383 sheep and 330 goats underwent the single intradermal cervical tuberculin (SICT) test for tuberculosis. Seventy (18 %) sheep and 43 (13 %) goats reacted to the SICT test. Those reactors were subjected to the single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test, and one (0.3 %) goat was deemed to be a positive reactor. No mycobacteria were diagnosed in concluding analyses, and further studies are considered necessary to determine the prevalence of the investigated diseases. Additionally, it is recommended that small ruminants should be included in the national eradication program on bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis to prevent potential reservoirs. PMID:26992736

  7. Evaluation of agar gel immunodiffusion serology using caprine and ovine lentiviral antigens for detection of antibody to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, D P; Evermann, J F; Shropshire, C; VanderSchalie, J; Bradway, D; Gezon, H M; Cheevers, W P

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test for the detection of antibody to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) was investigated with CAEV or ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) as the source of antigen. A total of 218 goat serum specimens were tested for anti-CAEV antibody by AGID and immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-labeled CAEV. In comparison with that of immunoprecipitation, the sensitivity of the CAEV AGID test was 0.91, and that of the OPPV AGID test ...

  8. Caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus-infected goats can generate human immunodeficiency virus-gp120 cross-reactive antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentiviruses display surprisingly disparate clinical manifestations in their specific hosts, share complex genetic structures, and exhibit extensive diversity, particularly in their envelope genes. The envelope protein, gp135, of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) has minimal primary sequence homology to gp120, the envelope protein of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Nevertheless, they bear certain similarities in that they both possess five variable regions, both are heavily glycosylated, and both share short sequence motifs. We establish a further relationship and demonstrate that some goats, infected with CAEV, possess gp135-specific antibodies which cross-react with gp120 from several HIV strains, provided the protein is expressed in insect cells. We show that, although the cross-reactivity of these immunoglobulins depends on the level of glycosylation, nevertheless, some antibodies recognize the protein epitopes on gp120, at least some of which are linear in character. Further characterization of this unexpected cross-reaction will define its potential therapeutic utility

  9. Competitive-Inhibition Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Serum Antibodies to Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus: Diagnostic Tool for Successful Eradication

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Lynn M.; Cheevers, William P.; McGuire, Travis C.; Adams, D. Scott; Hutton, Melinda M.; Gavin, William G.; Knowles, Donald P

    2003-01-01

    A competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was evaluated for the detection of serum antibodies to the surface envelope (SU) of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) in goats. This assay utilized 96-well microtiter plates containing CAEV-63 SU captured by monoclonal antibody (MAb) F7-299 and measured the competitive displacement of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated MAb GPB 74A binding by undiluted goat sera (F. Özyörük, W. P. Cheevers, G. A. Hullinger, T. C. McGu...

  10. Detection of Serum Antibodies to Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Virus in Sheep by Using a Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus Competitive-Inhibition Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Lynn M.; Cheevers, William P.; Marshall, Katherine L.; McGuire, Travis C.; Hutton, Melinda M.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Knowles, Donald P

    2003-01-01

    A competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for detection of antibodies to the surface envelope (SU) of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) was recently reported (L. M. Herrmann, W. P. Cheevers, T. C. McGuire, D. Scott Adams, M. M. Hutton, W. G. Gavin, and D. P. Knowles, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 10:267-271, 2003). The cELISA utilizes CAEV-63 SU captured on microtiter plates using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) F7-299 and measures competitive displacement of bi...

  11. Evaluation of a Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus/Maedi-Visna Virus Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in the Serological Diagnosis of Ovine Progressive Pneumonia Virus in U.S. Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serological diagnostic testing of sheep and goats using enzyme immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) is the most common method of determining small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection. A caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV)/maedi-visna virus (MVV) indirect (i) ELISA, which utilizes MVV EV1 capsid a...

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies to Conformational Epitopes of the Surface Glycoprotein of Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus: Potential Application to Competitive-Inhibition Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detecting Antibodies in Goat Sera

    OpenAIRE

    Özyörük, Fuat; Cheevers, William P.; Hullinger, Gordon A.; McGuire, Travis C.; Hutton, Melinda; Knowles, Donald P

    2001-01-01

    Four immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the gp135 surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) of the 79–63 isolate of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), referred to as CAEV-63, were characterized and evaluated for their ability to compete with antibody from CAEV-infected goats. Three murine MAbs (MAbs GPB16A, 29A, and 74A) and one caprine MAb (MAb F7-299) were examined. All MAbs reacted in nitrocellulose dot blots with native CAEV-63 SU purified by MAb F7-299 affinity chromato...

  13. A Polytropic Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Promoter Isolated from Multiple Tissues from a Sheep with Multisystemic Lentivirus-Associated Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Murphy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV is a lentivirus that infects both goats and sheep and is closely related to maedi-visna virus that infects sheep; collectively, these viruses are known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV. Infection of goats and sheep with SRLV typically results in discrete inflammatory diseases which include arthritis, mastitis, pneumonia or encephalomyelitis. SRLV-infected animals concurrently demonstrating lentivirus-associated lesions in tissues of lung, mammary gland, joint synovium and the central nervous system are either very rare or have not been reported. Here we describe a novel CAEV promoter isolated from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease including interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, polyarthritis and leukomyelitis. A single, novel SRLV promoter was cloned and sequenced from five different anatomical locations (brain stem, spinal cord, lung, mammary gland and carpal joint synovium, all of which demonstrated lesions characteristic of lentivirus associated inflammation. This SRLV promoter isolate was found to be closely related to CAEV promoters isolated from goats in northern California and other parts of the world. The promoter was denoted CAEV-ovine-MS (multisystemic disease; the stability of the transcription factor binding sites within the U3 promoter sequence are discussed.

  14. A polytropic caprine arthritis encephalitis virus promoter isolated from multiple tissues from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedeji, Adeyemi O; Barr, Bradd; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza; Murphy, Brian

    2013-08-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is a lentivirus that infects both goats and sheep and is closely related to maedi-visna virus that infects sheep; collectively, these viruses are known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). Infection of goats and sheep with SRLV typically results in discrete inflammatory diseases which include arthritis, mastitis, pneumonia or encephalomyelitis. SRLV-infected animals concurrently demonstrating lentivirus-associated lesions in tissues of lung, mammary gland, joint synovium and the central nervous system are either very rare or have not been reported. Here we describe a novel CAEV promoter isolated from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease including interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, polyarthritis and leukomyelitis. A single, novel SRLV promoter was cloned and sequenced from five different anatomical locations (brain stem, spinal cord, lung, mammary gland and carpal joint synovium), all of which demonstrated lesions characteristic of lentivirus associated inflammation. This SRLV promoter isolate was found to be closely related to CAEV promoters isolated from goats in northern California and other parts of the world. The promoter was denoted CAEV-ovine-MS (multisystemic disease); the stability of the transcription factor binding sites within the U3 promoter sequence are discussed. PMID:23955501

  15. Competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of serum antibodies to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus: diagnostic tool for successful eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Lynn M; Cheevers, William P; McGuire, Travis C; Adams, D Scott; Hutton, Melinda M; Gavin, William G; Knowles, Donald P

    2003-03-01

    A competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was evaluated for the detection of serum antibodies to the surface envelope (SU) of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) in goats. This assay utilized 96-well microtiter plates containing CAEV-63 SU captured by monoclonal antibody (MAb) F7-299 and measured the competitive displacement of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated MAb GPB 74A binding by undiluted goat sera (F. Ozyörük, W. P. Cheevers, G. A. Hullinger, T. C. McGuire, M. Hutton, and D. P. Knowles, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 8:44-51, 2001). Two hundred serum samples from goats in the United States were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of cELISA based on the immunoprecipitation (IP) of [(35)S]methionine-labeled viral antigens as a standard of comparison. A positive cELISA was defined as >33.2% inhibition of MAb 74A binding based on 2 standard deviations above the mean percent inhibition of 140 IP-negative serum samples. At this cutoff value, there were 0 of 60 false-negative sera (100% sensitivity) and 5 of 140 false-positive sera (96.4% specificity). Additional studies utilized IP-monitored cELISA to establish a CAEV-free herd of 1,640 dairy goats. PMID:12626453

  16. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hötzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain beta-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding. PMID

  17. Detection of serum antibodies to ovine progressive pneumonia virus in sheep by using a caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Lynn M; Cheevers, William P; Marshall, Katherine L; McGuire, Travis C; Hutton, Melinda M; Lewis, Gregory S; Knowles, Donald P

    2003-09-01

    A competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for detection of antibodies to the surface envelope (SU) of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) was recently reported (L. M. Herrmann, W. P. Cheevers, T. C. McGuire, D. Scott Adams, M. M. Hutton, W. G. Gavin, and D. P. Knowles, Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 10:267-271, 2003). The cELISA utilizes CAEV-63 SU captured on microtiter plates using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) F7-299 and measures competitive displacement of binding of the anti-CAEV MAb GPB 74A by goat serum. The present study evaluated the CAEV cELISA for detection of antibodies to ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in sheep. Three hundred thirty-two sera were randomly selected from 21,373 sheep sera collected throughout the United States to determine the sensitivity and specificity of cELISA and agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) based on immunoprecipitation (IP) of [35S]methionine-labeled OPPV antigens as a standard of comparison. A positive cELISA test was defined as >20.9 percent inhibition (% I) of MAb 74A binding based on two standard deviations above the mean % I of 191 IP-negative sheep sera. At this cutoff, there were 2 of 141 false-negative sera (98.6% sensitivity) and 6 of 191 false-positive sera (96.9% specificity). Sensitivity and specificity values for IP-monitored AGID were comparable to those for cELISA for 314 of 332 sera with unambiguous AGID results. Concordant results by cELISA and IP resolved 16 of the 18 sera that were indeterminate by AGID. Additional studies evaluated cELISA by using 539 sera from a single OPPV-positive flock. Based on IP of 36 of these sera, there was one false-negative by cELISA among 21 IP-positive sera (95.5% sensitivity) and 0 of 15 false-positives (100% specificity). We conclude that the CAEV cELISA can be applied to detection of OPPV antibodies in sheep with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:12965917

  18. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain β-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding

  19. Infecção experimental em cabritos pelo vírus da artrite encefalite Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus experimental infection in new-born kids

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    M.I.M.C. Guedes

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Vinte e quatro caprinos de uma semana de idade, soronegativos pela imunodifusão em gel de agar para artrite encefalite caprina (AEC, foram utilizados para estudo de infecção experimental pelo vírus da AEC. Dezesseis animais foram inoculados com lentivirus caprino, amostra Cork, oito pela via intravenosa e oito por instilação nasal. Oito animais serviram como controle, inoculados pelas vias intranasal ou intravenosa com 1ml de meio de cultura de células não infectadas. Os animais foram sacrificados aos 2, 6, 12 e 20 dias pós-inoculação (PI, e colhidas amostras do sistema nervoso central, articulações, tonsilas, linfonodos, pulmões, rins, timo, baço e intestinos delgado e grosso para histopatologia e imunoistoquímica. Um animal inoculado com o vírus da AEC pela via intranasal e sacrificado aos 20 dias PI apresentou imunomarcação positiva em um macrófago alveolar. Concluiu-se que a via aerógena é uma provável rota de infecção pelo vírus da AEC.The caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV experimental infection was studied in 24 one-week-old seronegative kids. Sixteen kids were inoculated with CAEV-Cork, with 10(6 TCID50/ml concentration, being eight inoculated intravenously, and eight intranasally. Eight animals were used as controls, being four inoculated intravenously, and four intranasally with non-infected cell culture medium. Since the day of the inoculation, clinical evaluation was performed daily, until the day of the sacrifice. Blood samples were taken for serological tests. The animals were killed in pairs at 2, 6, 12 and 20 days post-inoculation (PI and tissues samples of central nervous system, joints, tonsils, lymphonodes, lungs, kidneys, thymus, spleen, small and large intestine were collected for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. One animal CAEV inoculated intranasally and killed at 20 days PI showed immunohistochemical positive reaction in an alveolar macrophage. It was concluded that

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of the surface glycoprotein of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus: potential application to competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting antibodies in goat sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyörük, F; Cheevers, W P; Hullinger, G A; McGuire, T C; Hutton, M; Knowles, D P

    2001-01-01

    Four immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the gp135 surface envelope glycoprotein (SU) of the 79-63 isolate of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), referred to as CAEV-63, were characterized and evaluated for their ability to compete with antibody from CAEV-infected goats. Three murine MAbs (MAbs GPB16A, 29A, and 74A) and one caprine MAb (MAb F7-299) were examined. All MAbs reacted in nitrocellulose dot blots with native CAEV-63 SU purified by MAb F7-299 affinity chromatography, whereas none reacted with denatured and reduced SU. All MAbs reacted in Western blots with purified CAEV-63 SU or the SU component of whole-virus lysate following denaturation in the absence of reducing agent, indicating that intramolecular disulfide bonding was essential for epitope integrity. Peptide-N-glycosidase F digestion of SU abolished the reactivities of MAbs 74A and F7-299, whereas treatment of SU with N-acetylneuraminate glycohydrolase (sialidase A) under nonreducing conditions enhanced the reactivities of all MAbs as well as polyclonal goat sera. MAbs 29A and F7-299 were cross-reactive with the SU of an independent strain of CAEV (CAEV-Co). By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the reactivities of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated MAbs 16A and 29A with homologous CAEV-63 SU were MAb 74A. The reactivity of HRP-conjugated MAb 74A was blocked by sera from goats immunized with CAEV-63 SU or infected with CAEV-63. The reactivity of MAb 74A was also blocked by sera from goats infected with a CAEV-Co molecular clone, although MAb 74A did not react with CAEV-Co SU in Western blots. Thus, goats infected with either CAEV-63 or CAEV-Co make antibodies that inhibit binding of MAb 74A to CAEV-63 SU. A competitive-inhibition ELISA based on displacement of MAb 74A reactivity has potential applicability for the serologic diagnosis of CAEV infection. PMID:11139194

  1. Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) replicates productively in cultured epididymal cells from goats

    OpenAIRE

    Lamara, Ali; Fieni, Francis; Chatagnon, Gérard; Larrat, Myriam; Dubreil, Laurence; Chebloune, Yahia

    2013-01-01

    The transmission of CAEV from male goats has not been well studied and the target cells that support viral replication are not well characterized. Epididymal epithelial cells (EECs) are important and play a key role in the fertility and motility of spermatozoa. During their transit, spermatozoa incorporate several EEC-produced proteins into their plasma membranes to stabilize them and prevent premature acrosomal reaction. This intimate interaction between spermatozoa and EECs may increase the...

  2. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... training for muscle tone. Your provider may suggest physical therapy. This might include: Heat or ice Splints or ... American College of Rheumatology guidelines for management of gout. Part 2: therapy and anti-inflammatory prophylaxis of acute gouty arthritis. ...

  3. Viral encephalitis

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    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  4. Rasmussen's Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... severe seizures, loss of motor skills and speech, paralysis on one side of the body (hemiparesis), inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), and mental deterioration. Most individuals with Rasmussen’s ...

  5. Acanthamoeba encephalitis

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    Kaushal V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system infection with free-living amoebae is rare. We present a fatal case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis in a 63-year-old female from India where acanthamoebae were demonstrated and cultured from CSF. In spite of treatment with amphotericin B, fluconazole and rifampicin the patient did not survive. Amoebic infection should be suspected in a patient of encephalitis of unexplained aetiology as timely diagnosis can lead to a favourable outcome.

  6. Seroconversion and seroreactivity patterns of dairy goats naturally exposed to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus in Brazil Soroconversão e sororeatividade de cabras leiteiras naturalmente expostas ao virus da artrite-encefalite caprina no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Soares Castro

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A labelled avidin-biotin ELISA (lab-ELISA using repeated serum samples of goats showed a progressive seroconversion with higher seroconversion rate at the period going from the beginning of the breeding up to the last half of lactation (35.0%, compared to that recorded at the beginning of breeding (17.8%(pForam realizados exames sorológicos em cabras leiteiras, utilizando-se ELISA marcado com avidina-biotina (LAB-ELISA. Esses exames mostraram soroconversão progressiva, com uma taxa maior entre os animais a partir do início da reprodução até a última metade da lactação (35% comparada à observada nos animais até o início da reprodução (17,8%(p<0,05. Além disso, o padrão de sororeatividade das amostras colhidas a cada 30-40 dias, durante 12 meses, avaliado pelo LAB-ELISA, foi caracterizado por alta variabilidade individual. Não foi observada sororeversão, e títulos mais altos foram obtidos mais no grupo constituído por animais que entraram em lactação (n=6, média de títulos=913,4 do que no grupo constituído por animais que cruzaram, mas não conceberam (n=4, média de títulos=261,2(p<0,01.

  7. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the r...

  8. Dengue encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kapil Borawake; Parikshit Prayag; Atul Wagh; Swati Dole

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of dengue fever with features of encephalitis. The diagnosis of dengue was confirmed by the serum antibodies to dengue and the presence of a dengue antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid. This patient had characteristic magnetic resonance imaging brain findings, mainly involving the bilateral thalami, with hemorrhage. Dengue is not primarily a neurotropic virus and encephalopathy is a common finding in Dengue. Hence various other etiological possibilities were considered before c...

  9. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine, what should I do? What is Japanese encephalitis? Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially severe disease. ... cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts of ...

  10. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis Fact Sheet See a list of ... Where can I get more information? What is meningitis? What is encephalitis? Infections, and less commonly other ...

  11. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  12. AcEST: BP917760 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sp|P33458|GAG_CAEVC Gag polyprotein OS=Caprine arthritis encepha... 34 0.52 sp|Q...C Sbjct: 403 IICHHCGKRGHMQKDC 418 >sp|P33458|GAG_CAEVC Gag polyprotein OS=Caprine arthritis encephalitis vir

  13. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Enteropathic Arthritis Learn About Spondylitis / Enteropathic Arthritis Overview For The ... Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Overview: Enteropathic Arthritis Enteropathic (en-ter-o-path-ic) arthritis is ...

  14. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  15. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute encephalitis is the most commonly recognized clinical manifestation of JE virus infection. Milder forms of disease, ... in the United States—an inactivated Vero cell culture–derived vaccine, Ixiaro ( Table 3-06 ). Ixiaro is ...

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical, CT and, in one case, autopsy findings indicated a diagnosis of a severe necrotising encephalitis in two patients. Although usually herpes simplex virus is blamed for this form of encephalitis, it was possible to prove in these two patients that mycoplasma was the causative agent of the disease. It is concluded that this organism can produce a serious disease in the central nervous system similar to that caused by herpes simplex. (orig.)

  17. Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tick-borne Encephalitis (TBE) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tick-borne encephalitis, or TBE, is a human viral ...

  18. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  19. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss ... common type of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of ...

  20. Psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  1. Raccoon roundworm encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Pareen; Boyd, Zachary [University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Cully, Brent [University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Raccoon roundworm encephalitis is a rare but devastating infection characterized by progressive neurological decline despite attempted therapy. Patients present with deteriorating neurological function, eosinophilia, and history of pica or geophagia resulting in ingestion of the parasite. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate nonspecific findings of progressive white matter inflammation and cortical atrophy. (orig.)

  2. Whose failure? Encephalitis kills!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushana Rao Potharaju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis continues to be one of the most dreaded diagnoses because a high rate of morbidity and mortality are accepted even before starting the treatment. Most encephalitis cases occur in rural areas due to poor environmental sanitation, high-vector density, shortage of protected water supplies and lack of health education. Vaccination, environmental sanitation, vector control, health education and attention to prompt diagnosis and treatment in rural hospitals are the four essential pillars for reducing case fatality rate (CFR of encephalitis. Frequently, virulence of the virus, immunological state of the host, unavailability of antiviral drugs and lack of enough tertiary care hospitals (TCH are not responsible for the high CFR. Basic supportive care is not being practiced meticulously in Primary and Secondary Care Hospitals (PSCH, and their services are not being utilized fully. Main causes of high mortality and morbidity rates are hypoxia and ischemia of brain and other organs precipitated by preventable, controllable or treatable complications due to lack of basic medical and nursing care during transport to the TCH. Undiagnosed Rickettsial infections are suspected to be partly responsible for the high CFR in some areas. Improving rural hospitals and their ambulance services are the most economical way to reduce CFR. "Treatment facilities must be made available at places where cases occur." The best way to reduce CFR of encephalitis in developing and underdeveloped countries is to increase and improve PSCH and sensitize politicians, administrators, medical/nursing professionals and more importantly to impress and convince the public to utilize them.

  3. [Neurological syndromes, encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    The remote effects of malignant tumors in most cases of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes(PNS)are mediated by autoimmune processes against antigens shared by the tumor cells and the nervous tissue(onconeural antigens). Onconeural (or paraneoplastic)antibodies are broadly categorized into two groups according to the location of the corresponding onconeural antigens, inside or on the surface of neurons. Antibodies established as clinically relevant diagnostic markers for PNS are designated as well-characterized onconeural antibodies (or classical antibodies)that target intracellular antigens(Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2/CRMP5,Ma2, and amphiphysin). They also serve as useful markers in detecting primary tumors. Recent identification of new antibodies as markers of subtypes of limbic encephalitis has also expanded the concept of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. These autoantibodies are directed to neuronal cell-surface antigens including neurotransmitter receptors(NMDA, AMPA, and GABAB receptors)and ion channels(VGKC). They are less frequently associated with cancer, so that they cannot be used as specific markers for PNS. Autoimmune limbic encephalitis with anti-neuronal cell surface antobodies and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with classical antibodies overlap in some clinical features but are pathophysiologically distinct. Classical antibodies are not simple tumor markers. They seem to be closely related to the disease mechanisms because specific intrathecal synthesis has been shown in PNS patients. However, attempts to produce an animal model of PNS by passive transfer of these antibodies have been unsuccessful, and there is no direct evidence demonstrating the pathogenic role of classical antibodies. Instead, some circumstantial evidence, including pathological studies showing extensive infiltrates of T cells in the CNS of the patients, supports the hypothesis that cytotoxic-T cell mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal damage. On the other hand, humoral immune

  4. A transfectant RK13 cell line permissive to classical caprine scrapie prion propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Zhuang, Dongyue; Truscott, Thomas C; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Schneider, David A

    2016-03-01

    To assess scrapie infectivity associated with caprine-origin tissues, bioassay can be performed using kids, lambs or transgenic mice expressing caprine or ovine prion (PRNP) alleles, but the incubation periods are fairly long. Although several classical ovine scrapie prion permissive cell lines with the ability to detect brain-derived scrapie prion have been available, no classical caprine scrapie permissive cell line is currently available. Therefore, the aims of this study were to generate a rabbit kidney epithelial cell line (RK13) stably expressing caprine wild-type PRNP (cpRK13) and then to assess permissiveness of cpRK13 cells to classical caprine scrapie prion propagation. The cpRK13 and plasmid control RK13 (pcRK13) cells were incubated with brain-derived classical caprine scrapie inocula prepared from goats or ovinized transgenic mice (Tg338, express ovine VRQ allele) infected with caprine scrapie. Significant PrP(Sc) accumulation, which is indicative of scrapie prion propagation, was detected by TSE ELISA and immunohistochemistry in cpRK13 cells inoculated with classical caprine scrapie inocula. Western blot analysis revealed the typical proteinase K-resistant 3 PrP(res) isoforms in the caprine scrapie prion inoculated cpRK13 cell lysate. Importantly, PrP(Sc) accumulation was not detected in similarly inoculated pcRK13 cells, whether by TSE ELISA, immunohistochemistry, or western blot. These findings suggest that caprine scrapie prions can be propagated in cpRK13 cells, thus this cell line may be a useful tool for the assessment of classical caprine prions in the brain tissues of goats. PMID:27216989

  5. Development of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Inactivated Vaccine( M1601 Strain)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Ping; He; Ying; Chu; Yuefeng; Gao; Pengcheng; Zhang; Xuan; Lu; Zhongxin

    2014-01-01

    Three batches of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia inactivated vaccine( M1601 strain) developed by the laboratory were studied from the aspects of safety,minimum immune dose,immunity duration and storage life. The results showed that the vaccine was safe to goats under different physiological conditions.Regardless of lambs or adult goats,the minimum immune dose was 3 m L,and the immunity duration and the storage life were 6 and 12 months,respectively.

  6. Encephalitis in primary HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, M; Kirk, O

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of primary HIV encephalitis, which initially presented as acute psychosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was suggestive of vasculitis and multiple infarctions, whereas a brain biopsy after six weeks of symptoms showed HIV encephalitis with microglial nodules, but no signs...... of vasculitis. We review previous reported cases and radiological findings in HIV encephalitis and discuss the role of antiretroviral therapy and steroids in its management....

  7. Postinfectious encephalitis (21 cases appended)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丰宏林; 孙伟; 王文秋; 王德生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To report 21 cases of postinfectious encephatitis according to ICD-NA, postinfectious/parainfectious encephalitis is an independent disease.Methods Using the uniform criteria provided by The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we diagnosed postinfectious encephalitis among patients admitted to The First Hospital of Harbin Medical University and analyzed the characteristics of these cases. Results All the patients had histories of preceding infection, and most of them suffered from mental and conscious disorders. Adrenocortical hormone was effective.Conclusions Postinfectious encephalitis is an independent disease. According to this article, about 10% patients with encephalitis admitted to our hospital are postinfectious.

  8. Japanese Encephalitis Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Yoshito

    1995-01-01

    On the ecological basis of vector mosquitoes of Japanese encephalitis, measures of their control were examined from viewpoint of their practicability. It was concluded that chemical control is not of practical value, biological control is of limited effectiveness, and environmental control by source reduction is impossible. Instead, it was recommended to improve human living style so as to reduce the frequency of man/mosquito contact.

  9. Fungal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  11. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  12. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  13. Identification and biological activity of ovine and caprine calcitonin receptor-stimulating peptides 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher J; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Yandle, Timothy G; Minamino, Naoto

    2008-08-01

    We have recently reported the isolation of three new members of the calcitonin (CT) gene-related peptide family of peptides, the CT receptor (CT-R)-stimulating peptides (CRSPs). We now report the sequencing and characterization of ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2. Mature ovine and caprine CRSP-1 are identical and have strong structural homology to CRSP-1s identified to date from other species. As with other CRSP-1s, ovine/caprine CRSP-1 binds to and activates the CT-R but not the CT-like receptor (CL-R) in combination with the receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 does not activate any of these receptor-RAMP complexes. Intravenous infusions of ovine CRSP-1 to normal conscious sheep induced dose-dependent reduction in plasma total Ca levels (P=0.02) and corrected Ca levels (P=0.017) associated with increases in plasma cAMP (P=0.002). CRSP-1 reduced both plasma amino-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.006) and plasma renin activity (P=0.028). There were no significant effects observed on hemodynamic or renal indices measured. In conclusion, we have sequenced ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2 precursors. This newly identified CRSP-1 has been shown to share the structural and biological features of CRSP-1s known to date. In vivo studies confirm that ovine CRSP-1 reduces plasma Ca levels in sheep, presumably via a cAMP-mediated mechanism. By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 did not stimulate any combination of CT-R, CL-R, and RAMPs. Accession numbers of cDNA determined in this study are caprine CRSP-1, AB364646; caprine CRSP-2, AB364647; and ovine CRSP-1, AB364648.

  14. Japanese Encephalitis Outbreak, India, 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Parida, Manmohan; Dash, Paban K.; Tripathi, Nagesh K.; ,; Sannarangaiah, Santhosh; Saxena, Parag; Agarwal, Surekha; Sahni, Ajay K.; Singh, Sanjay P; Rathi, Arvind K.; Bhargava, Rakesh; Abhyankar, Ajay; Shailendra K Verma; Rao, Putcha V. Lakshmana; Sekhar, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    An outbreak of viral encephalitis occurred in Gorakhpur, India, from July through November 2005. The etiologic agent was confirmed to be Japanese encephalitis virus by analyzing 326 acute-phase clinical specimens for virus-specific antibodies and viral RNA and by virus isolation. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these isolates belonged to genogroup 3.

  15. Dengue encephalitis -a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.C.Bhattacharyya; Jagdish Prasad Agarwal

    2009-01-01

    Encephalitis is an uncommon manifestation of dengue fever.Here we present a 4 years old female child from Northeast Region of India who suffered from dengue encephalitis.To our knowledge,this is probably the first diagnosed case of dengue fever from this region.

  16. Multiphasic presentation of Rasmussen's encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Avbersek; A. Miserocchi; A.W. McEvoy; A.V. Patel; E. Aronica; I. Blumcke; T.S. Jacques; J. Acheson; M. Thom; S.M. Sisodiya

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause, characterised by drug-resistant focal epilepsy that may rarely present in adolescence or adulthood. We present a case of Rasmussen's encephalitis with prominent recurrent fluctuation in symptoms and well-documented f

  17. MRI Findings In Dengue Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf V.V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations are rare in dengue fever. Two cases with encephalopathy and systemic features of dengue fever with abnormal CSF and MR imaging are reported. Striking MRI finding was bilateral symmetrical thalamic lesions similar to those reported in Japanese encephalitis. This report highlights that MRI findings can be similar in dengue and Japanese encephalitis.

  18. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  19. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  20. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBD Help Center Home > Resources > Arthritis Go Back Arthritis Email Print + Share Arthritis, or inflammation of the ... joints and a reduction in flexibility. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS In IBD, arthritis may appear in three different ...

  1. MRI in Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Kalita, J. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Salwani, V. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gupta, R.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gujral, R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We document the MRI features in seven patients with Japanese encephalitis. MRI was carried out on a 1.5 T system within 10-60 days of onset. In all the patients MRI revealed bilateral thalamic lesions, haemorrhagic in five. Signal changes were present in the cerebrum in four patients, the midbrain and cerebellum in three each, the pons in two and the basal ganglia in one. The lesions were haemorrhagic in three of the four patients with lesions in the cortex, two of the three with lesions in the midbrain and cerebellum, but the pontine lesions were haemorrhagic in both patients. Spinal cord involvement was seen in one of the three patients who underwent MRI. In two patients MRI was repeated 3 years after the onset, showing marked reduction in abnormal signal; and all the lesions gave low signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Bilateral thalamic involvement, especially haemorrhagic, may be considered characteristic of Japanese encephalitis, especially in endemic areas. (orig.)

  2. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  3. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Arthritis What is Arthritis? Arthritis, in general terms, is inflammation and swelling of ... an increase in the fluid in the joints. Arthritis has multiple causes; just as a sore throat ...

  4. Protection against Japanese encephalitis by inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Nisalak, A; Sangawhipa, N; Jatanasen, S; Laorakapongse, T; Innis, B L; Kotchasenee, S; Gingrich, J B; Latendresse, J; Fukai, K

    1988-09-01

    Encephalitis caused by Japanese encephalitis virus occurs in annual epidemics throughout Asia, making it the principal cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in the world. No currently available vaccine has demonstrated efficacy in preventing this disease in a controlled trial. We performed a placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial in a northern Thai province, with two doses of monovalent (Nakayama strain) or bivalent (Nakayama plus Beijing strains) inactivated, purified Japanese encephalitis vaccine made from whole virus derived from mouse brain. We examined the effect of these vaccines on the incidence and severity of Japanese encephalitis and dengue hemorrhagic fever, a disease caused by a closely related flavivirus. Between November 1984 and March 1985, 65,224 children received two doses of monovalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 21,628), bivalent Japanese encephalitis vaccine (n = 22,080), or tetanus toxoid placebo (n = 21,516), with only minor side effects. The cumulative attack rate for encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus was 51 per 100,000 in the placebo group and 5 per 100,000 in each vaccine group. The efficacy in both vaccine groups combined was 91 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 70 to 97 percent). Attack rates for dengue hemorrhagic fever declined, but not significantly. The severity of cases of dengue was also reduced. We conclude that two doses of inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine, either monovalent or bivalent, protect against encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus and may have a limited beneficial effect on the severity of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  5. Vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Karin Linda; Samuel, Miny; Wai, Kim Lay

    2007-01-01

    ), no intervention, or alternative Japanese encephalitis vaccine. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Authors independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Dichotomous data were compared with relative risks and a 95% confidence interval (CI), and converted into percentage vaccine efficacy. MAIN RESULTS......BACKGROUND: Vaccination is recognized as the only practical measure for preventing Japanese encephalitis. Production shortage, costs, and issues of licensure impair vaccination programmes in many affected countries. Concerns over vaccine effectiveness and safety also have a negative impact...... on acceptance and uptake. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis in terms of effectiveness, adverse events, and immunogenicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: In March 2007, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1...

  6. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  7. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  10. Viral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  15. Ebola Virus-Related Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greslan, Thierry; Billhot, Magali; Rousseau, Claire; Mac Nab, Christine; Karkowski, Ludovic; Cournac, Jean-Marie; Bordes, Julien; Gagnon, Nicolas; Dubrous, Philippe; Duron, Sandrine; Moroge, Sophie; Quentin, Benoit; Koulibaly, Fassou; Bompaire, Flavie; Renard, Jean-Luc; Cellarier, Gilles

    2016-10-15

    Ebola patients frequently exhibit behavioral modifications with ideation slowing and aggressiveness, sometimes contrasting with mild severity of Ebola disease. We performed lumbar punctures in 3 patients with this presentation and found Ebola virus in all cerebrospinal fluid samples. This discovery helps to discuss the concept of a specific Ebola virus encephalitis. PMID:27418576

  16. Japanese encephalitis: current worldwide status*

    OpenAIRE

    Umenai, T.; Krzysko, R.; Bektimirov, T. A.; Assaad, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    The changing epidemiological and distribution patterns of Japanese encephalitis in various southern and east Asian countries are described. Immunization is considered to be the only practical way to control the infection. Several vaccines have been developed and two types of inactivated vaccine are now available for use in man.

  17. CT findings of Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoji, Hiroshi; Toyomasu, Teruo; Fukada, Makiko; Nakashima, Kenichi; Kaji, Masaro; Kobayashi, Kenji

    1984-04-01

    In this study, CT findings of eight patients with Japanese encephalitis were analyzed. In principle, CT scans were done at the acute stage, within 3 weeks of the onset, and at the convalescent stage, after from 1 month to 1 year. The results may be divided into three groups: normal scans, low-density lesions, and ventricular abnormalities. 1) Normal scans: CT findings in Cases 1 and 5, showed no abnormalities, although patient 5 had clinically severe encephalitis. 2) Low-density lesions: In Case 3, a slight low-density area was observed in the bilateral thalami only at the acute stage. CT scans in Case 4, obtained 2 and 4 months after the onset, exhibited low-density areas in the bilateral thalami, the left basal ganglia, and the left substantia nigra. In Case 7, diffuse low-density areas in the white matter were found 3 months after the onset. 3) Ventricular abnormalities: CT in Case 2 revealed a moderate dilatation of the ventricular system, which probably suggests normal-pressure hydrocephalus. In 2 other cases, a narrowing or dilatation of the lateral ventricle was observed. The CT findings regarding Japanese encephalitis were discussed in comparison with those of other viral encephalitides, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis.

  18. Encephalitis Lethargica: An Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Twenty patients (16 from 2-16 years old, mean 10.4 years; 4 from 17-69, mean 47.5 years) with an encephalitis lethargica (EL) syndrome resembling that reported in the 1916-1927 epidemic, and presenting between 1999 and 2002, are reported from Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, and other tertiary neurology centers in the UK.

  19. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution.

  20. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  1. Chondrogenic differentiation and lubricin expression of caprine infraspinatus tendon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Tadanao; Spector, Myron

    2010-06-01

    Reparative strategies for the treatment of injuries to tendons, including those of the rotator cuff of the shoulder, need to address the formation of the cartilage which serves as the attachment apparatus to bone and which forms at regions undergoing compressive loading. Moreover, recent work indicates that cells employed for rotator cuff repair may need to synthesize a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, which has recently been found to play a role in tendon tribology. The objective of the present study was to investigate the chondrogenic differentiation and lubricin expression of caprine infraspinatus tendon cells in monolayer and three-dimensional culture, and to compare the behavior with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The results demonstrated that while tendon cells in various media, including chondrogenic medium, expressed lubricin, virtually none of the MSCs synthesized this important lubricating molecule. Also of interest was that the cartilage formation capacity of the tendon cells grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic medium was comparable with MSCs. These data inform the use of tendon cells for rotator cuff repair, including for fibrocartilaginous zones.

