WorldWideScience

Sample records for capped gold nanoparticles

  1. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shreedhar Bhata; Uday Maitra

    2008-11-01

    A series of bile acid-derived facially amphiphilic thiols have been used to cap sliver and gold nanoparticles. The self-assembling properties of these steroid-capped nanoparticles have been investigated and reported in this article.

  2. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, Shreedhar; Maitra, Uday

    2008-01-01

    A series of bile acid-derived facially amphiphilic thiols have been used to cap sliver and gold nanoparticles. The self-assembling properties of these steroid-capped nanoparticles have been investigated and reported in this article.

  3. Trapping and release of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrical method to trap and release charged gold nanoparticles onto and from the surface of gold electrodes modified by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is presented. To form electrodes coated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs), amine-terminated SAMs on gold electrodes were immersed in a solution of negatively charged citrate-capped GNPs. Accumulation of GNPs on the electrode surface was monitored by a decrease in the impedance of the SAM-modified electrode and by an increase in the electrochemical activity at the electrode as shown through cyclic voltammetry (CV). Electrostatic interactions between the GNPs and the amine-terminated SAM trap the GNPs on the electrode surface. Application of a subsequent negative bias to the electrode initiated a partial release of the GNPs from the electrode surface. Impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to monitor and confirm the attraction of GNPs to and release from the aminealkanethiolated gold electrodes. This work describes a method of trapping and release for citrate-capped GNPs that could be used for on-demand nanoparticle delivery applications such as in assessing and modeling nanoparticle toxicology, as well as for monitoring the functionalization of gold nanoparticles.

  4. Size control synthesis of starch capped-gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of chloroaurate anions [AuCl4]- solution with hydrazine in the aqueous starch and ethylene glycol solution at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. The characterization of synthesized gold nanoparticles by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that average size of pure gold nanoparticles is 3.5 nm, they are spherical in shape and are pure metallic gold. The concentration effects of [AuCl4]- anions, starch, ethylene glycol, and hydrazine, on particle size, were investigated, and the stabilization mechanism of Au nanoparticles by starch polymer molecules was also studied by FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis shows that hydroxyl groups of starch are responsible of capping and stabilizing gold nanoparticles. The UV-vis spectrum of these samples shows that there is blue shift in surface plasmon resonance peak with decrease in particle size due to the quantum confinement effect, a supporting evidence of formation of gold nanoparticles and this shift remains stable even after 3 months.

  5. Using Glutamic Acid, Phenylalanine and Tryptophan to Synthesize Capped Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kamyar Khoshnevisan; Mohammad Barkhi; Nasim Bararpour; Shahram Tangestaninejad; Azim Akbarzadeh; Davood Zare

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The study and investigation of gold nanoparticles produced by amino acid is one of the interesting and applied issues in nanotechnology. In this study, amino acids were used to reduce gold cations as well as an agent to cap gold nanoparticles. In fact, strong bound of amino groups to amino acid and protein on the gold nanoparticles surface indicate the medical applications of these materials. Methods: In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared and functionalized by using so...

  6. Synergistic Effect of Fullerene-Capped Gold Nanoparticles on Graphene Electrochemical Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of graphene/fullerene-capped gold nanoparticle nanocomposite film which was used to construct supercapacitor electrodes. The fullerene-based self-assembled monolayers on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were attained via the fullerene(C60)-gold interaction. The fullerene-capped AuNPs effectively separated the graphene sheets preventing aggregation. A synergistic effect was observed—the specific capacitance of graphene/fullerene-capped AuNP electrode is 197 F/g, which is high...

  7. Catechin-capped gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yoonho; Choi, Myung-Jin; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2014-01-01

    An eco-friendly approach is described for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using catechin as a reducing and capping agent. The reaction occurred at room temperature within 1 h without the use of any external energy and an excellent yield (99%) was obtained, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Various shapes of gold nanoparticles with an estimated diameter of 16.6 nm were green-synthesized. Notably, the capping of freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles by ca...

  8. Synthesis, capping and binding of colloidal gold nanoparticles to proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a stabilizing agent and biofunctionalized layer for water-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized from metal precursor HAuCl4. The BSA binding to gold NPs was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by transmission electron microscopy, UV-VIS and FTIR spectrophotometers. HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) specific phage antibodies were attached to BSA stabilized gold NPs to form a gold–antibody complex. An ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test was done to confirm the bioactivity of antibodies attached to gold NPs

  9. Two-dimensional self-organi-zation of 1-nonanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) ordered hexagonal close-packed structure, formed by 1-nonanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles, is reported. The structure was constructed only by dipping the gold nanoparticle colloidal solution on flat substrate. The gold nanoparticles were synthesized as follows: First, AuCl4-1 was transferred from aqueous solution to toluene by the phase-transfer reagent of tetraoctylammo-nium bromide. Then it was reduced with aqueous sodium borohydride in the presence of a given amount of 1-nonanethiol molecules which was used to control the nuclea-tion and growth of the gold nanoparticles for the desired size. The experimental techniques, such as UV-Vis, FT-IR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), were employed to characterize the obtained product. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurement demonstrated the size of the gold nanoparticle and the formation of two-dimensional ordered hexagonal close-packed gold nanoparticle structure.

  10. Effect of a thioalkane capping layer on the first hyperpolarizabilities of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harfouch, Yara; Benichou, Emmanuel; Bertorelle, Franck; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Jonin, Christian; Lascoux, Noelle; Brevet, Pierre F

    2012-03-28

    We have measured the first hyperpolarizabilities of thioalkane capped silver and gold metallic nanoparticles. The values found are β(AgC 12-10 nm) = (2.10 ± 0.23) × 10(-26) esu for 10 nm diameter silver nanoparticles and β(AuC 18-18 nm) = (3.37 ± 0.08) × 10(-26) esu for 18 nm diameter gold nanoparticles at the fundamental wavelength of 784 nm. By comparison to the corresponding values reported for citrate capped silver and gold metallic nanoparticles, after size corrections, decreases by factors of 4.3 and 6.5 respectively are observed. These decreases are tentatively attributed to the bonds formed between the gold and silver surface atoms and the sulfur atoms of the capping layer. PMID:22395007

  11. Using Glutamic Acid, Phenylalanine and Tryptophan to Synthesize Capped Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamyar Khoshnevisan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study and investigation of gold nanoparticles produced by amino acid is one of the interesting and applied issues in nanotechnology. In this study, amino acids were used to reduce gold cations as well as an agent to cap gold nanoparticles. In fact, strong bound of amino groups to amino acid and protein on the gold nanoparticles surface indicate the medical applications of these materials. Methods: In this study, gold nanoparticles were prepared and functionalized by using solution reduction containing gold cations with optimum concentration (0.005 M, and also prepared by using glutamic acid, phenylalanine and tryptophan with optimum concentration (0.025 M. Results: The investigation of optimum condition for gold solution and amino acids and also determination of gold nanoparticles were done by UV-Vis. The nanoparticles size were reported 5-20, 10-20 and 20-30 nm respectively by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques, which is appropriate for biological activities. Conclusion: The comparison of the data from experimental and quantum calculations demonstrated that amino acids have strong band when they are conjugated by anion state. Free carboxylic groups of capped gold nanoparticles with glutamic acid are one of the suitable and capable beads for binding to biological agents.

  12. Highly stable, protein capped gold nanoparticles as effective drug delivery vehicles for amino-glycosidic antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the production of highly stable gold nanoparticles (Au NP) was optimized using sodium borohydride as reducing agent and bovine serum albumin as capping agent. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic light scattering techniques. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of pink colour and an absorption maximum at 532 nm. These protein capped nanoparticles exhibited excellent stability towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape, nearly monodispersed and with an average particle size of 7.8 ± 1.7 nm. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles in face centered cubic structure is confirmed from the selected‐area electron diffraction and XRD patterns. The nanoparticles were functionalized with various amino-glycosidic antibiotics for utilizing them as drug delivery vehicles. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the possible functional groups of antibiotics bound to the nanoparticle surface have been examined. These drug loaded nanoparticle solutions were tested for their antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, by well diffusion assay. The antibiotic conjugated Au NP exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity, compared to pure antibiotic at the same concentration. Being protein capped and highly stable, these gold nanoparticles can act as effective carriers for drugs and might have considerable applications in the field of infection prevention and therapeutics. - Highlights: ► Method for NaBH4 reduced and BSA capped gold nanoparticle was standardized. ► Nanoparticles were spherical and nearly monodispersed with a size of 7.8 nm. ► Nanoparticles are extremely stable towards pH modification and electrolyte addition. ► Antibiotic conjugated nanoparticles exhibited enhanced antibacterial activity

  13. Catechin-capped gold nanoparticles: green synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity toward 4-nitrophenol reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonho; Choi, Myung-Jin; Cha, Song-Hyun; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2014-03-01

    An eco-friendly approach is described for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using catechin as a reducing and capping agent. The reaction occurred at room temperature within 1 h without the use of any external energy and an excellent yield (99%) was obtained, as determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Various shapes of gold nanoparticles with an estimated diameter of 16.6 nm were green-synthesized. Notably, the capping of freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles by catechin was clearly visualized with the aid of microscopic techniques, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Strong peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles confirmed their crystalline nature. The catalytic activity of the as-prepared gold nanoparticles was observed in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The results suggest that the newly prepared gold nanoparticles have potential uses in catalysis.

  14. Adsorption kinetics of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles at the hexane–water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pendant drop technique was used to characterize the adsorption behavior of n-dodecane-1-thiol and n-hexane-1-thiol-capped gold nanoparticles at the hexane–water interface. The adsorption process was studied by analyzing the dynamic interfacial tension versus nanoparticle concentration, both at early times and at later stages (i.e., immediately after the interface between the fluids is made and once equilibrium has been established). A series of gold colloids were made using nanoparticles ranging in size from 1.60 to 2.85 nm dissolved in hexane for the interfacial tension analysis. Following free diffusion of nanoparticles from the bulk hexane phase, adsorption leads to ordering and rearrangement of the nanoparticles at the interface and formation of a dense monolayer. With increasing interfacial coverage, the diffusion-controlled adsorption for the nanoparticles at the interface was found to change to an interaction-controlled assembly and the presence of an adsorption barrier was experimentally verified. At the same bulk concentration, different sizes of n-dodecane-1-thiol nanoparticles showed different absorption behavior at the interface, in agreement with the findings of Kutuzov et al. (Phys Chem Chem Phys 9:6351–6358, 2007). The experiments additionally demonstrated the important role played by the capping agent. At the same concentration, gold nanoparticles stabilized by n-hexane-1-thiol exhibited greater surface activity than gold nanoparticles of the same size stabilized by n-dodecane-1-thiol. These findings contribute to the design of useful supra-colloidal structures by the self-assembly of alkane-thiol-capped gold nanoparticles at liquid–liquid interfaces.

  15. Facile biosynthesis of phosphate capped gold nanoparticles by a bacterial isolate Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by a strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (AuRed02) isolated from the soil samples of Singhbhum gold mines, India. An aqueous solution of gold chloride was reduced to metallic gold in a suspension of disrupted cell mass of AuRed02, which progressively turns into cherry red within 8 h of incubation at 25 deg. C. The optical spectrum showed the plasmon resonance at 530 nm and analysis by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering confirmed the formation of around 40 nm GNPs. Zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared measurements confirmed GNPs are capped by negatively charged phosphate groups of NADP.

  16. Analysis of citrate-capped gold and silver nanoparticles by thiol ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the capillary electrophoretic behavior of citrate-capped gold and silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium when applying a ligand-exchange surface reaction with thiols. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of similar size (39 ± 6 and 41 ± 7 nm, respectively) and shape were synthesized, covered with a citrate shell, and characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The analysis of these NPs by CE was accomplished by using a buffer solution (pH 9.7; 40 mM SDS, 10 mM CAPS; 0.1 % methanol) containing the anions of thioctic acid or thiomalic acid. These are capable of differently interacting with the surface of the AuNPs and AgNPs and thus introducing additional negative charges. This results in different migration times due to the formation of differently charged nanoparticles. (author)

  17. Electrochemical stability of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles electrostatically assembled on amine-modified glassy carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles assembled on covalently attached ethylenediamine films on glassy carbon was probed using cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. The accessible potential windows in 0.01 M HClO4 and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) were found to be very similar to those for re-constructed polycrystalline bulk gold. At the nanoparticle electrodes, gold is dissolved at high positive potentials and re-deposited at lower potentials resulting in the formation of fewer, larger particles. The electrografted amine layer does not limit the stability range and citrate-capping groups do not stabilise the nanoparticles to oxidation. In addition to the structural stability of the nanoparticle electrodes, preliminary investigations of the stability of their activity for voltammetric analyses were also undertaken. Repeated voltammetric reduction of H2O2 at the nanoparticle electrodes showed excellent reproducibility indicating that the nanoparticle surface maintained a constant activity for the redox process. In contrast, a re-constructed polycrystalline bulk gold electrode did not exhibit a stable response under the same conditions.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance and magnetism of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, E; Munoz-Marquez, M A; Fernandez, A [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-US, Avenida Americo Vespucio 49, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia, M A; Crespo, P; Fernandez-Pinel, E; Hernando, A [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (UCM-ADIF-CSIC), PO Box 155, E-28230 Las Rozas, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: miguel.angel@icmse.csic.es

    2008-04-30

    Surface plasmon resonance measurements and magnetic characterization studies have been carried out for two types of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles (NPs) with similar diameters between 2.0 and 2.5 nm and different organic molecules linked to the sulfur atom: dodecanethiol and tiopronin. In addition, Au NPs capped with tetraoctyl ammonium bromide have also been included in the investigation since such capping molecules weakly interact with the gold surface atoms and, therefore, this system can be used as a model for naked gold NPs; such particles presented a bimodal size distribution with diameters around 1.5 and 5 nm. The plasmon resonance is non-existent for tiopronin-capped NPs, whereas a trace of such a feature is observed for NPs covered with dodecanethiol molecules and a bulk-like feature is measured for NPs capped with tetralkyl ammonium salts. These differences would indicate that the modification of the surface electronic structure of the Au NPs depends on the geometry and self-assembling capabilities of the capping molecules and on the electric charge transferred between Au and S atoms. Regarding the magnetization, dodecanethiol-capped NPs have a ferromagnetic-like behaviour, while the NPs capped with tiopronin exhibit a paramagnetic behaviour and tetralkyl ammonium-protected NPs are diamagnetic across the studied temperature range; straight chains with a well-defined symmetry axis can induce orbital momentum on surface electrons close to the binding atoms. The orbital momentum not only contributes to the magnetization but also to the local anisotropy, giving rise to permanent magnetism. Due to the domain structure of the adsorbed molecules, orbital momentum is not induced for tiopronin-capped NPs and the charge transfer only induces a paramagnetic spin component.

  19. Preparation, stability and two-dimensional ordered arrangement of gold nanoparticles capped by surfactants with different chain lengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周学华; 江龙; 李津如; 刘春艳

    2002-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles modified with C10NH2, C12NH2, C16NH2 and C18NH2 respectively have been prepared by the reverse micelle method. Nanoparticles stability and their two-dimensional (2D) ordered arrangement were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectra and LB technique. The factors, such as the chain length and the size distribution of particles, which affect the 2D ordered arrangement formation, are discussed. Experimental results show that the longer the chain length of surfactants capping the gold nanoparticles, the more stable the nanoparticles, and the more ordered 2D arrangement of gold nanoparticles.

  20. Studies on ligand exchange reaction of functionalized mercaptothiadiazole compounds onto citrate capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercaptothiadiazole ligands functionalized with thiol (2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT)) and methyl (5-methyl-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (MMT)) groups capped onto citrate capped gold nanoparticles (C-AuNPs) by ligand exchange reaction was investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The surface plasmon resonance band at 522 nm for C-AuNPs was shifted to 530 nm after capping with DMT whereas an additional band was observed at 630 nm due to aggregation in addition to a shift in the band at 522 nm after capping of MMT onto C-AuNPs. Thus, capping of DMT onto C-AuNPs leads to the formation of stable AuNPs while capping of MMT leads to the formation of unstable AuNPs. FT-IR studies show that the citrate ions were completely replaced by both DMT and MMT ligands from the AuNPs. TEM images indicate that the size and shape of the AuNPs remain same after capping of these ligands.

  1. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Capped with Quaterthiophene for Transistor and Resistor Memory Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Ha Hoang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the fabrication of nonvolatile memory devices based on gold nanoparticles has been intensively investigated. In this work, we report on the design and synthesis of new semiconducting quaterthiophene incorporating hexyl thiol group (4TT. Gold nanoparticles capped with 4TT (4TTG were prepared in a two-phase liquid-liquid system. These nanoparticles have diameters in the range 2–6 nm and are well dispersed in the poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT host matrix. The intermolecular interaction between 4TT and P3HT could enhance the charge-transport between gold nanoparticles and P3HT. Transfer curve of transistor memory device made of 4TTG/P3HT hybrid film exhibited significant current hysteresis, probably arising from the energy level barrier at 4TTG/P3HT interface. Additionally, the polymer memory resistor structure with an active layer consisting of 4TTG and P3HT displayed a remarkable electrical bistable behavior.

  2. Selective photothermal efficiency of citrate capped gold nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raji, V. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India); Kumar, Jatish [Division of photochemistry and photobiology, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences and Technology (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Rejiya, C.S.; Vibin, M.; Shenoi, Vinesh N. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India); Abraham, Annie, E-mail: annieab2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)

    2011-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles are recently having much attention because of their increased applications in biomedical fields. In this paper, we demonstrated the photothermal efficacy of citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the destruction of A431 cancer cells. Citrate capped AuNPs were synthesized successfully and characterized by UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometry and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, AuNPs were conjugated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR) and applied for the selective photothermal therapy (PTT) of human epithelial cancer cells, A431. PTT experiments were conducted in four groups, Group I-control cells, Group II-cells treated with laser light alone, Group III-cells treated with unconjugated AuNP and further laser irradiation and Group IV-anti-EGFR conjugated AuNP treated cells irradiated by laser light. After laser irradiation, cell morphology changes that were examined using phase contrast microscopy along with the relevant biochemical parameters like lactate dehydrogenase activity, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activity were studied for all the groups to determine whether cell death occurs due to necrosis or apoptosis. From these results we concluded that, these immunotargeted nanoparticles could selectively induce cell death via ROS mediated apoptosis when cells were exposed to a low power laser light.

  3. Two-phase synthesis of hydrophobic ionic liquid-capped gold nanoparticles and their application for sensing cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel cholesterol biosensor was constructed based on ChOx-IL-capped-AuNPs/GCE. • IL-capped-AuNPs was synthesized using two-phase synthesis and employed as a conducting matrix to immobilize ChOx. • Direct electrochemistry of ChOx on the electrode was obtained. • The ChOx-IL-capped-AuNPs/GCE exhibit remarkable performance for cholesterol detection. - Abstract: A novel scheme for fabrication of hydrophobic ionic liquid-capped gold nanoparticles (IL-capped AuNPs) modified electrode is presented and its application potential for cholesterol biosensor is investigated. Highly stable gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) indicated that IL-capped AuNPs nanocomposites showed excellent electrical conductivity. Furthermore, cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) was directly immobilized on the IL-capped AuNPs nanocomposite, and then the direct electrochemistry of ChOx on the modified glass carbon electrode (GCE) was obtained. As a new platform in cholesterol analysis, ChOx-IL-capped AuNPs/GCE exhibited a linear response to cholesterol in the range of 0.1–50 μM with a detection limit of 0.033 μM. Therefore, hydrophobic ionic liquid-capped gold nanoparticles would serve as a good candidate material to construct the related enzyme biosensors

  4. Efficient pH Dependent Drug Delivery to Target Cancer Cells by Gold Nanoparticles Capped with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    OpenAIRE

    Alle Madhusudhan; Gangapuram Bhagavanth Reddy; Maragoni Venkatesham; Guttena Veerabhadram; Dudde Anil Kumar; Sumathi Natarajan; Ming-Yeh Yang; Anren Hu; Singh, Surya S.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) was immobilized on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) for effective delivery to cancer cells. The carboxylic group of carboxymethyl chitosan interacts with the amino group of the doxorubicin (DOX) forming stable, non-covalent interactions on the surface of AuNPs. The carboxylic group ionizes at acidic pH, thereby releasing the drug effectively at acidic pH suitable to target cancer cells. The DOX loaded gold nanoparticles were effectively abs...

  5. Water-dispersible nanoparticles via interdigitation of sodium dodecylsulphate molecules in octadecylamine-capped gold nanoparticles at a liquid-liquid interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Swami; Amol Jadhav; Ashavani Kumar; Suguna D Adyanthaya; Murali Sastry

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes the formation of water-dispersible gold nanoparticles capped with a bilayer of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and octadecylamine (ODA) molecules. Vigorous shaking of a biphasic mixture consisting of ODA-capped gold nanoparticles in chloroform and SDS in water results in the rapid phase transfer of ODA-capped gold nanoparticles from the organic to the aqueous phase, the latter acquiring a pink, foam-like appearance in the process. Drying of the coloured aqueous phase results in the formation of a highly stable, reddish powder of gold nanoparticles that may be readily redispersed in water. The water-dispersible gold nanoparticles have been investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). These studies indicate the presence of interdigitated bilayers consisting of an ODA primary monolayer directly coordinated to the gold nanoparticle surface and a secondary monolayer of SDS, this secondary monolayer providing sufficient hydrophilicity to facilitate gold nanoparticle transfer into water and rendering them water-dispersible.

  6. Colorimetric and visual determination of dicyandiamide using gallic acid-capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method is presented for the visual detection of dicyandiamide (DCD). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with gallic acid (GA) were synthesized in a single step at room temperature, using GA as both the reducing agent and stabilizer. In the presence of DCD, the hydrogen-bonding interaction between GA and DCD induces the aggregation of AuNPs, associated with a color change from red to gray that can be observed with bare eye. DCD could be quantified by photometry as the red shift of the maximal absorption band is linearly related to the logarithm of concentration of DCD in the 0.1 to 500 μM concentration range, with a regression coefficient of 0.9987 and a 80 nM detection limit (at an SNR of 3). The proposed method was successfully applied to the detection of DCD in spiked dairy samples. (author)

  7. Influence of Capping Ligands on the Self-organization of Gold Nanoparticles into Superlattices from CTAB Reverse Micelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN,Jun(林君); ZHOU,Wei-Lie(周维烈); CARPENTER, Everett; O' CONNOR, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles with size 3-10 nm (diameter) were prepared by the reduction of HAuCl4 in a CTAB/octane + 1-butanol/H2O reverse micelle system using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. The as-formed gold nanoparticle colloid was characterized by UV/vis absorption spectrum and transmission electron microscopy(TEM). Various capping ligands, such as alkylthiols with different chain length and shape,trioctylphosphine (TOP), and pyridine are used to passivate the gold nanoparticles for the purpose of self-organization into superstructrues.It is shown that the ligands have a great influence on the selforganization of gold nanoparticles into superlattices, and dodecanethiol C12H25SH is confirmed to be the best ligand for the self-organization. Self-organization of C12H25SH-capped gold nanoparticles into 1D, 2D and 3D superlattices has been observed on the carbon-coated copper grid by TEM without using any selective precipitation processs.

  8. pH-dependent immobilization of urease on glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Seema; De, Arnab; Mozumdar, Subho

    2015-05-01

    Urease is a nickel-dependent metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. Although the enzyme serves a significant role in several detoxification and analytical processes, its usability is restricted due to high cost, availability in small amounts, instability, and a limited possibility of economic recovery from a reaction mixture. Hence, there is a need to develop an efficient, simple, and reliable immobilization strategy for the enzyme. In this study, the carboxyl terminated surface of glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles have been utilized as a solid support for the covalent attachment of urease. The immobilization has been carried out at different pH conditions so as to elucidate its effect on the immobilization efficiency and enzyme bioactivity. The binding of the enzyme has been quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed through techniques like ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, intrinsic steady state fluorescence, and circular dichorism. The bioactivity of the immobilized enzyme was investigated with respect to the native enzyme under different thermal conditions. Recyclability and shelf life studies of the immobilized enzyme have also been carried out. Results reveal that the immobilization is most effective at pH of 7.4 followed by that in an acidic medium and is least in alkaline environment. The immobilized enzyme also exhibits enhance activity in comparison to the native form at physiological temperature. The immobilized urease (on gold glutathione nanoconjugates surface) can be effectively employed for biosensor fabrication, immunoassays and as an in vivo diagnostic tool in the future. PMID:25227875

  9. Miscibility and alignment effects of mixed monolayer cyanobiphenyl liquid-crystal-capped gold nanoparticles in nematic cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hao; Kinkead, Brandy; Marx, Vanessa M; Zhang, Huai R; Hegmann, Torsten

    2009-06-01

    Against the rule: Liquid crystal hosts (5CB and 8CB) are doped with different thiol decorated gold nanoparticles (see figure). The "simple" hexanethiol and dodecanethiol capped nanoparticles (Au1 and Au2) are more compatible to the nematic cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals than nanoparticles capped simultaneously with alkylthiols and a nematic cyanobiphenyl thiol (Au3 and Au4).This study focuses on the miscibility of liquid crystal (LC) decorated gold nanoparticles (NPs) in nematic LCs. To explore if LC functional groups on the gold NP corona improve the compatibility (miscibility) with structurally related LC hosts, we examined mixtures of two LC hosts, 5CB and 8CB, doped at 5 wt % with different types of gold NPs. Four alkanethiol-capped NPs were synthesized; two homogeneously coated with alkanethiols (Au1 with C(6)H(13)SH and Au2 with C(12)H(25)SH), and two that were additionally capped at a different ratio with a mesogenic cyanobiphenyl end-functionalized alkanethiol HS10OCB (C(6)H(13)SH + HS10OCB for Au3 and C(12)H(25)SH + HS10OCB for Au4). Investigating these mixtures in the bulk for settling of the NPs, and in thin films using polarized optical microscopy (POM) between untreated glass slides as well as POM studies and electro-optic tests in planar ITO/polyimide test cells, reveal that the alkanethiol capped NPs Au1 and Au2 are more compatible with the two polar cyanobiphenyl hosts in comparison to the NPs decorated with the cyanobiphenyl moieties. All NPs induce homeotropic alignment in 5CB and 8CB between untreated glass slides, with Au1 and Au2 showing characteristic birefringent stripes, and Au3 and A4 exhibiting clear signs of aggregation. In rubbed polyimide cells, however, Au3 and Au4 fail to induce homeotropic alignment and show clear signs of macroscopic aggregation. PMID:19334026

  10. Preparation of lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for molecular imaging of angiotensin-converting enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Baeta, Cesar; Aras, Omer; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2009-05-01

    Overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) has been associated with the pathophysiology of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, the prescription of ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, has shown a favorable effect on patient outcome for patients with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE would be of crucial importance for monitoring tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-coated gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. The preparation involved non-modified lisinopril, using its primary amine group as the anchoring function on the gold nanoparticles surface. The stable lisinopril-coated gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their zeta potential was also measured in order to assess the charge density on the modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs).

  11. One step alkaline synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles using dextrin as capping agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are used in sensing methods as tracers and transducers. The most common AuNP synthesis techniques utilize citrate under acidic reaction conditions. The synthesis described in this article generates glyco-AuNPs under mild alkaline conditions providing a “greener” alternative to Brust and Turkevich methodologies. This biologically compatible one-step technique uses dextrin as a capping agent and sodium carbonate as the reducing agent for chloroauric acid. The generated particles were relatively mono-dispersed and water soluble with a range of controllable mean diameters from 5.9 to 16.8 ± 1.6 nm. The produced AuNPs were stable in water for more than 6 months stored at room temperature (21 °C) in generation solution without protection from light. This article shows the effect of temperature, pH, and dextrin concentration on the synthesis procedure and AuNP diameter. These factors were found to control the reaction speed. The produced glyco-AuNPs were successfully functionalized with DNA oligonucleotides, and the functionalization efficiency was similar to citrate-generated AuNPs. The alkaline synthesis allows future exploration of simultaneous synthesis and functionalization procedures, which could significantly reduce the time of current ligand exchange methodologies.

  12. Adsorption of doxorubicin on citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: insights into engineering potent chemotherapeutic delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Dennis; Cameron, Amanda; MacDonald, Bruce; Nganou, Collins; Scheller, Hope; Marsh, James; Beale, Stefanie; Lu, Mingsheng; Shan, Zhi; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran; Xu, Heping; Servos, Mark; Bennett, Craig; Macquarrie, Stephanie; Oakes, Ken D.; Mkandawire, Martin; Zhang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied. Here, for the first time, we propose empirical and theoretical evidence suggestive of the main adsorption process where (1) hydrophobic forces drive doxorubicin towards the gold nanoparticle surface before (2) cation-π interactions and gold-carbonyl coordination between the drug molecule and the cations on AuNP surface facilitate DOX adsorption. In addition, biologically relevant compounds, such as serum albumin and glutathione, were shown to enhance desorption of loaded drug molecules from AuNP at physiologically relevant concentrations, providing insight into the drug release and in vivo stability of such drug conjugates.Gold nanomaterials have received great interest for their use in cancer theranostic applications over the past two decades. Many gold nanoparticle-based drug delivery system designs rely on adsorbed ligands such as DNA or cleavable linkers to load therapeutic cargo. The heightened research interest was recently demonstrated in the simple design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates wherein drug molecules are directly adsorbed onto the as-synthesized nanoparticle surface. The potent chemotherapeutic, doxorubicin often serves as a model drug for gold nanoparticle-based delivery platforms; however, the specific interaction facilitating adsorption in this system remains understudied

  13. Peptide-Decorated Gold Nanoparticles as Functional Nano-Capping Agent of Mesoporous Silica Container for Targeting Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ganchao; Xie, Yusheng; Peltier, Raoul; Lei, Haipeng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Jun; Hu, Yi; Wang, Feng; Yao, Xi; Sun, Hongyan

    2016-05-11

    A stimuli-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) with bioactive surface is constructed by end-capping mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with functional peptide-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs). MSNs are first functionalized with acid-labile α-amide-β-carboxyl groups to carry negative charges, and then capped with positively charged GNPs that are decorated with oligo-lysine-containing peptide. The resulting hybrid delivery system exhibits endo/lysosomal pH triggered drug release, and the incorporation of RGD peptide facilitates targeting delivery to αvβ3 integrin overexpressing cancer cells. The system can serve as a platform for preparing diversified multifunctional nanocomposites using various functional inorganic nanoparticles and bioactive peptides. PMID:27102225

  14. In situ synthesized BSA capped gold nanoparticles: Effective carrier of anticancer drug Methotrexate to MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawala, Priyanka [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Tirmale, Amruta [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS, Pune 411007 (India); Shiras, Anjali, E-mail: anjalishiras@nccs.res.in [National Centre for Cell Science, NCCS, Pune 411007 (India); Prasad, B.L.V., E-mail: pl.bhagavatula@ncl.res.in [Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India)

    2014-01-01

    The proficiency of MTX loaded BSA capped gold nanoparticles (Au-BSA-MTX) in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells MCF-7 as compared to the free drug Methotrexate (MTX) is demonstrated based on MTT and Ki-67 proliferation assays. In addition, DNA ladder gel electrophoresis studies, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay confirmed the induction of apoptosis by MTX and Au-BSA-MTX in MCF-7 cells. Notably, Au-BSA-MTX was found to have higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells compared with an equivalent dose of free MTX. The enhanced activity is attributed to the preferential uptake of Au-BSA-MTX particles by MCF-7 cells due to the presence of BSA that acts as a source of nutrient and energy to the rapidly proliferating MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the targeting ability of the drug MTX to the over expressed folate receptors on MCF-7 cells also contributes to the enhanced uptake and activity. Taken together, these results unveil that Au-BSA-MTX could be more effective than free drug for cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles prepared using bovine serum albumin as a reducing and capping agent. • These gold nanoparticles are extremely stable under strong electrolyte and pH conditions. • The anticancer drug methotrexate has been loaded on the Au-BSA nanoparticles. • Due to BSA loading these are taken up by cancerous cells preferentially. • Better proficiency in inhibiting MCF-7 cells as compared to the free drug Methotrexate is demonstrated.

