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Sample records for caprine arthritis encephalitis

  1. Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, explant cultures prepared from the brain of new-born goat-kid were infected with. Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis (CAE) virus- a retrovirus affecting goats. The specific brain cell types infected by the (CAE) virus were determined using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) and transmission ...

  2. Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... Full Length Research Paper. Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells. Adebayo, I. A.1*, Awoniyi, T. A. M. 1 and Olaleye, O. D.2. 1Department of Animal Production and Health, Animal Parasitology and Microbiology Research Unit, Federal University of Technology, P M B 704, ...

  3. Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus: prevalence and risk factors in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabet, E; Hosri, C; Abi-Rizk, A

    2015-12-01

    An epidemiological survey, accompanied by a serological analysis,was conducted on samples taken from Lebanese goat herds in order to determine the prevalence of infection with the caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) in Lebanon. The results of the survey provided information on various livestock production, animal health and herd management factors. Serum samplesfrom 952 goats, including the local breeds (Baladi and Damascene) and imported breeds (Alpine and Saneen), were taken from 60 farms distributed throughout Lebanon and tested for the presence of anti-CAEV antibodies. The data obtained were analysed using a statistical model to assess CAEV infection risk factors in Lebanon. In total, 125 samples proved to be positive, representing a prevalence in selected individuals of 13.1% and in selected herds of 51.7%. The Bekaa region had the highest number of herds with seropositive goats (90% of herds); the level was lower in Mount Lebanon, the North and the South (54%, 34% and 33%, respectively). The prevalence in relation to the livestock production system was 70% in herds in intensive systems, 54% in semi-intensive systems and 45% in extensive systems. The indigenous breeds were more resistant and tolerant of CAEV than the imported breeds. This study confirms the presence of CAEV in Lebanese goat herds and identifies the different livestock production practices likely to favour the rapid spread of the virus.

  4. Pestivirus is a common contaminant in maedi-visna and caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckert, R A; Power, C A; Briscoe, M R

    1992-01-01

    Eight different laboratory stocks of maedi-visna or caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus were examined for the presence of pestiviruses by a fixed-cell immunoperoxidase assay with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. All of the viral stocks examined were found to contain noncytopathic pestivirus contaminants. The panel of monoclonal antibodies could not type the isolates as being more related to bovine virus diarrhea virus or border disease virus. However, the results did indicate that all isolates were not the same, except for two from the same laboratory where the source of pestivirus contamination may have been common. PMID:1335836

  5. [Caprine arthritis-encephalitis: trial of an adjuvant vaccine preparation. I. Clinical and virological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Vitu, C; Fontaine, J J; Vignoni, M

    1993-04-01

    In purpose to protect goats against caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), the first group of kids (I) was inoculated with purified, inactivated and adjuvant-treated virions, the second group (II) with adjuvant and the third one (III) with culture medium. 2-4 months later, the three groups were challenged with virulent CAEV by intraarticular route. On the clinical level, vaccinated and challenged kids show more early and severe arthritis than other groups. On the virological level, isolation of lentivirus from white blood cells and different organs is more important in group I than groups II and III. Therefore, vaccinations with inactivated and adjuvant-treated virions do not protect against a virulent challenge; there is an enhancement of lesions. We note that the adjuvant elicits a mild non-specific protection against virulent challenge.

  6. Use of serological diagnostic techniques in the control and eradication of caprine arthritis encephalitis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamili Maria Suhet Mussi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAE is a chronic disease caused by a small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV, which causes significant losses in goat breeding. The actual state of animal infection with SRLV is difficult to determine due to a complex pathogenesis of the virus, including factors such as delayed or intermittent seroconversion in serological tests. Several serological techniques are available for disease diagnosis, such as screening or confirmation tests, which are different in sensitivity and specificity. Regarding the choice of the test to be applied, availability of commercial immunoreagents, team training, antigen used, and cost of techniques must be considered. This review presents the serological methods available for use in different stages of CAE control and eradication programs, and management measures to be adopted in conjunction with serological diagnosis of the disease.

  7. Diagnosis of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus infection in dairy goats by ELISA, PCR and Viral Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneum, S; Rukkwamsuk, T

    2017-03-01

    For preventive and control strategies of Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV) infection in dairy goats, performance of the available diagnostic tests was described as one of the most important and necessary aspects. The study aimed at evaluating the diagnostic test performance, including PCR, ELISA and viral culture, for CAEV infection in dairy goats in Thailand. Blood samples of 29 dairy goats from five low- to medium-prevalence herds and one very low-prevalence herd were collected for PCR and ELISA methods. The performance of these two diagnostic methods was evaluated by comparing with cytopathic effects (CPE) in the co-cultivation of CAEV and primary synovial cells. Results indicated that sensitivity, specificity were, respectively, 69.6%, 100%, for PCR; and 95.7%, 83.3% for ELISA. The PCR assay tended to have lower sensitivity and higher specificity than ELISA. When multiple tests were applied, parallel testing provided sensitivity and specificity of 98.7% and 83.3%, while series testing showed sensitivity and specificity of 66.6% and 100% respectively. These results indicated that combination of ELISA and PCR provided some advantages and possibly offered optimal methods to detect CAEV-infected goats. Kappa value of the agreement between PCR and ELISA test was 0.34, indicating fair agreement. Regarding the possibility of antigenic variation between CAEV strains used in both PCR and ELISA assays, the actual circulating CAEV strain should be reviewed in order to develop and enhance the diagnostic tests using the CAE viral antigens derived from specific local strains of Thailand.

  8. Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus dysregulates the expression of cytokines in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, F; Machado, J; Bertoni, G; Seow, H F; Dobbelaere, D A; Peterhans, E

    1997-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is a lentivirus of goats that leads to chronic mononuclear infiltration of various tissues, in particular, the radiocarpal joints. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the major host cells of CAEV in vivo. We have shown that infection of cultured goat macrophages with CAEV results in an alteration of cytokine expression in vitro. Constitutive expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) was increased in infected macrophages, whereas transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) mRNA was down-regulated. When macrophages were infected with a CAEV clone lacking the trans-acting nuclear regulatory gene tat, IL-8 and MCP-1 were also increased. No significant differences from cells infected with the wild-type clone were observed, suggesting that Tat is not required for the increased expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 in infected macrophages. Furthermore, infection with CAEV led to an altered pattern of cytokine expression in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes plus gamma interferon, or fixed cells of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. In infected macrophages, tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-12 p40 mRNA expression was reduced in response to all stimuli tested whereas changes in expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor depended on the stimulating agent. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that, in contrast to effects of human immunodeficiency virus infection of macrophages, CAEV infection had no effect on the level of constitutive nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity or on the level of LPS-stimulated NF-kappaB activity, suggesting that NF-kappaB is not involved in altered regulation of cytokine expression in CAEV-infected cells. In contrast, activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding activity was decreased in infected macrophages. These data show that CAEV infection may result in a dysregulation of

  9. Blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocyte and monocyte/macrophage functions in naturally caprine arthritis encephalitis virus infection in dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruna Parapinski; Souza, Fernando Nogueira; Blagitz, Maiara Garcia; Batista, Camila Freitas; Bertagnon, Heloísa Godoi; Diniz, Soraia Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Haddad, João Paulo Amaral; Della Libera, Alice Maria Melville Paiva

    2017-06-01

    The exact influence of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection on blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) and monocyte/macrophages of goats remains unclear. Thus, the present study sought to explore the blood and milk PMNL and monocyte/macrophage functions in naturally CAEV-infected goats. The present study used 18 healthy Saanen goats that were segregated according to sera test outcomes into serologically CAEV negative (n=8; 14 halves) and positive (n=10; 14 halves) groups. All milk samples from mammary halves with milk bacteriologically positive outcomes, somatic cell count ≥2×10 6 cellsmL -1 , and abnormal secretions in the strip cup test were excluded. We evaluated the percentage of blood and milk PMNLs and monocyte/macrophages, the viability of PMNLs and monocyte/macrophages, the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the nonopsonized phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by flow cytometry. In the present study, a higher percentage of milk macrophages (CD14 + ) and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes undergoing late apoptosis or necrosis (Annexin-V + /Propidium iodide + ) was observed in CAEV-infected goats; we did not find any further alterations in blood and milk PMNL and monocyte/macrophage functions. Thus, regarding our results, the goats naturally infected with CAEV did not reveal pronounced dysfunctions in blood and milk polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a recombinase polymerase amplification lateral flow dipstick (RPA-LFD) for the field diagnosis of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Po-An; Shiu, Jia-Shian; Lee, Shu-Hwae; Pang, Victor Fei; Wang, De-Chi; Wang, Pei-Hwa

    2017-05-01

    Caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) in goats is a complex disease syndrome caused by a lentivirus. This persistent viral infection results in arthritis in adult goats and encephalitis in lambs. The prognosis for the encephalitic form is normally poor, and this form of the disease has caused substantial economic losses for goat farmers. Hence, a more efficient detection platform based on recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and a lateral flow dipstick (LFD) was developed in the present study for detecting the proviral DNA of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Under the optimal incubation conditions, specifically, 30min at 37°C for RPA followed by 5min at room temperature for LFD, the assay was found to be sensitive to a lower limit of 80pg of total DNA and 10 copies of plasmid DNA. Furthermore, there was no cross-reaction with other tested viruses, including goat pox virus and bovine leukemia virus. Given its simplicity and portability, this RPA-LFD protocol can serve as an alternative tool to ELISA for the primary screening of CAEV, one that is suitable for both laboratory and field application. When the RPA-LFD was applied in parallel with serological ELISA for the detection of CAEV in field samples, the RPA-LFD assay exhibited a higher sensitivity than the traditional method, and 82% of the 200 samples collected in Taiwan were found to be positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing evidence to support the use of an RPA-LFD assay as a specific and sensitive platform for detecting CAEV proviral DNA in goats in a faster manner, one that is also applicable for on-site utilization at farms and that should be useful in both eradication programs and epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Polytropic Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Promoter Isolated from Multiple Tissues from a Sheep with Multisystemic Lentivirus-Associated Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Murphy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV is a lentivirus that infects both goats and sheep and is closely related to maedi-visna virus that infects sheep; collectively, these viruses are known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV. Infection of goats and sheep with SRLV typically results in discrete inflammatory diseases which include arthritis, mastitis, pneumonia or encephalomyelitis. SRLV-infected animals concurrently demonstrating lentivirus-associated lesions in tissues of lung, mammary gland, joint synovium and the central nervous system are either very rare or have not been reported. Here we describe a novel CAEV promoter isolated from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease including interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, polyarthritis and leukomyelitis. A single, novel SRLV promoter was cloned and sequenced from five different anatomical locations (brain stem, spinal cord, lung, mammary gland and carpal joint synovium, all of which demonstrated lesions characteristic of lentivirus associated inflammation. This SRLV promoter isolate was found to be closely related to CAEV promoters isolated from goats in northern California and other parts of the world. The promoter was denoted CAEV-ovine-MS (multisystemic disease; the stability of the transcription factor binding sites within the U3 promoter sequence are discussed.

  12. Activation/proliferation and apoptosis of bystander goat lymphocytes induced by a macrophage-tropic chimeric caprine arthritis encephalitis virus expressing SIV Nef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzar, Baya Amel; Rea, Angela; Hoc-Villet, Stephanie; Garnier, Celine; Guiguen, Francois; Jin Yuhuai; Narayan, Opendra; Chebloune, Yahia

    2007-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is the natural lentivirus of goats, well known for its tropism for macrophages and its inability to cause infection in lymphocytes. The viral genome lacks nef, tat, vpu and vpx coding sequences. To test the hypothesis that when nef is expressed by the viral genome, the virus became toxic for lymphocytes during replication in macrophages, we inserted the SIVsmm PBj14 nef coding sequences into the genome of CAEV thereby generating CAEV-nef. This recombinant virus is not infectious for lymphocytes but is fully replication competent in goat macrophages in which it constitutively expresses the SIV Nef. We found that goat lymphocytes cocultured with CAEV-nef-infected macrophages became activated, showing increased expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). Activation correlated with increased proliferation of the cells. Interestingly, a dual effect in terms of apoptosis regulation was observed in exposed goat lymphocytes. Nef was found first to induce a protection of lymphocytes from apoptosis during the first few days following exposure to infected macrophages, but later it induced increased apoptosis in the activated lymphocytes. This new recombinant virus provides a model to study the functions of Nef in the context of infection of macrophages, but in absence of infection of T lymphocytes and brings new insights into the biological effects of Nef on lymphocytes

  13. Infecção experimental em cabritos pelo vírus da artrite encefalite Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus experimental infection in new-born kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I.M.C. Guedes

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Vinte e quatro caprinos de uma semana de idade, soronegativos pela imunodifusão em gel de agar para artrite encefalite caprina (AEC, foram utilizados para estudo de infecção experimental pelo vírus da AEC. Dezesseis animais foram inoculados com lentivirus caprino, amostra Cork, oito pela via intravenosa e oito por instilação nasal. Oito animais serviram como controle, inoculados pelas vias intranasal ou intravenosa com 1ml de meio de cultura de células não infectadas. Os animais foram sacrificados aos 2, 6, 12 e 20 dias pós-inoculação (PI, e colhidas amostras do sistema nervoso central, articulações, tonsilas, linfonodos, pulmões, rins, timo, baço e intestinos delgado e grosso para histopatologia e imunoistoquímica. Um animal inoculado com o vírus da AEC pela via intranasal e sacrificado aos 20 dias PI apresentou imunomarcação positiva em um macrófago alveolar. Concluiu-se que a via aerógena é uma provável rota de infecção pelo vírus da AEC.The caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV experimental infection was studied in 24 one-week-old seronegative kids. Sixteen kids were inoculated with CAEV-Cork, with 10(6 TCID50/ml concentration, being eight inoculated intravenously, and eight intranasally. Eight animals were used as controls, being four inoculated intravenously, and four intranasally with non-infected cell culture medium. Since the day of the inoculation, clinical evaluation was performed daily, until the day of the sacrifice. Blood samples were taken for serological tests. The animals were killed in pairs at 2, 6, 12 and 20 days post-inoculation (PI and tissues samples of central nervous system, joints, tonsils, lymphonodes, lungs, kidneys, thymus, spleen, small and large intestine were collected for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. One animal CAEV inoculated intranasally and killed at 20 days PI showed immunohistochemical positive reaction in an alveolar macrophage. It was concluded that

  14. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzel, Isidro; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-01-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain β-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding

  15. Goat uterine epithelial cells are susceptible to infection with Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus (CAEV in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Al Ahmad Mohamad Z

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine, using immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, whether CAEV is capable of infecting goat uterine epithelial cells in vivo. Five CAEV seropositive goats confirmed as infected using double nested polymerase chain reaction (dnPCR on leucocytes and on vaginal secretions were used as CAEV positive goats. Five CAEV-free goats were used as controls. Samples from the uterine horn were prepared for dnPCR, in situ hybridization, and immunofluorescence. The results from dnPCR confirmed the presence of CAEV proviral DNA in the uterine horn samples of infected goats whereas no CAEV proviral DNA was detected in samples taken from the uninfected control goats. The in situ hybridization probe was complementary to part of the CAEV gag gene and confirmed the presence of CAEV nucleic acids in uterine samples. The positively staining cells were seen concentrated in the mucosa of the lamina propria of uterine sections. Finally, laser confocal analysis of double p28/cytokeratin immunolabelled transverse sections of CAEV infected goat uterus, demonstrated that the virus was localized in glandular and epithelial cells. This study clearly demonstrates that goat uterine epithelial cells are susceptible to CAEV infection in vivo. This finding could help to further our understanding of the epidemiology of CAEV, and in particular the possibility of vertical transmission.

  16. Determination of antibodies to Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus in goats and sheep in some localities in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegdan Hassan Ali

    2016-09-01

    Results: The overall seroprevalence of CAE was 2.99% (n=11/368. Positive results were found only in 11 of foreign breed of goats (Cyprus shami collected from Gazira (39.29%; n=11/28. Statistically, there was an association between breed and location (P=0.001 and P=0.671, respectively. Conclusion: The CAE virus infection exists only in foreign goat breeds. Gazira state showed the highest seroprevalence as compared to other states considered in this study. Strict hygienic measures should be adopted to control the disease and to prevent its spread to local breeds. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(3.000: 259-262

  17. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis in a paediatric patient with septic arthritis using multiplexed diagnostic PCR targeting meningitis/encephalitis (ME).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Donnchadh

    2018-03-23

    Neisseria meningitidis is associated with meningitis and septicemia. Septic meningococcal arthritis is relatively uncommon and its diagnosis associated with clinical and microbiological challenges. Early recognition and treatment is required to prevent joint destruction.

  18. Encephalitis Lethargica

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a year after the illness. View Full Definition Treatment Treatment for encephalitis lethargica is symptomatic. Levodopa and other antiparkinson drugs often produce dramatic responses. × Treatment Treatment for encephalitis ...

  19. Seroprevalence of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia in Borana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Addis Ababa University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, PO ... conducted on contagious caprine pleuropneumonia in selected districts of Borana ..... A Text Book of the Disease of Cattle, Sheep, Pigs, Goats and Horses.

  20. Seroconversion and seroreactivity patterns of dairy goats naturally exposed to caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus in Brazil Soroconversão e sororeatividade de cabras leiteiras naturalmente expostas ao virus da artrite-encefalite caprina no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Soares Castro

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A labelled avidin-biotin ELISA (lab-ELISA using repeated serum samples of goats showed a progressive seroconversion with higher seroconversion rate at the period going from the beginning of the breeding up to the last half of lactation (35.0%, compared to that recorded at the beginning of breeding (17.8%(pForam realizados exames sorológicos em cabras leiteiras, utilizando-se ELISA marcado com avidina-biotina (LAB-ELISA. Esses exames mostraram soroconversão progressiva, com uma taxa maior entre os animais a partir do início da reprodução até a última metade da lactação (35% comparada à observada nos animais até o início da reprodução (17,8%(p<0,05. Além disso, o padrão de sororeatividade das amostras colhidas a cada 30-40 dias, durante 12 meses, avaliado pelo LAB-ELISA, foi caracterizado por alta variabilidade individual. Não foi observada sororeversão, e títulos mais altos foram obtidos mais no grupo constituído por animais que entraram em lactação (n=6, média de títulos=913,4 do que no grupo constituído por animais que cruzaram, mas não conceberam (n=4, média de títulos=261,2(p<0,01.

  1. Rasmussen's Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cognitive deficits, and problems with speech. In some cases, the disease can progress to involve the opposite brain hemisphere. Clinical Trials Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical ... Definition Rasmussen’s encephalitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory neurological ...

  2. Encephalitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... West Nile encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, and Western Equine encephalitis. Over the last several years in the ... lack of muscle control. Speech, physical, or occupational therapy may be needed in these cases. It's difficult ...

  3. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine, what should I do? What is Japanese encephalitis? Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially severe ... cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts ...

  4. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  5. Herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, J.S.; Camenga, D.L.; Glazier, M.C.; Coughlan, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Early institution of therapy with acyclovir is essential for the successful outcome in herpes simplex encephalitis. Brain biopsy remains the only conclusive means of establishing the diagnosis, but many fear possible biobsy complications. Thus, therapy is often instituted when the diagnosis is clinically suspected, even though cerebral computed tomography and other diagnostic studies may be inconclusive. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) has proven to be a sensitive tool for diagnosing presumptive herpes simplex encephalitis. This case presentation demonstrates the superiority of cerebral NMR over computerized tomography for detecting early temporal lobe changes consistent with acute herpes simplex encephalitis

  6. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 7, No 22 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affinity (tropism) of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus for brain cells · EMAIL FREE ... Sorghum stem yield and soluble carbohydrates under different salinity levels ... Establishment of a plant regeneration system from callus of Dendrobium cv.

  7. St. Louis Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Treatment Diagnosis Links & References Fact Sheet Other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes Chikungunya virus Dengue Eastern Equine Encephalitis ... Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

  8. Prevalence Of Caprine Strongyle Infection And The Diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of caprine strongyle infections and the diagnostic efficacy of some culture media in supporting the recovery of strongyle larvae were evaluated using 840 faecal sampes collected from goats during slaughter at Maiduguri Metropolitan abattoir. Faecal examination conducted by the modfied McMaster ...

  9. Binding properties of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-23

    Jul 23, 2014 ... The aim of the study was to illustrate the radio-receptor assay of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone (rcGH) ... interaction with microsomal membrane that shall be beneficial to study hormone receptor interactions of other Bovidae .... adding 1 ml of ice cold assay buffer, followed by 1 ml of 25% (w/v).

  10. Cross-Sectional Study on Contagious Caprine Pleuro Pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contagious caprine pleuro-pneumonia (CCPP) is an important, devastating disease of goats and sheep, caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae ( Mccp). In Uganda the disease occurs mainly in the Karamoja region and the surrounding districts. It is a devastating disease of goats, caused by ...

  11. Age Related Variations in The Architecture of Caprine Haemal Nodes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age related variations in the architecture of caprine haemal nodes were studied in West African dwarf goats aged between 1-24 months. Variations were observed in the thickness of the capsule, the content and organization of the cortical and medullary parenchyma as well as the stroma. In young goats age between 1-4 ...

  12. Sero-prevalence and associated risk factors of contagious Caprine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sero-prevalence and associated risk factors of contagious Caprine pleuropneumonia in goats in selected districts of bale zone pastoral area, south eastern Ethiopia. ... Multivariable logistic regression statistical analysis revealed that age category, flock size, newly introduced goats and accessibility to veterinary service ...

  13. Binding properties of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to illustrate the radio-receptor assay of beetal recombinant caprine growth hormone (rcGH). Tracer (125I-rcGH) was prepared by iodinating beetal rcGH with iodine-125 and its biological activity was analyzed by rabbit anti-rcGH antibodies. Liver microsomal membranes of the Bovidae species ...

  14. Determination of risk factors and level of awareness of caprine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Oju, goats are the major livestock kept and there is a well established goat market held every five days. This study was aimed at determining the risk factors associated with caprine brucellosis and assessing level of awareness amongst goat owners in Oju Local Government Area (LGA) of Benue State using a structured ...

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H.; Korinthenberg, R.; Fahrendorf, G.

    1987-07-01

    Clinical, CT and, in one case, autopsy findings indicated a diagnosis of a severe necrotising encephalitis in two patients. Although usually herpes simplex virus is blamed for this form of encephalitis, it was possible to prove in these two patients that mycoplasma was the causative agent of the disease. It is concluded that this organism can produce a serious disease in the central nervous system similar to that caused by herpes simplex.

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Korinthenberg, R.; Fahrendorf, G.; Muenster Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical, CT and, in one case, autopsy findings indicated a diagnosis of a severe necrotising encephalitis in two patients. Although usually herpes simplex virus is blamed for this form of encephalitis, it was possible to prove in these two patients that mycoplasma was the causative agent of the disease. It is concluded that this organism can produce a serious disease in the central nervous system similar to that caused by herpes simplex. (orig.) [de

  17. Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virus, Siberian tick-borne encephalitis virus, and Far eastern Tick-borne encephalitis virus (formerly known as Russian ... viruses are closely related to TBEV and Far-eastern TBE, and include Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus in ...

  18. Paraneoplastic brain stem encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaes, Franz

    2013-04-01

    Paraneoplastic brain stem encephalitis can occur as an isolated clinical syndrome or, more often, may be part of a more widespread encephalitis. Different antineuronal autoantibodies, such as anti-Hu, anti-Ri, and anti-Ma2 can be associated with the syndrome, and the most frequent tumors are lung and testicular cancer. Anti-Hu-associated brain stem encephalitis does not normally respond to immunotherapy; the syndrome may stabilize under tumor treatment. Brain stem encephalitis with anti-Ma2 often improves after immunotherapy and/or tumor therapy, whereas only a minority of anti-Ri positive patients respond to immunosuppressants or tumor treatment. The Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) in children, almost exclusively associated with neuroblastoma, shows a good response to steroids, ACTH, and rituximab, some patients do respond to intravenous immunoglobulins or cyclophosphamide. In adults, OMS is mainly associated with small cell lung cancer or gynecological tumors and only a small part of the patients show improvement after immunotherapy. Earlier diagnosis and treatment seem to be one major problem to improve the prognosis of both, paraneoplastic brain stem encephalitis, and OMS.

  19. CT scans in encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Iida, Noriyuki; Hisanaga, Manabu; Kinugawa, Kazuhiko

    1980-01-01

    Generally, CT scans reveal a decrease in the volume of the ventricular system, sylvian fissures and cortical sulci in the acute stage of encephalitis, and softening of the cerebral lobes with dilatation of the lateral ventricles and subarachnoidian dilated spaces in the chronic stage. We encountered three cases of encephalitis: mumps (case 1), herpes simplex (case 2), and syphilis (case 3). In case 1, brain edema was seen in the acute stage and brain atrophy in the chronic stage. In case 2, necrosis of the temporal pole, which is pathognomonic in herpes simplex encephalitis, was recognized. And in case 3, multiple lesions whose CT appearance was enhanced by contrast materials were found scattered over the whole brain. These lesions were diagnosed as inflammatory granuloma by histological examination. (author)

  20. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  1. Raccoon roundworm encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Pareen; Boyd, Zachary [University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Cully, Brent [University of Missouri, Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Raccoon roundworm encephalitis is a rare but devastating infection characterized by progressive neurological decline despite attempted therapy. Patients present with deteriorating neurological function, eosinophilia, and history of pica or geophagia resulting in ingestion of the parasite. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate nonspecific findings of progressive white matter inflammation and cortical atrophy. (orig.)

  2. Raccoon roundworm encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Pareen; Boyd, Zachary; Cully, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Raccoon roundworm encephalitis is a rare but devastating infection characterized by progressive neurological decline despite attempted therapy. Patients present with deteriorating neurological function, eosinophilia, and history of pica or geophagia resulting in ingestion of the parasite. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate nonspecific findings of progressive white matter inflammation and cortical atrophy. (orig.)

  3. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  4. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  5. Encephalitis in primary HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, M; Kirk, O

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of primary HIV encephalitis, which initially presented as acute psychosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was suggestive of vasculitis and multiple infarctions, whereas a brain biopsy after six weeks of symptoms showed HIV encephalitis with microglial nodules, but no signs...... of vasculitis. We review previous reported cases and radiological findings in HIV encephalitis and discuss the role of antiretroviral therapy and steroids in its management....

  6. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus capable of causing large outbreaks of encephalitis in humans and horses. In North America, EEEV infection has a very high mortality rate in humans, and survivors often suffer severe neurological sequelae. Interestingly, EEEV infections from South American isolates are generally subclinical. Although EEEV is divided into two antigenic varieties and four lineages, only eleven isolates have been sequenced and eight of these are from the North American variety (Lineage I). Most sequenced strains were collected from mosquitoes and only one human isolate has been sequenced. EEEV isolates exist from a variety of hosts, vectors, years, and geographical locations and efforts should focus on sequencing strains that represent this diversity.

  7. Moyamoya Disease Mimicking Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khalesi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a rare vaso-occlusive illness with an unknown etiology characterized by stenosis of the internal carotid arteries with spontaneous development of a collateral vascular network. A 15-month-old girl was referred to the emergency ward of Imam Reza Hospital due to decreased level of consciousness, focal seizures and fever during the previous 24 hours with an impression of encephalitis. Physical examination revealed left side hemiparesis; however brain CT-Scan did not show any significant lesions. Initial therapy with vancomycin, ceftriaxone and acyclovir was administered. CSF analysis did not show any abnormality and the blood as well as CSF cultures results were negative. Brain MRI showed hyperintensity at right frontal and parietal regions, suggesting vascular lesion. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA showed bilaterally multiple torsions in vessels at the basal ganglia consistent with moyamoya vessels. In all children exhibiting encephalitis, vascular events such as moyamoya disease should be considered. Brain MRI is a critical tool for this purpose. Common causes of encephalitis such as herpes simplex should also be ruled out.

  8. Multiphasic presentation of Rasmussen's encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avbersek, A.; Miserocchi, A.; McEvoy, A.W.; Patel, A.V.; Aronica, E.; Blumcke, I.; Jacques, T.S.; Acheson, J.; Thom, M.; Sisodiya, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder of unknown cause, characterised by drug-resistant focal epilepsy that may rarely present in adolescence or adulthood. We present a case of Rasmussen's encephalitis with prominent recurrent fluctuation in symptoms and well-documented

  9. [Herpetic encephalitis: a clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryhant, L P; Sereda, V H; Kushpiĭ, O V; Tkachenko, V V; Kravchuk, N A; Inhula, N I; Sizina, A V; Sachko, Iu Iu; Andrusenko, A S; Tytenko, Iu I; Babirad, A M

    2012-01-01

    An example of diagnostics and treatment of patient is in-process made with herpetic encephalitis. It is well-proven in researches, that a herpetic encephalitis is 11.5% among sharp encephalitises. Morbidity is sporadic, some researchers specify on an increase its spring. An infection can be passed tiny and pin a way. Seasonal vibrations are not incident to the herpetic encephalitis. Two peaks of morbidity are on 5-30 years and age more senior 50 years. More than in 95% cases the virus of simple herpes of type serves as an exciter of herpetic encephalitis 1. A characteristic triad of herpetic encephalitis is the sharp feverish beginning, development of cramps of dzheksonovskogo type and violation of consciousness, developing usually after a brief respirator infection. Sometimes sudden development of cramps and loss of consciousness is preceded a fever. Example of such development of disease is made an in our work.

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  11. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Code of Ethics Financials Annual Report Contact Us Privacy Policy Terms & Conditions Donate Press Store Blog Community Local Offices Kids Get Arthritis Too Español Arthritis Today Social Media Newsletters Sign Up for E-Newsletters Arthritis Foundation ...

  12. First isolation of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum, one of the causal agents of caprine contagious agalactia, on the island of Lanzarote (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fe, C; Gutiérrez, A; Poveda, J B; Assunção, P; Ramírez, A S; Fabelo, F

    2007-03-01

    During an unusually long period of bad weather, several outbreaks of caprine contagious agalactia (CCA) were reported in a number of flocks on the island of Lanzarote (Canary Islands, Spain). Clinical and subclinical mastitis in lactating goats and some cases of arthritis and pneumonia in kids were observed in the affected flocks. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum was isolated as the main causal agent of the outbreaks, associated with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides "large colony type" (Mmm LC) in two flocks. This is the first report of an isolation of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum on the island of Lanzarote. The finding is of epidemiological importance and could complicate plans to control the disease. The significance of this mycoplasma species in association with CCA must now be studied in detail.

  13. Atypical presentation of anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Maria Cristina; Mastrangelo, Greta; Skabar, Aldo; Ventura, Alessandro; Carrozzi, Marco; Santangelo, Giuseppe; Vanadia, Francesca; Corsello, Giovanni; Cimaz, Rolando

    2017-08-16

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by severe neurological and psychiatric symptoms and a difficult diagnosis. The disease is often secondary to a neoplastic lesion, seldom diagnosed years later. Psychiatric symptoms are prevalent in adults; neurologic symptoms are more evident in children, who typically present primarily with neurological symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, the association with juvenile idiopathic arthritis has not been described. We report the cases of two caucasian girls with an atypical presentation. The first patient was an 8-year-old girl with normal psychomotor development. Over a 4-month period she developed behavioral problems, speech impairment, and deterioration in academic skills. Within 8 months from the onset of symptoms, choreic movements gradually appeared. Hematological, neuroradiological, and neurophysiological examinations were negative; however, her symptoms worsened and treatment with prednisone was started. Although her choreic movements improved within 1 month, her neuropsychological and behavioral symptoms continued. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid and in blood were detected. Therapy with intravenously administered immunoglobulins was administered, without improvement of symptoms. After 2 months of steroid treatment, she suddenly started to pronounce some words with a progressive improvement in language and behavior. The second patient was a 14-year-old girl with classic anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, treated successfully with intravenously administered immunoglobulins and methylprednisolone, followed by orally administered prednisone, who developed chronic arthritis of the hip. The arthritis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and associated to antinuclear antigen antibody positivity. One year after the encephalitis presentation, an ovarian cystic mass was identified as a teratoma. The surgical resection

  14. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumpis, U; Crook, D; Oksi, J

    1999-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a zoonotic arbovirus infection endemic to Russia and Eastern and Central Europe. Despite being a common and serious life-threatening disease for which a mass vaccination program was implemented in Austria, there is only limited reference to this disease in the English-language literature. TBE is transmitted to humans usually by the bite of a tick (either Ixodes persulcatus or Ixodes ricinus); occasionally, cases occur following consumption of infected unpasteurized milk. Transmission is seasonal and occurs in spring and summer, particularly in rural areas favored by the vector. TBE is a serious cause of acute central nervous system disease, which may result in death or long-term neurological sequelae. Effective vaccines are available in a few countries. The risk for travelers of acquiring TBE is increasing with the recent rise in tourism to areas of endemicity during spring and summer.

  16. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  17. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  18. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  19. Prostate cancer may trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Zakharia, Elias Raja; Boysen, Anders Kindberg Fossø

    2013-01-01

    -Hu antibody test the patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to prostate cancer. The patient died within 6 months. We review the literature on prostate cancer-related paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. High-risk prostate cancer can trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis...

  20. Vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Karin Linda; Samuel, Miny; Wai, Kim Lay

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccination is recognized as the only practical measure for preventing Japanese encephalitis. Production shortage, costs, and issues of licensure impair vaccination programmes in many affected countries. Concerns over vaccine effectiveness and safety also have a negative impact...... on acceptance and uptake. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis in terms of effectiveness, adverse events, and immunogenicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: In March 2007, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1......), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOSIS, and reference lists. We also attempted to contact corresponding authors and vaccine companies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-RCTs, comparing Japanese encephalitis vaccines with placebo (inert agent or unrelated vaccine...

  1. MicroRNA-Mediated Myostatin Silencing in Caprine Fetal Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bushuai; Zhang, Yanli; Yan, Yibo; Wang, Ziyu; Ying, Shijia; Huang, Mingrui; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth by suppressing proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Dysfunction of the myostatin gene, either due to natural mutation or genetic manipulations such as knockout or knockdown, has been reported to increase muscle mass in mammalian species. RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) is a promising method for gene knockdown studies. In the present study, transient and stable silencing of the myostatin gene in caprine fetal fibroblasts (CFF) was evaluated using the two most effective constructs selected from four different miRNA expression constructs screened in 293FT cells. Using these two miRNA constructs, we achieved up to 84% silencing of myostatin mRNA in transiently transfected CFF cells and up to 31% silencing in stably transfected CFF cells. Moreover, off-target effects due to induction of interferon (IFN) response genes, such as interferon beta (IFN-β) and 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), were markedly fewer in stably transfected CFF cells than in transiently transfected cells. Stable expression of anti-myostatin miRNA with minimal induction of interferon shows great promise for increasing muscle mass in transgenic goats. PMID:25244645

  2. MicroRNA-mediated myostatin silencing in caprine fetal fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushuai Zhong

    Full Text Available Myostatin functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth by suppressing proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Dysfunction of the myostatin gene, either due to natural mutation or genetic manipulations such as knockout or knockdown, has been reported to increase muscle mass in mammalian species. RNA interference (RNAi mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs is a promising method for gene knockdown studies. In the present study, transient and stable silencing of the myostatin gene in caprine fetal fibroblasts (CFF was evaluated using the two most effective constructs selected from four different miRNA expression constructs screened in 293FT cells. Using these two miRNA constructs, we achieved up to 84% silencing of myostatin mRNA in transiently transfected CFF cells and up to 31% silencing in stably transfected CFF cells. Moreover, off-target effects due to induction of interferon (IFN response genes, such as interferon beta (IFN-β and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2, were markedly fewer in stably transfected CFF cells than in transiently transfected cells. Stable expression of anti-myostatin miRNA with minimal induction of interferon shows great promise for increasing muscle mass in transgenic goats.

  3. CT images of infantile viral encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Tateo; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Woo, Man

    1985-01-01

    Cranial CT scanning was undertaken in 40 patients with infantile viral encephalitis seen from 1977 to 1983. According to the pathogenic viruses, abnormal CT findings were detected most frequently in cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), followed by non-eruptive viral encephalitis, measles encephalitis, and rubella encephalitis in that order, which coincided well with neurological prognosis. Although CT findings lay within a normal range in cases of measles encephalitis, except a case in which cerebral ventricle was slightly dilated, the degree of consciousness disturbance was unfavorable and it persisted long. This revealed that there is no distinct correlation between the degree of consciousness disturbance and CT findings. Normal CT findings were detected in 13% of patients aged less than 5 years and 76.5% of patients aged 5 years or more. In many patients who had an attack of viral encephalitis at the age of 5 years or more, epileptic seizures occurred frequently, even though CT findings were normal. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Abortion in woman caused by caprine Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serovar 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, A; Thoma, R; Hilbe, M; Grest, P; Gebbers, J-O

    2002-02-09

    On a farm housing cattle and goats an abortion storm occurred affecting 50% of the goats during the lambing season 2000/2001. In one of three investigated caprine abortions Chlamydophila abortus could be identified as aetiology. During this time a pregnant woman (pregnancy week 19/20) had contact with aborting goats. She developed a severe generalized infection and aborted. The placenta contained Chlamydophila abortus shown by immunohistochemistry and PCR. The aim of the present case report is to alert medical doctors about the potential zoonotic risk of ovine/caprine abortions.

  5. Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Arthritis is often used to refer to any ... primary immunodeficiency syndrome March 11, 2013 Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease News Research Brief | January 9, 2017 Tofacitinib Shows ...

  6. Human Parechovirus and Neonatal Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical presentation, cranial ultrasound (cUS and MRi findings, and neurodevelopmental outcome of 10 neonates (70% term with human parechovirus (HPeV encephalitis are described by researchers at University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands; University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; and Universitaire de Quebec, Canada.

  7. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution.

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Program CDC-RFA-DP18-1803 NOFO FAQs Attachment 1 Attachment 2 Key Public Health Messages Policy Resources Partners ... mood and the ability to move. Classes take place at local Ys, parks, and community centers. These ...