  2. Chlamydia pecorum: fetal and placental lesions in sporadic caprine abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, Federico; Anderson, Mark; Miller, Myrna; Rowe, Joan; Sverlow, Karen; Vasquez, Marce; Cantón, Germán

    2016-03-01

    Chlamydial abortion in small ruminants is usually associated with Chlamydia abortus infection. Although Chlamydia pecorum has been detected in aborted ruminants and epidemiological data suggests that C. pecorum is abortigenic in these species, published descriptions of lesions in fetuses are lacking. This work describes fetoplacental lesions in a caprine abortion with C. pecorum infection, and further supports the abortigenic role of C. pecorum in ruminants. A 16-month-old Boer goat aborted twin fetuses at ~130 days of gestation. Both fetuses (A and B) and the placenta of fetus A were submitted for postmortem examination and diagnostic workup. At autopsy, the fetuses had moderate anasarca, intermuscular edema in the hindquarters (A), and brachygnathia and palatoschisis (B). In the placenta, the cotyledons were covered by yellow fibrinosuppurative exudate that extended into the adjacent intercotyledonary areas. Histologically, there was severe suppurative and necrotizing placentitis with vasculitis (arteriolitis) and thrombosis, multifocal lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic hepatitis (A), and fibrinosuppurative enteritis in both fetuses. Chlamydia antigen was detected in the placenta by the direct fluorescent antibody test and in fetal intestines by immunohistochemistry. Nested polymerase chain reaction of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of placenta and intestine amplified 400 bp of the Chlamydia 16S rRNA gene that was sequenced and found to be 99% identical to C. pecorum by BLAST analysis. Other known abortigenic infectious agents were ruled out by specific testing. It is concluded that C. pecorum infection is associated with fetoplacental lesions and sporadic abortion in goats. PMID:26965241

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes Office of the Director 27 Institutes and Centers that make up the NIH About Mission The NIH ... arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about 1.3 million adults, and causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in the joints. Several ...

  4. Imaging of cerebritis, encephalitis, and brain abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Tanya J; Hughes, Marion; Arabi, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain abscess, pyogenic infection, and encephalitis. The role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and management of pyogenic brain abscess and its complications is reviewed. The imaging appearances of several common and select uncommon infectious encephalitides are reviewed. Common causes of encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, and their imaging appearances, are also discussed. When combined with CSF, serologic studies and patient history, imaging findings can suggest the cause of encephalitis. PMID:23122258

  5. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis Psoriatic arthritis can develop slowly with mild symptoms, or it ... severe. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis can help prevent or limit extensive joint damage ...

  6. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Treating Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment for psoriatic arthritis can relieve pain, reduce swelling, help keep joints ... recommend treatments based on the type of psoriatic arthritis, its severity and your reaction to treatment. Download ...

  7. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  8. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to complications from the flu? 1. What is arthritis? The word arthritis actually means joint inflammation, but ... for you. 2. Who is at risk for arthritis? Certain factors are associated with a greater risk ...

  9. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  10. Proteomic study on the stability of proteins in bovine, camel, and caprine milk sera after processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Lina; Boeren, Sjef; Smits, Marcel; Hooijdonk, van Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Milk proteins have been shown to be very sensitive to processing. This study aims to investigate the changes of the bovine, camel, and caprine milk proteins after freezing, pasteurization (62 °C, 30 min), and spray drying by proteomic techniques, filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) and dimethy

  11. Prevalence of Subclinical Caprine Mastitis in Bangladesh Based on Parallel Interpretation of Three Screening Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminul Islam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the point prevalence of subclinical caprine mastitis based on parallel interpretation of results of three screening test. A total of 462 milk samples from 231 lactating Black Bengal goats comprises of three organized goat farms in Bangladesh were collected and were screened for subclinical mastitis using California Mastitis Test (CMT, White Side Test (WST and Surf Field Mastitis Test (SFMT simultaneously. Integrated test results yield the prevalence of caprine subclinical mastitis as 44.59% (95% Confidence Interval of 40.12-49.15% based on “the OR rule” and 40.48% (95% Confidence Interval of 36.10-45.01% based on “the AND rule” of parallel interpretation. Animal level and udder half level prevalence of subclinical caprine mastitis were 39.83, 38.96, 38.10% and 35.05, 34.85, 31.60% by CMT, WST and SFMT, respectively noticed when tests were interpreted individually. CMT in combination with one or two other indirect low cost indirect tests can be recommended for screening of caprine mastitis in field condition with “the OR rule” of parallel interpretation.

  12. Lipid oxidation in algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine and caprine caseins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caseins (alpha S1-, alpha S2-, and beta-casein) are phosphoproteins that are capable of binding transition metals and scavenging free radicals, these properties make them good candidates to be used as natural antioxidants in oil-in-water emulsions. Caprine casein exhibits variability in aS1-casein c...

  13. Screening of fluoroquinolone residues in caprine milk using a 5-kg luminescence photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL) method was developed to screen presence of residues of four fluoroquinolones (FQ) registered in caprine milk in the European Union: enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, flumequine, and danofloxacin. After extraction in McIlvaine buffer and SPE cleanup, TSL was measure...

  14. Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Meningitis Patients, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Ito, Mikako; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Fukuda, Shinji; Miyazaki, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 57 patients diagnosed with meningitis were tested for Japanese encephalitis virus. Total RNA was extracted from the specimens and amplified. Two products had highest homology with Nakayama strain and 2 with Ishikawa strain. Results suggest that Japanese encephalitis virus causes some aseptic meningitis in Japan.

  15. Effect of caprine testicular extract on acrosome formation of spermatids of lead-injured mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-yan TIAN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of caprine testicular extract on the acrosomal formation of spermatids of lead-treated mice, and find a theoretical and experimental basis for further research on the effects of caprine testicular extract on the reproductive system. Methods The study was carried out on thirty male adult ICR mice, which were randomly assigned into control group, model group and treatment group (10 each. The testis-injury model was reproduced by intragastric administration of lead acetate (30mg/kg, 0.1ml/10g. Animals in treatment group received intragastric administration of lead acetate and intraabdominal injection of 0.5ml caprine testicular extract at the same time for 21days, and the mice in control group received the same amount of distilled water by intragastric administration and 0.5ml distilled water by intraabdominal injection. By the end of the experimental period, the mice were sacrificed. The testes were fixed by cardiac perfusion and processed for light microscopic examination. The acrosomal formation in round spermatids was observed by PAS staining. Results  Compared with the control group, the acrosomal formation in model group was blocked. Acrosomal vesicle was incomplete, the membrane was shrunken, rough and fuzzy. The acrosomal formation in treatment group was similar to that of the control group. The structure of the acrosomal vesicle was complete and the membrane was smooth. Conclusion  Administration of caprine testicular extract may protect the acrosomal formation of spermatids from lead poisoning, and the normal structure and function of the acrosome are preserved. Thus, indepth study of the effects of caprine testicular extract may contribute to the treatment of male infertility caused by heavy metal-induced testicular damage, and offer an effective protective measure for the lead-exposed males.

  16. [Complicated febrile convulsion vs herpes-encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, M

    1993-01-01

    Since Acyclovir is available a sufficient treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis exists. Febrile convulsions may occur as the initial manifestation of an encephalitis, particularly of an HSV encephalitis. Within 25 months out of 151 children with febrile convulsions five children with complicated febrile convulsions were admitted at the pediatric department of Graz. In all children HSV antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were negative and the diagnosis of an HSV encephalitis was made by positive CSF HSV polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Therefore, in any suspected case, i.e. in any case of a complicated febrile convulsion, CSF should be investigated including a HSV PCR to rapidly confirm or exclude HSV encephalitis. PMID:8386831

  17. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  18. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  19. Arthritis in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schidlow, D V; Goldsmith, D P; Palmer, J; Huang, N N

    1984-01-01

    We have confirmed previous observations of a transient, non-disabling recurrent arthritis in patients with cystic fibrosis. This arthritis differs from classic rheumatoid arthritis, is frequently associated with skin arthritis lesions, and its occurrence is unrelated to the severity of lung disease.

  20. Abattoir-based study on the epidemiology of caprine tuberculosis in Ethiopia using conventional and molecular tools

    OpenAIRE

    Deresa, Benti; Conraths, Franz J.; Ameni, Gobena

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the important role of goats for meat and milk production in Ethiopia, little information is available on the epidemiology of caprine tuberculosis (TB). Caprine TB is important as milk is usually consumed raw particularly by Ethiopian pastoralists. The objectives of the present study were to estimate the prevalence of TB in goats at an abattoir, to evaluate associated risk factors and to characterize the causative mycobacteria. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted o...

  1. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis in hamadan, iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Sabouri Ghannad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis can cause a severe public health problem. The main aim of this research was to evaluate the medical laboratory results of patients with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV encephalitis.Diagnosis of encephalitis for these patients was firstly based on a clinical profile for Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE, plus either a detected HSV1&2-DNA by PCR in CSF or brain neuro-imaging results.Molecular testing on CSF showed that 15 patients (15% had HSV infection, 5 patients (5% had Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV and one case was positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-RNA in CSF. The cause of encephalitis in 79 out of 100 patients (79% was unknown. The comparison of CSF analysis in HSV positives and negatives showed a significant increase of glucose and protein levels in HSV positives than negatives. The mortality rate was 46.6% (7/15 in patients with HSV encephalitis compared to 11.4% (10/85 in non-HSV encephalitis (P = 0.003.In the current study, 15% of cases were diagnosed as having HSV.

  2. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  3. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery. PMID:16049881

  4. Identification and isolation of Genotype-I Japanese Encephalitis virus from encephalitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gao Xiaoyan; Jiang Hongyue; Chen Weixin; Lv Zhi; Li Minghua; Zhai Yougang; Yuan Jun; Yu Deshan; Deng Zhang; Ye Xufang; Zhang Hailin; Fu Shihong; Wang Lihua; Cao Yuxi; Wang Huanyu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Historically, Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype III (GIII) has been responsible for human diseases. In recent years, JEV genotype I (GI) has been isolated from mosquitoes collected in numerous countries, but has not been isolated from patients with encephalitis. In this study, we report recovery of JEV GI live virus and identification of JEV GI RNA from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of encephalitis patients in JE endemic areas of China. Whole-genome sequencing and molecular phyl...

  5. Incidence of Japanese Encephalitis among Acute Encephalitis Syndrome Cases in West Bengal, India

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaswati Bandyopadhyay; Indrani Bhattacharyya; Srima Adhikary; Saiantani Mondal; Jayashree Konar; Nidhi Dawar; Asit Biswas; Nemai Bhattacharya

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the most important cause of acute and epidemic viral encephalitis. Every year sporadic JE cases are reported from the various districts of West Bengal, indicating its endemicity in this state. JE vaccination programme has been undertaken by the State Health Department of West Bengal. This study was aimed at seeing the present scenario of JE among acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) cases in West Bengal. Materials and Methods. Blood and/or...

  6. An Unusual Psychiatric Emergency: Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Doyle

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of fatal herpes simplex virus (HSV encephalitis, presenting as a psychiatric emergency, is reported. The possibility of HSV encephalitis presenting mainly or solely with psychiatric symptoms is highlighted. HSV can cause a severe form of encephalitis which may present with mainly psychiatric symptoms in some cases. Early treatment with anti-viral agents can reduce mortality and morbidity, but accurate early diagnosis may be very difficult. HSV encephalopathy may mimic psychiatric illness and has been likened to syphilis as the great imitator. The case presented here should serve to raise awareness of the psychiatric features and the need to consider this diagnosis in patients with atypical behavioural disturbance.

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions psoriatic arthritis psoriatic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Psoriatic arthritis is a condition involving joint inflammation (arthritis) that ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  11. Influenza-Associated Encephalitis/Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    The role of influenza A and influenza B in acute childhood encephalitis and encephalopathy (ACE) was evaluated prospectively in all children admitted to the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, during an 11-year period from Jan 1994- Dec 2004.

  12. Neuropsychological Outcomes of Neonatal Herpes Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological outcome and the relation to neuroimaging findings are studied in a cohort of 9 children between 2.5 and 13 years of age with neonatal herpes encephalitis, examined at Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.

  13. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  14. Expanding possibilities for intervention against small ruminant lentiviruses through genetic marker-assisted selective breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include members that infect sheep (ovine lentivirus [OvLV]; also known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus/maedi-visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus [CAEV]). Breed differences in seroprevalence and proviral concentration of OvLV had suggested a s...

  15. Detection and control of lentiviral infections in sheep and goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhof, J.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) of sheep (maedi visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus) are a serious economical threat to small ruminant farming particularly in the more intensive settings like dairy farms. Revenue is ultimately negatively influence

  16. Cryopreservation of caprine ovarian tissue: recovery of gonadal function after auto-translantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues dos Santos, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is a promising technique to rescue animal species and breeds from extinction and to restore fertility of women after cancer treatment. Establishment of cryopreservation protocols starts by choosing the most efficient cryoprotective agents, the dimension of ovarian fragments, the volume of the cryoprotectant solution, the addition of extra-cellular cryoprotectant, and efficient methods to evaluate follicular quality. Based on these parameters, caprine ovarian...

  17. A modified enrichment protocol for adult caprine skeletal muscle stem cell

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Ajai K.; Ramani, Umed V.; Ahir, Viral B.; Rank, Dharamshi N.; Joshi, Chaitanya G.

    2010-01-01

    To establish an adequate model to study the proliferation and differentiation of adult caprine skeletal muscle in response to bioactive compounds, a pool of satellite cells (SC) was derived from the rectus abdominis muscle of adult goat. Skeletal muscle contains a population of adult stem cells, named as satellite cells that reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fiber and other populations of cells. These SC are multipotent stem cells, since cells cultured in the presence of spec...

  18. Prevalence of Subclinical Caprine Mastitis in Bangladesh Based on Parallel Interpretation of Three Screening Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Aminul Islam; Abdus Samad; AKM Anisur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the point prevalence of subclinical caprine mastitis based on parallel interpretation of results of three screening test. A total of 462 milk samples from 231 lactating Black Bengal goats comprises of three organized goat farms in Bangladesh were collected and were screened for subclinical mastitis using California Mastitis Test (CMT), White Side Test (WST) and Surf Field Mastitis Test (SFMT) simultaneously. Integrated test results yield the preval...

  19. Alginate hydrogel matrix stiffness influences the in vitro development of caprine preantral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, I R; Silva, C M G; Duarte, A B G; Lima, I M T; Rodrigues, G Q; Rossetto, R; Sales, A D; Lobo, C H; Bernuci, M P; Rosa-E-Silva, A C J S; Campello, C C; Xu, M; Figueiredo, J R

    2014-07-01

    This study examined caprine follicular development in different concentrations of alginate matrix to determine the optimal conditions for culture. Caprine preantral follicles were cultured in a two-dimensional system (control) or a three-dimensional encapsulated system in 0.25%, 0.5%, or 1% alginate (ALG 0.25, ALG 0.5, and ALG 1, respectively). A higher percentage of morphologically normal follicles developed in ALG 0.5 and ALG 1 than in ALG 0.25 or the control (P < 0.05). The rate of antrum formation, however, was higher in ALG 0.25 than in ALG 0.5 and ALG 1 conditions (P < 0.05), but similar to the control. Follicles cultured in ALG 0.25 had higher growth rates and meiotic resumption than those cultured in ALG 0.5, ALG 1, or the control (P < 0.05). Moreover, follicles cultured in ALG 0.25 had higher levels of estradiol and progesterone than those cultured in ALG 0.5, ALG 1, or the control, as well as higher levels of CYP19A1 and HSD3B mRNA. In conclusion, a three-dimensional system that uses ALG 0.25 fosters the in vitro development of caprine preantral follicles and increases the rate of meiotic resumption.

  20. Relevance of Neuroinflammation and Encephalitis in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eKern

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies indicate that children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD diagnosis have brain pathology suggestive of ongoing neuroinflammation or encephalitis in different regions of their brains. Evidence of neuroinflammation or encephalitis in ASD includes: microglial and astrocytic activation, a unique and elevated proinflammatory profile of cytokines, and aberrant expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. A conservative estimate based on the research suggests that at least 69% of individuals with an ASD diagnosis have microglial activation or neuroinflammation. Encephalitis, which is defined as inflammation of the brain, is medical diagnosis code G04.90 in the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision; however, children with an ASD diagnosis are not generally assessed for a possible medical diagnosis of encephalitis. This is unfortunate because if a child with ASD has neuroinflammation, then treating the underlying brain inflammation could lead to improved outcomes. The purpose of this review of the literature is to examine the evidence of neuroinflammation/encephalitis in those with an ASD diagnosis and to address how a medical diagnosis of encephalitis, when appropriate, could benefit these children by driving more immediate and targeted treatments.

  1. Studying avian encephalization with geometric morphometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Watanabe, Akinobu; Kawabe, Soichiro

    2016-08-01

    Encephalization is a core concept in comparative neurobiology, aiming to quantify the neurological capacity of organisms. For measuring encephalization, many studies have employed relative brain sizes corrected for expected allometric scaling to body size. Here we highlight the utility of a multivariate geometric morphometric (GM) approach for visualizing and analyzing neuroanatomical shape variation associated with encephalization. GM readily allows the statistical evaluation of covariates, such as size, and many software tools exist for visualizing their effects on shape. Thus far, however, studies using GM have not attempted to translate the meaning of encephalization to shape data. As such, we tested the statistical relationship between size and encephalization quotients (EQs) to brain shape utilizing a broad interspecific sample of avian endocranial data. Although statistically significant, the analyses indicate that allometry accounts for <10% of total neuroanatomical shape variation. Notably, we find that EQs, despite being corrected for allometric scaling based on size, contain size-related neuroanatomical shape changes. In addition, much of what is traditionally considered encephalization comprises clade-specific trends in relative forebrain expansion, particularly driven by landbirds. EQs, therefore, fail to capture 90% of the total neuroanatomical variation after correcting for allometry and shared phylogenetic history. Moving forward, GM techniques provide crucial tools for investigating key drivers of this vast, largely unexplored aspect of avian brain morphology. PMID:27112986

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  3. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  4. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  5. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... in to name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION Arthritis is the wearing away of the cartilage at ...

  6. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It is thought to be an autoimmune illness . This means the body attacks ...

  7. Rare case of acute dengue encephalitis with correlated MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dengue encephalitis is extremely rare, with most patients showing no significant abnormality on neuroimaging (CT/MRI). We report one of the very few documented cases of dengue encephalitis, with abnormal signal intensities on all major sequences on brain MRI.

  8. Putaminal involvement in Rasmussen encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, Bhagavatheeswaran; Ashalatha, Radhakrishnan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2006-08-15

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare devastating disease of childhood causing progressive neurological deficits and intractable seizures, typically affecting one hemisphere. Characteristic MRI features include progressive unihemispheric focal cortical atrophy and grey- or white-matter high-signal changes and basal ganglion involvement, particularly of the caudate nucleus. To analyse the pattern of involvement of different brain structures in a series of patients with RE and to attempt clinical correlation. We reviewed the medical records and neuroimaging data of 12 patients diagnosed with RE satisfying the European Consensus Statement diagnostic criteria. The disease manifested as seizures in all patients and was refractory; epilepsia partialis continua was a notable feature (nine patients). Hemiparesis of varying grades was noted in all but one patient; none had extrapyramidal signs. Neuroimaging showed cortical involvement in the insular/periinsular regions in 11 patients. Caudate atrophy was noted in ten patients. Putaminal atrophy was seen in nine patients, six of whom had additional hyperintense signal changes. Our study highlights frequent putaminal atrophy and signal changes in RE, which suggests a more extensive basal ganglion involvement than emphasized previously. Recognition of putaminal changes may be a useful additional tool in the radiological diagnosis of RE. (orig.)

  9. Microbial study of meningitis and encephalitis cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Heba S; El-Barrawy, Mohamed A; Rakha, Magda E; Yingst, Samuel L; Baskharoun, Magda F

    2007-01-01

    Meningitis and/or encephalitis can pose a serious public health problem especially during outbreaks. A rapid and accurate diagnosis is important for effective earlier treatment. This study aimed to identify the possible microbial causes of meningitis and/or encephalitis cases. CSF and serum samples were collected from 322 patients who had signs and symptoms suggestive of meningitis and/or encephalitis. Out of 250 cases with confirmed clinical diagnosis, 83 (33.2%) were definitely diagnosed as bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis cases (by using CSF culture, biochemical tests, latex agglutination test, and CSF stain), 17 (6.8%) were definitely diagnosed as having viral causes ( by viral isolation on tissue culture, PCR and ELISA), and one (0.4%) was diagnosed as fungal meningitis case (by India ink stain, culture, and biochemical tests). Also, there was one encephalitis case with positive serum ELISA IgM antibodies against Sandfly scilian virus. N. meningitidis, S. pneumonia and M. tuberculosis were the most frequently detected bacterial agents, while Enteroviruses, herpes simplex viruses and varicella zoster viruses were the most common viral agents encountered. Further studies are needed to assess the role of different microbial agents in CNS infections and their effective methods of diagnosis.

  10. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications.

  11. Mycotic encephalitis: predilection for grey matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, M.S. van der (Dept. of Child Neurology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Valk, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Jansen, G.H. (Dept. of Pathology, Subdivision of Neuropathology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Kapelle, L.J. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Nieuwenhuizen, O. van (Dept. of Child Neurology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1993-10-01

    In mycotic infections of the brain three patterns of abnormality may be observed: meningitis, granuloma, and encephalitis. The first two, consisting of diffuse meningeal enhancement and mass lesion respectively, can easily be visualised by CT or MRI, but are nonspecific. The third pattern has been described histopathologically; as the clinical picture is nonspecific and the diagnosis is often unsuspected, especially in immunocompetent patients, acquaintance with the characteristic CT and MRI patterns of mycotic encephalitis may help in establishing the correct diagnosis, with important therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  12. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, D J; Bergin, A; Rotenberg, A; Peters, J; Gorman, M; Poduri, A; Cryan, J; Lidov, H; Madsen, J; Harini, C

    2014-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and discuss the literature on this topic. PMID:25667877

  13. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. O'Rourke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and discuss the literature on this topic.

  14. Natural course of LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Marton, Annamaria; Kover, Ferenc;

    2014-01-01

    . Follow-up brain MRI indicated early hippocampal sclerosis and global brain atrophy in one case characterized by more pronounced cognitive deficit. Memory and verbal fluency were affected most during the natural course of LGI1 encephalitis. LGI1 encephalitis had a monophasic course and spontaneously...... bilateral inflammation of the hippocampus in one case. We reviewed longitudinal clinical and MRI data covering 53 and 36 months after LE without immunotherapy, respectively. Both patients became seizure-free and spontaneously recovered with mild/moderate cognitive impairment. No relapses have been observed...

  15. Effect of Ca Ionophore On Blastocyst Production Following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection in Caprine Oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, S D; Pathak, J; Agarwal, S; Kushwah, B; Sikarwar, Aks

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcium ionophore activation on blastocyst production following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes. A total of 470 in vitro-matured oocytes were selected and randomly divided in to three groups. Cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) recovered by slicing the Caprine ovaries were matured in TCM199 supplemented with 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS) + 10% follicular fluid + FSH (5 μg/ml) + LH (10 μg/ml) + estradiol (1 μg/ml) + EGF (10 ng/ml) + BSA (3 mg/ml) for 27 h in humidified atmosphere at 38.5°C with 5% CO2 in CO2 incubator. After 27 h of culture, selected COCs (n = 470) were separated from cumulus cells by treating with 0.1% hyaluronidase enzyme and passing repeatedly through a fine pipette and randomly divided into three groups. In group 1, (n = 168) matured oocytes were injected with injection micropipette without sperm as control. In group 2, (n = 152) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette. In group 3, (n = 150) capacitated spermatozoa were injected into cytoplasm of in vitro-matured oocytes through injection micropipette and then activated with 5 μm Ca ionophore for 5 min. The oocytes of all groups were then culture in RVCL media for embryo development. The cleavage rate was observed after 48-72 h of injection. The cleavage rate and blastocyst production in group 1, 2 and 3 were 0.00 and 0.00, 18.42 and 3.57 and 61.33% and 16.30%, respectively. The result indicated that mechanical activation failed to induce cleavage in in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes, whereas chemical activation of intracytoplasmic sperm-injected in vitro-matured Caprine oocytes showed significantly higher cleavage rate and blastocyst production as compare to non-activated oocytes. PMID:27170442

  16. Comparison of three suture techniques in closure of caprine skin incision: cosmetic and cost considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamu Abdul Abubakar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The cosmetic and economic evaluations of three suture techniques were evaluated in closure of caprine skin incision. Fifteen apparently healthy male and female intact goats, free of any dermatological lesions were used for the investigation. They were randomly grouped into three; A (Subcuticular; B (Ford interlocking and C (Simple interrupted. Cosmetic appearance of the surgical site was assessed on day 7, 14 and 21 post surgery using standard procedure as described by Sakka et al, 1995. There was statistical significant difference (P0.05 at day 21 post surgery; in the entire scoring interval, subcuticular group had the best score. There was also statistical significant difference (P

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  1. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  3. Clinical Profile and Outcome of Japanese Encephalitis in Children Admitted with Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gitali Kakoti; Prafulla Dutta; Bishnu Ram Das; Jani Borah; Jagadish Mahanta

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an arthropod borne viral disease. Children are most commonly affected in Southeast Asian region showing symptoms of central nervous system with several complications and death. The clinical characteristics and outcomes in pediatric JE patients hospitalized with acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) are still poorly understood. A prospective study was conducted in pediatric ward of Assam Medical College Hospital to evaluate the clinical profile and outcome of JE in ch...

  4. Brainstem Encephalitis and ADEM Following Mumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestations of brainstem encephalitis (BSE with fever, decreased level of consciousness, and left facial and abducens paralysis developed 1 week after bilateral parotitis and mumps in a 4 year-old female child and were followed by symptoms of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM within 20 days of recovery from BSE.

  5. Change in Japanese Encephalitis Virus distribution, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Nitatpattana, Narong; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey; Gouilh, Meriadeg Ar; Souris, Marc; Barbazan, Philippe; Yoksan, Sutee; De Lamballerie, Xavier; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotypes in Thailand were studied in pigs and mosquitoes collected near houses of confirmed human JEV cases in 2003-2005. Twelve JEV strains isolated belonged to genotype 1, which shows a switch from genotype I I I incidence that started during the 1980s.

  6. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoff, Paweł; Rosińska, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    In Poland, 2 806 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2005, of which 998 had bacterial aetiology, 1469 viral, and 339 cases had other or unknown origin. Incidence of bacterial neuroin-fections increased in 2003-2005, following a decreasing trend observed during the past decade. Etiological factor was determined in 486 (49%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 135 cases, Haemophilus influenzae in 59 cases and Streptococ-cus pneumoniae in 111 cases. Unlike previously in 2005 serogroup B was no longer the predominant type of N. meningitidis cultured from patients. Both types B and C constituted similar proportions of all strains serotyped in 2005. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2005 remained on the same level as in 2004. Etiological factor of central nervous system aseptic infections were established only in minor proportion of cases--3% of meningitis and 20% of encephalitis. Among confirmed cases, there were 177 cases of tick-borne encephalitis and 13 cases of herpetic encephalitis. Tick borne encephalitis incidence decreased in 2005 (0.46), compared to 2003-2004. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of northeastern part of the country.

  7. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicman-Gawłowska, Agnieszka; Chrześcijańska, Irena; Stefanoff, Paweł

    2008-01-01

    In Poland, 3 693 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2006, of which 989 had bacterial aetiology, 1 874--viral aetiology, and 512--other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 455 (46%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 148 cases, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) in 39 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 119 cases. An increasing trend in meningococcal infections incidence has been observed in 2006, and a substantial decrease of Hib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2006 increased compared to year 2005. Etiological factors of central nervous system aseptic infections were established only in minor proportion of cases--3% of meningitis and 20% of encephalitis. Among confirmed cases, there were 317 cases of tick-borne encephalitis and 31 cases of herpetic encephalitis. Tick borne encephalitis incidence increased in 2006 (0.83), compared to 2004 - 2005. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  8. Early Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Records of 38 patients, 23 boys and 15 girls (ages 3 months to 16 years [42% ages 3-12 months], seen between 1990 and 1997 with proven herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE, were reviewed retrospectively to determine the diagnostic reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR results, in a study at the Neuropediatric Service, Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, Paris, France.

  9. PET Scan and Autoimmune Focal Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    The value of the PET scan in the diagnosis of autoimmune focal encephalitis is reported in a 22-month-old girl who presented with involuntary movements, hemiparesis, and behavioral changes at Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute for Neuroscience, Japan.

  10. Neurophysiological changes in Japanese encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita J

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is an encephalomyelitis involving cortex, subcortex, brainstem and spinal cord. There is paucity of studies on the neurophysiological evaluation in JE. This study aims at comprehensive evaluation of EEG, sensory and motor evoked potentials, nerve conduction and electromyography; and correlate these with clinical findings. Sixty five patients with JE diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological and virological criteria were subjected to a detailed clinical evaluation during the acute stage of illness. Cranial CT scan or MRI was carried out in all the patients. All the patients underwent 10 or 18 channel EEG, motor and sensory evoked potentials to both upper and lower limbs bilaterally as well as peroneal and sural nerve conductions and concentric needle EMG. Outcome, was defined at the end of 3 months into poor, partial and complete recovery. The patient′s age ranged between 2-65 years. There were 40 males and 25 female patients. Fifteen patients were less than 12 years of age. History of seizure was present in 31 patients. Quadriplegia was seen in 39 and hemiplegia in 8 patients. Muscle wasting was present in 16 patients and tendon reflexes were reduced in 12 and of mixed pattern in 14 patients. Cranial MRI revealed thalamic lesion in 38, basal ganglia in 21, substantia nigra in 30, pons in 5, cerebellum in 3 and cerebral cortex in 7 patients out of 57 patients. EEG revealed nonspecific theta to delta slowing in 45, alpha pattern coma in 5 and epileptiform discharges in 8 patients. EMG revealed fibrillations in 23 patients. Motor evoked potentials were abnormal in 34 out of 46 patients and revealed patchy and focal abnormalities comprising of unrecordable, prolonged and normal pattern. Somatosensory evoked potentials were abnormal in 8 patients only. At 3 month, 26 patients had complete, 13 partial and 15 had poor outcome. Eight patients died in acute stage and 3 were lost to followup. MEP correlated with weakness

  11. Nucleotide sequencing, cloning, and expression of Capra hircus Heme Oxygenase-1 in caprine islets to promote insulin secretion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhshiteh, Faezeh; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd Azmi B Mohd; Abbasiliasi, Sahar; Ajdari, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of islets of Langerhans that have been isolated from whole pancreas is an attractive alternative for the reversal of Type 1 diabetes. However, in vitro culture of isolated pancreatic islets has been reported to cause a decrease in glucose response over time. Hence, the improvement in islet culture conditions is an important goal in islet transplantation. Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress protein that has been described as an inducible protein with the capacity of preventing apoptosis and cytoprotection via radical scavenging. Therefore, this study was aimed to assess the influence of endogenous HO-1 gene transfer on insulin secretion of caprine islets. The full-length cDNA sequence of Capra hircus HO-1 was determined using specific designed primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends of pancreatic tissue. The HO-1 cDNA was then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vectors and transfected into caprine islets using lipid carriers. Efficiency of lipid carriers to transfect caprine islets was determined by flow cytometry. Insulin secretion assay was carried out by ovine insulin ELISA. The finding demonstrated that endogenous HO-1 gene transfer could improve caprine islet function in in vitro culture. Consequently, strategies using HO-1 gene transfer to islets might lead to better outcome in islet transplantation.

  12. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  13. Experimental caprine coccidiosis: the pattern of changes in antioxidant micronutrients and vitamins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Rakhshandehroo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the status of non-enzymatic antioxidant agents during experimental caprine coccidiosis. A total of 20 newborn kids were selected and allocated into 2 (diseased and healthy groups. Ten of the kids were infected with sporulated oocysts of the most pathogenic species of Eimeria and ten served as controls. Blood samples were taken at 0 (before inoculation, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days post infection (dpi and the concentrations of antioxidant trace elements, antioxidant vitamins and ceruloplasmin were measured. Our data showed remarkable reductions in serum concentrations of some antioxidant trace elements (zinc, manganese and selenium and vitamins (vitamin C in the diseased kids, however, significant increases were observed in the serum level of ceruloplasmin in infected animals. These alterations became more prominent at 14 to 21 dpi. These observations suggest that Eimeria parasites can significantly interfere with the levels of some antioxidant trace elements and vitamins during caprine coccidiosis. These changes indicate the overproduction of oxidative radicals during the pathogenesis of Eimeria species that may account for extensive oxidative damage in infected animals.

  14. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Cellular and Haematological Changes in Different Types of Caprine Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarikre, A T; Emikpe, O B; Ohore, G O; Akinremi, A T; Akpavie, O S

    2016-01-01

    Goats in the tropics are often reared under the traditional extensive and semi-intensive management systems. These and other factors influence the pattern of pneumonia complex in goats. We investigated the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) cellular changes and haematological response in different types of caprine pneumonia in Nigeria. Haematological indices and BALf cells were analysed from 300 goats randomly selected from 700 goats comprising different breed, age and body scores. The pneumonia status was well characterised using standard pathological tools. Data is summarized as Mean ± SEM and compared using non-parametric statistics at 5% significance. There was leukocytosis in the pneumonic animals. The overall lavage recovery rate was 55.5%. The differences in Haemoglobin concentration, and Lymphocyte-Neutrophil ratio were significant (peosinophil counts were significantly different (peosinophils observed in BAL were reliable and also correlated positively to the pathological findings. BAL should be considered a component of the diagnostic approach to caprine pneumonia complex, as it may accurately aid diagnosis and identification of the causal organisms. PMID:27574761

  15. Study of caprine bones after moist and dry heat processes by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tissue is a biological material composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and collagen matrix. The bone X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern presents characteristics of the hydroxyapatite crystallography planes. This paper presents the characterization by X-ray diffraction of caprine bone powder pattern and the comparison of this pattern with moist or dry heat cooked bone patterns. The parameters chosen to characterize the X-ray diffraction peaks were: angular position (2θ), full width at half maximumt (FWHM), and relative intensity (Irel). The X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained with a Shimadzu XRD-6000 diffractometer. The caprine bone XRD pattern revealed a significant correlation of several crystallographic parameters (lattice data) with hydroxyapatite. The profiles of the three bone types analyzed presented differences. The study showed as small angular displacement (decrease of the 2θ angle) of some peaks was observed after moist and dry heat cooking processes. The characterization of bone tissue aimed to contribute to future analysis in the field of archeology. (author)

  16. Molecular characterization of exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khichar, Jai Prakash; Gahlot, Gyan Chand; Agrawal, Vijay Kumar; Kiran; Dewna, Ajay Singh; Prakash; Ashraf, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To estimate genetic variability in exon 3 of caprine myostatin gene in Marwari goats. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 blood samples from unrelated Marwari goats were randomly collected from different villages of Bikaner (Rajasthan), India. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood using blood DNA isolation kit (Himedia Ltd.) as per manufacturer’s protocol. The quality of extracted genomic DNA was checked on 0.8% agarose gel. Specifically designed a primer set for caprine myostatin (MSTN) gene (Genebank accession no. DQ167575) was used to amplify the exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat. The genetic variability in exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat was assessed on 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) pattern. Results: The exon 3 of MSTN gene in Marwari goat showed two types of conformation patterns on 8% polyacrylamide gel. One of the patterns showed only two bands and was considered as genotype AA, whereas another pattern having an extra band was designated as genotype AB. The frequencies of AA and AB genotype for exon 3 region of MSTN gene were calculated as 0.90 and 0.10, respectively. Conclusion: Low level of polymorphism was observed at exon 3 region of MSTN gene in Marwari goat through SSCP analysis. This information could be utilized in future breeding plan to exploit the unique characteristics of Marwari goat of Rajasthan. PMID:27397994

  17. Seasonal changes in protein composition of whey from commercial manufacture of caprine and ovine specialty cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, J L; Wendorff, W L; Thomas, D L

    1998-12-01

    Pooled whey from the production of one variety of ovine cheese and two varieties of caprine cheeses was studied for gross composition and individual whey protein composition over one production season. Individual proteins were quantified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE and digital imaging technology. The mean proportion of alpha-lactalbumin (LA) from caprine wheys from the manufacture of Chevre and Cheddar-type cheeses was higher than values previously reported for bovine whey from Cheddar cheese; proportions of serum albumin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, and beta-lactoglobulin (LG) were lower. Ovine whey from Manchego-type cheese showed a higher proportion of beta-LG, about the same proportion of alpha-LA, and lower proportions of serum albumin and IgG than did the bovine whey. Relative amounts of alpha-LA decreased throughout the season, but beta-LG rose in midlactation and then gradually decreased toward the end of lactation. Relative proportions of serum albumin remained fairly stable throughout the year, and IgG decreased. PMID:9891259

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore; Martini, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterised by arthritis of unknown origin with onset before age of 16 years. Pivotal studies in the past 5 years have led to substantial progress in various areas, ranging from disease classification to new treatments. Gene expres

  19. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  20. Identification and isolation of Genotype-I Japanese Encephalitis virus from encephalitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiaoyan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically, Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV genotype III (GIII has been responsible for human diseases. In recent years, JEV genotype I (GI has been isolated from mosquitoes collected in numerous countries, but has not been isolated from patients with encephalitis. In this study, we report recovery of JEV GI live virus and identification of JEV GI RNA from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of encephalitis patients in JE endemic areas of China. Whole-genome sequencing and molecular phylogenetic analysis of the JEV isolate from the CSF samples was performed. The isolate in this study is highly similar to other JEV GI strains which isolated from mosquitoes at both the nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic sequence showed that the isolate belongs to JEV GI, which is consistent with the phylogenetic analysis based on the pre-membrane (PrM and Glycoprotein genes. As a conclusion, this is the first time to isolate JEV GI strain from CSF samples of encephalitis patients, so continuous survey and evaluate the infectivity and pathogenecity of JEV GI strains are necessary, especially for the JEV GI strains from encephalitis patients. With respect to the latter, because all current JEV vaccines (live and inactivated are derived from JEV GIII strains, future studies should be aimed at investigating and monitoring cross-protection of the human JEV GI isolates against widely used JEV vaccines.