  15. In situ synthesized BSA capped gold nanoparticles: Effective carrier of anticancer drug Methotrexate to MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proficiency of MTX loaded BSA capped gold nanoparticles (Au-BSA-MTX) in inhibiting the proliferation of breast cancer cells MCF-7 as compared to the free drug Methotrexate (MTX) is demonstrated based on MTT and Ki-67 proliferation assays. In addition, DNA ladder gel electrophoresis studies, flow cytometry and TUNEL assay confirmed the induction of apoptosis by MTX and Au-BSA-MTX in MCF-7 cells. Notably, Au-BSA-MTX was found to have higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells compared with an equivalent dose of free MTX. The enhanced activity is attributed to the preferential uptake of Au-BSA-MTX particles by MCF-7 cells due to the presence of BSA that acts as a source of nutrient and energy to the rapidly proliferating MCF-7 cells. Moreover, the targeting ability of the drug MTX to the over expressed folate receptors on MCF-7 cells also contributes to the enhanced uptake and activity. Taken together, these results unveil that Au-BSA-MTX could be more effective than free drug for cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles prepared using bovine serum albumin as a reducing and capping agent. • These gold nanoparticles are extremely stable under strong electrolyte and pH conditions. • The anticancer drug methotrexate has been loaded on the Au-BSA nanoparticles. • Due to BSA loading these are taken up by cancerous cells preferentially. • Better proficiency in inhibiting MCF-7 cells as compared to the free drug Methotrexate is demonstrated

  16. Liposomal flucytosine capped with gold nanoparticle formulations for improved ocular delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem HF

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heba F Salem,1 Sayed M Ahmed,2 Mahmoud M Omar3 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt; 2Department of Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt; 3Department of Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Deraya University, El-Minia, Egypt Abstract: Nanoliposomes have an organized architecture that provides versatile functions. In this study, liposomes were used as an ocular carrier for nanogold capped with flucytosine antifungal drug. Gold nanoparticles were used as a contrasting agent that provides tracking of the drug to the posterior segment of the eye for treating fungal intraocular endophthalmitis. The nanoliposomes were prepared with varying molar ratios of lecithin, cholesterol, Span 60, a positive charge inducer (stearylamine, and a negative charge inducer (dicetyl phosphate. Formulation F6 (phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, Span 60, and stearylamine at a molar ratio of 1:1:1:0.15 demonstrated the highest extent of drug released, which reached 7.043 mg/h. It had a zeta potential value of 42.5±2.12 mV and an average particle size approaching 135.1±12.0 nm. The ocular penetration of the selected nanoliposomes was evaluated in vivo using a computed tomography imaging technique. It was found that F6 had both the highest intraocular penetration depth (10.22±0.11 mm as measured by the computed tomography and the highest antifungal efficacy when evaluated in vivo using 32 infected rabbits’ eyes. The results showed a strong correlation between the average intraocular penetration of the nanoparticles capped with flucytosine and the percentage of the eyes healed. After 4 weeks, all the infected eyes (n=8 were significantly healed (P<0.01 when treated with liposomal formulation F6. Overall, the nanoliposomes encapsulating flucytosine have been proven efficient in treating the infected rabbits’ eyes, which proves the efficiency of the

  17. Evolution of the microstructure, chemical composition and magnetic behaviour during the synthesis of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, E. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla CSIC-Univ. Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla CSIC-Univ. Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Multigner, M. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (RENFE-UCM-CSIC), P.O. Box 155, 28230, Las Rozas, Madrid, Spain and Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Crespo, P. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (RENFE-UCM-CSIC), P.O. Box 155, 28230, Las Rozas, Madrid, Spain and Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Munoz-Marquez, M.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla CSIC-Univ. Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Garcia, M.A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla CSIC-Univ. Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Hernando, A. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (RENFE-UCM-CSIC), P.O. Box 155, 28230, Las Rozas, Madrid, Spain and Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla CSIC-Univ. Sevilla, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: asuncion@icmse.csic.es

    2007-03-15

    In the present paper, we show an exhaustive microstructural characterization of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles (NPs) with two different average particle sizes. These samples are compared with the polymer-like Au(I) phase formed as a precursor during the synthesis of the thiol-capped gold NPs. The set of analysed samples shows different microstructures at the nanoscale with different proportions of Au atoms bonded either to S or to Au atoms. It has been experimentally shown that the presence of a ferromagnetic-like behaviour is associated to the formation of NPs with simultaneous presence of Au-Au and Au-S bonds. In order to explain such magnetic behaviour a possible model is proposed based on the spin-orbit coupling so that localized charges and/or spins (Au-S bonds) can trap conduction electrons (Au-Au bonds) in orbits.

  18. Multiple alignment modes for nematic liquid crystals doped with alkylthiol-capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hao; Hegmann, Torsten

    2009-08-01

    The ability of alkylthiol capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to tune, alter, and reverse the alignment of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) has been investigated in detail. Adjusting the concentration of the suspended Au NPs in the nematic LC host, optimizing the sample preparation protocol, or providing different sample substrates (untreated glass slides, rubbed polyimide-coated LC test cell, or ITO-coated glass slides) results in several LC alignment scenarios (modes) including vertical alignment, planar alignment, and a thermally controlled alignment switch between these two alignment modes. The latter thermal switch between planar and homeotropic alignment was observed particularly for lower concentrations (i.e., around 1 to 2 wt %) of suspended NPs in the size regime of 1.5-2 nm and was found to be concentration-dependent and thermally reversible. Different scenarios are discussed that could explain these induced alignment modes. In one scenario, the NP-induced alignment is related to the temperature-dependent change of the order parameter, S, of the nematic phase (ordering in the bulk). In the second scenario, a change of the ordering of the nematic molecules around the NPs that reside at the interfaces is described. We also started to test spin coating as an alternative way of preparing nematic thin films with well-separated Au NPs on the substrate and found this to be a possible method for manufacturing of future NP-doped LC devices, as this method produced evenly distributed NPs on glass substrates. Together the presented findings continue to pave the way for LC display-related applications of Au NP-doped nematic LCs and provide insights for N-LC sensor applications. PMID:20355789

  19. Synthesis of PEG-Iodine-Capped Gold Nanoparticles and Their Contrast Enhancement in In Vitro and In Vivo for X-Ray/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hee Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We designed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs capped with iodine and polyethylene glycol (PEG to provide effective enhancement for X-ray CT imaging. The methoxy PEG-iodine-capped AuNPs were prepared through the chemisorption of iodine and substitution of methoxy PEG-SH onto the surface of gold nanoparticles, and severe aggregation in TEM was not observed. The binding energies of Au 4f7/2 and I 3d5/2 of the methoxy PEG-iodine-capped AuNPs were obtained as 84.1 eV and 619.3 eV, respectively. The binding energy shift of methoxy PEG-iodine-capped AuNPs would be resulted from the chemisorption between gold nanoparticles and iodine atoms. The methoxy PEG-iodine-capped AuNPs have higher enhancement compared to PEG-capped gold nanoparicles in the same amount of gold in vitro. After postinjection of methoxy PEG-iodine-capped AuNPs into the mice, dramatic contrast enhancement at the heart, aorta, liver, and kidney was observed, this was maintained up to 5 days, and there was no evidence of apparent toxicity. In conclusion, methoxy PEG-iodine-capped AuNPs might be a good candidate as a CT contrast agent for blood pool imaging, and this will also contribute to the prolongation of a blood circulation time for X-ray CT imaging.

  20. Permanent magnetism in phosphine- and chlorine-capped gold: from clusters to nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Marquez, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel.angel@icmse.csic.es; Guerrero, Estefania; Fernandez, Asuncion [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US) (Spain); Crespo, Patricia; Hernando, Antonio [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado (UCM-ADIF-CSIC) (Spain); Lucena, Raquel; Conesa, Jose C. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC) (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Magnetometry results have shown that gold NPs ({approx}2 nm in size) protected with phosphine and chlorine ligands exhibit permanent magnetism. When the NPs size decreases down to the subnanometric size range, e.g. undecagold atom clusters, the permanent magnetism disappears. The near edge structure of the X-ray absorption spectroscopy data points out that charge transfer between gold and the capping system occurs in both cases. These results strongly suggest that nearly metallic Au bonds are also required for the induction of a magnetic response. Electron paramagnetic resonance observations indicate that the contribution to magnetism from eventual iron impurities can be disregarded.

  1. Targeted in-vivo computed tomography (CT) imaging of tissue ACE using concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticle solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Marie-Christine; Aras, Omer; Smith, Mark F.; Nan, Anjan; Fleiter, Thorsten

    2010-04-01

    The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis have been associated with overexpression of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, ACE inhibitors, such as lisinopril, have shown a benificial effect for patients diagnosed with heart failure or systemic hypertension. Thus targeted imaging of the ACE is of crucial importance for monitoring of the tissue ACE activity as well as the treatment efficacy in heart failure. In this respect, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles were prepared to provide a new type of probe for targeted molecular imaging of ACE by tuned K-edge computed tomography (CT) imaging. Concentrated solutions of these modified gold nanoparticles, with a diameter around 16 nm, showed high contrast in CT imaging. These new targeted imaging agents were thus used for in vivo imaging on rat models.

  2. Synthesis and biological studies of highly concentrated lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles for CT tracking of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghann, William E.; Aras, Omer; Fleiter, Thorsten; Daniel, Marie-Christine

    2011-05-01

    For patients with a history of heart attack or stroke, the prevention of another cardiovascular or cerebrovascular event is crucial. The development of cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis has been associated with overexpression of tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Recently, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown great potential as X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents. Since lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor, it has been used as coating on GNPs for targeted imaging of tissue ACE in prevention of fibrosis. Herein, lisinopril-capped gold nanoparticles (LIS-GNPs) were synthesized up to a concentration of 55 mgAu/mL. Their contrast was measured using CT and the results were compared to Omnipaque, a commonly used iodine-based contrast agent. The targeting ability of these LIS-GNPs was also assessed.

  3. Efficient pH Dependent Drug Delivery to Target Cancer Cells by Gold Nanoparticles Capped with Carboxymethyl Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alle Madhusudhan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (DOX was immobilized on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs capped with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC for effective delivery to cancer cells. The carboxylic group of carboxymethyl chitosan interacts with the amino group of the doxorubicin (DOX forming stable, non-covalent interactions on the surface of AuNPs. The carboxylic group ionizes at acidic pH, thereby releasing the drug effectively at acidic pH suitable to target cancer cells. The DOX loaded gold nanoparticles were effectively absorbed by cervical cancer cells compared to free DOX and their uptake was further increased at acidic conditions induced by nigericin, an ionophore that causes intracellular acidification. These results suggest that DOX loaded AuNPs with pH-triggered drug releasing properties is a novel nanotheraputic approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  4. Synthesis of functionalized gold nanoparticles capped with 3-mercapto-1-propansulfonate and 1-thioglucose mixed thiols and "in vitro" bioresponse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, F; Battocchio, C; Antoccia, A; Fratoddi, I; Venditti, I; Fracassi, A; Luisetto, I; Russo, M V; Polzonetti, G

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis, characterization and assessment of biological behavior of innovative negatively charged functionalized gold nanoparticles is herein reported, for potential applications in the field of radiotherapy and drug delivery. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with two capping agents, i.e., the 3-mercapto-1-propansulfonate (3-MPS) and 1-β-thio-D-glucose (TG), have been on purpose synthesized and fully characterized. Advanced characterization techniques including X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were applied to probe the chemical structure of the synthesized nanomaterials. Z-potential and Dynamic Light Scattering measurements allowed assessing the nanodimension, dispersity, surface charge and stability of AuNPs. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS) were applied to the "in vitro" HSG cell model, to investigate the nanoparticles-cells interaction and to evaluate the internalization efficiency, whereas short term cytotoxicity and long term cell killing were evaluated by means of MTT and SRB assays, respectively. In conclusion, in order to increase the amount of gold atoms inside the cell we have optimized the synthesis for a new kind of biocompatible and very stable negatively charged TG-functionalized nanoparticles, with diameters in a range that maximize the uptake in cells (i.e., ∼15nm). Such particles are very promising for radiotherapy and drug delivery application. PMID:26977977

  5. Detection of captopril based on its enhanced resonance light scattering signals of fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study,based on its enhancement effect on resonance light scattering (RLS) of fluorosurfactant (FSN)-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs),we reported a simple approach for the rapid sensing of captopril. Under optimum conditions,the lowest detectable concentration of captopril through this approach (S/N=3) was 0.01μg/mL. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.08-4.0μg/mL for the detection of captopril. The recoveries of captopril were found to fall in the range between 99% and 100%. We have...

  6. Capillary electrophoretic study of thiolated alpha-cyclodextrin-capped gold nanoparticles with tetraalkylammonium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paau, Man Chin; Lo, Chung Keung; Yang, Xiupei; Choi, Martin M F

    2009-11-27

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) has been employed to characterize nanometer-sized thiolated alpha-cyclodextrin-capped gold nanoparticles (alpha-CD-S-AuNPs). The addition of tetrabutylammonium (Bu(4)N(+)) ions to the run buffer greatly narrows the migration peak of alpha-CD-S-AuNP. The optimal run buffer was determined to be 10mM Bu(4)N(+) in 30 mM phosphate buffer at pH 12 and an applied voltage of 15 kV. The effect of various tetraalkylammonium ions on the peak width and electrophoretic mobility (mu(e)) of alpha-CD-S-AuNP was studied in detail. Bu(4)N(+) ions assist in inter-linking the alpha-CD-S-AuNPs and narrowing the migration peak in CZE. This observation can be explained by the fact that each Bu(4)N(+) ion can simultaneously interact with several hydrophobic cavities of the surface-attached alpha-CDs on AuNPs. The TEM images show that alpha-CD-S-AuNPs with Bu(4)N(+) are linked together but in the absence of Bu(4)N(+), they are more dispersed. The migration mechanism in CZE is based on the formation of inclusion complexes between Bu(4)N(+) and alpha-CD-S-AuNPs which induces changes in the charge-to-size ratio of alpha-CD-S-AuNPs and mu(e). An inverse linear relationship (r(2)>0.998) exists between the mu(e) and size of alpha-CD-S-AuNPs in the core range 1.4-4.1 nm. The CZE analyses are rapid with migration time less than 4 min. A few nanoliters of each of the alpha-CD-S-AuNP samples were injected hydrodynamically at 0.5 psi for 5s. Our work confirms that CZE is an efficient tool for characterizing the sizes of alpha-CD-S-AuNPs using Bu(4)N(+) ions. PMID:19853853

  7. An anisotropic snowflake-like structural assembly of polymer-capped gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Harshala; Jung, Cheulhee; Woo, Min-Ah; Park, Hyun Gyu, E-mail: hgpark@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Snowflake-like structural assembly of isotropic gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is reported. A modified polyamine method has been employed to synthesize positively charged GNPs in presence of a polymeric metaphosphate. This process yields fascinating dendritic self-assembled morphologies. Structural characterization revealed that there was aggregation of crystalline GNPs. The aggregates of GNPs formed in the initial stage of synthesis are assumed to act as the bulging seeds for final growth of complex morphologies at nanometer to micrometer length scale. Self-assembly of GNPs was found to be greatly influenced by the concentration of gold precursor. Diffusion limited aggregation of GNPs is suggested as the plausible mechanism for this nanoparticle self-organization process.

  8. New method for preparation of polyoxometalate-capped gold nanoparticles, and their assembly on an indium-doped tin oxide electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functionalized gold nanoparticles capped with polyoxometalates were prepared by a simple photoreduction technique where phosphododecamolybdates serve as reducing reagents, photocatalysts, and as stabilizers. TEM images of the resulting gold nanoparticles show the particles to have a relative narrow size distribution. Monolayer and multilayer structures of the negatively charged capped gold nanoparticles were deposited on a poly(vinyl pyridine)-derivatized indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrode via the layer-by-layer technique. The surface plasmon resonance band of the gold nanoparticles displays a blue shift on the surface of the ITO electrode. This is due to the substrate-induced charge redistribution in the gold nanoparticles and a change in the electromagnetic coupling between the assembled nanoparticles. The modified electrode exhibits the characteristic electrochemical behavior of surface-confined phosphododecamolybdate and excellent electrocatalytic activity. The catalysis of the modified electrode towards the model compound iodate was systematically studied. The heterogeneous catalytic rate constant for the electrochemical reduction of iodate was determined by chronoamperometry to be ca. 1. 34 x 105 mol-1.L.s-1. The amperometric method gave a linear range from 2. 5 x 10-6 to 1. 5 x 10-3 M and a detection limit of 1. 0 x 10-6 M. We believe that the functionalized gold nanoparticles prepared by this photoreduction technique are advantageous in terms of fabrication of sensitive and stable redox electrodes. (author)

  9. Synthesis of gelatin-capped gold nanoparticles with variable gelatin concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelatin-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs-gelatin) with controlled particle size were synthesized with simple variation of concentration of gelatin by reducing in situ tetrachloroauric acid with sodium citrate. The nanoparticles showed excellent colloidal stability. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with different sizes. The methodology produces particles 10–15 nm in size depending on the concentration of gelatin used. The measured AuNPs are 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 nm for AuNPs-gelatin 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.1 and 0.05%, and pure AuNPs, respectively. The AuNPs-gelatin exhibit size-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance behavior as measured by UV–visible spectroscopy. UV–vis spectroscopy and TEM results suggest that higher concentration of gelatin favor smaller particle size and vice versa. FTIR spectroscopy analysis of AuNPs-gelatin revealed the amino bands and carboxyl peak of gelatin. The crystalline nature of AuNPs was investigated by X-ray diffraction.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and vibrational spectroscopic studies of different particle size of gold nanoparticle capped with polyvinylpyrrolidone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoudi, R., E-mail: rsmawed@yahoo.co [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo 12622 (Egypt); Fouda, A.A. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo 12622 (Egypt); Elmenshawy, D.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Women, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-02-01

    Different sizes of gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) were prepared by UV irradiation technique. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) used as a stabilizing agent, and reducing agent was sodium borohydride. The main particle size was calculated from TEM images and the particle size was depending on the wavelength and time of UV irradiation. The FTIR data obtained that the band position of C=O and C-N of pyrrolidone ring was shifted as a result of donor-acceptor interactions between these groups with AuNPs surface. The origin of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was explored from UV-VIS spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band position was explained in terms of the size of AuNPs. The results were confirmed that SP resonance was depending on the particle sizes that depend on the wavelength and time of UV irradiation.

  11. Cyclodextrin capped gold nanoparticles as a delivery vehicle for a prodrug of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2013-08-19

    In this work, we explore the use of a quick coupling mechanism for "arming" a cyclodextrin coated gold nanoparticle (AuNP) delivery vehicle, 2, with an adamantane-oxoplatin conjugate that is a prodrug of cisplatin, 3, to produce a cytotoxic nanodrug, 4. The two-part arming system, which utilizes the well-known guest-host interaction between β-cyclodextrin and adamantane, may be useful for rapidly constituting polyfunctional nanodrugs prior to their application in chemotherapy. The 4.7 ± 1.1 nm delivery vehicle, 2, coated with per-6-thio-β-cyclodextrin (βSCD), was characterized using transmission electron microscopy and absorption spectroscopy, and the density of surface-attached βSCD molecules, ∼210 βSCD/AuNP, was determined using thermogravimetric analysis. Because (13)C NMR spectra of βSCD used in the study exhibited disulfide linkages and the observed surface density on the AuNP exceeded that possible for a close-packed mono layer, a fraction of the surface-attached βSCD molecules on the particle were oligomerized through disulfide linkages. Determination of the binding constant, K, for the 3-βCD interaction using (1)H NMR chemical shifts was complicated by the self-association of 3 to form a dimer through its conjugated adamantane residue. With a dimerization constant of K2 = 26.7 M(-1), the value of K for the 3-βCD interaction (1:1 stoichiometry) is 400-800 M(-1), which is lower than the value, K = 1.4 × 10(3) M(-1), measured for the 2-3 interaction using ICP-MS. Optical microscopy showed that when neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells are treated with the nanodrug, 4 (2+3), clusters of gold nanoparticles are observed in the nuclear regions of living cells within 24 h after exposure, but, at later times when most cells are dying or dead, clustering is no longer observed. Treating the cells with 4 for 72 h gave percent inhibitions that are lower than that of cisplatin, suggesting that the Pt(IV) ions in 4 may be incompletely reduced to cytotoxic Pt

  12. Chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles for selective and colorimetric sensing of heparin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution, novel chitosan-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared by mixing chitosan with citrate-reductive AuNPs under appropriate conditions. The as-prepared chitosan-stabilized AuNPs were positively charged and highly stably dispersed in aqueous solution. They exhibited weak resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity and a wine red color. In addition, the chitosan-stabilized AuNPs were successfully utilized as novel sensitive probes for the detection of heparin for the first time. It was found that the addition of heparin induced a strong increase of RLS intensity for AuNPs and the color change from red to blue. The increase in RLS intensity and the color change of chitosan-stabilized AuNPs caused by heparin allowed the sensitive detection of heparin in the range of 0.2–60 μM (∼6.7 U/mL). The detection limit for heparin is 0.8 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The present sensor for heparin detection possessed a low detection limit and wide linear range. Additionally, the proposed method was also applied to the detection of heparin in biological media with satisfactory results

  13. Chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles for selective and colorimetric sensing of heparin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhanguang, E-mail: kqlu@stu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Xi [Shantou University, Department of Chemistry (China); Xu, Haixiong [Shantou Central Hospital, Affiliated Shantou Hospital of SUN YAT-SEN University (China); Liu, Jinbin [University of Texasat Dallas, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-09-15

    In this contribution, novel chitosan-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were prepared by mixing chitosan with citrate-reductive AuNPs under appropriate conditions. The as-prepared chitosan-stabilized AuNPs were positively charged and highly stably dispersed in aqueous solution. They exhibited weak resonance light scattering (RLS) intensity and a wine red color. In addition, the chitosan-stabilized AuNPs were successfully utilized as novel sensitive probes for the detection of heparin for the first time. It was found that the addition of heparin induced a strong increase of RLS intensity for AuNPs and the color change from red to blue. The increase in RLS intensity and the color change of chitosan-stabilized AuNPs caused by heparin allowed the sensitive detection of heparin in the range of 0.2-60 {mu}M ({approx}6.7 U/mL). The detection limit for heparin is 0.8 {mu}M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The present sensor for heparin detection possessed a low detection limit and wide linear range. Additionally, the proposed method was also applied to the detection of heparin in biological media with satisfactory results.

  14. Controlled multilayer films of sulfonate-capped gold nanoparticles/thionine used for construction of a reagentless bienzymatic glucose biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel reagentless bienzymatic sensor for the determination of glucose in the low working potentials without interference is proposed. The bienzymatic sensor was fabricated by covalently attachment of periodate-oxidized glucose oxidase (IO4--GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on controlled multilayer films of sulfonate-capped gold nanoparticles/thionine (SCGNPs/TH). Using the layer-by-layer method (LBL), SCGNPs and TH were deposited alternately on the gold electrode through the electrostatic and covalent interactions. SCGNPs could greatly enhance the amount of immobilized TH and ensure the good conductivity of the whole structure. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical methods showed that the resulting multilayer films were tridimensional conductive and porous, and TH incorporated in LBL configuration had well electroactive performance. Such superstructures can thus provide an ideal matrix for the construction of bienzymatic sensor, where TH molecules acted as a mediator for electron transfer. After IO4--GOx and HRP were covalently attached to the multilayer precursor film, the resulting biosensor exhibited good electrocatalytical response toward glucose and that the electrocatalytical response increased with the number of TH layers. This suggested that the analytical performance such as sensitivity and detection limit of the bienzymatic sensors could be tuned to the desired level by adjusting the number of deposited SCGNPs/TH bilayers. Furthermore, because of the low working potentials, the interference from other electro-oxidizable compounds (such as uric acid, ascorbic acid and acetaminophen) was avoided, which improved the selectivity of the biosensors. The biosensor constructed with six bilayers of SCGNPs/TH showed a good performance of glucose detection with a fast response less than 20 s, acceptable sensitivity of 3.8 μA mM-1 cm-2 and the detection limit of 3.5 x 10-5 M

  15. Controlled multilayer films of sulfonate-capped gold nanoparticles/thionine used for construction of a reagentless bienzymatic glucose biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yingying [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Bai, Yu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yang, Weiwei [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Changqing [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)]. E-mail: sunchq@mail.jlu.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    A novel reagentless bienzymatic sensor for the determination of glucose in the low working potentials without interference is proposed. The bienzymatic sensor was fabricated by covalently attachment of periodate-oxidized glucose oxidase (IO{sub 4} {sup -}-GOx) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on controlled multilayer films of sulfonate-capped gold nanoparticles/thionine (SCGNPs/TH). Using the layer-by-layer method (LBL), SCGNPs and TH were deposited alternately on the gold electrode through the electrostatic and covalent interactions. SCGNPs could greatly enhance the amount of immobilized TH and ensure the good conductivity of the whole structure. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical methods showed that the resulting multilayer films were tridimensional conductive and porous, and TH incorporated in LBL configuration had well electroactive performance. Such superstructures can thus provide an ideal matrix for the construction of bienzymatic sensor, where TH molecules acted as a mediator for electron transfer. After IO{sub 4} {sup -}-GOx and HRP were covalently attached to the multilayer precursor film, the resulting biosensor exhibited good electrocatalytical response toward glucose and that the electrocatalytical response increased with the number of TH layers. This suggested that the analytical performance such as sensitivity and detection limit of the bienzymatic sensors could be tuned to the desired level by adjusting the number of deposited SCGNPs/TH bilayers. Furthermore, because of the low working potentials, the interference from other electro-oxidizable compounds (such as uric acid, ascorbic acid and acetaminophen) was avoided, which improved the selectivity of the biosensors. The biosensor constructed with six bilayers of SCGNPs/TH showed a good performance of glucose detection with a fast response less than 20 s, acceptable sensitivity of 3.8 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and the detection limit of 3.5 x 10{sup -5} M.

  16. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali; Semwal, Manoj K.; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  17. Green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles employing levan, a biopolymer from Acetobacter xylinum NCIM 2526, as a reducing agent and capping agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khan Behlol Ayaz; Kalla, Divya; Uppuluri, Kiran Babu; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2014-11-01

    With a vision of finding greener materials to synthesize nanoparticles, we report the production and isolation of levan, a polysaccharide with repeating units of fructose, from Acetobacter xylinum NCIM2526. The isolated levan were characterized using potassium ferricyanide reducing power assay, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). To exploit levan in nanotechnology, we present a simple and greener method to synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using biopolymer, levan as both reducing and stabilizing agents. The morphology and stability of the AgNPs and AuNPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The possible capping mechanism of the nanoparticles was postulated using FTIR studies. As synthesized biogenic nanoparticles showed excellent catalytic activity as evidenced from sodium borohydride mediated reduction of 4-nitro phenol and methylene blue. PMID:25129779

  18. Selective colorimetric detection of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) using gallic acid capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Wu, Genhua; Wang, Zhuqing; Ren, Wenzhi; Zhang, Yujie; Shen, Zheyu; Li, Tianhua; Wu, Aiguo

    2016-05-28

    A colorimetric assay is proposed for the selective detection of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) via the aggregation-induced color change of gallic acid capped gold nanoparticles (GA-AuNPs). The AuNPs are characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR). To detect Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) coexisting in a sample, citrate and thiosulfate were applied to mask Cr(vi) for the detection of Cr(iii), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA) was applied to mask Cr(iii) for the detection of Cr(vi). At optimized experimental conditions, the selectivity of these AuNPs-based detection systems is excellent for Cr(iii) and/or Cr(vi) compared with other types of metal ions. The limit of detections (LODs) of a mixture of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi), Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) by eye vision are 1.5, 1.5 and 2 μM, respectively, and those by UV-vis spectroscopy are 0.05, 0.1 and 0.1 μM, respectively. The minimum detectable concentrations for Cr(iii) or Cr(vi) are all below the guideline value set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The applicability of the AuNPs-based colorimetric sensor is also validated by the detection of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) in electroplating wastewater and real water samples with high recoveries. PMID:26606324

  19. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering study of thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; Pinel, E. F.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian, C.; Garcia, M. A.; Univ. Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado UCM; Univ. Pisa; Univ. di Padova

    2009-11-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} was found at the Au L{sub 3} edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, of 0.06 emu/g{sub Au}. SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences.

  20. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering studies of thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S. G. E; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian Fernandez, C.; Garcia, M. A.; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado; Univ. of Pisa; Lab. di Magnetismo Molecolare

    2009-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} was found at the Au L{sub 3} edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, of 0.06 emu/g{sub Au}. SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences.

  1. In vitro studies on radiosensitization effect of glucose capped gold nanoparticles in photon and ion irradiation of HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Harminder; Pujari, Geetanjali [Radiation Biology Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Semwal, Manoj K. [Army Hospital (R and R), Delhi Cantonment, New Delhi 110010 (India); Sarma, Asitikantha [Radiation Biology Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Avasthi, Devesh Kumar, E-mail: dka@iuac.res.in [Radiation Biology Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNPs) are synthesized for internalization in HeLa cells (cervical cancer cells). ► Internalization of Glu-AuNPs in HeLa cells is confirmed by cross section TEM of cells. ► Irradiation (by C ion or γ-rays) of HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs results in enhanced radiosensitization. ► There is about 30% reduction in radiation dose for 90% cell killing of HeLa cells, when internalized by Glu-AuNPs. ► The enhanced radiosensitization due to Glu-AuNPs is of interest for researchers in nanobiotechnology and radiation biology. -- Abstract: Noble metal nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. In the present work, we synthesized glucose capped gold nanoparticle (Glu-AuNP) for internalization in the HeLa cell line (human cervix cancer cells). The capping of glucose on Au nanoparticle was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The Glu-AuNP did not show any toxicity to the HeLa cell. The γ-radiation and carbon ion irradiation of HeLa cell with and without Glu-AuNP were performed to evaluate radiosensitization effects. The study revealed a significant reduction in radiation dose for killing the HeLa cells with internalized Glu-AuNPs as compared to the HeLa cells without Glu-AuNP. The Glu-AuNP treatment resulted in enhancement of radiation effect as evident from increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon ion irradiated HeLa cells.

  2. The Radiation Enhancement of 15 nm Citrate-Capped Gold Nanoparticles Exposed to 70 keV/μm Carbon Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Xi; Jin, Xiaodong; He, Pengbo; Zheng, Xiaogang; Ye, Fei; Chen, Weiqiang; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an important modality for tumor treatment. The central goal of radiotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose to the tumor as much as possible whilst sparing the surrounding normal tissues. On one hand, heavy ion radiation induces maximum damage at the end of the track (called the Bragg Peak). Hadron therapy based on heavy ions is considered superior to conventional X-rays and γ-rays radiations for tumors sited in sensitive tissues, childhood cases and radioresistant cancers. On the other hand, radiation sensitizers enhanced the radiation effects in tumors by increasing the dose specifically to the tumor cells. Recently, the use of gold nanoparticles as potential tumor selective radio-sensitizers has been proposed as a breakthrough in radiotherapy with conventional radiations. The enhanced radiation effect of heavy ions in tumor by using gold nanoparticles as radio-sensitizer may provide alternative in hadron therapy. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effects of carbon ions with a linear energy transfer of 70 keV/μm in the presence of 15 nm citrate-capped AuNPs. The existing of AuNPs resulted in 5.5-fold enhancement in hydroxyl radical production and 24.5% increment in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for carbon-ion-irradiated HeLa cells. The study indicated gold nanoparticles can be used as potential radio-sensitizer in carbon ions therapy. PMID:27455642

  3. Molecular beacon based biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA using DNA-capped gold nanoparticles-streptavidin conjugates for signal amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a highly sensitive and selective molecular beacon-based electrochemical impedance biosensor for the sequence-specific detection of DNA. DNA-capped conjugates between gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) and streptavidin are used for signal amplification. The molecular beacon was labeled with a thiol at its 5′ end and with biotin at its 3′ end, and then immobilized on the surface of a bare gold electrode through the formation of Au-S bonds. Initially, the molecular beacon is present in the “closed” state, and this shields the biotin from being approached by streptavidin due to steric hindrance. In the presence of the target DNA, the target DNA molecules hybridize with the loop and cause a conformational change that moves the biotin away from the surface of the electrode. The biotin thereby becomes accessible for the reporter (the DNA-streptavidin capped Au-NPs), and this results in a distinct increase in electron transfer resistance. Under optimal conditions, the increase in resistance is linearly related to the logarithm of the concentration of complementary target DNA in the range from 1.0 fM to 0.1 μM, with a detection limit of 0.35 fM (at an S/N of 3). This biosensor exhibits good selectivity, and acceptable stability and reproducibility. (author)

  4. A universal strategy for visual chiral recognition of α-amino acids with l-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guoxin; Zhou, Fulin; Xu, Chunli; Li, Baoxin

    2016-02-01

    The ability to recognize and quantify the chirality of alpha-amino acids constitutes the basis of many critical areas for specific targeting in drug development and metabolite probing. It is still challenging to conveniently distinguish the enantiomer of amino acids largely due to the lack of a universal and simple strategy. In this work, we report a strategy for the visual recognition of α-amino acids. It is based on the chirality of l-tartaric acid-capped gold nanoparticles (l-TA-capped AuNPs, ca. 13 nm in diameter). All of 19 right-handed α-amino acids can induce a red-to-blue color change of l-TA-capped AuNP solution, whereas all of the left-handed amino acids (except cysteine) cannot. The chiral recognition can be achieved by the naked eye and a simple spectrophotometer. This method does not require complicated chiral modification, and excels through its low-cost, good availability of materials and its simplicity. Another notable feature of this method is its high generality, and this method can discriminate almost all native α-amino acid enantiomers. This versatile method could be potentially used for high-throughput chiral recognition of amino acids. PMID:26759834

  5. {sup 99m}Tc-labelled gold nanoparticles capped with HYNIC-peptide/mannose for sentinel lymph node detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo-Garcia, Blanca E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ramirez, Flor de M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro-Flores, Guillermina, E-mail: ferro_flores@yahoo.com.m [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico); Santos-Cuevas, Clara L.; Morales-Avila, Enrique [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo; Pedraza-Lopez, Martha [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico City (Mexico); Medina, Luis A. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico City (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, Marco A. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-01-15

    The aim of this research was to prepare a multifunctional system of technetium-99m-labelled gold nanoparticles conjugated to HYNIC-GGC/mannose and to evaluate its biological behaviour as a potential radiopharmaceutical for sentinel lymph node detection (SLND). Methods: Hydrazinonicotinamide-Gly-Gly-Cys-NH{sub 2} (HYNIC-GGC) peptide and a thiol-triazole-mannose derivative were synthesized, characterized and conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNP, 20 nm) to prepare a multifunctional system of HYNIC-GGC-AuNP-mannose by means of spontaneous reaction of the thiol (Cys) present in HYNIC-GGC sequence and in the thiol-mannose derivative. The nanoconjugate was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), IR, UV-Vis, Raman, fluorescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Technetium-99m labelling was carried out using EDDA/tricine as coligands and SnCl{sub 2} as reducing agent with further size-exclusion chromatography purification. Radiochemical purity was determined by size-exclusion HPLC and ITLC-SG analyses. In vitro binding studies were carried out in rat liver homogenized tissue (mannose-receptor positive tissue). Biodistribution studies were accomplished in Wistar rats and images obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT system. Results: TEM and spectroscopy techniques demonstrated that AuNPs were functionalized with HYNIC-GGC-NH{sub 2} and thiol-mannose through interactions with thiol groups and the N-terminal amine of cysteine. Radio-chromatograms showed radiochemical purity higher than 95%. {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-GGC-AuNP-mannose ({sup 99m}Tc-AuNP-mannose) showed specific recognition for mannose receptors in rat liver tissue. After subcutaneous administration of {sup 99m}Tc-AuNP-mannose in rats (footpad), radioactivity levels in the popliteal and inguinal lymph nodes revealed that 99% of the activity was extracted by the first lymph node (popliteal extraction). Biodistribution studies and in vivo micro-SPECT/CT images in Wistar rats showed an evident

  6. Protein-gold clusters-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for high drug loading, autonomous gemcitabine/doxorubicin co-delivery, and in-vivo tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croissant, Jonas G; Zhang, Dingyuan; Alsaiari, Shahad; Lu, Jie; Deng, Lin; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; AlMalik, Abdulaziz M; Zink, Jeffrey I; Khashab, Niveen M

    2016-05-10

    Functional nanocarriers capable of transporting high drug contents without premature leakage and to controllably deliver several drugs are needed for better cancer treatments. To address this clinical need, gold cluster bovine serum albumin (AuNC@BSA) nanogates were engineered on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for high drug loadings and co-delivery of two different anticancer drugs. The first drug, gemcitabine (GEM, 40wt%), was loaded in positively-charged ammonium-functionalized MSN (MSN-NH3(+)). The second drug, doxorubicin (DOX, 32wt%), was bound with negatively-charged AuNC@BSA electrostatically-attached onto MSN-NH3(+), affording highly loaded pH-responsive MSN-AuNC@BSA nanocarriers. The co-delivery of DOX and GEM was achieved for the first time via an inorganic nanocarrier, possessing a zero-premature leakage behavior as well as drug loading capacities seven times higher than polymersome NPs. Besides, unlike the majority of strategies used to cap the pores of MSN, AuNC@BSA nanogates are biotools and were applied for targeted red nuclear staining and in-vivo tumor imaging. The straightforward non-covalent combination of MSN and gold-protein cluster bioconjugates thus leads to a simple, yet multifunctional nanotheranostic for the next generation of cancer treatments. PMID:27016140

  7. Protein-gold clusters-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for high drug loading, autonomous gemcitabine/doxorubicin co-delivery, and in-vivo tumor imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Croissant, Jonas G.