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Firestein's Textbook of Rheumatology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 70. Garneau E. Rheumatoid arthritis. In: ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2018 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:1125-1128. June RR, Moreland LW. Rheumatoid ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... on this website. Copyright Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center © 2018 Patient Privacy Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  14. [Anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-08-01

    Anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis (or anti-Ma2 encephalitis) is a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) characterized by isolated or combined limbic, diencephalic, or brainstem dysfunction. Anti-Ma2 antibodies detected in the serum or cerebrospinal fluid of patients are highly specific for this disease entity and belong to a group of well-characterized onconeuronal antibodies (or classical antibodies). The corresponding antigen, Ma2 is selectively expressed intracellularly in neurons and tumors as is the case with other onconeuronal antigens targeted by classical antibodies. However, in most cases the clinical pictures are different from those of classical PNS and this creates a potential risk of underdiagnosis. Although limbic dysfunction is the most common manifestation in patients with anti-Ma2 encephalitis which is one of the major causes of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (LE), it has been reported that less than 30% of the patients with anti-Ma2 LE exhibit clinical presentations typical of the classical description of LE. Of the remaining, many exhibit excessive daytime sleepiness, vertical ophthalmoparesis, or both associated with LE, because of frequent involvement of the diencephalon and/or upper brainstem. Anti-Ma2 LE can also be manifested as a pure psychiatric disturbance such as obsessive-compulsive disorder in a few cases. Some patients develop mesodiencephalic encephalitis with minor involvement of the limbic system, and some may manifest severe hypokinesis. About 40% of the patients with anti-Ma2 antibodies also have antibodies against different epitopes on Ma1, a homologue of Ma2. These patients may have predominant cerebellar and/or brainstem dysfunctions due to more extensive involvement of subtentorial structures. Anti-Ma2 encephalitis is outstanding among other PNS associated with classical antibodies in that the response rate to treatment is relatively high. While it can cause severe neurological deficits or death in a substantial

  15. Chlamydia pecorum: fetal and placental lesions in sporadic caprine abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, Federico; Anderson, Mark; Miller, Myrna; Rowe, Joan; Sverlow, Karen; Vasquez, Marce; Cantón, Germán

    2016-03-01

    Chlamydial abortion in small ruminants is usually associated with Chlamydia abortus infection. Although Chlamydia pecorum has been detected in aborted ruminants and epidemiological data suggests that C. pecorum is abortigenic in these species, published descriptions of lesions in fetuses are lacking. This work describes fetoplacental lesions in a caprine abortion with C. pecorum infection, and further supports the abortigenic role of C. pecorum in ruminants. A 16-month-old Boer goat aborted twin fetuses at ~130 days of gestation. Both fetuses (A and B) and the placenta of fetus A were submitted for postmortem examination and diagnostic workup. At autopsy, the fetuses had moderate anasarca, intermuscular edema in the hindquarters (A), and brachygnathia and palatoschisis (B). In the placenta, the cotyledons were covered by yellow fibrinosuppurative exudate that extended into the adjacent intercotyledonary areas. Histologically, there was severe suppurative and necrotizing placentitis with vasculitis (arteriolitis) and thrombosis, multifocal lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic hepatitis (A), and fibrinosuppurative enteritis in both fetuses. Chlamydia antigen was detected in the placenta by the direct fluorescent antibody test and in fetal intestines by immunohistochemistry. Nested polymerase chain reaction of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of placenta and intestine amplified 400 bp of the Chlamydia 16S rRNA gene that was sequenced and found to be 99% identical to C. pecorum by BLAST analysis. Other known abortigenic infectious agents were ruled out by specific testing. It is concluded that C. pecorum infection is associated with fetoplacental lesions and sporadic abortion in goats. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  19. Proteomic study on the stability of proteins in bovine, camel, and caprine milk sera after processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Lina; Boeren, Sjef; Smits, Marcel; Hooijdonk, van Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    Milk proteins have been shown to be very sensitive to processing. This study aims to investigate the changes of the bovine, camel, and caprine milk proteins after freezing, pasteurization (62 °C, 30 min), and spray drying by proteomic techniques, filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) and

  20. Outbreak of caprine abortion by Toxoplasma gondii in Midwest Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Bravim Caldeira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of abortion by Toxoplasma gondii in goats on a farm in the Brazilian Midwest is reported. Gross lesions were not observed in seven aborted fetuses submitted to the Veterinary Pathology Laboratory, Federal University of Mato Grosso, for necropsy investigation. The main histologic lesions were mononuclear cell pneumonia and necrotizing encephalitis in varying degrees of intensity. PCR for Brucella abortus and Neospora caninum and aerobic cultures were negative in all cases. Antibody titles against T. gondii varying from 1:1024 to 1:32.768 were detected in serum samples from four aborted goats. Nested-PCR assay for T. gondii were positive in brain samples of all cases submitted. These findings indicate that T. gondii infection should be considered in the diagnosis of abortion in goats in Midwest Brazil.

  1. Gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi. (orig.)

  2. Incidence of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk using cultural method and the PCR assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Momtaz, Hassan; Behzadnia, Asma; Baghbadorani, Zeinab Torki

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk in Iran. Methods: From September 2010 to December 2011 a total of 260 bulk milk samples including 85 bovine, 37 camel, 34 water buffalo, 56 ovine and 48 caprine bulk milk samples were collected from commercial dairy herds, in Fars and Khuzestan provinces, Iran and were evaluated for the presence of Listeria species using cultural method and the PCR assay. R...

  3. Caprine Butchery and Bone Modification Templates: A step towards standardisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Popkin

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Widely accepted zooarchaeological procedure for recording butchery marks and other types of bone modification involves two processes: Drawing the bone showing the exact location and orientation of the modification and recording all of the information about the bone and its modification into an electronic database. No recording templates have ever been published, however, resulting in individual zooarchaeologists repeating the effort of developing their own templates or drawings for each bone in an assemblage showing a modification. Both of these tasks are time consuming and lead to inconsistencies in recording and quantification methods. To help alleviate this problem a series of caprine (sheep and goat bone templates have been created. These templates show every bone in a goat skeleton, apart from the skull, from six views at life-size when printed on A4 paper. They have intentionally been produced with a minimum of detail (without shading or stippling etc. so that the recorded butchery marks and bone modifications will be clearly visible. Because the skeletal morphology of sheep and goats is so similar these templates may be used interchangeably for either species. They may also be used for many other artiodactyl species such as cattle and deer as no scale has been indicated. The study of butchery marks and bone modification has the potential to provide zooarchaeologists with information about taphonomy, site formation processes, burial/ritual practices, human behaviour, ancient technologies and possibly ethnicity amongst other things, but only if the recording of these bone modifications is undertaken in a standardised fashion across the field. While much effort has been directed towards standardising the recognition and classification of various bone modifications, the recording of these modifications regularly occurs in various ways. Using standardised recording templates will save valuable time and help to alleviate problems of data

  4. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ...

  7. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin “Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2014” and “Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2014”. In 2014 in Poland 3488 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 61.3% of these were viral infections. In 2014, in comparison to 2013, a 1.1% increase in the number of cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis was observed and 91% with viral etiology.

  8. Arthritis in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Arthritis in America Time to Take Action! Language: English ( ... by about 40% by being physically active. Problem Arthritis is common and a growing health threat. Arthritis ...

  9. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Juvenile Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Juvenile Arthritis Juvenile arthritis is the term used to describe ...

  10. Juvenil idiopatisk arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-01-01

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis...

  11. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia M. Barnett; Nicole C. Roy; Warren C. McNabb; Adrian L. Cookson

    2016-01-01

    Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF) on barrier function of epithelial ce...

  12. Feasibility study on retinal vascular bypass surgery in isolated arterially perfused caprine eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Wu, W; Zhang, X; Fan, W; Shen, L

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of bypassing occluded segments of retinal venous main vessels in isolated, arterially perfused caprine eyes via the closed-sky vitrectomy approach using keratoprosthesis. Methods Isolated caprine eyes were used in this study. For each eye, the retinal vessel was perfused by Krebs solution via ophthalmic artery, and pars plana vitrectomy was performed using temporary keratoprosthesis. All retinal micro-vascular maneuvers were performed in a closed-sky eyeball. The main retinal vein was blocked by endodiathermy at the site of the vessel's first branching. Two openings, several millimeters apart, were created by vascular punctures in both the main vein and its branch vein wall straddling the induced occluded segment. Catheterization was achieved using a flexible polyimide tube, with each end inserted into the vessel wall opening. A sealed connection between the vessel and the tube was obtained by endodiathermy. Bypass of the occluded retinal vein segment was thus achieved, and the patency of this vascular bypass was confirmed by intravascular staining. Results Puncturing, catheterization, and endodiathermy were viable by closed-sky approach using keratoprosthesis. Bypassing of the occluded retinal main vein segment was accomplished with the combination of these maneuvers. Good results were obtained in 23 of 38 (60%) caprine eyes. Conclusions This study demonstrated that bypassing the occluded segment of retinal main vein can be successfully performed in a closed-sky eyeball model of isolated, arterially perfused caprine eye. This early work indicated that the more advanced retinal vascular bypass surgery in in vivo eye may be feasible in the future. PMID:21921946

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... know. Arthritis Foundation. http://www.arthritis.org/about-arthritis/types/rheumatoid-arthritis/articles/lung-disease-rheumatoid-arthritis.php. Accessed ...

  14. Paraneoplastic syndromes and autoimmune encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Titulaer, Maarten J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We review novel findings in paraneoplastic syndromes including the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, and then focus on the novel disorders associated with antibodies against cell surface antigens, discussing the importance and caveats of antibody testing, and providing an algorithm for interpretation of results. In anti-NMDAR encephalitis 2 novel findings include the recognition of a characteristic EEG pattern (“extreme delta brush”) in 30% of patients and the demonstration of a fronto-temporo-occipital gradient of glucose metabolism that correlates with disease activity. In limbic encephalitis, antibodies to GABA(B) receptor are the most frequently detected in patients with small-cell lung cancer who are anti-Hu negative, and antibodies to mGluR5 distinctively associate with Hodgkin lymphoma (Ophelia syndrome). We also address the syndromes associated with “VGKC-complex antibodies,” a problematic term that groups well-characterized immune-mediated disorders (LGI1, Caspr2) with others that lack syndrome specificity, are less responsive to treatment, and for which the target antigens are unknown. PMID:23634368

  15. [Limbic encephalitis with antibodies against intracellular antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akihiko; Kamei, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a paraneoplastic syndrome that is often associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), breast cancer, testicular tumors, teratoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and thymoma. The common clinical manifestations of limbic encephalitis are subacute onset, cognitive dysfunction, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are considered to occur because of cytotoxic T cell responses and antibodies against target neuronal proteins that are usually expressed by an underlying tumor. The main intracellular antigens related to limbic encephalitis are Hu, Ma2, and less frequently CV2/CRMP5 and amphiphysin. The anti-Hu antibody, which is involved in cerebellar degeneration and extensive or multifocal encephalomyelitis such as limbic encephalitis is closely associated with a history of smoking and SCLC. The anti-Ma2 antibody is associated with encephalitis of the limbic system, hypothalamus and brain-stem. For this reason, some patients with limbic encephalitis have sleep disorders (including REM sleep abnormalities), severe hypokinesis and gaze palsy in addition to limbic dysfunction. In men aged less than 50 years, anti-Ma2 antibody encephalitis is almost always associated with testicular germ-cell tumors that are occasionally difficult to detect. In older men and women, the most common tumors are non-SCLC and breast cancer. Limbic encephalitis associated with cell-surface antigens (e.g., voltage-gated potassium channels, NMDA receptors) is mediated by antibodies and often improves after a reduction in the antibody titer and after tumor resection. Patients with antibodies against intracellular antigens, except for those with anti-Ma2 antibodies and testicular tumors, are less responsive. Early diagnosis and treatment with immunotherapy, tumor resection or both are important for improving or stabilizing the condition of limbic encephalitis.

  16. Imaging of limbic para-neoplastic encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Sellat, F.; Morand, G.; Quoix, E.; Clouet, P.L.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare syndrome mostly associated with small cell lung cancer. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with selective amnesia suggesting limbic encephalitis. A neuroendocrine cell lung cancer was found, confirming the diagnostics of para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis. Contrast-enhanced cerebral CT was normal whether magnetic resonance imaging showed signal abnormalities of the medial part of temporal lobes and hippocampal regions. Because neurologic improvement may follow treatment of the primary tumor, early diagnosis is important. (authors)

  17. Radionuclide imaging in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlin, C.A.; Robinson, R.G.; Hinthorn, D.R.; Liu, C.

    1978-01-01

    Eight patients with herpes simplex encephalitis among the 10 cases diagnosed at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1966 to 1976 were studied with /sup 99m/Tc early in their diagnostic work-up. The images were unilaterally positive in the temporal lobe area in all 8 patients. Radionuclide studies can suggest herpes simplex as the specific etiology in cases of encephalitis and can also indicate the best site for brain biopsy to confirm the diagnosis by fluorescent antibody techniques. Appropriate antiviral therapy should be instituted as soon as possible to alter the course of this destructive form of viral encephalitis

  18. Detection and control of lentiviral infections in sheep and goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhof, J.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) of sheep (maedi visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus) are a serious economical threat to small ruminant farming particularly in the more intensive settings like dairy farms. Revenue is ultimately negatively

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary ...

  20. Psychiatric aspects of herpes simplex encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis and herpes zoster encephalitis among immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więdłocha, Magdalena; Marcinowicz, Piotr; Stańczykiewicz, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    The psychopathological symptoms occurring in the course of diseases associated with infections are often initially isolated and non-characteristic, and may cause diagnostic difficulties. Moreover, such disorders tend to be less responsive to psychiatric management. Among possible causes such as trauma, neoplasm and vascular changes, inflammatory changes of the brain as a result of a viral infection should also be considered. There were 452 registered cases of viral encephalitis in Poland in 2010, and although not very prevalent they remain a severe and life-threatening condition. What is more, the frequently occurring neurological and psychiatric complications of viral encephalitis often result in permanent disabilities, causing a significant decrease in the quality of life. This article presents the three types of encephalitis that are most prevalent among immunocompetent patients in Poland, i.e. herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and herpes zoster encephalitis (HZE). The psychopathology of the acute phase of the infection, the residual symptoms, features apparent in imaging studies and some neuropathological aspects are also presented. The paper also focuses on psychiatric aspects of the diagnostics and treatment of the described conditions. The clinical pictures of these infections are quite specific, although they cover a wide range of symptoms, and these characteristic features are described. The aim of this review is also to show the significance of thorough diagnostics and a multidisciplinary approach to patients with viral CNS infections.

  1. Rasmussen's encephalitis | Dawodu | Nigerian Journal of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complicated meningo.encephalitis and the third episode was associated with receptive aphasia, hemiparesis and intellectual impairment. Neuroimaging studies revealed cerebellar atrophy and infarction of territory of the middle cerebral artery.

  2. Natural course of LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Marton, Annamaria; Kover, Ferenc

    2014-01-01

    . Follow-up brain MRI indicated early hippocampal sclerosis and global brain atrophy in one case characterized by more pronounced cognitive deficit. Memory and verbal fluency were affected most during the natural course of LGI1 encephalitis. LGI1 encephalitis had a monophasic course and spontaneously...... improved, suggesting that a relatively benign natural course may contribute to the favorable outcome observed after immunotherapy. Our data also indicate that LGI1 antibodies can be present in the sera without clinical disease activity....

  3. Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bacteria such as Lyme disease , syphilis, and tuberculosis Parasites such as roundworms, cysticercosis , and toxoplasmosis in people with HIV/AIDS and other people who have a weakened immune system The effects of cancer Symptoms Some people may have symptoms of a ...

  4. Genetic study of Andalusia's ovine and caprine breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, E; Haba, M R; Rodero, A

    1997-01-12

    Two different breeds of Andalusian sheep, 'Grazalema Merino' and 'Lebrijan Churro', and two different breeds of Andalusian goats, 'Andalusian White' and 'Andalusian Black', chosen by previous studies (Rodero et al. 1992a) as priority breeds for conservation, were studied. The systems used corresponded to ethnozootechnic characteristics, as well as the different biochemical-polymorphism variables. Farms were differentiated within breeds, or between themselves, and different tests were used of genetic and genotypic frequencies: Wright's indices, medium heterozygosities, Whalund's variances, G test of probability of reason, etc. Also Cavalli-Sforza's genetic distance was obtained. In the Andalusian Black and Grazalema Merino breeds, the Whalund's variances obtained were a result of selection, that has divided the breeds into distinct populations differentiated spatially. Medium heterozygosities of each breed do not differ much within themselves, but when each system is considered alone, discrepancies between ethnic groups are relevant. Wright's F indices demonstrated in the Andalusian White and Grazalema Merino breeds, genetic heterozygosities between populations or studied herds can be deduced, but this is not possible in the Andalusian Black. The F(IS) values indicated, despite the small size of the populations, that inbreeding has been avoided, probably because of the entry of foreign sires. In none of the breeds is there a significant excess of heterozygosis. The genetic distances between flocks within breeds do not differ from those found between breeds. RÉSUMÉ: On a travallé avec, differents troupeau des races de montons de l'Andalusie, Grazalema Merino et Lebrija Churro, et avec les races caprines Andalusian White et Andalusian Black, choisie entre les races Andaluciennes comme prioritaires pour la conservation, dans un etudie avant (Rodero et col. 1992a). Les sistémes utilicés dans cette travaille correspondent á charactérés etnozootechniques et

  5. Relevance of Neuroinflammation and Encephalitis in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eKern

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many studies indicate that children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD diagnosis have brain pathology suggestive of ongoing neuroinflammation or encephalitis in different regions of their brains. Evidence of neuroinflammation or encephalitis in ASD includes: microglial and astrocytic activation, a unique and elevated proinflammatory profile of cytokines, and aberrant expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. A conservative estimate based on the research suggests that at least 69% of individuals with an ASD diagnosis have microglial activation or neuroinflammation. Encephalitis, which is defined as inflammation of the brain, is medical diagnosis code G04.90 in the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision; however, children with an ASD diagnosis are not generally assessed for a possible medical diagnosis of encephalitis. This is unfortunate because if a child with ASD has neuroinflammation, then treating the underlying brain inflammation could lead to improved outcomes. The purpose of this review of the literature is to examine the evidence of neuroinflammation/encephalitis in those with an ASD diagnosis and to address how a medical diagnosis of encephalitis, when appropriate, could benefit these children by driving more immediate and targeted treatments.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ...

  9. Comparison of Coxiella burnetii shedding in milk of dairy bovine, caprine, and ovine herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolakis, A; Berri, M; Héchard, C; Caudron, C; Souriau, A; Bodier, C C; Blanchard, B; Camuset, P; Devillechaise, P; Natorp, J C; Vadet, J P; Arricau-Bouvery, N

    2007-12-01

    The shedding of Coxiella burnetii in bovine, caprine, and ovine milk was measured using PCR, in 3 herds for each species, the bulk tank milk samples of which were positive at the time of their selection. Milk samples of 95 cows, 120 goats, and 90 ewes were sampled over 16 wk, as was the bulk tank milk. The shedding of C. burnetii in vaginal mucus and feces was checked at the beginning of the experiment and 2 mo later. The clinical signs in the selected herds as well as the duration and the shedding routes differed among the 3 species. The cows were asymptomatic and shed C. burnetii almost exclusively in milk. In one of the caprine herds, abortions due to C. burnetii were reported. The goats excreted the bacteria mainly in milk. In contrast, the ewes, which came from flocks with abortions due to Q fever (C. burnetii infection), shed the bacteria mostly in feces and in vaginal mucus. This could explain why human outbreaks of Q fever are more often related to ovine flocks than to bovine herds. These excretions did not seem more frequent when the samples were taken close to parturition. The samples were taken from 0 to 421 d after parturition in bovine herds and from 5 to 119 d and 11 to 238 d after parturition in the caprine and ovine herds, respectively. The shedding in milk was sometimes intermittent, and several animals shed the bacteria but were negative by ELISA: 80% of the ewes were seronegative, underscoring the lack of sensitivity of the ELISA tests available for veterinary diagnosis. The detection of antibodies in milk seems more sensitive than it is in serum.

  10. Expression of angiotensin II receptors in the caprine ovary and improvement of follicular viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, J B; Lima-Verde, I B; Celestino, J J H; Lima, L F; Matos, M H T; Faustino, L R; Donato, M A M; Peixoto, C A; Campello, C C; Silva, J R V; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate mRNA levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors (AGTR1 and AGTR2) in caprine follicles and to investigate the influence of ANG II on the viability and in vitro growth of preantral follicles. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to quantify AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA levels in the different follicular stages. For culture, caprine ovaries were collected, cut into 13 fragments and then either directly fixed for histological and ultrastructural analysis (fresh control) or placed in culture for 1 or 7 days in α-minumum essential medium plus (α-MEM+) with 0, 1, 5, 10, 50 or 100 ng/ml ANG II. Then, the fragments were destined to morphological, viability and ultrastructural analysis. The results showed that primordial follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA than secondary follicles. Granulosa/theca cells from antral follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 mRNA than their respective cumulus-oocyte complex (COCs). After 7 days of culture, ANG II (10 or 50 ng/ml) maintained the percentages of normal follicles compared with α-MEM+. Fluorescence and ultrastructural microscopy confirmed follicular integrity in ANG II (10 ng/ml). In conclusion, a high expression of AGTR1 and AGTR2 is observed in primordial follicles. Granulosa/theca cells from antral follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 mRNA. Finally, 10 ng/ml ANG II maintained the viability of caprine preantral follicles after in vitro culture.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  12. Rare case of acute dengue encephalitis with correlated MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Hegde, Pavan; Devdas, Jaidev M.; Khan, Habeeb Ullah; Bukelo, Mario Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Dengue encephalitis is extremely rare, with most patients showing no significant abnormality on neuroimaging (CT/MRI). We report one of the very few documented cases of dengue encephalitis, with abnormal signal intensities on all major sequences on brain MRI.

  13. Complexes of lutein with bovine and caprine caseins and their impact on lutein chemical stability in emulsion systems: Effect of arabinogalactan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Gutierrez, A; Attaie, R; Núñez de González, M T; Jung, Y; Woldesenbet, S; Marquez, S A

    2018-01-01

    Lutein is an important xanthophyll carotenoid with many benefits to human health. Factors affecting the application of lutein as a functional ingredient in low-fat dairy-like beverages (pH 6.0-7.0) are not well understood. The interactions of bovine and caprine caseins with hydrophobic lutein were studied using UV/visible spectroscopy as well as fluorescence. Our studies confirmed that the aqueous solubility of lutein is improved after binding with bovine and caprine caseins. The rates of lutein solubilization by the binding to bovine and caprine caseins were as follows: caprine α S1 -II-casein 34%, caprine α S1 -I-casein 10%, and bovine casein 7% at 100 μM lutein. Fluorescence of the protein was quenched on binding supporting complex formation. The fluorescence experiments showed that the binding involves tryptophan residues and some nonspecific interactions. Scatchard plots of lutein binding to the caseins demonstrated competitive binding between the caseins and their sites of interaction with lutein. Competition experiments suggest that caprine α S1 -II casein will bind a larger number of lutein molecules with higher affinity than other caseins. The chemical stability of lutein was largely dependent on casein type and significant increases occurred in the chemical stability of lutein with the following pattern: caprine α S1 -II-casein > caprine α S1 -I-casein > bovine casein. Addition of arabinogalactan to lutein-enriched emulsions increases the chemical stability of lutein-casein complexes during storage under accelerated photo-oxidation conditions at 25°C. Therefore, caprine α S1 -II-casein alone and in combination with arabinogalactan can have important applications in the beverage industry as carrier of this xanthophyll carotenoid (lutein). Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adult-onset Rasmussen encephalitis associated with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenbichler, Katharina; Lelotte, Julie; Lhommel, Renaud; Tahry, Riëm El; Vrielynck, Pascal; Santos, Susana Ferrao

    2017-12-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis is a rare, devastating condition, typically presenting in childhood. Cases of adult-onset Rasmussen have also been described, but the clinical picture is less defined, rendering final diagnosis difficult. We present a case of adult-onset Rasmussen encephalitis with dual pathology, associated with focal cortical dysplasia and encephalitis. We interpreted the Rasmussen encephalitis to be caused by severe and continuous epileptic activity due to focal cortical dysplasia. The best therapeutic approach for such cases remains unclear.

  15. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kari L.; Kay, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The ‘expensive-tissue hypothesis’ (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans. PMID:21831898

  16. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kari L; Kay, Richard F

    2012-02-22

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The 'expensive-tissue hypothesis' (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans.

  17. PD-1 Checkpoint Inhibitor Associated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Schneider

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report first-hand narrative experience of autoimmune encephalitis and to briefly review currently available evidence of autoimmune encephalitis in cancer patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Setting: A case study is presented on the management of a patient who developed autoimmune encephalitis during nivolumab monotherapy occurring after 28 weeks on anti-PD-1 monotherapy (nivolumab 3 mg/kg every 2 weeks for non-small cell lung cancer. Results: No substantial improvement was observed by antiepileptic treatment. After administration of 80 mg methylprednisolone, neurologic symptoms disappeared within 24 h and the patient fully recovered. Conclusions: Immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment can lead to autoimmune encephalitis. Clinical trial data indicate a frequency of autoimmune encephalitis of ≥0.1 to <1% with a higher probability during combined or sequential anti-CTLA-4/anti-PD-1 therapy than during anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 monotherapy. Further collection of evidence and translational research is warranted.

  18. Children and encephalitis lethargica: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilensky, Joel A; Foley, Paul; Gilman, Sid

    2007-08-01

    Between 1917 and the late 1920s, encephalitis lethargica was an epidemic and often lethal neurologic disease. In adults, it typically elicited severe somatic effects, and in particular, various forms of cranial nerve and motor dysfunction. In children, the psychiatric effects were often as severe as the physical consequences. Approximately one third of affected children underwent a rapid transformation from normal behavior to delinquency, often leading to institutionalization. Many neurologic and psychological theories were advanced to explain these severe behavioral changes, and the therapeutic approaches employed ranged from training in dedicated schools to frontal leucotomy. Whereas epidemiologic associations provide both positive and negative support for an etiologic relationship between encephalitis lethargica and the approximately contemporaneous "Spanish" influenza epidemic, previously unutilized data from children provide some of the strongest links between influenza and encephalitis lethargica. Encephalitis lethargica triggered behavioral changes in children that are not duplicated by any other neurologic condition, with the possible exception of traumatic brain injury. These unique behavioral abnormalities may provide the earliest clear indication of new encephalitis lethargica cases, whether alone or in concert with an influenza epidemic.

  19. Putaminal involvement in Rasmussen encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, Bhagavatheeswaran; Ashalatha, Radhakrishnan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2006-08-15

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare devastating disease of childhood causing progressive neurological deficits and intractable seizures, typically affecting one hemisphere. Characteristic MRI features include progressive unihemispheric focal cortical atrophy and grey- or white-matter high-signal changes and basal ganglion involvement, particularly of the caudate nucleus. To analyse the pattern of involvement of different brain structures in a series of patients with RE and to attempt clinical correlation. We reviewed the medical records and neuroimaging data of 12 patients diagnosed with RE satisfying the European Consensus Statement diagnostic criteria. The disease manifested as seizures in all patients and was refractory; epilepsia partialis continua was a notable feature (nine patients). Hemiparesis of varying grades was noted in all but one patient; none had extrapyramidal signs. Neuroimaging showed cortical involvement in the insular/periinsular regions in 11 patients. Caudate atrophy was noted in ten patients. Putaminal atrophy was seen in nine patients, six of whom had additional hyperintense signal changes. Our study highlights frequent putaminal atrophy and signal changes in RE, which suggests a more extensive basal ganglion involvement than emphasized previously. Recognition of putaminal changes may be a useful additional tool in the radiological diagnosis of RE. (orig.)

  20. Putaminal involvement in Rasmussen encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, Bhagavatheeswaran; Ashalatha, Radhakrishnan; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy

    2006-01-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare devastating disease of childhood causing progressive neurological deficits and intractable seizures, typically affecting one hemisphere. Characteristic MRI features include progressive unihemispheric focal cortical atrophy and grey- or white-matter high-signal changes and basal ganglion involvement, particularly of the caudate nucleus. To analyse the pattern of involvement of different brain structures in a series of patients with RE and to attempt clinical correlation. We reviewed the medical records and neuroimaging data of 12 patients diagnosed with RE satisfying the European Consensus Statement diagnostic criteria. The disease manifested as seizures in all patients and was refractory; epilepsia partialis continua was a notable feature (nine patients). Hemiparesis of varying grades was noted in all but one patient; none had extrapyramidal signs. Neuroimaging showed cortical involvement in the insular/periinsular regions in 11 patients. Caudate atrophy was noted in ten patients. Putaminal atrophy was seen in nine patients, six of whom had additional hyperintense signal changes. Our study highlights frequent putaminal atrophy and signal changes in RE, which suggests a more extensive basal ganglion involvement than emphasized previously. Recognition of putaminal changes may be a useful additional tool in the radiological diagnosis of RE. (orig.)

  1. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  3. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  4. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  5. Comparison of Staphylococcus aureus genotypes recovered from cases of bovine, ovine, and caprine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørk, T; Tollersrud, T; Kvitle, B; Jørgensen, H J; Waage, S

    2005-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in domestic ruminants. The main objective of this study was to determine the similarity of epidemiologically unrelated S. aureus isolates from bovine, ovine, and caprine mastitis. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, 160 different pulsotypes (PTs) were identified among 905 isolates recovered from 588 herds in 12 counties in Norway. Based on estimates of similarity, using an 80% cluster cutoff, the isolates were assigned to 47 clusters. One cluster included 62% of all the isolates and more than 45% of the isolates from each host species. Twenty-three PTs included isolates from more than one host species; these 23 PTs represented 72% of all the isolates. The six most prevalent PTs included isolates from all host species and contained 45% of the bovine isolates, 54% of the ovine isolates, and 37% of the caprine isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 373 of the isolates revealed resistance to penicillin in 2.9% and to streptomycin in 2.4%; only 1.9% were resistant to 1 of the other 11 antimicrobials tested. The results of this study suggest that a small number of closely related genotypes are responsible for a great proportion of S. aureus mastitis cases in cows, ewes, and goats in Norway and that these genotypes exhibit little or no host preference among these species. Selection due to antimicrobial resistance appears not to have contributed to the predominance of these genotypes.

  6. Study of caprine bones after moist and dry heat processes by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Caroline M.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Souza, Sheila M.F.M de

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissue is a biological material composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and collagen matrix. The bone X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern presents characteristics of the hydroxyapatite crystallography planes. This paper presents the characterization by X-ray diffraction of caprine bone powder pattern and the comparison of this pattern with moist or dry heat cooked bone patterns. The parameters chosen to characterize the X-ray diffraction peaks were: angular position (2θ), full width at half maximumt (FWHM), and relative intensity (I rel ). The X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained with a Shimadzu XRD-6000 diffractometer. The caprine bone XRD pattern revealed a significant correlation of several crystallographic parameters (lattice data) with hydroxyapatite. The profiles of the three bone types analyzed presented differences. The study showed as small angular displacement (decrease of the 2θ angle) of some peaks was observed after moist and dry heat cooking processes. The characterization of bone tissue aimed to contribute to future analysis in the field of archeology. (author)

  7. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of caprine muscle with high and low meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Manshun; Wei, Yanchao; Li, Xin; Quek, Siew Young; Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Huazhen; Zhang, Dequan; Liu, Yongfeng

    2018-07-01

    During the conversion of muscle to meat, protein phosphorylation can regulate various biological processes that have important effects on meat quality. To investigate the phosphorylation pattern of protein on rigor mortis, goat longissimus thoracis and external intercostals were classified into two groups (high quality and low quality), and meat quality was evaluated according to meat quality attributes (Warner-Bratzler shear force, Color, pH and drip loss). A quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic study was conducted to analyze the caprine muscle at 12h postmortem applying the TiO 2 -SIMAC-HILIC (TiSH) phosphopeptide enrichment strategy. A total of 2125 phosphopeptides were identified from 750 phosphoproteins. Among them, 96 proteins had differed in phosphorylation levels. The majority of these proteins are involved in glucose metabolism and muscle contraction. The differential phosphorylation level of proteins (PFK, MYL2 and HSP27) in two groups may be the crucial factors of regulating muscle rigor mortis. This study provides a comprehensive view for the phosphorylation status of caprine muscle at rigor mortis, it also gives a better understanding of the regulation of protein phosphorylation on various biological processes that affect the final meat quality attributes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Study of caprine bones after moist and dry heat processes by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Caroline M., E-mail: carolmattosb@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Arqueologia Brasileira (IAB), Belford Roxo, RJ (Brazil); Azeredo, Soraia R.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: soraia@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/LIN/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Souza, Sheila M.F.M de, E-mail: sferraz@ensp.fiocruz.br [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (ENSP/FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola Nacional de Saude Publica Sergio Arouca

    2013-07-01

    Bone tissue is a biological material composed of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and collagen matrix. The bone X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern presents characteristics of the hydroxyapatite crystallography planes. This paper presents the characterization by X-ray diffraction of caprine bone powder pattern and the comparison of this pattern with moist or dry heat cooked bone patterns. The parameters chosen to characterize the X-ray diffraction peaks were: angular position (2θ), full width at half maximumt (FWHM), and relative intensity (I{sub rel}). The X-ray diffraction patterns were obtained with a Shimadzu XRD-6000 diffractometer. The caprine bone XRD pattern revealed a significant correlation of several crystallographic parameters (lattice data) with hydroxyapatite. The profiles of the three bone types analyzed presented differences. The study showed as small angular displacement (decrease of the 2θ angle) of some peaks was observed after moist and dry heat cooking processes. The characterization of bone tissue aimed to contribute to future analysis in the field of archeology. (author)

  9. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: a common cause of encephalitis in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueping; Li, Jin-Mei; Liu, Fan; Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Dong; Lai, Xiaohui

    2016-12-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) is the most common type of immune-mediated encephalitis. This study aimed to assess the incidence and mortality of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in intensive care unit (ICU) to evaluate the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, managements and outcomes, and to compare these characteristics with patients with non-anti-NMDAR encephalitis admitted to ICU. Patients admitted to the neurological ICU with suspected encephalitis were included between January 1, 2012 and July 31, 2015. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of enrolled patients was screened for anti-NMDAR antibodies using a cell-based assay. 72 critically ill patients with encephalitis of uncertain etiology were investigated, and 16 patients were positive for anti-NMDAR antibodies in CSF. Compared to patients with non-anti-NMDAR encephalitis, patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were younger, more likely to present with the psychiatric symptoms, dyskinesia, and autonomic dysfunction, and had longer ICU stays. The abnormal movements were so difficult to control that complicated the management. The outcome was favorable in ten patients 1 year after the disease onset, and the mortality was as high as 25 % overall. The incidence of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is high among critically ill patients with encephalitis of uncertain etiology. Controlling dyskinesia proved to be a challenge. Persistent dysautonomias were additional difficult to manage confounders. Same points being highlighted in this study may aid clinicians in the management of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in intensive care practice.

  10. In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    be used to identify and characterize CD4+T cells specific for influenza A, West Nile, Yellow fever , Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis viruses. The...four difference species of Flavivirus using the TGEM approach. These will include: Yellow Fever Virus, West Nile Virus, Dengue Virus and Japanese...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0004 TITLE: In-Depth Analysis of Citrulline-Specific CD4 T-Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  11. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  12. [Autoimmune encephalitis: possibilities in the laboratory investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böröcz, Katalin; Hayden, Zsófia; Mészáros, Viktória; Csizmadia, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Kornélia; Kellermayer, Zoltán; Balogh, Péter; Nagy, Ferenc; Berki, Tímea

    2018-01-01

    The role of autoimmune responses against central nervous system (CNS) antigens in encephalitis presenting with non-classified neurologic or psychiatric symptoms has been appreciated in the past decade. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis has a poor prognosis and is most commonly associated with lung, ovarium, and testicular neoplasms, leading to immune reactions against intracellular antigens (anti-Hu/ANNA1, anti-Ri/ANNA2, anti-CV2/CRMP5 and anti-Ma2/Ta). In contrast, the recently described autoimmune encephalitis subtypes present with a broad spectrum of symptoms, respond to autoimmune therapies well and usually associate with autoantibodies against neuronal cell surface receptors (NMDAR, GABA B R, AMPAR) or synaptic proteins (LGI1, CASPR2). Our aim is to bring to awareness the increasing number of autoimmune encephalitis patients requiring neurologic, psychiatric and intensive care and to emphasize the significance of detecting various autoantibodies in diagnosing patients. In the past 6 years, our laboratory received 836 autoimmune encephalitis diagnostic test requests from a total of 717 patients. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were analysed with indirect immunofluorescence using a BIOCHIP consisting of cell lines transfected with 6 different receptor proteins. IgG autoantibodies against receptor proteins were present in 7.5% of patients. The frequency of positive samples was the following: NMDAR > LGI1 > GABA B R > CASPR2. Detecting autoantibodies facilitates the diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis in an early stage. Patients diagnosed early can be effectively treated with plasmapheresis and immunosuppressive drugs. The efficiency of therapies can be monitored by autoantibody detection. Therefore, the diagnostic immune laboratory plays an important role in proper diagnosis and in the prevention of rapidly progressing symptoms. Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(3): 107-112.

  13. Mycotic encephalitis: predilection for grey matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaap, M.S. van der; Valk, J.; Jansen, G.H.; Kapelle, L.J.; Nieuwenhuizen, O. van

    1993-01-01

    In mycotic infections of the brain three patterns of abnormality may be observed: meningitis, granuloma, and encephalitis. The first two, consisting of diffuse meningeal enhancement and mass lesion respectively, can easily be visualised by CT or MRI, but are nonspecific. The third pattern has been described histopathologically; as the clinical picture is nonspecific and the diagnosis is often unsuspected, especially in immunocompetent patients, acquaintance with the characteristic CT and MRI patterns of mycotic encephalitis may help in establishing the correct diagnosis, with important therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  14. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. O'Rourke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and discuss the literature on this topic.

  15. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, D.J.; Bergin, A.; Rotenberg, A.; Peters, J.; Gorman, M.; Poduri, A.; Cryan, J.; Lidov, H.; Madsen, J.; Harini, C.