  1. Dengue encephalitis-A rare manifestation of dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Madi, Deepak; Achappa, Basavaprabhu; Ramapuram, John T; Chowta, Nityananda; Laxman, Mridula; Mahalingam, Soundarya

    2014-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection to dengue shock syndrome. Dengue is classically considered a non-neurotropic virus. Neurological complications are not commonly seen in dengue. The neurological manifestations seen in dengue are encephalitis, meningitis, encephalopathy, stroke and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dengue encephalitis is a rare disease. We report an interesting case of dengue encephalitis from Southern India. A 49-year-old gentleman presented with...

  2. Origin and Evolution of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Tom; Ni, Haolin; Beasley, David W. C.; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel; Cardosa, Mary Jane; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2003-01-01

    Since it emerged in Japan in the 1870s, Japanese encephalitis has spread across Asia and has become the most important cause of epidemic encephalitis worldwide. Four genotypes of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are presently recognized (representatives of genotypes I to III have been fully sequenced), but its origin is not known. We have determined the complete nucleotide and amino acid sequence of a genotype IV Indonesian isolate (JKT6468) which represents the oldest lineage, compared it w...

  3. Acute encephalitis associated with measles: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.Y.; Cho, W.H.; Kim, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, 760-1 Sanggye-7 dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139707 (Korea); Kim, H.D. [Department of Paediatrics, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, 760-1 Sanggye-7 dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139707 (Korea); Kim, I.O. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110744 (Korea)

    2003-02-01

    We document the MRI features in six patients aged 5-14 years with acute encephalitis following measles. The diagnosis was made on a characteristic morbiliform rash and detection of specific IgM and IgG antibodies. The symptoms of encephalitis occurred 1-11 days after the appearance of the rash. All patients underwent MRI within 1-4 days of the onset of neurological symptoms. Diffusion weighted images (DWI) were obtained in three patients. In all patients, T2-weighted images showed widely distributed, multifocal high signal in both cerebral hemispheres with swelling of the cortex, with bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the putamen and caudate nucleus. The lesions had showed low apparent diffusion coefficients. Three patients showed subacute gyriform haemorrhage, and asymmetrical gyriform contrast enhancement on follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  4. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  5. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

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    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  6. Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis: Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Naveed A.

    2005-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) is a serious human disease with fatal consequences. With the mortality rate of more than 90%, it is not surprising that the majority of GAE infections are identified at the post-mortem stage. The most distressing aspect is that the high level of mortality is attributed to lack of awareness. Early diagnosis with aggressive treatment can lead to successful prognosis for the patient. Here, we describe a brief overview of the current understanding of the p...

  7. A rare case of dengue encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Sachin; Kumar, Manish; Ghosh, Soumik; Gadpayle, Adesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever has a variable clinical spectrum ranging from asymptomatic infection to life-threatening dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, neurological complications, in general, are unusual. Dengue encephalopathy is not an unknown entity; however, dengue encephalitis, a direct neuronal infiltration by the dengue virus, is an extremely rare disease. Although dengue is classically considered a non-neurotropic virus, there is increasing evidence for dengue viral neurotr...

  8. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoff, Paweł; Rosińska, Magdalena

    2006-01-01

    In Poland, 2 725 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2004, of which 945 had bacterial etiology, 1427 viral, and 353 cases had other or unknown origin. Incidence of bacterial neuroinfections increased in 2004, despite a decreasing trend observed during the past decade. Etiological factor was determined in 433 (46%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 119 cases, Haemophilus influenzae in 77 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 107 cases. As in the previous years, serotype B was the predominant type of N. meningitidis cultured from patients, but type C appears to be systematically increasing, accounting for 27% of the strains serotyped in 2004. Viral neuroinfections were less common in 2004, compared to previous years. Etiological factor of central nervous system aseptic infections were established only in 17% of cases. Among confirmed cases, there were 262 cases of tick-borne encephalitis and 15 cases of herpetic encephalitis. Tick borne encephalitis incidence decreased in 2004 (0.7), compared to 2003 (339 cases, incidence 0.9). Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  9. A REVIEW ARTICLE ON HERPES SIMPLEX ENCEPHALITIS

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    A. Karimi MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Herpes Simplex encephalitis (HSE is a life threatening outcome of Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection of the central nervous system (CNS. HSVaccounts for 2-5 percent of all cases of encephalitis. One third of cases occur in those younger than 20 years old and one half in those older than 50 years old.Clinical diagnosis is recommended in the encephalopathic, febrile patients with focal neurological signs. However, the clinical findings are not pathogonomic because numerous other diseases of CNS can mimic HSE. Diagnosis should be confirmed based on medical history, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for protein and glucose contents, the cellular analysis and identifying the pathogens by serology and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR amplification .The diagnostic gold standard is the detection of HSV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid by PCR. But negative results need to be interpreted regarding thepatients clinical signs and symptoms and the time of CSF sampling. Spike and slow wave patterns is observed in Electroencephalogram (EEG.Neuroimaging, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is essential for evaluating the patients, which shows temporal lobe edema or hemorrhage.All patients with HSE should be treated by intravenous Acyclovir (10mg/kg q8hr for 14-21 days. After completing therapy, PCR of the CSF can confirmthe elimination of replicating virus, assisting further management of the patient.Keywords:Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV, Encephalitis, Children

  10. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, a mimicker of acute infectious encephalitis and a review of the literature

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    Darren Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis has become an increasingly recognized etiology of acute psychosis in young patients. The diverse constellation of symptoms allows for misdiagnosis as an infectious, psychological, or toxicological entity resulting in delays in treatment with increasing morbidity. We describe a case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis that was a particular challenge to diagnose. Practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion for anti-NMDAR and related neuroautoimmune syndromes, especially in young patients that present with acute mental status decline or dyskinesia.

  11. Some factors influencing the syneresis of bovine, ovine, and caprine milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M M; Balcones, E

    2000-08-01

    The influence of the species, fat, curd incubation temperature (25, 30, and 35 degrees C), heat treatment of milk (70 degrees C for 5 or 30 min), and milk pH on the initial volume drained, syneresis rate, and the loss of proteins in drainage was studied. The volume drained as a function of the curd incubation time (up to 60 min) was adjusted to a first-order kinetic reaction. The k values (drained rate) and the initial volume obtained applying the equation were compared to establish the possible influence of the studied factors. In general, for all the factors studied, the syneresis rate of curd from caprine and ovine milk did not differ from those described previously in the literature for the curds from bovine milk. However, for each studied factor the pattern of syneresis rate was significantly different among the species in most of the experiments.

  12. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  13. Molecular dating of caprines using ancient DNA sequences of Myotragus balearicus, an extinct endemic Balearic mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcover Josep Antoni

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotragus balearicus was an endemic bovid from the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean that became extinct around 6,000-4,000 years ago. The Myotragus evolutionary lineage became isolated in the islands most probably at the end of the Messinian crisis, when the desiccation of the Mediterranean ended, in a geological date established at 5.35 Mya. Thus, the sequences of Myotragus could be very valuable for calibrating the mammalian mitochondrial DNA clock and, in particular, the tree of the Caprinae subfamily, to which Myotragus belongs. Results We have retrieved the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (1,143 base pairs, plus fragments of the mitochondrial 12S gene and the nuclear 28S rDNA multi-copy gene from a well preserved Myotragus subfossil bone. The best resolved phylogenetic trees, obtained with the cytochrome b gene, placed Myotragus in a position basal to the Ovis group. Using the calibration provided by the isolation of Balearic Islands, we calculated that the initial radiation of caprines can be dated at 6.2 ± 0.4 Mya. In addition, alpine and southern chamois, considered until recently the same species, split around 1.6 ± 0.3 Mya, indicating that the two chamois species have been separated much longer than previously thought. Conclusion Since there are almost no extant endemic mammals in Mediterranean islands, the sequence of the extinct Balearic endemic Myotragus has been crucial for allowing us to use the Messinian crisis calibration point for dating the caprines phylogenetic tree.

  14. Purification and characterization of a sperm motility inhibiting factor from caprine epididymal plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujoy Das

    Full Text Available Several studies have been reported on the occurrence of sperm motility inhibiting factors in the male reproductive fluids of different mammalian species, but these proteins have not been adequately purified and characterized. A novel sperm motility inhibiting factor (MIF-II has been purified from caprine epididymal plasma (EP by Hydroxylapatite gel adsorption chromatography, DEAE-Cellulose ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing. The MIF-II has been purified to apparent homogeneity and the molecular weight estimated by Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration is 160 kDa. MIF-II is a dimeric protein, made up of two subunits each having a molecular mass of 80 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric point of MIF-II is 5.1 as determined by chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing. It is a heat labile protein and maximal active at the pH 6.9 to 7.5. The sperm motility inhibiting protein factor at 2 microg/ml (12.5 nM level showed maximal motility-inhibiting activity. The observation that the epididymal plasma factor lowered the intracellular cAMP level of spermatozoa in a concentration-dependent manner suggests that it may block the motility of caprine cauda spermatozoa by interfering the cAMP dependent motility function. The results revealed that the purified protein factor has the potential of sperm motility inhibition and may serve as a vaginal contraceptive. The antibody raised against the MIF-II has the potential for enhancement of forward motility of cauda-spermatozoa. This antibody may thus be useful for solving some of the problems of male infertility due to low sperm motility.

  15. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Become Lifelong Learners Featured Website: GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery Links Rheumatoid Arthritis Osteoarthritis Gout Rheumatoid Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Feeling Out of Joint: The Aches of Arthritis CONTACT ...

  16. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Wesula Lwande

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen, it's known as a "flare" or a "flare-up." JIA often causes only minor problems, but in ... was possible a few years ago. For arthritis flare-ups, doctors may also use medicines called corticosteroids (like ...

  18. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... providers, including the primary care physician, rheumatologist, and physical therapist, will work together to develop the best method ... the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities and ...

  19. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  20. Epigenetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Trenkmann, M.; Brock, M; Ospelt, C; Gay, S.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics is a steadily growing research area. In many human diseases, especially in cancers, but also in autoimmune diseases, epigenetic aberrations have been found. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and destruction of synovial joints. Even though the etiology is not yet fully understood, rheumatoid arthritis is generally considered to be caused by a combination of genetic predisposition, deregulated immunomodulation, and environmental infl...

  1. Japanese Encephalitis Viruses from Bats in Yunnan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing-Lin; Pan, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Fu, Shi-Hong; WANG Huan-yu; Tang, Qing; Wang, Lin-Fa; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequencing and virulence studies of 2 Japanese encephalitis viruses (JEVs) from bats in Yunnan, China, showed a close relationship with JEVs isolated from mosquitoes and humans in the same region over 2 decades. These results indicate that bats may play a role in human Japanese encephalitis outbreaks in this region.

  2. Alterations of Spinal Cord in Japanese B Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kishikawa, Masao

    1993-01-01

    The cytopathologic changes of Japanese B encephalitis (JBE) are basically similar to those of other forms of arbovirus encephalitis. Because the entire central nervous system including the spinal cord is involved to varying degrees, the nomenclature of JBE should actually be Japanese B panencephalomyelitis.

  3. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Dettwiler Martina; Stahel Anina; Krüger Sonka; Gerspach Christian; Braun Ueli; Engels Monika; Hilbe Monika

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF). This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with ...

  4. Simulated-physiological loading conditions preserve biological and mechanical properties of caprine lumbar intervertebral discs in ex vivo culture.

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    Cornelis P L Paul

    Full Text Available Low-back pain (LBP is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions.In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties.Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175 were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL, or with simulated-physiological load (SPL. IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content.IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group.In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration

  5. Serological diagnosis of bovine, caprine, and ovine mastitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourry, A; Cochard, T; POUTREL, B.

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Listeria monocytogenes antibodies in bovine (n = 35), caprine (n = 27), and ovine (n = 30) milk samples was evaluated by comparison with bacteriological examination. Microtiter plates were coated with proteins obtained from culture supernatant, and antibodies were revealed with a monoclonal antibody able to react with the immunoglobulins belonging to the three animal species. The arithmetic mean optical density (OD) of milk samples infected w...

  6. An international collaborative study to determine the prevalence of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by monoclonal antibody-based cELISA

    OpenAIRE

    Peyraud, Armelle; Poumarat, Francois; Tardy, Florence; Manso-Silvan, Lucia; Hamroev, Karomatullo; Tilloev, Tillo; Amirbekov, Mullojon; Tounkara, Karim; Bodjo, Charles; Wesonga, Hezron; Nkando, Isabel Gacheri; Jenberie, Shiferaw; Yami, Martha; Cardinale, Eric; Meenowa, Deodass

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few serological tests are available for detecting antibodies against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, the causal agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP). The complement fixation test, the test prescribed for international trade purposes, uses a crude antigen that cross-reacts with all the other mycoplasma species of the "mycoides cluster" frequently infecting goat herds. The lack of a more specific test has been a real obstacle to the evaluation of the prev...

  7. Temporal Lobe Encephalitis Need not Always be Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: Think of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madireddi, Jagadesh; Reddy, Gowtham; Stanley, Weena; Prabu, Mukhyaprana

    2016-05-01

    Historically, temporal lobe encephalitis is considered as a pathognomonic feature of Herpes simplex encephalitis. This rule may not always be true and we believe that clinicians should keep their differential open. We here report once such. Case of a 36-year-old Indian male who developed altered sensorium following a prodrome of headache and fever. Examination and imaging suggested Temporal Lobe Encephalitis (TLE). Herpes encephalitis was considered and he was started on anti-virals awaiting lumbar puncture reports. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis for Herpes Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) turned out to be negative. Later, to our surprise PCR for tuberculosis (TB) was positive. CSF was 100% lymphocytic and Adenosine deaminase was 12. He was started on 5 drug anti-tuberculosis regimen following which he showed a significant clinical improvement. Given the prevalence of tuberculosis in the sub-continent, clinicians must be aware of this diagnostic possibility when a patient with TLE does not respond to anti-virals. Apart from disease specific therapy, multi-disciplinary approach involving speech therapy is warranted. An early aetiological characterization of TLE has both diagnostic and prognostic implications, failing which patient may succumb. PMID:27437274

  8. Prevalence Study of Coxiella burnetii in Aborted Ovine and Caprine Fetuses by Evaluation of Nested and Real-Time PCR Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad S. Dehkordi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Q fever is a ubiquitous zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, an obligate intracellular rickettsial organism that caused abortion and stillbirth in ruminants. Approach: The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in Iran is essentially unknown. Its traditional diagnosis is based on culture, serology and conventional PCR. In this present study, for more sensitive and accurate detection and prevalence's determination of Coxiella burnetii in aborted Ovine and Caprine fetuses, the nested and real-time PCR methods are recommended. Results: About 98 (12.53% and 122 (16.39% out of 782 and 744 Ovine and Caprine aborted fetuses, were positive for presence of Coxiella burnetii by nested PCR, respectively. After LSI Taqvet Coxiella burnetii real-time PCR, it was recognized that 121 (15.47% and 152 (20.43% samples were positive for Coxiella burnetii in Ovine and Caprine aborted fetuses, respectively. Results indicated that the real-time PCR was 7 times more sensitive than the nested PCR. Statistical analysis showed significant differences about PCoxiella burnetii in aborted Ovine and Caprine fetuses by both nested and real-time PCR assays and PCoxiella burnetii. The Ct values which obtained from real-time PCR had significant differences about PCoxiella burnetii between aborted Ovine and Caprine fetuses. Our results indicated that Caprine is more sensitive than Ovine to Coxiella burnetii’s abortion Khozestan and Gilan have the highest and Khorasan and Sistan va Baluchistan provinces have the lowest prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, respectively. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this study is the first prevalence report of direct identification of Coxiella burnetii in aborted Ovine and Caprine fetuses by evaluation of nested and real-time PCR assays in Iran. This study showed that the nested PCR for detecting Coxiella burnetii are technically time-consuming and labor-intensive.

  9. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed. PMID:26243956

  10. Designing, optimization and validation of tetra-primer ARMS PCR protocol for genotyping mutations in caprine Fec genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonika Ahlawat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New, quick, and inexpensive methods for genotyping novel caprine Fec gene polymorphisms through tetra-primer ARMS PCR were developed in the present investigation. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping needs to be attempted to establish association between the identified mutations and traits of economic importance. In the current study, we have successfully genotyped three new SNPs identified in caprine fecundity genes viz. T(-242C (BMPR1B, G1189A (GDF9 and G735A (BMP15. Tetra-primer ARMS PCR protocol was optimized and validated for these SNPs with short turn-around time and costs. The optimized techniques were tested on 158 random samples of Black Bengal goat breed. Samples with known genotypes for the described genes, previously tested in duplicate using the sequencing methods, were employed for validation of the assay. Upon validation, complete concordance was observed between the tetra-primer ARMS PCR assays and the sequencing results. These results highlight the ability of tetra-primer ARMS PCR in genotyping of mutations in Fec genes. Any associated SNP could be used to accelerate the improvement of goat reproductive traits by identifying high prolific animals at an early stage of life. Our results provide direct evidence that tetra-primer ARMS-PCR is a rapid, reliable, and cost-effective method for SNP genotyping of mutations in caprine Fec genes.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis and encephalomyelitis: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shian, W.J. [Department of Pediatrics, Tao-Yuan Veterans Hospital, No. 100, Sec 3, Cheng-Kung Rd, City of Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Chi, C.S. [Department of Pediatrics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the clinical and brain MR characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encephalitis and encephalomyelitis. Clinical and 30 MR findings of 29 patients with EBV encephalitis or encephalomyelitis were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included 24 with encephalitis, 3 with encephalomyelitis, and 2 with brain-stem encephalitis. Altered consciousness, seizures, visual hallucination, and acute psychotic reaction were the common presentations. Eight patients had positive MR findings. These included T2 prolongation over gray and white matter, periventricular leukomalacia, and brain atrophy. Transient T2 prolongation over gray and white matter was found in one patient. Our results indicate that EBV encephalitis and encephalomyelitis have a wide range of both clinical and MR findings. The MR lesions may disappear in a short period, so the timing for the MR scan may be critical. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Antiviral macrophage responses in flavivirus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashhurst, Thomas Myles; Vreden, Caryn van; Munoz-Erazo, Luis; Niewold, Paula; Watabe, Kanami; Terry, Rachael L; Deffrasnes, Celine; Getts, Daniel R; Cole King, Nicholas Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are a major current and emerging threat, affecting millions of people worldwide. Global climate change, combined with increasing proximity of humans to animals and mosquito vectors by expansion into natural habitats, coupled with the increase in international travel, have resulted in significant spread and concomitant increase in the incidence of infection and severe disease. Although neuroinvasive disease has been well described for some viral infections such as Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), others such as dengue virus (DENV) have recently displayed an emerging pattern of neuroinvasive disease, distinct from the previously observed, systemically-induced encephalomyelopathy. In this setting, the immune response is a crucial component of host defence, in preventing viral dissemination and invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). However, subversion of the anti-viral activities of macrophages by flaviviruses can facilitate viral replication and spread, enhancing the intensity of immune responses, leading to severe immune-mediated disease which may be further exacerbated during the subsequent infection with some flaviviruses. Furthermore, in the CNS myeloid cells may be responsible for inducing specific inflammatory changes, which can lead to significant pathological damage during encephalitis. The interaction of virus and cells of the myeloid lineage is complex, and this interaction is likely responsible at least in part, for crucial differences between viral clearance and pathology. Recent studies on the role of myeloid cells in innate immunity and viral control, and the mechanisms of evasion and subversion used by flaviviruses are rapidly advancing our understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in flavivirus encephalitis and will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies previously not considered. PMID:24434318

  13. Severe enterovirus 76-associated acute encephalitis syndrome complicated by myocarditis and successfully treated with intravenous immunoglobulins

    OpenAIRE

    Girish C Bhatt; Tanya Sharma; Komal P Kushwaha

    2012-01-01

    Acute viral encephalitis is known to be caused by a wide range of viruses including enteroviruses. Here, we describe two cases of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) from Japanese encephalitis endemic area diagnosed as enteroviral (EV 76) encephalitis with myocarditis. Intravenous immunoglobulin was given, following which, ejection fraction improved in both of them.

  14. What should you know about limbic encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Machado

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by a subacute impairment of short-term memory, psychiatric features and seizures. It is often associated with a variety of other neurological symptoms, and its differential diagnosis is wide, leading to challenges in its recognition. It used to be regarded as a rare disease, usually paraneoplastic and with poor prognosis. However, with the recent recognition of membrane-surface directed antibodies, it is now known that in a substantial proportion of cases there is no association with any malignancy and there is a good prognosis if treated. Hence, early recognition and prompt initiation of immunotherapies are of great importance.

  15. Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis: Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed A. Khan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE is a serious human disease with fatal consequences. With the mortality rate of more than 90%, it is not surprising that the majority of GAE infections are identified at the post-mortem stage. The most distressing aspect is that the high level of mortality is attributed to lack of awareness. Early diagnosis with aggressive treatment can lead to successful prognosis for the patient. Here, we describe a brief overview of the current understanding of the pathophysiology of GAE, available diagnostic methods, possible therapeutic interventions and the causative agents.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain ...

  19. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more! Email * Zipcode Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis Physical activity plays an important role in overall well-being. If you have psoriatic arthritis, moderate exercise may offer specific benefits, including improved ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  1. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. Van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is considered to be a cornerstone in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Till now the efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis on functional performance and social part...

  2. Organizing Pneumonia Preceding Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiaki Kinoshita; Atsuhiko Sakamoto; Kouko Hidaka

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis patients are susceptible to interstitial lung disease, and joint manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis usually precede lung involvements by several years. Organizing pneumonia, as the first manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis, is extremely rare, and its clinical features remain currently unknown. We present a case and a literature review of patients who were pathologically diagnosed with organizing pneumonia first and met the diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis...

  3. Th17 cytokines and arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTh17 cells are implicated in human autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although it has not been established whether this persistent destructive arthritis is driven by Th1 and/or Th17 cells. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) contributes to the pathogenesis of arthritis as has b

  4. Japanese Encephalitis: Estimating Future Trends in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Metelka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Limited surveillance programs and lack of diagnostic laboratory testing capacity in many low and middle income Asian countries have made it difficult to validate epidemiological patterns and anticipate future changes in disease risk. In this study, we consider the case of Japanese Encephalitis in Asia and examine how populations of human hosts and animal reservoirs are expected to change over the next three decades. Growth was modelled at the sub-national level for rural and urban areas to estimate where high-density, susceptible populations will potentially overlap with populations of the virus' amplifying host. High-risk areas based on these projections were compared to the current distribution of Japanese Encephalitis, and known immunization activities in order to identify areas of highest priority for concern. Results indicated that mapping JE risk factors at the sub-national level is an effective way to contextualize and supplement JE surveillance data. New patterns of risk factor change occurring in Southeast Asia were identified, including around major urban areas experiencing both urbanization and growth in pig populations. A hotspot analysis of pig-to-population ratio found a significant spatial cluster extending northward through Southeast Asia and interior China. Mapping forecasted changes in risk factors for JE highlights regions vulnerable to emerging zoonoses and may be an important tool for developing effecting transnational health policies.

  5. A REVIEW ARTICLE ON HERPES SIMPLEX ENCEPHALITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karimi MD,

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpes Simplex encephalitis (HSE is a life threatening outcome of Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection of the central nervous system (CNS. HSVaccounts for 2-5 percent of all cases of encephalitis. One third of cases occur in those younger than 20 years old and one half in those older than 50 years old.Clinical diagnosis is recommended in the encephalopathic, febrile patients with focal neurological signs. However, the clinical findings are not pathogonomic because numerous other diseases of CNS can mimic HSE. Diagnosis should be confirmed based on medical history, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for protein and glucose contents, the cellular analysis and identifying the pathogens by serology and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR amplification .The diagnostic gold standard is the detection of HSV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid by PCR. But negative results need to be interpreted regarding thepatients clinical signs and symptoms and the time of CSF sampling. Spike and slow wave patterns is observed in Electroencephalogram (EEG.Neuroimaging, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is essential for evaluating the patients, which shows temporal lobe edema or hemorrhage.All patients with HSE should be treated by intravenous Acyclovir (10mg/kg q8hr for 14-21 days. After completing therapy, PCR of the CSF can confirmthe elimination of replicating virus, assisting further management of the patient.

  6. Childhood epileptic seizures imitating migraine and encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravljanac Ružica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paroxismal events can resemble epileptic seizures, however, some epileptic seizures, especially benign occipital childhood epilepsies can imitate migraine, cycling vomiting or encephalitis. Objective. The aim of this study was evaluation of clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG features and outcome in children with benign occipital childhood epilepsies. Methods. Investigation included 18 patients with benign occipital childhood epilepsies hospitalized in the period from 2007 to 2010. The diagnosis was based on clinical and EEG characteristics of seizures, while treatment included acute therapy for seizures and chronic antiepileptic drugs. Prognosis was analyzed in terms of neurological outcome and seizure recurrence rate. Results. Benign occipital childhood epilepsy with early onset was diagnosed in 15 children. Vegetative symptoms, mostly ictal vomiting (13, eye deviation and loss of consciousness (13 dominated in the clinical presentation. The most frequent EEG findings showed occipital epileptic discharges. Benign occipital childhood epilepsy with late onset was diagnosed in three cases. Seizures were manifested by visual hallucinations, headache and secondary generalized convulsions. All three patients were administered chronic antiepileptic drugs and had good outcome. Conclusion. In our patients, clinical manifestations of benign occipital epilepsies had some similarities with clinical features of migraine and encephalitis. It could explain misdiagnosis in some of them. Knowledge about main features and differences between each of these disorders is crucial for making appropriate diagnosis.

  7. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath R

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. ′Chi′ square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. CT findings in a case of Japanese encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyomasu, Teruo; Nakashima, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Tomie; Shida, Kenshiro (Ohmuta Rosai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1982-10-01

    A 44-year-old man was admitted to a hospital on August 1980, with chief complaints of high fever and consciousness disturbance. Three months later he was referred to our hospital. Neurological examination revealed mental deterioration, amnesia, bilateral pyramidal signs, tremor, truncal ataxia and others. Serum CF titer to Japanese encephalitis virus was 1 : 16. He was diagnosed as having Japanese encephalitis from the clinical features and serological response. CT scans showed low density areas in bilateral thalami, the left ganglia, left internal capsule, left substantia nigra and others. It is noticeable that the CT findings were compatible with the pathological changes of Japanese encephalitis.

  9. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  10. Incidence of Japanese Encephalitis among Acute Encephalitis Syndrome Cases in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswati Bandyopadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Japanese encephalitis (JE is the most important cause of acute and epidemic viral encephalitis. Every year sporadic JE cases are reported from the various districts of West Bengal, indicating its endemicity in this state. JE vaccination programme has been undertaken by the State Health Department of West Bengal. This study was aimed at seeing the present scenario of JE among acute encephalitis syndrome (AES cases in West Bengal. Materials and Methods. Blood and/or CSF samples were referred from suspected AES cases to the referral virology laboratory of the Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine from different hospitals of Kolkata. IgM antibody capture ELISA was performed on the CSF and serum samples by JE virus MAC ELISA kit supplied by the National Institute of Virology, Pune. Results. The present study reveals that 22.76% and 5% of the AES cases were positive for JE IgM in 2011 and 2012, respectively. JE is mainly prevalent in children and adolescents below 20 years of age with no gender predilection. Although the percentages of JE positive cases were high in 2011, it sharply decreased thereafter possibly due to better awareness programs, due to mass vaccination, or simply due to natural epidemiological niche periodicity due to herd immunity.

  11. In Vivo Caprine Model for Osteomyelitis and Evaluation of Biofilm-Resistant Intramedullary Nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhiem Tran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone infection remains a formidable challenge to the medical field. The goal of the current study is to evaluate antibacterial coatings in vitro and to develop a large animal model to assess coated bone implants. A novel coating consisting of titanium oxide and siloxane polymer doped with silver was created by metal-organic methods. The coating was tested in vitro using rapid screening techniques to determine compositions which inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth, while not affecting osteoblast viability. The coating was then applied to intramedullary nails and evaluated in vivo in a caprine model. In this pilot study, a fracture was created in the tibia of the goat, and Staphylococcus aureus was inoculated directly into the bone canal. The fractures were fixed by either coated (treated or non-coated intramedullary nails (control for 5 weeks. Clinical observations as well as microbiology, mechanical, radiology, and histology testing were used to compare the animals. The treated goat was able to walk using all four limbs after 5 weeks, while the control was unwilling to bear weight on the fixed leg. These results suggest the antimicrobial potential of the hybrid coating and the feasibility of the goat model for antimicrobial coated intramedullary implant evaluation.

  12. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial susceptibility of caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, A; Tatay-Dualde, J; Amores, J; Prats-van der Ham, M; Sánchez, A; de la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Corrales, J C; Gómez-Martín, Á

    2016-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum mycoplasmacidal concentration (MMC) of 17 antimicrobials against 41 Spanish caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) obtained from different specimens (milk, external auricular canal and semen) were determined using a liquid microdilution method. For half of the isolates, the MIC was also estimated for seven of the antimicrobials using an epsilometric test (ET), in order to compare both methods and assess the validity of ET. Mutations in genes gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE conferring fluoroquinolone resistance, which have been recently described in Mmc, were investigated using PCR. The anatomical origin of the isolate had no effect on its antimicrobial susceptibility. Moxifloxacin and doxycycline had the lowest MIC values. The rest of the fluoroquinolones studied (except norfloxacin), together with tylosin and clindamycin, also had low MIC values, although the MMC obtained for clindamycin was higher than for the other antimicrobials. For all the aminoglycosides, spiramycin and erythromycin, a notable level of resistance was observed. The ET was in close agreement with broth microdilution at low MICs, but not at intermediate or high MICs. The analysis of the genomic sequences revealed the presence of an amino acid substitution in codon 83 of the gene gyrA, which has not been described previously in Mmc. PMID:27387734

  13. Paleogenomics in a temperate environment: shotgun sequencing from an extinct Mediterranean caprine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ramírez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous endemic mammals, including dwarf elephants, goats, hippos and deers, evolved in isolation in the Mediterranean islands during the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Most of them subsequently became extinct during the Holocene. Recently developed high-throughput sequencing technologies could provide a unique tool for retrieving genomic data from these extinct species, making it possible to study their evolutionary history and the genetic bases underlying their particular, sometimes unique, adaptations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPALS FINDINGS: A DNA extraction of a approximately 6,000 year-old bone sample from an extinct caprine (Myotragus balearicus from the Balearic Islands in the Western Mediterranean, has been subjected to shotgun sequencing with the GS FLX 454 platform. Only 0.27% of the resulting sequences, identified from alignments with the cow genome and comprising 15,832 nucleotides, with an average length of 60 nucleotides, proved to be endogenous. CONCLUSIONS: A phylogenetic tree generated with Myotragus sequences and those from other artiodactyls displays an identical topology to that generated from mitochondrial DNA data. Despite being in an unfavourable thermal environment, which explains the low yield of endogenous sequences, our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain genomic data from extinct species from temperate regions.

  14. Virulence factors genes of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from caprine subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaberry, Sandra Renata Sampaio; Saidenberg, André Becker Simões; Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla Anne; Santos, Franklin Gerônimo Bispo; Guimarães, Ednaldo Carvalho; Gregori, Fábio; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate genes involved in adhesion expression, biofilm formation, and enterotoxin production in isolates of Staphylococcus spp. from goats with subclinical mastitis and associate these results with the staphylococcal species. One hundred and twenty-four isolates were identified and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect the following genes: cna, ebpS, eno, fib, fnbA, fnbB, bap, sea, seb, sec, sed and see. The most commonly Staphylococcus species included S. epidermidis, S. lugdunensis, S. chromogenes, S. capitis ss capitis and S. intermedius. With the exception of fnbB, the genes were detected in different frequencies of occurrence in 86.3% of the Staphylococcus spp. isolates. Eno (73.2%) and bap (94.8%) were more frequently detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS); ebpS (76%), fib (90.9%) and fnbA (87%) were the most frequent genes in coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS). Regarding enterotoxins, genes sed (28.2%) and see (24.2%) had a higher frequency of occurrence; sec gene was more frequently detected in CPS (58.8%). There was no association between the presence of the genes and the Staphylococcus species. Different virulence factors genes can be detected in caprine subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS. The knowledge of the occurrence of these virulence factors is important for the development of effective control and prevention measures of subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS in goats. PMID:26026835

  15. Pathogenesis and Immunohistochemical Studies of Caprine Pleuropneumonia in Experimentally Infected Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Sadique*, Zafar Iqbal Chaudhry1, Muhammad Younus Rana2, Aftab Ahmad Anjum3, Zahoor-Ul-Hassan, Abdul Sajid and Muhammad Mushtaq

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the pathogenesis of caprine pleuropneumonia (CPP in the experimentally inoculated goats with Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies Capri (Mmc. For this purpose, 12 goats (Group B were inoculated with bacterial isolates of Mmc while four goats were kept as untreated control (Group A. Clinical signs of the disease were recorded twice daily. Two goats from group B were sacrificed on weekly basis to demonstrate gross pathological lesions in different organs. Tissue samples from lungs, trachea, liver, heart, kidney, spleen, and small intestines were preserved for histopathological studies. The lungs and lymph nodes were preserved to demonstrate the antigen in tissue by using immuno- histochemical technique. The disease was successfully reproduced in all infected goats with severe manifestation. The clinical signs and gross lesions of the disease were mild at the beginning and became severe at the third and fourth weeks and then progressed to moderate and chronic forms. The histopathological lesions characteristic of CPP were found in all the organs. Antigen of Mmc was detected in tissue sections of lungs and lymph nodes. In conclusion, the disease was efficiently reproduced in experimental animals that showed acute septicemic form with lethal outcome.