    2016-03-23

    Functional nanocarriers capable of transporting high drug contents without premature leakage and to controllably deliver several drugs are needed for better cancer treatments. To address this clinical need, gold cluster bovine serum albumin (AuNC@BSA) nanogates were engineered on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for high drug loadings and co-delivery of two different anticancer drugs. The first drug, gemcitabine (GEM, 40 wt%), was loaded in positively-charged ammonium-functionalized MSN (MSN-NH3+). The second drug, doxorubicin (DOX, 32 wt%), was bound with negatively-charged AuNC@BSA electrostatically-attached onto MSN-NH3+, affording highly loaded pH-responsive MSN-AuNC@BSA nanocarriers. The co-delivery of DOX and GEM was achieved for the first time via an inorganic nanocarrier, possessing a zero-premature leakage behavior as well as drug loading capacities seven times higher than polymersome NPs. Besides, unlike the majority of strategies used to cap the pores of MSN, AuNC@BSA nanogates are biotools and were applied for targeted red nuclear staining and in-vivo tumor imaging. The straightforward non-covalent combination of MSN and gold-protein cluster bioconjugates thus leads to a simple, yet multifunctional nanotheranostic for the next generation of cancer treatments.

  8. Polymer Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Polymer protected gold nanoparticles have successfully been synthesized by both "grafting-from" and "grafting-to" techniques. The synthesis methods of the gold particles were systematically studied. Two chemically different homopolymers were used to protect gold particles: thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), PNIPAM, and polystyrene, PS. Both polymers were synthesized by using a controlled/living radical polymerization process, reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)...

  9. Characterization and in vitro studies on anticancer, antioxidant activity against colon cancer cell line of gold nanoparticles capped with Cassia tora SM leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Ezra Elumalai; John Poonga, Preetam Raj; Panicker, Shirly George

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effectiveness of synthesized gold nanoparticles of an ethnobotanically and medicinally important plant species Cassia tora against colon cancer cells and to find its antibacterial and antioxidant activities. In order to improve the bioavailability of C. tora, we synthesized gold nanoparticles through green synthesis, by simple mixing and stirring of C. tora leaf powder and tetrachloroauric acid (HAuCl4) solution which gave a dispersion of gold nanoparticles conjugate with C. tora secondary metabolites (SMs) with characteristic surface plasmon resonance. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta sizer, zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy. Antibacterial activity was carried out for gold nanoparticles conjugated with C. tora SMs, using well-diffusion method. The MTT assay for cell viability and markers such as catalase, nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation was predictable to confirm the cytotoxicity and antioxidant properties. The treatment of gold nanoparticles conjugated with C. tora SMs on Col320 cells showed reduction in the cell viability through MTT assay, and it also significantly suppressed the release of H2O2, LPO and NO production in a dose-dependent manner. C. tora SMs conjugate gold nanoparticles showed enhanced bioavailability, antioxidant and anticancer effect against colon cancer cell line (Col320).

  10. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coopersmith, Kaitlin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute, maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  11. Green Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Reza Ghorbani

    2015-01-01

    There is an increased interest in understanding the toxicity and rational design of gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications in recent years. In this study gold nanoparticles were synthesized using dextrose as a reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles displayed characteristic Surface Plasmon Resonance peak at around 550 nm having a mean particle size of 75±30 nm. In order to identify and analyze nanoparticles, UV–Vis spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and dynamic light sca...

  12. Hydroxyl capped silver-gold alloy nanoparticles: characterization and their combination effect with different antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayon Bahrami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: Metal nanoparticles (NPs offer a wide variety of potential applications in pharmaceutical sciences due to the unique advances in nanotechnology research. In this work, bimetal Ag-Au alloy NPs were prepared and their combinations with other antibiotics were tested against Staphylococcus aureus .   Materials and Methods: Firstly, Ag-Au alloy NPs with Au/Ag molar ratio of 1:1 was fabricated and was purified by agarose gel electrophoresis system. The morphology and size of the purified NPs were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Chemical composition and surface chemistry of these NPs were studied with atomic absorption spectophotometry and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The size of purified Ag-Au alloy NPs was less than 200 nm. Also the presence of organic compounds with a hydroxyl residue was detected on the surface of these purified NPs. In next step the effect of purified Ag-Au alloy NPs on the antibacterial activity of different antibiotics was evaluated at sub-inhibitory content (5 μg/disk using disk diffusion method against S. aureus. Ag NPs and Au NPs were also tested at same content (5 μg using mentioned method. Results: The most enhancing effect of Ag-Au alloy NPs was observed for penicillin G and piperacillin. No enhancing effects on the antibacterial activity of different antibiotics were observed at 5 μg/disk for the mono-metal nanoparticles (Ag NPs and Au NPs against S. aureus. Conclusion: These results signify that the Ag-Au alloy NPs potentiates the antimicrobial action of certain antibiotics suggesting a possible utilization of this nano material in combination therapy against resistant S. aureus.

  13. Coalescence Behavior of Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Wang YQ; Liang WS; Geng CY

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB)-stabilized gold nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated. After an annealing of the as-synthesized nanoparticles at 300 °C for 30 min, the coalescence behavior of gold nanoparticles has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy in detail. Two types of coalescence, one being an ordered combination of two or more particles in appropriate orientations through twinning, and the other being an ordered combina...

  14. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  15. The adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Lev A.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Staroverov, Sergey A.; Pristensky, Dmitry V.; Shchyogolev, Sergey Yu.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2006-06-01

    A new variant of a technique for in vivo production of antibodies to various antigens with colloidal-gold nanoparticles as carrier is discussed. With this technique we obtained highly specific and relatively high-titre antibodies to different antigens. The antibodies were tested by an immunodot assay with gold nanoparticle markers. Our results provide the first demonstration that immunization of animals with colloidal gold complexed with either haptens or complete antigens gives rise to highly specific antibodies even without the use of complete Freund's adjuvant. These findings may attest to the adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles itself. We provide also experimental results and discussion aimed at elucidation of possible mechanisms of the discovered colloidal-gold-adjuvanticity effect.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Hedkvist, Olof

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis of three different shapes of gold nanoparticles; the gold nanosphere, the gold nanorod and the gold nanocube. These will be synthesized using wet chemistry methods and characterized using UV-Vis- NIR spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The results will be used to draw some conclusions as to what factors influence the growth of gold nanoparticles.

  17. Shaped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yugang; An, Changhua

    2011-03-01

    Advance in the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles made of gold and silver is reviewed in this article. This review starts with a new angle by analyzing the relationship between the geometrical symmetry of a nanoparticle shape and its internal crystalline structures. According to the relationship, the nanoparticles with well-defined shapes are classified into three categories: nanoparticles with single crystallinity, nanoparticles with angular twins, and nanoparticles with parallel twins. Discussion and analysis on the classical methods for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles in each category are also included and personal perspectives on the future research directions in the synthesis of shaped metal nanoparticles are briefly summarized. This review is expected to provide a guideline in designing the strategy for the synthesis of shaped nanoparticles and analyzing the corresponding growth mechanism.

  18. Coalescence Behavior of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang YQ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB-stabilized gold nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated. After an annealing of the as-synthesized nanoparticles at 300 °C for 30 min, the coalescence behavior of gold nanoparticles has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy in detail. Two types of coalescence, one being an ordered combination of two or more particles in appropriate orientations through twinning, and the other being an ordered combination of two small particles with facets through a common lattice plane, have been observed.

  19. Peroxide-Dependent Analyte Conversion by the Heme Prosthetic Group, the Heme Peptide “Microperoxidase-11” and Cytochrome c on Chitosan Capped Gold Nanoparticles Modified Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder W. Scheller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In view of the role ascribed to the peroxidatic activity of degradation products of cytochrome c (cyt c in the processes of apoptosis, we investigate the catalytic potential of heme and of the cyt c derived heme peptide MP-11 to catalyse the cathodic reduction of hydrogen peroxide and to oxidize aromatic compounds. In order to check whether cyt c has an enzymatic activity in the native state where the protein matrix should suppress the inherent peroxidatic activity of its heme prosthetic group, we applied a biocompatible immobilization matrix and very low concentrations of the co-substrate H2O2. The biocatalysts were entrapped on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode in a biocompatible chitosan layer which contained gold nanoparticles. The electrochemical signal for the peroxide reduction is generated by the redox conversion of the heme group, whilst a reaction product of the substrate oxidation is cathodically reduced in the substrate indication. The catalytic efficiency of microperoxidase-11 is sufficient for sensors indicating HRP substrates, e.g., p-aminophenol, paracetamol and catechol, but also the hydroxylation of aniline and dehalogenation of 4-fluoroaniline. The lower limit of detection for p-aminophenol is comparable to previously published papers with different enzyme systems. The peroxidatic activity of cyt c immobilized in the chitosan layer for catechol was found to be below 1 per mill and for p-aminophenol about 3% as compared with that of heme or MP-11.

  20. Ultrastable and Biofunctionalizable Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akash; Moyano, Daniel F; Parnsubsakul, Attasith; Papadopoulos, Alexander; Wang, Li-Sheng; Landis, Ryan F; Das, Riddha; Rotello, Vincent M

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles provide an excellent platform for biological and material applications due to their unique physical and chemical properties. However, decreased colloidal stability and formation of irreversible aggregates while freeze-drying nanomaterials limit their use in real world applications. Here, we report a new generation of surface ligands based on a combination of short oligo (ethylene glycol) chains and zwitterions capable of providing nonfouling characteristics while maintaining colloidal stability and functionalization capabilities. Additionally, conjugation of these gold nanoparticles with avidin can help the development of a universal toolkit for further functionalization of nanomaterials. PMID:27191946

  1. Kinematics of gold nanoparticles manipulation in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires are subject to different forces regimes compared with their macroscopic counterparts. In this work, we report the experimental manipulation of an individual gold nanoparticle (96 nm) capped with PVP considering forces surrounding the nanoparticle such as adhesion, friction, and the external load in real time, and how the differences between these forces produce distinct motions. Combining a scanning probe tool within a transmission electron microscope, we manipulated a gold nanoparticle and recorded the sliding and rolling kinematic motions. Our observations show quantitatively the adhesion force, maximum rolling resistance, and friction coefficients of the probe and the surface of the capped particle as well as particle and substrate surface

  2. Simultaneous determination of paracetamol and ascorbic acid using tetraoctylammonium bromide capped gold nanoparticles immobilized on 1,6-hexanedithiol modified Au electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetraoctylammonium bromide stabilized gold nanoparticles (TOAB-AuNPs) attached to 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) modified Au electrode was used for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PA) and ascorbic acid (AA) at physiological pH. The attachment of TOAB-AuNPs on HDT modified Au surface was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). The ATR-FT-IR spectrum of TOAB-AuNPs attached to the HDT monolayer showed a characteristic stretching modes corresponding to -CH2 and -CH3 of TOAB, confirming the immobilization of AuNPs with surface-protecting TOAB ions on the surface of the AuNPs after being attached to HDT modified Au electrode. AFM image showed that the immobilized AuNPs were spherical in shape and densely packed to a film of ca. 7 nm thickness. Interestingly, TOAB-AuNPs modified electrode shifted the oxidation potential of PA towards less positive potential by 70 mV and enhanced its oxidation current twice when compared to bare Au electrode. In addition, the AuNPs modified electrode separated the oxidation potentials of AA and PA by 210 mV, whereas bare Au electrode failed to resolve them. The amperometry current of PA was increased linearly from 1.50 x 10-7 to 1.34 x 10-5 M with a correlation coefficient of 0.9981 and the lowest detection limit was found to be 2.6 nM (S/N = 3). The present method was successfully used to determine the concentration of PA in human blood plasma and commercial drugs.

  3. Simultaneous determination of paracetamol and ascorbic acid using tetraoctylammonium bromide capped gold nanoparticles immobilized on 1,6-hexanedithiol modified Au electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Santhosh S. [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Dindigul (India); John, S. Abraham [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Dindigul (India)], E-mail: abrajohn@yahoo.co.in; Sagara, Takamasa [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Dindigul (India)], E-mail: sagara@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

    2009-11-30

    Tetraoctylammonium bromide stabilized gold nanoparticles (TOAB-AuNPs) attached to 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) modified Au electrode was used for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol (PA) and ascorbic acid (AA) at physiological pH. The attachment of TOAB-AuNPs on HDT modified Au surface was confirmed by attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). The ATR-FT-IR spectrum of TOAB-AuNPs attached to the HDT monolayer showed a characteristic stretching modes corresponding to -CH{sub 2} and -CH{sub 3} of TOAB, confirming the immobilization of AuNPs with surface-protecting TOAB ions on the surface of the AuNPs after being attached to HDT modified Au electrode. AFM image showed that the immobilized AuNPs were spherical in shape and densely packed to a film of ca. 7 nm thickness. Interestingly, TOAB-AuNPs modified electrode shifted the oxidation potential of PA towards less positive potential by 70 mV and enhanced its oxidation current twice when compared to bare Au electrode. In addition, the AuNPs modified electrode separated the oxidation potentials of AA and PA by 210 mV, whereas bare Au electrode failed to resolve them. The amperometry current of PA was increased linearly from 1.50 x 10{sup -7} to 1.34 x 10{sup -5} M with a correlation coefficient of 0.9981 and the lowest detection limit was found to be 2.6 nM (S/N = 3). The present method was successfully used to determine the concentration of PA in human blood plasma and commercial drugs.

  4. Magnetic/NIR-responsive drug carrier, multicolor cell imaging, and enhanced photothermal therapy of gold capped magnetite-fluorescent carbon hybrid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Cao, Guixin; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports a type of multifunctional hybrid nanoparticle (NP) composed of gold nanocrystals coated on and/or embedded in a magnetite-fluorescent porous carbon core-shell NP template (Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au) for biomedical applications, including magnetic/NIR-responsive drug release, multicolor cell imaging, and enhanced photothermal therapy. The synthesis of the Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs firstly involves the preparation of core-shell template NPs with magnetite nanocrystals clustered in the cores and fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) embedded in a porous carbon shell, followed by an in situ reduction of silver ions (Ag+) loaded in the porous carbon shell and a subsequent replacement of Ag NPs with Au NPs through a galvanic replacement reaction using HAuCl4 as a precursor. The Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs can enter the intracellular region and light up mouse melanoma B16F10 cells in multicolor mode. The porous carbon shell, anchored with hydrophilic hydroxyl/carboxyl groups, endows the Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs with excellent stability in the aqueous phase and a high loading capacity (719 mg g-1) for the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). The superparamagnetic Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au NPs with a saturation magnetization of 23.26 emu g-1 produce localized heat under an alternating magnetic field, which triggers the release of the loaded drug. The combined photothermal effects of the Au nanocrystals and the CDs on/in the carbon shell can not only regulate the release rate of the loaded drug, but also efficiently kill tumor cells under NIR irradiation. Benefitting from their excellent optical properties, their magnetic field and NIR light-responsive drug release capabilities and their enhanced photothermal effect, such nanostructured Fe3O4@PC-CDs-Au hybrid NPs are very promising for simultaneous imaging diagnostics and high efficacy therapy.This paper reports a type of multifunctional hybrid nanoparticle (NP) composed of gold nanocrystals coated on and/or embedded in a magnetite-fluorescent porous

  5. Application of Gold Nanoparticles to Paint Colorants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hideo

    Metal nanoparticles possess unique properties that they do not exhibit in their bulk states. One of these properties is the color due to surface plasmon resonance. Gold nanoparticles appear red. This color has been utilized in glass for a long long time. In recent years, highly concentrated pastes of gold and silver nanoparticles have been successfully produced by using a special type of protective polymer and a mild reductant. The paste of gold nanoparticles can be used for paint and other materials as red colorants. In this article,application examples of gold nanoparticles as colorant are introduced. Recently, methods for producing bimetal nanoparticles such as gold/silver and gold/copper have been developed. These nanoparticles allow colors from yellow to green to be created. These methods and colors they produce are also described in this article.

  6. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle films deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Swami; Ashavani Kumar; Murali Sastry

    2003-06-01

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic mixture experiment wherein the molecule hexadecylaniline present in the organic phase leads to electrostatic complexation and reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions, capping of the gold nanoparticles thus formed and phase transfer of the now hydrophobic particles into the organic phase. Organization of gold nanoparticles at the air-water interface is followed by surface pressure-area isotherm measurements while the formation of multilayer films of the nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is monitored by quartz crystal microgravimetry, UVVis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using diatoms-silica-gold and EPS-gold bionanocomposite formation

    OpenAIRE

    Schröfel, Adam; Kratošová, Gabriela; Bohunická, Markéta; Dobročka, Edmund; Vávra, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Novel synthesis of gold nanoparticles, EPS-gold, and silica-gold bionanocomposites by biologically driven processes employing two diatom strains (Navicula atomus, Diadesmis gallica) is described. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction analysis (SAED) revealed a presence of gold nanoparticles in the experimental solutions of the diatom culture mixed with tetrachloroaureate. Nature of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Scanning electron m...

  8. Arrays of magnetic nanoparticles capped with alkylamines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P John Thomas; P Saravanan; G U Kulkarni; C N R Rao

    2002-02-01

    Magnetic metal and metal oxide nanoparticles capped with alkylamines have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and magnetization measurements. Core-shell Pd–Ni particles with composition, Pd561Ni3000, (diameter ∼ 3.3 nm) are superparamagnetic at 5 K and organize themselves into two-dimensional crystalline arrays. Similar arrays are obtained with Pd561Ni3000Pd1500 nanoparticles containing an additional Pd shell. Magnetic spinel particles of -Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 of average diameters in the 4–6 nm range coated with octylamine are all supermagnetic at room temperature and yield close-packed disordered arrays. Relatively regular arrays are formed by dodecylamine-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles (∼ 8.6 nm diameter) while well-ordered hexagonal arrays were obtained with octylamine-covered Co3O4 nanoparticles (∼ 4.2 nm diameter).

  9. Photochemical synthesis of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monodisperse gold nanoparticles protected by small organic molecules or by macromolecules with different sizes and shapes are widely used as a precursor material in various applications of gold nanotechnology. However, their preparation is still a formidable task. In this paper the use of photochemically assisted syntheses of monodisperse gold nanoparticles is summarized and some preparations by the authors' group are introduced. These include spherical and rod-like particles, bimetallic composite nanoparticles, and syntheses using complex intramolecular photoreduction to generate the reducing agent

  10. Gold nanoparticles: generation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation we report the reduction of Au3+ through chemical and free radical (esolv-) reactions both in non-aqueous and aqueous media. In chemical reduction, the spectral nature in ascorbic acid (AA) and citric acid (CA) systems was different. The band intensity of gold nanoparticles was lower in AA system. While in free radical reaction, the yield of nanoparticles was pure i.e. free from excess reactants. Under the study 60-200 nm size nanoparticles were generated, which are inert to oxygen. Using pulse radiolysis technique, the initial rate for esolv- reaction with Au3+ was determined to be 7.6 x 109 M-1s-1. (author)

  11. Preparation of Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Polyelectrolyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ping SUN; Zhe Ling ZHANG; Bai Lin ZHANG; Xian Dui DONG; Shao Jun DONG; Er Kang WANG

    2003-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized through the reduction of tetrachlorauric acid (HAuCl4) by NaBH4, with polyethyleneimine(PEI) as stabilizer. The nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy(AFM).

  12. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles Doped DVB Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams was researched, which can be used as ICF target materials. By high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) method, gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams were prepared, with gold nanoparticles dissolved in inner phase. The results show that the content of Au in the gold nanoparticles doped DVB foam is 3. 19%, the axial direction density of the foam is uniform which indicates none evident settlement of gold nanoparticles. SEM tests show that the gold doped DVB polymer foams have open-celled structure and very uniform aperture, and the average pore size is about 1 μm, which is much smaller than that of pure DVB foams. EDX test shows that Au disperses uniformly in the foams. (authors)

  13. Gold Nanoparticles With Special Shapes: Controlled Synthesis, Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering, and The Application in Biodetection

    OpenAIRE

    Jinghong Li; Zhouping Wang; Jianqiang Hu

    2007-01-01

    Specially shaped gold nanoparticles have intrigued considerable attention because they usually possess high-sensitivity surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and thus result in large advantages in trace biodetermination. In this article, starch-capped gold nanoparticles with hexagon and boot shapes were prepared through using a nontoxic and biologically benign aqueous-phase synthetic route. Shape effects of gold nanoparticles on SERS properties were mainly investigated, and found that diff...

  14. Gold nanoparticle photosensitized radical photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyaogu, Kelechi C; Cai, Xichen; Neckers, Douglas C

    2008-12-01

    We report the photopolymerization of an acrylic monomer using thiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and [4-[(octyloxy)phenyl] phenyl] iodonium hexafluoroantimonate (OPPI) as photoinitiator and coinitiator, respectively. Polymerization occurred only when the AuNPs, in the presence of the iodonium salt, were irradiated at the particle plasmonic absorption region (lambda>450 nm). The AuNPs activate the coinitiator by intermolecular electron transfer since OPPI has no absorption in the visible region. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor polymerization. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements were used to characterize the NPs. PMID:19037499

  15. Formation of gold nanoparticles via a thiol functionalized polyoxometalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Shweta; Joshi, Satyawati [Department of Chemistry, Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Mukherjee, Tulsi [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kapoor, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhirk@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-05-01

    A useful method for the synthesis of Au nanoparticles is presented. The synthesis of Au nanoparticles with various morphologies was carried out at room temperature using gamma radiolysis and NaBH{sub 4} reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} in N,N′-dimethylformamide:water solutions containing polyoxometalate (POM). The results demonstrated that by controlling the rate of reduction and ratio of DMF and water, metal particle size and shape can be further tailored. It is shown that gold nanoparticles with controllable size can be synthesized. In principle, the general finding of this work can be extended to other transition/noble metal nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of [POM(SH{sub 2})]{sup 4−} capped gold nanoparticles in 1:1 ratio of DMF/water. Highlights: ► Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using radiolytic method ► Changes in the shapes of Au nanoparticles by changing the composition of the solvent ► The role of reductant in the formation of different shapes.

  16. Formation of gold nanoparticles via a thiol functionalized polyoxometalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A useful method for the synthesis of Au nanoparticles is presented. The synthesis of Au nanoparticles with various morphologies was carried out at room temperature using gamma radiolysis and NaBH4 reduction of HAuCl4 in N,N′-dimethylformamide:water solutions containing polyoxometalate (POM). The results demonstrated that by controlling the rate of reduction and ratio of DMF and water, metal particle size and shape can be further tailored. It is shown that gold nanoparticles with controllable size can be synthesized. In principle, the general finding of this work can be extended to other transition/noble metal nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of [POM(SH2)]4− capped gold nanoparticles in 1:1 ratio of DMF/water. Highlights: ► Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using radiolytic method ► Changes in the shapes of Au nanoparticles by changing the composition of the solvent ► The role of reductant in the formation of different shapes

  17. CO oxidation on gold nanoparticles: Theoretical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remediakis, Ioannis; Lopez, Nuria; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of our theoretical results regarding CO oxidation on both oxide-supported and isolated gold nanoparticles. Using Density Functional Theory we have studied the adsorption of molecules and the oxidation reaction of CO on gold clusters. Low-coordinated sites on the gold...

  18. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed. PMID:25423733

  19. Resonance scattering spectroscopy of gold nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; Zhiliang; FENG; Zhongwei; LI; Tingsheng; LI; Fang; ZHONG; Fuxin; XIE; Jiyun; YI; Xianghui

    2001-01-01

    The gold nanoparticles in diameter of 10-95 nm have been prepared by Frens procedure, all of which exhibit a resonance scattering peak at 580 nm. The mechanism of resonance scattering for gold nanoparticle has been considered according to the wave motion theory of nanoparticle in liquid. The principle of superamolecular interface energy band(SIEB) has been set up and utilized to explain the relationship between the diameter and colors for gold nanoparticle in liquid. A novel spectrophotometric ruler for the determination of the diameter has been proposed according to the relationship of the maximum absorption wavelength and diameter.

  20. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yongkun; Burkhard Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are useful tools for biological applications due to their attractive physical and chemical properties. Their applications can be further expanded when they are functionalized with biological molecules. The biological molecules not only provide the interfaces for interactions between nanoparticles and biological environment, but also contribute their biological functions to the nanoparticles. Therefore, we used self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa extract

    OpenAIRE

    Kirtee Wani; Amit Choudhari; Ruchika Kaul-Ghanekar; Rajeev Chikate

    2013-01-01

    We report a cost effective and eco-friendly biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (F-AuNPs) using aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa as the reducing and stabilizing agent. These nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Vis, XRD, TEM and FTIR. The characteristic surface plasmon peak was observed at 540 nm while XRD analysis suggested it to be a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure with peaks at 38.06, 44.46, 64.75 and 77.56. FTIR studies indicated the capping of the nanopa...

  2. Fluorescence Quenching of CdTe Nanocrystals by Bound Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Jian ZHANG; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2008-01-01

    Water-soluble gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 5 nm were prepared with carboxylic acid terminated thiol ligands. These ligands contain zero to eight methylene moieties. CdTe nanocrystals with an average diameter of 5 nm were synthesized with aminoethanethiol capping. These nanocrystals displayed characteristic absorption and emission spectra of quantum dots. The amine terminated CdTe nanocrystals and carboxylic-acid-terminated gold nanoparticles were conjugated in aqueous soluti...

  3. Synthesis of Monodispersed Gold Nanoparticles with Exceptional Colloidal Stability with Grafted Polyethylene Glycol-g-polyvinyl Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles with tunable core size (23–79 nm) in the presence of polyethylene glycol-g-polyvinyl alcohol (PEG-g-PVA) grafted copolymer as a reducing, capping, and stabilizing agent in a one-step protocol. The resulted PEG-g-PVA-capped gold nanoparticles are monodispersed with an exceptional colloidal stability against salt addition, repeated centrifugation, and extensive dialysis. The effect of various synthesis parameters and the kinetic/me...

  4. Preparation and properties of buckypaper-gold nanoparticle composites

    OpenAIRE

    GOUNKO, IOURI; BYRNE, MICHELE THERESE; HANLEY, CORMAC

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Highly conductive buckypaper-gold nanoparticles composites have been prepared by the in situ electroless deposition of gold nanoparticles during the filtration that resulted in increases in conductivities of up to 684% at very low gold content.

  5. Poly(acrylic acid)-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles: synthesis and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combining the intriguing optical properties of gold nanoparticles with the inherent physical and dynamic properties of polymers can give rise to interesting hybrid nanomaterials. In this study, we report the synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-capped gold nanoparticles. The polyelectrolyte-wrapped gold nanoparticles were fully characterized and studied via a combination of techniques, i.e. UV-vis and infrared spectroscopy, dark field optical microscopy, SEM imaging, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements. Although PAA-capped nanoparticles have been previously reported, this study revealed some interesting aspects of the colloidal stability and morphological change of the polymer coating on the nanoparticle surface in an electrolytic environment, at various pH values and at different temperatures.

  6. Singlet Oxygen Generation by Laser Irradiation of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The formation of singlet oxygen by irradiation of gold nanoparticles in their plasmon resonance band with continuous or pulsed laser light has been investigated. Citrate-stabilized nanoparticles were found to facilitate the photogeneration of singlet oxygen, albeit with low quantum yield. The reaction caused by pulsed laser irradiation makes use of the equilibrated hot electrons that can reach temperatures of several thousand degrees during the laser pulse. Although less efficient, continuous irradiation, which acts via the short-lived directly excited primary “hot” electrons only, can produce enough singlet oxygen for photodynamic cancer therapy and has significant advantages for practical applications. However, careful design of the nanoparticles is needed, since even a moderately thick capping layer can completely inhibit singlet oxygen formation. Moreover, the efficiency of the process also depends on the nanoparticle size. PMID:27239247

  7. Dendritic assembly of gold nanoparticles during fuel-forming electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manthiram, Karthish; Surendranath, Yogesh; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2014-05-21

    We observe the dendritic assembly of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles on a glassy carbon support during electrochemical reduction of protons and CO2. We find that the primary mechanism by which surfactant-ligated gold nanoparticles lose surface area is by taking a random walk along the support, colliding with their neighbors, and fusing to form dendrites, a type of fractal aggregate. A random walk model reproduces the fractal dimensionality of the dendrites observed experimentally. The rate at which the dendrites form is strongly dependent on the solubility of the surfactant in the electrochemical double layer under the conditions of electrolysis. Since alkanethiolate surfactants reductively desorb at potentials close to the onset of CO2 reduction, they do not poison the catalytic activity of the gold nanoparticles. Although catalyst mobility is typically thought to be limited for room-temperature electrochemistry, our results demonstrate that nanoparticle mobility is significant under conditions at which they electrochemically catalyze gas evolution, even in the presence of a high surface area carbon and binder. A careful understanding of the electrolyte- and polarization-dependent nanoparticle aggregation kinetics informs strategies for maintaining catalyst dispersion during fuel-forming electrocatalysis. PMID:24766431

  8. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES BY JUSTICIA GENDARUSSA BURM F. LEAF EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnuswamy Renuka Devi et al.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The unusual physio and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles are found to have more advantage in the field of medicine, diagnostics and biosensors. In the present document, it is reported that Justicia gendarussa leaf extract mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of gold ions. Three different phytochemical fractions were prepared from methanolic leaf extract by liquid-liquid extraction method using immiscible solvents. The total polyphenols, flavonoids and electron donating capacity (DPPH assay of each phytochemical fraction was analyzed. The 1mg/ml of diethyl ether phytochemical fraction produced more gold nanoparticles within 15 minutes when exposed to 10ml of 0.5mM chloroauric acid compared to chloroform and ethyl acetate phytochemical fractions. The structural characteristics of diethyl ether phytochemical fraction synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Dynamic light scattering, Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopies. These biosynthesized gold nanoparticles showed surface plasmon resonance band at 536nm in UV-visible spectrum. The size of the gold nanoparticles ranged from 20 to 42nm and 62 to 88nm with spherical, triangle, truncated triangle and hexagonal shapes. From the Fourier transform-infrared spectra of diethyl ether phytochemical fraction and synthesized gold nanoparticles, the possible functional group involved in gold ions reduction and capping of gold nanoparticles were identified. The stability of gold nanoparticles for 5 month period and at different pH range (5-10 was analyzed by observing the changes in surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles. Moreover, the diethyl ether phytochemical fraction showed no cytotoxicity up to 100μg/ml in RAW 264.7 cell line .