    2014-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and discuss the literature on this topic. PMID:25667877

  16. MRI in tick-borne encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkadhi, H.; Kollias, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus gives rise to epidemic encephalitis. Mild forms usually manifest as influenza-like episodes or are clinically silent. MRI is usually normal in TBE. We describe severe TBE in a patient who presented with fever and altered mental status after a tick bite and a specific antibody response to TBE. MRI revealed pronounced signal abnormalities in the basal ganglia and thalamus, without contrast enhancement. These findings coincide well with neuropathological studies of severe nerve cell degeneration with inflammatory cell infiltrates, neuronophagia and reactive astrocytosis in the deep grey matter. We review the literature and discuss the relevant differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. Mycotic encephalitis: predilection for grey matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, M.S. van der (Dept. of Child Neurology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Valk, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Jansen, G.H. (Dept. of Pathology, Subdivision of Neuropathology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Kapelle, L.J. (Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)); Nieuwenhuizen, O. van (Dept. of Child Neurology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1993-10-01

    In mycotic infections of the brain three patterns of abnormality may be observed: meningitis, granuloma, and encephalitis. The first two, consisting of diffuse meningeal enhancement and mass lesion respectively, can easily be visualised by CT or MRI, but are nonspecific. The third pattern has been described histopathologically; as the clinical picture is nonspecific and the diagnosis is often unsuspected, especially in immunocompetent patients, acquaintance with the characteristic CT and MRI patterns of mycotic encephalitis may help in establishing the correct diagnosis, with important therapeutic consequences. (orig.)

  18. Intracerebral hematoma complicating herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sainz, Aida; Escalza-Cortina, Inés; Guio-Carrión, Laura; Matute-Nieves, Alexandra; Gómez-Beldarrain, Marian; Carbayo-Lozano, Guillermo; Garcia-Monco, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    To describe two patients who developed an intracranial hematoma as a complication of temporal lobe encephalitis due to herpes simplex type 1 virus, and to review the literature. The first patient, a 45-year-old woman developed a brain hematoma in the location of the encephalitic lesion on day 9 after the onset of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) that required surgical evacuation. The second patient, a 53-year-old woman was being treated for HSE; on day 8 after admission a temporal lobe hematoma with midline shift was disclosed due to persistent headache. Both patients survived but were left with sequelae. We conducted a PubMed/MEDLINE search from 1986 to April 2013 on this topic. We have found 20 additional cases reported in the literature and review their characteristics. Hemorrhage was present on admission in 35% of pooled patients, and consistently involved the area of encephalitis. Clinical presentation of intracranial hemorrhage overlapped the encephalitic symptoms in two-thirds of the patients. Half of patients underwent surgery. Overall, mortality rate was low (5.2%), and half of patients fully recovered. Intracranial bleeding, although infrequent, can complicate the evolution of herpes simplex encephalitis and should be borne in mind since its presence may require neurosurgery. Although its presentation may overlap the encephalitic features, the lack of improvement or the worsening of initial symptoms, particularly during the second week of admission, should lead to this suspicion and to perform a neuroimaging study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Viral encephalitis virus, a new bioterrorist menace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaudeau, Sophie; Micol, Romain; Bricaire, François; Bossi, Philippe

    2005-01-29

    Often responsible for little known infections, today viral encephalitis viruses appear as a new bioterrorist menace, because of their easy production and their great pathogenic potential. Spraying is the best way to permit the rapid diffusion of certain encephalitis viruses. Diagnosis of viral encephalitis, predominating in tropical surroundings, is difficult. In the majority of cases, symptoms differ little from those of common flu. With supplementary examinations, the biological abnormalities are usually non-specific. There are no characteristic images on scans or MRI. Identification of the virus in the nasopharynx, blood or cerebrospinal fluid, in serology, PCR or RT-PCR permits confirmation of the virus. Treatment is essentially symptomatic and relies on appropriate reanimation measures. Ribavirin can be indicated in some cases such as the Rift Valley fever, but is formally contraindicated in West Nile encephalitis. The aim of terrorist groups who would use this type of weapon is more to provoke panic and disorganisation than to kill as many people as possible.

  20. Joint determination of biological encephalization, economic specialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horan, R.D.; Shogren, J.F.; Bulte, E.H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a paleoeconomic model of the co-evolution of economic specialization and encephalization-the common physiological measure of intelligence as reflected by brain mass relative to total body mass. Our economic analysis links ecological and social intelligence theories of

  1. Japanese encephalitis virus: from genome to infectome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Unni, S. K.; Růžek, Daniel; Chhatbar, C.; Mishra, R.; Johri, M. K.; Singh, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2011), 312-321 ISSN 1286-4579 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Japanese encephalitis * Neurotropic infection * Neuropathogenesis * Mosquito borne infections * Arboviral infections Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.101, year: 2011

  2. Activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk of different somatic cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Kelly, A L; Caroprese, M; Marino, R; Sevi, A

    2015-11-01

    Individual caprine milk with different somatic cell counts (SCC) were studied with the aim of investigating the percentage distribution of leukocyte cell types and the activities of indigenous proteolytic enzymes; proteolysis of casein was also studied in relation to cell type following recovery from milk. The experiment was conducted on 5 intensively managed dairy flocks of Garganica goats; on the basis of SCC, the experimental groups were denoted low (L-SCC; 1,501,000 cells/mL) SCC. Leukocyte distribution differed between groups; polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes were higher in M-SCC and H-SCC milk samples, the percentage macrophages was the highest in H-SCC, and levels of nonviable cells significantly decreased with increasing SCC. Activities of all the main proteolytic enzymes were affected by SCC; plasmin activity was the highest in H-SCC milk and the lowest in L-SCC, and elastase and cathepsin D activities were the highest in M-SCC. Somatic cell count influenced casein hydrolysis patterns, with less intact α- and β-casein in H-SCC milk. Higher levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides were detected in sodium caseinate incubated with leukocytes isolated from L-SCC milk, independent of cell type, whereas among cells recovered from M-SCC milk, macrophages yielded the highest levels of low electrophoretic mobility peptides from sodium caseinate. The level of high electrophoretic mobility peptides was higher in sodium caseinate incubated with polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes and macrophages isolated from M-SCC, whereas the same fraction of peptides was always the highest, independent of leukocyte type, for cells recovered from H-SCC milk. In caprine milk, a level of 700,000 cells/mL represented the threshold for changes in leukocyte distribution, which is presumably related to the immune status of the mammary gland. Differences in the profile of indigenous lysosomal proteolytic enzymes in caprine milk may influence the integrity of casein

  3. [Rasmussen encephalitis and non-herpetic acute limbic encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Kubota, Yuko; Yamasaki, Etsuko; Matsuda, Kazumi

    2008-03-01

    Rasmussen syndrome (RS) and non-herpetic acute limbic encephalitis (NHALE) have pathophysiological background related with autoimmunity to glutamate receptors (GluRs) after infections. RS and NHALE were reviewed, depending mainly on our recent studies. RS is the prototype of autoimmune-mediated epilepsy. In patients with RS, several kinds of autoantibodies against neuronal molecules, for example, GluR3, GluRepsilon2 (NMDA-R2B), etc., are reported. These autoantibodies are not specific for RS. About autoantibodies against GluR3, significance and stimulating effects to GluR3 are controversial. Autoantibodies against GluRepsilon2 were detected in all patients within six months from epilepsy onset, and in some patients at chronic stage. These data suggest that autoantibodies against GluRepsilon2 may be involved in the pathological mechanisms in the early stage, but we could not confirm the effect of the autoantibodies from RS patients on excitatory postsynaptic NMDA current using patch clump methods. However, anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies in patients with SLE are reported to cross-react with n-terminal of GluRepsilon2, and cause neuronal apoptosis in rat hippocampus, ensuing memory impairment, and emotional behavior impairment in mice. Therefore, autoantibodies against GluRepsilon2 may contribute to the cognitive and behavioral changes in RS. Concerning about cellular immunity in RS, lymphocytes stimulating tests revealed peripheral lymphocytes sensitized by antigens containing GluRepsilon2. Cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) excreting Granzyme B were reported in resected brain tissue, and we confirmed the elevated levels of Granzyme B, not in sera, but in CSF. These data suggest that CTLs activated by infection invade into CNS, and recognize neural antigens, and excrete Granzyme B. The incidence of NHALE is 4.1/1 million/year in Japanese adults. Our study in 91 adult patients with NHALE revealed the following characteristics. Mean onset age was 35.2 +/- 16.9 years old

  4. Medicines, injections, and supplements for arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthritis - medications; Arthritis - steroid injections; Arthritis - supplements; Arthritis - hyaluronic acid ... the-counter pain relievers can help with your arthritis symptoms. "Over-the-counter" means you can buy ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition arthritis, rheumatoid RA Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  13. Caprine brucellosis: A historically neglected disease with significant impact on public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Gamboa, Angela M.; Maurizio, Estefanía

    2017-01-01

    Caprine brucellosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by the gram-negative cocci-bacillus Brucella melitensis. Middle- to late-term abortion, stillbirths, and the delivery of weak offspring are the characteristic clinical signs of the disease that is associated with an extensive negative impact in a flock’s productivity. B. melitensis is also the most virulent Brucella species for humans, responsible for a severely debilitating and disabling illness that results in high morbidity with intermittent fever, chills, sweats, weakness, myalgia, abortion, osteoarticular complications, endocarditis, depression, anorexia, and low mortality. Historical observations indicate that goats have been the hosts of B. melitensis for centuries; but around 1905, the Greek physician Themistokles Zammit was able to build the epidemiological link between “Malta fever” and the consumption of goat milk. While the disease has been successfully managed in most industrialized countries, it remains a significant burden on goat and human health in the Mediterranean region, the Middle East, Central and Southeast Asia (including India and China), sub-Saharan Africa, and certain areas in Latin America, where approximately 3.5 billion people live at risk. In this review, we describe a historical evolution of the disease, highlight the current worldwide distribution, and estimate (by simple formula) the approximate costs of brucellosis outbreaks to meat- and milk-producing farms and the economic losses associated with the disease in humans. Successful control leading to eradication of caprine brucellosis in the developing world will require a coordinated Global One Health approach involving active involvement of human and animal health efforts to enhance public health and improve livestock productivity. PMID:28817647

  14. Degradation of spent craft brewer's yeast by caprine rumen hyper ammonia-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, B E; Bryant, R W; Cohen, S D; O'Connell, S P; Flythe, M D

    2016-10-01

    Spent yeast from craft beers often includes more hops (Humulus lupulus L.) secondary metabolites than traditional recipes. These compounds include α- and β- acids, which are antimicrobial to the rumen hyper ammonia-producing bacteria (HAB) that are major contributors to amino acid degradation. The objective was to determine if the hops acids in spent craft brewer's yeast (CY; ~ 3·5 mg g(-1) hops acids) would protect it from degradation by caprine rumen bacteria and HAB when compared to a baker's yeast (BY; no hops acids). Cell suspensions were prepared by harvesting rumen fluid from fistulated goats, straining and differential centrifugation. The cells were re-suspended in media with BY or CY. After 24 h (39°C), HAB were enumerated and ammonia was measured. Fewer HAB and less ammonia was produced from CY than from BY. Pure culture experiments were conducted with Peptostreptococcus anaerobiusBG1 (caprine HAB). Ammonia production by BG1 from BY was greater than from CY. Ammonia production was greater when exogenous amino acids were included, but similar inhibition was observed in CY treatments. These results indicate that rumen micro-organisms deaminated the amino acids in CY to a lesser degree than BY. Spent brewer's yeast has long been included in ruminant diets as a protein supplement. However, modern craft beers often include more hops (Humulus lupulus L.) than traditional recipes. These compounds include α- and β- acids, which are antimicrobial to the rumen hyper ammonia-producing bacteria (HAB) that are major contributors to amino acid degradation. This study demonstrated that hops acids in spent craft brewer's yeast protected protein from destruction by HABin vitro. These results suggest that the spent yeast from craft breweries, a source of beneficial hops secondary metabolites, could have value as rumen-protected protein. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Molecular dating of caprines using ancient DNA sequences of Myotragus balearicus, an extinct endemic Balearic mammal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcover Josep Antoni

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotragus balearicus was an endemic bovid from the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean that became extinct around 6,000-4,000 years ago. The Myotragus evolutionary lineage became isolated in the islands most probably at the end of the Messinian crisis, when the desiccation of the Mediterranean ended, in a geological date established at 5.35 Mya. Thus, the sequences of Myotragus could be very valuable for calibrating the mammalian mitochondrial DNA clock and, in particular, the tree of the Caprinae subfamily, to which Myotragus belongs. Results We have retrieved the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (1,143 base pairs, plus fragments of the mitochondrial 12S gene and the nuclear 28S rDNA multi-copy gene from a well preserved Myotragus subfossil bone. The best resolved phylogenetic trees, obtained with the cytochrome b gene, placed Myotragus in a position basal to the Ovis group. Using the calibration provided by the isolation of Balearic Islands, we calculated that the initial radiation of caprines can be dated at 6.2 ± 0.4 Mya. In addition, alpine and southern chamois, considered until recently the same species, split around 1.6 ± 0.3 Mya, indicating that the two chamois species have been separated much longer than previously thought. Conclusion Since there are almost no extant endemic mammals in Mediterranean islands, the sequence of the extinct Balearic endemic Myotragus has been crucial for allowing us to use the Messinian crisis calibration point for dating the caprines phylogenetic tree.

  16. Diagnostic potential of low molecular weight excretory secretory proteins of Paramphistomum epiclitum for caprine amphistomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Shanker, Daya; Sudan, Vikrant; Singh, Amit

    2018-06-15

    In the present study, the 75% alcoholic fractionation of excretory-secretory (ES) antigen isolated from 200 to 300 live P. epiclitum was assessed for its diagnostic potential for the detection of caprine amphistomosis by using antibody detection enzyme immunoassay. Prior to enzyme immunoassay, 75% alcoholic fractionation of excretory-secretory (ES) antigen was subjected to SDS- PAGE and western blot analysis for the presence of immunoreactive polypeptides. SDS-PAGE analysis of ES antigen resolved a total 7 polypeptides bands of size 56, 27, 25, 22.5, 12, 11 and 10 kDa. Western blot analysis revealed only two immunoreactive polypeptides (11 kDa and 12 kDa) when polypeptides resolved in SDS-PAGE were probed with known positive pooled serum. None of the polypeptides showed reactions with pooled known negative serum. The working dilutions of antigen, sera and conjugates were determined by checkerboard titration for employing ELISA and cut-off O.D. was calculated 0.616 by using the mean absorbance value of 11 negative kid sera. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA was found to be 100% and 86.76%, respectively. As per kappa value estimation, the strength of agreement was found to be good. Antibodies to 75% alcoholic fractionation of ES antigen was detected in 20% goats (n = 160) of either sex, although faecal examination detected 10.6% goats to be infected with amphistomosis. The study confirmed that 75% alcoholic fractionation of ES antigen of P. epiclitum based ELISA had good value for serodiagnosis of caprine amphistomosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have ... and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  19. OUTCOMES OF TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS IN THE TOMSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Pinegina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study outcomes of tick-borne encephalitis in adults in the Tomsk Region. Patients conducted a comprehensive clinical and laboratory examination. Revealed the prevalence of autonomic disorders in individuals who have had at different periods of tick-borne encephalitis, which is regarded as the effects of tick-borne infection. Residual effects of tick-borne encephalitis occurs mainly in the form of light paresis after suffering a focal forms. Among the chronic (progredient forms of tick-borne encephalitis often formed hyperkinetic options. Most of the study revealed the presence of precipitating factors that could have an influence on the outcome. Fundamental diffe rences in all-clinical and immunological analyses at patients with various outcomes of tick-borne encephalitis it wasn't noted. KEY WORDS: tick-borne encephalitis, Tomsk Region, the outcomes.

  20. Japanese encephalitis in a French traveler to Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, S; Lagier, J-C; Charrel, R; Quérat, G; Vanhomwegen, J; Desprès, P; Pelletier, J; Kaphan, E

    2014-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis is frequent in Asia, with a severe prognosis, but rare in travelers. Culex mosquitoes transmit Japanese encephalitis virus. Risk factors are destination, duration of stay, summer and fall seasons, outdoor activities, and type of accommodation. We report the case of a French traveler to Nepal with neutralization-based serological confirmed Japanese encephalitis. He presented classical clinical (viral syndrome before an encephalitis status with behavioral disorder, global hypotonia, mutism, movement disorders, seizure, and coma), radiological (lesions of thalami, cortico-spinal tracts, and brainstem) and biological features (lymphocytic meningitis). Nowadays, the presence of Japanese encephalitis virus in Nepal, including mountain areas, is established but Japanese encephalitis remains rare in travelers returning from this area and neurologist physicians need to become familiar with this. We recommend vaccination for travelers spending a long period of time in Nepal and having at-risk outdoor activities.

  1. Incidence of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk using cultural method and the PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Rahimi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk in Iran. Methods: From September 2010 to December 2011 a total of 260 bulk milk samples including 85 bovine, 37 camel, 34 water buffalo, 56 ovine and 48 caprine bulk milk samples were collected from commercial dairy herds, in Fars and Khuzestan provinces, Iran and were evaluated for the presence of Listeria species using cultural method and the PCR assay. Results: Using cultural method, 19 samples (7.3% were positive for Listeria spp. The highest prevalence of Listeria was found in raw water buffalo milk (11.8%, followed by raw bovine milk (10.6%, raw ovine milk (7.1%, and raw caprine milk (4.2% samples. All 37 camel milk samples from 20 camel breeding farms were negative for Listeria spp. The overall prevalence of Listeria was 7.3%, in which Listeria innocua was the most recovered species (4.2%; the remaining isolates were Listeria monocytogenes (1.9%, Listeria ivanovii (0.08% and Listeria seeligari (0.04%. The PCR assay could identify 8 Listeria-contaminated milk samples that were negative using the cultural method. Conclusions: The results presented in this study indicate the potential risk of infection with Listeria in people consuming raw and unpasteurized milk.

  2. Sequence diversity of the leukotoxin (lktA) gene in caprine and ovine strains of Mannheimia haemolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vougidou, C; Sandalakis, V; Psaroulaki, A; Petridou, E; Ekateriniadou, L

    2013-04-20

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the aetiological agent of pneumonic pasteurellosis in small ruminants. The primary virulence factor of the bacterium is a leukotoxin (LktA), which induces apoptosis in susceptible cells via mitochondrial targeting. It has been previously shown that certain lktA alleles are associated either with cattle or sheep. The objective of the present study was to investigate lktA sequence variation among ovine and caprine M haemolytica strains isolated from pneumonic lungs, revealing any potential adaptation for the caprine host, for which there is no available data. Furthermore, we investigated amino acid variation in the N-terminal part of the sequences and its effect on targeting mitochondria. Data analysis showed that the prevalent caprine genotype differed at a single non-synonymous site from a previously described uncommon bovine allele, whereas the ovine sequences represented new, distinct alleles. N-terminal sequence differences did not affect the mitochondrial targeting ability of the isolates; interestingly enough in one case, mitochondrial matrix targeting was indicated rather than membrane association, suggesting an alternative LktA trafficking pattern.

  3. Acute encephalitis associated with measles: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.Y.; Cho, W.H.; Kim, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, 760-1 Sanggye-7 dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139707 (Korea); Kim, H.D. [Department of Paediatrics, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, 760-1 Sanggye-7 dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139707 (Korea); Kim, I.O. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110744 (Korea)

    2003-02-01

    We document the MRI features in six patients aged 5-14 years with acute encephalitis following measles. The diagnosis was made on a characteristic morbiliform rash and detection of specific IgM and IgG antibodies. The symptoms of encephalitis occurred 1-11 days after the appearance of the rash. All patients underwent MRI within 1-4 days of the onset of neurological symptoms. Diffusion weighted images (DWI) were obtained in three patients. In all patients, T2-weighted images showed widely distributed, multifocal high signal in both cerebral hemispheres with swelling of the cortex, with bilateral, symmetrical involvement of the putamen and caudate nucleus. The lesions had showed low apparent diffusion coefficients. Three patients showed subacute gyriform haemorrhage, and asymmetrical gyriform contrast enhancement on follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  4. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  5. Sarcocystis neurona encephalitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, A J; Barr, B; Rejmanek, D

    2007-11-01

    A 1.5-year-old male Feist dog was presented to a veterinarian for reluctance to stand on the hind legs. Treatment included dexamethasone and resulted in a favorable initial response, but posterior paresis returned and progressed to recumbency, hyperesthesia, and attempts to bite the owner. The dog was euthanized. The brain was negative for rabies by fluorescent antibody analysis. Multiple foci of encephalitis were found in the cerebrum and particularly in the cerebellum. Protozoa morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis sp. were identified at sites of intense inflammation and malacia. Additionally, multiple schizonts were identified in areas without inflammation. Immunohistochemistry using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for Sarcocystis neurona was strongly positive. No reaction to polyclonal antisera for Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum was found. Polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the protozoa were S. neurona. Additional aberrant hosts for S. neurona other than horses have been identified, but S. neurona encephalitis has not been documented previously in the dog.

  6. Brain biopsy for diagnosis of chlamydia encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Voznyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the case of encephalitis associated with chlamydia infection of central nervous system. The diagnostic protocol of the patient included: a careful observation of somatic and neurological status, laboratory tests of blood and cerebrospinal fluid, neurovisualization. The results of the diagnostic protocol suggest that laboratory tests blood and cerebrospinal fluid possess low sensitivity and specificity. The MRI study has revealed the localization and inflammatory character of the changes in brain tissue; it has also helped to choose the most favorable area for the stereotaxic biopsy. The obtained tissue was evaluated by means of light (immunohistochemistry and electronic microscopy. The active chlamydia infection was estimated. The subsequent antibacterial etiotropic therapy resulted in the regression of the neurologic symptoms and remission.The intravitalpathomorphology study of the brain could be recommended for the management of the severe encephalitis of the unknown origin. 

  7. Early maternal death due to acute encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maternal death in an unmarried woman poses a medico-legal challenge. A 24-year-old unmarried schoolteacher, residing at a boarding place, had been admitted to hospital in a state of cardiac arrest. At the autopsy, mild to moderate congestion of subarachnoid vessels and oedema of the brain was noted. An un-interfered foetus of 15 weeks with an intact sac and placental tissues were seen. Genital tract injuries were not present. Histopathological examination showed diffuse perivascular cuffing by mononuclear cells suggestive of viral encephalitis, considering the circumstances of death and the social stigma of pregnancy in this unmarried teacher, the possibility of attempted suicide by ingestion of a poison was considered. Abrus precatorius (olinda seeds commonly found in the area is known to produce acute encephalitis as well as haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and pulmonary congestion was also considered as a possible cause for this unusual presentation

  8. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis: neuroradiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struffert, T.; Reith, W.

    2000-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE) is the most frequent viral encephalitis, as a rule with the starting point and centre within the temporal lobe. If untreated, HSE is usually fatal, thus diagnosis has to be established rapidly. Treatment with Acyclovir should begin as soon possible. As MRI is extremely sensitive in detecting the early inflammatory changes, it should be initially performed, especially as in the early stadium CT may be unspecific. We recommend the following examination protocol: coronar T1-weighted MR imaging before and after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine, coronar FLAIR sequence and axial T2-weighted imaging. The diagnostic proof is to show the evidence of viral DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cerebrospinal liquor. (orig.) [de

  9. Herpes simplex encephalitis with thalamic, brainstem and cerebellar involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Meenal; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Udwadia Hegde, Anaita

    2018-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis is a common and treatable cause of acute encephalitis in all age groups. Certain radiological features such as temporal parenchymal involvement facilitate the diagnosis. The use of herpes simplex virus polymerase chain reaction has expanded the clinical and imaging spectrum. We report the case of a young patient who presented with a movement disorder and predominant involvement of thalami, brainstem and cerebellum on magnetic resonance imaging, and was diagnosed with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. Differentiation from Japanese encephalitis may be difficult in these patients, especially in endemic areas, and may necessitate the use of relevant investigations in all patients.

  10. Serial CT scannings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, M.; Sawada, T.; Kuriyama, Y.; Kinugawa, H.; Yamaguchi, T. (National Cardivascular Center, Osaka (Japan))

    1981-10-01

    Two patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were studied by serial CT scannings. Case 1, a 60-year-old woman, was admitted to National Cardiovascular Center because of headache, fever, and attacks of Jacksonian seizure. Case 2, a 54-year-old man, was admitted because of fever, consciousness disturbance and right hemiparesis. Pleocytosis (mainly lymphocytes) and elevation of protein content in cerebrospinal fluid were observed in both cases. Both patients presented ''das apallische Syndrom'' one month after admission. The diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was confirmed by typical clinical courses and by greater than fourfold rises in serum antibody titer for herpes simplex virus as well as that in cerebrospinal fluid in case 1. Characteristic CT findings observed in these two cases were summarized as follows: Within a week after the onset, no obvious abnormalities could be detected on CT scans (Case 1). Two weeks after the onset, a large low-density area appeared in the left temporal lobe and in the contralateral insular cortex with midline shift toward the right side (Case 2). One month later, an ill-defined linear and ring-like high-density area (Case 1), or a well-defined high-density area (Case 2), that was enhanced after contrast administration, was observed in the large low-density area in the temporal lobe. These findings were considered as characteristic for hemorrhagic encephalitis. These high-density areas disappeared two months later, however, widespread and intensified low-density areas still remained. In both cases, the basal ganglia and thalamus were completely spared on CT scans. From these observations, it can be concluded that serial CT scannings are quite useful for diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis.

  11. Serial CT scannings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Masashi; Sawada, Tohru; Kuriyama, Yoshihiro; Kinugawa, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    1981-01-01

    Two patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were studied by serial CT scannings. Case 1, a 60-year-old woman, was admitted to National Cardiovascular Center because of headache, fever, and attacks of Jacksonian seizure. Case 2, a 54-year-old man, was admitted because of fever, consciousness disturbance and right hemipare sis. Pleocytosis (mainly lymphocytes) and elevation of protein content in cerebrospinal fluid were observed in both cases. Both patients presented ''das apallische Syndrom'' one month after admission. The diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis was confirmed by typical clinical courses and by greater than fourfold rises in serum antibody titer for herpes simplex virus as well as that in cerebrospinal fluid in case 1. Characteristic CT findings observed in these two cases were summarized as follows: Within a week after the onset, no obvious abnormalities could be detected on CT scans (Case 1). Two weeks after the onset, a large low-density area appeared in the left temporal lobe and in the contralateral insular cortex with midline shift toward the right side (Case 2). One month later, an ill-defined linear and ring-like high-density area (Case 1), or a well-defined high-density area (Case 2), that was enhanced after contrast administration, was observed in the large low-density area in the temporal lobe. These findings were considered as characteristic for hemorrhagic encephalitis. These high-density areas disappeared two months later, however, widespread and intensified low-density areas still remained. In both cases, the basal ganglia and thalamus were completely spared on CT scans. From these observations, it can be concluded that serial CT scannings are quite useful for diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. (author)

  12. Computed tomography of herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Backmund, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Psychiatrie, Muenchen

    1984-01-01

    Referring to 9 patients of our own material we report on the pattern of distribution and the development of CT-changes in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Our cases include the outstanding findings of a primarily hemorrhagic HSE and an extensive calcification at the residual stage on the borderline of widespread tissue necrosis on a baby. With respect to literature we receive a quite homogenous picture, reflecting the crucial characteristics of the disease as known from neuropathology. (orig.) [de

  13. [VGKC antibodies associated with limbic encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, B M; Urbach, H; Elger, C E; Bien, C G; Beyenburg, S

    2005-06-01

    Since the initial description of limbic encephalitis (LE) in 1960/1968, several subforms of this clinico-neuropathological syndrome have been identified. The best known is paraneoplastic LE. However, non-paraneoplastic forms have been reported, too. Very recently, autoantibodies against voltage-gated potassium channels have been described in association with LE. The diagnostic workup of such a case and the apparently typical good response to long-term immunotherapy of this LE subform are described.

  14. [Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Malignant Tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis consists of limbic symptoms and signs associated with antibodies against neuronal cell-surface antigens or intracellular antigens. Some cases are known to be associated with anti-channel or anti-receptor-related molecule antibodies. Whether these cases are paraneoplastic depends on the kinds of antigens that the antibodies are produced against. Other cases due to well-characterized onco-neural antibodies are almost always paraneoplastic and are generally resistant to anti-tumor therapy and/or immunotherapy. An exception is anti-Ma2 antibody-positive encephalitis associated with a testicular tumor. Antibodies for intracellular antigens are considered not to be pathogenic. Rather, the T-cell response is thought to be responsible. These antibodies are useful markers for the diagnosis of paraneoplastic disorders and in the search for underlying cancer, as neurological symptoms often precede tumor diagnosis. There is a relationship among onco-neural antibodies, clinical features, tumor types, and response to immunotherapy. Here we describe the characteristics of autoimmune encephalitis cases with antibodies against different intracellular antigens, such as Hu, Ma2, CRMP5, or amphiphysin.

  15. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  16. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lift your mood and make you feel more positive. Learn about physical activity for people with arthritis and CDC-recommended physical ... Top of Page 6. How does being overweight affect arthritis? It’s ... physical activity and diet changes can help you lose weight. ...

  17. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, a mimicker of acute infectious encephalitis and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis has become an increasingly recognized etiology of acute psychosis in young patients. The diverse constellation of symptoms allows for misdiagnosis as an infectious, psychological, or toxicological entity resulting in delays in treatment with increasing morbidity. We describe a case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis that was a particular challenge to diagnose. Practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion for anti-NMDAR and related neuroautoimmune syndromes, especially in young patients that present with acute mental status decline or dyskinesia.

  18. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  19. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Barut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of unknown aetiology in childhood and predominantly presents with peripheral arthritis. The disease is divided into several subgroups, according to demographic characteristics, clinical features, treatment modalities and disease prognosis. Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is one of the most frequent disease subtypes, is characterized by recurrent fever and rash. Oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, common among young female patients, is usually accompanied by anti-nuclear antibodie positivity and anterior uveitis. Seropositive polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an analogue of adult rheumatoid arthritis, is seen in less than 10% of paediatric patients. Seronegative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, an entity more specific for childhood, appears with widespread large- and small-joint involvement. Enthesitis-related arthritis is a separate disease subtype, characterized by enthesitis and asymmetric lower-extremity arthritis. This disease subtype represents the childhood form of adult spondyloarthropathies, with human leukocyte antigen-B27 positivity and uveitis but commonly without axial skeleton involvement. Juvenile psoriatic arthritis is characterized by a psoriatic rash, accompanied by arthritis, nail pitting and dactylitis. Disease complications can vary from growth retardation and osteoporosis secondary to treatment and disease activity, to life-threatening macrophage activation syndrome with multi-organ insufficiency. With the advent of new therapeutics over the past 15 years, there has been a marked improvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis treatment and long-term outcome, without any sequelae. The treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients involves teamwork, including an experienced paediatric rheumatologist, an ophthalmologist, an orthopaedist, a paediatric psychiatrist and a physiotherapist. The primary goals

  20. Identification and profiling of microRNAs and their target genes from developing caprine skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Wang

    Full Text Available Goat is an important agricultural animal for meat production. Functional studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in various biological processes. Although studies on miRNAs expression profiles have been performed in various animals, relatively limited information about goat muscle miRNAs has been reported. To investigate the miRNAs involved in regulating different periods of skeletal muscle development, we herein performed a comprehensive research for expression profiles of caprine miRNAs during two developmental stages of skeletal muscles: fetal stage and six month-old stage. As a result, 15,627,457 and 15,593,721 clean reads were obtained from the fetal goat library (FC and the six month old goat library (SMC, respectively. 464 known miRNAs and 83 novel miRNA candidates were identified. Furthermore, by comparing the miRNA profile, 336 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and then the potential targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted. To understand the regulatory network of miRNAs during muscle development, the mRNA expression profiles for the two development stages were characterized and 7322 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified. Then the potential targets of miRNAs were compared to the DEGs, the intersection of the two gene sets were screened out and called differentially expressed targets (DE-targets, which were involved in 231 pathways. Ten of the 231 pathways that have smallest P-value were shown as network figures. Based on the analysis of pathways and networks, we found that miR-424-5p and miR-29a might have important regulatory effect on muscle development, which needed to be further studied. This study provided the first global view of the miRNAs in caprine muscle tissues. Our results help elucidation of complex regulatory networks between miRNAs and mRNAs and for the study of muscle

  1. Operculum syndrome: unusual feature of herpes simplex encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poel, J. C.; Haenggeli, C. A.; Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis in adults and young patients carries a high mortality and morbidity. Its presentation may be nonspecific, sometimes hampering early diagnosis. Two young children are reported with herpes simplex encephalitis in whom the operculum syndrome was an outstanding feature. This

  2. Tick-borne encephalitis: Pathogenesis and clinical implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Daniel; Dobler, G.; Mantke, O. D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2010), s. 223-232 ISSN 1477-8939 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP302/10/P438; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Tick-borne encephalitis * Tick-borne encephalitis virus * Pathogenesis * Clinical data Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  3. Influenza-associated Encephalitis/Encephalopathy Identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis Study 2013-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Philip N; Dale, Russell C; Blyth, Christopher C; Macartney, Kristine; Crawford, Nigel W; Marshall, Helen; Clark, Julia E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Webster, Richard I; Cheng, Allen C; Booy, Robert; Jones, Cheryl A

    2017-11-01

    Influenza-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy (IAE) is an important cause of acute encephalitis syndrome in children. IAE includes a series of clinicoradiologic syndromes or acute encephalopathy syndromes that have been infrequently reported outside East Asia. We aimed to describe cases of IAE identified by the Australian Childhood Encephalitis study. Children ≤ 14 years of age with suspected encephalitis were prospectively identified in 5 hospitals in Australia. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and outcome at discharge data were reviewed by an expert panel and cases were categorized by using predetermined case definitions. We extracted cases associated with laboratory identification of influenza virus for this analysis; among these cases, specific IAE syndromes were identified where clinical and radiologic features were consistent with descriptions in the published literature. We identified 13 cases of IAE during 3 southern hemisphere influenza seasons at 5 tertiary children's hospitals in Australia; 8 children with specific acute encephalopathy syndromes including: acute necrotizing encephalopathy, acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late diffusion restriction, mild encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion, and hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome. Use of influenza-specific antiviral therapy and prior influenza vaccination were infrequent. In contrast, death or significant neurologic morbidity occurred in 7 of the 13 children (54%). The conditions comprising IAE are heterogeneous with varied clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging changes, and outcomes. Overall, outcome of IAE is poor emphasizing the need for optimized prevention, early recognition, and empiric management.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis and encephalomyelitis: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shian, W.J.; Chi, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the clinical and brain MR characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encephalitis and encephalomyelitis. Clinical and 30 MR findings of 29 patients with EBV encephalitis or encephalomyelitis were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included 24 with encephalitis, 3 with encephalomyelitis, and 2 with brain-stem encephalitis. Altered consciousness, seizures, visual hallucination, and acute psychotic reaction were the common presentations. Eight patients had positive MR findings. These included T2 prolongation over gray and white matter, periventricular leukomalacia, and brain atrophy. Transient T2 prolongation over gray and white matter was found in one patient. Our results indicate that EBV encephalitis and encephalomyelitis have a wide range of both clinical and MR findings. The MR lesions may disappear in a short period, so the timing for the MR scan may be critical. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis and encephalomyelitis: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shian, W.J. [Department of Pediatrics, Tao-Yuan Veterans Hospital, No. 100, Sec 3, Cheng-Kung Rd, City of Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Chi, C.S. [Department of Pediatrics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the clinical and brain MR characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encephalitis and encephalomyelitis. Clinical and 30 MR findings of 29 patients with EBV encephalitis or encephalomyelitis were retrospectively reviewed. Patients included 24 with encephalitis, 3 with encephalomyelitis, and 2 with brain-stem encephalitis. Altered consciousness, seizures, visual hallucination, and acute psychotic reaction were the common presentations. Eight patients had positive MR findings. These included T2 prolongation over gray and white matter, periventricular leukomalacia, and brain atrophy. Transient T2 prolongation over gray and white matter was found in one patient. Our results indicate that EBV encephalitis and encephalomyelitis have a wide range of both clinical and MR findings. The MR lesions may disappear in a short period, so the timing for the MR scan may be critical. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Visual pathways involvement in children with acute viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voitenkov Vladislav Borisovich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate extent and nature of visual pathways involvement in children with acute viral encephalitis. METHODS: Thirty patients(age 5-12 yearswith acute viral encephalitis underwent visual evoked potentials(VEPinvestigation within 12 days from the appearance of the first signs of disease. Latency and amplitude of P100 peak were compared with normative data and between patients with varicella and tick-borne encephalitis. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between children with these two forms of encephalitis. In the whole group in 40% of the cases signs of the visual cortex dysfunction(P100 amplitude loweringand mild slowing of the conductivity along the visual pathways(P100 latency lengtheningwere seen. In 3% of the cases retrobulbar optic neuritis was diagnosed. CONCLUSION:The results indicate that visual pathway have good endurance to the viral encephalitis anatomically, but functionally visual cortex is quite vulnerable towards general disturbances caused by this kind of illness.

  7. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothschild, B.; Williams, E.M.; Poteat, G.B.; Woods, R.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  9. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial susceptibility of caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, A; Tatay-Dualde, J; Amores, J; Prats-van der Ham, M; Sánchez, A; de la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Corrales, J C; Gómez-Martín, Á

    2016-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum mycoplasmacidal concentration (MMC) of 17 antimicrobials against 41 Spanish caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) obtained from different specimens (milk, external auricular canal and semen) were determined using a liquid microdilution method. For half of the isolates, the MIC was also estimated for seven of the antimicrobials using an epsilometric test (ET), in order to compare both methods and assess the validity of ET. Mutations in genes gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE conferring fluoroquinolone resistance, which have been recently described in Mmc, were investigated using PCR. The anatomical origin of the isolate had no effect on its antimicrobial susceptibility. Moxifloxacin and doxycycline had the lowest MIC values. The rest of the fluoroquinolones studied (except norfloxacin), together with tylosin and clindamycin, also had low MIC values, although the MMC obtained for clindamycin was higher than for the other antimicrobials. For all the aminoglycosides, spiramycin and erythromycin, a notable level of resistance was observed. The ET was in close agreement with broth microdilution at low MICs, but not at intermediate or high MICs. The analysis of the genomic sequences revealed the presence of an amino acid substitution in codon 83 of the gene gyrA, which has not been described previously in Mmc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation of caprine herpesvirus 1 from a major outbreak of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, K L; Fitzgerald, C J; Ficorilli, N; Studdert, M J

    2008-04-01

    We describe an outbreak of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis caused by Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV1) in a group of approximately 200, 8 month old virgin does that were imported to Victoria from New Zealand. CpHV1 was isolated in cell cultures from vaginal swabs from three of three affected does but not from two bucks that had been with the does. The identity of the virus as a herpesvirus was confirmed by negative stain electron microscopy. Restriction endonuclease DNA fingerprint analysis showed that the DNA fingerprints were similar, but not identical, to previously described CpHV1 isolates made in New Zealand, New South Wales, and in other parts of the world. Acute and convalescent phase sera from selected does supported the diagnosis of CpHV1 infection. It is most likely that the disease was initiated by reactivation of latent virus in at least one of four bucks that served the does, since each was positive for CpHV neutralising antibody when first tested. This is the first report of CpHV infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in goats in Victoria and to our knowledge appears to be one of the largest outbreaks recorded anywhere.