  16. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Robert W; Li, Weizhong; Sun, Jiajie; Yu, Peng; Baldwin, Ransom L; Urban, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most injurious helminth parasite for small ruminants. We characterized the impact of H. contortus infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were inoculated with 5,000 H. contortus infective larvae and followed for 50 days. Six age-matched naïve goats served as uninfected controls. Reduced bodyweight gain and a significant increase in the abosamal pH was observed in infected goats compared to uninfected controls. Infection also increased the bacterial load while reducing the abundance of the Archaea in the abomasum but did not appear to affect microbial diversity. Nevertheless, the infection altered the abundance of approximately 19% of the 432 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected per sample. A total of 30 taxa displayed a significantly different abundance between control and infected goats. Furthermore, the infection resulted in a distinct difference in the microbiome structure. As many as 8 KEGG pathways were predicted to be significantly affected by infection. In addition, H. contortus-induced changes in butyrate producing bacteria could regulate mucosal inflammation and tissue repair. Our results provided insight into physiological consequences of helminth infection in small ruminants and could facilitate the development of novel control strategies to improve animal and human health. PMID:26853110

  17. Dengue encephalitis-A rare manifestation of dengue fever

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepak Madi; Basavaprabhu Achappa; John T Ramapuram; Nityananda Chowta; Mridula Laxman; Soundarya Mahalingam

    2014-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of dengue fever ranges from asymptomatic infection to dengue shock syndrome. Dengue is classically considered a non-neurotropic virus. Neurological complications are not commonly seen in dengue. The neurological manifestations seen in dengue are encephalitis, meningitis, encephalopathy, stroke and Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dengue encephalitis is a rare disease. We report an interesting case of dengue encephalitis from Southern India. A 49-year-old gentleman presented with fever, altered sensorium and seizures. Dengue NS-1 antigen test was reactive. Dengue IgM was also positive. CSF PCR was negative for herpes simplex 1 & 2. Dengue encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever with altered sensorium, especially in countries like India where dengue is rampant.

  18. Enterovirus 71 Brainstem Encephalitis and Cognitive and Motor Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up studies were conducted in 63 previously healthy children with enterovirus 71 brainstem encephalitis (49 stage II, 7 stage Ilia, and 7 stage Illb at National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

  19. Endemic Venezuelan equine encephalitis in northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Patricia V; Greene, Ivorlyne P; Coffey, Lark L; Medina, Gladys; Moncayo, Abelardo C; Anishchenko, Michael; Ludwig, George V; Turell, Michael J; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John; Tesh, Robert B; Watts, Douglas M; Russell, Kevin L; Hice, Christine; Yanoviak, Stephen; Morrison, Amy C; Klein, Terry A; Dohm, David J; Guzman, Hilda; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Guevara, Carolina; Kochel, Tadeusz; Olson, James; Cabezas, Cesar; Weaver, Scott C

    2004-05-01

    Since Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) was isolated in Peru in 1942, >70 isolates have been obtained from mosquitoes, humans, and sylvatic mammals primarily in the Amazon region. To investigate genetic relationships among the Peru VEEV isolates and between the Peru isolates and other VEEV strains, a fragment of the PE2 gene was amplified and analyzed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism. Representatives of seven genotypes underwent sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The results identified four VEE complex lineages that cocirculate in the Amazon region: subtypes ID (Panama and Colombia/Venezuela genotypes), IIIC, and a new, proposed subtype IIID, which was isolated from a febrile human, mosquitoes, and spiny rats. Both ID lineages and the IIID subtype are associated with febrile human illness. Most of the subtype ID isolates belonged to the Panama genotype, but the Colombia/Venezuela genotype, which is phylogenetically related to epizootic strains, also continues to circulate in the Amazon basin.

  20. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  1. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankiewicz, Aleksandra; Polkowska, Aleksandra; Chrześcijańska, Irena; Kicman-Gawłowska, Agnieszka; Stefanoff, Paweł

    2009-01-01

    In Poland, 3,361 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2007, of which 1,078 had bacterial etiology, 1,717--viral aetiology, and 566--other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 611 (57%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them N. meningitidis was found in 224 cases, H. influenzae type B (Hib) in 35 cases and S. pneumoniae in 161 cases. An increasing trend in meningococcal infections incidence has been observed in 2007, and a substantial decrease ofHib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2007 increased compared to year 2006. Among confirmed cases, there were 233 cases oftick-borne encephalitis. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  2. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowska, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    In Poland, 2 517 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2009, of which 865 had bacterial aetiology, 1 244--viral aetiology, and 408-- other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 493 (57%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 190 cases, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) in 13 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 163 cases. An increasing trend in pneumococcal infections incidence has been observed since 2005, and a substantial decrease of Hib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2009 increased compared to year 2008. Among confirmed cases, there were 351 cases of tick-borne encephalitis. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  3. [Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turczyńska, Aleksandra; Polkowska, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    In Poland, 2 475 cases of neuroinfections were reported in 2008, of which 979 had bacterial aetiology, 1 122--viral aetiology, and 374--other or unknown origin. The etiological agent was determined in 555 (56%) cases of bacterial neuroinfections. Among them Neisseria meningitidis was found in 220 cases, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) in 23 cases and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 151 cases. An increasing trend in meningococcal infections incidence has been observed in 2008, and a substantial decrease of Hib incidence, related to increasing vaccination coverage. Viral neuroinfections incidence in 2008 decreased compared to year 2007. Among confirmed cases, there were 202 cases of tick-borne encephalitis. Most of the cases were reported from endemic areas of north-eastern part of the country.

  4. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  5. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIH-MIN eWANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection.

  6. Development history of herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-wei WANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is an acute central nervous system infection caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV. Early clinical manifestations mainly include fever, headache and unconsciousness; when progressing, psychiatric symptoms can occur. Death or serious neurological sequelae will happen if not treated. With the development of laboratory tests and imaging techniques, the early diagnosis of HSE is possible. Even though imaging with temporal lobe abnormal signal has the implication to HSE, the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in detecting HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is currently the "gold standard" to diagnose HSE. Once diagnosed, acyclovir must be given as soon as possible, as delayed treatment will result in a poor outcome. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.003

  7. Expanding Possibilities for Intervention against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses through Genetic Marker-Assisted Selective Breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, Donald P.; White, Stephen N.

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include members that infect sheep (ovine lentivirus [OvLV]; also known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus/maedi-visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus [CAEV]). Breed differences in seroprevalence and proviral concentration of OvLV had suggested a strong genetic component in susceptibility to infection by OvLV in sheep. A genetic marker test for susceptibility to OvLV has been developed recently based on the TMEM154 gene with validation data ...

  8. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  9. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and psoriatic arthritis. Email * Zipcode The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) is a non-profit organization with a mission to drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. Copyright © 1996-2015 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA Bottom Menu About NPF About Us Annual ...

  10. Juvenile arthritis and uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1990-01-01

    The association between juvenile arthritis and uveitis is reviewed. Some children with the HLA-B27 related spondyloarthropathies develop anterior uveitis. About 20% of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) who are negative for IgM rheumatoid factor develop a frequently bilateral, nongranulomatous chronic anterior uveitis. Risk factors for uveitis in JRA patients are: female gender, pauciarticular onset of arthritis, presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, and the antigens HLA-DW5 and HLA-DPw2. Uveitis is rare after seven years or more have elapsed from the onset of arthritis. The visual prognosis in patients with uveitis is good in 25% and fair in 50%. The remaining 25% develop visual impairment from complicated cataract and/or secondary inflammatory glaucoma. The potential benefit of cytotoxic agents in the treatment of intractable uveitis is outweighed by the risk of serious side effects. The management of secondary inflammatory glaucoma is unsatisfactory, but the results of treatment of complicated cataracts by lensectomy-vitrectomy are good.

  11. Bilateral facial palsy as a manifestation of Japanese encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Rajesh; Praharaj, Heramba Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a cause of substantial morbidity and mortality, prevalent mainly in South East nations. It is caused by group B arbovirus and transmitted with bite of infected culex mosquitoes. The clinical features described are: headache, vomiting, altered sensorium, convulsions and both hypokinetic and hyperkinetic movement disorders. In this submission, we described a 68-year-old man suffering from Japanese encephalitis, who presented with bilateral facial palsy with encephalitic...

  12. The Involvement of Microglial Cells in Japanese Encephalitis Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Thananya Thongtan; Chutima Thepparit; Duncan R. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective vaccines, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infections remain a leading cause of encephalitis in many Asian countries. The virus is transmitted to humans by Culex mosquitoes, and, while the majority of human infections are asymptomatic, up to 30% of JE cases admitted to hospital die and 50% of the survivors suffer from neurological sequelae. Microglia are brain-resident macrophages that play key roles in both the innate and adaptive immune responses in th...

  13. Epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis: past, present, and future prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Wang H; Liang G

    2015-01-01

    Huanyu Wang,1,2 Guodong Liang1,21State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control (SKLID), Department of Viral Encephalitis, Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing People’s Republic of China; 2Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of severe viral ence...

  14. Transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein in caprine embryos produced through electroporation-aided sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Pramod, R; Kumar, Rakesh; Mitra, Abhijit

    2016-01-15

    Current methods of transgenic animal production are afflicted by low efficiency and high cost. Recently, the electroporation aided sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT) emerges as a promising alternative with variable success rate. Among the domestic animal species, the electroporation-aided SMGT is less investigated in goats, except a few reports in which attempts have been made using the auto-uptake method of SMGT. In this study, we report an optimized electroporation condition for SMGT of caprine sperm cells. Results of this study demonstrated that electroporation of caprine sperm cells at 300 V for 200 mS in TALP medium allowed the maximum uptake of foreign DNA with minimum adverse effects on the vital semen parameters viz., progressive motility, viability, and membrane and acrosome integrity. Further, DNA binding assay revealed DNA uptake by 81.3% sperm cells when 1.0 μg of DNA was used under optimum electroporation conditions as compared to 16.5% on simple incubation. The qPCR analysis showed four-fold more (Pelectroporation than incubation. A similar cleavage rate was observed after IVF using either electroporated (23.20 ± 1.20) or non-electroporated (25.20 ± 2.41) sperm cells suggesting the absence of adverse effect of electroporation on the fertilizing ability. Out of the 116 embryos produced by electroporated sperm, five (4.31%) embryos showed the expression of the foreign gene. In conclusion, our results confirm that using optimized electroporation conditions, the caprine sperm cells can uptake foreign DNA effectively with minimum negative effect on the semen parameters and could produce transgenic embryos.

  15. [Acute encephalitis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations as expression of influenza virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Flagge, Noris; Bayard, Vicente; Quirós, Evelia; Alonso, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    The aim is to review the encephalitis in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestation, epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment, and the neuropsyquiatric signs appearing an influenza epidemy. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) which involves the brain. The clinical manifestations usually are: headache, fever and confusional stage. It could also be manifested as seizures, personality changes, or psiqyiatric symptoms. The clinical manifestations are related to the virus and the cell type affected in the brain. A meningitis or encephalopathy need to be ruled out. It could be present as an epidemic or isolated form, beeing this the most frequent form. It could be produced by a great variety of infections agents including virus, bacterias, fungal and parasitic. Viral causes are herpesvirus, arbovirus, rabies and enterovirus. Bacterias such as Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia and Mycoplasma neumoniae. Some fungal causes are: Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. More than 100 agents are related to encephalitis. The diagnosis of encephalitis is a challenge for the clinician and its infectious etiology is clear in only 40 to 70% of all cases. The diagnosis of encephalitis can be established with absolute certainty only by the microscopic examination of brain tissue. Epidemiology is related to age of the patients, geographic area, season, weather or the host immune system. Early intervention can reduce the mortality rate and sequels. We describe four patients with encephalitis and neuropsychiatric symptoms during an influenza epidemic. PMID:19240010

  16. Innovations et performances environnementales en production caprine et ovine : Expertise Elevage-Environnement à l’INRA

    OpenAIRE

    Bocquier, Francois; Benoit, Marc; Laignel, Gabriel; Dedieu, Benoit; Cournut, Sylvie; Fiorelli, Cecile; Jouven, Magali; Moulin, Charles-Henri; Aubron, Claire; Lurette, Amandine; Lapeyronie, Paul; Hassoun, Philippe; Michel MEURET; Agreil, Cyril; Napoleone, Martine

    2011-01-01

    Les systèmes d’élevage ovins et les caprins, comme les autres productions animales, sont confrontés aux multiples défis environnementaux : limiter les nuisances et contribuer positivement à l’entretien ou à l’amélioration du milieu. Les travaux de l’INRA, et de ses partenaires, se sont largement impliqués dans ces questions en considérant ces élevages de petits ruminants comme faisant partie d‘agroécosystèmes complexes. Cette synthèse collective rassemble, en privilégiant les niveaux d’approc...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  19. Oxidative Stress and Cell Apoptosis in Caprine Liver Induced by Molybdenum and Cadmium in Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Caiying; Zhuang, Yu; Gu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Qingyang; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of co-exposure to molybdenum (Mo) and cadmium (Cd) on oxidative stress and cell apoptosis in caprine livers, 36 Boer goats were randomly divided into four groups with nine goats in each group. Three groups were randomly assigned with one of three oral treatments of CdCl2 (0.5 mg Cd kg(-1)·BW) and [(NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O] (15 mg Mo kg(-1)·BW, 30 mg Mo kg(-1)·BW, 45 mg Mo kg(-1)·BW), while the control group received deionized water. Liver tissues on days 0, 25, and 50 were subjected to determine antioxidant activity indexes and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of ceruloplasmin (CP), cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase-3 (caspase-3), second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac), and cytochrome-C (Cyt-C) genes. The results showed that significant reductions were observed in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activities (P < 0.05), while activities or contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were increased (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression levels of CP, caspase-3, Smac, and Cyt-C genes were upregulated (P < 0.05). In addition, histopathological lesions showed different degrees of vacuolar degeneration and edematous and mitochondrial swelling. The results suggest that co-exposure to Mo and Cd could induce oxidative stress and cell apoptosis possibly associated with mitochondrial intrinsic pathway in goat liver and show possible synergistic effects between the two elements. PMID:26883837

  20. Critical role of the lipid rafts in caprine herpesvirus type 1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2016-01-01

    The fusion machinery for herpesvirus entry in the host cells involves the interactions of viral glycoproteins with cellular receptors, although additional viral and cellular domains are required. Extensive areas of the plasma membrane surface consist of lipid rafts organized into cholesterol-rich microdomains involved in signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane transport and in many processes of viruses infection. Because of the extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to the lipid rafts, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) on caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV.1) in three important phases of virus infection such as binding, entry and post-entry. MβCD treatment did not prejudice virus binding to cells, while a dose-dependent reduction of the virus yield was observed at the virus entry stage, and 30 mM MβCD reduced infectivity evidently. Treatment of MDBK after virus entry revealed a moderate inhibitory effect suggesting that cholesterol is mainly required during virus entry rather than during the post-entry stage. Alteration of the envelope lipid composition affected virus entry and a noticeable reduction in virus infectivity was detected in the presence of 15 mM MβCD. Considering that the recognition of a host cell receptor is a crucial step in the start-up phase of infection, these data are essential for the study of CpHV.1 pathogenesis. To date virus receptors for CpHV.1 have not yet been identified and further investigations are required to state that MβCD treatment affects the expression of the viral receptors.

  1. Short communication: genetic variability in the predicted microRNA target sites of caprine casein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidi, A; Amills, M; Tomás, A; Vidal, O; Ramírez, O; Carrizosa, J; Urrutia, B; Serradilla, J M; Clop, A

    2010-04-01

    The main goal of the current work was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that might create or disrupt microRNA (miRNA) target sites in the caprine casein genes. The 3' untranslated regions of the goat alpha(S1)-, alpha(S2)-, beta-, and kappa-casein genes (CSN1S1, CSN1S2, CSN2, and CSN3, respectively) were resequenced in 25 individuals of the Murciano-Granadina, Cashmere, Canarian, Saanen, and Sahelian breeds. Five SNP were identified through this strategy: c.175C>T at CSN1S1; c.109T>C, c.139G>C, and c.160T>C at CSN1S2; and c.216C>T at CSN2. Analysis with the Patrocles Finder tool predicted that all of these SNP are located within regions complementary to the seed of diverse miRNA sequences. These in silico results suggest that polymorphism at miRNA target sites might have some effect on casein expression. We explored this issue by genotyping the c.175C>T SNP (CSN1S1) in 85 Murciano-Granadina goats with records for milk CSN1S1 concentrations. This substitution destroys a putative target site for miR-101, a miRNA known to be expressed in the bovine mammary gland. Although TT goats had higher levels (6.25 g/L) of CSN1S1 than their CT (6.05 g/L) and CC (6.04 g/L) counterparts, these differences were not significant. Experimental confirmation of the miRNA target sites predicted in the current work and performance of additional association analyses in other goat populations will be an essential step to find out if polymorphic miRNA target sites constitute an important source of variation in casein expression.

  2. The use of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiaucourt, F; Bölske, G; Libeau, G; Le Goff, C; Lefèvre, P C

    1994-08-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is a severe disease affecting goats in Eastern Africa and the Middle East, caused by Mycoplasma sp. type F38. Its exact geographical distribution is however not exactly known due to the lack of specificity of the available serological tests and the difficulty in cultivating M. sp. F38. A panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was produced, using crude or membrane proteins antigens from type F38 strains to immunize mice. The reactivity of the mAbs was tested by an immunobinding assay with crude mycoplasma antigens spotted on nitrocellulose filters. One hundred and twelve antigens, standardized at 0.5 mg protein/ml, were used. Mycoplasma strains were chosen among closely related species of the "mycoides cluster", M. capricolum, Group 7 of Leach, M. mycoides mycoides LC, M. mycoides mycoides SC, M. mycoides capri, as well as among species that are isolated from goat lungs, M. arginini, M. ovipneumoniae, M. putrefaciens, M. agalactiae. Out of 60 mAbs, 4 were chosen to build an identification test for mycoplasmas of the "mycoides cluster". Controls showed that accurate identification could be hampered by antigenic heterogeneity within the M. capricolum species. One mAb was used for the direct detection of M. sp. F38 antigen in pleural fluid from goats suspected of CCPP. The sensitivity of the test can be estimated at 0.5 micrograms protein/ml. Comparison with isolation results show a 74% agreement between the two methods. The same mAb was used to build a blocking ELISA. This serological test was strictly specific for CCPP. It detects antibodies in sera of naturally infected or artificially immunized animals while it remained negative with hyperimmune sera to related strains such as PG 50. Direct antigen detection and blocking ELISA are tools that may enable a better assessment of CCPP distribution.

  3. Development and characterization of a caprine aerosol infection model of melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Soffler

    Full Text Available Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, which often presents as a serious suppurative infection that is typically fatal without intensive treatment and is a significant emerging infectious disease in Southeast Asia. Despite intensive research there is still much that remains unknown about melioidosis pathogenesis. New animal models of melioidosis are needed to examine novel aspects of pathogenesis as well as for the evaluation of novel therapeutics. The objective of the work presented here was to develop a subacute to chronic caprine model of melioidosis and to characterize the progression of disease with respect to clinical presentation, hematology, clinical microbiology, thoracic radiography, and gross and microscopic pathology. Disease was produced in all animals following an intratracheal aerosol of 10(4 CFU delivered, with variable clinical manifestations indicative of subacute and chronic disease. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia was apparent microscopically by day 2 and radiographically and grossly apparent by day 7 post infection (PI. Early lesions of bronchopneumonia soon progressed to more severe bronchointerstitial pneumonia with pyogranuloma formation. Extrapulmonary dissemination appeared to be a function of pyogranuloma invasion of pulmonary vasculature, which peaked around day 7 PI. Histopathology indicated that leukocytoclastic vasculitis was the central step in dissemination of B. pseudomallei from the lungs as well as in the establishment of new lesions. While higher doses of organism in goats can produce acute fatal disease, the dose investigated and resulting disease had many similarities to human melioidosis and may warrant further development to provide a model for the study of both natural and bioterrorism associated disease.

  4. Varying Dietary Levels of Molybdenum Inducing Cell Apoptosis of Spleen Under Cadmium Stress in Caprine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingyang; Zhang, Caiying; Gu, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Yu; Luo, Junrong; Liu, Ping; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin

    2016-07-01

    The present experiment aims at evaluating chronic toxic effects of the combination of cadmium (Cd) and molybdenum (Mo) according to residual element contents, apoptosis gene expression, and ultrastructure and histopathology changes of caprine spleen. In total, 36 Boer goats were randomly divided into four groups with the equal number in each group. The control group was orally administered with deionized water while the experimental groups I, II, and III were administered with the equal quantity of CdCl2 (1 mg kg(-1) BW) and (NH4)6·Mo7O24·4H2O including 15, 30, and 45 mg·Mo kg(-1) BW, respectively. Three individuals from each group were treated with euthanasia on days 0, 25, and 50. The data showed that the content of splenic residual Mo and Cd increased (P < 0.05) in the experimental groups on days 25 and 50, while no significant difference was observed in the content of Cu. The apoptosis-related gene expression levels including Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Smac, and ceruloplasmin (CP) were also determined. Results showed that significant reductions were observed in Bcl-2 and CP expressions (P < 0.01), while Caspase-3 gene was up-regulated (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in Smac and Bax expressions. Furthermore, on day 50, spleen tissues were presented to observe ultrastructural changes in lesions by means of transmission electron microscopy, with fragmentized nucleus, vesiculation of cytoplasm, mitochondria hyperplasia, and increasing lysosomes included. In addition, histopathology results corroborated the toxicity by showing cell hemorrhage, thickening central arteries, and enhanced capsule thickness. To sum up, our study revealed that the combination of Cd and Mo could induce remarkable damage to the spleen of goats by promoting cell apoptosis in the mitochondrial pathway and affecting the deposition of Mo and Cd. PMID:26585322

  5. Diagnosis of contagious caprine and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) are caused by Mycoplasma capricolum ssp. capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides ssp. mycoides, small colony type (SC), respectively. These species belong to the group of six mycoplasmas referred to as the Mycoplasma mycoides cluster. The members of the M. mycoides cluster are closely related, and some of them are very difficult to grow. Diagnosis based on identification of the causative agents by cultivation, biochemical reactions, or serology is therefore difficult, and improved diagnostic methods are sorely needed. Identification methods for M. capricolum ssp. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides ssp. mycoides SC, based on detection of the 16S rRNA genes from all members of the M. mycoides cluster by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and differentiation of species by restriction enzyme analysis with PstI and AluI, respectively, have been developed in the Department of Bacteriology, National Veterinary Institute Laboratory, Sweden. The methods are based on the fact that members of the M. mycoides cluster have two rRNA operons and that there are sequence differences (polymorphisms) between the two 16S rRNA genes from the two operons. The majority of these polymorphisms are characteristic for each species, and some of them can be utilized for differentiation between the species. Techniques for extraction of DNA from lung tissue and from clinical material dried onto filter paper for preservation are described. Pleural fluid was found to be an ideal sample for direct analysis by PCR, but this material can also be dried onto filter paper for preservation and sent to another laboratory for the PCR analysis. These identification systems designed for M. capricolum ssp. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides ssp. mycoides SC have been used for diagnosis of CCPP and CBPP, respectively, by analysis of clinical samples brought to the laboratory as frozen lung tissue or preserved by drying onto a filter

  6. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  7. Arthritis Associated with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A controlled prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence and characteristic features of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, ankylosing spondylitis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a group of patients with Crohn's disease, and to define the relationship of such arthritides with disease site, duration and activity. Peripheral arthritis occurred in 14.5% of the patients; it was not seen in the control group. This arthritis, which tended to be pauciarticular, was more common i...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus triggered reactive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Siam, A R; M. Hammoudeh

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report two patients who developed reactive arthritis in association with Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODS--A review of the case notes of two patients. RESULTS--Two adult female patients have developed sterile arthritis in association with Staph aureus infection. The first patient has had two episodes of arthritis; the first followed olecranon bursitis, the second followed infection of a central venous catheter used for dialysis. The second patient developed sterile arth...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research ... Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals ...

  10. Microbiology and biochemistry of cheeses with Appélation d'Origine Protegée and manufactured in the Iberian Peninsula from ovine and caprine milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, C; Malcata, F X

    2000-03-01

    To support legal protection with objective technical data and to promote enforcement of high quality standards a few European countries have created Appélation d'Origine Protegées. This paper reviews and updates fundamental and applied aspects encompassing microbiological and biochemical characteristics of traditional cheeses with Appélation d'Origine Protegée manufactured in the Iberian Peninsula from ovine, caprine, or both milks. Ovine and caprine cheeses with Appélation d'Origine Protegée from Portugal and Spain can be divided into four distinct groups based on milk source and rennet type: 1) Azeitão, Castelo Branco, Evora, Nisa, Serpa, Serra da Estrela, and La Serena cheeses are manufactured with raw ovine milk and coagulated via plant rennet; 2) Terrincho, Idiazábal, Manchego, Roncal, and Zamorano cheeses are manufactured with raw ovine milk and coagulated via animal rennet; 3) Cabra Transmontano and Majorero are manufactured with raw caprine milk and coagulated via animal rennet; and 4) Amarelo da Beira Baixa, Picante da Beira Baixa, and Rabaçal are manufactured with mixtures of raw ovine and caprine milks and coagulated via animal rennet. PMID:10750117

  11. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dettwiler Martina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2 causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF. This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with persistent fever, dyspnoea, nasal bleeding and haematuria. Despite symptomatic therapy, the buffalo died and was submitted to post mortem examination. Major findings were an abomasal ulceration, a mild haemorrhagic cystitis and multifocal haemorrhages on the epicardium and on serosal and mucosal surfaces. Eyes and oral cavity were not affected. Histopathology revealed a mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic vasculitis limited to the brain and the urinary bladder. Although these findings are typical for MCF, OvHV-2 DNA was not detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes or in paraffin-embedded brain, using an OvHV-2 specific real time PCR. With the aid of a panherpesvirus PCR, a caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2 sequence could be amplified from both samples. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant catarrhal fever in the subfamily Bovinae, where the presence of CpHV-2 could be demonstrated. The etiological context has yet to be evaluated.

  12. Anaerobic digestion of caprine manure in different seasons; Biodigestao anaerobica de dejetos de caprinos obtidos nas diferentes estacoes do ano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Ana C. [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Programa de Producao Animal]. E-mail: amorim@fcav.unesp.br; Lucas Junior, Jorge de [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Engenharia Rural]. E-mail: jlucas@fcav.unesp.br; Resende, Kleber T. [UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Zootecnia

    2004-04-01

    The dejections produced by caprine were used in different physiologic states and submitted to the same alimentary regime, in the four seasons of the year. This study was carried out in 60 L batch digesters at ambient temperature and aimed to evaluate the effect of the season on the anaerobic digestion of caprine manure. The biogas production, volatile solids (VS) reduction, the potential production (m{sup 3}) of biogas/kg of substrate, manure, total solids (TS) or (VS), the removal of total and fecal coliforms and the biogas composition were evaluated. The VS reductions were of 38: 34: 33 and 39% for Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring, respectively. The biogas production were of 1.06 m{sup 3} in summer, 0.88 m{sup 3} in autumn, 0,88 m{sup 3} in winter and 0.99 m{sup 3} in spring and the mean potential production were of 0.02 m{sup 3} of biogas/kg of substrate and 0.2 m{sup 3} of biogas/kg of manure for all seasons. The batch digesters reduced total and fecal coliforms densities in 99.99% and the CH{sub 4} contents in biogas were 88.3; 84.6; 80.6 and 79.2% for Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring respectively. (author)

  13. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage traffic

  14. Prognostic significance of serum iron levels in cases of Japanese encephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bharadwaj, M.; Prakash, V.; Mathur, A.; Chaturvedi, U. C.

    1991-01-01

    Forty-one children with acute laboratory confirmed Japanese encephalitis were studied. Serum iron concentrations were consistently low following Japanese encephalitis virus infection, with the levels being of prognostic significance.

  15. Development of a vaccine to prevent Japanese encephalitis: a brief review

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2009-01-01

    Viroj WiwanitkitWiwanitkit House, Bangkhae, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: Japanese encephalitis (ICD 10: A83.0) is an important specific viral encephalitis caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus, a virus of the Flavivirus group. Millions of people, especially those in endemic areas of developing countries in Asia, are at high risk from this infection. Therefore proper management to deal with this virus is essential. There is no specific treatment for Japanese encephalitis virus. Supportive an...

  16. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in Korea: Clinical Features, Treatment, and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Kim, Soyun; Shin, Jung-Won; Moon, Jangsup; Byun, Jung-Ick; Kim, Tae-Joon; Shin, Yong-Won; Lee, Keon-Joo; Kim, Young-Su; Park, Kyung-Il; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is the most common type of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis and it often responds to treatment. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in Korea. Methods Serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with encephalitis of undetermined cause were screened for anti-NMDAR antibodies using a cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assay. The patients came from ...

  17. Modern features of varicella encephalitis in children

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    N. V. Scripchenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There was conducted a survey among 65 children aged from 1 year to 17 with varicella encephalitis. There was determined predominance of cerebellar forms of the disease, in 93,9%, that is characterized by the development of the light pyramidal disorders on the contrast to the cerebral that is characterized by the development of convulsivecomatose syndrome. It was determined that the disease is distinguished by the rareness of the detected changes on the MRI, 12,3% only. It was detected that the changes of the evoked potentials could be seen among all the patients and are characterized by the predominance demyelinating changes of the brainstem structures when having a cerebellar form and neuronal disorders of the cerebral hemisphere when having a cerebral form. The outcome of the cerebellar form is recovery in 100% of cases, and in cerebral – the development of epilepsy was detected in 50% and death in 25%.

  18. Acute encephalitis syndrome following scrub typhus infection

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    Ayan Kar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to find the incidence of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES secondary to scrub infection and to observe the clinical, biochemical, radiological profile, and outcomes in these patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 consecutive patients of AES were evaluated for scrub infection using scrub typhus immunoglobulin M enzyme linked immuno-sorbant assay positivity along with the presence or absence of an eschar. Clinical profile, routine laboratory tests, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis, and neuroimaging were analyzed. Patients were treated with doxycycline and followed-up. Results: Among 20 consecutive patients with AES, 6 (30% were due to scrub infection. They presented with acute onset fever, altered sensorium, seizures. "Eschar" was seen in 50% of patients. CSF done in two of them was similar to consistent with viral meningitis. Magnetic resonance imaging brain revealed cerebral edema, bright lesions in the putamen and the thalamus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Renal involvement was seen in all patients. All patients responded well to oral doxycycline. Conclusion: AES is not an uncommon neurological presentation following scrub typhus infection. It should be suspected in all patients with fever, altered sensorium, and renal involvement. Oral doxycycline should be started as early as possible for better outcomes.

  19. Charles Bonnet syndrome after herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ömer Faruk; Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Özyürek, Hamit

    2012-04-01

    Visual impairment associated with Charles Bonnet syndrome is rarely reported in childhood. We describe a child who presented with visual hallucinations and postinfectious bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis. The patient had undergone acyclovir therapy for 3 weeks because of herpes encephalitis. Four days after therapy was completed, he experienced visual impairment in both eyes. He manifested a bilateral decrease in visual acuity, with normal funduscopic findings. The patient experienced visual hallucinations for about 1 week, and then experienced total loss of vision. During his hallucinations, the patient did not exhibit behavioral changes or cognitive impairment. The visual hallucinations included unfamiliar children hiding under his bed, and he spoke to someone whom he did not know. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral optic nerve hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted and contrast-enhanced images. The patient received corticosteroid therapy for his retrobulbar optic neuritis, and his vision returned to normal after 1 month. Although rare, visual impairment can be associated with complex visual hallucinations indicative of Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  20. Neurotropic astrovirus in cattle with nonsuppurative encephalitis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzalas, Ilias G; Wüthrich, Daniel; Walland, Julia; Drögemüller, Cord; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc; Oevermann, Anna; Bruggmann, Rémy; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2014-09-01

    Encephalitis is a frequently diagnosed condition in cattle with neurological diseases. Many affected animals present with a nonsuppurative inflammatory reaction pattern in the brain. While this pattern supports a viral etiology, the causative pathogen remains unknown in a large proportion of cases. Using viral metagenomics, we identified an astrovirus (bovine astrovirus [BoAstV]-CH13) in the brain of a cow with nonsuppurative encephalitis. Additionally, BoAstV RNA was detected with reverse transcription-PCR and in situ hybridization in about one fourth (5/22 animals) of cattle with nonsuppurative encephalitis of unknown etiology. Viral RNA was found primarily in neurons and at the site of pathology. These findings support the notion that BoAstV infection is a common cause of encephalitis in cattle. Phylogenetically, BoAstV-CH13 was closely related to rare astrovirus isolates from encephalitis cases in animals and a human patient. Future research needs to be directed toward the pathogenic mechanisms, epidemiology, and potential cross-species transmission of these neurotropic astroviruses.

  1. Unusual acute encephalitis involving the thalamus: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Han Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho; Nam, Hyun Woo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Woo Ho [Sanggyo Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    To describe the brain CT and MR imaging findings of unusual acute encephalitis involving the thalamus. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and CT and/or MR imaging findings of six patients with acute encephalitis involving the thalamus. CT (n=6) and MR imaging (n=6) were performed during the acute and/or convalescent stage of the illness. Brain CT showed brain swelling (n=2), low attenuation of both thalami (n=1) or normal findings (n=3). Initial MR imaging indicated that in all patients the thalamus was involved either bilaterally (n=5) or unilaterally (n=1). Lesions were also present in the midbrain (n=5), medial temporal lobe (n=4), pons (n=3), both hippocampi (n=3) the insular cortex (n=2), medulla (n=2), lateral temporal lobe cortex (n=1), both cingulate gyri (n=1), both basal ganglia (n=1), and the left hemispheric cortex (n=1). These CT or MR imaging findings of acute encephalitis of unknown etiology were similar to a combination of those of Japanese encephalitis and herpes simplex encephalitis. In order to document the specific causative agents which lead to the appearance of these imaging features, further investigation is required.

  2. KARAKTERISTIK PRODUK FERMENTASI DARI BAHAN BAKU KOMBINASI SUSU KAMBING DENGAN EKSTRAK KEDELAI, EKSTRAK JAGUNG, ATAU SANTAN KELAPA [Characterization of Fermented Products Made From Caprine Milk in Combination with Soy Extract, Corn Extract or Coconut Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartati Chairunnisa*

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the best combination of caprine milk with soy extract, corn extract, or coconut extract in the production of flavored fermented milk products. Products were analyzed for the lactic acid content, crude protein, viscosity and also organoleptic properties (color, texsture, flavour, overall acceptance. This study was performed by a Completely Randomized Design with four kind of treatments, i.e.caprine, caprine milk in combination with soy extract, corn extract, or coconut extract with five replications. The result indicated that the caprine milk in combination with soy extract resulted an acceptable flavored fermented milk product containing 0.78% lactic acid, 6.62% crude protein, and had a viscosity of 2120 centipoise. The texture of the most liked flavoured fermented milk product was viscous to most viscous, and the flavour was slightly sour to sour.

  3. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  4. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is con

  5. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  6. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  7. Early identification of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Jessica Annemarie Bernadette van

    2016-01-01

    The first part is focused on early recognition of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Two large early arthritis recognition clinics were started in Leiden and Groningen. The results showed that this initiative reduces the GP-delay significantly. Secondly, it was investigated whether an association between sh

  8. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

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    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  9. Antiviral activity of luteolin against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Suhong; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-07-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of family Flaviviridae, is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE). JEV is one of the most important causative agents of viral encephalitis in humans, and this disease leads to high fatality rates. Although effective vaccines are available, no effective antiviral therapy for JE has been developed. Hence, identifying effective antiviral agents against JEV infection is important. In this study, we found that luteolin was an antiviral bioflavonoid with potent antiviral activity against JEV replication in A549 cells with IC50=4.56μg/mL. Luteolin also showed extracellular virucidal activity on JEV. With a time-of-drug addition assay revealing that JEV replication was inhibited by luteolin after the entry stage. Overall, our results suggested that luteolin can be used to develop an antiviral drug against JEV. PMID:27126774

  10. Nipah virus encephalitis: A cause for concern for Indian neurologists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first and only recorded outbreak of Nipah virus (NV encephalitis in India occurred in the winter of 2001, although the causative organism could only be identified 5 years down the line in 2006. The first ever-recorded outbreak of NV encephalitis occurred in the Malaysian peninsula in 1998-99; though between 2001 and 2005, at least four outbreaks occurred in our neighboring country of Bangladesh. The threat of further outbreaks of this dangerous disease looms large on the Indian subcontinent, given the natural reservoir of the definitive host, namely, fruit-eating bats of the genus Pteropus. This review would briefly highlight the epidemiology, clinical aspects and diagnosis of NV encephalitis to enlighten the neurological community of the country for early detection and implementation of preventive measures in the event of further outbreaks, especially those which are generally passed of as ′mystery diseases′ in the lay press and even by governmental agencies.