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  10. Porous Carbon-Supported Gold Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Effects of Nanoparticle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likai; Tang, Zhenghua; Yan, Wei; Yang, Hongyu; Wang, Qiannan; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-08-17

    Porous carbon-supported gold nanoparticles of varied sizes were prepared using thiolate-capped molecular Au25, Au38, and Au144 nanoclusters as precursors. The organic capping ligands were removed by pyrolysis at controlled temperatures, resulting in good dispersion of gold nanoparticles within the porous carbons, although the nanoparticle sizes were somewhat larger than those of the respective nanocluster precursors. The resulting nanocomposites displayed apparent activity in the electroreduction of oxygen in alkaline solutions, which increased with decreasing nanoparticle dimensions. Among the series of samples tested, the nanocomposite prepared with Au25 nanoclusters displayed the best activity, as manifested by the positive onset potential at +0.95 V vs RHE, remarkable sustainable stability, and high numbers of electron transfer at (3.60-3.92) at potentials from +0.50 to +0.80 V. The performance is comparable to that of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C. The results demonstrated the unique feasibility of porous carbon-supported gold nanoparticles as high-efficiency ORR catalysts. PMID:27454707

  11. Robust Synthesis of Ciprofloxacin-Capped Metallic Nanoparticles and Their Urease Inhibitory Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Qayum, Mughal; Khan, Ajmal; Farooq, Umar; Jaafar, Hawa Z E; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Ali, Rashid

    2016-01-01

    The fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin (cip) has been used to cap metallic (silver and gold) nanoparticles by a robust one pot synthetic method under optimized conditions, using NaBH₄ as a mild reducing agent. Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) showed constancy against variations in pH, table salt (NaCl) solution, and heat. Capping with metal ions (Ag/Au-cip) has significant implications for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of fluoroquinolone molecules. The metallic nanoparticles were characterized by several techniques such as ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) methods. The nanoparticles synthesized using silver and gold were subjected to energy dispersive X-ray tests in order to show their metallic composition. The NH moiety of the piperazine group capped the Ag/Au surfaces, as revealed by spectroscopic studies. The synthesized nanoparticles were also assessed for urease inhibition potential. Fascinatingly, both Ag-cip and Au-cip NPs exhibited significant urease enzyme inhibitory potential, with IC50 = 1.181 ± 0.02 µg/mL and 52.55 ± 2.3 µg/mL, compared to ciprofloxacin (IC50 = 82.95 ± 1.62 µg/mL). MNPs also exhibited significant antibacterial activity against selected bacterial strains. PMID:27023506

  12. Robust Synthesis of Ciprofloxacin-Capped Metallic Nanoparticles and Their Urease Inhibitory Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nisar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin (cip has been used to cap metallic (silver and gold nanoparticles by a robust one pot synthetic method under optimized conditions, using NaBH4 as a mild reducing agent. Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs showed constancy against variations in pH, table salt (NaCl solution, and heat. Capping with metal ions (Ag/Au-cip has significant implications for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of fluoroquinolone molecules. The metallic nanoparticles were characterized by several techniques such as ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV, atomic force microscopy (AFM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX methods. The nanoparticles synthesized using silver and gold were subjected to energy dispersive X-ray tests in order to show their metallic composition. The NH moiety of the piperazine group capped the Ag/Au surfaces, as revealed by spectroscopic studies. The synthesized nanoparticles were also assessed for urease inhibition potential. Fascinatingly, both Ag-cip and Au-cip NPs exhibited significant urease enzyme inhibitory potential, with IC50 = 1.181 ± 0.02 µg/mL and 52.55 ± 2.3 µg/mL, compared to ciprofloxacin (IC50 = 82.95 ± 1.62 µg/mL. MNPs also exhibited significant antibacterial activity against selected bacterial strains.

  13. Surface modification of gold nanoparticles and nanoclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolowska, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are used in many beneficial technological applications in biochemistry, medicine and electronics. Among them, monolayer protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs) have received a significant attention in the scientific community due to their well-defined atomic structure, which is important for fundamental studies of nanoparticles properties and their functionalization. These particles, with a precise number of atoms, exhibit size-dependent optical, chemical and electronic properti...

  14. Nonlinear optical studies of single gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Meindert Alexander van

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are spherical clusters of gold atoms, with diameters typically between 1 and 100 nanometers. The applications of these particles are rather diverse, from optical labels for biological experiments to data carrier for optical data storage. The goal of my project was to develop new

  15. Dendrimer-Capped Nanoparticles Prepared by Picosecond Laser Ablation in Liquid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Marsili; Simona Laza; Francesco Giammanco; Anna Giusti; Emilia Giorgetti

    2009-01-01

    Fifth generation ethylendiamine-core poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM G5) is presented as an efficient capping agent for the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles by ps laser ablation in water. In particular, we describe results obtained with the fundamental, second and third harmonic of a ps Nd:YAG laser and the influence of laser wavelength and pulse energy on gold particle production and subsequent photofragmentation. In this framework, the role of the dendrimer and, in particular, i...

  16. Anthelmintic efficacy of gold nanoparticles derived from a phytopathogenic fungus, Nigrospora oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip Kumar Kar

    Full Text Available Exploring a green chemistry approach, this study brings to the fore, the anthelmintic efficacy of gold nanoparticles, highlighting the plausible usage of myconanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles of ∼6 to ∼18 nm diameter were synthesized by treating the mycelia-free culture filtrate of the phytopathogenic fungus with gold chloride. Their size and morphology were confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, DLS data, AFM and TEM images. The XRD studies reveal a crystalline nature of the nanoparticles, which are in cubic phase. The FTIR spectroscopic studies before and after the formation of nanoparticles show the presence of possible functional groups responsible for the bio-reduction and capping of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The latter were tested as vermifugal agents against a model cestode Raillietina sp., an intestinal parasite of domestic fowl. Further, ultrastructural and biochemical parameters were used to corroborate the efficacy study.

  17. Optical Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles Capped with Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Noguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles capped with polymers were investigated. Polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP were used as capping reagents. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the sol-gel method. Fluorescence and absorption spectra were measured. When we varied the timing of the addition of the polymer to the ZnO nanoparticle solution, the optical properties were drastically changed. When PEG was added to the solution before the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles, the fluorescence intensity increased. At the same time, the total particle size increased, which indicated that PEG molecules had capped the ZnO nanoparticles. The capping led to surface passivation, which increased fluorescence intensity. However, when PEG was added to the solution after the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles, the fluorescence and particle size did not change. When PVP was added to the solution before the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles, aggregation of nanoparticles occurred. When PVP was added to the solution after the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles, fluorescence and particle size increased. This improvement of optical properties is advantageous to the practical usage of ZnO nanoparticles, such as bioimaging

  18. Protein-mediated autoreduction of gold salts to gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Nivedita; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: Mukherjee.Priyabrata@mayo.edu

    2008-09-01

    Here we report for the first time that proteins can function as unique reducing agents to produce gold nanoparticles from gold salts. We demonstrate that three different proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), Rituximab (RIT-an anti-CD20 antibody) and Cetuximab (C225-anti-EGFR antibody), reduce gold salts to gold nanoparticles (GNP). Interestingly, among all the three proteins tested, only BSA can reduce gold salts to gold nanotriangles (GNT). BSA-induced formation of GNT can be controlled by carefully selecting the reaction condition. Heating or using excess of ascorbic acid (AA) as additional reducing agent shifts the reaction towards the formation of GNP with flower-like morphology, whereas slowing down the reaction either by cooling or by adding small amount of AA directs the synthesis towards GNT formation. GNT is formed only at pH 3; higher pHs (pH 7 and pH 10) did not produce any nanoparticles, suggesting the involvement of specific protein conformation in GNT formation. The nanomaterials formed by this method were characterized using UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is an important finding that will have uses in various nanotechnological applications, particularly in the green synthesis of novel nanomaterials based on protein structure.

  19. Dendrimer-Capped Nanoparticles Prepared by Picosecond Laser Ablation in Liquid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Marsili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifth generation ethylendiamine-core poly(amidoamine (PAMAM G5 is presented as an efficient capping agent for the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles by ps laser ablation in water. In particular, we describe results obtained with the fundamental, second and third harmonic of a ps Nd:YAG laser and the influence of laser wavelength and pulse energy on gold particle production and subsequent photofragmentation. In this framework, the role of the dendrimer and, in particular, its interactions with gold clusters and cations are accounted.

  20. Green Chemistry Approach for the Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using the Fungus Alternaria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekar, Naresh Niranjan; Rahul, Ganga Ravindran; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Raman, Gurusamy; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles has gained tremendous attention owing to their immense applications in the field of biomedical sciences. Although several chemical procedures are used for the synthesis of nanoparticles, the release of toxic and hazardous by-products restricts their use in biomedical applications. In the present investigation, gold nanoparticles were synthesized biologically using the culture filtrate of the filamentous fungus Alternaria sp. The culture filtrate of the fungus was exposed to three different concentrations of chloroaurate ions. In all cases, the gold ions were reduced to Au(0), leading to the formation of stable gold nanoparticles of variable sizes and shapes. UV-Vis spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of nanoparticles by reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0). TEM analysis revealed the presence of spherical, rod, square, pentagonal, and hexagonal morphologies for 1 mM chloroaurate solution. However, quasi-spherical and spherical nanoparticles/heart-like morphologies with size range of about 7-13 and 15-18 nm were observed for lower molar concentrations of 0.3 and 0.5 mM gold chloride solution, respectively. The XRD spectrum revealed the face-centered cubic crystals of synthesized gold nanoparticles. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of aromatic primary amines, and the additional SPR bands at 290 and 230 nm further suggested that the presence of amino acids such as tryptophan/tyrosine or phenylalanine acts as the capping agent on the synthesized mycogenic gold nanoparticles. PMID:25737119

  1. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John, E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in [SMARTS, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu-603 102 (India)

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  2. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Yong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are widely used in consumer products, including cosmetics, food packaging, beverages, toothpaste, automobiles, and lubricants. With this increase in consumer products containing gold nanoparticles, the potential for worker exposure to gold nanoparticles will also increase. Only a few studies have produced data on the in vivo toxicology of gold nanoparticles, meaning that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME of gold nanoparticles remain unclear. Results The toxicity of gold nanoparticles was studied in Sprague Dawley rats by inhalation. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 200 g (males and 145 g (females, were divided into 4 groups (10 rats in each group: fresh-air control, low-dose (2.36 × 104 particle/cm3, 0.04 μg/m3, middle-dose (2.36 × 105 particle/cm3, 0.38 μg/m3, and high-dose (1.85 × 106 particle/cm3, 20.02 μg/m3. The animals were exposed to gold nanoparticles (average diameter 4-5 nm for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 90-days in a whole-body inhalation chamber. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, and lung function were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for hematology and clinical chemistry tests, and organ weights were measured. Cellular differential counts and cytotoxicity measurements, such as albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and total protein were also monitored in a cellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Among lung function test measurements, tidal volume and minute volume showed a tendency to decrease comparing control and dose groups during the 90-days of exposure. Although no statistically significant differences were found in cellular differential counts, histopathologic examination showed minimal alveoli, an inflammatory infiltrate with a mixed cell type, and increased macrophages in the high-dose rats. Tissue

  3. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtee Wani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a cost effective and eco-friendly biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (F-AuNPs using aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa as the reducing and stabilizing agent. These nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Vis, XRD, TEM and FTIR. The characteristic surface plasmon peak was observed at 540 nm while XRD analysis suggested it to be a face-centered cubic (fcc structure with peaks at 38.06, 44.46, 64.75 and 77.56. FTIR studies indicated the capping of the nanoparticles with polyphenols, amines and carboxylates present in the extract of Ficus religiosa whereas TEM analysis showed spherical morphology with other shapes such as triangles and hexagons. The F-AuNPs were found to be non-toxic to HEK 293 cells, thereby suggesting their potential application in the field of nanobiotechnology.

  4. Green synthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles for photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Sajid; Jayasree, Aswathy; Sasidharan, Sisini; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-06-11

    Nanoparticles of varying composition, size, shape, and architecture have been explored for use as photothermal agents in the field of cancer nanomedicine. Among them, gold nanoparticles provide a simple platform for thermal ablation owing to its biocompatibility in vivo. However, the synthesis of such gold nanoparticles exhibiting suitable properties for photothermal activity involves cumbersome routes using toxic chemicals as capping agents, which can cause concerns in vivo. Herein, gold nanoparticles, synthesized using green chemistry routes possessing near-infrared (NIR) absorbance facilitating photothermal therapy, would be a viable alternative. In this study, anisotropic gold nanoparticles were synthesized using an aqueous route with cocoa extract which served both as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The as-prepared gold nanoparticles were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to maximize its NIR absorption in the wavelength range of 800-1000 nm. The particles also showed good biocompatibility when tested in vitro using A431, MDA-MB231, L929, and NIH-3T3 cell lines up to concentrations of 200 μg/mL. Cell death induced in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells upon irradiation with a femtosecond laser at 800 nm at a low power density of 6 W/cm(2) proved the suitability of green synthesized NIR absorbing anisotropic gold nanoparticles for photothermal ablation of cancer cells. These gold nanoparticles also showed good X-ray contrast when tested using computed tomography (CT), proving their feasibility for use as a contrast agent as well. This is the first report on green synthesized anisotropic and cytocompatible gold nanoparticles without any capping agents and their suitability for photothermal therapy. PMID:24842534

  5. GREEN SYNTHESIS OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES USING TOONA CILIATA METHANOL BARK EXTRACT AND THEIR CHARACTERISATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik Rajan; Mann Avninder Singh; Sandhu Bharpur Singh; Parihar Vidya Bhushan Singh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we identified and justified the use of MeOH extract from Toona ciliata bark as a reducing and capping agent for the ecofriendly synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the basis of modern analytical techniques. The reduction of 1.0 mM aqueous solution of aurochloric acid with 1 ml, 1% w/v aqueous solution of MeOH bark extract from Toona ciliata has resulted in the formation of stabilised Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs). The synthesised gold particles showed a surface plasmon band ...

  6. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above Tg of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  7. Glutathione-mediated release of Bodipy® from PEG cofunctionalized gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dhiraj Kumar, Brian J Meenan, Dorian DixonNanotechnology and Integrated BioEngineering Centre, University of Ulster, Belfast, Northern IrelandAbstract: Gold nanoparticles synthesized via sodium citrate reduction of chloroauric acid (HAuCl4 were functionalized with either various concentrations of thiol-terminated Bodipy® FL L-cystine (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 µg/mL or Bodipy-poly(ethylene glycol at concentrations of 0.5–18.75, 1.0–12.50, and 1.5–6.25 µg/mL to form a mixed monolayer of BODIPY-PEG. Thiol-terminated Bodipy, a fluorescing molecule, was used as the model drug, while PEG is widely used in drug-delivery applications to shield nanoparticles from unwanted immune responses. Understanding the influence of PEG-capping on payload release is critical because it is the most widely used type of nanoparticle functionalization in drug delivery studies. It has been previously reported that glutathione can trigger release of thiol-bound payloads from gold nanoparticles. Bodipy release from Bodipy capped and from Bodipy-PEG functionalized gold nanoparticles was studied at typical intracellular glutathione levels. It was observed that the addition of PEG capping inhibits the initial burst release observed in gold nanoparticles functionalized only with Bodipy and inhibits nanoparticle aggregation. Efficient and controlled payload release was observed in gold nanoparticles cofunctionalized with only a limited amount of PEG, thus enabling the coattachment of large amounts of drug, targeting groups or other payloads.Keywords: gold nanoparticles, FL L-cystine, Bodipy®, poly(ethylene glycol, glutathione-mediated release, photoluminescence

  8. Synthesis of Capped AIIBVI Nanoparticles for Fluorescent Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudko, Galyna; Fediv, Volodymyr; Davydenko, Igor; Gule, Evgen; Olar, Olena; Kovalchuk, Andrii

    2016-02-01

    The conditions for growing CdS nanoparticles suitable for the visualization of biological tissues were theoretically studied and experimentally checked. The optimal ranges for pH values and precursors' concentrations were determined. The applicability of the mercaptoethanol-capped nanoparticles for in vitro luminescence visualization of several cellular forms in histological specimens of human placenta has been proven.

  9. Mimusops elengi bark extract mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rakhi; Bag, Braja Gopal; Ghosh, Pooja

    2016-04-01

    The bark extract of Mimusops elengi is rich in different types of plant secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, tannins, triterpenoids and saponins. The present study shows the usefulness of the bark extract of Mimusops elengi for the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles in water at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the gold nanoparticles was complete within a few minutes without any extra stabilizing or capping agents and the polyphenols present in the bark extract acted as both reducing as well as stabilizing agents. The synthesized colloidal gold nanoparticles were characterized by HRTEM, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The synthesized gold nanoparticles have been used as an efficient catalyst for the reduction of 3-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol to their corresponding aminophenols in water at room temperature.

  10. A low cost microwave synthesis method for preparation of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in 15-20 nm size range have attention for fabrication of smart sensing devices in biomedical sciences as diagnostic tools. Citrate capped GNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibody. In this study, we are developing a low-cost technique by using a common microwave system with medium power for synthesizing gold nanoparticles with using sodium citrate (Na3Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl4.3H2O). It was found that the comparing with normal thermal method, the reaction by the microwave irradiation was much faster. Besides, the effects the sodium citrate concentration and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were studied. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles suspension were characterized by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). Maximum absorbance wavelengths (λmax ) for gold nanoparticles are ∼ 518-524 nm with the size of 12-25 nm. The size of gold nanoparticles decreases with increasing concentration of sodium citrate. Besides, the morphology of gold nanoparticles have a spherical shape with face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structure. (author)

  11. One pot, rapid and efficient synthesis of water dispersible gold nanoparticles using alpha-amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed study on the synthesis of spherical and monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using all of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids has been reported. The synthesized nanoparticles have been further characterized using various techniques such as absorbance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. Size control of the nanoparticles has been achieved by varying the ratio of the gold ion to the amino acid. These monodispersed water soluble AuNPs synthesized using non-toxic, naturally occurring α-amino acids as reducing and capping/stabilizing agents serve as a remarkable example of green chemistry. (paper)

  12. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  13. Facile method to synthesize oleic acid-capped magnetite nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We described a simple one-step process for the synthesis of oleic acid-capped magnetite nanoparticles using the dimethyl sulfoxide(DMSO) to oxidize the precursor Fe~(2+) at 140℃.By adjusting the alkalinity of the reaction system,magnetite nanoparticles with two sizes of 4 and 7 nm could be easily achieved.And the magnetite nanoparticles coated by oleate were well-monodispersed in organic solvent.

  14. Using gold colloid nanoparticles to modulate the surface enhanced fluorescence of Rhodamine B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced fluorescence from Rhodamine B (RB) mixed with gold colloids has been observed under ultraviolet irradiation. Spectroscopic studies show that with the increasing gold colloids content, the fluorescence of RB at about 590 nm increases firstly and then decreases with slight red shift. These features observed in the experiment can be explained by the local electric field enhancement via surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of gold nanoparticles. Fluorescence enhancement is obtained when the emission frequency of RB lies within the bandwidth of local field enhancement from gold nanoparticles. Theoretical calculation results show that the local field band red shifts obviously with increase the thickness of dye shell which capped on gold particle, whereas the fluorescence band of RB is fixed around 590 nm. Therefore, the red shift and non-monotonic change of fluorescence intensity from RB is attributed to the dye shell dependent red shift of local field band of gold particles

  15. Dependence of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization on Functionalizing Layer Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaas, Cedric; Dok, Rüveyda; Deschaume, Olivier; De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Seo, Jin Won; Bartic, Carmen; Hoet, Peter; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Nuyts, Sandra; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with polyethylene glycol of different chain lengths are used to determine the influence of the capping layer thickness on the radiosensitizing effect of the particles. The size variations in organic coating, built up with polyethylene glycol polymers of molecular weight 1-20 kDa, allow an evaluation of the decrease in dose enhancement percentages caused by the gold nanoparticles at different radial distances from their surface. With localized eradication of malignant cells as a primary focus, radiosensitization is most effective after internalization in the nucleus. For this reason, we performed controlled radiation experiments, with doses up to 20 Gy and particle diameters in a range of 5-30 nm, and studied the relaxation pattern of supercoiled DNA. Subsequent gel electrophoresis of the suspensions was performed to evaluate the molecular damage and consecutively quantify the gold nanoparticle sensitization. In conclusion, on average up to 58.4% of the radiosensitizing efficiency was lost when the radial dimensions of the functionalizing layer were increased from 4.1 to 15.3 nm. These results serve as an experimental supplement for biophysical simulations and demonstrate the influence of an important parameter in the development of nanomaterials for targeted therapies in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26950059

  16. Irradiation stability and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles for radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Mei-Li; Wu, Hong-Ying; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Ding, Yan-Qiu; Feng, Xin; Zhang, Liang-An

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are promising as a kind of novel radiosensitizer in radiotherapy. If gold nanoparticles are shown to have good irradiation stability and biocompatibility, they would play an important role in radiotherapy. In this work, we investigated irradiation effects of gold nanoparticles under 2–10 kR gamma irradiation and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles with human K562 cells by using Cell Titre-Glo™ luminescent cell viability assay. The results revealed that gamma irradiation had ...

  17. Orientations of polyoxometalate anions on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharet, Shelly; Sandars, Ella; Wang, Yifeng; Zeiri, Offer; Neyman, Alevtina; Meshi, Louisa; Weinstock, Ira A

    2012-09-01

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy of polyoxometalate-protected gold nanoparticles reveals that the Preyssler ion, [NaP(5)W(30)O(110)](14-), lies "face down" with its C(5) axis perpendicular to the gold surface, while the Finke-Droege ion, [P(4)W(30)Zn(4)(H(2)O)(2)O(112)](16-), is "tilted", with its long axis close to 60° from the normal to the surface. PMID:22510818

  18. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed. PMID:27236049

  19. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2007-06-05

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Douglas E.; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher; Robert W.; Schmidt, Jurgen G.

    2009-07-07

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Synthesis of Monodispersed Gold Nanoparticles with Exceptional Colloidal Stability with Grafted Polyethylene Glycol-g-polyvinyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaaldin M. Alkilany

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report the synthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles with tunable core size (23–79 nm in the presence of polyethylene glycol-g-polyvinyl alcohol (PEG-g-PVA grafted copolymer as a reducing, capping, and stabilizing agent in a one-step protocol. The resulted PEG-g-PVA-capped gold nanoparticles are monodispersed with an exceptional colloidal stability against salt addition, repeated centrifugation, and extensive dialysis. The effect of various synthesis parameters and the kinetic/mechanism of the nanoparticle formation are discussed.

  2. Grain boundary engineering with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated high-TC grain boundary Josephson junctions with and without incorporated gold nanoparticles. Pulsed laser deposition was used for the deposition of YBa2Cu3O7−δ thin films on SrTiO3 bicrystal substrates with different grain boundary angles. During the deposition process, single-crystalline nanoparticles self-assembled from a thin gold layer which was sputtered on the substrate before the YBCO deposition. The interaction between nanoparticles and thin film growth significantly influences the quality of the YBCO films [1]. The critical current density and the critical temperature of the superconducting films can be increased in a defined manner. Furthermore, the nanoparticles influence the growth conditions in the region of the grain boundary and thus the properties of the later patterned Josephson junctions. The comparison between Josephson junctions with and without nanoparticles on the same substrate shows a reduction of the critical current IC and an increase of the normal state resistance RN for all investigated types of grain boundaries in the areas with gold nanoparticles. In some cases we even found an increase of the resulting ICRN product. We present the influence of light irradiation on the properties of the Josephson junctions.

  3. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibo Cai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Weibo Cai1,2, Ting Gao3, Hao Hong1, Jiangtao Sun11Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 2University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 3Tyco Electronics Corporation, 306 Constitution Drive, Menlo Park, California, USAAbstract: It has been almost 4 decades since the “war on cancer” was declared. It is now generally believed that personalized medicine is the future for cancer patient management. Possessing unprecedented potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer, nanoparticles have been extensively studied over the last decade. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications targeting cancer. Gold nanospheres, nanorods, nanoshells, nanocages, and surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles will be discussed in detail regarding their uses in in vitro assays, ex vivo and in vivo imaging, cancer therapy, and drug delivery. Multifunctionality is the key feature of nanoparticle-based agents. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and other functionalities can all be integrated to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy of cancer. Big strides have been made and many proof-of-principle studies have been successfully performed. The future looks brighter than ever yet many hurdles remain to be conquered. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanoparticles, with multiple receptor targeting, multimodality imaging, and multiple therapeutic entities, holds the promise for a “magic gold bullet” against cancer.Keywords: gold nanoparticles, cancer, nanotechnology, optical imaging, nanomedicine, molecular therapy

  4. Noncovalent Interactions of Tiopronin-Protected Gold Nanoparticles with DNA: Two Methods to Quantify Free Energy of Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Prado-Gotor, R.; Grueso, E

    2014-01-01

    The binding of gold nanoparticles capped with N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine (Au@tiopronin) with double-stranded DNA has been investigated and quantified in terms of free energies by using two different approaches. The first approach follows the DNA conformational changes induced by gold nanoparticles using the CD technique. The second methodology consists in the use of pyrene-1-carboxaldehyde as a fluorescent probe. This second procedure implies the determination of the “true” free energy of...

  5. Reversible multi polyelectrolyte layers on gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djoumessi Lekeufack, Diane; Brioude, Arnaud, E-mail: arnaud.brioude@univ-lyon1.fr [UMR CNRS 5615, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces (LMI) (France); Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence [UMR 7244 CNRS, Universite Paris 13, Laboratoire CSPBAT (France); Coleman, Anthony W.; Miele, Philippe [UMR CNRS 5615, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces (LMI) (France)

    2012-06-15

    Gold nanoparticles surface can be easily modified by different molecules such as polyelectrolytes. In a typical multilayer system made of polyethyleneimine and poly(styrene sulfonate)sodium alternated layers around gold nanoparticles, we have evaluated the interactions between the different layers and the relative strength of interfacial properties. By means of UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopies, we have shown that due to its amine functionalities, the bonding of polyethyleneimine to gold particles is stronger than the one implied with the sulfonate anion in the PSS inducing a clean removal of this latter after the last polyethyleneimine deposition. Considering that polyethyleneimine is cytotoxic and that only weak covalent bonds are concerned in polyelectrolyte multilayer, this last point is of main importance since external degradation thus exposing polyethyleneimine sub-layer of multilayer films to in vivo tissue cells can occur by many ways.

  6. Urease immobilized fluorescent gold nanoparticles for urea sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Upendra Kumar; Nirala, Narsingh R; Upadhyay, Chandan; Saxena, P S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2015-05-01

    We report a surfactant-free synthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with average size of 15 nm. An approach for visual and fluorescent sensing of urea in aqueous solution based on shift in surface plasmon band (SPB) maxima as well as quench in fluorescence intensity. To enable the urea detection, we functionalized the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles with urease, the enzyme specific to urea using carbodiimide chemistry. The visible color changed of the gold colloidal solution from red to blue (or purple); this was evident from quenching in absorbance and fluorescence intensity, is the principle applied here for the sensing of urea. The solution turns blue when the urea concentration exceeds 8 mg/dL which reveals visual lower detection limit. The lower detection limits governed by the fluorescence quenching were found 5 mg/dL (R(2) = 0.99) which is highly sensitive and selective compared to shift in SPB maxima. The approach depicted here seems to be important in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25809996

  7. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tokeer, E-mail: tahmad3@jmi.ac.in [Nanochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna [Nanochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz [Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Ahmed, Jahangeer [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Al-Shihri, Ayed S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha 61413, P.O. Box 9004 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m{sup 2}/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m{sup 2/}g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl{sub 2}, however, NaBH{sub 4} produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m{sup 2}/g for 7 nm and 269 m{sup 2}/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H{sup +} efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  8. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m2/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m2/g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl2 and NaBH4 as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl2, however, NaBH4 produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m2/g for 7 nm and 269 m2/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H+ efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  9. Comparative study of gum arabic and PVP as stabilizing agents for synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use Colloidal metallic nanoparticles such as gold nanoparticles have received a great attention, due in part to their specific properties and potential applications. Control of size and uniformity of nanoparticles is important to prevent aggregation. High-molecular-weight polymers were used as stabilizer agents. Natural polymers, such as gum Arabic, are used as stabilizer because of capping nanoparticles behavior and present advantages such as solubility, non- toxicity and its compatibility for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Previous studies showed that the hydrophilic group of Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) caused repulsion on gold nanoparticles surface because steric interactions with polymer, for this reason this kind of polymers could be used as stabilizer agent. The aim of this work is to study the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles with PVP and gum Arabic using gamma radiation. The results obtained by samples analysis using UV-Visible showed that the gamma irradiation doses influenced the nanoparticles formation by PVP but that is not the case with the GA, because for smaller quantity of Arabic gum in different doses produced and stabilized nanoparticles. The samples were observed for 20 days and showed stability. We have obtained preliminary results showed that the use of radiation is applicable to the formation of gold nanoparticles. (author)

  10. Comparative study of gum arabic and PVP as stabilizing agents for synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Andressa A.; Leal, Jessica; Geraldes, Adriana N.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: andressa_alvess@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Use Colloidal metallic nanoparticles such as gold nanoparticles have received a great attention, due in part to their specific properties and potential applications. Control of size and uniformity of nanoparticles is important to prevent aggregation. High-molecular-weight polymers were used as stabilizer agents. Natural polymers, such as gum Arabic, are used as stabilizer because of capping nanoparticles behavior and present advantages such as solubility, non- toxicity and its compatibility for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Previous studies showed that the hydrophilic group of Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) caused repulsion on gold nanoparticles surface because steric interactions with polymer, for this reason this kind of polymers could be used as stabilizer agent. The aim of this work is to study the synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles with PVP and gum Arabic using gamma radiation. The results obtained by samples analysis using UV-Visible showed that the gamma irradiation doses influenced the nanoparticles formation by PVP but that is not the case with the GA, because for smaller quantity of Arabic gum in different doses produced and stabilized nanoparticles. The samples were observed for 20 days and showed stability. We have obtained preliminary results showed that the use of radiation is applicable to the formation of gold nanoparticles. (author)

  11. Growth of two-dimensional arrays of uncapped gold nanoparticles on silicon substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anindya Das; Soma Das; A K Raychaudhuri

    2008-06-01

    A method of preparing large area patterned 2D arrays of uncapped gold (Au) nanoparticles has been developed. The pattern has been formed using self-assembly of uncapped Au nanoparticles. The Au nanoparticles were synthesized via toluene/water two phase systems using a reducing agent and colloidal solution of Au nanoparticles was produced. These nanoparticles have been prepared without using any kind of capping agent. Analysis by TEM showed discrete Au nanoparticles of 4 nm average diameter. AFM analysis also showed similar result. The TEM studies showed that these nanoparticles formed self-assembled coherent patterns with dimensions exceeding 500 nm. Spin coating on silicon substrate by suitably adjusting the speed can self-assemble these nanoparticles to lengths exceeding 1 m.

  12. Green coconut ( Cocos nucifera Linn) shell extract mediated size controlled green synthesis of polyshaped gold nanoparticles and its application in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Koushik; Bag, Braja Gopal; Samanta, Kousik

    2014-08-01

    The shell extract of green coconut ( Cocos nucifera Linn) has been utilized for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles at room temperature under very mild condition without any extra stabilizing or capping agents. The size of the synthesized gold nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the shell extract. The stabilized gold nanoparticles were analyzed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, HRTEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The catalytic activity of the freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles was studied for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol and the kinetics of the reduction reaction were studied spectrophotometrically.

  13. Synchrotron X-Ray Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles for Tumor Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly concentrated gold nanoparticles (20 ± 5 nm) were produced by an x-ray irradiation method. The particles were then examined for the interactions between gold and tumor cells under x-ray radiation conditions. The biological effects of gold nanoparticles were investigated in terms of the internalization, cytotoxicity and capability to enhance x-ray radiotherapy. The results of this investigation indicated that x-ray derived gold nanoparticles were nontoxic to CT-26 cell line and immobilized within cytoplasm. The irradiation experiments provided further evidence that gold nanoparticles were capable of enhancing the efficiency of radiotherapy

  14. Polymer-templated self-assembly of a 2-dimensional gold nanoparticle network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rein; Westerlund, Fredrik; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper;

    2008-01-01

    We here report on the formation of well-ordered 2D gold nanostructures at the air/water interface. Spreading a mixture of alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and an amphiphilic poly(p-phenylene) on a water surface and compressing the mixture to a surface pressure of 40 mN/m lead to the...... formation of a network of well-ordered gold nanostructures. The structures are transferred horizontally (Langmuir-Schafer) onto a solid substrate and investigated with TEM, AFM, and X-ray reflectivity, showing a pattern that is repeating over several micrometers. AFM and X-ray reflectivity data at different...