  11. Prevalence and Economic Significance of Caprine Fascioliasis at Sylhet District of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Hossain*, S. Paul, M. M. Rahman, F. M. A. Hossain1, M. T. Hossain2 and M. R. Islam

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Caprine fascioliasis plays an important role of major constraints to small ruminant production in Bangladesh. This study was conducted in Sylhet district of Bangladesh to determine the prevalence of fascioliasis in Black Bengal goats of different age groups, sex and in seasons. In this study, livers of male and female goats were collected randomly from slaughter house during a period of 1 (one year (October, 2007 to September, 2008. A total of 318 livers examined of which 66 were found to contain Fasciola gigantica. The overall prevalence rate was 20.75%. Fascioliasis was observed significantly higher in older (58.33%, female goats (36.79% and during the rainy season (26.16%. The estimated economic losses due to condemnation of liver were 5.59% which amounted to US$ 115.44 per thousand liver of slaughtered goat. The prevalence was significantly different (P≤0.05 in different age groups and sex of the animals. The present study indicates that Fasciola infection in Black Bengal goats associated with age and sex of the animals; and seasons of the year. To control the disease in this area, appropriate preventive control strategies have to be designed to reduce the impact of the disease on goat production in Bangladesh.

  12. Pathogenesis and Immunohistochemical Studies of Caprine Pleuropneumonia in Experimentally Infected Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Sadique*, Zafar Iqbal Chaudhry1, Muhammad Younus Rana2, Aftab Ahmad Anjum3, Zahoor-Ul-Hassan, Abdul Sajid and Muhammad Mushtaq

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the pathogenesis of caprine pleuropneumonia (CPP in the experimentally inoculated goats with Mycoplasma mycoides subspecies Capri (Mmc. For this purpose, 12 goats (Group B were inoculated with bacterial isolates of Mmc while four goats were kept as untreated control (Group A. Clinical signs of the disease were recorded twice daily. Two goats from group B were sacrificed on weekly basis to demonstrate gross pathological lesions in different organs. Tissue samples from lungs, trachea, liver, heart, kidney, spleen, and small intestines were preserved for histopathological studies. The lungs and lymph nodes were preserved to demonstrate the antigen in tissue by using immuno- histochemical technique. The disease was successfully reproduced in all infected goats with severe manifestation. The clinical signs and gross lesions of the disease were mild at the beginning and became severe at the third and fourth weeks and then progressed to moderate and chronic forms. The histopathological lesions characteristic of CPP were found in all the organs. Antigen of Mmc was detected in tissue sections of lungs and lymph nodes. In conclusion, the disease was efficiently reproduced in experimental animals that showed acute septicemic form with lethal outcome.

  13. [Epidemiology of caprine brucellosis in the Central Zone of the State of Veracruz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Ramírez, Daniela Lucía; Martínez-Herrera, David Itzcoatl; Villagómez-Cortés, José Alfredo; Peniche-Cardeña, Álvaro Enrique de Jesús; Morales-Álvarez, José Francisco; Flores-Castro, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is a disease of high morbidity that affects several animal species, is transmitted to humans and, therefore, is a zoonosis. It is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. In this study we aim to determine seroprevalence, risk factors, and spatial distribution of caprine brucellosis in 14 municipalities in the central region of the state of Veracruz. This cross-stratified multistage study was conducted between 2009 and 2012. It included 572 animals of 81 production units selected by consensus according to the value tables of ​​Cannon and Roe. The diagnosis was by Card Testing and Radial Immunodiffusion. The seroprevalence was determined with the VassarStats® risk factor program and odds. The overall seroprevalence was 0.52% (95% CI: 0.13-1.65) and production units 2.47% (95% CI: 0.43-9.46). They were identified as risk factor for infection, production units in feedlot system and Card Testing seroconversion to vaccine against brucellosis; and as a protective factor, vaccination. Seroprevalence and distribution of goat brucellosis is low, the intensive system is a risk, and according with the Health Ministry in order that human cases are scarce.

  14. Paleogenomics in a temperate environment: shotgun sequencing from an extinct Mediterranean caprine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ramírez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous endemic mammals, including dwarf elephants, goats, hippos and deers, evolved in isolation in the Mediterranean islands during the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Most of them subsequently became extinct during the Holocene. Recently developed high-throughput sequencing technologies could provide a unique tool for retrieving genomic data from these extinct species, making it possible to study their evolutionary history and the genetic bases underlying their particular, sometimes unique, adaptations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPALS FINDINGS: A DNA extraction of a approximately 6,000 year-old bone sample from an extinct caprine (Myotragus balearicus from the Balearic Islands in the Western Mediterranean, has been subjected to shotgun sequencing with the GS FLX 454 platform. Only 0.27% of the resulting sequences, identified from alignments with the cow genome and comprising 15,832 nucleotides, with an average length of 60 nucleotides, proved to be endogenous. CONCLUSIONS: A phylogenetic tree generated with Myotragus sequences and those from other artiodactyls displays an identical topology to that generated from mitochondrial DNA data. Despite being in an unfavourable thermal environment, which explains the low yield of endogenous sequences, our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain genomic data from extinct species from temperate regions.

  15. Psoriatic Arthritis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Psoriatic arthritis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Psoriatic Arthritis updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Psoriatic arthritis Related Health Topics Arthritis Psoriasis National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  16. Four cases of gabab receptor encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, M.; Kondziella, D

    2016-01-01

    loss of short-term memory, but no epilepsy. Without immunotherapy, his memory spontaneously improved up to mild cognitive impairment in six weeks. GABAbR antibodies persisted in his serum, and 18 months later, FDG-PET detected abnormal mediastinal lymph nodes and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Another...... in three patients. Only the patient, who spontaneously improved, survived for more than 24 months. In summary, our cases show that (i) GABAbR encephalitis may develop without epilepsy; (ii) the severe short-term memory loss can spontaneously improve; (iii) persistent hyponatremia can be present...

  17. What should you know about limbic encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Machado

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is an inflammatory disorder characterized by a subacute impairment of short-term memory, psychiatric features and seizures. It is often associated with a variety of other neurological symptoms, and its differential diagnosis is wide, leading to challenges in its recognition. It used to be regarded as a rare disease, usually paraneoplastic and with poor prognosis. However, with the recent recognition of membrane-surface directed antibodies, it is now known that in a substantial proportion of cases there is no association with any malignancy and there is a good prognosis if treated. Hence, early recognition and prompt initiation of immunotherapies are of great importance.

  18. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain and stiffness in the lower spine and sacroiliac joints (at the bottom of the back). Interestingly, ... addition to causing arthritis of the spine and sacroiliac joints, ankylosing spondylitis can cause inflammation of the ...

  19. Tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shun; Tsai, Tsen-Fang

    2017-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a heterogeneous disease that has been difficult to manage until the recent advent of biologics. However, there are still unmet medical needs for newer agents. Tofacitinib is a Janus family of kinases inhibitor approved for treating rheumatoid arthritis in many countries and psoriasis in Russia. We reviewed the evidences of tofacitinib in psoriatic arthritis treatment. The efficacy and safety profiles result from Phase III clinical trials (OPAL BROADEN and OPAL BEYOND) and one open-label extension study (OPAL BALANCE). Both tofacitinib 5 or 10 mg twice a day were superior to placebo for American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria response at 3 months and showed significant improvement of skin, enthesitis and dactylitis. Tofacitinib is a promising treatment option for psoriatic arthritis.

  20. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RAC) Information OIG Opioid and Chronic Pain Management OSHA Off-Label Use Physician Payment Sunshine Act (Open ... perhaps only five percent of the most serious cases, usually of rheumatoid arthritis, result in such severe ...

  1. Detection of Coxiella burnetii by PCR in bulk tank milk samples from dairy caprine herds in southeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khalili

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To use PCR for the detection of Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii in bulk tank milk samples collected from dairy caprine herds in southeast Iran. Methods: In the present study, 31 goat bulk milk from 31 dairy goat herds were tested for C. burnetii using trans-PCR assay. The animals which their milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. Results: In total, 5 of 31 (16.12% goat milk samples were positive. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate clinically healthy dairy goats are important sources of C. burnetii infection in this area.

  2. Case of Herpes encephalitis followed-up by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Nagai, S.; Nishibayashi, Y.; Okamoto, H.; Goishi, J. (Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital, Ehime (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    A 9-month-old girl was admitted with lethargy, fever and convulsion. EGG showed localized slow waves in the right temporal region. CT showed a localized low density area accompanied by a hemorrhagic focus in the right frontal lobe. Herpes encephalitis was suspected, and cytosine arabinoside was administered. The antibody titers of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid against herpes simplex virus type I significantly rose. Clinically the patient recovered without serious sequelae. CT revealed marked cerebral atrophy and subdural hematoma which were surgically treated. The importance of CT in the diagnosis and prognosis of herpes encephalitis was argued, and CT findings of herpes encephalitis were discussed.

  3. CT findings in a case of Japanese encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyomasu, Teruo; Nakashima, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Tomie; Shida, Kenshiro

    1982-01-01

    A 44-year-old man was admitted to a hospital on August 1980, with chief complaints of high fever and consciousness disturbance. Three months later he was referred to our hospital. Neurological examination revealed mental deterioration, amnesia, bilateral pyramidal signs, tremor, truncal ataxia and others. Serum CF titer to Japanese encephalitis virus was 1 : 16. He was diagnosed as having Japanese encephalitis from the clinical features and serological response. CT scans showed low density areas in bilateral thalami, the left ganglia, left internal capsule, left substantia nigra and others. It is noticeable that the CT findings were compatible with the pathological changes of Japanese encephalitis. (author)

  4. Limbic Encephalitis Driven by a Pleural Mesothelioma: A Paraneoplastic Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob O. Day

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes have only been described with pleural mesothelioma in five cases. We have described a 72-year-old man who developed anterograde amnesia 27 months after diagnosis of epithelioid pleural mesothelioma. Investigations revealed a limbic encephalitis with no alternative causes identified. Limbic encephalitis is a classical paraneoplastic syndrome and presentation within five years of a cancer with no other causes identified is sufficient to diagnose a paraneoplastic etiology. This is the first case of isolated paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis driven by a pleural mesothelioma.

  5. A case of Herpes encephalitis followed-up by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Yukiko; Nagai, Shinya; Nishibayashi, Yohei; Okamoto, Hirofumi; Goishi, Junji

    1982-01-01

    A 9-month-old girl was admitted with lethargy, fever and convulsion. EGG showed localized slow waves in the right temporal region. CT showed a localized low density area accompanied by a hemorrhagic focus in the right frontal lobe. Herpes encephalitis was suspected, and cytosine arabinoside was administered. The antibody titers of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid against herpes simplex virus type I significantly rose. Clinically the patient recovered without serious sequelae. CT revealed marked cerebral atrophy and subdural hematoma which were surgically treated. The importance of CT in the diagnosis and prognosis of herpes encephalitis was argued, and CT findings of herpes encephalitis were discussed. (Chiba, N.)

  6. Anti-N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Severe, Potentially Reversible Autoimmune Encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cai-yun; Zheng, Xiang-Yu; Ma, Chi

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is potentially lethal, but it is also a treatable autoimmune disorder characterized by prominent psychiatric and neurologic symptoms. It is often accompanied with teratoma or other neoplasm, especially in female patients. Anti-NMDAR antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum are characteristic features of the disease, thereby suggesting a pathogenic role in the disease. Here, we summarize recent studies that have clearly documented that both clinical manifestations and the antibodies may contribute to early diagnosis and multidisciplinary care. The clinical course of the disorder is reversible and the relapse could occur in some patients. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis coexisting with demyelinating disorders makes the diagnosis more complex; thus, clinicians should be aware of the overlapping diseases. PMID:28698711

  7. Biopsy histopathology in herpes simplex encephalitis and in encephalitis of undefined etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booss, J.; Kim, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The histopathology of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) has been described principally from postmortem studies which reveal end-stage disease. Biopsy material, which selects an earlier stage in disease development, has been used principally to isolate virus, identify viral particles, and locate viral antigens. Further, little attention has been paid to the histopathology of biopsies of encephalitis of undefined etiology. In the present study, sections from biopsies which yielded virus and those which were negative for virus were evaluated in a systematic and controlled manner. Biopsies yielding virus were characterized by meningeal inflammation, perivascular infiltrates, and glial nodules. Biopsies which did not yield virus and which failed to reveal another diagnosis were characterized by nonspecific gliosis. Thus the early histiopathology of HSE is characterized by early signs of inflammation in the absence of necrosis and generally differs from biopsies in which virus is not isolated. PMID:6098083

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  12. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  16. Prevalence and species distribution of caprine trypanosomosis in Sinazongwe and Kalomo districts of Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyimba, P H; Komba, E V G; Sugimoto, C; Namangala, B

    2015-06-15

    African animal trypanosomosis is one of the key livestock diseases hindering full exploitation of livestock production potential covering 37 countries across sub-Saharan Africa. Many studies have been carried out to investigate the prevalence of the disease in cattle and humans in many tropical African countries but very little attention has been directed towards generating the disease prevalence rates in goats. The current study was conducted between December 2013 and January 2014 to establish the prevalence of caprine trypanosomosis in Sinazongwe and Kalomo districts, southern Zambia. It involved 422 goats which were first examined by palpation for possible enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. Blood samples were then collected from the goats and subjected to laboratory diagnosis using the microscope and Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP). None of the examined goats displayed enlargement of superficial lymph nodes. On microscopy only one goat was found to be positive. The results of investigation using the LAMP method showed that 100 goats were infected with trypanosomes giving an overall prevalence rate of 23.7%. The prevalence of infection in Sinazongwe was 22.4% (n=183) while in Kalomo it was 24.7% (n=239); and the difference between the two districts was statistically significant at 95% CL (x(2)=4.4, df=1, pgoats, respectively. Mixed infections were detected among 33.0% of the positive samples. The high prevalence rate of trypanosomes detected in the study area confirms the earlier reports that trypanosomosis is re-emerging in the areas previously aerial sprayed by Government. The detection of trypanosomes in naturally infected goats outlines the important role goats play in the epidemiology of African animal trypanosomosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Virulence factors genes of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from caprine subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaberry, Sandra Renata Sampaio; Saidenberg, André Becker Simões; Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla Anne; Santos, Franklin Gerônimo Bispo; Guimarães, Ednaldo Carvalho; Gregori, Fábio; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate genes involved in adhesion expression, biofilm formation, and enterotoxin production in isolates of Staphylococcus spp. from goats with subclinical mastitis and associate these results with the staphylococcal species. One hundred and twenty-four isolates were identified and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect the following genes: cna, ebpS, eno, fib, fnbA, fnbB, bap, sea, seb, sec, sed and see. The most commonly Staphylococcus species included S. epidermidis, S. lugdunensis, S. chromogenes, S. capitis ss capitis and S. intermedius. With the exception of fnbB, the genes were detected in different frequencies of occurrence in 86.3% of the Staphylococcus spp. isolates. Eno (73.2%) and bap (94.8%) were more frequently detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS); ebpS (76%), fib (90.9%) and fnbA (87%) were the most frequent genes in coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS). Regarding enterotoxins, genes sed (28.2%) and see (24.2%) had a higher frequency of occurrence; sec gene was more frequently detected in CPS (58.8%). There was no association between the presence of the genes and the Staphylococcus species. Different virulence factors genes can be detected in caprine subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS. The knowledge of the occurrence of these virulence factors is important for the development of effective control and prevention measures of subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS in goats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of volatile fatty acids on propionate metabolism and gluconeogenesis in caprine hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, R.J.; Armentano, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated caprine hepatocytes were incubated with fatty acids of various chain lengths. Short-chain fatty acids effects on rates of gluconeogenesis and oxidation from [2- 14 C] propionate were determined. Additions of glucose (2.5 mM) had no effect on hepatic [2- 14 C]-propionate metabolism in the presence and absence of amino acids. A complete mixture of amino acids increased label incorporation from [2- 14 C] propionate into [ 14 C] glucose by 22%. Butyrate inhibited [2- 14 C] propionate metabolism and increased the apparent Michaelis constant for [2- 14 C] propionate incorporation into [ 14 C] glucose from 2.4 +/- 1.5 to 5.6 +/- .9 mM. Butyrate's effects on propionate were similar in the presence and absence of L-carnitine (1 mM). Isobutyrate, 2-methylbutyrate, and valerate (1.25 mM) had no effect on [ 14 C] glucose production but decreased 14 CO 2 production to 57, 61, and 54% of the control [2- 14 C] propionate (1.25 mM). This inhibition on 14 CO 2 was not competitive. Isovalerate had no effect on either [2- 14 C] propionate incorporation into glucose of CO 2 . An increase in ratio of [ 14 C] glucose to 14 CO 2 from [2- 14 C]-propionate demonstrated that short-chain fatty acids other than butyrate do not inhibit gluconeogenesis from propionate. In addition, fatty acids that generate a net synthesis of intracellular oxaloacetate may partition propionate carbons toward gluconeogenic rather than oxidative pathways in goat hepatocytes

  19. Critical role of the lipid rafts in caprine herpesvirus type 1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2016-01-04

    The fusion machinery for herpesvirus entry in the host cells involves the interactions of viral glycoproteins with cellular receptors, although additional viral and cellular domains are required. Extensive areas of the plasma membrane surface consist of lipid rafts organized into cholesterol-rich microdomains involved in signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane transport and in many processes of viruses infection. Because of the extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to the lipid rafts, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) on caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV.1) in three important phases of virus infection such as binding, entry and post-entry. MβCD treatment did not prejudice virus binding to cells, while a dose-dependent reduction of the virus yield was observed at the virus entry stage, and 30 mM MβCD reduced infectivity evidently. Treatment of MDBK after virus entry revealed a moderate inhibitory effect suggesting that cholesterol is mainly required during virus entry rather than during the post-entry stage. Alteration of the envelope lipid composition affected virus entry and a noticeable reduction in virus infectivity was detected in the presence of 15 mM MβCD. Considering that the recognition of a host cell receptor is a crucial step in the start-up phase of infection, these data are essential for the study of CpHV.1 pathogenesis. To date virus receptors for CpHV.1 have not yet been identified and further investigations are required to state that MβCD treatment affects the expression of the viral receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and characterization of a caprine aerosol infection model of melioidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Soffler

    Full Text Available Infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, which often presents as a serious suppurative infection that is typically fatal without intensive treatment and is a significant emerging infectious disease in Southeast Asia. Despite intensive research there is still much that remains unknown about melioidosis pathogenesis. New animal models of melioidosis are needed to examine novel aspects of pathogenesis as well as for the evaluation of novel therapeutics. The objective of the work presented here was to develop a subacute to chronic caprine model of melioidosis and to characterize the progression of disease with respect to clinical presentation, hematology, clinical microbiology, thoracic radiography, and gross and microscopic pathology. Disease was produced in all animals following an intratracheal aerosol of 10(4 CFU delivered, with variable clinical manifestations indicative of subacute and chronic disease. Bronchointerstitial pneumonia was apparent microscopically by day 2 and radiographically and grossly apparent by day 7 post infection (PI. Early lesions of bronchopneumonia soon progressed to more severe bronchointerstitial pneumonia with pyogranuloma formation. Extrapulmonary dissemination appeared to be a function of pyogranuloma invasion of pulmonary vasculature, which peaked around day 7 PI. Histopathology indicated that leukocytoclastic vasculitis was the central step in dissemination of B. pseudomallei from the lungs as well as in the establishment of new lesions. While higher doses of organism in goats can produce acute fatal disease, the dose investigated and resulting disease had many similarities to human melioidosis and may warrant further development to provide a model for the study of both natural and bioterrorism associated disease.

  1. Ultrasonographic findings in goats with contagious caprine pleuropneumonia caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Al-Sobayil, Fahd

    2017-08-22

    In goats, contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a cause of major economic losses in Africa, Asia and in the Middle East. There is no information emphasising the importance of diagnostic ultrasound in goats with CCPP caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp). This study was designed to describe the ultrasonographic findings in goats with CCPP caused by Mccp and to correlate ultrasonographic with post-mortem findings. To this end, 55 goats with CCPP were examined. Twenty-five healthy adult goats were used as a control group. Major clinical findings included harried, painful respiration, dyspnoea and mouth breathing. On ultrasonography, a liver-like echotexture was imaged in 13 goats. Upon post-mortem examination, all 13 goats exhibited unilateral pulmonary consolidation. Seven goats had a unilateral hypoechoic pleural effusion. At necropsy, the related lung was consolidated and the pleural fluid appeared turbid and greenish. Pleural abscessiation detected in five goats was confirmed post-mortem. Twenty-eight goats had a bright, fibrinous matrix extending over the chest wall containing numerous anechoic fluid pockets with medial displacement and compression of lung tissue. Echogenic tags imaged floating in the fluid were found upon post-mortem examination to be fibrin. In two goats, a consolidated right parenchyma was imaged together with hypoechoic pericardial effusions with echogenic tags covering the epicardium. At necropsy, the right lung was consolidated in three goats and fibrin threads were found covering the epicardium and pericardium. In goats with CCPP, the extension and the severity of the pulmonary changes could not be verified with clinical certainty in most cases, whereas this was possible most of the time with sonography, thus making the prognosis easier. Ultrasonographic examination of the pleurae and the lungs helped in the detection of various lesions.

  2. Incidence of Japanese Encephalitis among Acute Encephalitis Syndrome Cases in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswati Bandyopadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Japanese encephalitis (JE is the most important cause of acute and epidemic viral encephalitis. Every year sporadic JE cases are reported from the various districts of West Bengal, indicating its endemicity in this state. JE vaccination programme has been undertaken by the State Health Department of West Bengal. This study was aimed at seeing the present scenario of JE among acute encephalitis syndrome (AES cases in West Bengal. Materials and Methods. Blood and/or CSF samples were referred from suspected AES cases to the referral virology laboratory of the Calcutta School of Tropical Medicine from different hospitals of Kolkata. IgM antibody capture ELISA was performed on the CSF and serum samples by JE virus MAC ELISA kit supplied by the National Institute of Virology, Pune. Results. The present study reveals that 22.76% and 5% of the AES cases were positive for JE IgM in 2011 and 2012, respectively. JE is mainly prevalent in children and adolescents below 20 years of age with no gender predilection. Although the percentages of JE positive cases were high in 2011, it sharply decreased thereafter possibly due to better awareness programs, due to mass vaccination, or simply due to natural epidemiological niche periodicity due to herd immunity.

  3. Neuronal surface antigen antibodies in limbic encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, F; Saiz, A; Lai, M; Bruna, J; López, F; Sabater, L; Blanco, Y; Rey, M J.; Ribalta, T; Dalmau, J

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report the frequency and type of antibodies against neuronal surface antigens (NSA-ab) in limbic encephalitis (LE). Methods: Analysis of clinical features, neuropathologic findings, and detection of NSA-ab using immunochemistry on rat tissue and neuronal cultures in a series of 45 patients with paraneoplastic (23) or idiopathic (22) LE. Results: NSA-ab were identified in 29 patients (64%; 12 paraneoplastic, 17 idiopathic). Thirteen patients had voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC)-ab, 11 novel NSA (nNSA)-ab, and 5 NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-ab. nNSA-ab did not identify a common antigen and were more frequent in paraneoplastic than idiopathic LE (39% vs 9%; p = 0.03). When compared with VGKC-ab or NMDAR-ab, the nNSA associated more frequently with intraneuronal antibodies (11% vs 73%; p = 0.001). Of 12 patients (9 nNSA-ab, 2 VGKC-ab, 1 NMDAR-ab) with paraneoplastic LE and NSA-ab, concomitant intraneuronal antibodies occurred in 9 (75%). None of these 12 patients improved with immunotherapy. The autopsy of three of them showed neuronal loss, microgliosis, and cytotoxic T cell infiltrates in the hippocampus and amygdala. These findings were compatible with a T-cell mediated neuronal damage. In contrast, 13 of 17 (76%) patients with idiopathic LE and NSA-ab (8 VGKC-ab, 4 NMDAR-ab, 1 nNSA-ab) and 1 of 5 (20%) without antibodies had clinical improvement (p = 0.04). Conclusions: In paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (LE), novel antibodies against neuronal surface antigens (nNSA-ab) occur frequently, coexist with antibodies against intracellular antigens, and these cases are refractory to immunotherapy. In idiopathic LE, the likelihood of improvement is significantly higher in patients with NSA-ab than in those without antibodies. GLOSSARY GAD = glutamic acid decarboxylase; LE = limbic encephalitis; NMDAR = N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor; NSA = neuronal surface antigens; nNSA = novel NSA; SCLC = small-cell lung cancer; VGKC = voltage-gated potassium channels

  4. Qigong Exercise and Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthritis is a chronic condition resulting in considerable disability, particularly in later life. Aims: The first aim of this review was to summarize and synthesize the research base concerning the use of Qigong exercises as a possible adjunctive strategy for promoting well-being among adults with arthritis. A second was to provide related intervention directives for health professionals working or who are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: Material specifically focusing on examining the nature of Qigong for minimizing arthritis disability, pain and dependence and for improving life quality was sought. Results: Collectively, despite almost no attention to this topic, available data reveal that while more research is indicated, Qigong exercises—practiced widely in China for many centuries as an exercise form, mind-body and relaxation technique—may be very useful as an intervention strategy for adults with different forms of painful disabling arthritis. Conclusion: Health professionals working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these exercises to most adults with this condition with the expectation they will heighten the life quality of the individual, while reducing pain and depression in adults with this condition.

  5. Hemorrhagic Transformation of Scrub Typhus Encephalitis: A Rare Entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H-C; Yoon, K-W; Yoo, D-S; Cho, C-S

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement of scrub typhus infection is well known. Most CNS involvement of scrub typhus infection present as meningitis or encephalitis. We report on a patient suffering from hemorrhagic transformation of intracranial lesions caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. A 53-year-old female farmer who was infected by scrub typhus was treated with doxycycline and recovered from the systemic illness. However, headache persisted. Brain radiologic studies revealed acute intracranial hemorrhage and enhancing lesion, which implied a CNS involvement. Hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis by scrub typhus is very rare complication and to our best knowledge, this is the first report of hemorrhagic transformation of scrub typhus encephalitis. Clinician should consider the possibility of hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis in cases of scrub typhus infection.

  6. Enterovirus 71 Brainstem Encephalitis and Cognitive and Motor Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up studies were conducted in 63 previously healthy children with enterovirus 71 brainstem encephalitis (49 stage II, 7 stage Ilia, and 7 stage Illb at National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan.

  7. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MRI findings of herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, In One; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Sang Joon

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the MR findings of 12 patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) (8 months - 64 years old). MR imaging was performed on either a 0.5T (6 patients) or 2.0T (6 patients) superconducting unit with spin echo pulse sequences. The most common and characteristic MR finding consisted of non-hemorrhagic lesions in the cortices of the temporal lobes(12), and insular(6), either bilateral(7) or unilateral(5). The frontal lobe and cingulate gyrus were involved in 4 and 2 patients respectively. Petechial hemorrhage was found in 3 patients. Non-hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high signal intensities on proton and T2WI, and iso- or low signal intensities on T1WI. In conclusion, MR imaging findings described above appear to be characteristic of HSE and were found to be extremely valuable in the diagnosis of HSE

  9. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIH-MIN eWANG

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection.

  10. Fluent Aphasia From Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Yadegari

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present case report introduces a patient with fluent aphasia, anterograde amnesia and anosmia due to herpes simplex encephalitis after her first delivery. The left medial temporal lobe was one of the main areas involved. On aphasia testing she showed severe anomia on both confrontation and free recall, agraphia, alexia, repetition disorder and some auditory comprehension impairments. Therapy was focused on the following issues: phonological output lexicon , using graphemes as a source of reestablishing phonological representation; describing pictures to reinforce free recall and self-cuing word retrieval strategies; sequencing the events for language memory reinforcement, etc. Results showed improvement in confrontational naming, free recall, correct responses without priming, writing on dictation, spontaneous writing and reading comprehension.

  11. A rat model for embolic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Aalbæk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    have recently shown that sepsis is a common cause of microabscesses in the brain, and that S. aureus is one of the most common organisms isolated from these abscesses. This raises the question whether the blood-brain barrier truly makes the brain an immune-privileged organ or not. This makes the brain...... a most interesting organ in sepsis patients. However, symptoms of brain infection may be confused with systemic responses and gross neuropathologic lesions may be absent. Brain infection in sepsis patients is therefore prone to misclassification or diagnostic delay, and when the diagnosis is made...... it is difficult to obtain tissue for further examination. This puts a hard demand on animal models of brain lesions in sepsis. We hereby present a novel animal model of embolic encephalitis. Our model introduces bacteria by an embolus to an area of brain necrosis and damage to the blood-brain...

  12. Computed tomographic brain scan findings in Q fever encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Aranda, F.; Romero Acebal, M.; Maestre Moreno, J.; Pachon Diaz, J.; Lopez Cortes, L.; Navarro Rodriguez, A.

    1984-07-01

    Neurological involvement in Q Fever is unusual. We present a case of encephalitis due to Coxiella Burnetii with neuroradiologic findings on CT not described previously, consisting in areas of decreased absorption coefficient in the subcortical white matter of both hemispheres, predominantly in the right. Differential diagnosis must be established from viral encephalitis, of similar clinical presentation, which may show similar CT lesions to those in this case.

  13. Adult herpes simplex encephalitis: fifteen years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera-Mestre, Antoni; Gubieras, Laura; Martínez-Yelamos, Sergio; Cabellos, Carmen; Fernández-Viladrich, Pedro

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most frequent cause of sporadic necrotizing encephalitis in adults. The aim of this study is to describe the characteristics of HSE and the factors influencing its outcome. Retrospective study of patients diagnosed with HSE in a tertiary care teaching hospital over a 15-year period. Diagnosis was based on a consistent clinical profile for HSE, plus either a PCR-positive CSF HSV study or consistent brain neuroimaging findings. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the modified Rankin Scale: good outcome (Grades =3). Thirty-five patients were included. Mean age was 53.9 years. More than half presented febricula or fever, headache, disorientation, behavioral changes, decreased level of consciousness, or neurological deficit. CSF glucose concentration was normal in all patients and WBC count was normal in 8 (23%). PCR for HSV was positive in 92% and cranial MRI was suggestive of HSE in 100% of patients. Mortality was 8.6%. In relation to outcome, age (OR=1.079; 95% CI, 1.023-1.138) and serum albumin level at admission (OR=0.87; 95% CI, 0.794-0.954) were independent prognostic factors at discharge. At 6 months, days of fever after initiation of acyclovir therapy (OR=1.219; 95% CI, 1.046-1.422) and serum albumin level at admission (OR=0.917; 95% CI, 0.87-0.967) were independent prognostic factors. Normal brain MRI or detection of low CSF glucose concentration requires consideration of diagnoses other than HSE. Age, serum albumin level at admission, and days of fever after initiation of acyclovir therapy were independent prognostic factors of the disease.

  14. Japanese Encephalitis in Malaysia: An Overview and Timeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kiven; Arshad, Siti Suri; Selvarajah, Gayathri Thevi; Abu, Jalila; Toung, Ooi Peck; Abba, Yusuf; Yasmin, A R; Bande, Faruku; Sharma, Reuben; Ong, Bee Lee

    2018-05-29

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a vector-borne zoonotic disease caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). It causes encephalitis in human and horses, and may lead to reproductive failure in sows. The first human encephalitis case in Malaya (now Malaysia) was reported during World War II in a British prison in 1942. Later, encephalitis was observed among race horses in Singapore. In 1951, the first JEV was isolated from the brain of an encephalitis patient. The true storyline of JE exposure among humans and animals has not been documented in Malaysia. In some places such as Sarawak, JEV has been isolated from mosquitoes before an outbreak in 1992. JE is an epidemic in Malaysia except Sarawak. There are four major outbreaks reported in Pulau Langkawi (1974), Penang (1988), Perak and Negeri Sembilan (1998-1999), and Sarawak (1992). JE is considered endemic only in Sarawak. Initially, both adults and children were victims of JE in Malaysia, however, according to the current reports; JE infection is only lethal to children in Malaysia. This paper describes a timeline of JE cases (background of each case) from first detection to current status, vaccination programs against JE, diagnostic methods used in hospitals and factors which may contribute to the transmission of JE among humans and animals in Malaysia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Vasculitis and inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard A; Scott, David G I

    2016-10-01

    Vasculitis has been described in most types of inflammatory arthritis. The best described and most widely recognised form is rheumatoid vasculitis. The incidence of systemic rheumatoid vasculitis has declined significantly following the general early use of methotrexate in the 1990s, and it is now a rare form of vasculitis. Treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis is conventionally with glucocorticoids and cyclophosphamide, but there is an increasing role for rituximab similar to that in other types of vasculitis. Despite these developments the mortality of rheumatoid vasculitis remains high. Vasculitis in other types of inflammatory arthritis is less well described and the treatment remains empirical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...... resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI....

  17. KARAKTERISTIK PRODUK FERMENTASI DARI BAHAN BAKU KOMBINASI SUSU KAMBING DENGAN EKSTRAK KEDELAI, EKSTRAK JAGUNG, ATAU SANTAN KELAPA [Characterization of Fermented Products Made From Caprine Milk in Combination with Soy Extract, Corn Extract or Coconut Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartati Chairunnisa*

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the best combination of caprine milk with soy extract, corn extract, or coconut extract in the production of flavored fermented milk products. Products were analyzed for the lactic acid content, crude protein, viscosity and also organoleptic properties (color, texsture, flavour, overall acceptance. This study was performed by a Completely Randomized Design with four kind of treatments, i.e.caprine, caprine milk in combination with soy extract, corn extract, or coconut extract with five replications. The result indicated that the caprine milk in combination with soy extract resulted an acceptable flavored fermented milk product containing 0.78% lactic acid, 6.62% crude protein, and had a viscosity of 2120 centipoise. The texture of the most liked flavoured fermented milk product was viscous to most viscous, and the flavour was slightly sour to sour.

  18. Enterotoxemia em caprinos no Rio Grande do Sul Caprine enterotoxaemia in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson M. Colodel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available São descritos surtos de enterotoxemia em caprinos em cinco propriedades no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os animais afetados eram, normalmente, encontrados mortos ou apresentavam evolução aguda de 2 a 3 horas com acentuada depressão, cólicas abdominais e diarréia profusa com fibrina. Em duas propriedades relataram-se casos com a evolução de até 12 horas. Em treze animais necropsiados observaram-se aumento de líquidos nas cavidades abdominal, torácica e pericárdica, congestão e hiperemia da serosa e mucosa do intestino, conteúdo do cólon líquido com fibrina além de hemorragias de serosa e fibrina. Em um animal constatou-se microangiopatia cerebral caracterizada por acúmulo de material homogêneo e eosinofílico no espaço perivascular. No conteúdo intestinal, colônias com bastonetes morfológica e bioquimicamente sugestivos de Clostridium perfringens foram caracterizadas no estudo bacteriológico. A soroneutralização em camundongos com conteúdo intestinal dos animais afetados, revelou a presença da toxina épsilon. Estes achados evidenciam a enterotoxemia como doença de importância para criação de caprinos no Rio Grande do Sul.Five outbreaks of caprine enterotoxaemia in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were studied. The animals were found dead or had a clinical course that usually lasted 2-3 hours. From two farms a clinical manifestation period of 12 hours was reported. Clinical signs were characterized by depression, marked abdominal discomfort, profuse watery diarrhea with fibrin clots, and death. Thirteen necropsies were performed and hydropericardium, hydrothorax and hydroperitoneum were commonly found. The mucosa and serosa of the colon were congested, and its contents was watery with multiple fibrin clots. Serosal hemorrhages and fibrin clots in the gallbladder were also seen. Fibrinous colitis and thyphilitis were the most frequent histological changes. Cerebral microangiopathy was observed in one case, which was

  19. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  20. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required ...

  1. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Alternative Medicine http://nccam.nih.gov NIHSeniorHealth.gov—Rheumatoid Arthritis ... ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects the ...

  4. Shell Vial culture Assay for the rapid diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis, West Nile and Dengue-2 viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrinath S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Encephalitis caused by flaviviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV and West Nile virus (WNV is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in many endemic countries. Dengue-2 (Den-2 virus is a recent addition to the list of encephalitogenic viruses, after its Central Nervous System (CNS invasion capability has been established. There is a wide array of laboratory tools that have helped us not only in the diagnosis of these conditions but also in understanding their pathogenesis and pathology. However, there are no reports of Shell Vial Culture (SVC, a centrifuge enhanced tissue culture assay that has revolutionized viral culturing in terms of rapidity and sensitivity being optimized for these flaviviral encephalitic conditions. The present study is an attempt to standardize and evaluate the usefulness of SVC for the laboratory diagnosis of JE, WN and Den-2 encephalitis cases and to compare it with Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF technique that detects cell associated virus antigen. Analysis of the various clinical parameters with respect to viral etiology has also been carried out. Results Pediatric patients constituted the major group involved in the study (92%. Etiological diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be established in twenty nine (58% patients. JE encephalitis was the commonest with 19 (39% cases being positive followed by, WN (9 cases-18% and Den-2 (one case. IIF test could detect antigens of JE, WN and Den-2 viruses in 16(32%, 7(14% and 1 case respectively. Shell vial culture assay picked up all cases that were positive by IIF test. In addition, SVC assay could detect 3 and 2 more cases of JE and WN encephalitis respectively, that were negative by the IIF test. Conclusion Shell vial culture is a rapid and efficient tool for the etiological diagnosis of JE, WN and Den-2 encephalitis cases. Early, prompt collection, transport and processing of the CSF samples, would make SVC a better method for the

  5. Unusual acute encephalitis involving the thalamus: imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Han Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho; Nam, Hyun Woo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyu Ho [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Woo Ho [Sanggyo Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    To describe the brain CT and MR imaging findings of unusual acute encephalitis involving the thalamus. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and CT and/or MR imaging findings of six patients with acute encephalitis involving the thalamus. CT (n=6) and MR imaging (n=6) were performed during the acute and/or convalescent stage of the illness. Brain CT showed brain swelling (n=2), low attenuation of both thalami (n=1) or normal findings (n=3). Initial MR imaging indicated that in all patients the thalamus was involved either bilaterally (n=5) or unilaterally (n=1). Lesions were also present in the midbrain (n=5), medial temporal lobe (n=4), pons (n=3), both hippocampi (n=3) the insular cortex (n=2), medulla (n=2), lateral temporal lobe cortex (n=1), both cingulate gyri (n=1), both basal ganglia (n=1), and the left hemispheric cortex (n=1). These CT or MR imaging findings of acute encephalitis of unknown etiology were similar to a combination of those of Japanese encephalitis and herpes simplex encephalitis. In order to document the specific causative agents which lead to the appearance of these imaging features, further investigation is required.