  11. Enterotoxemia em caprinos no Rio Grande do Sul Caprine enterotoxaemia in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Edson M. Colodel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available São descritos surtos de enterotoxemia em caprinos em cinco propriedades no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os animais afetados eram, normalmente, encontrados mortos ou apresentavam evolução aguda de 2 a 3 horas com acentuada depressão, cólicas abdominais e diarréia profusa com fibrina. Em duas propriedades relataram-se casos com a evolução de até 12 horas. Em treze animais necropsiados observaram-se aumento de líquidos nas cavidades abdominal, torácica e pericárdica, congestão e hiperemia da serosa e mucosa do intestino, conteúdo do cólon líquido com fibrina além de hemorragias de serosa e fibrina. Em um animal constatou-se microangiopatia cerebral caracterizada por acúmulo de material homogêneo e eosinofílico no espaço perivascular. No conteúdo intestinal, colônias com bastonetes morfológica e bioquimicamente sugestivos de Clostridium perfringens foram caracterizadas no estudo bacteriológico. A soroneutralização em camundongos com conteúdo intestinal dos animais afetados, revelou a presença da toxina épsilon. Estes achados evidenciam a enterotoxemia como doença de importância para criação de caprinos no Rio Grande do Sul.Five outbreaks of caprine enterotoxaemia in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were studied. The animals were found dead or had a clinical course that usually lasted 2-3 hours. From two farms a clinical manifestation period of 12 hours was reported. Clinical signs were characterized by depression, marked abdominal discomfort, profuse watery diarrhea with fibrin clots, and death. Thirteen necropsies were performed and hydropericardium, hydrothorax and hydroperitoneum were commonly found. The mucosa and serosa of the colon were congested, and its contents was watery with multiple fibrin clots. Serosal hemorrhages and fibrin clots in the gallbladder were also seen. Fibrinous colitis and thyphilitis were the most frequent histological changes. Cerebral microangiopathy was observed in one case, which was

  12. Neuroleptic intolerance in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejuste, Florian; Thomas, Laure; Picard, Géraldine; Desestret, Virginie; Ducray, François; Rogemond, Veronique; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Groc, Laurent; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To precisely describe the initial psychiatric presentation of patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) to identify potential clues enhancing its early diagnosis. Methods: We retrospectively studied the French Reference Centre medical records of every adult patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis to specify the patients' initial psychiatric symptoms leading to hospitalization in a psychiatric department and the reasons underlying the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Results: The medical records of 111 adult patients were reviewed. Psychiatric features were the initial presentation in 65 patients (59%). Among them, several psychiatric manifestations were observed, including visual and auditory hallucinations (n = 26, 40%), depression (n = 15, 23%), mania (n = 5, 8%), acute schizoaffective episode (n = 15, 23%), and eating disorder or addiction (n = 4; 6%). Forty-five patients (40% of total cohort) were first hospitalized in a psychiatric institution (91% women), with a median duration of stay of 9 days (range 0.25–239 days). Among them, 24 patients (53%) had associated discreet neurologic signs at the first evaluation, while 17 additional patients (38%) developed neurologic signs within a few days. Twenty-one patients (47%) were transferred to a medical unit for a suspicion of antipsychotic intolerance characterized by high temperature, muscle rigidity, mutism or coma, and biological results suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Conclusions: Several psychiatric presentations were observed in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although none was specific; however, patients, mostly women, also had discreet neurologic signs that should be carefully assessed as well as signs of antipsychotic intolerance that should raise suspicion for anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27606355

  13. Neuroleptic intolerance in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejuste, Florian; Thomas, Laure; Picard, Géraldine; Desestret, Virginie; Ducray, François; Rogemond, Veronique; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Groc, Laurent; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To precisely describe the initial psychiatric presentation of patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) to identify potential clues enhancing its early diagnosis. Methods: We retrospectively studied the French Reference Centre medical records of every adult patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis to specify the patients' initial psychiatric symptoms leading to hospitalization in a psychiatric department and the reasons underlying the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Results: The medical records of 111 adult patients were reviewed. Psychiatric features were the initial presentation in 65 patients (59%). Among them, several psychiatric manifestations were observed, including visual and auditory hallucinations (n = 26, 40%), depression (n = 15, 23%), mania (n = 5, 8%), acute schizoaffective episode (n = 15, 23%), and eating disorder or addiction (n = 4; 6%). Forty-five patients (40% of total cohort) were first hospitalized in a psychiatric institution (91% women), with a median duration of stay of 9 days (range 0.25–239 days). Among them, 24 patients (53%) had associated discreet neurologic signs at the first evaluation, while 17 additional patients (38%) developed neurologic signs within a few days. Twenty-one patients (47%) were transferred to a medical unit for a suspicion of antipsychotic intolerance characterized by high temperature, muscle rigidity, mutism or coma, and biological results suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Conclusions: Several psychiatric presentations were observed in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although none was specific; however, patients, mostly women, also had discreet neurologic signs that should be carefully assessed as well as signs of antipsychotic intolerance that should raise suspicion for anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  14. Combination therapy for pain management in inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthritis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ramiro; H. Radner; D. van der Heijde; A. van Tubergen; R. Buchbinder; D. Aletaha; R.B.M. Landewé

    2011-01-01

    Despite optimal therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, many people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) continue to have persistent pain that may require additional therapy. To assess the benefits and safety of combination pain therapy for people with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosi

  15. Encephalitis with Prolonged but Reversible Splenial Lesion

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    Alena Meleková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The splenium of the corpus callosum has a specific structure of blood supply with a tendency towards blood-brain barrier breakdown, intramyelinic edema, and damage due to hypoxia or toxins. Signs and symptoms of reversible syndrome of the splenium of the corpus callosum typically include disorientation, confusion, impaired consciousness, and epileptic seizures. Case report: A previously healthy 32-year-old man suffered from weakness, headache, and fever. Subsequently, he developed apathy, ataxia, and inability to walk, and therefore was admitted to the hospital. Cerebrospinal fluid showed protein elevation (0.9 g/l and pleocytosis (232/1 ul. A brain MRI showed hyperintense lesions in the middle of the corpus callosum. The patient was treated with antibiotics, and subsequently, in combination with steroids. Two months later, the hyperintense lesions in the splenium and the basal ganglia had disappeared. Almost seven months since his hospitalization in the Department of Neurology, the patient has returned to his previous employment. He now does not exhibit any mental changes, an optic edema and urological problems have improved. In addition, he is now actively engaged in sports. Conclusion: We have described a case of a 32-year-old man with confusion, ataxia, and inability to stand and walk. The man developed a febrile meningeal syndrome and a hyperintense lesion of the splenium, which lasted for two months. Neurological changes, optic nerve edema, and urinary retention have resolved over the course of seven months. We think that the prolonged but transient lesion of the splenium may have been caused by encephalitis of viral origin.

  16. Predictors of outcome in HSV encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarun D; Fugate, Jennifer E; Hocker, Sara; Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Aksamit, Allen J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explore the clinical features, radiological findings, management and the factors influencing prognosis in PCR-confirmed herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). This is a retrospective review of consecutive patients diagnosed with HSE at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, between January 1995 and December 2013. Only HSE cases confirmed by PCR were included. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with good (modified Rankin Scale of 0-2) or poor outcome (mRS of 3-6) at hospital discharge and 1-year follow-up. We identified 45 patients with HSE. Median age was 66 (IQR 53.5-78) years. HSE was caused by HSV-1 in 33 cases and by HSV-2 in 9. Nearly half had seizures upon admission or during hospitalization. The most common regions involved on MRI were the temporal lobe in 35 (87.5%), insula in 28 (70.0%), frontal lobe in 27 (67.5%) and thalamus in 11 (27.5%) patients. MRI pattern was quite homogeneous with HSV-1 infection, but much more heterogeneous with HSV-2. Good outcome at discharge and at 6-12 months was seen in 16 (35.6%) and 27 (65.9%) patients, respectively. On multivariate analyses, older age (p = 0.001), coma (p = 0.008), restricted diffusion on MRI (p = 0.005) and acyclovir started after the first day of admission (p = 0.050) were associated with poor outcome at discharge. Older age, development of coma, presence of restricted diffusion on brain MRI and delay in the administration of acyclovir portend poor outcome in HSE. Conversely, presence of seizures, focal neurological deficits, EEG abnormalities and location or extension of FLAIR/T2 abnormalities did not influence functional outcome. PMID:26568560

  17. Prevention, diagnosis, and management of Japanese encephalitis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar R.

    2014-01-01

    Rashmi Kumar Department of Pediatrics, King George Medical University, Lucknow (UP), India Abstract: Japanese encephalitis is the single largest cause of viral encephalitis in the world today. It is caused by a Flavivirus whose natural cycle occurs in mosquito and vertebrate hosts (ardeid birds and pigs) and man is an incidental dead-end host. It tends to occur in outbreaks in poor rural regions of Asia where rice growing and pig rearing are a way of life. The illness has three stages &n...

  18. [A case of acute disseminated Mucor encephalitis in a heifer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönmann, M; Thoma, R; Braun, U

    1997-01-01

    The case of a 2 1/2 year old Swiss Braunvieh heifer suffering from an acute disseminated mycotic encephalitis caused by a Mucorales spp. infection is presented. Clinical signs and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (increased protein concentration and pleocytosis) were typical for an acute encephalitis, probably due to a listeriosis. The histological examination of the brain revealed an acute disseminated thrombo-embolic encephalomyelitis due to a fungi infection, morphologically consistent with Mucorales spp. The occurrence of bovine cerebral mucormycosis is rare and therefore the veterinarian should become aware of a case which was clinically not distinguishable from a listeriosis.

  19. An Unusual Presentation of Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Boyapati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 65-year-old man with an acute alteration in mental state that was initially diagnosed as a functional psychiatric condition. After extensive workup, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was detected in the patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and he responded rapidly to treatment with acyclovir. The case illustrates the importance of actively excluding organic causes in such patients, the need to have a low threshold of suspicion for HSV encephalitis, and the central role of CSF PCR testing for the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis, even in the absence of CSF biochemical abnormalities.

  20. Case Report: Magnetic resonance imaging in rabies encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabies encephalitis is an invariably fatal disease characterized by typical clinical symptoms. Although the diagnosis of this condition can be made on the basis of the patient's history and the classical clinical presentation, neuroimaging may still play a role, especially for establishing an early diagnosis in cases with atypical presentations or when the history of animal bite is not forthcoming. We report the MRI findings in a case of furious rabies encephalitis and describe the utility of diffusion imaging in its diagnosis

  1. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, autoimmunity, and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Matthew S; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-09-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently-discovered synaptic autoimmune disorder in which auto-antibodies target NMDARs in the brain, leading to their removal from the synapse. Patients manifest with prominent psychiatric symptoms - and in particular psychosis - early in the disease course. This presentation converges with long-standing evidence on multiple fronts supporting the glutamatergic model of schizophrenia. We review mechanisms underlying disease in anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and discuss its role in furthering our understanding of neural circuit dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:25458857

  2. Toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis in a heart transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliu, C; Sanclemente, G; Cardona, M; Castel, M A; Perez-Villa, F; Moreno, A; Cervera, C

    2014-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations in immunosuppressed patients. Encephalitis and intracranial mass lesions are easily recognized as typical manifestations of toxoplasmosis. However, meningitis caused by T. gondii is a rare condition with very few cases described in the literature. We present the case of a heart transplant recipient who developed toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis. After an extensive review of the medical literature, we found only 1 case of meningitis in solid organ transplant recipients and meningitis in immunocompromised individuals.

  3. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  4. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  5. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    N M Kosheleva; E. V. Matyanova

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of thes...

  6. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  7. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  8. Development and validation of a competitive ELISA kit for the serological diagnosis of ovine, caprine and bovine brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portanti, O; Tittarelli, M; Di Febo, T; Luciani, M; Mercante, M T; Conte, A; Lelli, R

    2006-12-01

    A competitive ELISA (Brucella-Ab c-ELISA) was standardized and validated for the detection of Brucella antibodies in cattle, sheep and goat sera using a monoclonal antibody (MAb 4B5A) produced against Brucella melitensis biotype 2. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay were 100% to a 67.5% cut-off point (B/Bo%). When compared with an indirect ELISA, the Brucella-Ab c-ELISA did not demonstrate cross-reactions when testing positive sera for antibodies to some Enterobacteriaceae. A comparison was made between the Brucella-Ab c-ELISA and the complement fixation and Rose Bengal tests. Results demonstrated that the Brucella-Ab c-ELISA is a valuable tool for the serological diagnosis of bovine and ovine/caprine brucellosis. PMID:17123429

  9. Identification of a functional SNP in the 3'-UTR of caprine MTHFR gene that is associated with milk protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xiaopeng; Song, Yuxuan; Hou, Jinxing; Wang, Shan; Gao, Kexin; Cao, Binyun

    2016-08-01

    Xinong Saanen (n = 305) and Guanzhong (n = 317) dairy goats were used to detect SNPs in the caprine MTHFR 3'-UTR by DNA sequencing. One novel SNP (c.*2494G>A) was identified in the said region. Individuals with the AA genotype had greater milk protein levels than did those with the GG genotype at the c.*2494 G>A locus in both dairy goat breeds (P A substitution could increase the binding activity of bta-miR-370 with the MTHFR 3'-UTR. In addition, we observed a significant increase in the MTHFR protein level of AA carriers relative to that of GG carriers. These altered levels of MTHFR protein may account for the association of the SNP with milk protein level.

  10. Two Mutations in the Caprine MTHFR 3'UTR Regulated by MicroRNAs Are Associated with Milk Production Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Hou

    Full Text Available 5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR plays a central role in folate metabolism by irreversibly converting 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methylenetetrahydrofolate, a predominant circulating form of folate. Folate is reportedly important for milk protein synthesis, and MTHFR may be a key regulatory point of folate metabolism for milk protein synthesis in mammary epithelial cells. Prior to this study, polymorphisms of the MTHFR gene were not associated with milk production traits from a breeding perspective. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at microRNA (miRNA binding sites (miR-SNPs can affect gene expression. This study aimed to identify the effects of miR-SNPs (g.2244A>G and g.2264A>G in the caprine MTHFR 3' UTR on the milk production traits of dairy goats.Guanzhong dairy (GD, n = 325 goats were used to detect SNPs in the caprine MTHFR 3' UTR by DNA sequencing. Two novel SNPs (g.2244A>G and g.2264A>G were identified in the said region. The homozygous haplotype A-G of the SNPs g.2244A>G and g.2264A>G was significantly associated with milk yield and milk protein levels in GD goats (P G and g.2264A>G polymorphisms were associated with milk production traits in GD goats. Further investigations should explore the underlying miRNA-mediated mechanisms that are modified by the g.2244A>G and g.2264A>G SNPs. The current study evaluated these SNPs as potential genetic markers in goats, with potential applications in breeding programs.

  11. Computed tomography in young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T.; Woo, M.; Okazaki, H.; Nishida, N.; Hara, T.; Yasuhara, A.; Kasahara, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1985-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained from eight infants and young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. In two cases the initial scan showed diffuse edematous changes as a mass effect without laterality. Unilateral localized low attenuation in the initial scan was evident 4 days after the onset in one patient, and high attenuation in the initial scan appeared on the 6th day in another patient, but in general, it was not possible to establish an early diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis from CT scan. In the longitudinal study the calcification with ventriculomegaly appeared in 3 of 5 survivors, and gyriform calcification in 2 of 3 patients, respectively. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 6 months after the onset of neonatal herpes simplex encephalitis. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with herpes simplex encephalitis are different from those of older children and adults, and the importance of longitudinal CT studies was stressed in clarifying the pathophysiology of the central nervous system involvement in survivors.

  12. Concurrent infection of Japanese encephalitis and mixed plasmodium infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Chandra Bhatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE and malaria would coexist in the areas where both illnesses are endemic with overlapping clinical pictures, especially in a case of febrile encephalopathy with hepatosplenomegaly. However, there are no published data till date showing concurrent infection of these two agents despite both diseases being coendemic in many areas. We report a case of concurrent infection of JE and mixed plasmodium infection, where the case, initially diagnosed as cerebral malaria did not improve on antimalarials and alternative diagnosis of JEV encephalitis was thought which was confirmed by a serological test. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of concurrent Japanese encephalitis with mixed plasmodium infection. We report a case of 3-year-old male child, who presented with febrile encephalopathy with hepatosplenomegaly. Based on a rapid diagnostic test and peripheral smear examination, a diagnosis of mixed P.Vivax and P.falciparum infection was made and the patient was treated with quinine and doxycycline. However, besides giving antimalarials the patient did not improve and an alternative diagnosis of JE was considered as the patient was from the endemic zone of Japanese encephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of the patient was sent for a virological study which came out to be positive for JE IgM in CSF, which is confirmatory of JE infection. In a patient with febrile encephalopathy with hepatosplenomegaly especially in areas coendemic for JE and malaria, the possibility of mixed infection should be kept in mind.

  13. Acute measles encephalitis in partially vaccinated adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of acute measles encephalitis (AME is poorly understood. Treatment with immune-modulators is based on theories that post-infectious autoimmune responses cause demyelination. The clinical course and immunological parameters of AME were examined during an outbreak in Vietnam. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fifteen measles IgM-positive patients with confusion or Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score below 13, and thirteen with uncomplicated measles were enrolled from 2008-2010. Standardized clinical exams were performed and blood collected for lymphocyte and measles- and auto-antibody analysis. The median age of AME patients was 21 years, similar to controls. Eleven reported receiving measles vaccination when aged one year. Confusion developed a median of 4 days after rash. Six patients had GCS <8 and four required mechanical ventilation. CSF showed pleocytosis (64% and proteinorrhachia (71% but measles virus RNA was not detected. MRI revealed bilateral lesions in the cerebellum and brain stem in some patients. Most received dexamethasone +/- IVIG within 4 days of admission but symptoms persisted for ≥3 weeks in five. The concentration of voltage gated calcium channel-complex-reactive antibodies was 900 pM in one patient, and declined to 609 pM ∼ 3 months later. Measles-reactive IgG antibody avidity was high in AME patients born after vaccine coverage exceeded 50% (∼ 25 years earlier. AME patients had low CD4 (218/µl, p = 0.029 and CD8 (200/µl, p = 0.012 T-cell counts compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Young adults presenting with AME in Vietnam reported a history of one prior measles immunization, and those aged <25 years had high measles-reactive IgG avidity indicative of prior vaccination. This suggests that one-dose measles immunization is not sufficient to prevent AME in young adults and reinforces the importance of maintaining high coverage with a two-dose measles immunization schedule. Treatment with

  14. Analysis of EEG features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-hua WEI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical manifestations, EEG and head MRI features of neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis, and to investigate the role of EEG in determining the relapse or fluctuation of this disease, characteristics of EEG corresponding to head MRI, and EEG features in different clinical stages. Methods A total of 23 patients with neuronal surface antibody associated encephalitis were divided into ascent, climax, descent and recovery stage according to their clinical course. The relation between EEG background activity, distribution of slow wave, epileptiform discharge, extreme delta brush (EDB and relapse or fluctuation of the disease was analyzed. The relation between EEG features and head MRI abnormalities, and also EEG features in different stages were analyzed. Results There were 19 anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis patients, 3 anti-leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody associated encephalitis and one anti-γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GABABR antibody associated encephalitis. The frequencies of clinical presentations were psychological or cognitive dysfunction, epileptic seizure, conscious disturbance, speech dysfunction and movement disorder in descending order. Within 30.50 d from onset, 6 patients demonstrated slow wave background, of whom 2 relapsed or fluctuated; 5 patients had α rhythm background and none of them relapsed or fluctuated. In patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, the difference in first hospital stay (Z = -0.785, P = 0.433 and relapse or fluctuation (Fisher's exact probability: P = 0.155 between EDB group and non-EDB group was not significant. There was no apparent correlation between EEG background activities and head MRI abnormalities in different stages. In ascent and climax stage, EEG background activities were predominantly slow wave, and the distribution of slow wave was relatively broader. EEG background changed to α rhythm from descent stage

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis: A Case Report

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    Somayh HASHEMIAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Hashemian S, Ashrafzadeh F, Akhondian J, Beiraghi Toosi M. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis: A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2015 Winter;9(1:107-110.  Abstract Many neurologic manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection have been documented, including encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, transverse myelitis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. These manifestations can occur alone or coincidentally with the clinical picture of infectious mononucleosis. EBV encephalitis is rare and is indicated as a wide range of clinical manifestations. We report a 10-year-old girl presented with fever, gait disturbance, and bizarre behavior for one week. The results of the physical examination were unremarkable. The diagnosis of EBV encephalitis was made by changes in titers of EBV specific antibodies and MRI findings. A cranial MRI demonstrated abnormal high signal intensities in the basal ganglia and the striatal body, especially in the putamen and caudate nucleus. EBV infection should be considered when lesions are localized to the basal ganglia.ReferencesFujimoto H, Asaoka K, Imiazumi T, Ayabe M, Shoji H, Kaji M. Epstein-Barr virus Infections of the Central Nervous System. Intern Med 2003; 42:33-40.Mathew AG, Parvez Y. Fulminant Epstein Barr virus encephalitis. Indian Pediatrics 2013; 50:418-419Kalita J, Maurya PK, Kumar B, Misra UK. Epstein Barr virus encephalitis: Clinical diversity and radiological similarity. Neurol India 2011; 59:605-7Baskin HJ, Hedlund G. Neuroimaging of Herpes Virus Infections in Children. Pediatr Radiol 2007; 37:949-63.Weinberg A, Li SH, Palmer M, Tyler K .Quantitative CSF PCR in Epstein-Barr Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System. Ann Neurol 2002; 52:543-8.Ono J, Shimizu K, Harada k, Mano T, Okada S. Characteristic MR Features of Encephalitis Caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Pediatr Radiol 1998; 28:569-70.Hausler M, Raamaekers T, Doenges M, Shweizer K ,Ritter K. Neurological Complications of Acute

  16. Effect of combinations of antiviral drugs on herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M Gebhardt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bryan M Gebhardt1, Federico Focher2, Richard Eberle3, Andrzej Manikowski4, George E Wright41LSU Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Istituto di Genetica Molecolare, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia, Italy; 3Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 4GLSynthesis Inc., Worcester, MA, USAAbstract: 2-Phenylamino-6-oxo-9-(4-hydroxybutylpurine (HBPG is a thymidine kinase inhibitor that prevents encephalitic death in mice caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2, although its potency is somewhat less than that of acyclovir (ACV. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of combinations of HBPG and either ACV, phosphonoformate (PFA, or cidofovir (CDF against HSV encephalitis. BALB/c mice were given ocular infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2, and treated twice daily intraperitoneally for five days with HBPG, alone or in combination with ACV, PFA, or CDF. Animals were observed daily for up to 30 days, and the day of death of each was recorded. All of the combinations showed additivity, and the combination of HBPG + ACV appeared to be synergistic, ie, protected more mice against HSV-1 encephalitis compared with each drug given alone. Delay of treatment with HBPG for up to two days was still effective in preventing HSV-2 encephalitis. The combination of the thymidine kinase inhibitor HBPG and the antiherpes drug ACV may have synergistic activity against HSV encephalitis. The development of a potent and safe combination therapy for the prevention and/or treatment of HSV infection of the central nervous system can improve the outcome of this infection in humans.Keywords: antivirals, herpetic encephalitis

  17. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of, and surgery for, bone and joint diseases. Physical therapists: Health professionals who work with patients to improve ... heart. Pericarditis can be caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Physical therapist. A health professional who works with patients to ...

  18. Therapy strategies in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous condition with a myriad of different clinical presentations. It commonly affects the skin and musculoskeletal system causing psoriasis, peripheral arthritis, axial arthritis, enthesitis and dactylitis. Many patients also have related conditions, such as those within the metabolic syndrome and associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) conditions including inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis. Any therapeutic strategy must be tailored to the individual patient, taking into account her/his complete clinical presentation and comorbidities. New treatment recommendations from the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) provide evidence based recommendations on effective therapies for the management of each different manifestation of PsA, and how treatment may be affected by comorbidities (1). However, the limited evidence comparing different treatment strategies in PsA is recognised as a limitation in these recommendations and further information is detailed below.

  19. N-methyl D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: A new addition to the spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of "encephalitis" is caused by unknown agents. Of late, a new category of disorders, "autoimmune encephalitis," has been described, which present with features similar to viral encephalitides. A well-delineated and common entity among this group is the recently described anti-NMDAR encephalitis (NMDARE. Although this entity was initially described in young women harboring ovarian teratomas, it is now characterised as well in children and men. Approximately 60% of the patients have an underlying tumor, usually an ovarian teratoma. In 40% of the patients, no cause can be found (idiopathic NMDARE. NMDARE typically presents with psychiatric features followed by altered level of consciousness, severe dysautonomia, hyperkinetic movement disorders, seizures and central hypoventilation. Orofacial dyskinesias resulting in lip and tongue mutilation are quite common. Seizures, are common and may be difficult to treat. The disease can be confirmed by serum and cerebrospinal fluid anti-NMDAR antibodies. Titers of these antibodies can also guide response to treatment. Tumor removal is necessary if identified, followed by immunological treatment. Intravenous methylprednisolone and immunoglobulins aim to suppress/modulate immune response while plasma exchange attempts to remove antibodies and other inflammatory cytokines. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide aim to suppress antibody production. Recovery is slow and often with neurological deficits if treatment is delayed. With many distinctive clinical features, a specific antibody that aids diagnosis, and early effective treatment with commonly available drugs leading to good outcomes, NMDARE is a diagnosis that should be considered early in any case of "unexplained encephalitis."

  20. Uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1990-01-01

    About 20% of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis develop uveitis which is frequently bilateral. Risk factors for uveitis are: female gender, pauciarticular onset of arthritis, presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, and the antigens HLA-DW5 and HLA-DPw2. The visual prognosis in patients with uveitis is good in 25% and fair in 50%. The remaining 25% develop cataract and/or glaucoma. The management of glaucoma is unsatisfactory, but the results of cataract surgery by lensectomy are good.

  1. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    F. Atzeni; P Sarzi- Puttini; Lubrano, E

    2011-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massag...

  2. Biologic therapies for juvenile arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, N; Jackson, G.; Gardner-Medwin, J.

    2003-01-01

    A group of therapies with exciting potential has emerged for children and young people with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) uncontrolled by conventional disease modifying drugs. Theoretical understanding from molecular biologic research has identified specific targets within pathophysiological pathways that control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and JIA. This review identifies the pathways of autoimmunity to begin to show how biologic agents have been produced to replicate, mimic, or bl...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    N L Prokopjeva; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko; V A Ryabkov

    2008-01-01

    To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl) detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to ass...

  4. Demonstration of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp mycoides, small colony type in outbreaks of caprine pleuropneumonia in eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusiluka, L.J.M.; Semuguruka, W.D.; Kazwala, R.R.;

    2000-01-01

    by different degrees of vasculitis, and fibrinocellular exudation into the alveolar septae and lumina, and into interlobular septae and pleura. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were isolated...... from some of the examined goats including a case with a sequestrum which yielded Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type. This work reports the first description of an outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia in Tanzania in which M. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small...

  5. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added 125I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of 35S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases

  6. Psoriatic Arthritis: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating condition, which affects approximately one-quarter of psoriasis patients. Recent findings have furthered our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of PsA. There have been major advances in the identification of genes associated with joint involvement but not with cutaneous disease alone. The elucidation of key immunologic pathways has allowed the development of novel targeted therapies that are in the research pipeline. Currently, good screening tests and biomarkers to diagnose early PsA and to guide therapy are limited. In this paper, we present recent findings with regard to the immunopathogenesis and genetics of PsA, biomarkers, and screening tools and review the targeted therapies currently in clinical trials.

  7. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  8. Artritis Temprana Early Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la década de los años ochenta se consideraba a la artritis reumatoide (AR como una enfermedad poco frecuente, de gravedad leve a moderada, que tenía una evolución lentamente, progresiva hacia el daño articular y la incapacidad. El aborde terapéutico convencional hasta ese momento, era el tratamiento clásico de la pirámide.Until the early the eighties was considered rheumatoid arthritis to (RA as a rare disease of mild to moderate severity, which had a slowly evolution towards joint damage and disability. The conventional therapeutic option until then, was the classic treatment of the pyramid.

  9. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  10. Fragile X mental retardation protein interacts with the RNA-binding protein Caprin1 in neuronal RiboNucleoProtein complexes [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid El Fatimy

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP, an RNA-binding protein. FMRP is associated with messenger RiboNucleoParticles (mRNPs present in polyribosomes and its absence in neurons leads to alteration in synaptic plasticity as a result of translation regulation defects. The molecular mechanisms by which FMRP plays a role in translation regulation remain elusive. Using immunoprecipitation approaches with monoclonal Ab7G1-1 and a new generation of chicken antibodies, we identified Caprin1 as a novel FMRP-cellular partner. In vivo and in vitro evidence show that Caprin1 interacts with FMRP at the level of the translation machinery as well as in trafficking neuronal granules. As an RNA-binding protein, Caprin1 has in common with FMRP at least two RNA targets that have been identified as CaMKIIα and Map1b mRNAs. In view of the new concept that FMRP species bind to RNA regardless of known structural motifs, we propose that protein interactors might modulate FMRP functions.

  11. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  12. Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Juvenile Arthritis: Discoveries Lead to Newer Treatments Share Tweet Linkedin ... back to top Biologics: New Treatments for Juvenile Arthritis “As science at the molecular level has advanced, ...

  13. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  14. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6 weeks duration in patients aged less than 16 years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  15. Herpes simplex encephalitis: how good are we in diagnosing this condition?

    OpenAIRE

    Mak, W.; Kwan, MWM; Chan, KH; Cheung, RTF; Ho, SL

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the commonest sporadic infective encephalitis in Hong Kong. Early recognition of HSE, which relies on a high index of suspicion, is important as effective treatment is available. Empirical acyclovir is advocated for all cases of clinically suspected viral encephalitis. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a routine investigation in suspected HSE. METHODS: The EEG database of Neurodiagnostic Unit, Queen Mary Hospital, was reviewed retrospectively. ...

  16. Antibodies against prM protein distinguish between previous infection with dengue and Japanese encephalitis viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Sum Magdline; Wang Seok; Cardosa Mary; Tio Phaik

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background In Southeast Asia, dengue viruses often co-circulate with other flaviviruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus, and due to the presence of shared antigenic epitopes it is often difficult to use serological methods to distinguish between previous infections by these flaviviruses. Results Convalescent sera from 69 individuals who were known to have had dengue or Japanese encephalitis virus infection were tested by western blotting against dengue, Japanese encephalitis and ...

  17. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  18. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  19. Cognitive inferences in fossil apes (Primates, Hominoidea): does encephalization reflect intelligence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, David M

    2010-01-01

    Paleobiological inferences on general cognitive abilities (intelligence) in fossil hominoids strongly rely on relative brain size or encephalization, computed by means of allometric residuals, quotients or constants. Th is has been criticized on the basis that it presumably fails to reflect the higher intelligence of great apes, and absolute brain size has been favored instead. Many problems of encephalization metrics stem from the decrease of allometric slopes towards lower taxonomic level, thus making it difficult to determine at what level encephalization metrics have biological meaning. Here, the hypothesis that encephalization can be used as a good neuroanatomical proxy for intelligence is tested at two different taxonomic levels. A significant correlation is found between intelligence and encephalization only at a lower taxonomic level, i.e. on the basis of a low allometric slope, irrespective of whether species data or independent contrasts are employed. This indicates that higher-level slopes, resulting from encephalization grade shifts between subgroups (including hylobatids vs. great apes), do not reflect functional equivalence, whereas lower-level metrics can be employed as a paleobiological proxy for intelligence. Thus, in accordance to intelligence rankings, lower-level metrics indicate that great apes are more encephalized than both monkeys and hylobatids. Regarding fossil taxa, encephalization increased during hominin evolution (particularly in Homo), but during the Miocene a significant shift towards higher encephalization (and inferred enhanced cognitive abilities) must have been also involved in the emergence of the great-ape-and-human clade (Hominidae). This is confirmed by the modern great-ape-like degree of encephalization displayed by the fossil great ape Hispanopithecus, which contrasts with the rather hylobatid-like degree of the stem hominoid Proconsul. The similarly low encephalization of Oreopithecus might result from secondary reduction

  20. Some patients with advanced malignancies also have reversible catatonia or limbic encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Martin Alisky

    2015-01-01

    Two potentially treatable disorders, paraneoplastic catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, may be hidden within the presentation of end stage cancer patients, because catatonia and limbic encephalitis usually feature severely altered mental status, confusion, anorexia, and minimal responsiveness that are also common with people dying of cancer. If catatonia and limbic encephalitis are correctly diagnosed and treated, there should be definite and dramatic improvement that would tran...

  1. Limbic encephalitis as the presenting symptom of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: another cancer to search?

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Renata Barbosa; de Lucena, Adson Freitas; Maia, Fernanda Martins; Marinho, Antônia Rosivalda Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a syndrome characterised by irritability, depression, sleeping disturbance, convulsion, hallucination and short-period memory loss that is commonly associated with a malignancy even if there is no evidence of it by the time of presentation. Most reported cases of limbic encephalitis as a paraneoplastic syndrome are associated with small-cell lung cancer and lymphoma. This article is a case report of a patient with limbic encephalitis associated with an oesophageal adeno...

  2. Isolation and characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus from Ixodes persulcatus in Mongolia in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, Memi; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Tsevel, Bazartseren; Dashzevge, Erdenechimeg; Yoshii, Kentaro; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a zoonotic virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, in the family Flaviviridae. The virus, which is endemic in Europe and northern parts of Asia, causes severe encephalitis. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has been reported in Mongolia since the 1980s, but details about the biological characteristics of the endemic virus are lacking. In this study, 680 ticks (Ixodes persulcatus) were collected in Selenge aimag, northern Mongolia, in 2012. Nine Mongolian T...

  3. Case of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) with characteristic CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Shigehiro (Kumamoto Rosai Hospital (Japan)); Nakayama, Toshio; Yamanaga, Hiroaki; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Ideta, Tooru

    1984-01-01

    CT scans of a 59-year-old woman, with serologically comfirmed herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) were studied sequentially from 9 days after onset. The initial findings in CT scan were low density areas in insular cortex, claustrum and hippocampus. The low density areas, then, spread to the temporal lobe, rectal and cingulate gyri and occipital lobe, according to clinical progression of the disease. However, these low density areas disappeared and changed into isodensity areas in 25-35 days after oneset, which then returned to low density areas again in 51 days after onset. Thes characteristic phenomenon resembled a ''fogging effect,'' which is frequently seen during the second or third week after onset of ischemic cerebral infarction. HSE is characterized pathologically by acute hemorrhagic necrotizing encephalitis. Though cerebral angiography was not performed in this case, these characteristic CT findings suggested that HSE may have been associated with vascular involvement.

  4. Phylogeny and Homologous Recombination in Japanese Encephalitis Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiao-xue; Cong Ying-ying; Wang Xin; Ren Yu-dong; Ren Xiao-feng; Lu Ai-guo; Li Guang-xing

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a significant causative agent of arthropod-borne encephalitis and what is less clear that the factors cause the virus wide spread. The objective was to confirm whether the homologous recombination imposed on JEV. The phylogenetic and homologous recombination analyses were performed based on 163 complete JEV genomes which were recently isolated. They were still separated into five genotypes (GI-GV) and the most of recently isolated JEVs were GI rather than GIII in Asian areas including mainland China. Two recombinant events were identified in JEV and the evidence of the recombination was observed between China and Japan isolates that partitioned into two distinct subclades, but still the same genotype (GIII). Our data further suggested that most of the nucleotides in JEV genome were under negative selection; however, changes within codon 2 316 (amino acid NS4b-44) showed an evidence of the positive selection.