  15. Protracted elimination of gold nanoparticles from mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Wallin, Håkan; Stoltenberg, Meredin;

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at revealing the fate of 40-nm gold nanoparticles after intravenous injections. The gold nanoparticles were traced histochemically with light and transmission electron microscopy using autometallographic (AMG) staining, and the gold content in the liver was determined with ...

  16. Controlled synthesis and optical properties of pure gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.K.; Rai, A.K.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation of a gold metallic disc at wavelengths of 532 nm and 355 nm with 7 ns pulse duration in the pure water. The colloidal gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluo

  17. Assembly of functional gold nanoparticle on silica microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsuan-Lan; Lee, Fu-Cheng; Tang, Tse-Yu; Zhou, Chenguang; Tsai, De-Hao

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a controlled synthesis of silica microsphere with the surface-decorated functional gold nanoparticles. Surface of silica microsphere was modified by 3-aminopropypltriethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to generate a positive electric field, by which the gold nanoparticles with the negative charges (unconjugated, thiolated polyethylene glycol functionalized with the traceable packing density and conformation) were able to be attracted to the silica microsphere. Results show that both the molecular conjugation on gold nanoparticle and the uniformity in the amino-silanization of silica microsphere influenced the loading and the homogeneity of gold nanoparticles on silica microsphere. The 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane-functionalized silica microsphere provided an uniform field to attract gold nanoparticles. Increasing the ethanol content in aminosilane solution significantly improved the homogeneity and the loading of gold nanoparticles on the surface of silica microsphere. For the gold nanoparticle, increasing the molecular mass of polyethylene glycol yielded a greater homogeneity but a lower loading on silica microsphere. Bovine serum albumin induced the desorption of gold nanoparticles from silica microsphere, where the extent of desorption was suppressed by the presence of high-molecular mass polyethylene glycol on gold nanoparticles. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle-silica microsphere constructs useful to the applications in chemo-radioactive therapeutics. PMID:26874272

  18. Photo-induced growth of DNA-capped silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the photo-induced nucleation and growth of silver nanoparticles in aqueous solution in the presence of DNA oligomers. An organic dye (Cy5) was used as a photosensitizer to initiate the nanoparticle growth upon illumination with 647 nm light. The formation of nanoparticles and growth kinetics were observed by extinction spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation of the precursor solutions with light at the Cy5 absorption maximum triggered the instantaneous formation of spherical particles with a metallic core ∼15 nm in diameter. Remarkably, the particles feature significantly larger effective hydrodynamic diameters (35 nm) in solution, indicative of a DNA ad-layer on the nanoparticle surface. Centrifugation experiments confirmed that DNA was inseparably associated with the nanoparticles and indicated that DNA oligomers adsorb onto the nanoparticle surface during growth, playing the role of a capping agent. The introduced method is a fast and facile way to prepare DNA-capped silver nanoparticles in a single growth step. (paper)

  19. Increasing the stability of DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles using mercaptoalkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakenborg, T., E-mail: tim.stakenborg@imec.b [Veterinary Research Institute, Department of Bacteriology and Immunology (Belgium); Peeters, S.; Reekmans, G.; Laureyn, W.; Jans, H.; Borghs, G. [IMEC vzw, Nano Engineered Component Science (Belgium); Imberechts, H. [Veterinary Research Institute, Department of Bacteriology and Immunology (Belgium)

    2008-12-15

    In this work, the stability of DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles was examined in relation to their size, temperature, as well as the presence of mono- and bivalent ions. Furthermore, we report on the stabilizing effect of an additional post-functionalization with mercaptoalkanes, optionally bearing triethylene glycol (TEG) units. Although such so-called backfilling molecules are commonly used for planar gold surfaces, they have rarely been reported in combination with DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. Our results show that, conform the DLVO theory, smaller citrate-capped gold nanoparticles were more stable towards higher concentrations of salt. Citrate nanoparticles of 30 nm in size were only stable in sodium chloride concentrations up to {approx}0.05 M and up to 45 {sup o}C. The stability of these uncoated nanoparticles was even lower when bivalent salts were used (i.e. <2 x 10{sup -4} M). Immobilization of DNA on these nanoparticles, on the other hand, improved the stability in salt solutions with at least one order of magnitude. The additional use of backfilling molecules stabilized the gold nanoparticles even further, without negatively affecting the DNA hybridization efficiency. DNA functionalization also had a positive impact on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles. Unfortunately, this beneficial effect was not observed after a subsequent backfilling step.

  20. Increasing the stability of DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles using mercaptoalkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the stability of DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles was examined in relation to their size, temperature, as well as the presence of mono- and bivalent ions. Furthermore, we report on the stabilizing effect of an additional post-functionalization with mercaptoalkanes, optionally bearing triethylene glycol (TEG) units. Although such so-called backfilling molecules are commonly used for planar gold surfaces, they have rarely been reported in combination with DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. Our results show that, conform the DLVO theory, smaller citrate-capped gold nanoparticles were more stable towards higher concentrations of salt. Citrate nanoparticles of 30 nm in size were only stable in sodium chloride concentrations up to ∼0.05 M and up to 45 oC. The stability of these uncoated nanoparticles was even lower when bivalent salts were used (i.e. -4 M). Immobilization of DNA on these nanoparticles, on the other hand, improved the stability in salt solutions with at least one order of magnitude. The additional use of backfilling molecules stabilized the gold nanoparticles even further, without negatively affecting the DNA hybridization efficiency. DNA functionalization also had a positive impact on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles. Unfortunately, this beneficial effect was not observed after a subsequent backfilling step.

  1. Synthesis of Stabilized Myrrh-Capped Hydrocolloidal Magnetite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M. Atta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report a new method for synthesizing stabilized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP colloids. A new class of monodisperse water-soluble magnetite nano-particles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The ferrous and ferric ions were hydrolyzed at low temperature at pH 9 in the presence of iodine to produce iron oxide nanoparticles. The natural product myrrh gum was used as capping agent to produce highly dispersed coated magnetite nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogel was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD was used to examine the crystal structure of the produced magnetite nanoparticles.

  2. DNA-Templated Preparation of Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Byung Wook Jo; Jeong Sun Sohn; Jung Il Jin; Young Wan Kwon

    2011-01-01

    DNA-mediated gold nanoparticles were prepared by chemical reduction of DNA-Au(III) complex. The DNA-Au(III) was first formed by reacting DNA with HAuCl4 at a pH of 5.6. The complex in solution was reacted with hydrazine reducing Au(III) to Au. The reduced Au formed nanodimensional aggregates. The particle distributions were obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This method resulted in a rather uniform dispersion of Au nanoparticles of near-...

  3. Acacia nilotica (Babool) leaf extract mediated size-controlled rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rakhi; Bag, Braja Gopal; Maity, Nabasmita

    2013-09-01

    The leaf extract of Acacia nilotica (Babool) is rich in different types of plant secondary metabolites such as flavanoids, tannins, triterpenoids, saponines, etc. We have demonstrated the use of the leaf extract for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in water at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the gold nanoparticles was complete in several minutes, and no extra stabilizing or capping agents were necessary. The size of the nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the leaf extract. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by HRTEM, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. The synthesized gold nanoparticles have been used as an efficient catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in water at room temperature.

  4. Saraca indica bark extract mediated green synthesis of polyshaped gold nanoparticles and its application in catalytic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Majumdar, Rakhi; Sikder, Arun Kanti; Bag, Braja Gopal; Patra, Biplab Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The bark extract of the traditional ayurvedic medicinal plant Saraca indica containing redox active polyphenolic compounds has been utilized for the one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles at room temperature. The polyphenolic compounds acted as the reducing agent as well as the stabilizing agent without any additional capping agent. The synthesis of the gold nanoparticles of 15-23 nm size was complete in several minutes and no photo irradiation or heat treatment was necessary. Surface plasmon resonance, HRTEM, AFM, X-ray diffraction, and FTIR studies have been carried out to characterize the nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles synthesized were of triangular, tetragonal, pentagonal, hexagonal, and spherical shapes. The synthesized gold nanoparticles have been used as a catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol at room temperature and the kinetics of the reduction reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically.

  5. In Situ Synthesis and Deposition of Gold Nanoparticles with Different Morphologies on Glass and ITO Substrate by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de la Garza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and deposited in situ by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis on glass and indium tin oxide (ITO substrates. This technique led to the formation of gold nanoparticles with different morphologies without the use of any capping agent. The gold nanoparticles deposited on glass substrate were obtained as nanospheres with an average particle size of 30 nm with some agglomerates; however, the nanoparticles deposited on ITO substrate were obtained with different morphologies, such as triangular nanoprisms, nanorods, nanocubes, and nanorhombus, with particle sizes between 40 and 100 nm. The ITO substrate influenced the morphology of the gold nanoparticles obtained due to changes in the deposition temperature, which also change the crystalline structure of the ITO film on the substrate.

  6. Protein Cages as Containers for Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aijie; Verwegen, Martijn; de Ruiter, Mark V; Maassen, Stan J; Traulsen, Christoph H-H; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2016-07-01

    Abundant and highly diverse, viruses offer new scaffolds in nanotechnology for the encapsulation, organization, or even synthesis of novel materials. In this work the coat protein of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) is used to encapsulate gold nanoparticles with different sizes and stabilizing ligands yielding stable particles in buffered solutions at neutral pH. The sizes of the virus-like particles correspond to T = 1, 2, and 3 Caspar-Klug icosahedral triangulation numbers. We developed a simple one-step process enabling the encapsulation of commercially available gold nanoparticles without prior modification with up to 97% efficiency. The encapsulation efficiency is further increased using bis-p-(sufonatophenyl)phenyl phosphine surfactants up to 99%. Our work provides a simplified procedure for the preparation of metallic particles stabilized in CCMV protein cages. The presented results are expected to enable the preparation of a variety of similar virus-based colloids for current focus areas. PMID:27135176

  7. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: PROMISING AND POTENTIAL NANOMATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Shringirishi*, S.K. Prajapati , Alok Mahor , Shashi Alok , Poonam Yadav and Amita Verma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have appeared as an attractive candidate for delivery of various drug molecules or considered as extraordinary molecular carriers for the targeting, intracellular trafficking and delivery of a huge array of biomolecules including DNA, RNA, proteins, peptides, drugs, genes and other molecules of therapeutic significance. Particularly gold nanoparticles have attracted intensive interest, because they are easily prepared, have low toxicity and can be readily attached to molecules of biological interest. More and more research shows that AuNPs-based technologies are becoming promising approaches in drug and gene delivery, liver targeting, brain targeting, cancer research and AIDS treatment. The present review focuses on synthesis and functionalization methods of GNPs, the past researchs and reviews about GNPs, their emerging applications and uses and their future prospects.

  8. Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles to Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Cheng MA; Ning LUN; Shu Lin WEN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were initially chemically modified with an H2SO4-HNO3 treatment,and subsequently activated with Pd-Sn catalytic nuclei via a one-step activation approach. These activated nanotubes were used as precursors for obtaining gold nanoparticles-attached nanotubes via simple electroless plating. This approach provides an efficient method for attachment of metal nanostructures to carbon nanotubes. Such novel hybrid nanostructures are attractive for many applications.

  9. Application of gold nanoparticles in separation sciences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, D.; Kašička, Václav; Mikšík, Ivan; Řezanka, P.; Záruba, K.; Matějka, P.; Král, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2010), s. 372-387. ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : gold nanoparticles * electrophoresis * chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  10. Synthesis and characterization of L-histidine capped silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L-histidine capped Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized by a hydrothermal method. Spherical Ag nanoparticles with average diameter ranging from 9 to 21 nm can be obtained by tuning the reaction pH and the reactant ratio. The topography, surface and internal structures of the histidine capped Ag nanoparticles have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) results revealed that the Ag colloid in present study have a structure that the imidazole moiety of histidine is bound on the Ag surface and COO− group is exposed outward. The as-synthesized Ag colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored at room temperature at least one month. In addition, it was found that the solution color of Ag colloid can change from yellow to reddish-brown by addition of the NiCl2 solution, which may have potential application for Ni2+ detection. - Highlights: ► L-histidine capped Ag nanoparticles have been synthesized by a hydrothermal method. ► Ag nanoparticles have been characterized by TEM, AFM, DLS, XPS, XRD, SERS. ► The size of Ag nanoparticles depend on pH condition and the ratios of the reactants. ► A possible structural mode of histidine on surface of Ag nanoparticle was proposed. ► UV absorption and solution color of Ag colloid is sensitive to the addition of Ni2+

  11. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by microwave heating and application of spectroscopy to study conjugate of gold nanoparticles with antibody E. coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Phat Huynh, Trong; Nguyen Pham Tran, Nguyen; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 15-20 nm size range have attracted attention for producing smart sensing devices as diagnostic tools in biomedical sciences. Citrate capped AuNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibodies. In this paper we describe a method for the low cost synthesis of gold nanoparticles using sodium citrate (Na3Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl4.3H2O) by microwave heating (diameter about 13-15 nm). Gold nanoparticles were functionalized with surface activation by 3-mercaptopropionic acid for attaching antibody. These nanoparticles were then reacted with anti-E. coli O157:H7, using N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) and carbondimide hydrochloride (EDC) coupling chemistry. The product was characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and zeta potential. In addition, the binding of antibody-gold nanoparticles conjugates to E. coli O157:H7 was demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  12. Photochemical Synthesis of the Bioconjugate Folic Acid-Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León, John Jairo Castillo; Bertel, Linda; Páez-Mozo, Edgar;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a rapid and simple onepot method to obtain gold nanoparticles functionalized with folic acid using a photochemistry method. The bioconjugate folic acid-gold nanoparticle was generated in one step using a photo-reduction method, mixing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate with folic...... at 4°C prolongs the stability of folic acid-gold nanoparticle suspensions to up to 26 days. Ultraviolet visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed a surface plasmon band of around 534nm and fluorescence spectroscopy exhibited a quenching effect on gold nanoparticles in the...... fluorescence emission of folic acid and thus confirmed the conjugation of folic acid to the surface of gold nanoparticles. In this study we demonstrate the use of a photochemistry method to obtain folic acid-gold nanoparticles in a simple and rapid way without the use of surfactants and long reaction times...

  13. Optical Nonlinear Refractive Index of Laser-Ablated Gold Nanoparticles Graphene Oxide Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini; Noor, A. S. M.; Nastaran Faraji; Alireza Kharazmi; Mohd Adzir Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared in graphene oxide using laser ablation technique. The ablation times were varied from 10 to 40 minutes, and the particle size was decreased from 16.55 nm to 5.18 nm in spherical shape. The nanoparticles were capped with carboxyl and the hydroxyl groups were obtained from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the UV-visible peak shifted with decreasing of nanoparticles size, appearing from 528 nm to 510 nm. The Z-scan technique was used to measu...

  14. Selectively deposited silver coatings on gold-capped silicon nanowires for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, M; Stelzner, Th; Steinbrück, A; Berger, A; Liu, J; Lerose, D; Gösele, U; Christiansen, S

    2009-06-01

    Gold caps on silicon nanowires are selectively coated with silver by autometallography (electroless deposition). Changing the conditions of silver deposition, a variety of different coating morphologies can be produced [figure: see text]. The different silver coating morphologies are investigated in terms of their capabilities for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) experiments.Gold caps on silicon nanowires are hemispherical and only a few tens of nanometers in diameter when grown from metal catalysts by the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using chemical vapor deposition. These gold caps are capable of enhancing Raman signals based on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect. The Raman signal can be enhanced even further (by at least one order of magnitude) when silver is selectively deposited onto these gold caps by autometallography (electroless deposition). By changing the silver deposition conditions, different coating morphologies can be realized on the gold caps that range from very thin, smooth layers to uneven and extremely rough coatings. The SERS signal enhancement and the spatial homogeneity of the achievable enhancement are compared for the different silver coatings using a model dye molecule. PMID:19399821

  15. Methanobactin-Mediated One-Step Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of gold nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution has enormous importance in nanotechnology. Methanobactin (Mb is a copper-binding small peptide that appears to function as an agent for copper sequestration and uptake in methanotrophs. Mb can also bind and catalytically reduce Au (III to Au (0. In this study, we demonstrate a facile Mb-mediated one-step synthetic route to prepare monodispersed gold nanoparticles. Continuous reduction of Au (III by Mb can be achieved by using hydroquinone as the reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy. The formation and the surface plasmon resonance properties of the gold nanoparticles are highly dependent on the ratio of Au (III to Mb in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, fluorescence spectra and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectra suggest that Mb molecules catalytically reduce Au (III to Au (0 with the concomitant production of gold nanoparticles, and then, Mb statically adsorbed onto the surface of gold nanoparticles to form an Mb-gold nanoparticles assembly. This avoids secondary nucleation. The formed gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be monodispersed and uniform by transmission electron microscopy (TEM images. Analysis of these particles shows an average size of 14.9 nm with a standard deviation of 1.1 nm. The gold nanoparticles are extremely stable and can resist aggregation, even after several months.

  16. Formation of gold nanoparticles in polymeric nanowires by low-temperature thermolysis of gold mesitylene

    OpenAIRE

    Erk, Christoph; Yau, Man Yan Eric; Lange, Holger; Thomsen, Christian; Miclea, Paul; Ralf B. Wehrspohn; Schlecht, Sabine; Steinhart, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of polymer nanowires containing metal nanoparticle chains by low-temperature thermolyses of metal precursors has remained challenging. We report the block copolymer-assisted generation of locally regular chains of quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles with narrow particle diameter distribution by mild thermolysis of the non-polar gold precursor gold mesitylene inside the cylindrical nanopores of self-ordered anodic aluminium oxide (AAO). The block copolymer separates the gold mesit...

  17. Green synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extract of anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Devi, V.; Adavallan, K.; Saranya, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we have explored anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron) as a reducing agent for one pot size controlled green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) at ambient conditions. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-vis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The prepared AuNPs showed surface Plasmon resonance centered at 549 nm with average particle size of 15±5 nm. Stable, spherical and triangular crystalline AuNPs with well-defined dimensions were synthesized using anti-tumor potent Crocus sativus (saffron). Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles is confirmed from the HR-TEM, SAED and SEM images, and XRD patterns. From the FTIR spectra it is found that the biomolecules are responsible for capping in gold nanoparticles.

  18. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Joerg; Ristig, Simon [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Greulich, Christina [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bergmannsheil University Hospital/Surgical Research (Germany); Li Zian; Farle, Michael [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Physics, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Koeller, Manfred [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bergmannsheil University Hospital/Surgical Research (Germany); Epple, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.epple@uni-due.de [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Silver, gold, and silver-gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15-25 nm), gold (5-6 nm), and silver-gold (50:50; 10-12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver-gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver-gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver-gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1} induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  19. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver–gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, gold, and silver–gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15–25 nm), gold (5–6 nm), and silver–gold (50:50; 10–12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver–gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver–gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver–gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5–20 μg mL−1 induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  20. Biodistribution of gold nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in mouse lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Danscher, Gorm;

    2009-01-01

    Background The fate of gold nanoparticles, 2, 40 and 100 nm, administered intratracheally to adult female mice was examined. The nanoparticles were traced by autometallography (AMG) at both ultrastructural and light microscopic levels. Also, the gold content was quantified by inductively coupled...... plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The liver is the major site of deposition of circulating gold nanoparticles. Therefore the degree of translocation was determined by the hepatic deposition of gold. Mice were instilled with 5 intratracheal doses of gold...... repeatedly during 3 weeks, the load was substantial. Ultrastructurally, AMG silver enhanced gold nanoparticles were found in lysosome-/endosome-like organelles of the macrophages and analysis with AMG, ICP-MS and NAA of the liver revealed an almost total lack of translocation of nanoparticles. In mice given...

  1. Phonon assisted thermophoretic motion of gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Poulikakos, Dimos;

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigate the thermally driven mass transport of gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The observed thermophoretic motion of the gold nanoparticles correlates with the phonon dispersion exhibited by a standard carbon nanotube and, in...... particular, with the breathing mode of the tube. Additionally, the results show an increased static friction for gold nanoparticles confines inside a zig-zag carbon nanotube when increasing the size length of the nanoparticles. However, an unexpected, opposite trend is observed for the same nanoparticles...

  2. Biosynthesis and Application of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2010-01-01

    A green chemistry synthetic route has been used for both silver and gold nanoparticles synthesis. The reaction occurred at ambient temperature. Among the nanoparticles biological organism, some microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and yeast have been exploited for nanoparticles synthesis. Several plant biomass or plant extracts have been successfully used for extracellular biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. Analytical techniques, such as ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis...

  3. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Ratan Das; Nath, Siddartha S.; Ramendu Bhattacharjee

    2011-01-01

    Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible ran...

  4. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Ratan; Nath, Siddartha S.; Bhattacharjee, Ramendu

    2011-01-01

    Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible rang...

  5. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles via green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zulfiqaar; Balu, S. S.

    2012-11-01

    The proposed work describes the comparison of various methods of green synthesis for preparation of Gold and Silver nanoparticles. Pure extracts of Lemon (Citrus limon) and Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) were mixed with aqueous solution of auric tetrachloride and silver nitrate. The resultant solutions were treated with four common techniques to assist in the reduction namely photo catalytic, thermal, microwave assisted reduction and solvo - thermal reduction. UV - Visible Spectroscopy results and STM images of the final solutions confirmed the formation of stable metallic nanoparticles. A preliminary account of the green synthesis work is presented here.

  6. Antiglycating potential of gum arabic capped-silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M; Ansari, Mohammad Azam; Choi, Inho; Khan, Haris M; Alzohairy, Mohammad A

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products are major contributors to the pathology of diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and atherosclerosis; accordingly, identification of antiglycation compounds is attracting considerable interest. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of gum arabic capped-silver nanoparticles on advanced glycation end products formation was monitored by several biophysical techniques. Silver nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet-visible, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Bovine serum albumin and methylglyoxal mixtures incubated with increasing concentrations of silver nanoparticles showed significant reductions in advanced glycation end product formation that were confirmed by ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. High-performance liquid chromatography showed decreased adduct formation of glycated protein in the presence of silver nanoparticles. The structural changes induced by silver nanoparticles were further confirmed by circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Strong inhibition of advanced glycation end product formation was observed in the presence of elevated silver nanoparticles. The results of this study suggest that silver nanoparticles are a potent antiglycating agent. PMID:25080376

  7. Using Size-Exclusion Chromatography to Monitor Variations in the Sizes of Microwave-Irradiated Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Fu-Ken Liu

    2012-01-01

    Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used to evaluate gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) for variations in their sizes after microwave (MW) irradiation, with the eluted NPs monitored through diode array detection to reveal their surface plasmon absorptions. The sizes of citrate-capped Au NPs decreased upon increasing the MW irradiation temperature, consistent with digestive ripening of these NPs under the operating conditions. In contrast, Au NPs capped with sodium dodecyl sulfate increased in si...

  8. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  9. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N.N., E-mail: nnn_1900@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Obara, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  10. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  11. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Lévy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, ‘nanoparticle and cell’ hit. Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable. To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. Raphaël Lévy is a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. He graduated in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France. In 2002, after a Master in Soft Condensed Matter Physics, he obtained a PhD in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur. He then moved to

  12. Green Chemistry Techniques for Gold Nanoparticles Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Sarah A.; King, Christy A.; Ferrara, Davon W.

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are often utilized in many technological and research applications ranging from the detection of tumors, molecular and biological sensors, and as nanoantennas to probe physical processes. As these applications move from the research laboratory to industrial settings, there is a need to develop efficient and sustainable synthesis techniques. Recent research has shown that several food products and beverages containing polyphenols, a common antioxidant, can be used as reducing agents in the synthesis of AuNPs in solution. In this study, we explore a variety of products to determine which allow for the most reproducible solution of nanoparticles based on the size and shapes of particles present. We analyzed the AuNPs solutions using extinction spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. We also develop a laboratory activity to introduce introductory chemistry and physics students to AuNP synthesis techniques and analysis.

  13. Conductor microstructures by laser curing of printed gold nanoparticle ink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser-based curing of printed nanoparticle ink to create microlines (resistors) of electrical resistivity approaching that of bulk gold was investigated. The present work relies on laser absorption in both the nanoparticle ink and the sintered gold layer, as well as the transport of thermal energy in the substrate and the resulting solvent vaporization and nanoparticle deposition and sintering. The morphology and electrical properties of the gold line can be controlled by modulating the spatial distribution of the laser beam intensity. Based on the understanding of the underlying physics, a process that circumvents a serious drawback on the functionality of cured gold microlines is produced. Microconductors with resistivity approaching that of bulk gold are produced, while loss of gold nanoparticles and cross sectional nonuniformities are avoided

  14. Facile one-pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles using tannic acid and its application in catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathy Aromal, S.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-04-01

    The paper reports a simple and efficient method for the synthesis of stable, nearly spherical gold nanoparticles using tannic acid as both the reducing and stabilizing agent. The nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The influence of tannic acid on the control of size and shape of gold nanoparticles is reported. Upon an increase in the concentration of tannic acid, there is a shift in the shape of nanoparticles as evidenced by the change in bandwidth and peak position of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band. Also, it is found that tannic acid ceases to act as a reducing agent beyond the limit of 10 mL (6×10-3 M) for 30 mL of HAuCl4 (1.3×10-3 M). On increasing the quantity of tannic acid, nucleation is favored in the initial stages and thereafter growth supersedes nucleation. The stable colloids obtained by this method are found to consist of nanoparticles with average size 8 and 12 nm. The crystallinity of the sample with fcc phase is observed from TEM, SAED and XRD pattern. Involvement of carboxylic acid group in capping of gold nanoparticles is evident from the FTIR spectrum. The application of the synthesized nanoparticles as catalyst in the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol to 4-Aminophenol is also reported.

  15. Synthesis and optical properties of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles (spheres) have been prepared from HAuCl4 containing aqueous solution by using X-ray irradiation and by chemical reduction method. Gold nanorods were synthesized according to the seed-mediated growth method. The colloidal gold nanoparticles were characterized by using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy. It was found that the concentration of the precursors affects the size of the nanoparticles. In the chemical reduction approach the size of nanoparticles can be controlled by varying amount of trisodium citrate, but in the photochemical method the size of nanoparticles can been controlled by varying the ratio of HAuCl4 to TX-100 and X-ray irradiation duration. Gold nanorods have been synthesized according to the seed-mediated growth method with two steps. The effect of silver acetate and CTAB on formation of gold nanorods has been studied.

  16. The influence of molecular mobility on the properties of networks of gold nanoparticles and organic ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Devid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We prepare and investigate two-dimensional (2D single-layer arrays and multilayered networks of gold nanoparticles derivatized with conjugated hetero-aromatic molecules, i.e., S-(4-{[2,6-bipyrazol-1-ylpyrid-4-yl]ethynyl}phenylthiolate (herein S-BPP, as capping ligands. These structures are fabricated by a combination of self-assembly and microcontact printing techniques, and are characterized by electron microscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Selective binding of the S-BPP molecules to the gold nanoparticles through Au–S bonds is found, with no evidence for the formation of N–Au bonds between the pyridine or pyrazole groups of BPP and the gold surface. Subtle, but significant shifts with temperature of specific Raman S-BPP modes are also observed. We attribute these to dynamic changes in the orientation and/or increased mobility of the molecules on the gold nanoparticle facets. As for their conductance, the temperature-dependence for S-BPP networks differs significantly from standard alkanethiol-capped networks, especially above 220 K. Relating the latter two observations, we propose that dynamic changes in the molecular layers effectively lower the molecular tunnel barrier for BPP-based arrays at higher temperatures.

  17. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  18. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, S. L.; Philip, Daizy; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2009-10-01

    Development of biologically inspired experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is an important branch of nanotechnology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth as the reducing agent is reported. The morphology of the particles formed consists of a mixture of gold nanoprisms and spheres with fcc (1 1 1) structure of gold. At lower concentrations of the extract, formation of prism shaped Au particles dominates, while at higher concentrations almost spherical particles alone are observed. Good crystallinity of the nanoparticles with fcc phase is evident from XRD patterns, clear lattice fringes in the high resolution TEM image and bright circular rings in the SAED pattern. Au nanoparticles grown are observed to be photoluminescent and the intensity of photoemission is found to increase with increase in leaf broth concentration. The ability to modulate the shape of nanoparticles as observed in this study for gold nanoparticles opens up the exciting possibility of developing further synthetic routes employing ecofriendly sources.

  19. Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase-Gold Nanoparticles Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal K. Mitra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNP using electrochemical techniques, which provide some insight in the application of biosensors as tools for diagnostics because HRP is widely used in clinical diagnostics kits. AuNP capped with (i glutathione and (ii lipoic acid was covalently linked to HRP. The immobilized HRP/AuNP conjugate showed characteristic redox peaks at a gold electrode. It displayed good electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, with good sensitivity and without any electron mediator. The covalent linking of HRP and AuNP did not affect the activity of the enzyme significantly. The response of the electrode towards the different concentrations of H2O2 showed the characteristics of Michaelis Menten enzyme kinetics with an optimum pH between 7.0 to 8.0. The preparation of the sensor involves single layer of enzyme, which can be carried out efficiently and is also highly reproducible when compared to other systems involving the layer-by-layer assembly, adsorption or encapsulation of the enzyme. The immobilized AuNP-HRP can be used for immunosensor applications

  20. Protein-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindra, Pratibha [Department of Life Sciences, University of Mumbai, Kalina, Santacruz (E) 400098, Mumbai (India)], E-mail: Pratibha.kamble@osumc.edu

    2009-07-15

    Our current approach is to synthesize gold nanoparticles utilizing Serrapeptase that serves as both a reducing and stabilizing agent. The investigations further reveal that certain amino acid groups like lysine are involved in reduction and stabilization of these particles. The particles are characterized with UV-vis spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H NMR) Spectroscopy studies and Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for Serrapeptidase and Au-Serrapeptidase isolation. Transmission electron microscopy studies show particles ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm that are spherical, hexagonal and polygonal in nature. UV-vis spectroscopy shows surface plasmon band at 536 nm that indicates formation of spherical particles whereas, results further add that gold particles are formed inside the nanosphere that is stabilized by interaction of amino acid groups like {gamma}-lysine of peptase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies reveal that few carboxyl groups are involved during the synthesis process followed by stretching of -CH bonds which has been seen in the case of lysine of Serrapeptase. Current studies therefore show that the method utilized for the synthesis of Au-nanoparticles is a biofriendly method and the nanogold formed can be a useful attribute for various applications.

  1. Microbial synthesis of Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon Ju; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-09-01

    The shape of nanoparticles has been recognized as an important attribute that determines their applicability in various fields. The flower shape (F-shape) has been considered and is being focused on, because of its enhanced properties when compared to the properties of the spherical shape. The present study proposed the microbial synthesis of F-shaped gold nanoparticles within 48 h using the Bhargavaea indica DC1 strain. The F-shaped gold nanoparticles were synthesized extracellularly by the reduction of auric acid in the culture supernatant of B. indica DC1. The shape, size, purity, and crystalline nature of F-shaped gold nanoparticles were revealed by various instrumental techniques including UV-Vis, FE-TEM, EDX, elemental mapping, XRD, and DLS. The UV-Vis absorbance showed a maximum peak at 536 nm. FE-TEM revealed the F-shaped structure of nanoparticles. The EDX peak obtained at 2.3 keV indicated the purity. The peaks obtained on XRD analysis corresponded to the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. In addition, the results of elemental mapping indicated the maximum distribution of gold elements in the nanoproduct obtained. Particle size analysis revealed that the average diameter of the F-shaped gold nanoparticles was 106 nm, with a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.178. Thus, the methodology developed for the synthesis of F-shaped gold nanoparticles is completely green and economical. PMID:25943137

  2. Resonant Modes of L-Shaped Gold Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing; ZHANG Jia-Sen; WU Xiao-Fei; GONG Qi-Huang

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the electric field modes excited in resonant L-shaped gold nanoparticles using a finite-difference time domain method.Compared to a single gold nanorod,both the odd and even modes of the L-shaped nanoparticles can be excited due to the symmetry breaking.The nanoparticles with equal and unequal arms have different dependence of field enhancement and mode on the incident polarization.