  6. VGKC antibodies in pediatric encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, J; Brenner, T; Gill, D; Brilot, F; Antony, J; Vincent, A; Lang, B; Dale, R C

    2011-04-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Ab) are associated with limbic encephalitis and neuromyotonia in adults. There have been no systematic investigations in children to date. We looked for antibodies that are associated with CNS syndromes in adults including antibodies to VGKCs, NMDARs, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and glycine receptor (GlyR) in the stored acute serum from 10 children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with encephalopathy and status epilepticus. We also looked for antibodies to leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (Lgi1) and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), which are now known to be tightly complexed with VGKCs in vivo. Sixty-nine pediatric controls were used for comparison. An elevated VGKC Ab (>100 pM) was detected in 4/10 patients with encephalitis compared to only 1/69 controls (p VGKC Ab-positive patients with encephalitis was variable including good recovery (n = 1), cognitive impairment (n = 3), temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 2), and mesial temporal sclerosis (n = 1). No other antibodies were detected, including those to Lgi1 and Caspr2. Encephalitis associated with VGKC Ab occurs in children and presents with status epilepticus and focal epilepsy. These antibodies are not directed against Lgi1 or Caspr2.

  7. Herpes simplex encephalitis : from virus to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Flore; Deback, Claire; Agut, Henri

    2011-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the cause of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), a devastating human disease which occurs in 2-4 cases per million/year. HSE results either from a primary infection or virus reactivation, in accordance with the common pattern of HSV infection which is a chronic lifelong process. However its pathophysiology remains largely unknown and its poor prognosis is in contrast with the usually good tolerance of most clinical herpetic manifestations. HSE is due to HSV type 1 (HSV-1) in most cases but HSV type 2 (HSV-2) may be also implicated, especially in infants in the context of neonatal herpes. Polymerase chain reaction detection of HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is the diagnosis of choice for HSE. Acyclovir, a nucleoside analogue which inhibits viral DNA polymerase activity, is the reference treatment of HSE while foscarnet constitutes an alternative therapy and the efficacy of cidofovir is currently uncertain in that context. The emergence of HSV resistance to acyclovir, a phenomenon which is mainly observed among immunocompromised patients, is a current concern although no case of HSE due to an acyclovir-resistant HSV strain has been reported to date. Nevertheless the identification and development of novel therapeutic strategies against HSV appears to be a non dispensable objective for future research in virology.

  8. Computer tomography in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacke, W.; Zeumer, H.

    1981-01-01

    The CT findings in six patients with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were analysed and compared with the literature. Thirty-four examinations were performed, 27 within the first 14 days of the illness. The early findings show three characteristic features: The CT may be entirely normal up to the fourth day. Consistent with clinical and E.E.G. findings there then develops a hypodense temporal lesion which, even at this stage, acts as an expanding lesion in half the patients. Between the sixth and eighth day there is frequently involvement of the contra-lateral temporal lobe, not as a continuation, but as a new lesion. At the same time, or after several days, there is involvement of the basal portions of the frontal lobes. In this late phase there may be necrosis in the basal ganglia, thalamus or other parts of the brain. The CT findings in this late phase are uniform and characteristic of the disease. For early diagnosis and treatment the early clinical, electrophysiological and neuro-radiological findings are important. A normal CT scan two days after the onset of clinical symptoms may be regarded as significant. (orig.) [de

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Myostatin Gene in Stably Transfected Caprine Fibroblast Cells by Anti-Myostatin shRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir Kumar; Jain, Hemlata; Kumar, Dharmendra; Bedekar, Megha Kadam; Pandey, Akhilesh Kumar; Sarkhel, Bikash Chandra

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major component of lean tissue that is used for consumption, and myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Downregulation of this gene therefore offers a strategy for developing superior animals with enhanced muscle growth. Knockdown of myostatin was achieved by RNA interference technology. The anti-myostatin shRNA were designed and stably transfected in caprine fibroblast cells. The reduced expression of target gene was achieved and measured in clonal fibroblast cells by real-time PCR. Two single-cell clones induced significant decrease of myostatin gene expression by 73.96 and 72.66 %, respectively (P < 0.05). To ensure the appropriate growth of transfected cell, seven media were tested. The best suited media was used for transfected fibroblast cell proliferation. The findings suggest that shRNA provides a novel potential tool for gene knockdown and these stably transfected cells can be used as the donor cells for animal cloning.

  10. Japanese encephalitis can trigger anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiannan; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is usually a monophasic disease; however, in rare cases, patients with JE may have an early relapse after a partial recovery, giving rise to a biphasic pattern for the disease. In this study, we report three pediatric cases in which post-JE relapse was characterized by movement disorder and/or behavioral problems, and was related to anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) immunoglobulin G (IgG). Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were examined for anti-NMDAR IgG in three patients who had confirmed JE and then developed relapsing symptoms which were similar to those of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. The main symptoms of the two young children were choreoathetosis, irritability, and sleep disorder; while for the teenager, agitation, mutism, rigidity, and sleep disorder were the main symptoms. Samples of cerebrospinal fluid from all patients were positive for anti-NMDAR IgG, and all patients gradually improved with immunotherapy. Testing for NMDAR antibodies is highly recommend in patients with JE, especially those with a relapsing syndrome involving movement disorder and/or behavioral problems, as these patients may benefit from immunotherapy.

  11. Tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs for the treatment of caprine cartilage defects, including distribution of laminin and type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of (1) cartilage tissue-engineered constructs; and (2) the tissue filling cartilage defects in a goat model into which the constructs were implanted, particularly for the presence of the basement membrane molecules, laminin and type IV collagen. Basement membrane molecules are localized to the pericellular matrix in normal adult articular cartilage, but have not been examined in tissue-engineered constructs cultured in vitro or in tissue filling cartilage defects into which the constructs were implanted. Cartilaginous constructs were engineered in vitro using caprine chondrocyte-seeded type II collagen scaffolds. Autologous constructs were implanted into 4-mm-diameter defects created to the tidemark in the trochlear groove in the knee joints of skeletally mature goats. Eight weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. Constructs underwent immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation. Widespread staining for the two basement membrane molecules was observed throughout the extracellular matrix of in vitro and in vivo samples in a distribution unlike that previously reported for cartilage. At sacrifice, 70% of the defect site was filled with reparative tissue, which consisted largely of fibrous tissue and some fibrocartilage, with over 70% of the reparative tissue bonded to the adjacent host tissue. A novel finding of this study was the observation of laminin and type IV collagen in in vitro engineered cartilaginous constructs and in vivo cartilage repair samples from defects into which the constructs were implanted, as well as in normal caprine articular cartilage. Future work is needed to elucidate the role of basement membrane molecules during cartilage repair and regeneration.

  12. Cloning and expression of SOLD1 in ovine and caprine placenta, and their expected roles during the development of placentomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizaki Keiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ly-6 (Ly-6/uPAR superfamily members share the Ly-6 domain defined by distinct disulfide bonding patterns between 8 or 10 cysteine residues. They comprise membrane- and secretory-type proteins. We recently reported the gene and protein characterization of the bovine secreted protein of Ly-6 domain 1 (SOLD1. Bovine SOLD1 is expressed in trophoblast mononucleate cells (TMCs and is localized in the cotyledonary mesenchyme. Here, we compared the expression and functionality of SOLD1 among the ruminants. We examined mRNA expression by chorionic fibroblasts as a measure of one of the SOLD1 functions. Results Ovine and caprine SOLD1 mRNAs have 303 bp open reading frames and encode for deduced SOLD1 proteins with 100 amino acids, including a 22-aa-long signal peptide at the N-terminal. Both of the SOLD1 amino acid sequences have high similarities with the bovine sequence. Both SOLD1 mRNAs were also expressed in TMCs of cotyledons and intercotyledonary membranes. The mature SOLD1 proteins were localized in the mesenchymal villi of cotyledons after secretion. Bovine, ovine and caprine SOLD1 affected gene expression in mesenchymal fibroblasts in vitro; nucleoredoxin expression was upregulated and BCL2-like 13 was downregulated. Thus, we suggest that SOLD1 acts as a modulator of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Conclusion Expressing cells and protein localization of SOLD1 coincided among the three ruminants. SOLD1 participated in regulating nucleoredoxin and BCL2-like 13 expression in chorionic fibroblasts. SOLD1 is produced specifically in the cotyledons and intercotyledonary membranes in ruminants and appears to be involved in the construction of the ruminant placenta.

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact ...

  14. Psoriatic arthritis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ferrer, A; Laiz-Alonso, A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and clinical aspects of the disease justify the present review. Studies have identified common inflammatory pathways related to the innate immune response, such as the IL-12/IL-23 axis, along with numerous genes that affect susceptibility to both diseases and influence phenotypic development. Interest has grown in biomarkers that can be used for early diagnosis or prognosis or to predict joint destruction and the response to treatment. Recent reports describe important differences between the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics on the process of new bone formation. Other issues that have been discussed include the need for reliable screening methods, particularly for early detection of oligoarticular arthritis, and for protocols to guide referral to specialists, especially in newly created multidisciplinary practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Nipah virus encephalitis: A cause for concern for Indian neurologists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halder Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first and only recorded outbreak of Nipah virus (NV encephalitis in India occurred in the winter of 2001, although the causative organism could only be identified 5 years down the line in 2006. The first ever-recorded outbreak of NV encephalitis occurred in the Malaysian peninsula in 1998-99; though between 2001 and 2005, at least four outbreaks occurred in our neighboring country of Bangladesh. The threat of further outbreaks of this dangerous disease looms large on the Indian subcontinent, given the natural reservoir of the definitive host, namely, fruit-eating bats of the genus Pteropus. This review would briefly highlight the epidemiology, clinical aspects and diagnosis of NV encephalitis to enlighten the neurological community of the country for early detection and implementation of preventive measures in the event of further outbreaks, especially those which are generally passed of as ′mystery diseases′ in the lay press and even by governmental agencies.

  16. Japanese encephalitis: a review of the Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Tiwari

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV causes Japanese encephalitis, which is a leading form of viral encephalitis in Asia, with around 50,000 cases and 10,000 deaths per year in children below 15 years of age. The JEV has shown a tendency to extend to other geographic regions. Case fatality averages 30% and a high percentage of the survivors are left with permanent neuropsychiatric sequelae. Currently, there is no cure for JEV, and treatment is mainly supportive. Patients are not infectious, but should avoid further mosquito bites. A number of antiviral agents have been investigated; however, none of these have convincingly been shown to improve the outcome of JEV. In this review, the current knowledge of the epidemiology and the pathogenesis of this deadly disease have been summarized.

  17. Japanese encephalitis: a review of the Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Tiwari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV causes Japanese encephalitis, which is a leading form of viral encephalitis in Asia, with around 50,000 cases and 10,000 deaths per year in children below 15 years of age. The JEV has shown a tendency to extend to other geographic regions. Case fatality averages 30% and a high percentage of the survivors are left with permanent neuropsychiatric sequelae. Currently, there is no cure for JEV, and treatment is mainly supportive. Patients are not infectious, but should avoid further mosquito bites. A number of antiviral agents have been investigated; however, none of these have convincingly been shown to improve the outcome of JEV. In this review, the current knowledge of the epidemiology and the pathogenesis of this deadly disease have been summarized.

  18. A rare case of autoimmune limbic encephalitis: an uncharted territory!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hatim; Al Jasser, Abdulelah N; Khan, Sonia A; Tlili, Kalthoum G

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is rare. Several auto- antibodies are described in autoimmune encephalitis. We describe a case of autoimmune limbic encephalitis associated with positive voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies and positive leucine-rich glioma inactivated protein 1 antibodies (LGI1). A 33-year-old Saudi housewife, she presented with 2 months history of cognitive deterioration and recurrent left facio-brachial dystonic seizures followed by generalized tonic clonic seizures. At times the seizures are preceded by rising epigastric aura and shortness of breath. The neurological examination was normal apart from upgoing left plantar reflex. She had borderline IQ of 76 with impaired verbal fluency and impaired visual and verbal memory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed right mesial temporal non-enhancing lesion. Cerebrospinal fluid examination was positive for LGI1 and VGKC. Optimal seizure control was achieved with immunotherapy.

  19. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Vera, Sandra Liliana; Iglesias Gamarra, Antonio; Restrepo Suarez, Jose Felix

    2003-01-01

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  20. Tracheobronchomegaly and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rua Marin, Catalina; Diaz Betancur, James Samir; Cardona, Alejandro; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Tracheobronchomegaly is a rare condition of unknown etiology that has been described in association with connective tissue diseases. We present a case of tracheomegaly in a patient with a long evolution rheumatoid arthritis. This is the second case reported in the medical literature until now. Association between these pathologies is uncertain and we can not establish a clear pathophysiological link due to the rarity of its occurrence and the late onset of symptoms

  1. Epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in the Philippines: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Lopez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is an important cause of encephalitis in most of Asia, with high case fatality rates and often significant neurologic sequelae among survivors. The epidemiology of JE in the Philippines is not well defined. To support consideration of JE vaccine for introduction into the national schedule in the Philippines, we conducted a systematic literature review and summarized JE surveillance data from 2011 to 2014.We conducted searches on Japanese encephalitis and the Philippines in four databases and one library. Data from acute encephalitis syndrome (AES and JE surveillance and from the national reference laboratory from January 2011 to March 2014 were tabulated and mapped.We identified 29 published reports and presentations on JE in the Philippines, including 5 serologic surveys, 18 reports of clinical cases, and 8 animal studies (including two with both clinical cases and animal data. The 18 clinical studies reported 257 cases of laboratory-confirmed JE from 1972 to 2013. JE virus (JEV was the causative agent in 7% to 18% of cases of clinical meningitis and encephalitis combined, and 16% to 40% of clinical encephalitis cases. JE predominantly affected children under 15 years of age and 6% to 7% of cases resulted in death. Surveillance data from January 2011 to March 2014 identified 73 (15% laboratory-confirmed JE cases out of 497 cases tested.This comprehensive review demonstrates the endemicity and extensive geographic range of JE in the Philippines, and supports the use of JE vaccine in the country. Continued and improved surveillance with laboratory confirmation is needed to systematically quantify the burden of JE, to provide information that can guide prioritization of high risk areas in the country and determination of appropriate age and schedule of vaccine introduction, and to measure the impact of preventive measures including immunization against this important public health threat.

  2. Case Report: Magnetic resonance imaging in rabies encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Arekapudi Subramanyaswara; Varma, Dandu Ravi; Chalapathi Rao, Mamidi Venkata; Mohandas, Surat

    2009-01-01

    Rabies encephalitis is an invariably fatal disease characterized by typical clinical symptoms. Although the diagnosis of this condition can be made on the basis of the patient's history and the classical clinical presentation, neuroimaging may still play a role, especially for establishing an early diagnosis in cases with atypical presentations or when the history of animal bite is not forthcoming. We report the MRI findings in a case of furious rabies encephalitis and describe the utility of diffusion imaging in its diagnosis

  3. Hemorrhagic herpes encephalitis: A difficult diagnosis in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, N.U.; Albert, H.H. von

    1982-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common sporadically appearing encephalitis in Central Europe. Differential diagnosis to brain tumors or spontaneous intercerebral hemorrhage is difficult. There are CT scan findings which are characteristic of HSE but there are no pathognomonic patterns. These characteristic findings are helpful in differential diagnosis to neoplastic or vascular processes. Thus, other diagnostic procedures (i.e. brain biopsy) to confirm diagnosis of HSE and effective therapy may be carried out in time. The difficulties in differential diagnosis are shown by the presented case. (orig.) [de

  4. Imaging of Posttraumatic Arthritis, Avascular Necrosis, Septic Arthritis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, and Cancer Mimicking Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupasov, Andrey; Cain, Usa; Montoya, Simone; Blickman, Johan G

    2017-09-01

    This article focuses on the imaging of 5 discrete entities with a common end result of disability: posttraumatic arthritis, a common form of secondary osteoarthritis that results from a prior insult to the joint; avascular necrosis, a disease of impaired osseous blood flow, leading to cellular death and subsequent osseous collapse; septic arthritis, an infectious process leading to destructive changes within the joint; complex regional pain syndrome, a chronic limb-confined painful condition arising after injury; and cases of cancer mimicking arthritis, in which the initial findings seem to represent arthritis, despite a more insidious cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Demonstration of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp mycoides, small colony type in outbreaks of caprine pleuropneumonia in eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusiluka, L.J.M.; Semuguruka, W.D.; Kazwala, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    by different degrees of vasculitis, and fibrinocellular exudation into the alveolar septae and lumina, and into interlobular septae and pleura. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were isolated...... from some of the examined goats including a case with a sequestrum which yielded Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type. This work reports the first description of an outbreak of caprine pleuropneumonia in Tanzania in which M. capripneumoniae and M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small...

  6. Glioblastoma as differential diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogrig, Alberto; Joubert, Bastien; Ducray, Francois; Thomas, Laure; Izquierdo, Cristina; Decaestecker, Kévin; Martinaud, Olivier; Gerardin, Emmanuel; Grand, Sylvie; Honnorat, Jérome

    2018-03-01

    To identify the clinical and radiological features that should raise suspicion for the autoimmune encephalitis (AE)-like presentation of glioblastoma. This is an observational, retrospective case series of patients referred to the French National Reference Center on Paraneoplastic Neurological Diseases for suspected AE (possible, probable or definite, using the 2016 criteria) who later received a final diagnosis of glioblastoma according to 2016 WHO criteria. An extensive literature search was also conducted for similar existing cases. Between 2014 and 2016, 306 patients were referred to our center for suspected AE. Six of these patients (2%) later developed pathologically confirmed glioblastoma. Thirteen patients (9 male) were included for analysis (6 from the present series and 7 from the literature); median age was 63. Initially, a diagnosis of AE was clinically suspected based on: working memory deficits (77%), seizures (62%) (including status epilepticus in 23%), and psychiatric symptoms (46%). Initial brain MRI was not in favor of a typical glioblastoma pattern and showed bilateral (54%) or unilateral selective limbic involvement. Five patients exhibited initial slight contrast enhancement. A clear inflammatory CSF was present in five patients and three from the literature showed autoantibody positivity (NMDAR, VGKC, GluRepsilon2). Median delay between suspicions of AE to GBM diagnosis was 3 months (range 1.5-24) and one patient from the literature was diagnosed post-mortem. An alternative diagnosis of glioblastoma should be considered in patients presenting initially as AE, especially in patients who do not fulfill the criteria for definite AE and in those with a poor clinical evolution despite initial improvement.

  7. Rasmussen encephalitis with dual pathology in a patient without seizures: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Mazur, Marcus D; Mohila, Carrie A; Sweney, Matthew T; Hersh, Aimee; Bollo, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis without seizures is rare. We report a case of Rasmussen encephalitis and cortical dysplasia without epilepsy as well as describe the imaging, pathology, and clinical course and review the literature to investigate whether this may represent a rare subset of Rasmussen encephalitis. We report the case of a 12-year-old girl with a history of cognitive decline and right arm weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse left hemispheric cortical and subcortical atrophy suggestive of Rasmussen encephalitis. The patient had no clinical history of seizures, and electroencephalography did not demonstrate epileptiform abnormalities. Craniotomy for open brain biopsy was performed, and histopathologic evaluation identified Rasmussen encephalitis with cortical dysplasia (dual pathology). To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case of Rasmussen encephalitis diagnosed by both imaging and histopathology that had no clinical or electroencephalographic evidence of seizures and is the only case of Rasmussen encephalitis with cortical dysplasia without epilepsy.

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  10. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  11. Scrub Typhus Leading to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome, Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Siraj A; Bora, Trishna; Laskar, Basanta; Khan, Abdul M; Dutta, Prafulla

    2017-01-01

    To determine the contribution of Orientia tsutsugamushi, the agent of scrub typhus, as a cause of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) in Assam, India, we conducted a retrospective study of hospital patients with symptoms of AES during 2013-2015. Our findings suggest that O. tsutsugamushi infection leads to AES and the resulting illness and death.

  12. Group A Rotavirus Associated with Encephalitis in Red Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Chiara; Martella, Vito; Papetti, Alice; Sabelli, Cristiano; Lelli, Davide; Alborali, G Loris; Gibelli, Lucia; Gelmetti, Daniela; Lavazza, Antonio; Cordioli, Paolo; Boniotti, M Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In 2011, a group A rotavirus was isolated from the brain of a fox with encephalitis and neurologic signs, detected by rabies surveillance in Italy. Intracerebral inoculation of fox brain homogenates into mice was fatal. Genome sequencing revealed a heterologous rotavirus of avian origin, which could provide a model for investigating rotavirus neurovirulence.

  13. West Nile Virus Encephalitis in a Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Ian K.; Crawshaw, Graham J.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Drebot, Michael A.; Andonova, Maya

    2004-01-01

    An aged Barbary ape (Macaca sylvanus) at the Toronto Zoo became infected with naturally acquired West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis that caused neurologic signs, which, associated with other medical problems, led to euthanasia. The diagnosis was based on immunohistochemical assay of brain lesions, reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. PMID:15200866

  14. Infectious meningitis and encephalitis in adults in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Storgaard, Merete; Larsen, Lykke

    2018-01-01

    -haemolytic streptococci (n=14). Meningococcal meningitis was rare (n=11). In encephalitis, Herpes simplex virus-1 was most common (n=37) followed by Varicella zoster virus (n=20), while Varicella zoster virus (n=61) was most common in viral meningitis followed by enterovirus (n=50) and Herpes simplex virus-2 (n=46). Case...

  15. Reducing Vulnerability to the Threat of Japanese Encephalitis in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... The Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus results in between 30,000 to 50,000 reported ... members and health officials to promote sustainable solutions. ... little or no education and have a limited understanding of the disease. ... Tourism is an important driver of economic growth throughout Southeast Asia.

  16. Tick-borne encephalitis virus in horses, Austria, 2011

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rushton, J. O.; Lecollinet, S.; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Svobodová, Petra; Lussy, H.; Nowotny, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2013), s. 635-637 ISSN 1080-6040 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) * strains Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 7.327, year: 2013

  17. Human parechovirus causes encephalitis with white matter injury in Neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Groenendaal, Floris; Hahn, Cecil D.; Hellmann, Jonathan; van Loon, Anton M.; Boivin, Guy; de Vries, Linda S.

    Objective: To assess the role of human parechoviruses (HPeVs) as a cause of neonatal cerebral infection and to report neuroimaging findings of newborn infants with encephalitis caused by HPeVs. Methods: Clinical presentation, cranial ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and

  18. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, P.; de Beukelaar, J.W.; Jansen, C.; Schuur, M.; van Duijn, C.M.; van Coevorden, M.H.; de Graaff, E.; Titulaer, E.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Sillevis Smitt, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases

  19. HHV-6 symptoms in central nervous system. Encephalitis and encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinari, Satoshi; Hamano, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    Described is the present knowledge of central nervous symptoms, mainly encephalitis and encephalopathy, caused by the primary infection of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) in the pediatric field. Discovery of HHV-6 is in 1986, the virus, normally latent, has a high nervous affinity, and most infants are infected until the age of 3 years. Encephalitis and encephalopathy caused by the primary infection can be derived from direct viral invasion in nervous system or secondary like that through angitis. Most of early clinical symptoms are febrile convulsion. Imaging of the head by MRI particularly with diffusion weighted imaging and by cerebral blood flow SPECT with 123 I-infetamine (IMP) is important for classification of encephalitis and encephalopathy by HHV-6: Four types of them are defined according to the area of lesion observed in abnormal images, the basal nuclei-diencephalon-brainstem, frontal lobe-dominant one, cerebral hemisphere and diffusive one. Further reviewed are the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis together with other HHV-6 related problems like infection in neonate, temporal lobe epilepsy and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Current topics are related with activation of latent HHV-6. Despite numerous findings, many remain to be elucidated in acute encephalitis and encephalopathy which are most important in pediatrics. (R.T.)

  20. Computed tomography in young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, T.; Woo, M.; Okazaki, H.; Nishida, N.; Hara, T.; Yasuhara, A.; Kasahara, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained from eight infants and young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. In two cases the initial scan showed diffuse edematous changes as a mass effect without laterality. Unilateral localized low attenuation in the initial scan was evident 4 days after the onset in one patient, and high attenuation in the initial scan appeared on the 6th day in another patient, but in general, it was not possible to establish an early diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis from CT scan. In the longitudinal study the calcification with ventriculomegaly appeared in 3 of 5 survivors, and gyriform calcification in 2 of 3 patients, respectively. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 6 months after the onset of neonatal herpes simplex encephalitis. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with herpes simplex encephalitis are different from those of older children and adults, and the importance of longitudinal CT studies was stressed in clarifying the pathophysiology of the central nervous system involvement in survivors. (orig.)

  1. Von Willebrand Factor Gene Variants Associate with Herpes simplex Encephalitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abdelmagid, N.; Bereczky-Veress, B.; Atanur, S.; Musilová, Alena; Zídek, Václav; Saba, L.; Warnecke, A.; Khademi, M.; Studahl, M.; Aurelius, E.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Garcia-Dias, A.; Denis, C. V.; Bergström, T.; Sköldenberg, B.; Kockum, I.; Aitman, T.; Hübner, N.; Olsson, T.; Pravenec, Michal; Diez, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2016), e0155832 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Von Willebrand Factor gene * Herpes simplex encephalitis * rat * humans Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  2. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  3. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  4. Acute measles encephalitis in partially vaccinated adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fox

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of acute measles encephalitis (AME is poorly understood. Treatment with immune-modulators is based on theories that post-infectious autoimmune responses cause demyelination. The clinical course and immunological parameters of AME were examined during an outbreak in Vietnam.Fifteen measles IgM-positive patients with confusion or Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score below 13, and thirteen with uncomplicated measles were enrolled from 2008-2010. Standardized clinical exams were performed and blood collected for lymphocyte and measles- and auto-antibody analysis. The median age of AME patients was 21 years, similar to controls. Eleven reported receiving measles vaccination when aged one year. Confusion developed a median of 4 days after rash. Six patients had GCS <8 and four required mechanical ventilation. CSF showed pleocytosis (64% and proteinorrhachia (71% but measles virus RNA was not detected. MRI revealed bilateral lesions in the cerebellum and brain stem in some patients. Most received dexamethasone +/- IVIG within 4 days of admission but symptoms persisted for ≥3 weeks in five. The concentration of voltage gated calcium channel-complex-reactive antibodies was 900 pM in one patient, and declined to 609 pM ∼ 3 months later. Measles-reactive IgG antibody avidity was high in AME patients born after vaccine coverage exceeded 50% (∼ 25 years earlier. AME patients had low CD4 (218/µl, p = 0.029 and CD8 (200/µl, p = 0.012 T-cell counts compared to controls.Young adults presenting with AME in Vietnam reported a history of one prior measles immunization, and those aged <25 years had high measles-reactive IgG avidity indicative of prior vaccination. This suggests that one-dose measles immunization is not sufficient to prevent AME in young adults and reinforces the importance of maintaining high coverage with a two-dose measles immunization schedule. Treatment with corticosteroids and IVIG is common practice, and should be

  5. Effect of high-dose dexamethasone on the outcome of acute encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Vaughn, D W; Nisalak, A; Intralawan, P; Poolsuppasit, S; Jongsawas, V; Titsyakorn, U; Johnson, R T

    1992-04-01

    Death due to Japanese encephalitis usually occurs in the first 5 days of hospitalization as a result of deepening coma with respiratory arrest. Death may result from edema-induced increases in intracranial pressure that might be reduced by the administration of steroids. Sixty-five patients presenting in Thailand to four hospitals with a diagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis were randomized in a double-masked fashion and stratified by initial mental status into a placebo group (saline) or a treatment group (dexamethasone 0.6 mg/kg intravenously as a loading dose followed by 0.2 mg/kg every 6 h for 5 days). Fifty-five of the 65 had confirmed Japanese encephalitis as demonstrated by detection of virus or by Japanese encephalitis virus-specific IgM antibody. Important outcome measures included mortality (24%, treatment group; 27%, control group), days to alert mental status (3.9 vs. 6.2), and neurologic status 3 months after discharge (45% abnormal in each group). No statistically significant benefit of high-dose dexamethasone could be detected.

  6. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  7. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  8. TIME AND PLACE DISTRIBUTION OFACUTE ENCEPHALITIS SYNDROME (AES JAPANESE ENCEPHALITIS (JE CASES IN GORAKHPUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G K Singh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 1000 children below the age of 15 years died from encephalitis in the states of UP, Bihar and Assam since 1978. JE vaccinations in 2010 and deep bore wells in 60 districts in India are the two preventive measures in use. Hypothesis generation through a time, place distribution study followed by a risk factor study would help target preventive and curative measures. A spatial temporal analysis of the 2012 encephalitis epidemic in the district of Gorakhpur, having the most cases, is reported. Material and Method Government of UP data on 714 cases of AES/JE occurring during 2012 in Gorakhpur district was analysed. Time and place distribution is described. Various hypotheses on mode of transmission besides other important features of the epidemic were generated. Data was used to create video maps of the 2012 AESJE epidemic using Epi-info 7. Onset of symptoms was used on the time axis and longitude-latitude data from residential details was used to describe the place distribution. Videos were interpreted to draw important inferences which may be used in planning a strategy to break the 2013 epidemic Result: Thirty (4.20% of 714 patients fitting case definitions were confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis. 148 (20% died. 669 (93.69% were below 15 years of age. Male to female ratio was 1.45:1. On 9th Aug 2012 the usual 5 cases per day mark was crossed with 10 cases/day reported. On 22th August the peak of 19 cases/day was reached. On 11th September the epidemic started receding at rates slower than the rise showing multiple spurts. The medical college had 1.5 times the cases than anywhere else. On 10th Dec the daily incidence had returned to under 5 levels. District wise place distribution of the 2009, 2011 and 2012 cases shows Gorakhpur as having 714 i.e. twice the number of cases than anywhere else in 2012. Conclusion: The epidemic is seasonal and perhaps spreads man to man. Mosquito having a life time range of 5 miles cannot spread

  9. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schacherl, M.

    1985-01-01

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.) [de

  10. Cervical Myelopathy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mukerji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of the cervical spine is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical presentation can be variable, and symptoms may be due to neck pain or compressive myeloradiculopathy. We discuss the pathology, grading systems, clinical presentation, indications for surgery and surgical management of cervical myelopathy related to rheumatoid arthritis in this paper. We describe our surgical technique and results. We recommend early consultation for surgical management when involvement of the cervical spine is suspected in rheumatoid arthritis. Even patients with advanced cervical myelopathy should be discussed for surgical treatment, since in our experience improvement in function after surgery is common.

  11. Updating the mild encephalitis hypothesis of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechter, K

    2013-04-05

    Schizophrenia seems to be a heterogeneous disorder. Emerging evidence indicates that low level neuroinflammation (LLNI) may not occur infrequently. Many infectious agents with low overall pathogenicity are risk factors for psychoses including schizophrenia and for autoimmune disorders. According to the mild encephalitis (ME) hypothesis, LLNI represents the core pathogenetic mechanism in a schizophrenia subgroup that has syndromal overlap with other psychiatric disorders. ME may be triggered by infections, autoimmunity, toxicity, or trauma. A 'late hit' and gene-environment interaction are required to explain major findings about schizophrenia, and both aspects would be consistent with the ME hypothesis. Schizophrenia risk genes stay rather constant within populations despite a resulting low number of progeny; this may result from advantages associated with risk genes, e.g., an improved immune response, which may act protectively within changing environments, although they are associated with the disadvantage of increased susceptibility to psychotic disorders. Specific schizophrenic symptoms may arise with instances of LLNI when certain brain functional systems are involved, in addition to being shaped by pre-existing liability factors. Prodrome phase and the transition to a diseased status may be related to LLNI processes emerging and varying over time. The variability in the course of schizophrenia resembles the varying courses of autoimmune disorders, which result from three required factors: genes, the environment, and the immune system. Preliminary criteria for subgrouping neurodevelopmental, genetic, ME, and other types of schizophrenias are provided. A rare example of ME schizophrenia may be observed in Borna disease virus infection. Neurodevelopmental schizophrenia due to early infections has been estimated by others to explain approximately 30% of cases, but the underlying pathomechanisms of transition to disease remain in question. LLNI (e.g. from

  12. Identification of c.483C>T polymorphism in the caprine tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouabid Badaoui

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1 has been shown to play a fundamental role in pigmentation both in human and mouse. In this work, we aimed to characterize the variability of the caprine TYRP1 gene and investigate its segregation in a wide array of goat breeds. By partially sequencing the coding region of the TYRP1 gene in 18 individuals from eight different breeds, we were able to identify a synonymous nucleotide substitution at exon 3 (c.483C>T. An extensive survey of Iberian and Balearic (N=175, Italian (N=99, Swiss (N=54, Asian (N=14, Canarian (N=92 and North African (N=117 goats with different coat colours was carried out. We found that the C-allele has a different distribution in European vs African breeds, being almost fixed in the latter. Moreover, the C-allele showed an increased frequency in white coated breeds (Girgentana, Grigia Molisana, Blanca de Rasquera and Saanen when compared with those displaying a dark pigmentation (Cilentana Nera, Azpi Gorri and Murciano- Granadina. This could be due to genetic drift, migration and other factors associated with the demographic history of breeds under analysis or to a genetic hitchhiking event (c.483C>T frequencies would be shaped by a neighbouring causal mutation differentially selected in white and black goats. More refined studies will be needed to distinguish between these two alternative explanations.

  13. Identification of c.483C>T polymorphism in the caprine tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Amills

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TYRP1 has been shown to play a fundamental role in pigmentation both in human and mouse. In this work, we aimed to characterize the variability of the caprine TYRP1 gene and investigate its segregation in a wide array of goat breeds. By partially sequencing the coding region of the TYRP1 gene in 18 individuals from eight different breeds, we were able to identify a synonymous nucleotide substitution at exon 3 (c.483C>T. An extensive survey of Iberian and Balearic (N=175, Italian (N=99, Swiss (N=54, Asian (N=14, Canarian (N=92 and North African (N=117 goats with different coat colours was carried out. We found that the C-allele has a different distribution in European vs African breeds, being almost fixed in the latter. Moreover, the C-allele showed an increased frequency in white coated breeds (Girgentana, Grigia Molisana, Blanca de Rasquera and Saanen when compared with those displaying a dark pigmentation (Cilentana Nera, Azpi Gorri and Murciano- Granadina. This could be due to genetic drift, migration and other factors associated with the demographic history of breeds under analysis or to a genetic hitchhiking event (c.483C>T frequencies would be shaped by a neighbouring causal mutation differentially selected in white and black goats. More refined studies will be needed to distinguish between these two alternative explanations.

  14. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105+/− mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105+/− mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105+/− mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105+/− mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior. PMID:26865403

  15. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Knut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prüss, H; Leubner, J; Wenke, N K; Czirják, G Á; Szentiks, C A; Greenwood, A D

    2015-08-27

    Knut the polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden drowned in 2011 following seizures and was diagnosed as having suffered encephalitis of unknown etiology after exhaustive pathogen screening. Using the diagnostic criteria applied to human patients, we demonstrate that Knut's encephalitis is almost identical to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis which is a severe autoimmune disease representing the most common non-infectious encephalitis in humans. High concentrations of antibodies specific against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were detected in Knut's cerebrospinal fluid. Histological examination demonstrated very similar patterns of plasma cell infiltration and minimal neuronal loss in affected brain areas. We conclude that Knut suffered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis making his the first reported non-human case of this treatable disease. The results suggest that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be a disease of broad relevance to mammals that until now has remained undiagnosed.

  16. Serum uric acid and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yaqing; Wang, Yuge; Lu, Tingting; Li, Rui; Sun, Xiaobo; Li, Jing; Chang, Yanyu; Hu, Xueqiang; Lu, Zhengqi; Qiu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid (UA) levels are associated with autoimmune and neurodegenerative disorders, but their relationship with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is unknown. UA levels were evaluated in 58 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and 58 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (CTLs). Follow-up evaluations of 30 out of the 58 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were conducted 3 months after admission. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were evaluated in all anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients. Serum UA levels were significantly lower in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis than those in CTLs (p anti-NMDAR encephalitis are reduced during attacks compared with those in CTLs, are normalized after treatment, and are associated with disease severity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Managing ... is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in the immune ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, ... associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to take a more active role ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ...

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  2. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around your spine and legs stronger. Ask your health care provider if you can use a stationary bike. Be aware that if you have arthritis of the hip or knee cap, biking can worsen your symptoms. If you are not ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / ... Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient ...

  5. Fetal Programming in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.O. de Steenwinkel (Florentien)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease mainly affecting synovial tissues, which can lead to severe morbidity and progressive joint destruction resulting in deformations and disability. Other important outcomes include

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  7. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  8. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    inflammation, thick- ness of the synovial lining layer, and vascularity (16). These observations support the hypothesis that citrulli- nated chemokines may...Gerszten RE, Garcia-Zepeda EA, Lim YC, Yoshida M, Ding HA, Gimbrone MA, et al. MCP-1 and IL-8 trigger firm adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium...arthritis: regulation of its production in synovial cells by interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. Arthritis Rheum 1993;36:762–71. 35. Hatano Y

  9. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M Langille

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  10. New Onset Insomnia in a Pediatric Patient: A Case of Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Tamar N. Goldberg; Michael F. Cellucci

    2017-01-01

    Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is becoming more widely recognized as a cause of encephalopathy in both adults and children. Certain clinical features such as mood lability, movement disorders, speech dysfunction, seizures, and autonomic instability in a pediatric patient should prompt immediate concern and evaluation for autoimmune encephalitis among providers. We present the case of a pediatric patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in which the symptom prompting medical evaluation was insomnia. Inso...

  11. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langille, Megan M; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  12. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager

    OpenAIRE

    Langille, Megan M.; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum ...