  5. Hypothermia in VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S; Irani, S R; Rajabally, Y A; Grubneac, A; Walters, R J; Yazaki, M; Clover, L; Vincent, A

    2008-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab)-associated limbic encephalitis (LE) is a recently described syndrome that broadens the spectrum of immunotherapy-responsive central nervous system disorders. Limbic encephalitis is typically characterised by a sub-acute onset of disorientation, amnesia and seizures, but the clinical spectrum is not yet fully defined and the syndrome could be under-diagnosed. We here describe the clinical profile of four patients with VGKC-Ab-associated LE who had intermittent, episodic hypothermia. One of the patients also described a prodrome of severe neuropathic pain preceding the development of limbic symptoms. Both of these novel symptoms responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, with concurrent amelioration of amnesia/seizures.

  6. Microglia retard dengue virus-induced acute viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Huang, Chao-Ching; Ho, Chien-Jung; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Jhan, Ming-Kai; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with dengue virus (DENV) infection may also present acute viral encephalitis through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that encephalitic DENV-infected mice exhibited progressive hunchback posture, limbic seizures, limbic weakness, paralysis, and lethality 7 days post-infection. These symptoms were accompanied by CNS inflammation, neurotoxicity, and blood-brain barrier destruction. Microglial cells surrounding the blood vessels and injured hippocampus regions were activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically depleting microglia unexpectedly increased viral replication, neuropathy, and mortality in DENV-infected mice. In microglia-depleted mice, the DENV infection-mediated expression of antiviral cytokines and the infiltration of CD8-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was abolished. DENV infection prompted the antigen-presenting cell-like differentiation of microglia, which in turn stimulated CTL proliferation and activation. These results suggest that microglial cells play a key role in facilitating antiviral immune responses against DENV infection and acute viral encephalitis. PMID:27279150

  7. Encephalization in hominids: evidence for the model of punctuationalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, M A

    1983-01-01

    A progressive enlargement of the hominid brain started 3-2 million years ago, probably from a gracile australopithecine form. Since then, three major transitions in degree of encephalization have taken place, leading to modern Homo sapiens. In the present study it is shown that these transitions must have occurred in rapid bursts, interspersed with long periods of little or no evolutionary change (stasis). This stepwise mode of encephalization is in accordance with the model of punctuated evolutionary change. A further inquiry has been made into the size of the cerebral cortex of hominids and into the number of cortical neurons based on estimates which were derived from allometric equations in extant mammals. PMID:6405974

  8. Neuropathology of S. Paulo south coast epidemic encephalitis (Rocio flavivurus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, S

    1980-02-01

    The neuropathology of 8 cases of S. Paulo south coast epidemic encephalitis (Rocio flavivirus), a new arbo B virus encephalitis, is described. The topographic pattern of the lesions appears to be almost specific. The gray matter is predominantly affected. Interstitial mononuclear infiltration, microglial proliferation and perivascular lymphocytic cuffing were seen. Neuronophagia was seldom seen except during the acute phases of the disease. Throughout the neuraxis, the gray matter was affected to a greater degree than white matter. The more damaged structures, in descending order, were as follows: thalamus, dentate nucleus, substantia inominata, brain stem, spinal cord and basal nuclei. Most of the cases exhibited thalamic inflammatory necrosis. Electron microscopy disclosed in one case virus-like particles, resembling those described in other arbo B viruses in the cytoplasm of thalamic neurons. In this case, virus was isolated from the brain and an immunofluorescence test also showed antigenic material in the thalamic neurons.

  9. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  10. Therapeutical approach to rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial joints, and loss of the function leading to disability. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Although, οver the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of the factors that are crucial in regulating this disease, still the managment of the disease remains difficult.Aim : Τhe aim of the present study was the evaluation of the therapeutical approch on rheumatoid arthritis. The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature which referred to the relation between therapy and rheumatoid arthritis.Results : The majority of research studies showed thatthe main therapy on rheumatoid arthritis included medication therapy, modification of everyday living ensuring rest, physical exercise and finally surgical procedure. Individuals suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, apart from physical problems usually cope with mental disorders, that exert a negative indluence on their quality of life.Conclusively :Information and early screening of high risk may decrease the long-term consequnences on health. Monitoring from a group of specialists should serve as a cornerstone when planning a program of intervention.

  11. Diagnostic Pathways as Social and Participatory Practices: The Case of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jessie; Kierans, Ciara; Defres, Sylviane; Easton, Ava; Kneen, Rachel; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis is a potentially devastating disease, with significant rates of mortality and co-morbidities. Although the prognosis for people with HSV encephalitis can be improved by prompt treatment with aciclovir, there are often delays involved in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In response, National Clinical Guidelines have been produced for the UK which make recommendations for improving the management of suspected viral encephalitis. However, little is currently known about the everyday experiences and processes involved in the diagnosis and care of HSV encephalitis. The reported study aimed to provide an account of the diagnosis and treatment of HSV encephalitis from the perspective of people who had been affected by the condition. Thirty narrative interviews were conducted with people who had been diagnosed with HSV encephalitis and their significant others. The narrative accounts reveal problems with gaining access to a diagnosis of encephalitis and shortfalls in care for the condition once in hospital. In response, individuals and their families work hard to obtain medical recognition for the problem and shape the processes of acute care. As a consequence, we argue that the diagnosis and management of HSV encephalitis needs to be considered as a participatory process, which is co-produced by health professionals, patients, and their families. The paper concludes by making recommendations for developing the current management guidelines by formalising the critical role of patients and their significant others in the identification, and treatment of, HSV encephalitis. PMID:26960197

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy and/or plasmapheresis in autoimmune encephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Jessica L; Coebergh, Jan; Chandra, Brunda; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a poorly understood condition that can present with a combination of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, either of which may predominate. There are many autoantibodies associated with a variety of clinical syndromes - anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the commonest. Currently, the most widely used therapy is prompt plasmapheresis and steroid treatment (and tumour resection if indicated), followed by second line immunosuppression if this fails. Given the growing awareness of autoimmune encephalitis as an entity, it is increasingly important that we consider it as a potential diagnosis in order to provide timely, effective treatment. We discuss several previously published case reports and one new case. These reports examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with autoimmune encephalitis, particularly those in whom psychiatric symptoms are especially debilitating and refractory to standard treatment. We also discuss factors predicting good outcome and possible mechanisms by which ECT may be effective. Numerous cases, such as those presented by Wingfield, Tsutsui, Florance, Sansing, Braakman and Matsumoto, demonstrate effective use of ECT in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients with severe psychiatric symptoms such as catatonia, psychosis, narcolepsy and stupor who had failed to respond to standard treatments alone. We also present a new case of a 71-year-old female who presented to a psychiatric unit initially with depression, which escalated to catatonia, delusions, nihilism and auditory hallucinations. After anti-NMDAR antibodies were isolated, she was treated by the neurology team with plasmapheresis and steroids, with a partial response. She received multiple sessions of ECT and her psychiatric symptoms completely resolved and she returned to her premorbid state. For this reason, we suggest that ECT should be considered, particularly in those patients who are non-responders to standard therapies. PMID

  13. Seasonal Forecast of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus Transmission, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Jonathan F Day; Stieglitz, Marc; Zebiak, Stephen; Cane, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Disease transmission forecasts can help minimize human and domestic animal health risks by indicating where disease control and prevention efforts should be focused. For disease systems in which weather-related variables affect pathogen proliferation, dispersal, or transmission, the potential for disease forecasting exists. We present a seasonal forecast of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission in Indian River County, Florida. We derive an empirical relationship between modeled land surfa...

  14. Anti-NMDAR limbic encephalitis- a clinical curiosity

    OpenAIRE

    Kattepur, Abhay K; Patil, Darshan; Shankarappa, Amarendra; Swamy, Shivananda; Chandrashekar, Nayakanur Shankarappa; Chandrashekar, Pushpa; Prabhu, Shailesh; Gopinath, Kodaganur Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurological paraneoplastic syndromes are rarely the first manifestation of an underlying cancer. A high index of suspicion is thus needed to diagnose such conditions. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is one such entity which is well described in association with small cell lung cancers, testicular germ cell tumors, breast cancers and ovarian tumors. This article describes the entity being associated with an ovarian tumor. Case A 36-year-old female presented with abnormal behavio...

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy and/or plasmapheresis in autoimmune encephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Jessica L; Coebergh, Jan; Chandra, Brunda; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-08-16

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a poorly understood condition that can present with a combination of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, either of which may predominate. There are many autoantibodies associated with a variety of clinical syndromes - anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the commonest. Currently, the most widely used therapy is prompt plasmapheresis and steroid treatment (and tumour resection if indicated), followed by second line immunosuppression if this fails. Given the growing awareness of autoimmune encephalitis as an entity, it is increasingly important that we consider it as a potential diagnosis in order to provide timely, effective treatment. We discuss several previously published case reports and one new case. These reports examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with autoimmune encephalitis, particularly those in whom psychiatric symptoms are especially debilitating and refractory to standard treatment. We also discuss factors predicting good outcome and possible mechanisms by which ECT may be effective. Numerous cases, such as those presented by Wingfield, Tsutsui, Florance, Sansing, Braakman and Matsumoto, demonstrate effective use of ECT in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients with severe psychiatric symptoms such as catatonia, psychosis, narcolepsy and stupor who had failed to respond to standard treatments alone. We also present a new case of a 71-year-old female who presented to a psychiatric unit initially with depression, which escalated to catatonia, delusions, nihilism and auditory hallucinations. After anti-NMDAR antibodies were isolated, she was treated by the neurology team with plasmapheresis and steroids, with a partial response. She received multiple sessions of ECT and her psychiatric symptoms completely resolved and she returned to her premorbid state. For this reason, we suggest that ECT should be considered, particularly in those patients who are non-responders to standard therapies. PMID

  16. Disgust and fear recognition in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sprengelmeyer, R.; A. P. Atkinson; Sprengelmeyer, A; Mair-Walther, J.; Jacobi, C.; Wildemann, B.; Dittrich, W.H.; Hacke, W

    2010-01-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PNLE) affects limbic portions of the brain associated with recognition of social signals of emotions. Yet it is not known whether this perceptual ability is impaired in individuals with PNLE. We therefore conducted a single case study to explore possible impairments in recognising facially, vocally, and bodily expressed emotions, using standardised emotion recognition tests. Facial expression recognition was tested with two forced-choice emotion-labelling t...

  17. Review: A review on classical and atypical scrapie in caprine: Prion protein gene polymorphisms and their role in the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, L; Sebastiani, C; Di Lorenzo, P; Lasagna, E; Biagetti, M

    2016-10-01

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep and goat. It has been known for ~250 years and is characterised by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform of a host-encoded prion protein that leads to progressive neurodegeneration and death. Scrapie is recognised in two forms, classical and atypical scrapie. The susceptibility to both types of scrapie is influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP). Sheep susceptibility or resistance to classical scrapie is strongly regulated by the polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the PRNP. The genetic role in atypical scrapie in sheep has been defined by polymorphisms at codons 141, 154 and 171, which are associated with different degrees of risk in the occurrence of the ovine disease. Progress has been achieved in the prevention of scrapie in sheep due to efficient genetic breeding programmes based on eradication and control of the disease. In Europe, the success of these programmes has been verified by applying eradication and genetic selection plans. In general terms, the ovine selection plans aim to eliminate and reduce the susceptible allele and to enrich the resistant allele ARR. During outbreaks all susceptible animals are slaughtered, only ARR/ARR resistant rams and sheep and semi-resistant females are preserved. In the occurrence of scrapie positive goats a complete cull of the flock (stamping out) is performed with great economic loss and severe risk of extinction for the endangered breeds. The ability to select scrapie-resistant animals allows to define new breeding strategies aimed to boost genetic progress while reducing costs during scrapie outbreaks. Allelic variants of PRNP can be protective for caprine scrapie, and the knowledge of their distribution in goats has become very important. Over the past few years, the integration of genetic information on goat populations could be used to make selection decisions, commonly referred to as genetic selection

  18. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C

    2000-02-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis.

  19. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  20. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  1. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  2. MR and CT imaging patterns in post-varicella encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, C.F. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Larsen, M.B. [Div. of Neurology, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Byrd, S.E. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Radkowski, M.A. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Palka, P.S. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Allen, E.D. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to determine the patterns of cerebral involvement on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in post-varicella encephalitis. Four children between the ages of 2 and 11 years presented over a 5-year period with a diagnosis of post-varicella encephalitis. Their imaging studies and clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. The medical histories of all four children were noncontributory except for recent bouts of chickenpox 1 week to 3 months prior to hospitalization. Three children presented with parkinsonian manifestations. Bilateral, symmetric hypodense, nonenhancing basal ganglia lesions were found on CT. These areas showed nonenhancing low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images on MR. One child presented with diffuse, multiple gray and white matter lesions of similar imaging characteristics; some lesions, however, did enhance. This child had no gait disturbances. Post-varicella encephalitis can produce two patterns of dramatic CT and MR findings. With an appropriate history and clinical findings, varicella as a cause of bilateral basal ganglia or diffuse cerebral lesions can be differentiated from other possible etiologies which include trauma, anoxia, metabolic disorders and demyelinating diseases. (orig.)

  3. Catatonic syndrome in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starlin Vijay Mythri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers′ critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position.

  4. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers’ critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position. PMID:27114630

  5. Sequential analysis of CT findings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Tokumaru, Yukio; Ito, Naoki; Yamada, Tatsuo; Hirayama, Keizo (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-09-01

    CT findings of six patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were analyzed sequentially. The initial change in CT scan in 3 cases was generalized cerebral edema instead of low density areas in the anterior temporal lobes, which have generally been known as the initial findings. Then, bilateral (5 cases) or unilateral (1 case) island-shaped low absorption areas in the insular cortex and the claustrum appeared within 10 days of onset in all 6 cases. These findings, especially the latter, seem to be characteristic of the acute stage and useful in the early diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. The low density areas, then, spread to the temporal lobes, rectal and cingulate gyri in the subacute stage (3 cases) and finally to the frontal and occipital lobes in the chronic stage (2 cases). In the basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem and cerebellum, however, there were no low density areas. In 2 cases there was no progression of low density areas beyond those of the acute stage. In one case there were high density areas in the temporal lobes and parapontine cisterns bilaterally. This could correspond to the pathological findings in herpes simplex encephalitis. The improvement of CT findings (or arrest at the early stage) was noted in 2 cases in which the clinical state also improved. This might well be the effect of adenine arabinoside. The one case treated with cytosine arabinoside had extensive low density areas in CT and finally died. The importance of CT in the evaluation of adenine arabinoside therapy was stressed.

  6. Immunotherapy Responsive Autoimmune Subacute Encephalitis: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Mittal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics and radiological findings in two patients with subacute encephalitis associated with elevated serum voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKCAb and antithyroperoxidase (TPO antibody. Case Reports. Case 1: 63-year-old woman was admitted for altered mental status and possible seizure activity. MRI brain showed hyperintensity in the bilateral hippocampal areas. She was positive for VGKCAb and anti-TPO antibodies. She was treated with steroids, IVIG, plasma exchange and azathioprine. After 8 months, she had marked improvement in her memory and seizures. Case 2: 61-year-old woman was admitted for video EEG monitoring of unclassified seizure and cognitive function decline. MRI of the brain showed mild hyperintensity in bilateral hippocampal areas and significant atrophy in the frontotemporal lesion. Anti-TPO antibody and VGKCAb were positive. She was treated with steroids, plasma exchange and azathioprine. After 9 months, she had marked improvement in her memory and seizures. Conclusion. Autoimmune subacute encephalitis appears to be an underdiagnosed entity. It is important to screen patients with subacute encephalitis for anti-TPO antibody and VGKCAb, particularly in the presence of seizures. Immunosuppressive therapy appears to be effective in treating this entity.

  7. Improvement of advanced postvaccinal demyelinating encephalitis due to plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rogalewski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Rogalewski1, Jörg Kraus3, Martin Hasselblatt2, Christoffer Kraemer1, Wolf-Rüdiger Schäbitz11Department of Neurology; 2Institute of Neuropathology, University of Muenster, Germany, 3Paracelsus Private Medical University and Salzburger Landesklinken, Christian-Doppler-Klinik, Department of Neurology, Salzburg, AustriaAbstract: We report a case of acute demyelinating encephalitis that occurred after viral vaccination against hepatitis A-, hepatitis B-, and poliovirus and vaccination against bacterial toxins of diphtheria and tetanus. After different diagnosis had been excluded, we diagnosed postvaccinal demyelinating encephalitis and started treatment with high dose intravenous methylprednisolone, followed by peroral application in decreasing dosages for three weeks. A few days after the treatment with methylprednisolone had been finished, the patient’s medical condition deteriorated again. Thus, we initiated plasma exchange at an advanced state of illness, which led to significant continuous improvement. The role of plasma exchange is discussed controversially, in particular the issue of timing. We report a case that shows improvement due to plasmapheresis several weeks after symptom onset.Keywords: ADEM, vaccination, encephalitis, plasmapheresis, demyelination, plasma exchange

  8. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsen Akkoc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae.

  9. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis in an Immunocompetent Child: A Case Report and Management of Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoc, Gulsen; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually causes mild, asymptomatic, and self-limited infections in children and adults; however, it may occasionally lead to severe conditions such as neurological diseases, malignant diseases, hepatic failure, and myocarditis. Epstein-Barr virus-related neurological disorders include meningitis, encephalitis, and cranial or peripheral neuritis, which are mostly seen in immunocompromised patients. The therapeutic modalities for EBV-related severe organ damage including central nervous system manifestations are still uncertain. Herein, we describe a seven-year-old boy with EBV encephalitis who presented with prolonged fever, exudative pharyngitis, reduced consciousness, and neck stiffness. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed contrast enhancement in the bilateral insular cortex and the right hypothalamus. The diagnosis was made by EBV-DNA amplification in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. He was discharged with acyclovir therapy without any sequelae. PMID:27213062

  11. BIOBEHAVIORAL THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shabanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is connected with need to expand the arsenal of treatment methods patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study examined the efficacy of biobehavioral therapy in a comprehensive program of treatment patients with rheumatoid arthritis (medical therapy in combination with biobehavioral therapy. It has been shown when compared with the control group (isolated drug therapy maintaining  clinical  response  in  short-term  follow-up  study  in  the  intervention  group.  Statistically    significant relationship the volitional control of the alpha rhythm of EEG (increased power of the alpha rhythm with a reduction in pain intensity in the in neurofeedback program and positive dynamics of the main characteristics of the alpha rhythm have been drmonstrated. Inclusion in the treatment program of arthritis biobehavioral approach has reduced the dose of pain medication, so reducing aggression of pharmacotherapy.

  12. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  13. Identification of c.483C>T polymorphism in the caprine tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Amills

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1 has been shown to play a fundamental role in pigmentation both in human and mouse. In this work, we aimed to characterize the variability of the caprine TYRP1 gene and investigate its segregation in a wide array of goat breeds. By partially sequencing the coding region of the TYRP1 gene in 18 individuals from eight different breeds, we were able to identify a synonymous nucleotide substitution at exon 3 (c.483C>T. An extensive survey of Iberian and Balearic (N=175, Italian (N=99, Swiss (N=54, Asian (N=14, Canarian (N=92 and North African (N=117 goats with different coat colours was carried out. We found that the C-allele has a different distribution in European vs African breeds, being almost fixed in the latter. Moreover, the C-allele showed an increased frequency in white coated breeds (Girgentana, Grigia Molisana, Blanca de Rasquera and Saanen when compared with those displaying a dark pigmentation (Cilentana Nera, Azpi Gorri and Murciano- Granadina. This could be due to genetic drift, migration and other factors associated with the demographic history of breeds under analysis or to a genetic hitchhiking event (c.483C>T frequencies would be shaped by a neighbouring causal mutation differentially selected in white and black goats. More refined studies will be needed to distinguish between these two alternative explanations.

  14. In situ cultured preantral follicles is a useful model to evaluate the effect of anticancer drugs on caprine folliculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Denise Damasceno; Lima, Laritza Ferreira de; Rodrigues, Giovanna Quintino; Carvalho, Adeline de Andrade; Castro, Simone Vieira; Campello, Cláudio Cabral; Pessoa, Cláudia do Ó; Gadelha, Carla Renata Figueiredo; Figueiredo, José Ricardo de; Bordignon, Vilceu; Rodrigues, Ana Paula Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    Despite the increase in the incidence of cancer, the number of women who survive cancer treatment is growing. However, one of the principal results of chemotherapy is premature ovarian failure (POF). The aim of this study was to use the in situ culture preantral follicles as an in vitro model to evaluate the toxicity of two anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DXR) and paclitaxel (PTX), on the integrity and development of ovarian follicles. Fragments of the ovarian cortex of goats were cultured in vitro for 1 or 7 days in α-MEM(+) supplemented with different concentrations of DXR (0.003, 0.03, or 0.3 µg/mL) and PTX (0.001, 0.01, or 0.1 µg/mL). Analyses were performed before and after culture to evaluate tissue integrity by classical histology, apoptosis by TUNEL assay, DNA laddering kit and the detection of activated caspase 3, and DNA damage by the immune detection of phosphorylated histone H2A.x (H2AXph139). Both DXR and PTX reduced the number of morphologically normal primordial and developing follicles. Positive staining for TUNEL and active caspase 3 was detected in all the samples (P < 0.05). Therefore, we propose the in situ culture of caprine preantral follicles as a useful experimental model for assessing the toxic effects of the chemotherapeutic agents on ovarian folliculogenesis. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:773-781, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27311936

  15. Impact of food intake on in vivo VOC concentrations in exhaled breath assessed in a caprine animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sina; Bergmann, Andreas; Steffens, Markus; Trefz, Phillip; Ziller, Mario; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen S; Köhler, Heike; Reinhold, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Physiological processes within the body may change emitted volatile organic compound (VOC) composition, and may therefore cause confounding biological background variability in breath gas analyses. To evaluate the effect of food intake on VOC concentration patterns in exhaled breath, this study assessed the variability of VOC concentrations due to food intake in a standardized caprine animal model. VOCs in (i) alveolar breath gas samples of nine clinically healthy goats and (ii) room air samples were collected and pre-concentrated before morning feeding and repeatedly after (+60 min, +150 min, +240 min) using needle trap microextraction (NTME). Analysis of VOCs was performed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Only VOCs with significantly higher concentrations in breath gas samples compared to room air samples were taken into consideration. Six VOCs that belonged to the chemical classes of hydrocarbons and alcohols were identified presenting significantly different concentrations before and after feeding. Selected hydrocarbons showed a concentration pattern that was characterized by an initial increase 60 min after food intake, and a subsequent gradual decrease. Results emphasize consideration of physiological effects on exhaled VOC concentrations due to food intake with respect to standardized protocols of sample collection and critical evaluation of results. PMID:26670078

  16. Prevalence of contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia in pastoral flocks of goats in the Rift Valley region of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipronoh, Alexander Kipruto; Ombui, Jackson Nyarongi; Kiara, Henry Kimathi; Binepal, Yatinder Singh; Gitonga, Eric; Wesonga, Hezron Okwako

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted between the months of March 2014 and March 2015 to determine the prevalence of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia in goat populations in pastoral flocks in three sub-counties of the Rift Valley region. A total of 432 serum samples were collected from goats from 54 flocks and tested for the presence of antibodies against mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (mccp) using monoclonal antibody-based competitive enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Sero-prevalence recorded for Turkana West was 63.9%, Kajiado Central was 48.6%, while Pokot East was 29.2% which was statistically significant (χ2 = 34.997; P = 0.000) in the study sites. The results of this study confirmed that CCPP is widespread and endemic in the pastoral production systems studied in the Rift Valley region. The results confirmed that regions sharing international boundaries are at a higher risk of CCPP hence the need for a unified cross-border approach to disease control measures in the border areas. PMID:26516086

  17. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  18. Leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 and voltage gated potassium channel autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Patryce McGinley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypothesizes linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  19. Association of Enterovirus 71 encephalitis with the interleukin-8 gene region in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Lin, Aiwei; Yu, Chengwen; Zhang, Zhaofang; Xu, Daoyan; Hu, Wei; Liu, Liyan; Wang, Shaoning; Nie, Xiuzhen; Sun, Wenhui; Gai, Zhongtao; Chen, Zongbo

    2015-06-01

    The study was performed in 36 Chinese patients with Enterovirus 71 (EV71) encephalitis and 141 patients with EV71-related hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) without encephalitis. Genotyping was determined by polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism. Patients with EV71 encephalitis had a significantly higher frequency of interleukin-8 (IL-8)-251TT genotype than patients with EV71-related HFMD without encephalitis (55.6% vs 31.2%, p = 0.023). The frequency of IL-8-251T alleles was significantly higher among patients with EV71 encephalitis than in patients with EV71-related HFMD without encephalitis (72.2% vs 58.9%, odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.0-3.2, p = 0.038). There were significant differences in gender, age, fever days, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein and blood glucose concentration and IL-8 levels among genotypes of IL-8-251A/T in EV71-infected patients, but no significant differences in alanine or aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase-myocardial isozyme and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with EV71 encephalitis. These findings suggest that the IL-8-251T allele is associated with susceptibility to EV71 encephalitis in Chinese patients. PMID:25751776

  20. Genetics in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Heleen Marion

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a non-common disease in children that can persist into adulthood. JIA is considered to be an auto-immune disease. Genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis. In a new cohort of JIA patients from North-West European descent genetic candidate gene associatio

  1. Murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den; Joosten, L.A.B.; Lent, P.L.E.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Antigen induced arthritis is a unilateral T-cell driven model caused by direct injection of an antigen into the knee joint of a FCA preimmunized animal. The chronicity is determined by antigen retention in avascular structures of the joint through charge mediated binding or antibody mediated trappin

  2. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  3. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  4. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  5. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  6. Zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mattingly, P. C.; Mowat, A G

    1982-01-01

    To assess the antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate, 27 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in a 6-month, randomised, double-blind, between-group trial of oral zinc sulphate versus placebo. Twelve patients on zinc and 9 on placebo completed the trial, but no significant antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate was demonstrated.

  7. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  8. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a new category of treatment-responsive encephalitis associated with 'anti-NMDAR antibodies', which are antibodies to the NR1/NR2 heteromers of NMDAR. The antibodies are detected in the CSF/serum of young women with ovarian teratoma, who typically develop schizophrenia-like psychiatric symptoms, usually preceded by fever, headache, or viral infection-like illness. After reaching the peak of psychosis, most patients developed seizures followed by an unresponsive/catatonic state, decreased level of consciousness, central hypoventilation frequently requiring mechanical ventilation, orofacial-limb dyskinesias, and autonomic symptoms. Brain MRI is usually unremarkable but focal enhancement or medial temporal lobe abnormalities can be observed. The CSF reveals nonspecific changes. Electroencephalography (EEG) often reveals diffuse delta slowing without paroxysmal discharges, despite frequent bouts of seizures. This is a highly characteristic syndrome evolving in 5 stages, namely, the prodromal phase, psychotic phase, unresponsive phase, hyperkinetic phase, and gradual recovery phase. The hyperkinetic phase is the most prolonged and crucial. This disorder is usually severe and can be fatal, but it is potentially reversible. Once patients overcome the hyperkinetic phase, gradual improvement is expected with in months and full recovery can also be expected over 3 or more years. Ovarian teratoma-associated limbic encephalitis (OTLE) was first reported in 1997 when this syndrome was reported independently in 1 Japanese girl and 1 woman, both of whom improved following tumor resection. In 2005, Dalmau and his research group first demonstrated antibodies to novel neuronal cell membrane antigens in 4 women with OTLE in a non-permeabilized culture of hippocampal neurons. Two years later, they identified conformal extracellular epitopes present in the NR1/NR2B heteromers of NMDAR, which are expressed in the hippocampus

  9. Japanese encephalitis in two children--United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable encephalitis in Asia and the western Pacific. JEV is maintained in an enzootic cycle involving mosquitoes and amplifying vertebrate hosts, mainly pigs and wading birds. The virus is transmitted to humans primarily by Culex mosquitoes, which breed in flooded rice fields and pools of stagnant water and most often feed outdoors during the evening and night. JEV transmission occurs mainly in rural agricultural areas, but occasional human cases occur in urban areas. Japanese encephalitis (JE) in persons who have traveled or lived overseas is diagnosed infrequently in the United States, with only four cases identified from 1992 (when a JE vaccine was first licensed in the United States) to 2008. This report describes the only cases diagnosed in the United States and reported to CDC since then. The first was a fatal case in a U.S. child who had visited relatives in the Philippines. The other occurred in a refugee who became ill while traveling from Thailand to the United States and whose diagnosis was complicated by concurrent neurocysticercosis. JE should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any patient with an acute neurologic infection who recently has been in a JE-endemic country. Travelers to JE-endemic countries should be advised of the risk for JE and the importance of personal protective measures to prevent mosquito bites. JE vaccine should be considered for travelers who might be at greater risk based on the season, location, and duration of their visit and their planned activities.

  10. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  11. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii-Induced Arthritis with Encephalitic Dissemination in a Dog and Review of Published Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; Mota, Francisco Claudio D; Lindsay, Scott; de Oliveira, Luiza M; Medeiros, Alessandra Aparecida; Pretto-Giordano, Lucienne Garcia; Saut, João Paulo Elsen; Krockenberger, Mark

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemical findings associated with Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii in a 4-year-old female Boxer dog from Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Southeastern Brazil. Clinically, there was a swelling at the right metatarsal region and the hock joint with enlargement of regional lymph nodes. Radiographical evaluation revealed lysis of the tarsal bone; cytology demonstrated cryptococcal intralesional organisms at the swollen joint. Despite empirical antifungals therapeutic, the animal developed neurological cryptococcosis and died spontaneously. Significant pathological alterations included arthritis, lymphadenitis, and encephalitic cryptococcomas associated with numerous intralesional narrow-necked budding encapsulated yeasts. Immunohistochemistry utilising monoclonal antibodies that label C. neoformans sp. complex capsule, characterised the yeasts as C. neoformans var. grubii. Collectively, the pathological and immunohistochemical findings of this dog indicate that the intralesional organisms observed within the articular surface of the hock joint, lymph nodes, and the brain were C. neoformans var. grubii, confirming the participation of this fungal pathogen in the development of cryptococcal arthritis. In this case, the most likely pathogenesis was percutaneous inoculation with resultant abscess-like lesion, which resulted in the draining sinus, swelling of the right hind limb with progression to the articular disease. Thereafter, the fungal pathogen probably compromised the adjacent lymph nodes with subsequent haematogenous distribution to the brain, terminating with cryptococcal arthritis, lymphadenitis, and encephalitis. PMID:27126588

  12. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO.

  13. Quantitative gait analysis following hemispherotomy for Rasmussen′s encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh George Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Peri-insular hemispherotomy is a form of disconnective hemispherectomy involving complete disconnection of all ascending / descending and commisural connections of one hemisphere. We report a case of a seven and a half year old child with intractable epilepsy due to Rasmussen′s encephalitis who underwent peri-insular hemispherotomy and achieved complete freedom from seizures. Quantitative gait analysis was used to describe the changes in the kinematic and kinetic parameters of gait with surface electromyographs 18 months after surgery. The focus of this paper is to highlight the utility of gait analysis following hemispherotomy with a view to directing postsurgical motor training and rehabilitation.

  14. Improved early identification of arthritis : evaluating the efficacy of Early Arthritis Recognition Clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nies, Jessica A. B.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Gaalen, Floris A.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Only 31% of Dutch rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-patients visit a rheumatologist within 12weeks after symptom onset; this is mainly due to delay at the level of the general practitioner (GP). In order to reduce delay of GPs in identifying early arthritis, we initiated an Early Arthritis Recogni

  15. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  16. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  17. Caprine prion gene polymorphisms are associated with decreased incidence of classical scrapie in goat herds in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldmann Wilfred

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of genetic breeding programmes to eradicate transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in goats is an important aim for reasons of animal welfare as well as human food safety and food security. Based on the positive impact of Prnp genetics on sheep scrapie in Europe in the past decade, we have established caprine Prnp gene variation in more than 1100 goats from the United Kingdom and studied the association of Prnp alleles with disease phenotypes in 150 scrapie-positive goats. This investigation confirms the association of the Met142 encoding Prnp allele with increased resistance to preclinical and clinical scrapie. It reveals a novel association of the Ser127 encoding allele with a reduced probability to develop clinical signs of scrapie in goats that are already positive for the accumulation of disease-specific prion protein in brain or periphery. A United Kingdom survey of Prnp genotypes in eight common breeds revealed eleven alleles in over thirty genotypes. The Met142 encoding allele had a high overall mean allele frequency of 22.6%, whereas the Ser127 encoding allele frequency was considerably lower with 6.4%. In contrast, a well known resistance associated allele encoding Lys222 was found to be rare (0.9% in this survey. The analysis of Prnp genotypes in Mexican Criollas goats revealed nine alleles, including a novel Phe to Leu substitution in codon 201, confirming that high genetic variability of Prnp can be found in scrapie-free populations. Our study implies that it should be feasible to lower scrapie prevalence in goat herds in the United Kingdom by genetic selection.

  18. Elucidation of the involvement of p14, a sperm protein during maturation, capacitation and acrosome reaction of caprine spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinki Nandi

    Full Text Available Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilization. Although progress is being made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little has been yet explored about the potential role(s of individual sperm cell protein during this process. Therefore elucidation of the role of different sperm proteins in the process of capacitation might be of great importance to understand the process of fertilization. The present work describes the partial characterization of a 14-kDa protein (p14 detected in goat spermatozoa using an antibody directed against the purified protein. Confocal microscopic analysis reveals that the protein is present in both the intracellular and extracellular regions of the acrosomal and postacrosomal portion of caudal sperm head. Though subcellular localization shows that p14 is mainly cytosolic, however it is also seen to be present in peripheral plasma membrane and soluble part of acrosome. Immuno-localization experiment shows change in the distribution pattern of this protein upon induction of capacitation in sperm cells. Increased immunolabeling in the anterior head region of live spermatozoa is also observed when these cells are incubated under capacitating conditions, whereas most sperm cells challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187 to acrosome react, lose their labeling almost completely. Intracellular distribution of p14 also changes significantly during acrosome reaction. Interestingly, on the other hand the antibody raised against this 14-kDa sperm protein enhances the forward motility of caprine sperm cells. Rose-Bengal staining method shows that this anti-p14 antibody also decreases the number of acrosome reacted cells if incubated with capacitated sperm cells before induction of acrosome reaction. All these results taken together clearly indicate that p14 is intimately involved and plays a critical role in the acrosomal membrane fusion event.