  3. Nanoparticle-aggregated 3D monocrystalline gold dendritic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, through a simple and fast electroless metal deposition route, gold dendritic nanostructures are synthesized in aqueous conditions. The gold dendrites with a threefold symmetric characteristic were built up of numerous nanoparticles roughly 5-10 nm in size. The aggregated nanoparticles spontaneously experience a self-assembly process along crystallographic orientations and finally form a monocrystalline dendrite. An oriented attachment mechanism can be used to explain the nanoparticle-aggregated self-assembly process

  4. Bimodal Size Distribution of Gold Nanoparticles under Picosecond Laser Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inasawa, Susumu; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2005-05-19

    The evolution of size distributions of gold nanoparticles under pulsed laser irradiation (Nd:YAG, lambda = 355 nm, pulse width 30 ps) was carefully observed by transmission electron microscopy. Interestingly, the initial monomodal size distribution of gold nanoparticles turned into a bimodal one, with two peaks in the number of particles, one at 6 nm and the other at 16-24 nm. The sizes for small particles depended very little on the irradiated laser energy. This change is attributed to laser-induced size reduction of the initial gold nanoparticles followed by the formation of small particles. In our analysis, we extracted a characteristic value for the size-reduction rate per one pulse and revealed that laser-induced size reduction of gold nanoparticles occurred even below the boiling point. When laser energy is insufficient for the boiling of particles, formation of gold vapor around liquid gold drops is thought to cause the phenomenon. With enough laser energy for the boiling, the formation of gold vapor around and inside liquid gold drops is responsible for the phenomenon. We also observed particles with gold strings after one pulse irradiation with a laser energy of 43 mJ cm(-2) pulse(-1), which is sufficient energy for the boiling. It is considered that such particles with gold strings are formed by the projection of gaseous gold from liquid gold drops with some volume of liquid gold around the bubble. On the basis of comparison with previous work, picosecond laser pulses are thought to be the most efficient way to cause laser-induced size reduction of gold nanoparticles. PMID:16852127

  5. Temperature driven transport of gold nanoparticles physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, P.A.E.; Poulikakos, D.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2006-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate the temperature driven mass transport of solid gold nanoparticles, physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our results indicate that the nanoparticle experiences a guided motion, in the direction opposite to the direction of the temperature...... affects the nanoparticle motion along the carbon lattice....

  6. Pseudo-template synthesis of gold nanoparticles based on polyhydrosilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacarescu, Liviu, E-mail: livius@icmpp.ro [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Simionescu, Mihaela; Sacarescu, Gabriela [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2011-02-01

    Highly stable colloidal gold nanoparticles are obtained in a pseudo-template system using a specific polyhydrosilane copolymeric structure. This process takes place in situ by microwaves activation of the polymer solution in a non-polar solvent followed by stirring with solid HAuCl{sub 4} in natural light. The experimental procedure is very simple and the resulted colloidal gold solution is indefinitely stable. The specific surface plasmon resonance absorption band of the gold nanoparticles is strongly red shifted and is strictly related to their size. AFM correlated with DLS analysis showed flattened round shaped colloidal polymer-gold nanoparticles with large diameters. SEM-EDX combined analysis reveals that the polysilane-gold nanoparticles show a natural tendency to auto-assemble in close packed structures which form large areas over the polymer film surface.

  7. Biophysical characterization of gold nanoparticles-loaded liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Mohsen Mahmoud; Fathy, Mohamed Mahmoud; Youssef, Tareq; Khalil, Wafaa Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared and loaded into the bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes, named as gold-loaded liposomes. Biophysical characterization of gold-loaded liposomes was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as well as turbidity and rheological measurements. FTIR measurements showed that gold nanoparticles made significant changes in the frequency of the CH(2) stretching bands, revealing that gold nanoparticles increased the number of gauche conformers and create a conformational change within the acyl chains of phospholipids. The transmission electron micrographs (TEM) revealed that gold nanoparticles were loaded in the liposomal bilayer. The zeta potential of DPPC liposomes had a more negative value after incorporating of Au NPs into liposomal membranes. Turbidity studies revealed that the loading of gold nanoparticles into DPPC liposomes results in shifting the temperature of the main phase transition to a lower value. The membrane fluidity of DPPC bilayer was increased by loading the gold nanoparticles as shown from rheological measurements. Knowledge gained in this study may open the door to pursuing liposomes as a viable strategy for Au NPs delivery in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:22027546

  8. PEG conjugated citrate-capped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aim to develop polyethylene glycol decorated, citric acid capped magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with proper physicochemical characteristics including particle size distribution, morphology, magnetic property and stability in a biologic medium. MNP of about 10 nm were synthesized by a biocompatible chemical co-precipitation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ in an ammonia solution. A synthetic methodology has been developed to get a well dispersed and homogeneous aqueous suspension of MNPs. The naked MNPs are often insufficient for their stability, hydrophilicity and further functionalization. In order to overcome these limitations, citric acid was used to stabilize the magnetite particle suspension, which was anchored on the surface of freshly prepared MNPs by a direct addition method. Polyethylene glycol was covalently attached to the carboxylic moieties of citric acid anchored MNPs by carbodiimide chemistry. The microstructure and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, the magnetic properties were investigated by vibrating sample magnetometry. It was found that the nanoparticles demonstrated superparamagnetic behavior. - Highlights: ► PEG was covalently attached to MNPs, by carbodiimide chemistry. ► PEGylated MNPs are invisible to the immune system that could be considered advantageous over Feridex nanoparticles. ► The saturation magnetization of the PEGylated MNPs was 63 emu/g.

  9. Superior bactericidal activity of SDS capped silver nanoparticles: Synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized through UV photo-reduction of silver nitrate aqueous solution, containing ethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) using an UV digester equipped with high pressure mercury lamp of 500 W. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of surface plasmon absorption maxima at 418 nm. TEM showed the spherical nanoparticles with size in 23-67 nm (average 45 ± 10 nm). The silver nanoparticles were stable for more than 8 months. The antibacterial activity of these SDS capped silver nanoparticles was tested using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a model strain for gram-negative bacteria. SDS capped silver nanoparticles exhibit a much higher bactericidal activity compared to silver nanoparticles capped with other capping agents. Even at a low silver nanoparticle concentration of 5 μg/ml, complete inhibition of 107 colony forming units (CFU) was achieved with SDS capped silver nanoparticles. This concentration is much lower than the values reported by other authors. This enhanced bactericidal activity is attributed to much efficient transport of silver nanoparticles by SDS to the outer membrane of cell wall compared to the other capping agents and have a better interaction of nanoparticles with the cell.

  10. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaing Oo, Maung Kyaw

    As an important and growing branch of photomedicine, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being increasingly employed in clinical applications particularly for the treatment of skin cancer. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis, characterization and deployment of gold nanoparticles for enhanced PDT of fibrosarcoma cancer cells. We have developed robust strategies and methods in fabrication of gold nanoparticles with positively- and negatively-tethered surface charges by photo-reduction of gold chloride salt using branched polyethyleneimine and sodium citrate respectively. An optimal concentration window of gold salt has been established to yield the most stable and monodispersed gold nanoparticles. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a photosensitizing precursor, has been successfully conjugated on to positively charged gold nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions. The 5-ALA/gold nanoparticle conjugates are biocompatible and have shown to be preferably taken up by cancer cells. Subsequent light irradiation results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells, leading to their destruction without adverse effects on normal fibroblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that gold nanoparticles can enhance PDT efficacy by 50% compared to the treatment with 5-ALA alone. Collected evidence has strongly suggested that this enhancement stems from the elevated formation of ROS via the strongly localized electric field of gold nanoparticles. Through single cell imaging using surface-enhanced Raman scattering enabled by the very same gold nanoparticles, we have shown that multifunctionality of gold nanoparticles can be harvested concurrently for biomedical applications in general and for PDT in specific. In other words, gold nanoparticles can be used not only for targeted drug delivery and field-enhanced ROS formation, but also for monitoring cell destructions during PDT. Finally, our COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the size-dependent electric

  11. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with different atomistic structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical reduction method was used to produce nanometric gold particles. Depending on the concentration of the main reactant compound different nanometric sizes and consequently different atomic structural configurations of the particles are obtained. Insights on the structural nature of the gold nanoparticles are obtained through a comparison between digitally-processed experimental high-resolution electron microscopy images and theoretically-simulated images obtained with a multislice approach of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Quantum molecular mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory, are carried out to explain the relationships between the stability of the gold nanoparticles, the atomic structural configurations and the size of nanoparticles

  12. Fabrication of conducting polymer-gold nanoparticles film on electrodes using monolayer protected gold nanoparticles and its electrocatalytic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wish to report a simple and new strategy for the fabrication of gold nanoparticles-conducting polymer film on glassy carbon (GC) and indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces using 5-amino-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole capped gold nanoparticles (AMT-AuNPs) in 0.01 M H2SO4 by electropolymerization. The presence of amine groups on the surface of the AuNPs was responsible for the deposition of the AMT-AuNPs film on the electrode surface. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies reveal that the fabricated p-AMT-AuNPs film showed homogeneously distributed AuNPs with a spherical shape of ∼8 nm diameter. The XPS spectrum shows the binding energies at 83.8 and 87.5 eV in the Au 4f region corresponding to 4f7/2 and 4f5/2, respectively. The position and difference between these two peaks (3.7 eV) exactly match the value reported for Au0. The N1s XPS showed three binding energies at 396.7, 399.6 and 403.3 eV, corresponding to the =NH, -NH- and -N+H-, respectively, confirming that the electropolymerization proceeded through the oxidation of -NH2 groups present on the periphery of the AMT-AuNPs. The application of the present p-AMT-AuNPs modified electrode was demonstrated by studying the electro reduction of oxygen at pH 7.2. The p-AMT-AuNPs film enhanced the oxygen reduction current more than three times than that of p-AMT film prepared under identical conditions.

  13. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Hartsuiker; P. van Es; W. Petersen; T.G. van Leeuwen; L.W.M.M. Terstappen; C. Otto

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  14. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible range due to surface plasmon resonance, with absorption maximum at 530 nm. Fluorescence spectra of gold nanoparticles also show an emission peak at 610 nm when illuminated at 450 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy reveals that these nanoparticles remain stable for 10 days.

  15. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  16. Template free synthesis of silver-gold alloy nanoparticles and cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles in Chinese Hamster Ovary cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Angshuman; Shah, Sunil [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat-390002 (India); Kulkarni, Vijay; Murthy, R.S.R. [G. H. Patel Pharmacy Building, TIFAC-CORE in NDDS, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat-390002 (India); Devi, Surekha [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat-390002 (India)], E-mail: surekha_devi@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    Gold-silver alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by simultaneous reduction of varying mole fractions of HAuCl{sub 4} and AgNO{sub 3} by sodium citrate in aqueous solution without using stabilizing agents such as surfactant or polymer. Appearance of single absorption peak in visible spectrum indicated formation of homogeneous gold-silver alloy nanoparticles. Transmission electron micrographs also support formation of alloy nanoparticles rather than core-shell particles. The plasmon absorption bands for Au-Ag nanoparticles show linear bathochromic shift with increasing Au content. No significant change in surface plasmon band was observed on storage of samples at 25 {+-} 2 deg. C for 6 months, indicating stability of the particles. Particle size distribution, zeta-potential and conduction of these colloidal suspensions were measured by dynamic light scattering along with Zetasizer. Gold and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles exhibited fluorescence at 600 nm and in between 600 and 486 nm respectively depending on alloy composition. Gold nanoparticles were used for cell line study using liposome as a carrier. This liposome entrapped gold nanoparticles showed enhanced uptake by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells compared to gold nanoparticles.

  17. Establishing the Quality of Molecular Coatings on Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Pekcevik, Idah C.

    2014-01-01

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles imparts colloidal stability to nanoparticles by acting as barriers between their surrounding environment and the nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are an ideal platform for many studies because of localized surface plasmon resonant properties, chemical stability, and the relative ease of modifying their surfaces with a wide variety of molecular coatings (e.g., alkanethiolates). Understanding and improving the physicochemical stability of these su...

  18. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 μg/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  19. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Alvarez, S. A. [UASLP, Doctorado Institucional en Ingenieria y Ciencia de Materiales (Mexico); Martinez-Castanon, G. A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.m [UASLP, Maestria en Ciencias Odontologicas, Facultad de Estomatologia (Mexico); Nino-Martinez, N. [UASLP, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico); Reyes-Macias, J. F.; Patino-Marin, N.; Loyola-Rodriguez, J. P. [UASLP, Maestria en Ciencias Odontologicas, Facultad de Estomatologia (Mexico); Ruiz, Facundo [UASLP, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 {mu}g/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  20. Optical Nonlinear Refractive Index of Laser-Ablated Gold Nanoparticles Graphene Oxide Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles were prepared in graphene oxide using laser ablation technique. The ablation times were varied from 10 to 40 minutes, and the particle size was decreased from 16.55 nm to 5.18 nm in spherical shape. The nanoparticles were capped with carboxyl and the hydroxyl groups were obtained from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the UV-visible peak shifted with decreasing of nanoparticles size, appearing from 528 nm to 510 nm. The Z-scan technique was used to measure the nonlinear refractive indices of graphene oxide with different concentrations and a gold nanoparticle graphene oxide nanocomposite. Consequently, the optical nonlinear refractive indices of graphene oxide and gold nanoparticle graphene oxide nanocomposite were shifted from 1.63×10-9 cm2/W to 4.1×10-9 cm2/W and from 1.85×10-9 cm2/W to 5.8×10-9 cm2/W, respectively.

  1. Room temperature synthesis of an optically and thermally responsive hybrid PNIPAM-gold nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morones, J. Ruben, E-mail: morones@bu.ed [Boston University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Frey, Wolfgang, E-mail: wfrey@mail.utexas.ed [University of Texas at Austin, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Composites of metal nanoparticles and environmentally sensitive polymers are useful as nanoactuators that can be triggered externally using light of a particular wavelength. We demonstrate a synthesis route that is easier than grafting techniques and allows for the in situ formation of individual gold nanoparticles encapsulated by an environmentally sensitive polymer, while also providing a strong interaction between the polymer and the metal particle. We present a one-pot, room-temperature synthesis route for gold metal nanoparticles that uses poly-N-isopropyl acrylamide as the capping and stabilizing agent and ascorbic acid as the reducing agent and achieves size control similar to the most common citric acid synthesis. We show that the composite can be precipitated reversibly by temperature or light using the non-radiative decay and conversion to heat of the surface plasmon resonance of the metal nanoparticle. The precipitation is induced by the collapse of the polymer cocoon surrounding each gold nanoparticle, as can be seen by surface plasmon spectroscopy. The experiments agree with theoretical models for the heat generation in a colloidal suspension that support fast switching with low laser power densities. The synthesized composite is a simple nanosized opto-thermal switch.

  2. Bayesian object classification of gold nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Konomi, Bledar A.

    2013-06-01

    The properties of materials synthesized with nanoparticles (NPs) are highly correlated to the sizes and shapes of the nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging technique can be used to measure the morphological characteristics of NPs, which can be simple circles or more complex irregular polygons with varying degrees of scales and sizes. A major difficulty in analyzing the TEM images is the overlapping of objects, having different morphological properties with no specific information about the number of objects present. Furthermore, the objects lying along the boundary render automated image analysis much more difficult. To overcome these challenges, we propose a Bayesian method based on the marked-point process representation of the objects. We derive models, both for the marks which parameterize the morphological aspects and the points which determine the location of the objects. The proposed model is an automatic image segmentation and classification procedure, which simultaneously detects the boundaries and classifies the NPs into one of the predetermined shape families. We execute the inference by sampling the posterior distribution using Markov chainMonte Carlo (MCMC) since the posterior is doubly intractable. We apply our novel method to several TEM imaging samples of gold NPs, producing the needed statistical characterization of their morphology. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2013.

  3. Cells adhesion and growth on gold nanoparticle grafted glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of glass substrate was plasma treated, coated by gold nano-structures and subsequently grafted with nanoparticles. The samples were plasma treated, sputtered with Au nanostructures which was followed by grafting with biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol (BPD) and then gold nanoparticles. The wettability, optical and chemical properties and surface morphology were studied. The adhesion and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) on the samples were investigated in-vitro as well. Grafting of gold nanoparticles with the dithiol increases the UV–vis absorbance, the surface becomes more hydrophobic, rougher and more rugged compared to pristine, sputtered and only dithiol treated surface. Gold nano-particles bound over dithiol and Au nanostructures cause better cell proliferation than purely BPD treated or pristine glass.

  4. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  5. Copolymer template control of gold nanoparticle synthesis via thermal annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Plaud, A.; Sarrazin, A.; Béal, J.; Proust, J.; Royer, P.; Bijeon, J. -L.; Plain, J.; Adam, P. -M.; Maurer, T

    2013-01-01

    We present here an original process combining top-down and bottom-up approaches by annealing a thin gold film evaporated onto a hole template made by etching a PS-PMMA copolymer film. Such process allows a better control of the gold nanoparticle size distribution which provides a sharper localized surface plasmon resonance. This makes such route appealing for sensing applications since the figure of merit of the Au nanoparticles obtained after thermal evaporation is more than doubled. Such pr...

  6. Methanobactin-Mediated One-Step Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Wang; Chun-gu Xia; Hong-chen Fan; Kai Lin; Lan-xuan Zhang; Dan-dan Cheng; Jia-ying Xin

    2013-01-01

    Preparation of gold nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution has enormous importance in nanotechnology. Methanobactin (Mb) is a copper-binding small peptide that appears to function as an agent for copper sequestration and uptake in methanotrophs. Mb can also bind and catalytically reduce Au (III) to Au (0). In this study, we demonstrate a facile Mb-mediated one-step synthetic route to prepare monodispersed gold nanoparticles. Continuous reduction of Au (III) by Mb can be achieved by usi...

  7. Thermal stability and optical properties of HMTA capped zinc sulfide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZnS nanoparticles have been synthesized on a large scale by hydrothermal route using Hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) as capping agent in aqueous solution. The average grain size of the nanoparticles calculated from the XRD pattern using Scherrer's formula is about 2-3 nm, which exhibit cubic zinc blende structure. TEM results showed that the synthesized nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the HMTA matrix without aggregation. The UV-vis absorption results revealed that the synthesized HMTA capped ZnS nanoparticles exhibit strong quantum confinement effect as the optical energy band gap increased significantly compared to the uncapped and bulk ZnS. Formation of HMTA capped ZnS nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR studies. Emission spectra show that the HMTA capping not only increases the PL intensity, but also greatly improves the thermal stability of the ZnS nanoparticles.

  8. Synthesis of hexagonal gold nanoparticles using a microfluidic reaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new microfluidic reaction system capable of mixing, transporting and reacting is developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. It allows for a rapid and a cost-effective approach to accelerate the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The microfluidic reaction chip is made from micro-electro-mechanical-system technologies which integrate a micro-mixer, micro-pumps, a micro-valve, micro-heaters and a micro temperature sensor on a single chip. Successful synthesis of dispersed gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated within a shorter period of time, as compared to traditional methods. It is experimentally found that precise control of the mixing/heating time for gold salts and reducing agents plays an essential role in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The growth process of hexagonal gold nanoparticles by a thermal aqueous approach is also systematically studied by using the same microfluidic reaction system. The development of the microfluidic reaction system could be promising for the synthesis of functional nanoparticles for future biomedical applications

  9. Grafting of gold nanoparticles on polyethyleneterephthalate using dithiol interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, A., E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyně University, Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Zaruba, K. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    Two different procedures of grafting of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), modified by plasma treatment, with gold nanoparticles (nanospheres) are studied. In the first procedure the PET foil was grafted with biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol and subsequently with gold nanoparticles. In the second one the PET foil was grafted with gold nanoparticles previously coated by the same dithiol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrokinetic analysis were used for characterization of the polymer surface at different modification steps. Gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. The first procedure was found to be more effective. It was proved that the dithiol was chemically bonded to the surface of the plasma activated PET and it mediates subsequent grafting of the gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Two different techniques were used for coating of PET with gold nanoparticles. • Grafted GNPs were characterized by XPS, FTIR, UV–vis, zeta potential, AFM. • More effective coating is achieved by deposition of GNPs earlier grafted with thiol. • The studied structures may have potential application in electronics or biomedicine.

  10. Grafting of gold nanoparticles on polyethyleneterephthalate using dithiol interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different procedures of grafting of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), modified by plasma treatment, with gold nanoparticles (nanospheres) are studied. In the first procedure the PET foil was grafted with biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol and subsequently with gold nanoparticles. In the second one the PET foil was grafted with gold nanoparticles previously coated by the same dithiol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrokinetic analysis were used for characterization of the polymer surface at different modification steps. Gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. The first procedure was found to be more effective. It was proved that the dithiol was chemically bonded to the surface of the plasma activated PET and it mediates subsequent grafting of the gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Two different techniques were used for coating of PET with gold nanoparticles. • Grafted GNPs were characterized by XPS, FTIR, UV–vis, zeta potential, AFM. • More effective coating is achieved by deposition of GNPs earlier grafted with thiol. • The studied structures may have potential application in electronics or biomedicine

  11. Comparison between gold nanoparticle and gold plane electron emissions: a way to identify secondary electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the nanoparticle radiosensitising effect observed in the radiotherapy context, it is necessary to study the nanoparticle electron emission under x-ray irradiation, which is one of the causes of the radiosensitisation. In this paper, we compare the electron energy spectrum of gold samples irradiated by 1253.6 eV x-ray photons for energies down to 2 eV for nanoparticles and for a plane surface. This comparison highlights important differences due to nanoparticle properties especially at low energy, allowing the identification of strong nanoparticle secondary electron emission. This strong nanoparticle emission could play a very important role in radiosensitisation mechanisms. (paper)

  12. Simple Synthesis and Luminescence Characteristics of PVP-Capped GeO2 Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wu; Xu Zou; Quanjun Li; Bingbing Liu; Bo Liu; Ran Liu; Dedi Liu; Zepeng Li; Wen Cui; Zhaodong Liu; Dongmei Li; Tian Cui; Guangtian Zou

    2011-01-01

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-capped rutile GeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal process. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The capped GeO2 nanoparticles showed significantly enhanced luminescence properties compared with those of the uncapped ones. We attributed thi...

  13. Chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Weston Lewis

    This thesis focuses on the development and application of gold nanoparticle based detection systems and biomimetic structures. Each class of modified nanoparticle has properties that are defined by its chemical moieties that interface with solution and the gold nanoparticle core. In Chapter 2, a comparison of the biomolecular composition and binding properties of various preparations of antibody oligonucleotide gold nanoparticle conjugates is presented. These constructs differed significantly in terms of their structure and binding properties. Chapter 3 reports the use of electroless gold deposition as a light scattering signal enhancer in a multiplexed, microarray-based scanometric immunoassay using the gold nanoparticle probes evaluated in Chapter 2. The use of gold development results in greater signal enhancement than the typical silver development, and multiple rounds of metal development were found to increase the resulting signal compared to one development. Chapter 4 describes an amplified scanometric detection method for human telomerase activity. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with specific oligonucleotide sequences can efficiently capture telomerase enzymes and subsequently be elongated. Both the elongated and unmodified oligonucleotide sequences are simultaneously measured. At low telomerase concentrations, elongated strands cannot be detected, but the unmodified sequences, which come from the same probe particles, can be detected because their concentration is higher, providing a novel form of amplification. Chapter 5 reports the development of a novel colorimetric nitrite and nitrate ion assay based upon gold nanoparticle probes functionalized with Griess reaction reagents. This assay takes advantage of the distance-dependent plasmonic properties of the gold nanoparticles and the ability of nitrite ion to facilitate the cross coupling of novel nanoparticle probes. The assay works on the concept of a kinetic end point and can be triggered at the EPA

  14. Synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles capped with copolymerizable epoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Brandon J. [Saint Louis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Bunker, Christopher E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Propulsion Directorate (United States); Guliants, Elena A. [University of Dayton Research Institute, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Hayes, Sophia E. [Washington University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Kheyfets, Arthur [Saint Louis University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Wentz, Katherine M. [Washington University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Buckner, Steven W., E-mail: buckners@slu.edu; Jelliss, Paul A., E-mail: jellissp@slu.edu [Saint Louis University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We report on the synthesis of air-stable aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) capped with 1,2-epoxy-9-decene. Long-chain epoxides have proven to be effective capping agents for Al NPs as the epoxide ring is highly susceptible to ring-opening polymerization, leading to the formation of putative polyether loops on the nascent Al NP surface. However, these materials are observed to degrade within several hours to days following exposure to ambient air. By inducing polymerization of the additional terminal alkene functionality on the epoxide, we have produced Al NPs that exhibit both a shelf life of {approx}6 weeks and a high active Al content. Transmission electron microscopy confirms that these spherical nanostructures, {approx}25 nm in diameter, are embedded in a covalently bound polymer matrix that serves as a prophylactic barrier against water/air (H{sub 2}O/O{sub 2}) degradation, and {sup 27}Al solid-state NMR is used to nondestructively confirm the presence of both metallic Al{sup 0} and oxidized Al{sup 3+}. In addition, we have induced polymerization of the epoxide terminal alkene functionality with a long-chain diene monomer, 1,13-tetradecadiene, leading to the formation of Al NPs protected by an extremely hydrophobic polymer matrix. These core-shell nanomaterials also have high active Al contents along with extremely long shelf lives (up to 6 months upon air exposure).

  15. Spectroscopic evidence for the adsorption of propene on gold nanoparticles Spectroscopic evidence for the adsorption of propene on gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, T.A.; Sacaliuc, E.; Beale, A.M.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Schouten, J.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of propene on supported gold nanoparticles has been experimentally identified as a reaction step in the hydro-epoxidation of propene. This new finding was made possible by applying a detailed analysis of in situ measured XANES spectra. For this purpose, gold-on-silica catalysts were i

  16. Laser-induced assembly of gold nanoparticles into colloidal crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micron-sized colloidal crystals comprised of gold nanospheres have been synthesized directly from a gold nanoparticle/methyl methacrylate colloid by application of a 514 nm laser at 500 mW. An array of colloidal crystals can be created by translation of the glass substrate under the laser beam, after 2 min of irradiation at each site. We demonstrate through a series of control experiments and calculations that plasmon-induced, localized heating of the gold nanoparticles contributes to the mechanism responsible for the formation of these colloidal crystals

  17. Using femtosecond lasers to modify sizes of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Cordeiro, Thiago; Almeida de Matos, Ricardo; Silva, Flávia Rodrigues de Oliveira; Vieira, Nilson D.; Courrol, Lilia C.; Samad, Ricardo E.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are important on several scientific, medical and industrial areas. The control of nanoparticles characteristics has fundamental importance to increase the efficiency on the processes and applications in which they are employed. The metallic nanoparticles present specific surface plasmon resonances (SPR). These resonances are related with the collective oscillations of the electrons presents on the metallic nanoparticle. The SPR is determined by the potential defined by the nanoparticle size and geometry. There are several methods of producing gold nanoparticles, including the use of toxic chemical polymers. We already reported the use of natural polymers, as for example, the agar-agar, to produce metallic nanoparticles under xenon lamp irradiation. This technique is characterized as a "green" synthesis because the natural polymers are inoffensive to the environment. We report a technique to produce metallic nanoparticles and change its geometrical and dimensional characteristics using a femtosecond laser. The 1 ml initial solution was irradiate using a laser beam with 380 mW, 1 kHz and 40 nm of bandwidth centered at 800 nm. The setup uses an Acousto-optic modulator, Dazzler, to change the pulses spectral profiles by introduction of several orders of phase, resulting in different temporal energy distributions. The use of Dazzler has the objective of change the gold nanoparticles average size by the changing of temporal energy distributions of the laser pulses incident in the sample. After the laser irradiation, the gold nanoparticles average diameter were less than 15 nm.

  18. Uptake and depuration of gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Kern, Kristina; Hjorth, Rune;

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a series of short-term studies (total duration 48 h) of uptake and depuration of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in neonate Daphnia magna. Gold nanoparticles (Au NP) were used to study the influence of size, stabilizing agent and feeding on uptake and depuration kinetics and...

  19. Optical manipulation and study of single gold nanoparticles in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijgrok, Paul Victor

    2012-01-01

    We combine optical trapping and far-field optical detection techniques in a novel approach to study single metal nanoparticles in solution. We demonstrate the first measurements of the acoustic vibrations of single gold nanoparticles optically trapped in water, and find evidence for intrinsic dampi

  20. Synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets decorated with gold nanoparticles as an improved sensor for electrochemical determination of chloramphenicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nitrogen doped graphene decorated with gold nanoparticles were synthesized. • Au nanoparticles improved the surface area and electron transfer properties of N-G. • Au/N-G composite markedly enhanced the voltammetric response of chloramphenicol. • CAP in real sample was successfully determined on Au/N-G modified electrode. -- Abstract: Nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets decorated with gold nanoparticles (Au/N-G) were synthesized by the reduction of HAuCl4 on the surface of N-G using ethylene glycol as the reducing agent. The surface characterization with various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that many gold nanoparticles were effectively loaded on the surface of N-G via the proposed synthesis process. The impedance analysis indicated that Au/N-G was an excellent electrode material possessing outstanding electrochemical features for electron transfer. Using Au/N-G modified electrode, the electrochemical response of chloramphenicol (CAP) was significantly increased due to the synergetic effect of two nanomaterials. Thus, a high-performance electrochemical sensor for CAP based on Au/N-G was developed

  1. Phase Transition and Optical Properties of DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Harris, Nolan C.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    We review recent work on DNA-linked gold nanoparticle assemblies. The synthesis, properties, and phase behavior of such DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies are described. These nanoparticle assemblies have strong optical extinction in the ultraviolet and visible light regions; hence, the technique is used to study the kinetics and phase transitions of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies. The melting transition of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies shows unusual trends compared to those of free DNA. T...

  2. Reprotoxicity of gold, silver, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on mammalian gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, Daniela; Taylor, Ulrike; Rehbock, Christoph; Jakobi, Jurij; Klein, Sabine; Kues, Wilfried A; Barcikowski, Stephan; Rath, Detlef

    2014-03-01

    Metal and alloy nanoparticles are increasingly developed for biomedical applications, while a firm understanding of their biocompatibility is still missing. Various properties have been reported to influence the toxic potential of nanoparticles. This study aimed to assess the impact of nanoparticle size, surface ligands and chemical composition of gold, silver or gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on mammalian gametes. An in vitro assay for porcine gametes was developed, since these are delicate primary cells, for which well-established culture systems exist and functional parameters are defined. During coincubation with oocytes for 46 h neither any of the tested gold nanoparticles nor the gold-silver alloy particles with a silver molar fraction of up to 50% showed any impact on oocyte maturation. Alloy nanoparticles with 80% silver molar fraction and pure silver nanoparticles inhibited cumulus-oocyte maturation. Confocal microscopy revealed a selective uptake of gold nanoparticles by oocytes, while silver and alloy particles mainly accumulated in the cumulus cell layer surrounding the oocyte. Interestingly sperm vitality parameters (motility, membrane integrity and morphology) were not affected by any of the tested nanoparticles. Only sporadic association of nanoparticles with the sperm plasma membrane was found by transmission electron microscopy. In conclusion, mammalian oocytes were sensitive to silver containing nanoparticles. Likely, the delicate process of completing meiosis in maternal gametes features high vulnerability towards nanomaterial derived toxicity. The results imply that released Ag(+)-ions are responsible for the observed toxicity, but the compounding into an alloy seemed to alleviate the toxic effects to a certain extent. PMID:24171189

  3. Optical manipulation of gold nanoparticles using an optical nanofiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Hu Yan-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their biological and medical applications.In this letter,we experimentally demonstrate the optical manipulation of 250-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles along an optical nanofiber (550 nm in diameter) injected by an 808-nm laser light.The nanoparticles situated in the evanescent optical field are trapped by optical gradient force and move along the direction of light propagation due to optical scattering force.The velocities reach as high as 132 μm/s at an optical power of 80 mW.

  4. Microwave absorption properties of gold nanoparticle doped polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Chenhui; Ouattara, Lassana; Ingrosso, Chiara;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for characterizing microwave absorption properties of gold nanoparticle doped polymers. The method is based on on-wafer measurements at the frequencies from 0.5GHz to 20GHz. The on-wafer measurement method makes it possible to characterize electromagnetic (EM) property...... of small volume samples. The epoxy based SU8 polymer and SU8 doped with gold nanoparticles are chosen as the samples under test. Two types of microwave test devices are designed for exciting the samples through electrical coupling and magnetic coupling, respectively. Measurement results demonstrate...... that the nanocomposites absorb a certain amount of microwave energy due to gold nanoparticles. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in more significant absorption effect....

  5. Thermo-optical properties of gold nanoparticles in colloidal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M. A.; Rodriguez, L.; Castillo, J.; Piscitelli, V.; Fernandez, A.; Echevarria, L.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we report the thermo-optical properties of nanoparticles in colloidal suspensions. Spherical gold nanoparticles obtained by laser ablation in condensed media were characterized using thermal lens spectroscopy pumping at 532 nm with a 10 ns pulse laser-Nd-YAG system. The obtained nanoparticles were stabilized in the time by surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS) in water with different molar concentrations. The morphology and size of the gold nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible techniques. The plasmonic resonance bands in gold nanoparticles are responsible for the light optical absorption, and the positions of the absorption maximum and bandwidth in the UV-visible spectra are given by the morphological characteristics of these systems. The thermo-optical constants such as thermal diffusion, thermal diffusivity, and (dn/dT) are functions of the nanoparticle sizes and the dielectric function of the media. For these reasons, the thermal lens (TL) signal is also dependent on nanoparticle sizes. An analysis of the TL signal of the nanoparticles reveals the existence of an inverse dependence between the thermo-optical functions and the size. This methodology can be used in order to evaluate these systems and characterize nanoparticles in different media. These results are expected to have an impact in bioimaging, biosensors, and other technological applications such as cooling systems.