  13. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  14. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  15. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, C; Krüger, K

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease. Due to the destruction of joints in the course of the disease it leads to significant morbidity in affected patients. The quality of life and even life expectancy can be severely impaired. Early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment is a decisive step towards a more benign course of the disease. New classification criteria have been published in order to help in early diagnosis. Methods of imaging, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging help in the detection of synovitis, which is the major pathomorphological manifestation of arthritis and should be identified without any doubt. Treatment follows the rule of treat to target with the aim of achieving remission or if this is not realistic, at least the lowest possible level of disease activity. The first and perhaps most important step in therapy is the initiation of methotrexate or if contraindications are present, another disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) as soon as the diagnosis is made. Initial addition of glucocorticoids is recommended, which should be reduced in dose and terminated as soon as possible. Furthermore, either the combination of different DMARDs or the start of biologic DMARDs, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) inhibitors or second generation biologic DMARDs is possible as a treatment option. The treatment follows the rule of shared decision-making and is the standard to treat comorbidities, the use an interdisciplinary approach and to treat functional deficits by rehabilitation measures, such as physiotherapy.

  16. Upbeat nystagmus in anti-Ma2 encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Reitboeck, Pablo; Thompson, Graham; Johns, Paul; Al Wahab, Yasir; Omer, Salah; Griffin, Colette

    2014-02-01

    Anti-Ma2 encephalitis is a paraneoplastic disorder characterised by brainstem and/or limbic involvement. Eye movement abnormalities can occur in this condition, often with confusion or somnolence. We describe a patient with progressive oscillopsia (with upbeat nystagmus) and unsteadiness, followed by acute pancreatitis. She did not respond to immunomodulatory treatment and subsequently died of complications related to pancreatitis and sepsis. There was no tumour identified at autopsy, but the anti-Ma2 antibodies in her serum and the discovery of a brainstem-predominant inflammatory infiltrate at autopsy strongly suggest a paraneoplastic disorder. Our case illustrates that upbeat nystagmus can be a predominant feature in anti-Ma2 encephalitis; clinicians should consider testing for anti-Ma2 antibodies in patients with upbeat nystagmus of unknown cause.

  17. Dengue Haemorrhagic Encephalitis: Rare Case Report with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiyal, Aditya Singh; Malik, Chetanya; Hyanki, Gitika

    2017-07-01

    Dengue is an endemic arboviral infection prevalent especially in tropical countries including Southern and Southeast Asia. Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement in dengue infection is uncommon. Haemorrhagic encephalitis is a rare presentation in dengue. This is a case of a 58-year-old male who presented with fever, petechial rash and altered sensorium. Dengue serology IgM was reactive and MRI brain was suggestive of haemorrhagic encephalitis. Patient was managed in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) but eventually succumbed to his illness. We report this fatal outcome of a common viral infection with unusual neurological presentation to propose an association between dengue and neurotropism and the need to look at dengue infection beyond its classical features.

  18. Limbic encephalitis presenting as a post-partum psychiatric condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotkine, Marc; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Vincent, Angela; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi

    2011-09-15

    We describe a woman who presented with a psychiatric disorder post-partum and subsequently developed seizures and cognitive dysfunction prompting further investigation. A diagnosis of limbic encephalitis (LE) was made and antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC) detected. These antibodies are found in many non-paraneoplastic patients with LE. Although antibody-mediated conditions tend to present or relapse post-partum, VGKC-LE in the post-partum period has not been described. Case report. Clinical and imaging data were consistent with limbic encephalitis. High titres of anti-VGKC-complex antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of VGKC-LE. The similarities between the psychiatric symptomatology of VGKC-LE and post-partum psychiatric disorders raise the possibility that some instances of post-partum psychiatric conditions are manifestations of immune-mediated, non-paraneoplastic LE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypothermia in VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S; Irani, S R; Rajabally, Y A; Grubneac, A; Walters, R J; Yazaki, M; Clover, L; Vincent, A

    2008-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab)-associated limbic encephalitis (LE) is a recently described syndrome that broadens the spectrum of immunotherapy-responsive central nervous system disorders. Limbic encephalitis is typically characterised by a sub-acute onset of disorientation, amnesia and seizures, but the clinical spectrum is not yet fully defined and the syndrome could be under-diagnosed. We here describe the clinical profile of four patients with VGKC-Ab-associated LE who had intermittent, episodic hypothermia. One of the patients also described a prodrome of severe neuropathic pain preceding the development of limbic symptoms. Both of these novel symptoms responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, with concurrent amelioration of amnesia/seizures.

  20. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Diagnostic Pathways as Social and Participatory Practices: The Case of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Cooper

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV encephalitis is a potentially devastating disease, with significant rates of mortality and co-morbidities. Although the prognosis for people with HSV encephalitis can be improved by prompt treatment with aciclovir, there are often delays involved in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In response, National Clinical Guidelines have been produced for the UK which make recommendations for improving the management of suspected viral encephalitis. However, little is currently known about the everyday experiences and processes involved in the diagnosis and care of HSV encephalitis. The reported study aimed to provide an account of the diagnosis and treatment of HSV encephalitis from the perspective of people who had been affected by the condition. Thirty narrative interviews were conducted with people who had been diagnosed with HSV encephalitis and their significant others. The narrative accounts reveal problems with gaining access to a diagnosis of encephalitis and shortfalls in care for the condition once in hospital. In response, individuals and their families work hard to obtain medical recognition for the problem and shape the processes of acute care. As a consequence, we argue that the diagnosis and management of HSV encephalitis needs to be considered as a participatory process, which is co-produced by health professionals, patients, and their families. The paper concludes by making recommendations for developing the current management guidelines by formalising the critical role of patients and their significant others in the identification, and treatment of, HSV encephalitis.

  2. Diagnostic Pathways as Social and Participatory Practices: The Case of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jessie; Kierans, Ciara; Defres, Sylviane; Easton, Ava; Kneen, Rachel; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis is a potentially devastating disease, with significant rates of mortality and co-morbidities. Although the prognosis for people with HSV encephalitis can be improved by prompt treatment with aciclovir, there are often delays involved in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In response, National Clinical Guidelines have been produced for the UK which make recommendations for improving the management of suspected viral encephalitis. However, little is currently known about the everyday experiences and processes involved in the diagnosis and care of HSV encephalitis. The reported study aimed to provide an account of the diagnosis and treatment of HSV encephalitis from the perspective of people who had been affected by the condition. Thirty narrative interviews were conducted with people who had been diagnosed with HSV encephalitis and their significant others. The narrative accounts reveal problems with gaining access to a diagnosis of encephalitis and shortfalls in care for the condition once in hospital. In response, individuals and their families work hard to obtain medical recognition for the problem and shape the processes of acute care. As a consequence, we argue that the diagnosis and management of HSV encephalitis needs to be considered as a participatory process, which is co-produced by health professionals, patients, and their families. The paper concludes by making recommendations for developing the current management guidelines by formalising the critical role of patients and their significant others in the identification, and treatment of, HSV encephalitis.

  3. Clinical and cerebrospinal fluid findings contribute to the early differentiation between infectious and noninfectious encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Wilken

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Early recognition and prompt specific treatment are crucial factors influencing the outcome of patients with acute encephalitis. The aim of this study was to determine the main causes of acute encephalitis in our population and to find predictors that may lead to specific diagnosis. Adult patients admitted to our hospital with suspected diagnosis of encephalitis in the period 2006-2013 were included. One hundred and five medical records were analyzed. Eighty-two patients with infectious encephalitis were identified (78% of total cases, 53 (65% men and 29 (35% women, mean age 47.8 years. The most common microorganisms identified were: HSV-1 (11%, VZV (10%, HSV-2 (5% and EBV (5%. Twenty-three patients (22% of the series had non-infectious encephalitis. Headache (p < 0.0001 and fever (p = 0.008 were more frequent in encephalitis of infectious origin. Protein levels and white blood cell counts in the cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in patients affected by infectious encephalitis than in those affected by noninfectious encephalitis (OR 95% CI 12.3 [2.9-51.7] and OR 95% CI 7.4 [2-27], respectively. Identifying specific causal agents of acute encephalitis remains a major challenge. Cerebrospinal fluid markers, as well as specific clinical findings, may however contribute to initial differentiation between infectious and noninfectious causes.

  4. Western equine encephalitis with rapid onset of parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D R; Barthal, J S; Garrett, G

    1977-11-01

    A patient with confirmed western equine encephalitis had the rapid onset of postencephalitic parkinsonian sequelae. This observation corroborates similar previous but rare reports. Response to therapy with levodopa, dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, and trihexyphenidyl was dramatic. However, remission maintained for 12 months without medication suggests that the parkinsonism would have remitted spontaneously. In either case, this has not previously been reported with the western equine togavirus.

  5. Imaging findings of neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vossough, Arastoo; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Bilaniuk, Larissa T.; Schwartz, Erin M. [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The CT, MR, and diffusion-weighted initial and follow-up imaging findings in neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) encephalitis were assessed. The clinical, laboratory and imaging findings in 12 patients (eight girls and four boys) with proven neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis with follow-up were retrospectively reviewed. Patterns of brain involvement and distribution of lesions were studied and the contribution of diffusion-weighted imaging to the imaging diagnosis of this disease was explored. A total of 24 CT and 22 MRI studies were performed with a mean follow-up time of 38 months. Neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis can be multifocal or limited to only the temporal lobes, brainstem, or cerebellum. The deep gray matter structures were involved in 57% of patients, and hemorrhage was seen in more than half of the patients. CT images were normal or showed mild abnormalities in the early stages of the disease. Conventional MR images may be normal in the early stages of the disease. Lesions were initially seen only by diffusion-weighted imaging in 20% of the patients and this modality showed a substantially more extensive disease distribution in an additional 50% of patients. In 40% of patients, watershed distribution ischemic changes were observed in addition to areas of presumed direct herpetic necrosis. Neonatal HSV-2 encephalitis has a variable imaging appearance. Diffusion-weighted MRI is an important adjunct in the imaging evaluation of this disease. Watershed distribution ischemia in areas remote from the primary herpetic lesions may be seen. (orig.)

  6. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infection of cultured mouse macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahantarig, A.; Růžek, Daniel; Vancová, Marie; Janowitz, A.; Šťastná, Hana; Tesařová, Martina; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2009), s. 283-290 ISSN 0300-5526 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/06/1479; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis * macrophage s * electron microscopy Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.106, year: 2009

  7. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Valdés, James J.; Gil, V.A.; Nencka, Radim; Hřebabecký, Hubert; Šála, Michal; Salát, J.; Černý, Jiří; Palus, Martin; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 9 (2015), s. 5483-5493 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis virus * infection * molecular analyses Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 4.415, year: 2015

  8. Contrast enhancement of the gyri in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, K.A.; Langer, M.; Langer, R.

    1982-01-01

    A case of herpes simplex encephalitis was examined by computer tomography. Both cerebral hemispheres showed contrast enhancement of the gyri. The cause of this is considered. The increased contrast medium accumulation in the affected areas is probably due to the marked vascular proliferation which can be demonstrated anatomically, and to the rapid escape of contrast from the capillaries into the interstitial spaces. The findings of other authors, which differ somewhat, are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Investigations of Caspr2, an autoantigen of encephalitis and neuromyotonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric; Huijbers, Maartje GM; Bar, Vered; Boronat, Anna; Wong, Andrew; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Wilson, Christina; Jacobs, Dina; Lai, Meizan; Walker, Russell W; Graus, Francesc; Bataller, Luis; Illa, Isabel; Markx, Sander; Strauss, Kevin A.; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S; Dalmau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Objective To report clinical and immunological investigations of contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2), an autoantigen of encephalitis and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) previously attributed to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC). Methods Clinical analysis of patients with encephalitis, PNH, or both. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to identify the antigen and to develop an assay with Caspr2-expressing cells. Immunoabsorption with Caspr2 and comparative immunostaining of brain and peripheral nerve of wild-type and Caspr2-null mice were used to assess antibody specificity. Results Using Caspr2-expressing cells, antibodies were identified in 8 patients but not in 140 patients with several types of autoimmune or viral encephalitis, PNH, or mutations of the Caspr2-encoding gene. Patients’ antibodies reacted with brain and peripheral nerve in a pattern that co-localized with Caspr2. This reactivity was abrogated after immunoabsorption with Caspr2 and was absent in tissues from Caspr2-null mice. Of the 8 patients with Caspr2 antibodies, 7 had encephalopathy or seizures, 5 neuropathy or PNH, and 1 isolated PNH. Three patients had also myasthenia gravis, bulbar weakness, or symptoms that initially suggested motor neuron disease. None of the patients had active cancer; 7 responded to immunotherapy and were healthy or only mildly disabled at last follow-up (median 8 months, range 6–84). Interpretation Caspr2 is an autoantigen of encephalitis and PNH previously attributed to VGKC antibodies. The occurrence of other autoantibodies may result in a complex syndrome that at presentation could be mistaken for a motor neuron disorder. Recognition of this disorder is important because it responds to immunotherapy. PMID:21387375

  10. Limbic encephalitis presenting as a post-partum psychiatric condition.

    OpenAIRE

    Gotkine, Marc; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Vincent, Angela; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We describe a woman who presented with a psychiatric disorder post-partum and subsequently developed seizures and cognitive dysfunction prompting further investigation. A diagnosis of limbic encephalitis (LE) was made and antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC) detected. These antibodies are found in many non-paraneoplastic patients with LE. Although antibody-mediated conditions tend to present or relapse post-partum, VGKC-LE in the post-partum period has not b...

  11. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. MR and CT imaging patterns in post-varicella encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, C.F. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Larsen, M.B. [Div. of Neurology, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Byrd, S.E. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Radkowski, M.A. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Palka, P.S. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Allen, E.D. [Div. of Neuroimaging, Children`s Memorial Center, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The aim of the investigation was to determine the patterns of cerebral involvement on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in post-varicella encephalitis. Four children between the ages of 2 and 11 years presented over a 5-year period with a diagnosis of post-varicella encephalitis. Their imaging studies and clinical data were reviewed retrospectively. The medical histories of all four children were noncontributory except for recent bouts of chickenpox 1 week to 3 months prior to hospitalization. Three children presented with parkinsonian manifestations. Bilateral, symmetric hypodense, nonenhancing basal ganglia lesions were found on CT. These areas showed nonenhancing low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images on MR. One child presented with diffuse, multiple gray and white matter lesions of similar imaging characteristics; some lesions, however, did enhance. This child had no gait disturbances. Post-varicella encephalitis can produce two patterns of dramatic CT and MR findings. With an appropriate history and clinical findings, varicella as a cause of bilateral basal ganglia or diffuse cerebral lesions can be differentiated from other possible etiologies which include trauma, anoxia, metabolic disorders and demyelinating diseases. (orig.)

  13. Outbreaks of Eastern equine encephalitis in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria L C R; Galiza, Glauco J N; Dantas, Antônio F M; Oliveira, Rafael N; Iamamoto, Keila; Achkar, Samira M; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2011-05-01

    Outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis observed from May 2008 to August 2009 in the Brazilian states of Pernambuco, Ceará, and Paraíba are reported. The disease occurred in 93 farms affecting 229 equids with a case fatality rate of 72.92%. Main clinical signs were circling, depression or hyperexcitability, ataxia, and progressive paralysis with a clinical manifestation period of 3-15 days. Main histologic lesions were a diffuse lymphocytic encephalomyelitis with neuronal death, satellitosis, neuronophagia, and hemorrhages being more severe in the cerebral gray matter of the telencephalon, diencephalon, and mesencephalon. Some animals also had areas of malacia in the telencephalon, thalamus, and basal nuclei. From 1 case, the virus was isolated by mice inoculation, and in other 13 cases was identified as Eastern equine encephalitis virus by semi-nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After DNA sequencing, all samples were identified as eastern equine encephalitis through the BLASTn analysis, but samples from the Ceará and Paraíba states corresponded to the same cluster, while the sample from the state of Pernambuco corresponded to a different cluster. © 2011 The Author(s)

  14. Delays in initiation of acyclovir therapy in herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Peter S; Jackson, Alan C

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is based on clinical findings, MRI, and detection of herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using polymerase chain reaction amplification. Delays in starting treatment are associated with poorer clinical outcomes. We assessed the timing of initiation of acyclovir therapy in HSE. Inpatient databases from seven hospitals in Winnipeg, Manitoba were used to identify individuals diagnosed with encephalitis and HSE from 2004 to 2009. The time taken to initiate therapy with acyclovir and the reasons for delays were determined. Seventy-seven patients were identified; 69 (90%) received acyclovir; in the others a non-HSV infection was strongly suspected. Thirteen patients were subsequently confirmed to have HSE. Acyclovir was initiated a median of 21 hours (3-407) after presentation in encephalitis cases, and a median of 11 hours (3-118) in HSE. The most common reason for delay was a failure to consider HSE in the differential diagnosis, despite suggestive clinical features. Where therapy was delayed in HSE patients, the decision to begin acyclovir was prompted by transfer of the patient to a different service (55%), recommendations by consultants (18%), imaging results (18%), and CSF pleocytosis (9%). Delays in initiating acyclovir for HSE are common, and are most often due to a failure to consider HSE in a timely fashion on presentation. In order to improve patient outcomes, physicians should be more vigilant for HSE, and begin acyclovir therapy expeditiously on the basis of clinical suspicion rather than waiting for confirmatory tests.

  15. Characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus from Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavtchoutko, V; Vene, S; Haglund, M; Forsgren, M; Duks, A; Kalnina, V; Hörling, J; Lundkvist, A

    2000-02-01

    Viruses of the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) antigenic complex, within the family Flaviviridae, cause a variety of diseases including uncomplicated febrile illness, encephalitis, meningo-encephalitis, hemorrhagic fever and chronic disease in humans, domesticated animals or wildlife species. TBE is a serious problem in Latvia with up to a 1,000 patients confirmed serologically annually 1994-1995. No previous data had been reported on the causative agent of TBE in Latvia. In the present study, a virus was isolated from serum of a patient with clinical symptoms of an acute TBE infection. Nucleotide sequence information obtained by direct reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the serological characteristics of the isolated virus strain, designated TBE-Latvia-1-96, indicated a closer relationship to the Vasilchenko strain, isolated in Novosibirsk (Siberia, Russia), as compared to the western European or far eastern subtypes of TBE viruses. In a mouse neurovirulence assay, a significant difference in survival rates (days) was shown between Latvia-1-96 and the western European TBE virus subtype. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  17. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 new ... Edition Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with Us ...

  18. IJMBR ARTHRITIS edited 4.3.1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... Findings: Septic arthritis in the index patient developed insidiously and was diagnosed after ... mellitus, malignancy, and rheumatoid arthritis. Others include ... intravenous drug use, anemia, hemodialysis and the extremes of ...

  19. Silent circulation of St. Louis encephalitis virus prior to an encephalitis outbreak in Cordoba, Argentina (2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Adrian Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available St. Louis encephalitis virus is a complex zoonoses. In 2005, 47 laboratory-confirmed and probable clinical cases of SLEV infection were reported in Córdoba, Argentina. Although the causes of 2005 outbreak remain unknown, they might be related not only to virological factors, but also to ecological and environmental conditions. We hypothesized that one of the factors for SLE reemergence in Córdoba, Argentina, was the introduction of a new SLEV genotype (SLEV genotype III, with no previous activity in the area. In order to evaluate this hypothesis we carried out a molecular characterization of SLEV detections from mosquitoes collected between 2001 and 2004 in Córdoba city. A total of 315 mosquito pools (11,002 individuals including 12 mosquitoes species were analyzed. Overall, 20 pools (8 mosquitoes species were positive for SLEV. During this study, genotypes II, V and VII were detected. No mosquito pool infected with genotype III was detected before the 2005 outbreak. Genotype V was found every year and in the 8 sampled sites. Genotypes II and VII showed limited temporal and spatial activities. We cannot dismiss the association of genotype II and V as etiological agents during the outbreak. However, the silent circulation of other SLEV strains in Córdoba city before the 2005 outbreak suggests that the introduction of genotype III was an important factor associated to this event. Not mutually exclusive, other factors such as changes in avian hosts and mosquitoes vectors communities, driven by climatic and environmental modifications, should also be taken into consideration in further studies.

  20. Clinical analysis of anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; Villarejo, Alberto; Posner, Jerome B; Blumenthal, Deborah; Thiessen, Brian; Saiz, Albert; Meneses, Patricio; Rosenfeld, Myrna R

    2004-08-01

    Increasing experience indicates that anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis differs from classical paraneoplastic limbic or brainstem encephalitis, and therefore may be unrecognized. To facilitate its diagnosis we report a comprehensive clinical analysis of 38 patients with anti-Ma2 encephalitis. Thirty-four (89%) patients presented with isolated or combined limbic, diencephalic or brainstem dysfunction, and four with other syndromes. Considering the clinical and MRI follow-up, 95% of the patients developed limbic, diencephalic or brainstem encephalopathy. Only 26% had classical limbic encephalitis. Excessive daytime sleepiness affected 32% of the patients, sometimes with narcolepsy-cataplexy and low CSF hypocretin. Additional hormonal or MRI abnormalities indicated diencephalic-hypothalamic involvement in 34% of the patients. Eye movement abnormalities were prominent in 92% of the patients with brainstem dysfunction, but those with additional limbic or diencephalic deficits were most affected; 60% of these patients had vertical gaze paresis that sometimes evolved to total external ophthalmoplegia. Three patients developed atypical parkinsonism, and two a severe hypokinetic syndrome with a tendency to eye closure and dramatic reduction of verbal output. Neurological symptoms preceded the tumour diagnosis in 62% of the patients. Brain MRI abnormalities were present in 74% of all patients and 89% of those with limbic or diencephalic dysfunction. Among the 34 patients with cancer, 53% had testicular germ-cell tumours. Two patients without evidence of cancer had testicular microcalcification and one cryptorchidism, risk factors for testicular germ-cell tumours. After neurological syndrome development, 17 of 33 patients received oncological treatment (nine also immunotherapy), 10 immunotherapy alone, and six no treatment. Overall, 33% of the patients had neurological improvement, three with complete recovery; 21% had long-term stabilization, and 46% deteriorated. Features

  1. Allergy in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin-Yue; Zhang, Le; Jiang, Xian; Abdulaziz, Ammar Taha Abdullah; Wang, Yun-Hui; Li, Jin-Mei; Zhou, Dong

    2018-02-01

    Allergy is a potential outcome of dysregulated immune system. Previous studies have shown the association of allergy and autoimmune diseases, however, there is few study to investigate the relationship between allergy and anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis. Thus, we investigate the rate of allergy in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and analyze the risk factors. The rate of allergy was investigated in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and was compared with patients with virus encephalitis. The clinical cutaneous characters were described in details. All patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis were divided into allergic and nonallergic group. Clinical factors were compared in the two groups, and logistic regression model was also used to analyze possible risk factors of allergy. Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had a higher rate of allergy than those with viral encephalitis (22.1% vs 9.2%, odds ratio (OR)=3.23, confidence interval (CI)=1.40-7.42, P=0.006). In patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, allergic patients exhibited longer days in hospital (30days vs 22days, P=0.005) and higher occurrence of decreased consciousness (81.5% vs 58.9%, P=0.031), higher rate of complications (77.8% vs 57.9%, P=0.046) and abnormal electroencephalography (EEG) (100% vs 78.6%, P=0.021) than patients without allergy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibody titers of allergic patients during the disease course were also higher than nonallergic patients (P=0.004). However, further logistic regression analysis did not reveal independent predictors of allergy. Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis show higher allergic rate than those with virus encephalitis. Patients with allergy show higher CSF antibody titers and greater illness severity. However, the final outcome of anti-NMDAR encephalitis was not influenced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. VGKC complex antibodies in pediatric severe acute encephalitis: a study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; CHEESE Study Group

    2013-08-01

    Antibodies to surface proteins like voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complexes are increasingly found in different neurologic diseases and encephalitis in adults and recently, in children. Detecting such antibodies can help identify forms of encephalitis that may respond to immuno-therapies. However, there are few reports on VGKC complex antibodies in pediatric severe acute encephalitis. This study retrospectively reviewed antibodies to VGKC, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (Lgi1), and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2) in 46 children with severe acute encephalitis. Published cases of VGKC complex antibodies in pediatric encephalitis in the period of 2000-2012 were also reviewed. Elevated VGKC complex antibodies (>100pM) were detected in one of the 46 children with severe acute encephalitis. The 4-year and 6-month-old girl presented with seizure and disturbed consciousness. Viral PCR/culture and serologic evidence of influenza A infection was noted. She also had complications of epilepsy, impaired cognition, and altered behavior and psychology. Antibodies to Lgi1 and Caspr2 were not detected. Ten previously published reports revealed that VGKC complex antibodies can occur in children with limbic encephalitis and acute or sub-acute encephalitis. The incidence of VGKC complex antibodies in pediatric severe acute encephalitis is not high with only one (2.2%) of 46 children in this study. And, this is the first report on the association of VGKC complex antibodies and patients with influenza A-related severe acute encephalitis. The mechanism of VGKC complex antibodies in pediatric severe acute encephalitis warrants further study. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Váňová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Title of bachelors thesis: Case report patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis Summary: The work is focused on diseases rheumatoid arthritis and its physiotherapy care. It consists of two parts. Part of the general anatomy of the joint contains a general, deals with the disease rheumatoid arthritis, its diagnosis, treatment and comprehensive rehabilitation treatment. Part has its own special case report physiotherapy sessions on this topic. Key words: rheumatoid arthritis, comprehensive ...

  4. Leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 and voltage gated potassium channel autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Patryce McGinley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypothesizes linking these two disease processes are proposed.

  5. Exercise therapy in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, T.; van Brussel, M.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; van der Net, J.; Kuis, W.; Helders, P. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise therapy is considered an important component of the treatment of arthritis. The efficacy of exercise therapy has been reviewed in adults with rheumatoid arthritis but not in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess the effects of exercise therapy on functional ability,

  6. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for human...

  7. Collagen-induced arthritis in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevaart, Lisette; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J.; Tak, Paul P.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and can be induced in DBA/1 and C57BL/6 mice using different protocols. The CIA model can be used to unravel mechanisms involved in the development of arthritis and is frequently used to study the effect of new

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  10. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  11. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  12. Leishmaniasis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis represents a complex of diseases with an important clinical and epidemiological diversity. Visceral leishmaniasis is of higher priority than cutaneous leishmaniasis as it is a fatal disease in the absence of treatment. The clinical spectrum of leishmaniasis and control of the infection are influenced by the parasite-host relationship. The role of cellular immune responses of the Th1 type in the protection against disease in experimental and human leishmaniasis is well established. TNF-α has been implicated in cytokine-induced macrophage activation and tissue granuloma formation, two activities linked to control of intracellular visceral infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Anti- tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α strategies have had a marked and substantial impact in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, however the clinical use of TNF-α antagonists has been accompanied by increased reporting of infections. Here we report the first case of visceral leishmaniasis in a patient treated for a long period of time with human anti TNF-α monoclonal antibody, adalimumab. Due to the low incidence rate of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis, a systematic screening for leishmaniasis in all patients treated with biologics may be not recommended. However, for those patients living at high risk of leishmaniasis exposure, a periodical serological monitoring should be performed during therapy with anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies.

  13. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  14. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Barnett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs. This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells, that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10 and large intestine (75:25. Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER, in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function.

  15. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alicia M; Roy, Nicole C; McNabb, Warren C; Cookson, Adrian L

    2016-05-06

    Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF) on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells), that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10) and large intestine (75:25). Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL) enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function.

  16. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C.

    2000-01-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  17. Quantification of vector and host competence for Japanese encephalitis virus: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a virus of the Flavivirus genus that may result in encephalitis in human hosts. This vector-borne zoonosis occurs in Eastern and Southeastern Asia and an intentional or inadvertent introduction into the United States (US) will have major public health and economi...

  18. [Post-herpes simplex encephalitis chorea: Viral replication or immunological mechanism?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrhouma, H; Nasri, A; Kraoua, I; Klaa, H; Turki, I; Gouider-Khouja, N

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a severe neurological condition, whose outcome is improved if treated early with acyclovir. Post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea has rarely been reported. We report on two observations of children presenting with post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea, related to two different pathophysiological mechanisms. The first one is an 11-month-old girl developing relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis with chorea due to resumption of viral replication. The second one is a 2-year-old boy with relapsing post-herpes simplex encephalitis acute chorea caused by an immunoinflammatory mechanism. We discuss the different neurological presentations of herpetic relapses, notably those presenting with movement disorders, as well as their clinical, paraclinical, physiopathological, and therapeutic aspects. Post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea may involve two mechanisms: resumption of viral replication or an immunoinflammatory mechanism. Treatment of post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea depends on the underlying mechanism, while prevention is based on antiviral treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis with acyclovir at the dose of 20mg/kg/8h for 21 days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy in a pediatric patient with malignant catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew; Glick, David B; Dinwiddie, Stephen H

    2006-12-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare disorder that can cause memory loss, confusion, personality change, cognitive dysfunction, and psychosis. We present a case of an 11-year-old girl who was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy for a catatonic state associated with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis caused by an ovarian teratoma.

  20. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis during Treatment with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, Russell D.; Pettit, April C.; Wright, Patty W.; Mulligan, Mark J.; Moreland, Larry W.; McLain, David A.; Gnann, John W.; Bloch, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    We report 3 cases of herpes simplex virus encephalitis in patients receiving tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors for rheumatologic disorders. Although TNF-α inhibitors have been reported to increase the risk of other infectious diseases, to our knowledge, an association between anti–TNF-α drugs and herpes simplex virus encephalitis has not been previously described.

  1. Tick-borne encephalitis: What travelers should know when visiting an endemic country

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrdle, A.; Chmelík, V.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2016), s. 2694-2699 ISSN 2164-5515 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-34238A Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : endemic country * flavivirus * tick-borne encephalitis * tick-borne encephalitis virus * travel medicine * vaccination Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.157, year: 2016

  2. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Alvarez X, Williams K. J Leukoc Biol. 2003 Nov;74(5):650-6. Epub 2003 Aug 11. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Monocyte/macrophage... traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage tr

  3. CD8+ T-cells mediate immunopathology in tick-borne encephalitis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžek, Daniel; Salát, Jiří; Palus, M.; Gritsun, T. S.; Gould, E. A.; Dyková, Iva; Skallová, Anna; Jelínek, Jiří; Kopecký, Jan; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 384, č. 1 (2009), s. 1-6 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA ČR GA524/08/1509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis * immunopathology * encephalitis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.042, year: 2009

  4. Variability of the caprine whey protein genes and their association with milk yield, composition and renneting properties in the Sarda breed. 1. The LALBA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Maria Luisa; Pazzola, Michele; Paschino, Pietro; Pira, Maria Giovanna; Vacca, Giuseppe Massimo

    2015-11-01

    The 5' flanking region and 3' UTR of the caprine LALBA gene were analysed by SSCP and sequencing. A total of nine SNPs were detected: three in the promoter region, two were synonymous coding SNPs at exon-1, and four SNPs were in exon-4, within the 3'UTR. The nucleotide changes located in the promoter region (c.-358T>C, c.-163G>A, c.-121T>G) were genotyped by SSCP in 263 Sarda goats to evaluate their possible effect on milk yield, composition and renneting properties. We observed an effect of the three SNPs on milk yield and lactose content. Genotypes TT and CT at c.-358T>C (P A (P C and c.-121T>G were part of transcription factors binding sites, potentially involved in modulating the LALBA gene expression. The LALBA genotype affected renneting properties (P < 0.001), as heterozygotes c.-358CT and c.-163GA were characterised by delayed rennet coagulation time and curd firming time and the lowest value of curd firmness. The present investigation increases the panel of SNPs and adds new information about the effects of the caprine LALBA gene polymorphism.

  5. In vitro growth and maturation of isolated caprine preantral follicles: Influence of insulin and FSH concentration, culture dish, coculture, and oocyte size on meiotic resumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, G M; Brito, I R; Sales, A D; Aguiar, F L N; Duarte, A B G; Araújo, V R; Vieira, L A; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Lima, L F; Alves, B G; Silveira, L B R; Lo Turco, E G; Rodrigues, A P; Campello, C C; Wheeler, M B; Figueiredo, J R

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effect of different insulin concentrations, alone or in combination with either a fixed FSH concentration or increasing FSH concentrations on the in vitro culture of isolated caprine preantral follicles and (2) to analyze the efficiency of two IVM media and maturation culture systems (with or without coculture with in vivo grown oocytes) on the meiosis resumption. Secondary follicles were cultured for 18 days in a basic medium supplemented with low- or high-insulin concentration alone or with a fixed FSH concentration or with increasing FSH concentrations. Oocytes grown in vivo or in vitro were matured alone or cocultured. The high-insulin concentration associated with fixed FSH treatment had higher meiotic resumption rate (P media. In conclusion, a basic medium supplemented with 10-μg/mL insulin and 100-μg/mL FSH throughout the culture period improved meiotic resumption rate and produced MII oocytes from caprine preantral follicles cultured in vitro. The MII rate was similar between in vivo and in vitro grown oocytes ≥110 μm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Epilepsy surgery for epileptic encephalopathy as a sequela of herpes simplex encephalitis: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Birce Dilge; Tanji, Kurenai; Feldstein, Neil A; McSwiggan-Hardin, Maureen; Akman, Cigdem I

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis can manifest with different clinical presentations, including acute monophasic illness and biphasic chronic granulomatous HSV encephalitis. Chronic encephalitis is much less common, and very rare late relapses are associated with intractable epilepsy and progressive neurological deficits with or without evidence of HSV in the cerebrospinal fluid. The authors report on an 8-year-old girl with a history of treated HSV-1 encephalitis when she was 13 months of age and focal epilepsy when she was 2 years old. Although free of clinical seizures, when she was 5, she experienced behavioral and academic dysfunction, which was later attributed to electrographic focal seizures and worsening electroencephalography (EEG) findings with electrical status epilepticus during slow-wave sleep (ESES). Following a right temporal lobectomy, chronic granulomatous encephalitis was diagnosed. The patient's clinical course improved with the resolution of seizures and EEG abnormalities.

  7. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  8. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...... Set. METHODS: Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares...