  19. A large-scale genomic approach affords unprecedented resolution for the molecular epidemiology and evolutionary history of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Virginie; Verdier, Axel; Thiaucourt, François; Manso-Silván, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp), is a devastating disease of domestic goats and of some wild ungulate species. The disease is currently spreading in Africa and Asia and poses a serious threat to disease-free areas. A comprehensive view of the evolutionary history and dynamics of Mccp is essential to understand the epidemiology of CCPP. Yet, analysing the diversity of genetically monomorphic pathogens, such as Mccp, is complicated due to their low variability. In this study, the molecular epidemiology and evolution of CCPP was investigated using a large-scale genomic approach based on next-generation sequencing technologies, applied to a sample of strains representing the global distribution of this disease. A highly discriminatory multigene typing system was developed, allowing the differentiation of 24 haplotypes among 25 Mccp strains distributed in six genotyping groups, which showed some correlation with geographic origin. A Bayesian approach was used to infer the first robust phylogeny of the species and to date the principal events of its evolutionary history. The emergence of Mccp was estimated only at about 270 years ago, which explains the low genetic diversity of this species despite its high mutation rate, evaluated at 1.3 × 10(-6) substitutions per site per year. Finally, plausible scenarios were proposed to elucidate the evolution and dynamics of CCPP in Asia and Africa, though limited by the paucity of Mccp strains, particularly in Asia. This study shows how combining large-scale genomic data with spatial and temporal data makes it possible to obtain a comprehensive view of the epidemiology of CCPP, a precondition for the development of improved disease surveillance and control measures. PMID:26149260

  20. Brucella suis vaccine strain S2-infected immortalized caprine endometrial epithelial cell lines induce non-apoptotic ER-stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangguo; Lin, Pengfei; Yin, Yanlong; Zhou, Jinhua; Lei, Lanjie; Zhou, Xudong; Jin, Yaping; Wang, Aihua

    2015-05-01

    Brucella, which is regarded as an intracellular pathogen responsible for a zoonotic disease called brucellosis, survives and proliferates within several types of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. Brucella infects not only their preferred hosts but also other domestic and wild animal species, inducing abortion and infertility. Therefore, the interaction between uterine cells and Brucella is important for understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we describe the Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 (B.suis.S2) infection and replication in the immortalized caprine endometrial epithelial cell line hTERT-EECs and the induced cellular and molecular response modulation in vitro. We found that B.suis S2 was able to infect and replicate to high titers and inhibit the proliferation of EECs and induce non-apoptotic pathways, as determined by B.suis.S2 detection using MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining and flow cytometry. We explored the evidence of non-apoptotic pathways using real-time quantitative RT-PCR and by western blot analysis. Finally, we discovered the over-expression of GRP78, ATF4, ATF6, PERK, eIF2α, CHOP, and cytochrome c (Cyt-c) but not IRE1, xbp-1, and caspase-3 in B.suis.S2 (HK)-attacked and B.suis.S2-infected cells, suggesting that the molecular mechanism of ER stress sensor activation by B.suis.S2 is basically concomitant with that by B.suis.S2 (HK) and that ER stress, especially the PERK pathway, plays an important role in the process of B.suis.S2 infecting EEC, which may, in part, explain the role of the uterus in the pathogenesis of B.suis.S2. PMID:25633898

  1. First Description of Infection of Caprine Herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) in Goats in Mainland France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suavet, Florence; Champion, Jean-Luc; Bartolini, Luc; Bernou, Maryline; Alzieu, Jean-Pierre; Brugidou, Roland; Darnatigues, Séverine; Reynaud, Gaël; Perrin, Cécile; Adam, Gilbert; Thiéry, Richard; Duquesne, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological situation of the caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in nine districts in mainland France, mostly in the south, near Italy or Spain, where high seroprevalence has been observed. Two more central areas were also included in the study. The serosurvey was carried out in 9564 goats (275 herds) using bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) glycoprotein B and E ELISAs. To confirm the presence of specific CpHV-1 antibodies, some of the samples were tested in neutralization assay. Results demonstrate, for the first time, CpHV-1 infection in goat herds on the French mainland. The analysis found cases of alphaherpesviruses infection in each district studied, with different levels of seroprevalence observed within each district (ranging from 0.2% to 31.56% at an individual level and from 9% to 46.2% for herd seroprevalence). Moreover, in the Alpes-Maritimes district, the seroprevalence seemed to be higher in older goats (79.45% of animals 6 years old or more) than in younger animals (40.99% of one-year-olds). This result suggests frequent virus re-excretion and circulation in herds. Results analysis also shows that the seroprevalence was higher when the herd size increased. In addition, the first French CpHV-1 strain was isolated from nasal swabs taken on an infected goat. The data reported herein demonstrate that CpHV-1 circulates in mainland France, which should henceforth be taken into consideration in cases of unexplained abortion in goats. PMID:26861403

  2. Equine Septic Arthritis and Serum Amyloid A

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Elsa Karen

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection within a joint, septic arthritis, is a serious condition in horses that can lead to long-term joint disease if the infection is not resolved quickly. Equine septic arthritis is diagnosed primarily based on clinical signs and synovial fluid cytology. Septic synovial fluid is characterized by significant elevations in total protein (TP) and total nucleated cell count (TNCC). However, in some cases it can be difficult to distinguish between septic arthritis and non-septic joi...

  3. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  4. Current Treatments for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    AlbertoMartini

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) differs markedly from adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is not a single disease, but an exclusion diagnosis that gather together all forms of arthritis that begin before the age of 16 years, persist for more than 6 weeks, and are of unknown origin. The advent of the new biological treatments has dramatically changed both the observed responses to treatment and the expectations of therapies. The implementation of an adequate legislation as well as the ...

  5. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  6. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Barnett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs. This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells, that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10 and large intestine (75:25. Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function.

  7. MRI findings of recurrent herpes simplex encephalitis in an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the MRI findings of a 2-year-old boy with recurrent herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). At the age of 14 months, the patient developed a high fever that lasted over 1 week and he did not receive appropriate treatment. At 6 months after the fever, MRI showed marked atrophic changes in both deep temporal lobes with hyperintensity in the hippocampi and parahippocampal gyri. Thirteen months after the first episode of the fever, the patient was diagnosed with recurrent HSE by polymerase chain reaction assay of the CSF; MRI at this time revealed diffuse cortical swelling. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images was noted in the occipito-parietal cortex bilaterally, the left thalamus, the subcortical white matter and the splenium of the corpus callosum. Recurrence of HSE may be more common in infants than previously thought. It is important to consider the possibility of recurrent HSE and to understand that MRI findings in HSV1 encephalitis in infants and young children appear to differ from those observed in neonates, older children and adults. (orig.)

  8. MRI findings of recurrent herpes simplex encephalitis in an infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokumaru, Aya M.; Kaji, Tatsumi; Kohyama, Shinya; Sakata, Ikuko; Kusano, Shoichi [Department of Radiology, National Defence Medical College, 3-2 Namiki-Cho, 359-8513, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan); Horiuchi, Katsuyuki [Department of Paediatrics, National Defence Medical College, Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan)

    2003-10-01

    We report the MRI findings of a 2-year-old boy with recurrent herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). At the age of 14 months, the patient developed a high fever that lasted over 1 week and he did not receive appropriate treatment. At 6 months after the fever, MRI showed marked atrophic changes in both deep temporal lobes with hyperintensity in the hippocampi and parahippocampal gyri. Thirteen months after the first episode of the fever, the patient was diagnosed with recurrent HSE by polymerase chain reaction assay of the CSF; MRI at this time revealed diffuse cortical swelling. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images was noted in the occipito-parietal cortex bilaterally, the left thalamus, the subcortical white matter and the splenium of the corpus callosum. Recurrence of HSE may be more common in infants than previously thought. It is important to consider the possibility of recurrent HSE and to understand that MRI findings in HSV1 encephalitis in infants and young children appear to differ from those observed in neonates, older children and adults. (orig.)

  9. Human-like antibodies neutralizing Western equine encephalitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülseweh, Birgit; Rülker, Torsten; Pelat, Thibaut; Langermann, Claudia; Frenzel, Andrè; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of the first neutralizing antibodies against Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), a member of the genus Alphavirus. WEEV is transmitted by mosquitoes and can spread to the human central nervous system, causing symptoms ranging from mild febrile reactions to life-threatening encephalitis. WEEV has been classified as a biological warfare agent by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No anti-WEEV drugs are currently commercially available. Neutralizing antibodies are useful for the pre- and post-exposure treatment of WEEV infections. In this study, two immune antibody gene libraries were constructed from two macaques immunized with inactivated WEEV. Four antibodies were selected from these libraries and recloned as scFv-Fc, with a human Fc part. These antibodies bound WEEV specifically in ELISA with little or no cross-reaction with other alphaviruses. They were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. All binders were suitable for the intracellular detection of WEEV particles. Neutralizing activity was determined in vitro. Three of the four antibodies were found to be neutralizing; about 1 ng/mL of the best antibody (ToR69–3A2) neutralized 50% of 5x104 TCID50/mL. Due to its human-like nature with a germinality index of 89% (VH) and 91% (VL), the ToR69–3A2 antibody is a promising candidate for future passive vaccine development. PMID:24518197

  10. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H. (WU-MED)

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  11. First Bahraini adolescent with anti-NMDAR-Ab encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuslamani, Ahood; Mahmood, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis is a new autoimmune, often paraneoplastic disorder that presents with complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. It was first described in 2007 by Dalmau et al. Our patient presented with headache, behavioral changes and then seizures with hallucinations. She was initially misdiagnosed to have schizophrenia and was prescribed antipsychotics. She deteriorated and developed further seizures with hypoventilation and choreoathetosis. Her blood investigations were positive for mycoplasma IGM. Her CSF studies showed high white cell counts, predominantly lymphocytes, and high anti-NMDA-R titre. Her brain MRI scans showed high tbl2 and FLAIR intensities in the grey and white matter of the left cerebellar hemisphere suggestive of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. She responded to treatment with antibiotics, multiple antiepileptics, steroids and needed five sessions of plasmapheresis. There was no underlying malignancy on repeated scanning of the abdomen. She needed around one year for full recovery with intensive rehabilitation. The objective of this paper was to highlight the occurrence of this fairly new, challenging, easily missed, not-so-rare form of encephalitis often occurring in the absence of fever.

  12. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC, lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA (B receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis.

  13. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines: WHO position paper, February 2015--Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-12

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations on the use of Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccines excerpted from the WHO position paper on Japanese Encephalitis vaccines recently published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record [1]. This updated position paper on JE vaccines replaces the 2006 position paper on this subject [2]; it focuses on new information concerning the availability, safety, immunogenicity and effectiveness of JE vaccines and the duration of protection they confer. Recent data on global prevalence and burden of disease caused by JE and cost-effectiveness considerations regarding JE vaccination are also summarized. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references including references to grading tables that assess the quality of the scientific evidence. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its October 2014 meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html.

  14. Cytokine Immunopathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS. Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema.

  15. The case for immunomodulatory approaches in treating HSV encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Openshaw, Harry; Cantin, Edouard M

    2013-03-01

    HSV encephalitis (HSE) is the most prevalent sporadic viral encephalitis. Although safe and effective antiviral therapies and greatly improved noninvasive diagnostic procedures have significantly improved outcomes, mortality (~20%) and debilitating neurological sequelae in survivors remain unacceptably high. An encouraging new development is that the focus is now shifting away from the virus exclusively, to include consideration of the host immune response to infection in the pathology underlying development of HSE. In this article, the authors discuss results from recent studies in experimental mouse models, as well as clinical reports that demonstrate a role for exaggerated host inflammatory responses in the brain in the development of HSE that is motivating researchers and clinicians to consider new therapeutic approaches for treating HSE. The authors also discuss results from a few studies that have shown that immunomodulatory drugs can be highly protective against HSE, which supports a role for deleterious host inflammatory responses in HSE. The impressive outcomes of some immunomodulatory approaches in mouse models of HSE emphasize the urgent need for clinical trials to rigorously evaluate combination antiviral and immunomodulatory therapy in comparison with standard antiviral therapy for treatment of HSE, and support for such an initiative is gaining momentum.

  16. [Diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for acyclovir-resistant herpes encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Acyclovir (ACV), which inhibits the replication of herpes simplex virus, is the standard drug for the treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis. Thanks to the introduction of ACV, the morbidity and mortality of HSE patients have significantly improved. However, the disease is still the severe infection, because it makes some patients with HSE suffer from severe consequences. The sensitivity test of the etiological HSV to ACV is very difficult due to the inability of isolation of the virus from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The cases of the ACV treatment-resistant HSE patients have been reported. However, these cases were not virologically confirmed. The first case of encephalitis in newborn baby with HSE caused by an ACV-resistant HSV-1, which was virologically confirmed, was reported by our group. According to the sensitivity profile of the causative viruses to antiviral drugs, the drugs of choice for HSE should be properly considered. Strategy for diagnoses of HSE including antiviral sensitivity assessment and selection of drugs in HSE is reviewed.

  17. DETECTION OF A NEUTROPHIL CHEMOTACTIC FACTOR IN JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Singh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE one of the most common cause of acute encephalitis in tropical regions, has generated much public anxiety in India. An early influx of macrophages followed by neutrophils at the site of injury in different organs in humans and mice has previously been reported. It correlated with production of a neutrophil chemotactic protein derived from macrophages. In the present study out of a total of 324 acute encephalitic patients, admitted in Gandhi memorial and associated hospitals, Lucknow, 121 patients with one or more indicators of JE virus infection were included. Significant pleocytosis (mean TLC value of 126+52 cells / mm3 in CSF and leucocytosis (>11,000 cells/mm3 in peripheral blood was observed at the time of admission. The leucocytosis increased significantly during second week in 67% of patients. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells culture done on alternate days was tested for chemotactic activity (hMDF, which was observed to be highest in second week of illness. The direct detection of hMDF in circulation by dot blot was positive in 92% of acute serum samples, with negligible (12.5% reactivity for convalescent sera. A correlation between the hMDF levels and severity of illness has also been observed.

  18. Sequential MRI, SPECT and PET in respiratory syncytial virus encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirayama, K.; Sakazaki, Hiromi; Murakami, Seiko; Yonezawa, Sumiko [Department of Paediatrics, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Fujimoto, Keiji [Dept. of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Seto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Katsuji; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu [Dept. of Paediatrics, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Murata, Ryosuke [Children`s Medical Centre, Osaka City General Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) encephalitis manifested by disturbance of consciousness, conjugate eye deviation, anuria, truncal ataxia and intention tremor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex. No lesion was detected in the cerebral cortex, pons or spinal cord. The hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex diminished with recovery from the clinical manifestations and had resolved 2 months after onset. The MRI lesions in the cerebellum were considered to be due to oedema. SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET), performed 3 months after onset, disclosed areas of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism at the same sites. One year after onset, MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellum. Hypoperfusion on SPECT and hypometabolism on PET remained. Neuroimaging showed that ataxia and tremor in this case were the result of cerebellitis. The patient has no neurological deficit except for mild truncal ataxia. This patient is a rare example of RSV encephalitis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 16 refs.

  19. Medical image of the week: granulomatous amoebic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhury A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 64-year-old woman with history of deceased donor kidney transplantation presented with altered mental status. MRI of the brain showed new region of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity with restricted diffusion and slight cortical enhancement in the left middle temporal lobe (Figure 1, Panel A. Her neurological exam was notable for expressive aphasia and right-sided weakness. Initial diagnosis of ischemic stroke was further evaluated due to immunosuppressive status. Her CSF showed a WBC of 12 cells/microL with 80% lymphocytes, glucose 61 mg/dL, and protein 53 mg/dL. Follow up MRI showed progression of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, and peripheral patchy enhancement in the left anterior/medial temporal lobe and inferior frontal lobe suspicious for encephalitis (Figure 1, Panel B. Left temporal lobe biopsy revealed granulomatous encephalitis with microorganisms morphologically consistent with amoeba (Figure 2, and tissue cultures grew MRSA. Acanthamoeba species was confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC with antibody testing. ...

  20. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  1. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  2. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  3. [Anti-NMDA encephalitis in psychiatry; malignant catatonia, atypical psychosis and ECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbayashi, Takashi; Tsutsui, Ko; Tanaka, Keiko; Omori, Yuki; Takaki, Manabu; Omokawa, Mayu; Mori, Akane; Kusanagi, Hiroaki; Nishino, Seiji; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of malignant (lethal) catatonia has been reported similar to initial symptoms of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Subsequently, this autoimmune limbic encephalitis has been noticed in many psychiatrists. We have experienced several cases with malignant catatonia having anti-NMDAR antibody without clinical signs of encephalitis. Thereafter, we have also found anti-NMDAR antibody positive patients of young females with acute florid psychiatric symptoms without clinical signs of encephalitis. The features of these patients mirror-those of "Atypical psychosis" proposed by Mitsuda in Japan, a notion derived from "Cycloid psychosis" conceptualized by German psychiatrist, Leonhard. Both cycloid and atypical psychosis have coinciding features of acute onset, emotional disturbances, psychomotor disturbances, alternations of consciousness, high prevalence in women and oriented premorbid personality. Both malignant catatonia and atypical psychosis have been known to be effectively treated with modified electro convulsion therapy (m-ECT). Our 5 cases with anti-NMDAR antibody, m-ECT treatments were effective. Infectious encephalitis is contra indication of m-ECT, but this autoimmune encephalitis would be careful indication. Schizophrenia is a common, heterogeneous, and complex disorder with unknown etiology. There is established evidence of NMDAR hypofunction as a central component of the functional disconnectivity; this is one of the most accepted models for schizophrenia. Moreover, autoimmune mechanisms have been proposed to be involved, at least in subgroups of schizophrenia patients. Further research of anti-NMDAR antibody and encephalitis would be important clues for the investigation of schizophrenia, catatonia and atypical psychosis.

  4. Diagnosis of Swine Encephalitis%猪乙型脑炎病的诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史秀春; 刁富花

    2012-01-01

    猪乙型脑炎又称流行性乙型脑炎、日本脑炎,是由流行性乙型脑炎病毒引起的一种急性、人畜共患的自然疫源性传染病.作者对某养殖户的病死猪进行临床症状观察,病理剖检及实验室诊断,通过病毒分离及鉴定,确诊病死猪为乙型脑炎病毒感染.鉴于养殖户中该病的存在及对养猪业的危害,建议加强对猪乙型脑炎病的诊断及监控.%Swine encephalitis also known as epidemic encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis,caused by an epidemic of acute viral encephalitis,the natural foci of zoonotic diseases. The paper introduced a pig farm. The clinical symptoms and pathological lesions and laboratory diagnosis were observed, and swine encephalitis was detected by virus isolation culture and RT-PCR, the final diagnosis result was swine encephalitis. Because the existence of the disease and the harm fulness to the pig industry, the diagnosis and monitoring of swine encephalitis should be strengthening.

  5. The characterization of the physicochemical and sensory properties of full-fat, reduced-fat and low-fat bovine, caprine, and ovine Greek yogurt (Labneh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamian, Samson; Olabi, Ammar; Kebbe Baghdadi, Omar; Toufeili, Imad

    2014-03-01

    Concentrated/Greek yogurt or Labneh is a semisolid food produced from yogurt by eliminating part of its water and water-soluble compounds. Today's world is geared toward the production of lower fat foods without compromising the texture and flavor of these products. The objective of this study was to characterize the physicochemical and sensory properties of bovine, caprine, and ovine Labneh with different fat levels. Bovine, caprine, and ovine milks were used to produce two batches of full-fat (∼10%), reduced-fat (∼5%), and low-fat (syneresis, acidity, pH, sodium, magnesium, and calcium contents were conducted. Instrumental texture analysis using the back extrusion method was applied. Quantitative descriptive sensory analysis was used to profile samples by 11 trained panelists and the acceptability of samples was assessed by 47 panelists. Type of milk significantly affected (P syneresis, compactness, goaty odor and flavor, rate of flow, color, shininess, bitter flavor, denseness, melting rate, and spreadability, whereas fat level affected only color, denseness, and melting rate. Type of milk had a significant effect on overall acceptability and acceptability of flavor and texture.

  6. Demonstration of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. Capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, small colony type in outbreaks of caprine pleuropneumonia in eastern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiluka, L J; Semuguruka, W D; Kazwala, R R; Ojeniy, B; Friis, N F

    2000-01-01

    An outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia involving about 1200 goats in the Coast and Morogoro regions of eastern Tanzania is reported. The major clinical findings were severe respiratory distress, fever, mucopurulent nasal discharge and high mortality involving all age groups and both sexes of goats. The morbidity and mortality rates were 45%-90% and 14%-50%, respectively. The principal pathological lesions were confined to the thoracic cavity and comprised hydrothorax and serofibrinous pleuropneumonia. The histopathological features consisted of a necrotizing fibrinous pleuropneumonia characterized by different degrees of vasculitis, and fibrinocellular exudation into the alveolar septae and lumina, and into interlobular septae and pleura. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were isolated from some of the examined goats including a case with a sequestrum which yielded Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type. This work reports the first description of an outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia in Tanzania in which M. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type were concurrently isolated.

  7. Variability of the caprine whey protein genes and their association with milk yield, composition and renneting properties in the Sarda breed. 1. The LALBA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Maria Luisa; Pazzola, Michele; Paschino, Pietro; Pira, Maria Giovanna; Vacca, Giuseppe Massimo

    2015-11-01

    The 5' flanking region and 3' UTR of the caprine LALBA gene were analysed by SSCP and sequencing. A total of nine SNPs were detected: three in the promoter region, two were synonymous coding SNPs at exon-1, and four SNPs were in exon-4, within the 3'UTR. The nucleotide changes located in the promoter region (c.-358T>C, c.-163G>A, c.-121T>G) were genotyped by SSCP in 263 Sarda goats to evaluate their possible effect on milk yield, composition and renneting properties. We observed an effect of the three SNPs on milk yield and lactose content. Genotypes TT and CT at c.-358T>C (P A (P C and c.-121T>G were part of transcription factors binding sites, potentially involved in modulating the LALBA gene expression. The LALBA genotype affected renneting properties (P < 0.001), as heterozygotes c.-358CT and c.-163GA were characterised by delayed rennet coagulation time and curd firming time and the lowest value of curd firmness. The present investigation increases the panel of SNPs and adds new information about the effects of the caprine LALBA gene polymorphism. PMID:26304038

  8. Dietary intervention in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Jennifer R.

    1987-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disabling disease prevalent in modern society. Dietary prevention may be possible in a subgroup of individuals who appear to suffer food intolerance; dietary intervention, as an adjunct to other management strategies, may be useful in modifying the inflammatory response. The former suggestion is supported by anecdotal evidence; the latter by some in vitro experimentation which implicates arachidonic acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid tissue inflammatio...

  9. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  12. Tick-borne encephalitis: a retrospective study of clinical cases in Bornholm, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kirsten; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl

    2003-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is caused by a flavivirus, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). For decades TBE has been known to cause disease in Bornholm, a Danish island. A retrospective study was performed to identify undiagnosed cases of TBE among patients hospitalized with signs and symptoms...... of meningitis or encephalitis in the 5 y period 1994-1999. This investigation revealed 5 new, and initially undiagnosed cases of TBE. In total, 14 cases of TBE were found in the 7 y period 1994-2000; 2 patients were tourists and 12 cases were inhabitants in Bornholm, giving an incidence of 3.81 per 100...

  13. Treatment of VGKC complex antibody-associated limbic encephalitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radja, Guirindhra Koumar; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is an autoimmune neuropsychiatric condition characterized by subacute cognitive symptoms, seizures, and affective changes. Although limbic encephalitis is usually caused by an immune reaction secondary to neoplasms, different types of potentially treatable non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (nPLE) have recently been described. In particular, published studies have reported variable responses to immunosuppressive therapy in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel (VGKC) complex antibody-associated nPLE. This systematic literature review found that the most significant improvements were reported by patients presenting with affective symptoms and consistent neuroradiological changes. In these patients, improved clinical outcomes correlated with the largest decreases in antibody titers.

  14. Imaging of limbic para-neoplastic encephalitis; Imagerie de l`encephalite limbique paraneoplastique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmelin, A.; Sellat, F.; Morand, G.; Quoix, E.; Clouet, P.L.; Dietemann, J.L. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-09-01

    Para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare syndrome mostly associated with small cell lung cancer. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with selective amnesia suggesting limbic encephalitis. A neuroendocrine cell lung cancer was found, confirming the diagnostics of para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis. Contrast-enhanced cerebral CT was normal whether magnetic resonance imaging showed signal abnormalities of the medial part of temporal lobes and hippocampal regions. Because neurologic improvement may follow treatment of the primary tumor, early diagnosis is important. (authors). 10 refs.

  15. A case report on paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with astrocytoma - An unknown entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogeshwari S Deshmukh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic encephalitis is a multifocal inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS that is associated with remote neoplasias. The most common malignancy associated with it is bronchial carcinoma, typically small cell carcinoma of lung. It has never been described in association with intracranial neoplasm. We present and discuss the clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings of paraneoplastic encephalitis with intracranial space-occupying lesions (SOLs in a 55-year-old man. He was thoroughly investigated and biopsy revealed presence of astrocytoma with changes of paraneoplastic encephalitis.

  16. Association between high expression macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) alleles and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rituparna; Loughran, Kerry; Murchison, Charles; Qian, Feng; Leng, Lin; Song, Yan; Montgomery, Ruth R; Loeb, Mark; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Infection with mosquito-borne West Nile virus (WNV) is usually asymptomatic but can lead to severe WNV encephalitis. The innate cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), is elevated in patients with WNV encephalitis and promotes viral neuroinvasion and mortality in animal models. In a case-control study, we examined functional polymorphisms in the MIF locus in a cohort of 454 North American patients with neuroinvasive WNV disease and found patients homozygous for high-expression MIF alleles to be >20-fold (p=0.008) more likely to have WNV encephalitis. These data indicate that MIF is an important determinant of severity of WNV neuropathogenesis and may be a therapeutic target.

  17. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  18. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  19. A clinical case of pseudotumorous chronic parainfectious limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shnaider

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parainfectous limbic encephalitis (PILE associated with viruses of the Herpesviridae family is one of the forms of chronic herpes encephalitis characterized by limbic system dysfunction and a prolonged course with frequent exacerbations. There are two types of the course of the disease: latent autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE progressing to mesial temporal sclerosis and pseudotumorous granulomatous LE. The latter (inflammatory pseudotumor or granuloma is characterized by the formation of a polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate with the elements of fibrosis, necrosis, and a granulomatous reaction and by myofibroblast cells. This is a slowly growing benign pseudotumor that contains much more plasma cells than inflammatory ones. The diagnosis of pseudotumorous LE is difficult and requires the participation of a neurologist, an immunologist, an oncologist, and a neurosurgeon. Perfusion computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy give proof to the adequacy of the term inflammatory pseudotumor because it is histologically difficult to characterize the lesion as a tumor or inflammation. When a chronic lesion in the central nervous system is lately diagnosed, the prognosis of the disease may be poor and complicated by the development of resistant symptomatic focal epilepsy and emotional, volitional, and cognitive impairments. It was differentially diagnosed from brain tumors (astrocytic, oligodendroglial, and mixed gliomas, ependymal, neuronal, neuroglial, and embryonal tumors, meningiomas, cholesteatomas, dermoid cysts, teratomas, and cysts, other reactive and inflammatory processes (leukemic infiltrations, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, encephalomyelitis, hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, vitamin A intoxication, and the long-term use of glucocorticoids and contraceptives. The authors describe a clinical case of the pseudotumorous course of chronic PILE in a 28-year-old woman

  20. HIV positive patient with HSV-2 encephalitis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Pasquale; Ascione, Tiziana; Carleo, Maria Aurora; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Tortora, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of brain infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive patients is reduced after the availability of current high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2) is an infrequent cause of encephalitis in HIV patients despite it is frequently involved in sexual transmitted infections. Here, we report a case of HSV-2 encephalitis occurring in a patient without full suppression of HIV replication within the brain. A 38 year-old HIV infected man was admitted to our department because of recurrent generalized seizure and fever during the previous 24 hours. Eight months before our observation the patient was switched from a protease inhibitor based regimen to a rilpivirine-based regimen without any evidence of HIV-RNA replication in the plasma. When the patient was admitted in our hospital, he was febrile and moderately confused, no deficit of cranial nerves was reported, motility was conserved, but he was unable to walk. Laboratory examinations performed at admission demonstrated an increase of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and cells with lymphocyte prevalence, and normal CSF glucose. HSV-2-DNA and HIV-RNA were present within CSF at admission. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging of the brain revealed lesions of the medial part of both temporal lobes including hippocampus without any sign of bleeding. A 21-day course of acyclovir therapy was administered with consistent improvement of clinical findings and disappearance of HSV-2-DNA within CSF. After the episode, HAART was switched to a regimen with high CSF penetrability containing abacavir, lamivudine, darunavir and ritonavir. Twelve months after HSV-2 encephalitis neurologic evaluation was normal, but symptoms of depression were reported, HIV-RNA remained undetectable both in the plasma and CSF, and CD4+ lymphocytes were above 500/μL. No opportunistic infection was reported. Patients switched to regimen well tolerated such those containing rilpivirine, that have

  1. HIV positive patient with HSV-2 encephalitis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Pasquale; Ascione, Tiziana; Carleo, Maria Aurora; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Tortora, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of brain infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive patients is reduced after the availability of current high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2) is an infrequent cause of encephalitis in HIV patients despite it is frequently involved in sexual transmitted infections. Here, we report a case of HSV-2 encephalitis occurring in a patient without full suppression of HIV replication within the brain. A 38 year-old HIV infected man was admitted to our department because of recurrent generalized seizure and fever during the previous 24 hours. Eight months before our observation the patient was switched from a protease inhibitor based regimen to a rilpivirine-based regimen without any evidence of HIV-RNA replication in the plasma. When the patient was admitted in our hospital, he was febrile and moderately confused, no deficit of cranial nerves was reported, motility was conserved, but he was unable to walk. Laboratory examinations performed at admission demonstrated an increase of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and cells with lymphocyte prevalence, and normal CSF glucose. HSV-2-DNA and HIV-RNA were present within CSF at admission. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging of the brain revealed lesions of the medial part of both temporal lobes including hippocampus without any sign of bleeding. A 21-day course of acyclovir therapy was administered with consistent improvement of clinical findings and disappearance of HSV-2-DNA within CSF. After the episode, HAART was switched to a regimen with high CSF penetrability containing abacavir, lamivudine, darunavir and ritonavir. Twelve months after HSV-2 encephalitis neurologic evaluation was normal, but symptoms of depression were reported, HIV-RNA remained undetectable both in the plasma and CSF, and CD4+ lymphocytes were above 500/μL. No opportunistic infection was reported. Patients switched to regimen well tolerated such those containing rilpivirine, that have

  2. Immune modulation by vaccination in chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld - Huijssoon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination in autoimmunity can have beneficial, but also detrimental effects. In this thesis, we tried to identify factors that contribute to a favourable or an unfavourable outcome of vaccination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and experimental arthritis. In the first part, we focused on th

  3. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette;

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  4. Positive psychological qualities and adjustment to arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Bisopsychosocial approaches to arthritis emphasize the importance of psychological and individual difference factors as predisposing, precipitating or perpetuating factor in arthritis through their interface with pain-related, inflammatory, and immunological responses. Rather than just focusing on understanding how loss is experienced, positive psychological approaches emphasize the importance of promoting and understanding how adjustment is experienced. In this narrative review, four positiv...

  5. Treatment of early rheumatoid and undifferentiated arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimans, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on different aspects of treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated arthritis (UA), based on the results of three intervention studies; the IMPROVED-study, the BeSt study and the PROMPT study. This thesis discusses the results of different treatment

  6. Patient education for adults with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsma, R.P.; Kirwan, J.R.; Taal, E.; Rasker, H.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education shows short-term benefits for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of patient education interventions on health status (pain, functional disability, psychological well-being and disease activity) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  7. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  8. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  9. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  10. Some patients with advanced malignancies also have reversible catatonia or limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Martin Alisky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two potentially treatable disorders, paraneoplastic catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, may be hidden within the presentation of end stage cancer patients, because catatonia and limbic encephalitis usually feature severely altered mental status, confusion, anorexia, and minimal responsiveness that are also common with people dying of cancer. If catatonia and limbic encephalitis are correctly diagnosed and treated, there should be definite and dramatic improvement that would translate into better quality of life and perhaps even resumption of cancer therapy. This editorial reviews basic features of catatonia and limbic encephalitis, and then presents a strategy to systematically screen for these in end stage cancer patients who are about to enter hospice. A protocol is outlined that could be adapted for clinical practice or for designing clinical studies.

  11. Principle of Laboratory Diagnosis and Epidemiological Surveillance on Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Igarashi, Akira

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory diagnoses on viral infection are indispensable in order to obtain precise information on the disease agents, including dengue and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Such information is indispensable for proper clinical case management, epidemiology, and strategy to control viral diseases.

  12. Prognosis of Japanese encephalitis patients with dystonia compared to those with parkinsonian features only

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, U; J Kalita

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: A number of movement disorders have been reported in Japanese encephalitis (JE). The prognostic significance of these movement disorders, however, has not been evaluated. The present study reports the prognostic significance of parkinsonian features and dystonia in JE.

  13. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid endothelin 1 associated with neurogenic pulmonary edema in children with enterovirus 71 encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fang Tu

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: ET-1 in the central nervous system may play a role in the development of NPE in children with EV71 infection and could be used as a biomarker or therapeutic target for NPE in EV71 encephalitis.

  14. Imaging Appearance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis on the Diffusion Weighted Images: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Daejeon Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Keon Se [Dept. of Neurology, Daejeon Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Imaging finding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis contain bilateral, symmetric, patchy, or diffuse increased T2WI signal intensities in the basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, and centrum semiovale. In particular, the centrum semiovale is most commonly involved. Most of the HIV encephalitis cases are accompanied by brain atrophy. No previous study has reported symmetric increased signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale without brain atrophy on diffusion weighted images in HIV encephalitis patients. Here, we report a case of this. We suggest that radiologists should consider the possibility of HIV encephalitis if there are symmetric increases in signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale on diffusion weighted images of patients with a history of HIV infection.

  15. Encephalitis in a child with H1N1 infection: First case report from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kulkarni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological complications have been described with seasonal influenza infection. We report encephalitis manifesting as seizures in a child with confirmed H1N1 infection. Treatment with oseltamivir was started. Child was discharged without any neurological sequelae.

  16. Rabies viral encephalitis with proable 25 year incubation period!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of rabies viral encephalitis in a 48-year-old male with an unusually long incubation period, historically suspected to be more than 20 years. The case was referred for histological diagnosis following alleged medical negligence to the forensic department. The histology and immunocytochemical demonstration of rabies viral antigen established the diagnosis unequivocally. The case manifested initially with hydrophobia and aggressive behavior, although he suddenly went to the bathroom and drank a small amount of water. History of dog bite 25 years back was elicited retrospectively following clinical suspicion. There was no subsequent history to suggest nonbite exposure to a rabid dog to consider recent event causing the disease, although this cannot be totally excluded.

  17. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis of the Parietal Lobe: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Lara; Moisi, Marc; Rostad, Steven; Umeh, Randle; Zwillman, Michael E; Tubbs, R. Shane; Page, Jeni; Newell, David W.; Delashaw, Johnny B

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with a history of breast cancer and hypertension presented with a rare case of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) isolated to her left parietal lobe. The patient’s first biopsy was negative for herpes simplex virus (HSV) I/II antigens, but less than two weeks later, the patient tested positive on repeat biopsy. This initial failure to detect the virus and the similarities between HSE and symptoms of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) suggests repeat testing for HSV in the presence of ICH. Due to the frequency of patients with extra temporal HSE, a diagnosis of HSE should be more readily considered, particularly when a patient may not be improving and a concrete diagnosis has not been solidified. PMID:27774355

  18. Testosterone correlates with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection in macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koterski James

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we briefly report testosterone and cytokine responses to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV in macaques which were used as part of a larger study conducted by the Department of Defense to better characterize pathological responses to aerosolized VEEV in non-human primates. Serial samples were collected and analyzed for testosterone and cytokines prior to and during infection in 8 captive male macaques. Infected animals exhibited a febrile response with few significant changes in cytokine levels. Baseline testosterone levels were positively associated with viremia following exposure and were significantly higher than levels obtained during infection. Such findings suggest that disease-induced androgen suppression is a reasonable area for future study. Decreased androgen levels during physiological perturbations may function, in part, to prevent immunosuppression by high testosterone levels and to prevent the use of energetic resources for metabolically-expensive anabolic functions.

  19. Cognitive Impairments Preceding and Outlasting Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild cognitive impairment (MCI can be the initial manifestation of autoimmune limbic encephalitis (ALE, a disorder that at times presents a diagnostic challenge. In addition to memory impairment, clinical features that might suggest this disorder include personality changes, agitation, insomnia, alterations of consciousness, and seizures. Once recognized, ALE typically responds to treatment with immune therapies, but long-term cognitive deficits may remain. We report two cases of patients with MCI who were ultimately diagnosed with ALE with antibodies against the voltage gated potassium channel complex. Months after apparent resolution of their encephalitides, both underwent neuropsychological testing, which demonstrated persistent cognitive deficits, primarily in the domains of memory and executive function, for cases 1 and 2, respectively. A brief review of the literature is included.