  6. Self-assembled gold nanoparticles on functionalized gold(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG, Zhang-Quan; WANG, Er-Kang

    2000-01-01

    Nanogold colloidal solutions are prepared by the reduction of HAuClO4 with sodium citrate and sodium borohydride. 4- Aminothiophenol (ATP) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are formed on gold(111) surface, on which gold nanoparticles are immobilized and a sub-monolayer of the particles appears. This sub-monolayer of gold nanoparticles is characterized with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and a dual energy barrier tunneling model is proposed to explain the imgeability of the gold nanoparticles by STM. This model can also be used to construct multiple energy barrier structure on solid/ liquid interface and to evaluate the electron transport ability of some organic monolayers with the aid of electrochemical method.

  7. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYSTYRENE MATRIX DOPED BY GOLD NANOPARTICLES AND 8HQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explored the modification of polymeric film conductivity by changing the conducting filler percentage in the frame of the percolation theory. The polymeric film is a polystyrene (PS) matrix, while the fillers are gold nanoparticles capped with 1-dodecanethiol (Au-DT NPs) and small conjugated molecules 8- hydroxyquinoline (8HQ). Experimental results show, that increasing the Au- DT and 8HQ wt%, film conductivity increases by up to three orders of magnitude due to charge transfer in the 3D network composed by Au- DT NPs and 8HQ

  8. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YX

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yi Xia Zhang1, Jun Zheng2, Guo Gao1, Yi Fei Kong1, Xiao Zhi1, Kan Wang1, Xue Qing Zhang1, Da Xiang Cui11Department of Bio-Nano-Science and Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication of Ministry of Education, Institute of Micro-Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 2Wheat Research Institute, Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Linfen, Shan Xi, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this paper, a new method of one-pot biosynthesizing of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, using chloroplasts as reductants and stabilizers is reported. The as-prepared GNPs were characterized by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The cytotoxicity of the GNPs was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT method against gastric mucous cell line GES-1 and gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. Rhodamine 6G as a Raman probe was used for investigating surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS enhancement of GNPs. The transmission electron microscopy results indicated that the GNPs were spherical in structure and almost 20 nm in diameter. Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy exhibited an absorption peak at 545 nm. The GNPs exhibited high crystallinity, with the (111 plane as the predominant orientation, clarified by X-ray powder diffraction. In addition, a potential mechanism was proposed to interpret the formation process of GNPs, mainly based on the analysis of FTIR results. The FTIR spectrum confirmed that the GNPs were carried with N–H groups. Toxicological assays of as-prepared GNPs revealed that the green GNPs were nontoxic. SERS analysis revealed that the GNPs without any treatment could substantially enhance the Raman signals of rhodamine 6G. The Raman enhancement factor was calculated to be nearly 1010 orders of magnitude

  9. Surface Charge Controls the Suborgan Biodistributions of Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Sukru Gokhan; Jiang, Ying; Yan, Bo; Kim, Sung Tae; Saha, Krishnendu; Moyano, Daniel F; Yesilbag Tonga, Gulen; Jackson, Liam C; Rotello, Vincent M; Vachet, Richard W

    2016-05-24

    Surface chemistry plays a deciding role in nanoparticle biodistribution, yet very little is known about how surface chemistry influences the suborgan distributions of nanomaterials. Here, using quantitative imaging based on laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we demonstrate that surface charge dictates the suborgan distributions of nanoparticles in the kidney, liver, and spleen of mice intravenously injected with functionalized gold nanoparticles. Images of the kidney show that positively charged nanoparticles accumulate extensively in the glomeruli, the initial stage in filtering for the nephron, suggesting that these nanoparticles may be filtered by the kidney at a different rate than the neutral or negatively charged nanoparticles. We find that positively and negatively charged nanoparticles accumulate extensively in the red pulp of the spleen. In contrast, uncharged nanoparticles accumulate in the white pulp and marginal zone of the spleen to a greater extent than the positively or negatively charged nanoparticles. Moreover, these uncharged nanoparticles are also more likely to be found associated with Kupffer cells in the liver. Positively charged nanoparticles accumulate extensively in liver hepatocytes, whereas negatively charged nanoparticles show a broader distribution in the liver. Together these observations suggest that neutral nanoparticles having 2 nm cores may interact with the immune system to a greater extent than charged nanoparticles, highlighting the value of determining the suborgan distributions of nanomaterials for delivery and imaging applications. PMID:27164169

  10. Shape control technology during electrochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-yu; Cui, Cong-ying; Cheng, Ying-wen; Ma, Hou-yi; Liu, Duo

    2013-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were prepared by adding gold precursor (HAuCl4) to an electrolyzed aqueous solution of poly( N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and KNO3, which indicates the good reducing capacity of the PVP-containing solution after being treated by electrolysis. Using a catholyte and an anolyte as the reducing agents for HAuCl4, respectively, most gold nanoparticles were spherical particles in the former case but plate-like particles in the latter case. The change in the pH value of electrolytes caused by the electrolysis of water would be the origin of the differences in shape and morphology of gold nanoparticles. A hypothesis of the H+ or OH- catalyzed PVP degradation mechanism was proposed to interpret why the pH value played a key role in determining the shape or morphology of gold nanoparticles. These experiments open up a new method for effectively controlling the shape and morphology of metal nanoparticles by using electrochemical methods.

  11. Gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz MS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available MS Aziz1, Nathaporn Suwanpayak3,4, Muhammad Arif Jalil2, R Jomtarak4, T Saktioto2, Jalil Ali1, PP Yupapin41Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, 2Ibnu Sina Institute of Fundamental Science Studies, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 3King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chump on Campus, Chumphon, 4Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: A new optical trapping design to transport gold nanoparticles using a PANDA ring resonator system is proposed. Intense optical fields in the form of dark solitons controlled by Gaussian pulses are used to trap and transport nanoscopic volumes of matter to the desired destination via an optical waveguide. Theoretically, the gradient and scattering forces are responsible for this trapping phenomenon, where in practice such systems can be fabricated and a thin-film device formed on the specific artificial medical materials, for instance, an artificial bone. The dynamic behavior of the tweezers can be tuned by controlling the optical pulse input power and parameters of the ring resonator system. Different trap sizes can be generated to trap different gold nanoparticles sizes, which is useful for gold nanoparticle therapy. In this paper, we have shown the utility of gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapy, which may be useful for cosmetic therapy and related applications.Keywords: gold nanoparticle trapping, particle trapping, therapy, transport

  12. Electron production by sensitizing gold nanoparticles irradiated by fast ions

    CERN Document Server

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey V; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2014-01-01

    The yield of electrons generated by gold nanoparticles due to irradiation by fast charged projectiles is estimated. The results of calculations are compared to those obtained for pure water medium. It is demonstrated that a significant increase in the number of emitted electrons arises from collective electron excitations in the nanoparticle. The dominating enhancement mechanisms are related to the formation of (i) plasmons excited in a whole nanoparticle, and (ii) atomic giant resonances due to excitation of d electrons in individual atoms. Decay of the collective electron excitations in a nanoparticle embedded in a biological medium thus represents an important mechanism of the low-energy electron production. Parameters of the utilized model approach are justified through the calculation of the photoabsorption spectra of several gold nanoparticles, performed by means of time-dependent density-functional theory.

  13. Hybrid gold nanoparticles in molecular imaging and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic nanoparticles, because of their size, chemical and physical properties, are particularly attractive as therapeutic probes in treating cancer. Central to any clinical advances in nanoparticulate based therapy will be to produce hybrid nanoparticles that can be targeted to vascular, extracellular or cell surface receptors. Development of hybrid nanoparticles that specifically target cancer vasculature has received considerable attention. Most cancers have leaky vasculature and the defective vascular architecture, created due to the rapid vascularization necessary to serve fast growing cancers, in combination with poor lymphatic drainage allows increased permeation and retention effects. The leaky vasculature, because of higher porosity and permeability, serve as natural high affinity targets to metallic nanoparticles. Another attractive approach toward the application of nanotechnology to nanomedicine is the utility of nanoparticles that display inherent therapeutic properties. For example radioactive gold nanoparticles present attractive prospects in therapy of cancer. The radioactive properties of Au-198 (βmax = 0.96 MeV; t1/2 = 2.7 d) and Au-199 (βmax = 0.46 MeV; t1/2 = 3.14 d) make them ideal candidates for use in radiotherapeutic applications. In addition, they both have imageable gamma emissions for dosimetry and pharmacokinetic studies and Au-199 can be made carrier-free by indirect methods. Gold nanoparticles are of interest for treatment of disease as they can deliver agents directly into cells and cellular components with a higher concentration of radioactivity, e.g. higher dose of radioactivity, to cancerous tumour cells. This presentation will provide latest results on (i) the production of biocompatible hybrid gold nanoparticles; (ii) production, characterization and biodistribution of Au-198 nanoparticles and (iii) details on the utility of gold nanoparticles in molecular imaging using X ray contrast (CT) techniques. (author)

  14. Rapid purification and size separation of gold nanoparticles via diafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Scott F; Woehrle, Gerd H; Hutchison, James E

    2006-03-15

    Purification and size-based separation of nanoparticles remain significant challenges in the preparation of well-defined materials for fundamental studies and applications. Diafiltration shows considerable potential for the efficient and convenient purification and size separation of water-soluble nanoparticles, allowing for the removal of small-molecule impurities and for the isolation of small nanoparticles from larger nanostructures in a single process. Herein, we report studies aimed at assessing the suitability of diafiltration for (i) the purification of water-soluble thiol-stabilized 3-nm gold nanoparticles, (ii) the separation of a bimodal distribution of nanoparticles into the corresponding fractions, and (iii) the separation of a polydisperse sample into fractions of differing mean core diameter. NMR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements demonstrate that diafiltration produces nanoparticles with a much higher degree of purity than is possible by dialysis or a combination of solvent washes, chromatography, and ultracentrifugation. UV-visible spectroscopic and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses show that diafiltration offers the ability to separate nanoparticles of disparate core size. These results demonstrate the applicability of diafiltration for the rapid and green preparation of high-purity gold nanoparticle samples and the size separation of heterogeneous nanoparticle samples. They also suggest the development of novel diafiltration membranes specifically suited to high-resolution nanoparticle size separation. PMID:16522099

  15. Ligand exchange in gold-coated FePt nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    de la Presa, P; Morales, M P; Hernando, A; 10.1109/TMAG.2008.2002251

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the magnetic properties of gold coated FePt nanoparticles and the study of stable aqueous dispersions of FePt@Au and FePt synthesized after ligand exchange with mercaptoundecanoic acid. The particle size determined from TEM micrographs goes from 4 nm for the uncoated nanoparticles to a maximum of 10 nm for the gold coated ones indicating that the thickness of the shell ranges from 1 to 3 nm. The magnetic characterization consists in hysteresis cycles at 10 and 300 K. The results show that, at low field and room temperature, the magnetic behavior of uncoated and coated nanoparticles are surprisingly quite similar. Since the gold coated nanoparticles keep the magnetic properties of FePt and the presence of gold improves the functionalization of nanoparticles, the system is suitable for biological application. Mercaptoundecanoic ligand transfer was used to render water stable nanoparticles in a wide pH range. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results show the n...

  16. Diffraction patterns and nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable gold nanoparticles have been prepared by using soluble starch as both the reducing and stabilizing agents; this reaction was carried out at 40 °C for 5 h. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and z-scan technique. The size of these nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 12-22 nm as analyzed using transmission electron micrographs. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles have been measured showing the surface plasmon resonance. The second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by using a continuous-wave (CW) He-Ne laser beam with a wavelength of 632.8 nm at three different incident intensities by means of single beam techniques. The nonlinear refractive indices of gold nanoparticles were obtained from close aperture z-scan in order of 10-7 cm2/W. Then, they were compared with diffraction patterns observed in far-field. The nonlinear absorption of these nanoparticles was obtained from open aperture z-scan technique. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient are obtained in order of 10-1 cm/W.

  17. Diffraction patterns and nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majles Ara, M. H.; Dehghani, Z.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Javadi, Z.; Divsar, F.

    2012-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles have been prepared by using soluble starch as both the reducing and stabilizing agents; this reaction was carried out at 40 °C for 5 h. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and z-scan technique. The size of these nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 12-22 nm as analyzed using transmission electron micrographs. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles have been measured showing the surface plasmon resonance. The second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by using a continuous-wave (CW) He-Ne laser beam with a wavelength of 632.8 nm at three different incident intensities by means of single beam techniques. The nonlinear refractive indices of gold nanoparticles were obtained from close aperture z-scan in order of 10-7 cm2/W. Then, they were compared with diffraction patterns observed in far-field. The nonlinear absorption of these nanoparticles was obtained from open aperture z-scan technique. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient are obtained in order of 10-1 cm/W.

  18. PVP capped CdS nanoparticles for UV-LED applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaram, H.; Selvakumar, D.; Jayavel, R., E-mail: rjvel@annauniv.edu [Nanomaterials Lab, Center for NanoScience and technology, Anna University, Chennai (India)

    2015-06-24

    Polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates that the nanoparticles are crystallized in cubic phase. The optical properties are characterized by UV-Vis absorption. The morphology of CdS nanoparticles are studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermal behavior of the as prepared nanoparticles has been examined by Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical absorption study of pvp capped CdS reveal a red shift confirms the UV-LED applications.

  19. PVP capped CdS nanoparticles for UV-LED applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical method. The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) result indicates that the nanoparticles are crystallized in cubic phase. The optical properties are characterized by UV-Vis absorption. The morphology of CdS nanoparticles are studied using Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The thermal behavior of the as prepared nanoparticles has been examined by Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). The optical absorption study of pvp capped CdS reveal a red shift confirms the UV-LED applications

  20. Temperature driven transport of gold nanoparticles physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, P.A.E.; Poulikakos, D.; Walther, Jens Honore;

    2006-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate the temperature driven mass transport of solid gold nanoparticles, physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our results indicate that the nanoparticle experiences a guided motion, in the direction opposite to the direction of the temperature...... gradient applied to the carrier CNT. The force experienced by the nanoparticle is of thermophoretic character, scaling linearly with the applied temperature gradient. The present results prove that the surface corrugation of different types of CNTs and the magnitude of the temperature gradient strongly...... affects the nanoparticle motion along the carbon lattice....

  1. Response and Discrimination Performance of Arrays of Organothiol-Capped Au Nanoparticle Chemiresistive Vapor Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    García-Berríos, Edgardo; Gao, Ting; Theriot, Jordan C.; Woodka, Marc D.; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2011-01-01

    The response and discrimination performance of an array that consisted of 20 different organothiol-capped Au nanoparticle chemiresistive vapor sensors was evaluated during exposure to 13 different organic vapors. The passivating organothiol ligand library consisted of collections of straight-chain alkanethiols, branched alkanethiols, and aromatic thiols. A fourth collection of sensors was formed from composites of 2-phenylethanethiol-capped Au nanoparticles and nonpolymeric aromatic materials...

  2. Elongation of gold nanoparticles in silica glass by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    OpenAIRE

    Awazu, Koichi; Wang, Xiaomin; Fujimaki, Makoto; Tominaga, Junji; Aiba, Hirohiko; OHKI, Yoshimichi; Komatsubara, Tetsuro

    2008-01-01

    We examined the mechanism whereby nanoparticles of gold embedded in silica become elongated and oriented parallel to each other on ion irradiation. Elongation occurred for gold particles with radii smaller than 25 nm. The process was simulated by using a thermal spike model. For small-radius nanoparticles, ion irradiation raises the temperature above the melting points of both gold and silica, whereas for larger nanoparticles neither the gold nanoparticle nor the surrounding silica matrix is ...

  3. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Navas M., P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  4. Separation of Aminobenzoic Acids by Gold Nanoparticle modified Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN,Hongtao; LI,Tuo; GUO,Yanli

    2009-01-01

    A novel method for the separation of aminobenzoic acids by capillary electrophoresis was developed.The capillary was modified with gold nanoparticles.The effect of gold nanoparticles on the resolution and selectivity of separation was investigated.The influence of separation voltage,pH and buffer concentration on the separation of aminobenzoic acids was also examined.It was found that the presence of gold nanoparticles improved the precision of the analysis and increased the separation efficiency.Under the optimized experiment conditions,aminobenzoic acids were separated and determined.Linearity was established over the concentration range 0.5-40 μg·mL-1 with correlation coefficients of 0.9978-0.9992.The detection limits (S/N = 3) were from 0.1 to 0.5 μg·mL-1.

  5. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu2O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu2O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties

  6. Structural, spectroscopic and biological investigation of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, A., E-mail: ana.maria.nowak@gmail.com [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Szade, J.; Talik, E.; Ratuszna, A. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Ostafin, M. [Agricultural University of Cracow, Department of Microbiology, Krakow (Poland); Peszke, J. [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-06-01

    Powder composed of copper oxides nanoparticles with various capping agents has been synthesized and characterized with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), glycol propylene, glycerin and glycerin plus ammonia were used as capping agents. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies showed that nanoparticles form agglomerates with the size from 80 to 120 nm while particles size determined from the XRD experiment was in the range from 7 to 21 nm. XPS and XRD experiments revealed that depending on capping and reducing agents used in the synthesis nanoparticles are composed of Cu{sub 2}O, CuO or a mixture of them. The biological activity test performed for a selected sample where the capping agent was glycerin plus ammonia has shown promising killing/inhibiting behavior, very effective especially for Gram negatives bacteria. - Highlights: • We obtained copper oxide nanoparticles in a powder form. • Several capping agents were tested. • Structural and chemical tests showed that the main component were Cu{sub 2}O and CuO. • The size of nanoparticles was in the range 7–21 nm. • Nanoparticles with glycerin and ammonia capping agent showed good antibacterial properties.

  7. Deposition of functionalized gold nanoparticles onto modified silicon substrates

    OpenAIRE

    RISKIN, Alexander; De Dobbelaere, Christopher; Elen, Ken; D'Haen, Jan; VAN DEN RUL, Heidi; MULLENS, Jules; Hardy, An; Van Bael, Marlies

    2010-01-01

    In this report, an existing phase transfer method for the synthesis of alkylamine- or alkanethiol-functionalized gold nanoparticles (NPs) is investigated. A parameter study shows that the concentration of the gold salt used is important for the stability of the resulting sol, but has little effect on the final average particle size or the size distribution. By adding dodecanethiol before the reduction, the formation of NPs was inhibited, providing evidence for the autocatalytic pathway for th...

  8. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Trigonella foenum-graecum and its size-dependent catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathy Aromal, S.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-11-01

    The development of new synthesis methods for monodispersed nanocrystals using cheap and nontoxic chemicals, environmentally benign solvents and renewable materials remains a challenge to the scientific community. Most of the current methods involve known protocols which may be potentially harmful to either environment or human health. Recent research has been focused on green synthesis methods to produce new nanomaterials, ecofriendly and safer with sustainable commercial viability. The present work reports the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using the aqueous extract of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) as reducing and protecting agent. The pathway is based on the reduction of AuCl4- by the extract of fenugreek. This method is simple, efficient, economic and nontoxic. Gold nanoparticles having different sizes in the range from 15 to 25 nm could be obtained by controlling the synthesis parameters. The nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from clear lattice fringes in the HRTEM images, bright circular spots in the SAED pattern and peaks in the XRD pattern. FTIR spectrum indicates the presence of different functional groups present in the biomolecule capping the nanoparticles. The synthesized gold nanoparticles show good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by excess NaBH4. The catalytic activity is found to be size-dependent, the smaller nanoparticles showing faster activity.

  9. Preparation of 2 nm gold nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo applications

    OpenAIRE

    Moyano, Daniel F.; Duncan, Bradley; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been a versatile tool in recent years for the exploration of biological systems. However, challenges with purification and adequate surface coverage limit the biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for the synthesis, purification, and functionalization of biologically compatible gold nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo studies.

  10. Radiation-induced synthesis of gold, iron-oxide composite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles were synthesized using gamma-rays or electron beam. Ionizing irradiation induces the generation of reducing species inside the aqueous solution, and gold ions are reduced to form metallic Au nanoparticles. The size of Au nanoparticles depended on the dose rate and the concentration of support iron oxide. The gold nanoparticles on iron oxide nanoparticles selectively adsorb biomolecules via Au-S bonding. By using magnetic property of the support iron oxide nanoparticles, the composite nanoparticles are expected as a new type of magnetic nanocarrier for biomedical applications. (author)

  11. Simple Synthesis and Luminescence Characteristics of PVP-Capped GeO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-capped rutile GeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal process. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA, and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL. The capped GeO2 nanoparticles showed significantly enhanced luminescence properties compared with those of the uncapped ones. We attributed this result to the effect of reducing surface defects and enhancing the possibility of electron-hole recombination of the GeO2 nanoparticles by the PVP molecules. PVP-capped GeO2 nanoparticles have potential application in optical and electronic fields.

  12. Lantana camara Linn leaf extract mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Bag, Braja Gopal; Hota, Poulami

    2015-03-01

    A facile one-step green synthesis of stable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been described using chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) and the leaf extract of Lantana camara Linn (Verbenaceae family) at room temperature. The leaf extract enriched in various types of plant secondary metabolites is highly efficient for the reduction of chloroaurate ions into metallic gold and stabilizes the synthesized AuNPs without any additional stabilizing or capping agents. Detailed characterizations of the synthesized gold nanoparticles were carried out by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Zeta potential, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies. The synthesized AuNPs have been utilized as a catalyst for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in water at room temperature under mild reaction condition. The kinetics of the reduction reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically.

  13. Bio-mediated synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekotko, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Siednienko, Jakub; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Pawlik, Krzysztof; Samoc, Marek

    2015-11-21

    We report here a "green" approach for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in which the Mentha piperita extract was applied for the bioreduction of chloroauric acid and the stabilization of the formed nanostructures. The obtained GNPs were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reduction of gold ions with the plant extract leads to the production of nanoparticles with various shapes (spherical, triangular and hexagonal) and sizes (from 10 to 300 nm). The kinetics of the reaction was monitored and various conditions of the synthesis were investigated. As a result, we established protocols optimized towards the synthesis of nanospheres and nanoprisms of gold. The cytotoxic effect of the obtained gold nanoparticles was studied by performing MTT assay, which showed lower cytotoxicity of the biosynthesized GNPs compared to gold nanorods synthesized using the usual seed-mediated growth. The results suggest that the synthesis using plant extracts may be a useful method to produce gold nanostructures for various biological and medical applications. PMID:26456245

  14. Irradiation stability and cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles for radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Dong Zhang; Mei-Li Guo; Hong-Ying Wu; et al

    2009-01-01

    Xiao-Dong Zhang1, Mei-Li Guo2, Hong-Ying Wu1, Yuan-Ming Sun1, Yan-Qiu Ding1, Xin Feng1, Liang-An Zhang11Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics, Tianjin Institute of Urban Construction, Tianjin, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Gold nanoparticles are promising as a kind of novel radiosensitizer in radiotherapy. If gold nanoparticles are shown to hav...

  15. Spatio-selective surface modification of glass assisted by laser-induced deposition of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using pulsed laser irradiation (532 nm), dodecanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (DT-Au) were deposited on the laser-irradiated region of a hydrophobic glass substrate modified with dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DMOS). After removal of deposited DT-Au, the laser-deposited region on the substrate was hydrophilic, as verified by static water contact angles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggested that the naked glass surface was not exposed at the hydrophilic region. Immersion of the substrate into gold nanorod (NR) solution selectively immobilized NRs on the hydrophilic surface via electrostatic interactions, indicating that the hydrophilic region was an anionic surface. From these results, it is expected that some immobilized DMOS groups on the laser-irradiated region of the substrate were oxidized during DT-Au deposition and fragmentation of the deposited DT-Au

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and functionalization of gold nanoparticles for cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Gary A; Allen, Peter J; Mason, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the methodology by which mAb-F19-conjugated gold nanoparticles were prepared and used to label human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Specifically, gold nanoparticles were coated with dithiol bearing hetero-bifunctional PEG (polyethylene glycol), and cancer-specific mAb F19 was attached by means of NHS-EDC coupling chemistry taking advantage of a carboxylic acid group on the heterobifunctional PEG. These conjugates were completely stable and were characterized by a variety of methods, including UV-Vis absorbance spectrometry, darkfield microscopy, DLS (dynamic light scattering), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEC (size-exclusion chromatography), and confocal microscopy. Nanoparticle bioconjugates were used to label sections of healthy and cancerous human pancreatic tissue. Labeled tissue sections were examined by darkfield microscopy and indicate that these nanoparticle bioconjugates may selectively bind to cancerous tissue and provide a means of optical contrast. PMID:20217596

  17. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng;

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high...... activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas-phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50% conversion of ethanol with 98...

  18. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng;

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite‐1 is reported and their high...... activity and selectivity for the catalytic gas‐phase oxidation of ethanol are demonstrated. The zeolites are modified by a recrystallization process, which creates intraparticle voids and mesopores that facilitate the formation of small and disperse nanoparticles upon simple impregnation. The individual...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2–3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98...

  19. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids

  20. Photoluminescence enhancement of dye-doped nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance effects of gold colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the energy transfer from surface plasmons, the fluorescence of fluorophores near metallic nanostructures can be enhanced. This effect has been intensively studied recently for biosensor applications. This work reports on the luminescence enhancement of 100 nm Cy3 dye-doped polystyrene nanoparticles by energy transfer from surface plasmons of gold colloidal nanoparticles with sizes of 20 and 100 nm. Optimal luminescence enhancement of the fluorophores has been observed in the mixture with 20 nm gold nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the resonance energy transfer from gold nanoparticles to the fluorophore beads. The interaction between the fluorophores and gold particles is attributed to far-field interaction

  1. Optimization of PAMAM-gold nanoparticle conjugation for gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa, Elizabeth R.; Lin, Adam Y.; Yan, Jiaxi; Luo, Laureen; Foster, Aaron E.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient and biocompatible non-viral vectors for gene therapy remains a great challenge, and exploiting the properties of both nanoparticle carriers and cationic polymers is an attractive approach. In this work, we have developed gold nanoparticle (AuNP) polyamidoamine (PAMAM) conjugates for use as non-viral transfection agents. AuPAMAM conjugates were prepared by crosslinking PAMAM dendrimers to carboxylic-terminated AuNPs via EDC and sulfo-NHS chemistry. EDC and sulfo-NH...

  2. A green chemistry approach for synthesizing biocompatible gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, JaeWoong; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a fascinating class of nanomaterial that can be used for a wide range of biomedical applications, including bio-imaging, lateral flow assays, environmental detection and purification, data storage, drug delivery, biomarkers, catalysis, chemical sensors, and DNA detection. Biological synthesis of nanoparticles appears to be simple, cost-effective, non-toxic, and easy to use for controlling size, shape, and stability, which is unlike the chemically synthesized nan...

  3. Complete light annihilation in an ultrathin layer of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedendahl, Mikael; Johansson, Peter; Käll, Mikael

    2013-07-10

    We experimentally demonstrate that an incident light beam can be completely annihilated in a single layer of randomly distributed, widely spaced gold nanoparticle antennas. Under certain conditions, each antenna dissipates more than 10 times the number of photons that enter its geometric cross-sectional area. The underlying physics can be understood in terms of a critical coupling to localized plasmons in the nanoparticles or, equivalently, in terms of destructive optical Fano interference and so-called coherent absorption. PMID:23806090

  4. Singlet Oxygen Generation by Laser Irradiation of Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Samantha J.; Salah, Dina; Livesey, Penelope M.; Brust, Mathias; Volk, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The formation of singlet oxygen by irradiation of gold nanoparticles in their plasmon resonance band with continuous or pulsed laser light has been investigated. Citrate-stabilized nanoparticles were found to facilitate the photogeneration of singlet oxygen, albeit with low quantum yield. The reaction caused by pulsed laser irradiation makes use of the equilibrated hot electrons that can reach temperatures of several thousand degrees during the laser pulse. Although less efficient, continuous...

  5. Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-01-21

    A critical challenge in nanoparticle (NP) surface functionalization is to label the NP surface with a single copy of a functional group or to display multiple, unique molecules on the NP surface with control of the orientation and intermolecular distance. This challenge was addressed with the construction of a spatially addressable, self-assembling DNA origami nanocage that encapsulates gold nanoparticles and interrupts its surface symmetry

  6. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Ann E; Huber, Thaddaus R; Ni, Thomas W; Hartje, Luke F; Appel, Karina L; Yost, Jarad W; Ackerson, Christopher J; Snow, Christopher D

    2016-07-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)∼17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)∼1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. PMID:27264210

  7. Gold nanoparticle capture within protein crystal scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Ann E.; Huber, Thaddaus R.; Ni, Thomas W.; Hartje, Luke F.; Appel, Karina L.; Yost, Jarad W.; Ackerson, Christopher J.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2016-06-01

    DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography.DNA assemblies have been used to organize inorganic nanoparticles into 3D arrays, with emergent properties arising as a result of nanoparticle spacing and geometry. We report here the use of engineered protein crystals as an alternative approach to biologically mediated assembly of inorganic nanoparticles. The protein crystal's 13 nm diameter pores result in an 80% solvent content and display hexahistidine sequences on their interior. The hexahistidine sequence captures Au25(glutathione)~17 (nitrilotriacetic acid)~1 nanoclusters throughout a chemically crosslinked crystal via the coordination of Ni(ii) to both the cluster and the protein. Nanoparticle loading was validated by confocal microscopy and elemental analysis. The nanoparticles may be released from the crystal by exposure to EDTA, which chelates the Ni(ii) and breaks the specific protein/nanoparticle interaction. The integrity of the protein crystals after crosslinking and nanoparticle capture was

  8. Effect of gold ion concentration on size and properties of gold nanoparticles in TritonX-100 based inverse microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.

    2014-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been prepared successfully using TritonX-100 inverse microemulsion at different concentrations of HAuCl4 (0.1, 0.05, 0.04, 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 M). We have studied the effect of gold ion concentration on the particle size, morphology, surface area and optical properties of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. X-ray diffraction studies show the monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles. TritonX-100 stabilized gold nanoparticles were appeared to be agglomerated at higher concentrations (0.1 and 0.05 M) of Au3+ with an average grain size of 60 and 50 nm, respectively. Monodisperse and uniform gold nanoparticles with well-defined morphologies of an average grain size of 15 and 25 nm were obtained at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 M). UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak ~540 nm along with the peaks at shorter and longer wavelengths may be due to the higher order plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. The surface areas of the gold nanoparticles were found to be in the range of 5.8-107 m2/g which were well in agreement with the electron microscopic studies.

  9. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity

    OpenAIRE

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bang, Nipaporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a ‘green chemistry’ approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round...

  10. Synthesis of Capped A(II)B(VI) Nanoparticles for Fluorescent Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudko, Galyna; Fediv, Volodymyr; Davydenko, Igor; Gule, Evgen; Olar, Olena; Kovalchuk, Andrii

    2016-12-01

    The conditions for growing CdS nanoparticles suitable for the visualization of biological tissues were theoretically studied and experimentally checked. The optimal ranges for pH values and precursors' concentrations were determined. The applicability of the mercaptoethanol-capped nanoparticles for in vitro luminescence visualization of several cellular forms in histological specimens of human placenta has been proven. PMID:26864278

  11. Influence of fillers concentration on electrical properties of polystyrene matrix doped by gold nanoparticles and 8HQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaldaferri, R.; Salzillo, G.; Pepe, G. P.; Barra, M.; Cassinese, A.; Pagliarulo, V.; Borriello, A.; Fusco, L.

    2009-11-01

    The analysis of the electrical properties of polystyrene films containing gold nanoparticles capped with 1-dodecanethiol and 8-hydroxyquinoline molecules is reported. The conductivity of the nanocomposite as a function of the doping level has been investigated both in planar and stacked configurations. While the former configuration evidenced low field tunneling between nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, stacked devices allowed us to investigate the main phenomena ruling the transport properties when switching effects are present close to critical electric fields. In particular, through the analysis of current-voltage characteristics we studied the charge transport at different fillers concentrations and sketched a physical picture of conductivity in such nanocomposite systems.

  12. Synthesis of water soluble glycine capped silver nanoparticles and their surface selective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles at ambient reaction conditions. • Glycine as stabilizing agent for silver nanoparticles. • Surface selective interaction of glycine with silver nanoparticles. • Glycine concentration influences crystalinity and optical property of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Synthesis of biocompatible metal nanoparticles has been an area of significant interest because of their wide range of applications. In the present study, we have successfully synthesized water soluble silver nanoparticles assisted by small amino acid glycine. The method is primarily based on reduction of AgNO3 with NaBH4 in aqueous solution under atmospheric air in the presence of glycine. UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X–ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques used for characterization of resulting silver nanoparticles demonstrated that, glycine is an effective capping agent to stabilize silver nanoparticles. Surface selective interaction of glycine on (1 1 1) face of silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The optical property and crystalline behavior of silver nanoparticles were found to be sensitive to concentration of glycine. X–ray diffraction studies ascertained the phase specific interaction of glycine on silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesized were of diameter 60 nm. We thus demonstrated an efficient synthetic method for synthesis of water soluble silver nanoparticles capped by amino acid under mild reaction conditions with excellent reproducibility

  13. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using renewable Punica granatum juice and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Bag, Braja Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Punica granatum juice, a delicious multivitamin drink of great medicinal significance, is rich in different types of phytochemicals, such as terpenoids, alkaloids, sterols, polyphenols, sugars, fatty acids, aromatic compounds, amino acids, tocopherols, etc. We have demonstrated the use of the juice for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the AuNPs was complete in few minutes and no extra stabilizing or capping agents were necessary. The size of the nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the fruit extract. The AuNPs were characterized by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Catalytic activity of the synthesized colloidal AuNPs has also been demonstrated.