  9. St. Louis encephalitis virus possibly transmitted through blood transfusion-Arizona, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Heather; Adams, Laura; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; Levy, Craig; Kafenbaum, Tammy; Sylvester, Tammy; Smith, Kirk; Townsend, John; Dosmann, Melissa; Kamel, Hany; Patron, Roberto; Kuehnert, Matthew; Annambhotla, Pallavi; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Rabe, Ingrid B

    2017-12-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that infrequently causes epidemic central nervous system infections. In the United States, blood donors are not screened for St. Louis encephalitis virus infection, and transmission through blood transfusion has not been reported. During September 2015, St. Louis encephalitis virus infection was confirmed in an Arizona kidney transplant recipient. An investigation was initiated to determine the infection source. The patient was interviewed, and medical records were reviewed. To determine the likelihood of mosquito-borne infection, mosquito surveillance data collected at patient and blood donor residences in timeframes consistent with their possible exposure periods were reviewed. To investigate other routes of exposure, organ and blood donor and recipient specimens were obtained and tested for evidence of St. Louis encephalitis virus infection. The patient presented with symptoms of central nervous system infection. Recent St. Louis encephalitis virus infection was serologically confirmed. The organ donor and three other organ recipients showed no laboratory or clinical evidence of St. Louis encephalitis virus infection. Among four donors of blood products received by the patient via transfusion, one donor had a serologically confirmed, recent St. Louis encephalitis virus infection. Exposure to an infected mosquito was unlikely based on the patient's minimal outdoor exposure. In addition, no St. Louis encephalitis virus-infected mosquito pools were identified around the patient's residence. This investigation provides evidence of the first reported possible case of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission through blood product transfusion. Health care providers and public health professionals should maintain heightened awareness for St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission through blood transfusion in settings where outbreaks are identified. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Clinical manifestations and pathophysiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Takahiro; Sakai, Fumihiko

    2008-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a new category of treatment-responsive encephalitis associated with 'anti-NMDAR antibodies', which are antibodies to the NR1/NR2 heteromers of NMDAR. The antibodies are detected in the CSF/serum of young women with ovarian teratoma, who typically develop schizophrenia-like psychiatric symptoms, usually preceded by fever, headache, or viral infection-like illness. After reaching the peak of psychosis, most patients developed seizures followed by an unresponsive/catatonic state, decreased level of consciousness, central hypoventilation frequently requiring mechanical ventilation, orofacial-limb dyskinesias, and autonomic symptoms. Brain MRI is usually unremarkable but focal enhancement or medial temporal lobe abnormalities can be observed. The CSF reveals nonspecific changes. Electroencephalography (EEG) often reveals diffuse delta slowing without paroxysmal discharges, despite frequent bouts of seizures. This is a highly characteristic syndrome evolving in 5 stages, namely, the prodromal phase, psychotic phase, unresponsive phase, hyperkinetic phase, and gradual recovery phase. The hyperkinetic phase is the most prolonged and crucial. This disorder is usually severe and can be fatal, but it is potentially reversible. Once patients overcome the hyperkinetic phase, gradual improvement is expected with in months and full recovery can also be expected over 3 or more years. Ovarian teratoma-associated limbic encephalitis (OTLE) was first reported in 1997 when this syndrome was reported independently in 1 Japanese girl and 1 woman, both of whom improved following tumor resection. In 2005, Dalmau and his research group first demonstrated antibodies to novel neuronal cell membrane antigens in 4 women with OTLE in a non-permeabilized culture of hippocampal neurons. Two years later, they identified conformal extracellular epitopes present in the NR1/NR2B heteromers of NMDAR, which are expressed in the hippocampus

  11. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Mushtaq, A.; Bari, A.; Maqsud, A.; Khan, M. Z.; Ahmad, T. M.; Saira Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  12. Distemper virus encephalitis exerts detrimental effects on hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rüden, E-L; Avemary, J; Zellinger, C; Algermissen, D; Bock, P; Beineke, A; Baumgärtner, W; Stein, V M; Tipold, A; Potschka, H

    2012-08-01

    Despite knowledge about the impact of brain inflammation on hippocampal neurogenesis, data on the influence of virus encephalitis on dentate granule cell neurogenesis are so far limited. Canine distemper is considered an interesting model of virus encephalitis, which can be associated with a chronic progressing disease course and can cause symptomatic seizures. To determine the impact of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection on hippocampal neurogenesis, we compared post-mortem tissue from dogs with infection with and without seizures, from epileptic dogs with non-viral aetiology and from dogs without central nervous system diseases. The majority of animals with infection and with epilepsy of non-viral aetiology exhibited neuronal progenitor numbers below the age average in controls. Virus infection with and without seizures significantly decreased the mean number of neuronal progenitor cells by 43% and 76% as compared to age-matched controls. Ki-67 labelling demonstrated that hippocampal cell proliferation was neither affected by infection nor by epilepsy of non-viral aetiology. Analysis of CDV infection in cells expressing caspase-3, doublecortin or Ki-67 indicated that infection of neuronal progenitor cells is extremely rare and suggests that infection might damage non-differentiated progenitor cells, hamper neuronal differentiation and promote glial differentiation. A high inter-individual variance in the number of lectin-reactive microglial cells was evident in dogs with distemper infection. Statistical analyses did not reveal a correlation between the number of lectin-reactive microglia cells and neuronal progenitor cells. Our data demonstrate that virus encephalitis with and without seizures can exert detrimental effects on hippocampal neurogenesis, which might contribute to long-term consequences of the disease. The lack of a significant impact of distemper virus on Ki-67-labelled cells indicates that the infection affected neuronal differentiation and

  13. Substantia nigra depigmentation and exposure to encephalitis lethargica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Nawaz; Jicha, Gregory A; Abell, Annalisa; Dean, Dawson; Vitek, Jerrold L; Berger, Joseph R

    2012-12-01

    Parkinsonism has occasionally been reported as a consequence of infectious diseases. The present study examines the clinical and pathological correlates of parkinsonism across birth cohorts in relation to critical exposure to the encephalitis lethargica epidemic in the early 1900s. The study population consisted of 678 participants in the Nun Study, of whom 432 died and came to autopsy. Qualitative indices of substantia nigra (SN) depigmentation were verified in a subset of 40 randomly selected subjects using quantitative stereological techniques. SN depigmentation, detected neuropathologically, was correlated with clinical parameters of Parkinson disease, age, and birth cohort. SN depigmentation was detected in 57 (13.2%) of the cohort. Although qualitative SN depigmentation correlated modestly with age (p = 0.02), it correlated best with birth cohort (p = 0.009) for women born in the years 1895-1899. Quantitative measures of SN depigmentation were increased in this birth cohort compared to age matched subjects from flanking birth cohorts 1890-1894 and 1900-1904 (p < 0.001). SN depigmentation correlated with speed of 6- and 50-foot walk (p < 0.0001), up and go test (p < 0.0001), and hand coordination (p < 0.0001). Subjects in the birth cohort 1895-1899 would have been in their late teens and 20s at the onset and during the peak of the encephalitis lethargica epidemic. These were precisely the age ranges of persons who were most often affected by the illness. These data suggest the possibility that the coexistence of parkinsonism and SN depigmentation in this birth cohort may have resulted from the yet undetermined infectious agent responsible for encephalitis lethargica. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  14. Sequential analysis of CT findings in herpes simplex encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Tokumaru, Yukio; Ito, Naoki; Yamada, Tatsuo; Hirayama, Keizo

    1982-01-01

    CT findings of six patients with serologically confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were analyzed sequentially. The initial change in CT scan in 3 cases was generalized cerebral edema instead of low density areas in the anterior temporal lobes, which have generally been known as the initial findings. Then, bilateral (5 cases) or unilateral (1 case) island-shaped low absorption areas in the insular cortex and the claustrum appeared within 10 days of onset in all 6 cases. These findings, especially the latter, seem to be characteristic of the acute stage and useful in the early diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis. The low density areas, then, spread to the temporal lobes, rectal and cingulate gyri in the subacute stage (3 cases) and finally to the frontal and occipital lobes in the chronic stage (2 cases). In the basal ganglia, thalamus, brain stem and cerebellum, however, there were no low density areas. In 2 cases there was no progression of low density areas beyond those of the acute stage. In one case there were high density areas in the temporal lobes and parapontine cisterns bilaterally. This could correspond to the pathological findings in herpes simplex encephalitis. The improvement of CT findings (or arrest at the early stage) was noted in 2 cases in which the clinical state also improved. This might well be the effect of adenine arabinoside. The one case treated with cytosine arabinoside had extensive low density areas in CT and finally died. The importance of CT in the evaluation of adenine arabinoside therapy was stressed. (author)

  15. Efficacy of eastern equine encephalitis immunization in whooping cranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G H; Turell, M J; Pagac, B B

    1997-04-01

    An epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC), Laurel, Maryland (USA), in 1989 provided an opportunity to determine if EEE immunization protected whooping cranes (Grus americana). Based on seroconversion of 31% of sympatric hatch-year sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, and a previous 35% case fatality rate in whooping cranes, 17 (37%) of the 46 susceptible whooping cranes should have been exposed to virus and six should have died. As there were no deaths in these birds, the EEE vaccination program appeared to be efficacious in this whooping crane population.

  16. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  17. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MRI findings in eastern equine encephalitis: the "parenthesis" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Joshua P; Kannabiran, Suma; Burbank, Heather N

    2016-01-01

    Two patients with eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) presented to a tertiary referral center. Both subjects' brain magnetic resonance imaging showed T2/FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) hyperintensities including linear areas of hyperintensity in the external and internal capsules with sparing of the lentiform nuclei. Single case reports of imaging findings in EEE exist with nonspecific patterns of abnormality. We propose that this "( ) parentheses sign" on T2 or FLAIR imaging may distinguish EEE from other processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiographic progession of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siozos, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis can be graded on a 0-IV scala. For this purpose five objective criteria are used: a) destruction, b) osteoporosis, c) narrowing of joint space, d) luxation and e) ankylosis. The grading of the radiographic progression is defined by the extent and the number of the measured alterations. The radiographic progression can be registered yearly. (orig.) [de

  20. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this t...

  1. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  2. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  3. Glucocorticoid Sensitivity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Quax

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAccumulating observations of women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who ‘spontaneously’ experienced less active disease during pregnancy led to the growing belief by Philip Hench that a hormonal substance had to be involved in the improving clinical conditions of pregnant patients with RA.

  4. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields ...

  5. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  6. Clinical study on antibody-associated limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jia-wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE has attracted attentions of more and more clinicians. The associated antibodies mainly act on neuronal cell surface antigens, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptor, the γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2 and so on. The clinical manifestation is primarily defined by the subacute onset of short-term memory loss, seizures, confusion and psychiatric symptoms suggesting the involvement of the limbic system. These severe and protracted disorders can affect children and young adults, occurring with or without tumor association. Routine detection of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and imaging tests show no specificity, but associated antibodies can be detected in serum and (or CSF. The patients respond well to tumor resection and immunotherapies, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, plasma exchange or combination of them, but may relapse. This article aims to study the clinical features and treatment of antibody-associated limbic encephalitis and to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of these diseases.

  7. Cytokine Immunopathogenesis of Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the most important causes of herpangina and hand, foot, and mouth disease. It can also cause severe complications of the central nervous system (CNS. Brain stem encephalitis with pulmonary edema is the severe complication that can lead to death. EV71 replicates in leukocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells resulting in the production of immune and inflammatory mediators that shape innate and acquired immune responses and the complications of disease. Cytokines, as a part of innate immunity, favor the development of antiviral and Th1 immune responses. Cytokines and chemokines play an important role in the pathogenesis EV71 brain stem encephalitis. Both the CNS and the systemic inflammatory responses to infection play important, but distinctly different, roles in the pathogenesis of EV71 pulmonary edema. Administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to modulate inflammation, to reduce sympathetic overactivity, and to improve survival in patients with EV71 autonomic nervous system dysregulation and pulmonary edema.

  8. Crystal structure of the Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vincent C; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H

    2012-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  9. Cortical laminar necrosis in dengue encephalitis-a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Rizvi, Imran; Ingole, Rajan; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Kumar, Neeraj; Batra, Dhruv

    2017-04-20

    Dengue encephalitis is a rare neurological manifestation of dengue fever. Its clinical presentation is similar to other viral encephalitides and encephalopathy. No single specific finding on magnetic resonance imaging of dengue encephalitis has yet been documented. They are highly variable and atypical. A 15-year boy presented with fever, the headache and altered sensorium of 12-day duration. On neurological examination, his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 10 (E3M4V3). There was no focal neurological deficit. Laboratory evaluation revealed leukopenia and marked thrombocytopenia. Dengue virus IgM antibody was positive both in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed signal changes in bilateral parietooccipital and left frontal regions (left hemisphere more involved than the right hemisphere). There was gyriform enhancement bilateral parietooccipital regions consistent with cortical laminar necrosis. Bilaterally diffuse subcortical white matter was also involved and subtle T2 hyperintensity involving both basal ganglia was noted. Gradient echo sequence revealed presence of hemorrhage in the subcortical white matter. Patient was treated conservatively and received platelet transfusion. Patient became fully conscious after 7 days. In a patient with highly suggestive dengue e\\ephalitis, we describe an unusual magnetic resonance imaging finding. This report is possibly the first instance of cortical laminar necrosis in such a setting.

  10. Sequential MRI, SPECT and PET in respiratory syncytial virus encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, K.; Sakazaki, Hiromi; Murakami, Seiko; Yonezawa, Sumiko; Fujimoto, Keiji; Seto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Katsuji; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke

    1999-01-01

    We report on a 3-year-old girl with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) encephalitis manifested by disturbance of consciousness, conjugate eye deviation, anuria, truncal ataxia and intention tremor. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex. No lesion was detected in the cerebral cortex, pons or spinal cord. The hyperintense areas in the cerebellar cortex diminished with recovery from the clinical manifestations and had resolved 2 months after onset. The MRI lesions in the cerebellum were considered to be due to oedema. SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET), performed 3 months after onset, disclosed areas of hypoperfusion and hypometabolism at the same sites. One year after onset, MRI showed mild atrophy of the cerebellum. Hypoperfusion on SPECT and hypometabolism on PET remained. Neuroimaging showed that ataxia and tremor in this case were the result of cerebellitis. The patient has no neurological deficit except for mild truncal ataxia. This patient is a rare example of RSV encephalitis. (orig.)

  11. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC, lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA (B receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis.

  12. Tick-borne encephalitis: a disease neglected by travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haditsch, Martin; Kunze, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a vector-borne disease that is primarily transmitted to humans by infected ticks and causes infection of the central nervous system. Clinical presentations range from meningitis to encephalitis with or without myelitis, and infection may result in death or long-term neurological sequelae. TBE is endemic in regions of at least 27 European as well as in some Asian countries. Infection and disease, however, can be averted successfully by tick-bite prevention and active vaccination. The risk of infection has shifted from daily life and occupational exposure to leisure-time activities, including travelling. Outdoor activities during the tick season with contact with nature increase the risk of tick bites. Although the number of travel-associated cases is unknown, it is certainly under-estimated because there is hardly any awareness of TBE in non-endemic countries. Therefore, the majority of cases remain undiagnosed, also because of the lack of diagnostic serology, as there is no routine screening for TBE in non-endemic regions. Because of the increasing number of travellers from TBE non-endemic to endemic regions, and in view of the fact that TBE was included in the list of notifiable diseases in the European Union in September 2012, this disease needs to become an important issue in travel medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. West Nile Virus Encephalitis in a Patient with Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Deldar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance. Oftentimes, when patients with metastatic cancer present with acute encephalopathy, it is suspected to be secondary to their underlying malignancy. However, there are multiple causes of delirium such as central nervous system (CNS infections, electrolyte abnormalities, and drug adverse reactions. Because West Nile Virus (WNV neuroinvasive disease has a high mortality rate in immunosuppressed patients, a high index of suspicion is required in patients who present with fever, altered mental status, and other neurological symptoms. Observations. Our case report details a single patient with brain metastases who presented with unexplained fever, encephalopathy, and new-onset tremors. Initially, it was assumed that his symptoms were due to his underlying malignancy or seizures. However, because his unexplained fevers persisted, lumbar puncture was pursued. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis included WNV polymerase chain reaction and serologies were ordered which eventually led to diagnosis of WNV encephalitis. Conclusions and Relevance. Patients with metastatic cancer who present with encephalopathy are often evaluated with assumption that malignancy is the underlying etiology. This can lead to delays in diagnosis and possible mistreatment. Our case highlights the importance of maintaining a broad differential diagnosis and an important diagnostic consideration of WNV encephalitis in patients with cancer.

  14. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made

  15. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis and Rasmussen-like Syndrome: An Association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurcharran, Kevin; Karkare, Shefali

    2017-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an immune-mediated condition that has a broad spectrum of manifestations, including seizures, coma, psychosis, and focal neurological deficits. Although usually a diffuse process, unihemispheric involvement mimicking early stages of Rasmussen encephalitis can occur. Rasmussen's encephalitis is a unique syndrome characterized by progressive hemiplegia, drug-resistant focal epilepsy, cognitive decline, and hemispheric brain atrophy contralateral to the hemiplegia. We describe a two-year-old girl with progressive right weakness and epilepsia partialis continua, concerning for early Rasmussen's encephalitis, who tested positive for anti-NMDA receptor antibodies. She experienced complete clinical recovery after immunotherapy. Anti-NMDA receptor antibodies were absent at three weeks and again at one year after the first treatment of intravenous immunoglobulin. There are few reports of Rasmussen-like encephalitis in individuals with anti-NMDA receptor antibody positivity. Thus the clinical significance of this association is yet to be determined. In addition, several other antibodies have been documented in individuals with Rasmussen encephalitis. The lack of a consistently reported antibody in Rasmussen encephalitis patients and the temporary nature of the anti-NMDA receptor antibody in our patient raise the following question: Is the presence of anti-NMDA receptor antibodies the cause of the symptoms or secondary to the pathogenic process? Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum cystatin C and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Y; Chang, Y; Wu, H; Li, J; Cao, B; Sun, X; Wang, J; Peng, L; Hu, X; Yu, X; Qiu, W

    2018-05-01

    Cystatin C (CysC) is associated with many neurodegenerative disorders and autoimmune diseases, but its relationship with anti-N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is unknown. Serum levels of CysC were determined in 66 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 115 healthy controls. Of the 66 patients, 30 had a follow-up evaluation at 3 months after admission. Association of CysC with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and its clinical parameters were evaluated in the patients. The serum levels of CysC were significantly lower in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis than in controls (0.70 ± 0.13 vs 0.83 ± 0.17 mg/mL, P anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients had significantly increased serum CysC levels (P anti-NMDAR encephalitis and its clinical parameters and that the changes in CysC levels correlate with therapeutic effect. Therefore, our findings provide new insights into the association between serum CysC and anti-NMDAR encephalitis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Managing Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Arthritis is a common chronic condition among Americans. Early diagnosis and management of arthritis is critical for maintaining quality of life. This podcast discusses importance of early diagnosis and management of arthritis.

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis – an update on its diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-03

    Dec 3, 2015 ... Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common form of chronic arthritis in children and the most ... A swollen knee and uveitis in a young girl, for instance, is ..... Methotrexate for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  19. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Need to Know About Osteoporosis What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder in ... new habits for healthy bones. The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoporosis Studies have found an increased risk ...

  20. MRI findings in a remitting-relapsing case of Bickerstaff encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondejar, R.R.; Santos, J.M.G.; Villalba, E.F.

    2002-01-01

    A case of remitting-relapsing Bickerstaff encephalitis is reported. The article focuses on its imaging findings and their significance when a clinical differentiation between Bickerstaff encephalitis and Miller-Fisher syndrome is attempted. Signs and symptoms may occasionally overlap. However, because Miller-Fisher syndrome is related to the peripheral nervous system and Bickerstaff encephalitis is a central disease, the recognition of brain stem hypointense lesions on T1-weighted images, which are hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences, could be a reliable tool when the clinical diagnosis is unclear. (orig.)

  1. Imaging of limbic para-neoplastic encephalitis; Imagerie de l`encephalite limbique paraneoplastique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmelin, A.; Sellat, F.; Morand, G.; Quoix, E.; Clouet, P.L.; Dietemann, J.L. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-09-01

    Para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare syndrome mostly associated with small cell lung cancer. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with selective amnesia suggesting limbic encephalitis. A neuroendocrine cell lung cancer was found, confirming the diagnostics of para-neoplastic limbic encephalitis. Contrast-enhanced cerebral CT was normal whether magnetic resonance imaging showed signal abnormalities of the medial part of temporal lobes and hippocampal regions. Because neurologic improvement may follow treatment of the primary tumor, early diagnosis is important. (authors). 10 refs.

  2. Limbic encephalitis and antibodies to Ma2: a paraneoplastic presentation of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, I; Winer, J; Rowlands, D; Dalmau, J

    2000-08-01

    A patient with atypical medullary breast cancer is described who presented with symptoms of limbic encephalitis. The patient's serum and CSF contained antibodies that reacted with the nervous system and the tumour. These antibodies recognised Ma2, a neuronal protein related to paraneoplastic limbic and brainstem encephalitis in men with testicular tumours. This report highlights the importance of testing for paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies in cases of unexplained limbic encephalitis and suggests screening for breast cancer in women with antibodies predominantly directed to Ma2.

  3. Hypocretin-1 CSF levels in anti-Ma2 associated encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, S; Dalmau, J; Bataller, L; Nishino, S; Mignot, E; Verschuuren, J; Lammers, G J

    2004-01-13

    Idiopathic narcolepsy is associated with deficient hypocretin transmission. Narcoleptic symptoms have recently been described in paraneoplastic encephalitis with anti-Ma2 antibodies. The authors measured CSF hypocretin-1 levels in six patients with anti-Ma2 encephalitis, and screened for anti-Ma antibodies in patients with idiopathic narcolepsy. Anti-Ma autoantibodies were not detected in patients with idiopathic narcolepsy. Four patients with anti-Ma2 encephalitis had excessive daytime sleepiness; hypocretin-1 was not detectable in their cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting an immune-mediated hypocretin dysfunction.

  4. Histopathologic identification of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimath Alyemni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis is an uncommon manifestation of T. cruzi infection, typically seen in immunocompromised patients. Encephalitis results from the reactivation of chronic infection predominately in individuals from endemic areas. Increased awareness of this complication is essential especially with increased migration of patients from endemic areas with concomitant HIV infection. Here we report a case of Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient from Mexico in which there was no evidence of acute serologic, CSF, or blood infection by T. cruzi trypomastigotes.

  5. Treatment of VGKC complex antibody-associated limbic encephalitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radja, Guirindhra Koumar; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is an autoimmune neuropsychiatric condition characterized by subacute cognitive symptoms, seizures, and affective changes. Although limbic encephalitis is usually caused by an immune reaction secondary to neoplasms, different types of potentially treatable non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (nPLE) have recently been described. In particular, published studies have reported variable responses to immunosuppressive therapy in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel (VGKC) complex antibody-associated nPLE. This systematic literature review found that the most significant improvements were reported by patients presenting with affective symptoms and consistent neuroradiological changes. In these patients, improved clinical outcomes correlated with the largest decreases in antibody titers.

  6. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis early: a prediction model for persistent (erosive) arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Henk; le Cessie, Saskia; Vos, Koen; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.

    2002-01-01

    To develop a clinical model for the prediction, at the first visit, of 3 forms of arthritis outcome: self-limiting, persistent nonerosive, and persistent erosive arthritis. A standardized diagnostic evaluation was performed on 524 consecutive, newly referred patients with early arthritis.

  8. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  9. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  10. Optimization of the HS-SPME-GC/MS technique for the analysis of volatile compounds in caprine Coalho cheese using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliana Kênia Alves BEZERRA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Caprine Coalho cheese presents great potential for a typical protected designation of origin, considering that this traditional Brazilian cheese presents a slightly salty and acid flavor, combined with a unique texture. This study optimized the HS-SPME-GC-MS methodology for volatile analysis of Coalho cheese, which can be used as a tool to help in the identification of the distinctive aroma profile of this cheese. The conditions of equilibrium time, extraction temperature and time were optimized using the statistical tool factorial experimental design 23, and applying the desirability function. After the evaluation, it was concluded that the optimum extraction conditions comprised equilibrium and extraction time of 20 and 40 minutes, respectively; and ideal extraction temperature of 45 °C. The optimum extraction of volatile compounds in goat Coalho cheese captured 32 volatile compounds: 5 alcohols, 5 esters, 3 ketones, 6 acids, 3 aldehydes, 3 terpenes, and 7 hydrocarbons.

  11. Clinical profile and outcome of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES patients treated in College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekhjung J Thapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acute encephalitis syndrome is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in Nepal. Although Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV was thought to be a major cause for acute encephalitis syndrome, more non-Japanese encephalitis virus cases are reported. The outcome of patients with acute encephalitis syndrome is variable. Our study was designed to study the clinical profile and outcome of patients with acute encephalitis syndrome managed in tertiary care center in central Nepal. Methods: The record of patients admitted with diagnosis of acute encephalitis syndrome,from January 2010 to December 2010 in College of Medical Sciences-Teaching Hospital (CMS-TH was reviewed. They were classified clinically as meningitis, encephalitis and meningoencephalitis. The clinical details and reports of the patients were recorded and analyzed. Results: Total of 85 cases of meningitis and encephalitis were identified. Mean age was 19.18 years. Fifty-six (65.9% patients were males and 29 (34.1% were females. Sixty (70.58% patients had meningitis, 8 (9.41% had encephalitis, and 17 (20.0% had meningoencephalitis. JE serology was positive in 4 patients (4.7%. Seventy-two (84.7% patients made full recovery and were discharged from hospital. Thirteen (15.3% patients left against medical advice (LAMA. Conclusion: Acute encephalitis syndrome is still a major public health problem in Nepal. Few of these patients have Japanese Encephalitis. There is a trend towards improved outcome because of availability of improved health services. However, financial constraint remains a challenge in management of acute encephalitis syndrome. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-2, 31-37 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i2.9685

  12. Viral articular deformations in a goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Périe, P.; Maillard, R.; Polack, B.; Millemann, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A goat belonging to an animal aid association was presented for bilateral deformation of the tarsus and carpus and signs of high-grade pain. ELISA serology was positive for Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus. Radiography revealed marked osseous remodelling of the tarsus. The blood fibrinogen concentration was very elevated. On infected commercial farms, it is recommended that both seropositive animals and their offspring are culled when the level of infected is low, or to separate the kids from the mothers at an early age. In this case, palliative treatment was prescribed based on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and articular puncture-lavages [it

  13. A clinical case of pseudotumorous chronic parainfectious limbic encephalitis

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    N. A. Shnaider

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parainfectous limbic encephalitis (PILE associated with viruses of the Herpesviridae family is one of the forms of chronic herpes encephalitis characterized by limbic system dysfunction and a prolonged course with frequent exacerbations. There are two types of the course of the disease: latent autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE progressing to mesial temporal sclerosis and pseudotumorous granulomatous LE. The latter (inflammatory pseudotumor or granuloma is characterized by the formation of a polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate with the elements of fibrosis, necrosis, and a granulomatous reaction and by myofibroblast cells. This is a slowly growing benign pseudotumor that contains much more plasma cells than inflammatory ones. The diagnosis of pseudotumorous LE is difficult and requires the participation of a neurologist, an immunologist, an oncologist, and a neurosurgeon. Perfusion computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy give proof to the adequacy of the term inflammatory pseudotumor because it is histologically difficult to characterize the lesion as a tumor or inflammation. When a chronic lesion in the central nervous system is lately diagnosed, the prognosis of the disease may be poor and complicated by the development of resistant symptomatic focal epilepsy and emotional, volitional, and cognitive impairments. It was differentially diagnosed from brain tumors (astrocytic, oligodendroglial, and mixed gliomas, ependymal, neuronal, neuroglial, and embryonal tumors, meningiomas, cholesteatomas, dermoid cysts, teratomas, and cysts, other reactive and inflammatory processes (leukemic infiltrations, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, encephalomyelitis, hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, vitamin A intoxication, and the long-term use of glucocorticoids and contraceptives. The authors describe a clinical case of the pseudotumorous course of chronic PILE in a 28-year-old woman

  14. Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann, J P; Enzenauer, R J

    1995-05-01

    A pediatric case of Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis is described. A 12-year-old black boy was admitted to the pediatric service for presumed right knee septic arthritis. Symptoms included acute pain and swelling with decreased range-of-motion. Although the patient's right knee symptoms and positive Lyme serology were consistent with a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, the presence of sensorineural hearing loss and interstitial keratitis with inflammatory arthritis suggested a diagnosis of Cogan's syndrome. Subsequent Western blot analysis was negative for Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. The patient had dramatic clinical improvement of musculoskeletal and ophthalmologic complaints shortly after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, although residual sensorineural hearing loss persisted.

  15. Caprine and ovine Greek dairy products: The official German method generates false-positive results due to κ-casein gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsartsianidou, V; Triantafillidou, D; Karaiskou, N; Tarantili, P; Triantafillidis, G; Georgakis, E; Triantafyllidis, A

    2017-05-01

    Caseins are widely used for species identification of dairy products. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of para-κ-casein peptide is used as the official German method for the differentiation between caprine (isoform A) and ovine (isoform B) dairy products, based on their different isoelectric points. The discrimination between Greek goat and ewe dairy products using IEF has, however, been shown to be problematic because of the existence of the ewe isoform in milk from Greek indigenous dairy goats. This could be due to nucleotide polymorphisms within the goat κ-casein gene of Greek indigenous breeds, which alter the isoelectric point of the para-κ-casein peptide and lead to false positive results. Previous DNA analysis of the goat κ-casein gene has shown high levels of polymorphism; however, no such information is available for Greek indigenous dairy goats. Therefore, 87 indigenous dairy goats were sequenced at exon IV of κ-casein gene. In total, 9 polymorphic sites were detected. Three nonsynonymous point mutations were identified, which change the isoelectric point of the goat para-κ-casein peptide so that it appears identical to that of the ewe peptide. Ten composite genotypes were reconstructed and 6 of them included the problematic point mutations. For the verification of genetic results, IEF was carried out. Both goat and ewe patterns appeared in the problematic genotypes. The frequency of these genotypes could be characterized as moderate (0.23) to high (0.60) within Greek indigenous breeds. However, this is not an issue restricted to Greece, as such genotypes have been detected in various non-Greek goat breeds. In conclusion, IEF based on the official German method is certainly inappropriate for ovine and caprine discrimination concerning Greek dairy goat products, and consequently a new method should be established. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality.

  17. Cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, P.F.; Gubler, F.M.; Maas, A.

    1988-10-01

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity.

  18. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  19. Arthritis dermatitis syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasquez Mendez, Monica Patricia; Ramirez Gomez, Luis Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The pediatric rheumatology is a medical specialization with many areas under developed. The prevalence, pathophysiology and form of presentation of the pediatric rheumatic disease are different of adults. The skin compromise in many pediatric rheumatic diseases is a helping sing for diagnosis. The arthritis-dermatitis syndrome can be the first manifestation of many diseases as infections, tumors and endocrine diseases, but in pediatric age the immunologic and infections diseases are really important. Among infections diseases, virus (parvovirus, rubella, HIV) and bacteria (gonococcus, meningoccus) are the most Important. Within the group of autoimmune diseases the vasculitis such as Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are among the more prevalent autoimmune disease. This is a general review about arthritis-dermatitis syndrome in pediatric age

  20. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  1. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    goat anti-rat IgG (Life Technologies) at a dilution of 1:200 as secondary anti- body . The method of immunofluorescence staining has been described...Immunohistochemisty (IHC): RA, OA, and NL (not arthritis) ST cryo -sections as well as ankle sections of Wt mice induced with K/BxN serum were fixed in...The fractions containing exosomes were then isolated. The original whole supernatant, exosome and cellular debris depleted fraction, exosome

  2. [Bone structure in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kumiko; Ohashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , the osteoclast pathway is activated by abnormal immune conditions accompanied by chronic inflammation, resulting in periarticular osteoporosis and local bone destruction around joints. In addition, multiple factors, including reduced physical activity and pharmacotherapies such as steroids, lead to systemic osteoporosis. These conditions cause decreasing bone mineral density and deterioration of bone quality, and expose patients to increased risk of fracture. Understanding the bone structures of RA and evaluating fracture risk are central to the treatment of RA.

  3. {sup 11}C-Methionine positron emission tomography may monitor the activity of encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Kenji; Shiga, Tohru; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)], E-mail: khirata@med.hokudai.ac.jp; Fujima, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Usui, Reiko [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Central Institute of Isotope Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Encephalitis is generally diagnosed by clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid examination, and imaging studies including CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and perfusion single photon emission tomography (SPECT). However, the role of positron emission tomography (PET) in diagnosis of encephalitis remains unclear. A 49-year-old woman presenting with coma and elevated inflammatory reaction was diagnosed as having encephalitis according to slow activity on electroencephalogram, broad cortical lesion in MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery image, and increased blood flow demonstrated by SPECT. PET revealed increased accumulation of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET) in the affected brain tissues. After the symptom had improved 2 months later, the accumulation of MET as well as the abnormal findings of MR imaging and SPECT was normalized. This case indicated that MET PET may monitor the activity of encephalitis.

  4. Imaging Appearance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis on the Diffusion Weighted Images: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu; Oh, Keon Se

    2011-01-01

    Imaging finding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis contain bilateral, symmetric, patchy, or diffuse increased T2WI signal intensities in the basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, and centrum semiovale. In particular, the centrum semiovale is most commonly involved. Most of the HIV encephalitis cases are accompanied by brain atrophy. No previous study has reported symmetric increased signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale without brain atrophy on diffusion weighted images in HIV encephalitis patients. Here, we report a case of this. We suggest that radiologists should consider the possibility of HIV encephalitis if there are symmetric increases in signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale on diffusion weighted images of patients with a history of HIV infection.

  5. A case of urinary retention in the early stages of herpes simplex virus type-1 encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Nakazato, Yoshihiko; Miyake, Akifumi; Tamura, Naotoshi; Araki, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Toshimasa

    2017-06-01

    A 70-year-old man developed urinary retention in the early stages of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-1 encephalitis. A nerve conduction study suggested latent myeloradiculitis. This is the first report of human herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis followed by urinary retention at early stage from the onset like the Elsberg syndrome. Although relatively few similar cases have been reported, we consider that urinary retention is common in HSV-1 encephalitis, in which disturbances of consciousness usually require bladder catheterization from the onset. We further emphasize that urinary retention may occasionally occur in early stages of HSV-1 encephalitis, with a significant possibility of recovery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Postpartum Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doden, Tadashi; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Junji; Ozawa, Kazuki; Ohashi, Nobuhiko; Kodaira, Minori; Hineno, Akiyo; Tachibana, Naoko; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 24-year-old woman with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis that developed 3 weeks after normal delivery. She was treated with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis, in addition to teratoma excision. However, her recovery was slow, and dysmnesia and mental juvenility persisted even two years after onset. To date, five patients with postpartum anti-NMDAR encephalitis have been reported. All of those patients showed psychotic symptoms and were suspected of having postpartum psychosis in the early period of the encephalitis. Changes in hormonal factors, modification of immune tolerance, or retrograde infection of the ovary may be contributing factors for postpartum anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  7. Limbic Encephalitis in Taiwanese Children and Adolescence: A Single Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Jun Chou

    2013-08-01

    Conclusion: This study provides evidence for a potential association between antibodies and limbic encephalitis. The presence of antibodies, especially antibodies to GAD, may serve as an indicator for immunotherapy.

  8. New Onset Insomnia in a Pediatric Patient: A Case of Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar N. Goldberg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is becoming more widely recognized as a cause of encephalopathy in both adults and children. Certain clinical features such as mood lability, movement disorders, speech dysfunction, seizures, and autonomic instability in a pediatric patient should prompt immediate concern and evaluation for autoimmune encephalitis among providers. We present the case of a pediatric patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in which the symptom prompting medical evaluation was insomnia. Insomnia has not previously been emphasized in the literature as a presenting feature of this disease in children and has a broad differential. Recognition of the symptoms of anti-NMDAR encephalitis and its variable presentation are key to early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment which may help to improve outcomes.

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  11. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Sobolewski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established – the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index, mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index, and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  12. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  13. A Rare Case of Mediterranean Spotted Fever and Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Sousa Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean spotted fever is a tick-borne zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. It is transmitted by the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It usually presents as a benign self-limited disease characterized by a skin rash, high fever, and, sometimes, a characteristic ulcer at the tick bite site called tache noir. The course of this disease is usually benign, although severe manifestations have been previously described, mainly in adults. Neurological manifestations are very unusual. We present a case of Mediterranean spotted fever with encephalitis to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion, mainly in endemic areas, the potential severity of this disease, and the need of early initiation of therapy in order to prevent severe complications.

  14. Testosterone correlates with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection in macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koterski James

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we briefly report testosterone and cytokine responses to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV in macaques which were used as part of a larger study conducted by the Department of Defense to better characterize pathological responses to aerosolized VEEV in non-human primates. Serial samples were collected and analyzed for testosterone and cytokines prior to and during infection in 8 captive male macaques. Infected animals exhibited a febrile response with few significant changes in cytokine levels. Baseline testosterone levels were positively associated with viremia following exposure and were significantly higher than levels obtained during infection. Such findings suggest that disease-induced androgen suppression is a reasonable area for future study. Decreased androgen levels during physiological perturbations may function, in part, to prevent immunosuppression by high testosterone levels and to prevent the use of energetic resources for metabolically-expensive anabolic functions.

  15. Alexander the Great and West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, John S; Calisher, Charles H

    2003-12-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning; assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander's death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile virus encephalitis.

  16. Rabies viral encephalitis with proable 25 year incubation period!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of rabies viral encephalitis in a 48-year-old male with an unusually long incubation period, historically suspected to be more than 20 years. The case was referred for histological diagnosis following alleged medical negligence to the forensic department. The histology and immunocytochemical demonstration of rabies viral antigen established the diagnosis unequivocally. The case manifested initially with hydrophobia and aggressive behavior, although he suddenly went to the bathroom and drank a small amount of water. History of dog bite 25 years back was elicited retrospectively following clinical suspicion. There was no subsequent history to suggest nonbite exposure to a rabid dog to consider recent event causing the disease, although this cannot be totally excluded.

  17. Possible anti-VGKC autoimmune limbic encephalitis associated with SIADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Nicholas; Hamada, Hazim

    2018-03-07

    An 80-year-old woman presented with a 5-week history of increasing confusion. Examination was remarkable only for deficits in short-term memory and paranoid thoughts. Blood tests revealed hyponatraemia, and further biochemical testing was consistent with syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). After an exhaustive diagnostic workup for causes of SIADH, the only abnormal finding was a mildly raised antivoltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) titre of 185 pmol/L (0-69) consistent with possible anti-VGKC autoimmune limbic encephalitis. However, other diagnostic features were absent. She is currently undergoing outpatient investigation for other causes of memory loss. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. A case of herpes simplex encephalitis without neurologic symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabata, Nobuya; Tanaka, Tomoji; Hiramoto, Noritaka; Takazuka, Katsuya; Komatsu, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    The lack of neurologic symptoms is rare in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). A 42-year-old woman presented with psychiatric features alone, such as Korsakoff syndrome and abortive type Kluver-Bucy syndrome. The diagnosis of HSE was confirmed by serologically elevated antibody titer. The patient underwent both X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray computed tomography showed transient contrast enhancement and low density area confined to the lateral lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse areas with a high MRI signal intensity. Considering that the lack of neurologic features, as seen in the present HSE patient, may sometimes rule out the possibility of parenchymal disease, imaging modalities, especially MRI, may be of value in the detection of lesions for HSE. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Presenting with Normal CSF Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Kiani, I. G.; Shah, F.; Rehman, R. N.; Haq, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    A 28 years old female presented with headache, fever, altered sensorium and right side weakness for one week. She was febrile and drowsy with right sided hemiplegia and papilledema. Tuberculous or bacterial meningitis, tuberculoma and abscess were at the top of the diagnosis list followed by Herpes simplex meningo-encephalitis (HSE). MRI showed abnormal signal intensity of left temporal lobe without significant post-contrast enhancement and midline shift. CSF examination was normal, gram stain and Ziehl-Neelsen stain showed no micro-organism, or acid fast bacilli. CSF for MTB PCR was negative. PCR DNA for Herpes simplex 1 on CSF was detected. Acyclovir was started and the patient was discharged after full recovery. A high index of suspicion is required for HSE diagnosis in Pakistan where other infections predominantly affect the brain and HSE may be overlooked as a potential diagnosis. (author)

  20. Cognitive rehabilitation of amnesia after virus encephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Eliane Correa

    2007-01-01

    A number of memory rehabilitation techniques have targeted people with various degrees of memory impairments. However, few studies have shown the contribution of preserved non-declarative memory capacity and errorless learning in the treatment of amnesic patients. The current case report describes the memory rehabilitation of a 44-year-old man with amnesia following viral encephalitis. The patient's procedural memory capacity had an important role in the use of a motor imagery strategy to remember people's names. It was further demonstrated that the application of a verbal learning technique was helpful in recalling new verbal information. These different memory rehabilitation techniques are discussed in terms of alternative possibilities in the rehabilitation of amnesic patients.

  1. Competency of reptiles and amphibians for eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gregory; Ottendorfer, Christy; Graham, Sean; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2011-09-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is endemic throughout most of the eastern United States. Although it is transmitted year round in Florida, transmission elsewhere is seasonal. The mechanism that enables EEEV to overwinter in seasonal foci remains obscure. In previous field studies, early season EEEV activity was detected in mosquito species that feed primarily upon ectothermic hosts, suggesting that reptiles and amphibians might represent overwintering reservoir hosts for EEEV. To determine if this might be possible, two commonly fed upon amphibian and reptile species were evaluated as hosts for the North American subtype I strain of EEEV. Neither amphibian species was a competent host. However, circulating viremias were detected in both reptile species examined. Hibernating infected garter snakes remained viremic after exiting hibernation. These data suggest that snakes may represent an overwintering host for North American EEEV.

  2. Hemorrhage listerial encephalitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Gyu; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Young Jun; Kim, Young Seo; Kim, Hyun Young; Sung, Won Jae [Hanyang University Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    A 31-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented with fever, headache, seizures and mental status changes. Brain MRI showed T2 hyperintense lesions in the cerebellum and frontal white matter and a lesion in the cerebellum exhibited hemorrhagic changes and peripheral ring enhancement. The MRI features of listerial encephalitis are difficult to differentiate from those of neuropsychiatric SLE and various other diseases. Here, we report a case of hemorrhagic listerial encephalitis in a patient with SLE.

  3. Transient isolated lesion of the splenium associated with clinically mild influenza encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Srinivas; Ey, Elizabeth H.; Wolfson, Barbara J.; Khan, Nadir

    2008-01-01

    Transient isolated lesions of the splenium with restricted diffusion are rare in the pediatric population. We report two such cases with influenza-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy (IAEE). These reversible isolated central splenial lesions are not specific for IAEE, but the notable feature associated with this specific presentation is a comparatively milder form of encephalitis that resolves clinically and radiologically within a short time. (orig.)