  20. Varicella-zoster virus encephalitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Toledo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old man with a three-year history of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome was admitted with impaired consciousness, seizures and fever. He was on highly active antiretroviral therapy and on neurotoxoplasmosis secondary prophylaxis. Laboratory exams from two months before showed a CD4 cell count of 37/µL and a viral load of 230,000 copies/mL. Three months before admission he developed herpetic skin rash in the right trunk and acyclovir was added to his treatment regimen. On physical exam he was drowsy and had motor and sensory aphasia. The patient had elevated protein levels and normal pressure in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan of the brain showed a hypodense lesion in the left parietal lobe, with poorly defined margins and no contrast enhancement. The magnetic resonance scan (MRI showed multiple hyperintensities in T2-weighted image in white and grey matters and hypointense products of hemorrhage in both hemispheres and in the cerebellum. He was empirically treated with intravenous acyclovir and prednisone. Viral DNA of Varicella-zoster virus (VZV was detected in the CSF by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis. Acyclovir was continued for 10 days and the patient became well, with improvement of aphasia.We present a case of VZV encephalitis, confirmed by nested PCR, in a patient with suggestive MRI findings, who succeeded with treatment. VZV encephalitis is a rare opportunistic infection, occurring in 0.1 to 4% of AIDS patients with neurological disease; it is related to severe immunodeficiency and has a high mortality.

  1. Herpes simlex encephalitis. A neuropsychological and neuroradiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common causative pathogen of nonepidemic encephalitis in Japan. The mortality rate is approximately 30% and surviving patients often have severe sequelae such as amnestic syndrome. Between 1979 and 1992, 13 patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) were admitted to our Department. Diagnosis was based on the neurological symptoms and signs, the findings on EEG, CT and MRI, and the results of serological examination including ELISA for HSV type 1. Neuropsychological tests were performed over a period of approximatly 2 years in seven of 13 patients. The results of the tests disclosed memory impairments as follows. Namely, immediate recall was well preserved, but disturbance of recent memory and retrograde amnesia over 20 years were observed. The neuropsychological features more closely resembled those of amnestic syndrome than those of Korsakoff syndrome. The amnesia in HSE patients was characterized in the finding that it was prone to recover more gradually as compared with that following head trauma or surgical brain resection. CT scan was performed in 13 patients during the acute and convalescent stages. The low density areas were found in the temporal lobes in 60% of the patients. MRI were obtained during the convalescent stage in ten of 13 patients. In seven of the ten patients, abnormal signals were distributed uni- or bilaterally to the temporal lobe, insular and limbic system such as the hippocampus and amygdala. In the remaining three patients, the abnormal signals were localized in both hippocampi and amygdalae in one patient and only in the brain stem in another. In the last case, the MRI was normal. The findings that signal intensity on MRI showing the lesion in the temporal lobe spread continuously to the opposite limbic area or occipital lobe strongly suggested the spreading of HSV through neural fiber connections in HSE. (author)

  2. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infection in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrnjaković-Cvjetković Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tick-borne meningoencephalitis virus is a flavivirus that causes the most important vector-borne central nervous system infection in many countries of Europe and Asia. There are three subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis virus: European, Siberian and the Far-Eastern subtype. Transmission. In endemic areas, the virus remains in transmissive cycles between Ixodes ticks and small rodents. Clinical picture. In most cases (70−98% infection goes asymptomatically. In about one-third of meningitis cases, meningoencephalitis or meningomyelitis is developed. Postencephalytic syndrome may be the complication of the infection, presenting with neurological symptoms. Diagnosis. Etiologic diagnosis of tick-borne meningoencephalitis is only made on basis of laboratory analyses. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction is used for determining the presence of virus in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Antibodies in blood and cerebrospinal fluid can be detected by serological tests. Prevention. The most efficient way to control this potentially severe disease with possible serious long-term consequences is vaccination. It should be recommended to persons who live or travel to endemic areas. Conclusion. In Serbia, tick-borne encephalitis virus infection belongs to the list of reportable diseases; however, there are no reported cases because the diagnostics is not performed routinely. We believe that the significance of this zoonosis must be examined in our country and some of its parts because of preliminary positive serological findings found out in Vojvodina as well as because of reported cases in neighboring countries such as Hungary and Croatia and its worldwide distribution.

  3. Herpes simlex encephalitis. A neuropsychological and neuroradiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Masaya [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common causative pathogen of nonepidemic encephalitis in Japan. The mortality rate is approximately 30% and surviving patients often have severe sequelae such as amnestic syndrome. Between 1979 and 1992, 13 patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) were admitted to our Department. Diagnosis was based on the neurological symptoms and signs, the findings on EEG, CT and MRI, and the results of serological examination including ELISA for HSV type 1. Neuropsychological tests were performed over a period of approximatly 2 years in seven of 13 patients. The results of the tests disclosed memory impairments as follows. Namely, immediate recall was well preserved, but disturbance of recent memory and retrograde amnesia over 20 years were observed. The neuropsychological features more closely resembled those of amnestic syndrome than those of Korsakoff syndrome. The amnesia in HSE patients was characterized in the finding that it was prone to recover more gradually as compared with that following head trauma or surgical brain resection. CT scan was performed in 13 patients during the acute and convalescent stages. The low density areas were found in the temporal lobes in 60% of the patients. MRI were obtained during the convalescent stage in ten of 13 patients. In seven of the ten patients, abnormal signals were distributed uni- or bilaterally to the temporal lobe, insular and limbic system such as the hippocampus and amygdala. In the remaining three patients, the abnormal signals were localized in both hippocampi and amygdalae in one patient and only in the brain stem in another. In the last case, the MRI was normal. The findings that signal intensity on MRI showing the lesion in the temporal lobe spread continuously to the opposite limbic area or occipital lobe strongly suggested the spreading of HSV through neural fiber connections in HSE. (author).

  4. Phylogeography of Japanese encephalitis virus: genotype is associated with climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J Schuh

    Full Text Available The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate.

  5. Neuropathogenesis of Japanese encephalitis in a primate model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Saw Aye Myint

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is a major cause of mortality and morbidity for which there is no treatment. In addition to direct viral cytopathology, the inflammatory response is postulated to contribute to the pathogenesis. Our goal was to determine the contribution of bystander effects and inflammatory mediators to neuronal cell death.Material from a macaque model was used to characterize the inflammatory response and cytopathic effects of JE virus (JEV. Intranasal JEV infection induced a non-suppurative encephalitis, dominated by perivascular, infiltrates of mostly T cells, alongside endothelial cell activation, vascular damage and blood brain barrier (BBB leakage; in the adjacent parenchyma there was macrophage infiltration, astrocyte and microglia activation. JEV antigen was mostly in neurons, but there was no correlation between intensity of viral infection and degree of inflammatory response. Apoptotic cell death occurred in both infected and non-infected neurons. Interferon-α, which is a microglial activator, was also expressed by both. Tumour Necrosis Factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine were expressed by microglial cells, astrocytes and macrophages. The same cells expressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 whilst MMP-9 was expressed by neurons.The results are consistent with JEV inducing neuronal apoptotic death and release of cytokines that initiate microglial activation and release of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic mediators with subsequent apoptotic death of both infected and uninfected neurons. Activation of astrocytes, microglial and endothelial cells likely contributes to inflammatory cell recruitment and BBB breakdown. It appears that neuronal apoptotic death and activation of microglial cells and astrocytes play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of JE.

  6. Viral articular deformations in a goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A goat belonging to an animal aid association was presented for bilateral deformation of the tarsus and carpus and signs of high-grade pain. ELISA serology was positive for Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus. Radiography revealed marked osseous remodelling of the tarsus. The blood fibrinogen concentration was very elevated. On infected commercial farms, it is recommended that both seropositive animals and their offspring are culled when the level of infected is low, or to separate the kids from the mothers at an early age. In this case, palliative treatment was prescribed based on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and articular puncture-lavages

  7. First human case of tick-borne encephalitis virus infection acquired in the Netherlands, July 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Joris A; Reimerink, Johan H J; Voorn, G Paul; Bij de Vaate, Elisabeth A; de Vries, Ankje; Rockx, Barry; Schuitemaker, Alie; Hira, Vishal

    2016-08-18

    In July 2016, the first autochthonous case of tick-borne encephalitis was diagnosed in the Netherlands, five days after a report that tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) had been found in Dutch ticks. A person in their 60s without recent travel history suffered from neurological symptoms after a tick bite. TBEV serology was positive and the tick was positive in TBEV qRT-PCR. TBEV infection should be considered in patients with compatible symptoms in the Netherlands. PMID:27562931

  8. Acute Transverse Myelitis (Ascending Myelitis) as the Initial Manifestation of Japanese Encephalitis: A Rare Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Varshney Ankur Nandan; Kumar Nilesh; Behera Dibyaranjan; Tiwari Ashutosh; Anand Ravi; Anand Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis, an inflammatory brain disease prevalent in Southeast Asia, usually presented with fever, headache, convulsions, brain stem signs with pyramidal and extrapyramidal features, and altered sensorium. Acute transverse myelitis, as the initial manifestation of Japanese encephalitis, is an unusual manifestation and is seldom reported. We hereby report a case of 13-year-old adolescent boy who presented to us with fever and acute onset paraparesis with urinary retention initiall...

  9. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis after treatment with Japanese B encephalitis vaccine (Nakayama-Yoken and Beijing strains).

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtaki, E; Matsuishi, T; Hirano, Y; Maekawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Seven children with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) after treatment with Japanese B encephalitis vaccine (JBEV) (Nakayama-Yoken strain 1968-88 and Beijing strain 1989-93) were identified by mailed questionnaires and by compilation of previously published case reports. It was considered that encephalomyelitis might have been related to vaccine treatment as the vaccine is derived from mouse brain tissue infected with Japanese B encephalitis virus, a potentially cross reactive antige...

  10. Investigation of Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission in Hanam, Viet Nam

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, A.; Whitehead, S.; Anders, K. L.; Hoa, L. N. M.; Mai, L. Q.; Thai, P. Q.; Yen, N. T.; Duong, T. N.; Thoang, D. D.; Farrar, J.; Wertheim, H; Simmons, C.; Hien, N. T.; Horby, P.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether a large dengue epidemic that struck Hanoi in 2009 also affected a nearby semirural area. Seroconversion (dengue virus-reactive immunoglobulin G enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) was high during 2009 compared with 2008, but neutralization assays showed that it was caused by both dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis virus infections. The findings highlight the importance of continued Japanese encephalitis virus vaccination and dengue surveillance.

  11. Japanese encephalitis--an important cause of acute childhood encephalopathy in Lucknow, India.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, R.; Mathur, A.; Kumar, A.(State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, USA); Sharma, S.; Saksena, P. N.; Chaturvedi, U. C.

    1988-01-01

    Eighty-six randomly selected children between 6 months and 12 years of age admitted with acute unexplained encephalopathy over a one year period were examined for evidence of Japanese encephalitis. One or more indicators of the infection were present in 36 (41.8%). Viral isolation from brain tissue was possible in 2 of 12 patients and from cerebrospinal fluid in 19 out of 62 patients. Serological evidence of probable Japanese encephalitis was found in 21 out of 36 patients. Japanese encephali...

  12. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puri Raj K; Bhattacharya Bhaskar; Sharma Anuj; Maheshwari Radha K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated...

  13. Emergence or improved detection of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Himalayan highlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Matthew; Barker, Christopher M; Caminade, Cyril; Joshi, Bhoj R; Pant, Ganesh R; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Reisen, William K; Impoinvil, Daniel E

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in the Himalayan highlands is of significant veterinary and public health concern and may be related to climate warming and anthropogenic landscape change, or simply improved surveillance. To investigate this phenomenon, a One Health approach focusing on the phylogeography of JEV, the distribution and abundance of the mosquito vectors, and seroprevalence in humans and animal reservoirs would be useful to understand the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in highland areas. PMID:26956778

  14. Acquired heterotopic ossification in hips and knees following encephalitis: case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xianghong; Jie, Shuo; Liu, Tang; ZHANG, Xiangsheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a rare and potentially detrimental complication of soft-tissue trauma, amputations, central nervous system injury (traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord lesions, tumors, encephalitis), vasculopathies, arthroplasties and burn injury, characterized by lamellar bone growth in non-osseous tissues such as the muscle and the joint capsule. Heterotopic ossification associated with encephalitis is rare and the occurrence of excessive, symptomatic heterotopi...

  15. Experimental Infection of Potential Reservoir Hosts with Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Deardorff, Eleanor R.; Naomi L Forrester; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2009-01-01

    In 1993, an outbreak of encephalitis among 125 affected equids in coastal Chiapas, Mexico, resulted in a 50% case-fatality rate. The outbreak was attributed to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) subtype IE, not previously associated with equine disease and death. To better understand the ecology of this VEEV strain in Chiapas, we experimentally infected 5 species of wild rodents and evaluated their competence as reservoir and amplifying hosts. Rodents from 1 species (Baiomys musculus...

  16. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: an important differential diagnosis in psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Helen

    2012-02-01

    We present four cases of confirmed anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis; three presented initially with serious psychiatric symptoms and the other developed significant psychiatric symptoms during the initial phase of illness. Brain biopsy findings of one patient are also described. Psychiatrists should consider anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in patients presenting with psychosis and additional features of dyskinesias, seizures and catatonia, particularly where there is no previous history of psychiatric disorder.

  17. Does encephalization correlate with life history or metabolic rate in Carnivora?

    OpenAIRE

    Finarelli, John A.

    2009-01-01

    A recent analysis of brain size evolution reconstructed the plesiomorphic brain–body size allometry for the mammalian order Carnivora, providing an important reference frame for comparative analyses of encephalization (brain volume scaled to body mass). I performed phylogenetically corrected regressions to remove the effects of body mass, calculating correlations between residual values of encephalization with basal metabolic rate (BMR) and six life-history variables (gestation time, neonatal...

  18. Regional impact of climate on Japanese encephalitis in areas located near the three gorges dam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuntao Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study, we aim to identify key climatic factors that are associated with the transmission of Japanese encephalitis virus in areas located near the Three Gorges Dam, between 1997 and 2008. METHODS: We identified three geographical regions of Chongqing, based on their distance from the Three Gorges Dam. Collectively, the three regions consisted of 12 districts from which study information was collected. Zero-Inflated Poisson Regression models were run to identify key climatic factors of the transmission of Japanese encephalitis virus for both the whole study area and for each individual region; linear regression models were conducted to examine the fluctuation of climatic variables over time during the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. RESULTS: Between 1997 and 2008, the incidence of Japanese encephalitis decreased throughout the entire city of Chongqing, with noticeable variations taking place in 2000, 2001 and 2006. The eastern region, which is closest to the Three Gorges Dam, suffered the highest incidence of Japanese encephalitis, while the western region experienced the lowest incidence. Linear regression models revealed that there were seasonal fluctuations of climatic variables during this period. Zero-Inflated Poisson Regression models indicated a significant positive association between temperature (with a lag of 1 and 3 months and Japanese encephalitis incidence, and a significant negative association between rainfall (with a lag of 0 and 4 months and Japanese encephalitis incidence. CONCLUSION: The spatial and temporal trends of Japanese encephalitis incidence that occurred in the City of Chongqing were associated with temperature and rainfall. Seasonal fluctuations of climatic variables during this period were also observed. Additional studies that focus on long-term data collection are needed to validate the findings of this study and to further explore the effects of the Three Gorges Dam on Japanese

  19. GABAB Encephalitis: A Fifty-Two-Year-Old Man with Seizures, Dysautonomia, and Acute Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Loftspring

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor, subtype B (GABAB, are a known cause of limbic encephalitis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations attributable to this antibody is not well defined at the present time. Here we present a case of GABAB encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy, status epilepticus, dysautonomia, and acute heart failure. To our knowledge, heart failure and dysautonomia have not yet been reported with this syndrome.

  20. Diversity in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: case-based evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, J; Rocha, J.; Rodrigues, M.; Pereira, J.; Maré, R; Ferreira, C; Lourenço, E; Beleza, P

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) are identified in the form of immune-mediated encephalitis in which typical manifestations include neuropsychiatric symptoms, seizures, abnormal movements, dysautonomia and hypoventilation. The authors report two cases of anti-NMDAR encephalitis with different presentations and patterns of progression. The first patient presented with status epilepticus and later developed psychosis, pyramidal signs and diffuse encephalopathy. The secon...

  1. GABAB Encephalitis: A Fifty-Two-Year-Old Man with Seizures, Dysautonomia, and Acute Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Loftspring, Matthew C; Eric Landsness; Lindsey Wooliscroft; Robert Rudock; Sally Jo; Patel, Kevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor, subtype B (GABAB), are a known cause of limbic encephalitis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations attributable to this antibody is not well defined at the present time. Here we present a case of GABAB encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy, status epilepticus, dysautonomia, and acute heart failure. To our knowledge, heart failure and dysautonomia have not yet been reported with this syndrome.

  2. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  3. Cardiovascular involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Gennaro Colonna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, genetically determined and immunomediated inflammatory skin disease that affects 2-3% of the Caucasian population. A considerable proportion of these patients develop a form of inflammatory arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, although the prevalence of this has not been well defined. Patients with PsA have a higher mortality rate than the general population and the risk of mortality is related to disease severity at the time of presentation. Endothelial dysfunction and early atherosclerosis have been found in patients with PsA without any cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, and experts believe that CVD is one of the leading causes of death, as it is in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Various disease-related mechanisms may be involved in the development of premature vascular damage in both cases, including an increased synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (such as cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules, autoantibodies against endothelial cell components, perturbations in T-cell subsets, genetic polymorphisms, hyperhomocysteinemia, oxidative stress, abnormal vascular repair, and iatrogenic factors. In a recent study of 22 patients with PsA without any signs of CVD, we found that the plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA levels were significantly high and coronary flow reserve (CFR was significantly reduced. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between CFR and plasma ADMA levels in the PsA group. The significant correlation between the reduced CRF and increased ADMA levels suggests that, like patients with early RA, PsA patients suffer from endothelial dysfunction and impaired coronary microcirculation. Active PsA is a risk factor for CVD, and so PsA patients should be screened for subclinical forms of the disease and its risk factors, and an early treatment approach should be adopted.

  4. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  5. Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Although the use of corticosteroids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is now much more limited owing to the availability of methotrexate and biological agents, there are clinical scenarios where it is still indicated. For example, corticosteroids may be indicated for intraarticular injections to prevent joint deformities, as a "bridge" drug to relieve symptoms in polyarticular disease while waiting for methotrexate and biologics to exert their full therapeutic effects, and in the treatment of chronic iridocyclitis, macrophage activation syndrome, and systemic JIA, although the advent of interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 blockers has greatly reduced the latter indication.

  6. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Karl [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Radiology Department, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Over the past decade there have been considerable changes in the classification and imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology now has a considerable role in the management of JIA, the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. The different imaging modalities available, their role and limitations are discussed in this article and the various disease features that the radiologist should be aware of are described. An approach to the imaging of the child with joint disease and in the monitoring of disease complications are also discussed. (orig.)

  7. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, P; Toivanen, A

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most import...

  8. US guided injections in arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Zordo, Tobias [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Western Ontario, London Health Science Centre - University Hospital, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario, N6A 5A5 (Canada); Mur, Erich; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Sailer-Hoeck, Michaela [Department of Pediatrics, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Chhem, Rethy [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Western Ontario, London Health Science Centre - University Hospital, 339 Windermere Road, London, Ontario, N6A 5A5 (Canada); Feuchtner, Gudrun M.; Jaschke, Werner [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2009-08-15

    US guided procedures for diagnosis or treatment of different forms of arthritis are becoming more and more important. This review describes general considerations for fluid aspiration, articular or periarticular injections and biopsies by US guidance according to the recent literature. Guidelines regarding instrumentation, different techniques, pre- and postprocedural care as well as complications are outlined and in Second part a more detailed overview of different interventions in joints, tendons and other periarticular regions (nerves, bursae, etc.) is included. Furthermore, some newer, more sophisticated techniques are briefly discussed.

  9. Psoriatic arthritis: genetics and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mathieu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is a complex disease affecting primarily peripheral and axial joints and entheses together with the skin. The pathogenesis is characterized by a genetic background and by inflammatory mechanisms which may be triggered by environmental factors. Several susceptibility genes have been investigated; they include HLA genes, genes within the HLA region and genes outside the HLA region. T cells, including the recently described subset Th17, are thought to play an important role in the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Some of these findings allowed novel therapeutic interventions or opened new promising approaches in treatment. The most relevant data of the literature are summarized and discussed.

  10. [Physical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, E

    1990-03-20

    Physiotherapy is an important component of the treatment regimen for rheumatoid arthritis, and is aimed mainly at reducing pain and preserving function. Depending on the severity of the disease and the clinical picture, physiotherapy, ergotherapy, hydrotherapy and heat treatment, as well as massage and electrotherapy may all be considered. When properly applied, these treatments have the advantage of being free of side effects. Scientific proof of effectiveness is often lacking in physical medicine, which clearly represents a challenge to the discipline in the years to come. PMID:2182487

  11. SEPTIC ARTHRITIS OF THE HIP IN ADULTS: A RARE PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic Arthritis also known as infectious arthritis, can be bacterial or fungal arthritis. The condition is an inflammation of a joint that is caused by an infection. Typically, Septic Arthritis affects one large joint in the body such as knee or hip. Generally, Septic Arthritis is present with complete absorption of the head of the Femur in infants. A case was encountered in which the complete absorption of the femoral head was seen in adults also

  12. Clinical, radiological and neurophysiological spectrum of JEV encephalitis and other non-specific encephalitis during post-monsoon period in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra U

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the spectrum of encephalitis during the post-monsoon period in a tertiary care centre of India. Methods: Clinical, neurophysiological and radiological features of patients with encephalitis are reported in this communication. The patients were subjected to clinical examination, CT or MRI scan, EEG, motor and somatosensory evoked potentials in both upper and lower limbs bilaterally and concentric needle electromyography. The laboratory studies for Japanese encephalitis (JE comprised virus isolated, IgM capture ELISA, mercaptoethanol test and hemagglutination inhibition titre in paired sera against JE virus. Patients were classified into JEV encephalitis and non-specific encephalitis. On the basis of radiological features, they were classified into group I (thalamic or basal ganglia involvement, group II (brainstem involvement only and group III (normal MRI. The outcome was defined into poor (bedridden, partial (dependent for daily activities and complete (independent recovery at the end of 3 months. Results: Out of 26 patients (Age 7-70 years, mean 24.8 years, laboratory evidences of JEV infection was present in 14 patients and one patient had herpes simplex encephalitis. The patients with JEV encephalitis had more severe illness as evidenced by lower GCS score, higher frequency of anterior horn cell involvement, movement disorders and more extensive MRI changes. The EEG and MEP changes were also more frequently abnormal in the JEV group. On radiology, 15 patients had thalamic or basal ganglia involvement (group I, 3 isolated midbrain involvement (group II and 8 had normal MRI (group III. Laboratory evidence consistent with JE were present in 11 out of 12 patients in group I and 3 out of 8 in group III, however, there was no laboratory evidence of JE virus infection in patients with isolated brainstem involvement. There was overlap in the neurologic and systemic manifestations in all the 3 radiological groups as well as in the

  13. Improved surveillance of Japanese encephalitis by detection of virus-specific IgM in desiccated blood specimens*

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, D S; Chatiyanonda, K.; Anandrik, S.; Nakornsri, S.; Nisalak, A; Hoke, C H

    1985-01-01

    An IgM antibody-capture type enzyme-linked immunoassay (MAC ELISA) was compared with the haemagglutination inhibition method (HI) for establishing a laboratory diagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus infection using specimens of dried blood eluted from filter paper strips. Paired samples from 243 encephalitis patients, which had been obtained by mail through a national surveillance programme in Thailand, were tested. During the peak of the 1983 encephalitis epidemic, 72% of cases ...

  14. A case of pneumonitis and encephalitis associated with human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection after bone marrow transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama, T; Okada, F; Ando, Y.; Honda, K.; Ogata, M; Goto, K.; Kadota, J; Mori, H

    2010-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6)-associated encephalitis or pneumonitis has been reported in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. Several MRI studies in patients with HHV-6-associated encephalitis have been presented. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies describing thin-section CT imaging in patients with HHV-6-associated pneumonitis have been reported. Here we describe a case of HHV-6-associated encephalitis and pneumonitis that developed after bone marrow transplantatio...

  15. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis presenting with acute psychosis in a preteenage girl: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Maggina Paraskevi; Mavrikou Mersini; Karagianni Stavroula; Skevaki Chrysanthi L; Triantafyllidou Antigoni; Voudris Constantinos; Katsarou Eustathia; Stamogiannou Lela; Mastroyianni Sotiria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a rare, newly defined autoimmune clinical entity that presents with atypical clinical manifestations. Most patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis develop a progressive illness from psychosis into a state of unresponsiveness, with catatonic features often associated with abnormal movements and autonomic instability. This is the first report of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephal...

  16. Temporal and Pontine Involvement in a Case of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis, Presenting as Kluver Bucy Syndrome - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Thirunavukarasu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral temporal and frontal lobe involvement is a common characteristic of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. Clinical sequelae of herpes simplex encephalitis may manifest sometimes as Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS. In herpes simplex encephalitis, apart from frontal lobe, extra temporal involvement is rare and uncommon. We report a case of HSE manifesting clinically as KBS with a rare radiological finding of temporal and extratemporal involvement of pons.

  17. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  18. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  19. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  20. [Current treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, P; Landais, C; Aletti, M; Cournac, J-M; Poisnel, E; Paris, J-F

    2009-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, the management of rheumatoid arthritis has been revolutionized. Early diagnosis is essential and should allow an early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD), if possible within the first 3 three months after disease onset, aiming at disease remission and the best long-term prognosis. Recommendations for the prescription of synthetic and biologic DMARD (mainly anti-TNFalpha agents) are available since September 2007 [6] by HAS in France. The great efficacy of these drugs has been established from many clinical trials including tens of thousands of patients. However, severe adverse side effects may occur (allergy, tuberculosis, opportunistic infections, demyelination) and rheumatologists should remain vigilant. Global care of the patient includes prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments (education, physical treatment, ergotherapy, psychotherapy, surgery). A good coordination between all specialists is required. Screening and treatment of extra-articular manifestations, prevention of infections, osteoporosis and cardiovascular complications are essential to allow a better long-term prognosis, and reduce disability and mortality of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19833415

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  2. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciborski, Filip; Kłak, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5-1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000-157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  3. Influence of variable water-soluble soy extract and inulin contents on the rheological, technological and sensory properties of grapeflavored yogurt-like beverages made from caprine milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Evangelista Santos Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate the influences of the partial substitution of caprine milk for water-soluble soy extract (WSSE and the addition of inulin on the rheological, technological and sensory properties of grapeflavored yogurt-like beverages. For this purpose, a Central Composite Design (CCD in conjunction with Response Surface Methodology (RSM was employed. WSSE and inulin influenced the overall acceptability of the product, whereas syneresis, water holding capacity and rheological properties (the consistency index and the flow behavior index were influenced only by the WSSE content. RSM was shown to be an adequate statistical tool that can be used for the development of formulations with specified properties in the range of the ingredient concentrations studied.

  4. Employing in vitro analysis to test the potency of methylglyoxal in inducing the formation of amyloid-like aggregates of caprine brain cystatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Waseem Feeroze; Bhat, Sheraz Ahmad; Khaki, Peerzada Shariq Shaheen; Bano, Bilqees

    2015-01-01

    Thiol protease inhibitors (cystatins) are implicated in various disease states from cancer to neurodegenerative conditions and immune responses. Cystatins have high amyloidogenic propensity and they are prone to form fibrillar aggregates leading to amyloidosis. Particularly challenging examples of such disorders occur in type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The aim of the present study is to find an interaction between the compound methylglyoxal (MG) which is particularly elevated in type 2 diabetes with caprine brain cystatin (CBC). Results have shown that elevated concentration of MG forms amyloid aggregates of CBC. This was achieved by allowing slow growth in a solution containing moderate to high concentrations of MG. When analysed with microscopy, the protein aggregate present in the sample after incubation consisted of extended filaments with ordered structures. This fibrillar material possesses extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the fibrils exhibit increased Thioflavin T fluorescence.

  5. Emissions annuelles de méthane d'origine digestive par les ovins, les caprins et les équins en France

    OpenAIRE

    VERMOREL, M.

    1997-01-01

    Les résultats des mesures de production journalière de méthane des principaux types d’herbivores à l’aide de chambres respiratoires ont permis de modéliser les émissions de méthane selon l’espèce, le stade physiologique, la composition du régime et le niveau d’alimentation. Après l’évaluation des quantités annuelles de méthane émises par les bovins en France, présentée dans un article précédent, celles émises par les ovins, les caprins et les équins ont été calculées pour chaque type d’animal...

  6. Chronic Lyme disease arthritis: review of the literature and report of a case of wrist arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerpella, T A; Engber, W D

    1992-05-01

    A case of Lyme arthritis with advanced degenerative changes localized to the midcarpal joint was treated with a limited wrist arthrodesis with relief of pain and improved function. Chronic Lyme arthritis occurs as the third stage of Lyme disease. Serologic testing and a history of a characteristic rash may be helpful in the diagnosis. Radiographic and histopathologic findings are nonspecific, with both degenerative and inflammatory characteristics. Intravenous antibiotics provide an effective treatment of chronic Lyme arthritis.

  7. Psychotic symptoms in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: A case report and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pawan; Sagar, Rajesh; Patra, Bichitrananda; Saini, Lokesh; Gulati, Sheffali; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop

    2016-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, only recently first described, is an increasingly well-recognized inflammatory encephalitis that is seen in children and adults. An 11-year old girl admitted to the psychiatry ward with a presentation of acute psychosis was diagnosed with NMDA receptor encephalitis following neurology referral and was treated accordingly. This case highlights psychiatric manifestations in encephalitis and the need for the psychiatrist to have high index of suspicion when atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesia, seizure, fever etc.) present in acutely psychotic patients. PMID:27520914

  8. Cluster analysis for identifying sub-groups and selecting potential discriminatory variables in human encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowcroft Natasha S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitis is an acute clinical syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS, often associated with fatal outcome or permanent damage, including cognitive and behavioural impairment, affective disorders and epileptic seizures. Infection of the central nervous system is considered to be a major cause of encephalitis and more than 100 different pathogens have been recognized as causative agents. However, a large proportion of cases have unknown disease etiology. Methods We perform hierarchical cluster analysis on a multicenter England encephalitis data set with the aim of identifying sub-groups in human encephalitis. We use the simple matching similarity measure which is appropriate for binary data sets and performed variable selection using cluster heatmaps. We also use heatmaps to visually assess underlying patterns in the data, identify the main clinical and laboratory features and identify potential risk factors associated with encephalitis. Results Our results identified fever, personality and behavioural change, headache and lethargy as the main characteristics of encephalitis. Diagnostic variables such as brain scan and measurements from cerebrospinal fluids are also identified as main indicators of encephalitis. Our analysis revealed six major clusters in the England encephalitis data set. However, marked within-cluster heterogeneity is observed in some of the big clusters indicating possible sub-groups. Overall, the results show that patients are clustered according to symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents. Exposure variables such as recent infection, sick person contact and animal contact have been identified as potential risk factors. Conclusions It is in general assumed and is a common practice to group encephalitis cases according to disease etiology. However, our results indicate that patients are clustered with respect to mainly symptom and diagnostic variables rather than causal agents

  9. Screening for uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Three hundred and fifteen patients with anterior uveitis associated with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) were studied in order to identify the various risk factors for uveitis. Girls were more susceptible to uveitis than boys by a ratio of 3:1. In 94% of cases the uveitis was diagnosed after the development of arthritis. The risk of uveitis was small after seven or more years had elapsed from the onset of arthritis. Patients with pauciarticular onset JCA had the highest risk of uveitis and s...

  10. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  11. The influence of dexamethasone treatment and successive road transport stress on the occurrence of caprine pneumonia in a hot humid tropical environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Yussof Sabri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The information on the effect of multiple stress and caprine pneumonia especially in a hot humid environment is limited in literature. Material and Methods: Sixteen goats were divided into 4 groups. Group A were subjected to 8 hours and 3 hours transportation, group B to 8 hours transport stress once and dexamethasone injection, group C to 8 hours transport only while group D was the control. All goats were observed for respiratory signs while temperature was monitored daily. Dead ones were necropsied while the survivors and the goats in group D were sacrificed on day 21. The clinical, gross, histopathological, immunohistochemical scores were according to standard methods. Results: The mean total clinical score was higher in group B than group A, C and D. Two goats of the groups A, B and C goats died 21, 14 and 7 days post treatment. The dead goats in groups A, B, C had lung lesions typical of pneumonic pasteurellosis. An average of the lung consolidation of dead animals in group A was 15%, in group B, 8.5% and group C, 6.5% mostly involving the anterior and ventral parts of the lungs of the lung. The immunostaining results was also similar with all the lung samples positive for both P. multocida and M. haemolytica especially in the groups A, B, C with enhanced severity in A > B > C. Conclusions: This further buttress the need to reduce stress in farm animals and the emergence of P. multocida over M. haemolytica in the epidemiology of bacterial caprine pneumonia in stressed goats in Malaysia. [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 497-501

  12. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Kyong Ahn

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease (BD with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%. This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis.

  13. Arthritis mutilans: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vinod; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S; Gudbjörnsson, Björn

    2013-08-01

    Arthritis mutilans is often described as the most severe form of psoriatic arthritis. However, a widely agreed on definition of the disease has not been developed. At the 2012 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), members hoped to agree on a definition of arthritis mutilans and thus facilitate clinical and molecular epidemiological research into the disease. Members discussed the clinical features of arthritis mutilans and definitions used by researchers to date; reviewed data from the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis study, the Nordic psoriatic arthritis mutilans study, and the results of a premeeting survey; and participated in breakout group discussions. Through this exercise, GRAPPA members developed a broad consensus on the features of arthritis mutilans, which will help us develop a GRAPPA-endorsed definition of arthritis mutilans. PMID:23908536

  14. Subtype specific genetic associations for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: ERAP1 with the enthesitis related arthritis subtype and IL23R with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an umbrella term for all chronic childhood arthropathies and can be divided into seven subtypes. It includes the enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) subtype which displays symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis which has similarities to psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis (Ps). We, therefore, hypothesized that two well-established susceptibility loci for AS and Ps, ERAP1 and IL23R, could als...

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  16. Management of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, R P; Mathew, M; Smith, J; Morse, L P; Mehta, J A; Currie, B J

    2015-02-01

    Little information is available about several important aspects of the treatment of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. We undertook a retrospective review of 50 patients with these conditions in an attempt to determine the effect of location of the disease, type of surgical intervention and duration of antibiotic treatment on outcome, particularly complications and relapse. We found that there was a 27.5% risk of osteomyelitis of the adjacent bone in patients with septic arthritis in the lower limb. Patients with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone were in hospital significantly longer (p = 0.001), needed more operations (p = 0.031) and had a significantly higher rate of complications and re-presentation (p = 0.048). More than half the patients (61%), most particularly those with multifocal bone and joint involvement, and those with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone who were treated operatively, needed more visits to theatre.

  17. Tracheomegaly in association with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celenk, C.; Selcuk, M.B.; Oezyazici, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayys Univ., Samsun (Turkey); Celenk, P. [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Faculty of Dentistry, Ondokuz Mayys Univ., Samsun (Turkey); Kuru, Oe. [Dept. of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Ondokuz Mayys Univ., Samsun (Turkey)

    2000-11-01

    Herein we present a case of tracheomegaly seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. To the authors' knowledge, and from a review of the literature, this combination has not been previously described. (orig.)

  18. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  19. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: conge...

  20. Clinical management of septic arthritis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2014-03-01

    Synovial fluid, ultrasound, and radiographic imaging are common diagnostic tools for septic arthritis. Mycoplasma septic arthritis is suspected in calves with clinical signs of otitis and pneumonia. Commonly affected joints are carpus, stifle, and tarsus. Treatment strategy must include long-term antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and joint lavage. Knowledge of communication and boundaries for commonly affected joints is essential to perform joint lavage and arthrotomy.