  4. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: an important differential diagnosis in psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Helen

    2012-02-01

    We present four cases of confirmed anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis; three presented initially with serious psychiatric symptoms and the other developed significant psychiatric symptoms during the initial phase of illness. Brain biopsy findings of one patient are also described. Psychiatrists should consider anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in patients presenting with psychosis and additional features of dyskinesias, seizures and catatonia, particularly where there is no previous history of psychiatric disorder.

  5. First documented case of imported tick-borne encephalitis in Australia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chaunhuri, A.; Růžek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2013), s. 93-96 ISSN 0918-2918 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP302/10/P438; GA ČR GAP502/11/2116 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis virus * viral encephalitis * travel medicine * flavivirus Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 0.967, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/imj.12017/pdf

  6. Regional impact of climate on Japanese encephalitis in areas located near the three gorges dam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuntao Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this study, we aim to identify key climatic factors that are associated with the transmission of Japanese encephalitis virus in areas located near the Three Gorges Dam, between 1997 and 2008. METHODS: We identified three geographical regions of Chongqing, based on their distance from the Three Gorges Dam. Collectively, the three regions consisted of 12 districts from which study information was collected. Zero-Inflated Poisson Regression models were run to identify key climatic factors of the transmission of Japanese encephalitis virus for both the whole study area and for each individual region; linear regression models were conducted to examine the fluctuation of climatic variables over time during the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. RESULTS: Between 1997 and 2008, the incidence of Japanese encephalitis decreased throughout the entire city of Chongqing, with noticeable variations taking place in 2000, 2001 and 2006. The eastern region, which is closest to the Three Gorges Dam, suffered the highest incidence of Japanese encephalitis, while the western region experienced the lowest incidence. Linear regression models revealed that there were seasonal fluctuations of climatic variables during this period. Zero-Inflated Poisson Regression models indicated a significant positive association between temperature (with a lag of 1 and 3 months and Japanese encephalitis incidence, and a significant negative association between rainfall (with a lag of 0 and 4 months and Japanese encephalitis incidence. CONCLUSION: The spatial and temporal trends of Japanese encephalitis incidence that occurred in the City of Chongqing were associated with temperature and rainfall. Seasonal fluctuations of climatic variables during this period were also observed. Additional studies that focus on long-term data collection are needed to validate the findings of this study and to further explore the effects of the Three Gorges Dam on Japanese

  7. Infection and injury of human astrocytes by tick-borne encephalitis virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palus, Martin; Bílý, Tomáš; Elsterová, Jana; Langhansová, Helena; Salát, J.; Vancová, Marie; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 95, Pt 11 (2014), s. 2411-2426 ISSN 0022-1317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA ČR GAP302/12/2490; GA TA ČR TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Tick-borne encephalitis * Tick-borne encephalitis virus * human Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.183, year: 2014

  8. Adolescent with acute psychosis due to anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis: successful recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuskaite, Dovile; Kalibatas, Paulius; Praninskiene, Ruta; Zalubiene, Asta; Jucaite, Aurelija; Cerkauskiene, Rimante

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a relatively new autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system. We report the first case of anti-NMDAR autoimmune encephalitis combined with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies in Lithuania in a 16-year-old girl. The patient was admitted to psychiatry unit because of an acute psychotic episode. She was unsuccessfully treated with antipsychotics, and electroconvulsive therapy was initiated because of he...

  9. Focal CA3 hippocampal subfield atrophy following LGI1 VGKC-complex antibody limbic encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, T; Chong, T; Aimola Davies, A; Ng, T; Johnson, M; Irani, S; Vincent, A; Husain, M; Jacob, S; Maddison, P; Kennard, C; Gowland, P; Rosenthal, C

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has linked chronic voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated limbic encephalitis with generalized hippocampal atrophy. However, autoantibodies bind to specific rodent hippocampal subfields. Here, human hippocampal subfield (subiculum, cornu ammonis 1-3, and dentate gyrus) targets of immunomodulation-treated LGI1 VGKC-complex antibody-mediated limbic encephalitis were investigated using in vivo ultra-high resolution (0.39 × 0....

  10. Limbic encephalitis and antibodies to Ma2: a paraneoplastic presentation of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, I.; Winer, J.; Rowlands, D.; Dalmau, J.

    2000-01-01

    A patient with atypical medullary breast cancer is described who presented with symptoms of limbic encephalitis. The patient's serum and CSF contained antibodies that reacted with the nervous system and the tumour. These antibodies recognised Ma2, a neuronal protein related to paraneoplastic limbic and brainstem encephalitis in men with testicular tumours. This report highlights the importance of testing for paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies in cases of unexplained l...

  11. Rabies direct fluorescent antibody test does not inactivate rabies or eastern equine encephalitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Jodie A; Franke, Mary A; Davis, April D

    2016-08-01

    An examination using the routine rabies direct fluorescent antibody test was performed on rabies or Eastern equine encephalitis positive mammalian brain tissue to assess inactivation of the virus. Neither virus was inactivated with acetone fixation nor the routine test, thus laboratory employees should treat all samples as rabies and when appropriate Eastern equine encephalitis positive throughout the whole procedure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Phylogeography of Japanese encephalitis virus: genotype is associated with climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J Schuh

    Full Text Available The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate.

  13. Herpes simlex encephalitis. A neuropsychological and neuroradiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Masaya

    1994-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common causative pathogen of nonepidemic encephalitis in Japan. The mortality rate is approximately 30% and surviving patients often have severe sequelae such as amnestic syndrome. Between 1979 and 1992, 13 patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) were admitted to our Department. Diagnosis was based on the neurological symptoms and signs, the findings on EEG, CT and MRI, and the results of serological examination including ELISA for HSV type 1. Neuropsychological tests were performed over a period of approximatly 2 years in seven of 13 patients. The results of the tests disclosed memory impairments as follows. Namely, immediate recall was well preserved, but disturbance of recent memory and retrograde amnesia over 20 years were observed. The neuropsychological features more closely resembled those of amnestic syndrome than those of Korsakoff syndrome. The amnesia in HSE patients was characterized in the finding that it was prone to recover more gradually as compared with that following head trauma or surgical brain resection. CT scan was performed in 13 patients during the acute and convalescent stages. The low density areas were found in the temporal lobes in 60% of the patients. MRI were obtained during the convalescent stage in ten of 13 patients. In seven of the ten patients, abnormal signals were distributed uni- or bilaterally to the temporal lobe, insular and limbic system such as the hippocampus and amygdala. In the remaining three patients, the abnormal signals were localized in both hippocampi and amygdalae in one patient and only in the brain stem in another. In the last case, the MRI was normal. The findings that signal intensity on MRI showing the lesion in the temporal lobe spread continuously to the opposite limbic area or occipital lobe strongly suggested the spreading of HSV through neural fiber connections in HSE. (author)

  14. Herpes simlex encephalitis. A neuropsychological and neuroradiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Masaya [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common causative pathogen of nonepidemic encephalitis in Japan. The mortality rate is approximately 30% and surviving patients often have severe sequelae such as amnestic syndrome. Between 1979 and 1992, 13 patients with herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) were admitted to our Department. Diagnosis was based on the neurological symptoms and signs, the findings on EEG, CT and MRI, and the results of serological examination including ELISA for HSV type 1. Neuropsychological tests were performed over a period of approximatly 2 years in seven of 13 patients. The results of the tests disclosed memory impairments as follows. Namely, immediate recall was well preserved, but disturbance of recent memory and retrograde amnesia over 20 years were observed. The neuropsychological features more closely resembled those of amnestic syndrome than those of Korsakoff syndrome. The amnesia in HSE patients was characterized in the finding that it was prone to recover more gradually as compared with that following head trauma or surgical brain resection. CT scan was performed in 13 patients during the acute and convalescent stages. The low density areas were found in the temporal lobes in 60% of the patients. MRI were obtained during the convalescent stage in ten of 13 patients. In seven of the ten patients, abnormal signals were distributed uni- or bilaterally to the temporal lobe, insular and limbic system such as the hippocampus and amygdala. In the remaining three patients, the abnormal signals were localized in both hippocampi and amygdalae in one patient and only in the brain stem in another. In the last case, the MRI was normal. The findings that signal intensity on MRI showing the lesion in the temporal lobe spread continuously to the opposite limbic area or occipital lobe strongly suggested the spreading of HSV through neural fiber connections in HSE. (author).

  15. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis after Herpes simplex virus-associated encephalitis: an emerging disease with diagnosis and therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Flora; Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Lavernhe, Sylvie; Pillet, Sylvie; Paul, Stéphane; Frésard, Anne; Boutet, Claire; Grange, Rémi; Cazorla, Céline; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2017-08-01

    Morbidity and mortality of Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE) remain high. Relapses of neurological signs may occur after initial clinical improvement under acyclovir treatment. We report here a case of post-HSE anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-mediated encephalitis in an adult and perform a systematic search on PubMed to identify other cases in adults. We identified 11 previously published cases, to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic management. Symptoms in adults are often inappropriate behaviors, confusion and agitation. Diagnosis of anti-NMDA-R encephalitis after HSE is often delayed. Treatment consists in steroids, plasma exchange, and rituximab. Prognosis is often favorable. Anti-NMDA-R antibodies should be searched in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with unexpected evolution of HSE. This emerging entity reopens the hot debate about steroids in HSE.

  16. Serial EEG findings in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: correlation between clinical course and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Kawamoto, Michi; Hikiami, Ryota; Ishii, Junko; Yoshimura, Hajime; Matsumoto, Riki; Kohara, Nobuo

    2017-12-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a paraneoplastic encephalitis characterised by psychiatric features, involuntary movement, and autonomic instability. Various EEG findings in patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis have been reported, however, the correlation between the EEG findings and clinical course of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis remains unclear. We describe a patient with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with a focus on EEG findings, which included: status epilepticus, generalised rhythmic delta activity, excess beta activity, extreme delta brush, and paroxysmal alpha activity upon arousal from sleep, which we term"arousal alpha pattern". Initially, status epilepticus was observed on the EEG when the patient was comatose with conjugate deviation. The EEG then indicated excess beta activity, followed by the emergence of continuous slow activity, including generalised rhythmic delta activity and extreme delta brush, in the most severe phase. Slow activity gradually faded in parallel with clinical amelioration. Excess beta activity persisted, even after the patient became almost independent in daily activities, and finally disappeared with full recovery. In summary, our patient with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis demonstrated slow activity on the EEG, including extreme delta brush during the most severe phase, which gradually faded in parallel with clinical amelioration, with excess beta activity persisting into the recovery phase.

  17. Pseudomonas Septic Arthritis | Thanni | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis due to pseudomonas species is unusual and when it occurs, there is often an underlying cause like immune depression, intravenous drug abuse or a penetrating injury. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of pseudomonas septic arthritis complicating cannulation of a leg vein following ...

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosain, F.; Haddon, M.J.; Hosain, H.; Drost, J.K.; Spencer, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is given of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. Topics covered include the pathophysiology of arthritis and the basis for the use of radiotracers, diagnostic procedures and radiotracer applications and therapeutic approaches and radionuclide applications. (UK)

  19. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis in the hand. Chapter 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is primarily a disease of the synovial membrane. To demonstrate synovial changes it is necessary to show adequate detail of the soft tissue. This is best obtained by using industrial film and by hand-processing. The anatomy of the hand and the radiological appearance of rheumatoid arthritis are described. (author)

  1. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  2. Targeted treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, Naomi Bertine

    2013-01-01

    With the implementation of new treatment options, including biologicals and the early, agressive start of target-steered treatment the outlook for rheumatoid arthritis patients improved considerably the past decades. This thesis describes several aspects of modern rheumatoid arthritis treatment from

  3. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 are required for translation of interferon stimulated mRNAs and are targeted by a dengue virus non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, Katell; Dadlani, Dhivya; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2014-07-01

    Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV). We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2) infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN) response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs), and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells.

  4. G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 are required for translation of interferon stimulated mRNAs and are targeted by a dengue virus non-coding RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katell Bidet

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral RNA-host protein interactions are critical for replication of flaviviruses, a genus of positive-strand RNA viruses comprising major vector-borne human pathogens including dengue viruses (DENV. We examined three conserved host RNA-binding proteins (RBPs G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 in dengue virus (DENV-2 infection and found them to be novel regulators of the interferon (IFN response against DENV-2. The three RBPs were required for the accumulation of the protein products of several interferon stimulated genes (ISGs, and for efficient translation of PKR and IFITM2 mRNAs. This identifies G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1 as novel regulators of the antiviral state. Their antiviral activity was antagonized by the abundant DENV-2 non-coding subgenomic flaviviral RNA (sfRNA, which bound to G3BP1, G3BP2 and CAPRIN1, inhibited their activity and lead to profound inhibition of ISG mRNA translation. This work describes a new and unexpected level of regulation for interferon stimulated gene expression and presents the first mechanism of action for an sfRNA as a molecular sponge of anti-viral effectors in human cells.

  5. Hearing status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Daraei, M; Jalessi, M; Peyvandi, A A; Amini, E; Ranjbar, L A; Daneshi, A

    2017-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is thought to induce conductive hearing loss and/or sensorineural hearing loss. This study evaluated the function of the middle ear and cochlea, and the related factors. Pure tone audiometry, speech reception thresholds, speech discrimination scores, tympanometry, acoustic reflexes, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions were assessed in rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy volunteers. Pure tone audiometry results revealed a higher bone conduction threshold in the rheumatoid arthritis group, but there was no significant difference when evaluated according to the sensorineural hearing loss definition. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions related prevalence of conductive or mixed hearing loss, tympanometry values, acoustic reflexes, and speech discrimination scores were not significantly different between the two groups. Sensorineural hearing loss was significantly more prevalent in patients who used azathioprine, cyclosporine and etanercept. Higher bone conduction thresholds in some frequencies were detected in rheumatoid arthritis patients that were not clinically significant. Sensorineural hearing loss is significantly more prevalent in refractory rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  7. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  8. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS....... Levels of evidence, strength of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. RESULTS: The treat-to-target activity resulted in 10 recommendations. The treatment aim was defined as remission with low disease activity being an alternative goal in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow...

  9. Anticardiolipin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, A; Woods, R; Dowding, V; Roden, D; Barry, C

    1987-10-01

    Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) was present in the sera of 49% of 90 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ACA was absent in 30 control patients with osteoarthritis. C-reactive protein levels equal to or exceeding 7 mg/dl were found in 10 patients all of whom were ACA positive. ACA was present in a larger proportion of rheumatoid factor (RF) positive than of RF negative patients. Male sex and extra-articular manifestations of RA were both more common in ACA positive than ACA negative patients. In the ACA positive group the lupus anticoagulant and VDRL tests were negative. However, a small number of patients had evidence of vascular events.

  10. The joint in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Mahta; Thiele, Ralph; Ritchlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, is notable for diversity in disease presentation, course and response to treatment. Equally varied are the types of musculoskeletal involvement which include peripheral and axial joint disease, dactylitis and enthesitis. In this review, we focus on the psoriatic joint and discuss pathways that underlie synovial, cartilage and bone inflammation and highlight key histopathologic features. The pivotal inflammatory mechanisms and pathobiology of PsA parallel findings in other forms of spondyloarthritis but are distinct from disease pathways described in rheumatoid synovitis and bone disease. The diagnosis of PsA from both a clinical and imaging perspective is also discussed.

  11. Initial clinical presentation of young children with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Marion; Joubert, Bastien; Picard, Géraldine; Rogemond, Véronique; Thomas, Laure; Rheims, Sylvain; Bailhache, Marion; Villega, Frédéric; Pédespan, Jean-Michel; Berzero, Giulia; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Desestret, Virginie; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2018-05-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor autoantibodies (NMDA-R-Abs) is a recently described disease affecting adult and pediatric patients. Symptoms of the disease are now perfectly described in the adult population but the clinical presentation is less known in young children. The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical presentation and the specificities of symptoms presented by young children with NMDA-R-Abs encephalitis to improve diagnosis of this disease, and to compare these to a series of previously published female adult patients. Fifty cases of children younger than twelve years of age diagnosed with NMDA-R-Abs encephalitis between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2016 (27 females and 23 males) were retrospectively studied. The first neurological symptoms observed in young children with NMDA-R-Abs encephalitis were characterized by seizure (72%), especially focal seizure (42%), within a median of 15 days before other encephalitis symptoms; other patients mostly had behavioral disorders (26%). The seizures were frequently difficult to diagnose because of the transient unilateral dystonic or tonic posturing presentation or sudden unilateral pain in the absence of clonic movements. A post-ictal motor deficit was also frequently observed. This clinical presentation is different from that observed in adult females with NMDA-R-Abs encephalitis who initially present mainly psychiatric disorders (67%) or cognitive impairment (19%), and less frequently seizures (14%). The diagnosis of NMDA-R-Abs encephalitis should be systematically considered in young children of both sexes who present neurological symptoms suggesting recent seizures (focal or generalized) without obvious other etiology. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young; Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon; Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  14. Prevalence of antibodies to tickborne encephalitis and West Nile flaviviruses and the clinical signs of tickborne encephalitis in dogs in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, J.; Juřicová, Zina; Literák, I.; Schánilec, P.; Trachta e Silva, E.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 1 (2001), s. 17-20 ISSN 0042-4900 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : tick-borne encephalitis Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2001 http://veterinaryrecord.bvapublications.com/cgi/content/abstract/148/1/17

  15. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Solomon, G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  16. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...... the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger...

  17. Leucine-Rich Glioma Inactivated-1 and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Autoimmune Encephalitis Associated with Ischemic Stroke: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Marisa; Morales-Vidal, Sarkis; Ruland, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is associated with a wide variety of antibodies and clinical presentations. Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies are a cause of autoimmune non-paraneoplastic encephalitis characterized by memory impairment, psychiatric symptoms, and seizures. We present a case of VGKC encephalitis likely preceding an ischemic stroke. Reports of autoimmune encephalitis associated with ischemic stroke are rare. Several hypotheses linking these two disease processes are proposed. PMID:27242653

  18. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raciborski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%. According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems: M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  20. [Reiter disease or reactive arthritis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, S; Schmitt, J; Meurer, M

    2006-04-01

    There is an ongoing international discussion on whether the condition reactive arthritis should be named after a former Nazi functionary. The German dermatological community should participate in this debate. In 1916, Hans Reiter described a disease with the symptoms urethritis, conjunctivitis, and arthritis, which was later named after him. After becoming titular professor in May 1918, Reiter was appointed director of the regional public health department Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1926. At the same time he taught social hygiene at the University of Rostock, where he was appointed full professor in 1928. In 1931, Hans Reiter became a member of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). In July 1932 he was elected representative of the NSDAP to the seventh assembly of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. After becoming its acting director in July 1933, Reiter was appointed president of the Reich public health department in Berlin on October 1, 1933. Both his excellent professional qualifications, as well as his National Socialist attitudes, were considered key criteria for taking over this important position. As the president of the Reich public health department, Reiter was said to have known about the conduct of experiments with typhus-fever at the concentration camp Buchenwald in which 250 humans died. From the end of the Second World War until 1947, Reiter was imprisoned in the Nuremberg Prison for War Criminals, but never convicted of a crime.

  1. Coexistence of Sarcoidosis and Gouty Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiz, Hüseyin; Kobak, Senol

    2017-08-21

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease with unknown cause characterized by non-caseating granuloma formations. It may present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, skin lesions, the involvement of eye and symptoms on the locomotor system. Gouty arthritis is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by hyperuricemia, recurrent arthritis attacks and the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the joints and the surrounding tissues. We reported the coexistence of sarcoidosis and gouty arthritis in this paper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal......, range of movement, abduction force, or function. The risk of clinical asymptomatic loosening is a relatively late complication that is eventually followed by pronounced bone destruction related to the loose component. Long-term radiographic control of total shoulders with rheumatoid arthritis...... is recommended. Hemiarthroplasty with a cemented humeral prosthesis may be a better treatment in the end stage of rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder....

  3. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  4. Estimating the burden of Japanese encephalitis virus and other encephalitides in countries of the mekong region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Tarantola

    Full Text Available Diverse aetiologies of viral and bacterial encephalitis are widely recognized as significant yet neglected public health issues in the Mekong region. A robust analysis of the corresponding health burden is lacking. We retrieved 75 articles on encephalitis in the region published in English or in French from 1965 through 2011. Review of available data demonstrated that they are sparse and often derived from hospital-based studies with significant recruitment bias. Almost half (35 of 75 of articles were on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV alone or associated with dengue. In the Western Pacific region the WHO reported 30,000-50,000 annual JEV cases (15,000 deaths between 1966 and 1996 and 4,633 cases (200 deaths in 2008, a decline likely related to the introduction of JEV vaccination in China, Vietnam, or Thailand since the 1980s. Data on dengue, scrub typhus and rabies encephalitis, among other aetiologies, are also reviewed and discussed. Countries of the Mekong region are undergoing profound demographic, economic and ecological change. As the epidemiological aspects of Japanese encephalitis (JE are transformed by vaccination in some countries, highly integrated expert collaborative research and objective data are needed to identify and prioritize the human health, animal health and economic burden due to JE and other pathogens associated with encephalitides.

  5. The clinical usefulness of Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT in acute measles encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee

    2003-01-01

    Since the prognosis of measles encephalitis is poor, early diagnosis and proper management are very important to improve clinical outcomes. We compared Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT (SPECT) with MR imaging (MRI) for the detection of acute measles encephalitis. Eleven patients (M : F=4 : 7, age range 18 months-14 yrs) with acute measles encephalitis were enrolled in this studies. All of them underwent both MRI and SPECT. The results of SPECT were scored from 0 (normal) to 3 (most severe defect) according to perfusion state. We compared two image modalities for the detection of brain abnormality in acute measles encephalitis. Seven of 11 patients (63.6%) revealed high signal intensity in the white matter on T2WI of MRI, on the other hand all patients (100%) showed hypoperfusion on SPECT. Severe perfusion deficits above score 2 were located with decreasing frequencies in the frontal lobe (81.8%), temporal lobe (72.7%), occipital lobe (27.3%), basal ganglia (27.3%), and parietal lobe (9.1%). We conclude that SPECT is more useful than MRI for the detection of brain involvement in patients with acute measles encephalitis

  6. The clinical usefulness of Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT in acute measles encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung Hee [School of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-08-01

    Since the prognosis of measles encephalitis is poor, early diagnosis and proper management are very important to improve clinical outcomes. We compared Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT (SPECT) with MR imaging (MRI) for the detection of acute measles encephalitis. Eleven patients (M : F=4 : 7, age range 18 months-14 yrs) with acute measles encephalitis were enrolled in this studies. All of them underwent both MRI and SPECT. The results of SPECT were scored from 0 (normal) to 3 (most severe defect) according to perfusion state. We compared two image modalities for the detection of brain abnormality in acute measles encephalitis. Seven of 11 patients (63.6%) revealed high signal intensity in the white matter on T2WI of MRI, on the other hand all patients (100%) showed hypoperfusion on SPECT. Severe perfusion deficits above score 2 were located with decreasing frequencies in the frontal lobe (81.8%), temporal lobe (72.7%), occipital lobe (27.3%), basal ganglia (27.3%), and parietal lobe (9.1%). We conclude that SPECT is more useful than MRI for the detection of brain involvement in patients with acute measles encephalitis.

  7. Entomologic studies after a St. Louis encephalitis epidemic in Grand Junction, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasi, T F; Smith, G C; Ndukwu, M; Jakob, W L; Happ, C M; Kirk, L J; Francy, D B; Lampert, K J

    1988-08-01

    In 1986, after a St. Louis encephalitis epidemic in Grand Junction, Colorado, in 1985, vector mosquitoes in the city were surveyed to correlate their bionomics and infection rates with the occurrence of human disease. No human cases were reported, but mosquito surveillance disclosed St. Louis encephalitis virus in Culex tarsalis and Culex pipiens pipiens. Mosquitoes were collected with gravid traps designed to attract Cx. p. pipiens and with Centers for Disease Control light traps. Culex p. pipiens was the predominant vector mosquito collected and was captured chiefly in gravid traps. The Culex tarsalis population emerged and expanded approximately one month earlier than did the Cx. p. pipiens population. Consequently, Cx. p. pipiens was the predominant vector species after August. Infection rates throughout the surveillance period (June to September) were severalfold higher in Cx. tarsalis than in Cx. p. pipiens; however, in late summer, diminished numbers of Cx. tarsalis and a persistent population of Cx. p. pipiens resulted in relatively larger numbers of infected Cx. p. pipiens. Thus, the participation of Cx. p. pipiens as a St. Louis encephalitis vector would have been underestimated in previous studies employing light traps alone. These studies provide further evidence that Cx. p. pipiens-associated urban St. Louis encephalitis and rural Cx. tarsalis-associated St. Louis encephalitis cycles may coexist in the West.

  8. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Shelly; John, Rita Marie

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune disease that is becoming increasingly recognized in the pediatric population. It may be the most common cause of treatable autoimmune encephalitis. The majority of cases of anti-NMDAR encephalitis are idiopathic in etiology, but a significant minority can be attributed to a paraneoplastic origin. Children with anti-NMDAR encephalitis initially present with a prodrome of neuropsychiatric symptoms, often with orofacial dyskinesias followed by progressively worsening seizures, agitation, and spasticity, which may result in severe neurologic deficits and even death. Definitive diagnosis requires detection of NMDAR antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid. Optimal outcomes are associated with prompt removal of the tumor in paraneoplastic cases, as well as aggressive immunosuppressive therapy. Early detection is essential for increasing the chances for a good outcome. Close follow-up is required to screen for relapse and later onset tumor presentation. The nurse practitioner plays a major role in the research, screening, diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of a child or adolescent with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Orchiectomy for suspected microscopic tumor in patients with anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, R M; Vandenberghe, R; Garcia-Merino, A; Yamamoto, T; Landolfi, J C; Rosenfeld, M R; Rossi, J E; Thiessen, B; Dropcho, E J; Dalmau, J

    2007-03-20

    To report the presence of microscopic neoplasms of the testis in men with anti-Ma2-associated encephalitis (Ma2-encephalitis) and to discuss the clinical implications. Orchiectomy specimens were examined using immunohistochemistry with Ma2 and Oct4 antibodies. Among 25 patients with Ma2-encephalitis younger than 50 years, 19 had germ-cell tumors, and 6 had no evidence of cancer. These 6 patients underwent orchiectomy because they fulfilled five criteria: 1) demonstration of anti-Ma2 antibodies in association with MRI or clinical features compatible with Ma2-encephalitis, 2) life-threatening or progressive neurologic deficits, 3) age Ma2 was expressed by neoplastic cells in three of three patients examined. Even though most patients had severe neurologic deficits at the time of orchiectomy (median progression of symptoms, 10 months), 4 had partial improvement and prolonged stabilization (8 to 84 months, median 22.5 months) and two did not improve after the procedure. In young men with Ma2-encephalitis, 1) the disorder should be attributed to a germ-cell neoplasm of the testis unless another Ma2-expressing tumor is found, 2) negative tumor markers, ultrasound, body CT, or PET do not exclude an intratubular germ-cell neoplasm of the testis, and 3) if no tumor is found, the presence of the five indicated criteria should prompt consideration of orchiectomy.

  10. A case of suspected 'Bickerstaff's encephalitis' and its CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moto, Atsufumi; Endo, Shunro; Ohmori, Tomoaki; Oka, Nobuo; Takaku, Akira

    1985-01-01

    A case of suspected ''Bickerstaff's encephalitis'' was presented with special reference to the CT findings. A 4-year-old girl exhibited fever and nausea after the beginning of December, 1983, followed by unsteady gait on January 1, 1984. She was admitted to another hospital and diagnosed by means of a spinalfluid examination as having aseptic meningitis. Her symptoms subsided transiently, but then she began again to suffer recurrently from unsteady gait on January 27. After that she developed dysarthria and dysphagia, a disturbance of eye movement was observed, and she became lethargic and disoriented. On February 6, she was transferred to our hospital. Plain CT scan on admission revealed a low-density area on the left cerebellar peduncle and the inferior medial part of the left temporal lobe. Moreover, the low-density area was heterogenously enhanced with the contrast medium. Angiography showed no abnormal findings. Considering these CT findings, we suspected a pontine tumor. Four days after her admission, however, her symptoms and signs began rapidly to subside, and also the abnormal findings on the CT scan diminished gradually as the symptoms were relieved. On March 2, she was discharged without any neurological abnormality. (author)

  11. Vectors expressing chimeric Japanese encephalitis dengue 2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Wang, S; Wang, X

    2014-01-01

    Vectors based on self-replicating RNAs (replicons) of flaviviruses are becoming powerful tool for expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells and development of novel antiviral and anticancer vaccines. We constructed two vectors expressing chimeric viruses consisting of attenuated SA14-14-2 strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in which the PrM/M-E genes were replaced fully or partially with those of dengue 2 virus (DENV-2). These vectors, named pJED2 and pJED2-1770 were transfected to BHK-21 cells and produced chimeric viruses JED2V and JED2-1770V, respectively. The chimeric viruses could be passaged in C6/36 but not BHK-21 cells. The chimeric viruses produced in C6/36 cells CPE 4-5 days after infection and RT-PCR, sequencing, immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blot analysis confirmed the chimeric nature of produced viruses. The immunogenicity of chimeric viruses in mice was proved by detecting DENV-2 E protein-specific serum IgG antibodies with neutralization titer of 10. Successful preparation of infectious clones of chimeric JEV-DENV-2 viruses showed that JEV-based expression vectors are fully functional.

  12. Japanese encephalitis virus infection, diagnosis and control in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Karen L; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Banyard, Ashley C; Fooks, Anthony R; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a significant cause of neurological disease in humans throughout Asia causing an estimated 70,000 human cases each year with approximately 10,000 fatalities. The virus contains a positive sense RNA genome within a host-derived membrane and is classified within the family Flaviviridae. Like many flaviviruses, it is transmitted by mosquitoes, particularly those of the genus Culex in a natural cycle involving birds and some livestock species. Spill-over into domestic animals results in a spectrum of disease ranging from asymptomatic infection in some species to acute neurological signs in others. The impact of JEV infection is particularly apparent in pigs. Although infection in adult swine does not result in symptomatic disease, it is considered a significant reproductive problem causing abortion, still-birth and birth defects. Infected piglets can display fatal neurological disease. Equines are also infected, resulting in non-specific signs including pyrexia, but occasionally leading to overt neurological disease that in extreme cases can lead to death. Veterinary vaccination is available for both pigs and horses. This review of JEV disease in livestock considers the current diagnostic techniques available for detection of the virus. Options for disease control and prevention within the veterinary sector are discussed. Such measures are critical in breaking the link to zoonotic transmission into the human population where humans are dead-end hosts. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Autoimmune neurological syndromes associated limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayas, Zeynep Özözen; Kotan, Dilcan; Aras, Yeşim Güzey

    2016-10-06

    Autoimmune neurological syndrome is a group of disorders caused by cancer affecting nervous system by different immunological mechanisms. In this study, we aim to study the clinical symptoms, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings, autoantibody tests, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs and treatment outcome of patients with autoimmune syndromes. In this study, 7 patients (4 male, 3 female) diagnosed with autoimmune neurological syndrome were retrospectively examined. Five of patients were diagnosed with limbic encephalitis, two of them were paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Confusion and seizure were the most seen symptoms. Two patients had psychiatric disturbances (28,5%) followed by seizure. Headache was seen in 2 patients (% 28,5), disartria in 1 patient (% 14,2), and gait disorder in 2 patients (28,5%). The duration of symptoms was 46 (3-150) days on average. CSF abnormalities were detected in 2 patients. CT and MRI of the brain was available in all patients. Five patients had involvement of mesiotemporal region, two patients had diffuse cerebellar atrophy. One of patients had anti-GABAR B1 positivity. Tumors were detected in 2 patients while investigation for paraneoplasia screening. Remission is only possible with the detection and treatment of the malignancy. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tick-borne encephalitis vaccines: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zent, Olaf; Bröker, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Vaccines to protect against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) are produced by two manufacturers and are widely used in European and Asian countries, where TBE virus is endemic. General trends in vaccine development during recent decades and extensive postmarketing experience resulted in several modifications to their formulations and practical implications for use. Modifications were made to the production process, such as the change of the virus master bank from mouse brain to primary cells; to the excipients, especially the stabilizers and preservative; and to include formulations for children. Additionally, a rapid vaccination schedule has been developed for persons who require a fast onset of protection. Recent data from clinical studies and postmarketing surveillance indicate that both vaccines are safe, efficacious and interchangeable. Further (major) changes to formulation or alternative targets for vaccine development are not anticipated in the next 5 years. Recent serologic studies indicate that the persistence of protective immunity was longer than expected. Thus, recommendations for prolongation of TBE booster intervals have been made in several European countries, and a harmonization for booster recommendations is predicted within the European Union. Based on epidemiologic trends, the use of TBE vaccines will continue to increase in all age groups, including children.

  15. Vacuolating encephalitis in mice infected by human coronavirus OC43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomy, Helene; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2003-01-01

    Involvement of viruses in human neurodegenerative diseases and the underlying pathologic mechanisms remain generally unclear. Human respiratory coronaviruses (HCoV) can infect neural cells, persist in human brain, and activate myelin-reactive T cells. As a means of understanding the human infection, we characterized in vivo the neurotropic and neuroinvasive properties of HCoV-OC43 through the development of an experimental animal model. Virus inoculation of 21-day postnatal C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice led to a generalized infection of the whole CNS, demonstrating HCoV-OC43 neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence. This acute infection targeted neurons, which underwent vacuolation and degeneration while infected regions presented strong microglial reactivity and inflammatory reactions. Damage to the CNS was not immunologically mediated and microglial reactivity was instead a consequence of direct virus-mediated neuronal injury. Although this acute encephalitis appears generally similar to that induced by murine coronaviruses, an important difference rests in the prominent spongiform-like degeneration that could trigger neuropathology in surviving animals

  16. Brainstem encephalitis and acute polyneuropathy associated with hepatitis E infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Omar Jabbar; Davidson, Amy; Li, Kathy; Leach, John Paul; Heath, Craig

    2017-09-11

    A 59-year-old man presented with feverish illness. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 15, had reduced visual acuity in the left eye with partial left ptosis and mild left hemiparesis with an extensor left plantar. Over 48 hours, he accrued multiple cranial nerves palsies and progressed to a flaccid paralysis necessitating admission to an intensive care unit.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) study showed 20 lymphocytes and raised protein. Viral and bacterial PCRs were negative. Samples for Lyme, blood-borne viruses, syphilis and autoantibodies were also negative. MRI brain showed T2 abnormalities within the brainstem. Nerve conduction studies revealed an acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy pattern of Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS). The patient was treated for both infective and inflammatory causes of brainstem encephalitis and GBS.Retrospective studies confirmed the presence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA in CSF and serum studies showed positive HEV IgG and IgM prior to intravenous infusion. After 3 months of intensive rehabilitation, the patient was discharged home walking with a frame. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Impaired autonomic responses to emotional stimuli in autoimmune limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga eSchröder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis (LE is an autoimmune-mediated disorder that affects structures of the limbic system, in particular the amygdala. The amygdala constitutes a brain area substantial for processing of emotional, especially fear-related signals. The amygdala is also involved in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including skin conductance responses (SCRs to emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigates behavioral and autonomic responses to discrete emotion-evoking and neutral film clips in a patient suffering from LE associated with contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2-antibodies as compared to a healthy control group. Results show a lack of SCRs in the patient while watching the film clips, with significant differences compared to healthy controls in the case of fear-inducing videos. There was no comparable impairment in behavioral data (emotion report, valence and arousal ratings. The results point to a defective modulation of sympathetic responses during emotional stimulation in patients with LE, probably due to impaired functioning of the amygdala.

  18. Pitfalls in diagnosing limbic encephalitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerling, F; Blümcke, I; Stefan, H

    2008-11-01

    The syndrome of limbic encephalitis (LE) is characterized by subacute onset of temporal lobe epilepsy, loss of short-term memory, cognitive confusion and psychiatric symptoms. We report a patient with pharmacoresistant epilepsy who underwent presurgical video-electroencephalogram (EEG)-monitoring with normal psychiatric and neuropsychological findings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a hyperintense lesion within the right amygdala but no contrast enhancement. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed pleocytosis and positive oligoclonal bands, but all tests for neurotropic viruses or borrelia antibodies were negative. Presurgical evaluation identified a right mesiotemporal focus. As a tumour was the most likely differential diagnosis, we performed selective amygdalohippocampectomy of the right hemisphere. Subsequent histopathological examination revealed the surprising diagnosis of LE. As a consequence, tumour screening was initiated and a testicular carcinoma with high anti-Ma2-antibody titres was detected. Following surgical and chemotherapeutical treatment, the patient was seizure-free and Ma2-antibodies decreased below detection limits. Conclusion - This case report highlights that LE has to be considered even in patients with atypical clinical presentation, i.e. without neuropsychological deficits, if CSF analysis reveals an inflammatory response. When LE is diagnosed, extensive tumour search is mandatory to detect and treat the paraneoplastic origin of LE. Therapeutic strategies of LE include surgical treatment as well as early immunosuppression.

  19. Characterization of Genetic Variability of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shea N Gardner

    Full Text Available Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused large outbreaks of severe illness in both horses and humans. New approaches are needed to rapidly infer the origin of a newly discovered VEEV strain, estimate its equine amplification and resultant epidemic potential, and predict human virulence phenotype. We performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis of all available VEE antigenic complex genomes, verified that a SNP-based phylogeny accurately captured the features of a phylogenetic tree based on multiple sequence alignment, and developed a high resolution genome-wide SNP microarray. We used the microarray to analyze a broad panel of VEEV isolates, found excellent concordance between array- and sequence-based SNP calls, genotyped unsequenced isolates, and placed them on a phylogeny with sequenced genomes. The microarray successfully genotyped VEEV directly from tissue samples of an infected mouse, bypassing the need for viral isolation, culture and genomic sequencing. Finally, we identified genomic variants associated with serotypes and host species, revealing a complex relationship between genotype and phenotype.

  20. Quantification of vector and host competence and abundance for Japanese Encephalitis Virus: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a vector-borne disease caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that affects humans in Eastern and Southeastern Asia. Although it could be prevented by a vaccine, JE has no treatment and the inadvertent introduction of the virus into JEV-free countries, such as t...