  14. Comparative Aquatic Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles and Ionic Gold Using a Species Sensitivity Distribution Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tarryn L. Botha; Tanyn E. James; Victor Wepener

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (nAu) are used in drug delivery systems allowing for targeted cellular distribution. The effects of increased use and release of nanoparticles into the environment are not well known. A species sensitivity distribution (SSD) allows for the ecotoxicological hazard assessment of a chemical based on single species toxicity tests. Aquatic toxicity needs to be related to particle characterization in order to understand the effects. The behaviour of nAu in the medium changed as t...

  15. DNA-directed self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into binary and ternary nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hui; Yi, Changqing; Tzang, Chi-Hung; Zhu, Junjie; Yang, Mengsu

    2007-01-01

    The assembly and characterization of gold nanoparticle-based binary and ternary structures are reported. Two strategies were used to assemble gold nanoparticles into ordered nanoscale architectures: in strategy 1, gold nanoparticles were functionalized with single-strand DNA (ssDNA) first, and then hybridized with complementary ssDNA-labelled nanoparticles to assemble designed architectures. In strategy 2, the designed architectures were constructed through hybridization between complementary ssDNA first, then by assembling gold nanoparticles to the scaffolding through gold-sulfur bonds. Both TEM measurements and agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed that the latter strategy is more efficient in generating the designed nanostructures.

  16. Solid state synthesis of starch-capped silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeish, A; Shaheen, Th I; El-Naggar, Mehrez E

    2016-06-01

    The present research addresses the establishment of a technique which is solely devoted to environmentally friendly one-pot green synthesis of dry highly stable powdered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using starch as both reductant and stabilizing agent in the presence of sodium hydroxide. It is believed that the sodium hydroxide can improve the reduction potential of starch. Thus when the alkali treated starch is submitted to addition of silver nitrate (AgNO3), the alkali treated starch induces the well-established dual role of starch; reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) to AgNPs and capping the as-formed AgNPs to prevent them from further growth and agglomeration. Beside assessment of AgNPs formation, structural and morphological characteristics of AgNPs are investigated by making use of UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, FT-IR and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Research outputs signify (a) the absorbance around 410-420nm in the UV-vis spectra of AgNPs appears most, probably owing to the presence of nanosized silver particles and the intensity of this peak increases by increasing AgNO3 concentration; (b) that highly stable AgNPs with well-dispersed particle are successfully prepared using the present research-based innovation; (c) that the size of AgNPs does not exceed 30nm with sphere-like morphology even at the highest Ag(+) concentration employed during synthesis operation; (d) that the XRD and FT-IR confirm the successful preparation of pure AgNPs without noticeable impurities; (d) and that the one-pot synthesis of powdered AgNPs in large scale is clean and easily operated and easily transportation which may be applied as per demands of industries such as textile and painting industry. PMID:26902893

  17. Synthesis, purification and assembly of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Penghe

    The aims of the current research include developing new synthetic strategies to prepare structurally complex gold nanoparticles and new size sorting methods to separate nanoparticles of larger size, as well as studying the assembly of nanoparticles into novel hierarchical structures through both template-assisted and template-free strategies. In the synthesis section of this dissertation (Chapters 2 & 3), a size controllable synthesis of dendritic gold nanoparticles through a seed-mediated process in ethanol is described. The effect of seeds size and shape as well as the carbon chain length of alkylamines on the formation of dendritic structure was investigated. The synthetic strategy developed is capable of forming dendritic structure on various substrates, like flat or rod-like gold particles. In another work, the shape evolution of gold nanoparticles in a seed-mediated growth as well as the kinetics of reduction of HAuCl4 in the presence of seeds was studied. The reduction of the gold precursor by sodium citrate could be greatly accelerated in the presence of seed nanoparticles. Along with the enhanced reaction kinetics, dramatic shape evolution of gold nanoparticles was observed by changing ratios of precursors. In the purification section (Chapter 4), a novel method of separating nanoparticles of different sizes in a viscosity gradient was developed. The viscosity gradient was created with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) aqueous solutions. Previously, such size separation was all achieved in the density gradient, while the hidden contribution of viscosity difference inside the density gradient was not well recognized. Through this work, it is clarified that the viscosity can contribute as importantly as density in the size sorting of nanoparticles through rate zonal centrifuge. It was also demonstrated both experimentally and mathematically that the viscosity gradient is more effective in separation of larger sized nanoparticles. In the assembly section (Chapter 5

  18. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles – A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Poulsen, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    Elemental gold is used as a food coloring agent and in dental fillings. In addition, gold nanoparticles are gaining increasing attention due to their potential use as inert carriers for medical purposes. Although elemental gold is considered to be inert, there is evidence to suggest the release of....... In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in...

  19. Preparation and Characterization of ZrO2 Nanoparticles Capped by Trioctylphosphine Oxide(TOPO)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jianqi

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse ZrO2 nanoparticles capped by trioctylphosphine oxide(TOPO)were prepared in non-aqueous solvent using in-situ synthesis method.Transmission electron microscopy(TEM),X-ray diffraction(XRD),X-ray photoelectron spectrometer(XPS),Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),and thermogravimetric analysis(TGA)were adopted to characterize and investigate the size,structure,composition,and the binding manners between organic capping agent TOPO and inorganic ZrO2 nanocores of the as-prepared nanoparticles.In addition,the nanoparticles were also studied to determine their solubility and relative stability.The experimental results show that the prepared nanoparticles contain about 25% organic capping shell TOPO,75% inorganic ZrO2 nanocores,and can be easily dissolved and be stably disersed in nonpolar organic solvents.

  20. Resistive pressure sensors based on freestanding membranes of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicke, Hendrik; Rebber, Matthias; Kunze, Svenja; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    In this communication the application of gold nanoparticle membranes as ambient pressure sensors with electromechanical signal transduction is demonstrated. The devices were fabricated by sealing microstructured cavities with membranes of 1,6-hexanedithiol cross-linked gold nanoparticles, which were electrically contacted by metal electrodes deposited on both sides of the cavities. Variations of the external pressure resulted in a deflection of the membranes and, thus, increased the average interparticle distances. Therefore, the pressure change could easily be detected by simply monitoring the resistance of the membranes.In this communication the application of gold nanoparticle membranes as ambient pressure sensors with electromechanical signal transduction is demonstrated. The devices were fabricated by sealing microstructured cavities with membranes of 1,6-hexanedithiol cross-linked gold nanoparticles, which were electrically contacted by metal electrodes deposited on both sides of the cavities. Variations of the external pressure resulted in a deflection of the membranes and, thus, increased the average interparticle distances. Therefore, the pressure change could easily be detected by simply monitoring the resistance of the membranes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06937h

  1. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  2. Electronic shell structure and chemisorption on gold nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Kleis, Jesper; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer;

    2011-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic structure and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles. Different structural families of clusters are compared. For up to 60 atoms we optimize structures using DFT-based simulated annealing. Cluster geometries are found to...

  3. Design and Fabrication of Microfiber Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Marie; Wang, Guanghui; Hu, Dora Juan Juan;

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple fabrication method for embedding gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in a microfiber with two main advantages. The GNPs are positioned within the microfiber securing maximum enhancement of the electrical field and protection of the GNPs from the surroundings; moreover incoupling losses to...

  4. Gold nanoparticle-based microfluidic sensor for mercury detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2011-01-01

    The contamination of natural resources by human activity can have severe socio-economical impacts. Conventional methods of environmental analysis can be significantly improved by the development of portable microscale technologies for remote/field sensing. A gold nanoparticle-based lab-on-a-chip ...

  5. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, A. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Cabrera L, L. I. [UNAM-UAEM, Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, 50200 San Cayetano-Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  6. Aquatic Fern (Azolla Sp.) Assisted Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Anal K.; Prasad, K.

    2016-02-01

    Aquatic pteridophyte (Azolla sp.) was taken to assess its potential to synthesize the metal (Au) nanoparticles. The synthesized particles were characterized using X-ray, UV-visible, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses. Nanoparticles almost spherical in shape having the sizes of 5-17nm are found. UV-visible study revealed the surface plasmon resonance at 538nm. Responsible phytochemicals for the transformation were principally phenolics, tannins, anthraquinone glycosides and sugars present abundantly in the plant thereby bestowing it adaptive prodigality. Also, the use of Azolla sp. for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles offers the benefit of eco-friendliness.

  7. Diffusional transport to and through thin-layer nanoparticle film modified electrodes: capped CdSe nanoparticle modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, William G; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Tschulik, Kristina; Barnes, Edward O; Kachoosangi, Roohollah Torabi; Compton, Richard G

    2014-09-01

    We present a simple and general theoretical model which accounts fully for the influence of an electrode modifying non-electroactive layer on the voltammetric response of a diffusional redox probe. The layer is solely considered to alter the solubilities and diffusion coefficients of the electroactive species within the thin layer on the electrode surface. On this basis it is demonstrated how, first, the apparent electrochemical rate constant can deviate significantly from that measured at an unmodified electrode. Second, depending on the conditions within the layer the modification of the electrode may lead to either apparent 'negative' or 'positive' electrocatalytic effects without the true standard electrochemical rate constant for the electron transfer at the electrode surface being altered. Having presented the theoretical model three experimental cases are investigated, specifically, the reductions of ruthenium(III) hexaamine, oxygen and boric acid on a gold macro electrode with and without a multi-layer organic capped nanoparticle film. In the latter case of the reduction of boric acid the voltammetric reduction is found to be enhanced by the presence of the organic layer. This result is interpreted as being due to an increase in the solubility of the analyte within the non-electroactive layer and not due to an alteration of the standard electrochemical rate constant. PMID:25050481

  8. Reversible Thermochromic Nanocomposites Based on Thiolate-Capped Silver Nanoparticles Embedded in Amorphous Polystyrene

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Nicolais; Gianfranco Carotenuto

    2009-01-01

    Technologically useful reversible thermochromic materials can be prepared using very simple polymer-embedded nanostructures. In particular, silver nanoparticles capped by long-chain alkyl-thiolate molecules (i.e., Agx(SCnH2n+1)y, with n > 10) spontaneously organize in aggregates because of the interdigitation phenomenon involving the linear alkyl chains bonded at surfaces of neighboring nanoparticles. Owing to the alkylchain interdigitation, nanoparticles very close to each other result an...

  9. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University Kottayam, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  10. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles

  11. A simple gel electrophoresis method for separating polyhedral gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Lee, Hye Jin

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple approach to separate differently shaped and sized polyhedral gold nanoparticles (NPs) within colloidal solutions via gel electrophoresis is described. Gel running parameters for separating efficiently gold NPs including gel composition, added surfactant types and applied voltage were investigated. The plasmonic properties and physical structure of the separated NPs extracted from the gel matrix were then investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry respectively. Data analysis revealed that gel electrophoresis conditions of a 1.5 % agarose gel with 0.1 % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant under an applied voltage of 100 V resulted in the selective isolation of ~ 50 nm polyhedral shaped gold nanoparticles. Further efforts are underway to apply the method to purify biomolecule-conjugated polyhedral Au NPs that can be readily used for NP-enhanced biosensing platforms.

  12. Effect of nanoscale size and medium on metal work function in oleylamine-capped gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, M. H.; Ghosh, S.; Liakos, I.; Scarpellini, A.; Marras, S.; Diaspro, A.; Salerno, M.

    2016-02-01

    The work function is an important material property with several applications in photonics and optoelectronics. We aimed to characterize the work function of clusters resulting from gold nanocrystals capped with oleylamine surfactant and drop-casted onto gold substrate. We used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy to investigate the work function, and complemented our study mainly with X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oleylamine works as an electron blocking layer through which the electrical conduction takes place by tunneling effect. The surface potential appears to depend on the size of the clusters, which can be ascribed to their difference in effective work function with the substrate. The charge state of gold clusters is discussed in comparison with theory, and their capacitance is calculated from a semi-analytical equation. The results suggest that at the nanoscale the work function is not an intrinsic property of a material but rather depends on the size and morphology of the clusters, including also effects of the surrounding materials.

  13. Facile synthesis of size-tunable gold nanoparticles by pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaf extract: Applications in arsenate sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Pomegranate leaf extracts mediated rapid gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis. ► The phyto-inspired AuNPs were size-tuned and characterized. ► The reducing and capping agents in the extract were identified. ► The nanoparticles reacted specifically with arsenate (V) ions. - Abstract: When pomegranate leaf extracts were incubated with chloroauric acid (HAuCl4), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized. These were characterized by a variety of techniques. With an increasing content of the leaf extract, a gradual decrease in size and an increase in monodispersity were observed. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images showed that the phyto-fabricated AuNPs were surrounded by an amorphous layer. Gallic acid in the extract mediated the reduction and a natural decapeptide capped the nanostructures. Blocking of thiol groups in the decapeptide cysteine residues caused the nanoparticles to aggregate. On interaction with arsenate (V) ions, the UV–vis spectra of the nanoparticles showed a decrease in intensity and a red-shift. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the presence of arsenate associated with the AuNPs. Thus, by using these AuNPs, a method for sensing the toxic arsenate ions could be developed

  14. Facile synthesis of size-tunable gold nanoparticles by pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaf extract: Applications in arsenate sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Ashit; Mahajan, Ketakee; Bankar, Ashok [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Srikanth, Rapole [Proteomics Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Pune 411007 (India); Kumar, Ameeta Ravi [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Gosavi, Suresh, E-mail: swg@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Centre for Sensor Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Zinjarde, Smita, E-mail: smita@unipune.ac.in [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Centre for Sensor Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Pomegranate leaf extracts mediated rapid gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis. ► The phyto-inspired AuNPs were size-tuned and characterized. ► The reducing and capping agents in the extract were identified. ► The nanoparticles reacted specifically with arsenate (V) ions. - Abstract: When pomegranate leaf extracts were incubated with chloroauric acid (HAuCl{sub 4}), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized. These were characterized by a variety of techniques. With an increasing content of the leaf extract, a gradual decrease in size and an increase in monodispersity were observed. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images showed that the phyto-fabricated AuNPs were surrounded by an amorphous layer. Gallic acid in the extract mediated the reduction and a natural decapeptide capped the nanostructures. Blocking of thiol groups in the decapeptide cysteine residues caused the nanoparticles to aggregate. On interaction with arsenate (V) ions, the UV–vis spectra of the nanoparticles showed a decrease in intensity and a red-shift. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the presence of arsenate associated with the AuNPs. Thus, by using these AuNPs, a method for sensing the toxic arsenate ions could be developed.

  15. Preparation of DPPE-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Muller, David P.; Gunter, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is presented that introduces students to nanotechnology through the preparation of nanoparticles and their visualization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiment familiarizes the students with nonaqueous solvents, biphasic reactions, phase-transfer agents, ligands to stabilize growing nanoparticles, and bidentate…

  16. Functionalization of Amorphous Chalcogenide and Titanium Oxide Layers by Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kökényesi Sándor (1946-) (fizikus); Biri Sándor; Hegedűs Csaba (1953-) (fogszakorvos); Csarnovics István (1986-) (fizikus); Csik Attila

    2014-01-01

    The technology problems of fabricating different, nanometers sized gold particles in the layered composites like light-sensitive chalcogenide glass/gold nanoparticles/transparent substrate or titanium/titanium oxide/gold nanoparticles were investigated in our work. Combination of ion implantation, plasma deposition with annealing processes results physical routes for creation of gold nanoparticles in the mentioned structures, which possess plasmon effects. These functionalized structures are ...

  17. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanopa...

  18. CHITOSAN-GOLD NANOPARTICLES AS DELIVERY SYSTEMS FOR CURCUMIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Satish Kumar* D. Gnanaprakash, K. Mayilvaganan, C. Arunraj and S. Mohankumar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with investigating the effect of chitosan nano particles as carriers for an anticancer drug curcumin. The chitosan-curcumin nanocapsules were prepared in the presence and absence of gold nanoparticles via solvent evaporation method. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy was done to characterize the drug entrapped nanocapsules. The average diameter of gold nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 18-20 nm and size of the nanocapsules was found to be in the range of 200-250 nm. Fourier transform-infrared analysis revealed no possible interactions among the constituents with the chitosan nanoparticles. The controlled drug release of anticancer drug entrapped nanocapsules was carried out in 0.1M HCl and 0.1M phosphate buffer (pH 7. Experimental studies revealed that curcumin encapsulated chitosan with gold nanoparticles was controlled and steady when compared with curcumin encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles. Application of in vitro drug release date to various kinetic equations indicated higuchi matrix model indicating uniform distribution of curcumin in the nanocapsules.

  19. Trapping Iron Oxide into Hollow Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiankai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Synthesis of the core/shell-structured Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles by trapping Fe3O4 inside hollow Au nanoparticles is described. The produced composite nanoparticles are strongly magnetic with their surface plasmon resonance peaks in the near infrared region (wavelength from 700 to 800 nm, combining desirable magnetic and plasmonic properties into one nanoparticle. They are particularly suitable for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The intact Au surface provides convenient anchorage sites for attachment of targeting molecules, and the particles can be activated by both near infrared lights and magnetic fields. As more and more hollow nanoparticles become available, this synthetic method would find general applications in the fabrication of core–shell multifunctional nanostructures.

  20. Effects of surface ligands on the uptake and transport of gold nanoparticles in rice and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongying; Ye, Xinxin; Guo, Xisheng; Geng, Zhigang; Wang, Guozhong

    2016-08-15

    Nanotechnology is advancing rapidly and substantial amounts of nanomaterials are released into the environment. Plants are an essential base component of the ecological environment and play a critical role in the fate and transport of nanomaterials in the environment through plant uptake and bioaccumulation. In this study, plant uptake of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) functionalized with three types of short ligands [cysteamine (CA), cysteine (CYS) and thioglycolic acid (TGA)] and of nearly identical hydrodynamic size (8-12nm) was investigated in the major crops rice (Oryza sativa L.) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Uptake and translocation of GNPs not only depended on particle surface charge, but were also related to the species of ligand on the GNPs. The negatively charged GNPs capped with the CYS ligand (GNP-CYS) were more efficiently absorbed in roots and transferred to shoots (including stems and leaves) than that of GNPs capped with CA and TGA. The absorption process of GNPs involved a combination of both clathrin-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The endocytosis of GNPs was strongly inhibited by wortmannin, suggesting that clathrin-independent endocytosis was an important pathway of nanoparticle internalization in plants. Competition experiments with a free ligand (CYS) showed that the CYS ligand probably facilitated the endocytosis process of GNPs and increased the internalization of GNP-CYS in plants. The results will aid understanding of the mechanisms of nanoparticle uptake and translocation in plants. PMID:27131459

  1. Aggregation behaviour of gold nanoparticles in presence of chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado-González, Mar; Fernández Espín, Vanesa [University of Murcia, Department of Physical Chemistry (Spain); Montalbán, Mercedes G. [University of Murcia, Department of Chemical Engineering (Spain); Pamies, Ramón [Technical University of Cartagena, Department of Material Engineering and Manufacturing (Spain); Hernández Cifre, José Ginés; Díaz Baños, F. Guillermo, E-mail: fgb@um.es [University of Murcia, Department of Physical Chemistry (Spain); Víllora, Gloria [University of Murcia, Department of Chemical Engineering (Spain); García de la Torre, José [University of Murcia, Department of Physical Chemistry (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Chitosan (CS) is a biocompatible polysaccharide with positive charge that is widely used as a coating agent for negatively charged nanoparticles. However, the types of structures that emerge by combining CS and nanoparticles as well as their behaviour are still poorly understood. In this work, we characterize the nanocomposites formed by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and CS and study the influence of CS in the expected aggregation process that should experience those nanoparticles under the favourable conditions of low pH and high ionic strength. Thus, at the working CS concentration, we observe the existence of CS structures that quickly trap the AuNPs and avoid the formation of nanoparticle aggregates in environmental conditions that, otherwise, would lead to such an aggregation.

  2. Aggregation behaviour of gold nanoparticles in presence of chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan (CS) is a biocompatible polysaccharide with positive charge that is widely used as a coating agent for negatively charged nanoparticles. However, the types of structures that emerge by combining CS and nanoparticles as well as their behaviour are still poorly understood. In this work, we characterize the nanocomposites formed by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and CS and study the influence of CS in the expected aggregation process that should experience those nanoparticles under the favourable conditions of low pH and high ionic strength. Thus, at the working CS concentration, we observe the existence of CS structures that quickly trap the AuNPs and avoid the formation of nanoparticle aggregates in environmental conditions that, otherwise, would lead to such an aggregation

  3. The development of a green approach for the biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles by using Panax ginseng root extract, and their biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon Ju; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-06-01

    The biosynthesis of nanoparticles has received attention because of the development of economic and environmentally friendly technology for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The study develops a convenient method for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles by utilizing fresh root extract of the four-year old Panax ginseng plant, and evaluated the antimicrobial applications of silver nanoparticles against pathogenic microorganisms. P. ginseng is a well-known herbal medicinal plant, and its active ingredients are mainly ginsenosides. The fresh root of the 4 year old P. ginseng plant has been explored for the synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles without the use of any additional reducing and capping agents. The reduction of silver nitrate led to the formation of silver nanoparticles within 2 h of reaction at 80°C. The gold nanoparticles were also successfully synthesized by the reduction of auric acid at 80°C, within 5 min of reaction. The biosynthesized gold and silver nanoparticles were characterized by techniques using various instruments, viz. ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis spectroscopy), field emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), elemental mapping, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, the silver nanoparticles have shown antimicrobial potential against Bacillus anthracis, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus cereus. PMID:25771716

  4. Design of gold nanoshells via a gelatin-mediated self-assembly of gold nanoparticles on silica cores

    OpenAIRE

    Allouche, Joachim; Soulé, Samantha; Dupin, Jean-Charles; Masse, Sylvie; ,; Coradin, Thibaud; Martinez, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    International audience A gelatin-mediated self-assembly of gold nanoparticles on silica particles has been performed during gold ion reduction using ascorbic acid as reductant and PVP as stabilizer. Gold nanoshells with near infrared photothermal properties have been successfully designed.

  5. Rapid and selective lead (II) colorimetric sensor based on azacrown ether-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gold nanoparticle (AuNPs)-based simple and fast colorimetric sensor for selective detecting of Pb(II) in aqueous solution has been developed. Monodisperse AuNPs (approx. 2.0 nm diameter) has been prepared facilely and further modified with an alkanethiol-bearing monoazacrown ether terminus. These AuNPs are shown to selectively sense Pb2+ through color change, which is visually discernible by an appearance of the surface plasmon band (SPB) at 520 nm. The recognition mechanism is attributed to the unique structure of the monoazacrown ether attached to AuNPs and metal sandwich coordination between two azacrown ether moieties that are attached to separate nanoparticles. This inter-particle cross-linking results in an aggregation and apparent color change from brown to purple. Additionally, TEM experiments support the optical absorption data proving the aggregation between azacrown ether-capped gold nanoparticles. This AuNP-based colorimetric assay is a facile and robust method and allows fast detection of Pb2+ at ambient temperatures. More importantly, the developed technique does not utilize enzymatic reactions, light-sensitive dye molecules, lengthy protocols or sophisticated instrumentation.

  6. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET – 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ∼ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells

  7. The interaction of gold and silver nanoparticles with a range of anionic and cationic dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Kitching, H; Kenyon, A. J.; Parkin, I. P.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of charge-stabilised gold and silver nanoparticles by a modified Turkevich method and their interaction with a selection of cationic and anionic dyes. It was found that gold nanoparticles interact strongly with cationic dyes and in some cases enhanced absorption was observed by UV-visible spectroscopy. It is also shown that addition of cationic dyes to gold nanoparticles triggers aggregation of the nanoparticles into large, micrometre-scale clusters. Simultaneous fra...

  8. Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles with Mixed Valence States Generated from Dissociation of Polymeric Au (I) Thiolates

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Chen; Sun, CE; Yu, Mengxiao; Qin, Yanping; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon; Zheng, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Dissociation process of glutathione-gold(I) polymers in aqueous solution resulted in the formation of a class of ~2 nm gold nanoparticles. Different from the same sized but NaBH4 reduced gold nanoparticles, these nanoparticles exhibit strong luminescence but no surface plasmon absorption. Luminescence lifetimes of the nanoparticles were found strongly dependent on excitation wavelengths, and singlet and triplet excited states involving the emission were found degenerate in energy. X-ray photo...

  9. Facile Synthesis of Gold-nanoparticles-decorated Polymer Assemblies and Core-Shell Gold Nanoparticles Using Pluronic Block Copolymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOU Qing-hui; GUO Chen; GAO Hong-shuai; ZHOU Hua-cong; LIU Chun-zhao; LIU Hui-zhou

    2011-01-01

    Abstract:Synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Pluronic triblock copolymer composite in aqueous medium was studied.Gold-polymer nanocomposite with different structures was fabricated by tailoring the molar ratio of gold precursors to Pluronic P123 molecules or pH value of the P123 solution.When a lower volume ratio of [AuCl4-]/[P123] (0.05) was employed at pH 11.1,a nanostructure similar to plum pudding was obtained.AuNPs with an average diameter of 13.1 nm were embedded in Pluronic assemblies,and each one held about 21 single gold nanoparticles.When [AuCl4-]/[P123] was increased to 0.1,core-shell structure was obtained if the pH value was in the range of 10.6~11.6,while gold polyhedra were fabricated when pH value was 8.1.Typical core-shell AuNPs had an average diameter of 9.6 nm with a narrow size distribution,while gold polyhedras with a mean diameter of 12.8 nm was obtained.The specific morphologies of the resultant nanocomposite were presumably obtained due to the synergistic interaction among the reactants.

  10. The optical nonlinearity of gold nanoparticles prepared by bioreduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbuena Ortega, A.; Arroyo Carrasco, M. L.; Gayou, V. L.; Orduña Díaz, A.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, Marlon

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear optical and electronic properties of nanosized metal particles have drawn considerable attention because of their strong and size-dependent plasmon resonance absorption. In a metal nanoparticle system such as gold dispersed in a transparent matrix, an absorption peak due to surface plasmon resonance is usually observed in the visible spectral region. Metal nanoparticles are of special interest as nonlinear materials for optical switching and computing because of their relatively large third-order nonlinearity (χ3) and ultrafast response time. The purpose of this study was to analyze the nonlinear optical properties of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles. The samples were prepared by biosynthesis method using yeast extract as reducing agent and the nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles were investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with a beam power of 20 mW and operated at wavelength of 514 nm. The reaction between metal ions and yeast extracts were monitored by UV-visible spectra of Au nanoparticles in aqueous solution with different pH (3-6). The surface plasmon peak position was shifted from 528 nm to 573 nm, according to of pH variation 4 to 6. The average particle size was calculated by the absorption peak position using the Fernig method, from 42 to 103 nm. The z-scan curves showed a negative nonlocal nonlinear refractive index with a magnitude dependent on the nanoparticle size.

  11. Photothermal lens detection of gold nanoparticles: theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusnichkin, Anton V; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Proskurnin, Mikhail A; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2007-11-01

    An approach for mode-mismatched two-beam (pump-probe) photothermal lens detection of multipoint light-absorbing targets in solution (e.g., gold nanoparticles) is developed for continuous-wave intensity-modulated laser-excitation mode. A description of the blooming of the thermooptical element (thermal lens) upon absorption of the excitation laser radiation is based on the summation of individual thermal waves from multiple heat sources. This description makes it possible to estimate the irregularities of the temperature (and, thus, the refractive index) profile for a discrete number of nanoparticles in the irradiated area and a change in the concentration and particle size parameters. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical dependences of the photothermal signal on nanoparticle size and concentration and excitation laser power. Calibration plots for particles from 2 to 250 nm show long linear ranges, limits of detection of gold nanoparticles at the level of hundreds of nanoparticles with the current setup, and the photothermal-lens sensitivity coefficient increases as a cubic function of particle size. Further improvements are discussed, including increasing the sensitivity thresholds up to one nanoparticle in the detected volume. PMID:18028698

  12. Aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles in phosphate buffered saline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In applications in medicine and more specifically drug delivery, the dispersion stability of nanoparticles plays a significant role on their final performances. In this study, with the use of two laser technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), we report a simple method to estimate the stability of nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Stability has two features: (1) self-aggregation as the particles tend to stick to each other; (2) disappearance of particles as they adhere to surrounding substrate surfaces such as glass, metal, or polymer. By investigating the effects of sonication treatment and surface modification by five types of surfactants, including nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP9), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), human serum albumin (HSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and citrate ions on the dispersion stability, the varying self-aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles dispersed in PBS are demonstrated. The results showed that PVP effectively prevented aggregation, while HSA exhibited the best performance in avoiding the adhesion of gold nanoparticle in PBS onto glass and metal. The simple principle of this method makes it a high potential to be applied to other nanoparticles, including virus particles, used in dispersing and processing.

  13. Aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles in phosphate buffered saline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Shangfeng, E-mail: s.du@bham.ac.uk; Kendall, Kevin; Toloueinia, Panteha; Mehrabadi, Yasamin; Gupta, Gaurav; Newton, Jill [University of Birmingham, School of Chemical Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    In applications in medicine and more specifically drug delivery, the dispersion stability of nanoparticles plays a significant role on their final performances. In this study, with the use of two laser technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), we report a simple method to estimate the stability of nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Stability has two features: (1) self-aggregation as the particles tend to stick to each other; (2) disappearance of particles as they adhere to surrounding substrate surfaces such as glass, metal, or polymer. By investigating the effects of sonication treatment and surface modification by five types of surfactants, including nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP9), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), human serum albumin (HSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and citrate ions on the dispersion stability, the varying self-aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles dispersed in PBS are demonstrated. The results showed that PVP effectively prevented aggregation, while HSA exhibited the best performance in avoiding the adhesion of gold nanoparticle in PBS onto glass and metal. The simple principle of this method makes it a high potential to be applied to other nanoparticles, including virus particles, used in dispersing and processing.

  14. Ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent immunoassay for morphine using a gold electrode modified with CdS quantum dots, polyamidoamine, and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a novel electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay for the ultrasensitive determination of morphine by making use of a gold electrode which was modified with a nanocomposite film containing self-assembled polyamidoamine (PAMAM) CdS quantum dots and electrodeposited gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). The highly uniform and well-dispersed quantum dots were capped with PAMAM dendrimers. Due to the synergistic effect of the modified quantum dots and the electrodeposited Au-NPs, the ECL response is dramatically enhanced. Under optimal experimental conditions, the immunoreaction between morphine and anti-morphine antibody resulted in a decrease of the ECL signal because of steric hindrance. The calibration plot is linear in the morphine concentration range from 0.2 to 180 ng•mL−1, with a detection limit as low as 67 pg•mL−1. The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of morphine in blood plasma. This kind of assay is expected to pave new avenues in label-free drug assays. (author)

  15. Growth of gold/zinc sulphide multilayer films using layer-by-layer assembly of colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promnimit, S.; Cavelius, C.; Mathur, S.; Dutta, J.

    2008-12-01

    Fabrication of multilayer thin films through layer-by-layer (lbl) deposition of charged nanoparticles on tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) coated and uncoated glass substrates are reported. The thin films were constructed by alternately dipping a substrate into a colloidal suspension of chitosan capped zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles (∼30 nm) and citrate stabilized colloidal gold (Au) nanoparticles (∼20 nm) leading to electrostatic interactions between the oppositely charged nanoparticle layers. Thin films consisting of up to 200 deposition cycles by multiple dipping have been studied and surface morphology, changes in the optical absorption characteristics, thickness, uniformity, roughness and electrical characteristics are reported. The multilayered assemblies, attached to the surface by strong ionic bonds, were highly stable and could not be removed by moderate scratching. The current-voltage characteristics in the forward and reverse bias conditions demonstrated rectifying behaviors in the onset of conduction voltage which makes these films attractive for future electronic devices.

  16. Gold Nanoparticles as the Catalyst of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Homma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have been proven to act as efficient catalysts for chemical reactions, such as oxidation and hydrogen production. In this review we focus on a different aspect of the catalysis of gold nanoparticles; single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT synthesis. This is not a traditional meaning of catalytic reaction, but SWCNTs cannot be synthesized without nanoparticles. Previously, gold was considered as unsuitable metal species as the catalyst of SWCNT synthesis. However, gold nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm were found to effectively produce SWCNTs. We discuss the catalysis of gold and related metals for SWCNT synthesis in comparison with conventional catalysts, such as iron, cobalt, and nickel.

  17. Molecular recognition by gold, silver and copper nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yannick; Tauran; Arnaud; Brioude; Anthony; W; Coleman; Moez; Rhimi; Beonjoom; Kim

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic physical properties of the noble metal nanoparticles,which are highly sensitive to the nature of their local molecular environment,make such systems ideal for the detection of molecular recognition events.The current review describes the state of the art concerning molecular recognition of Noble metal nanoparticles.In the first part the preparation of such nanoparticles is discussed along with methods of capping and stabilization.A brief discussion of the three common methods of functionalization:Electrostatic adsorption;Chemisorption;Affinity-based coordination is given.In the second section a discussion of the optical and electrical properties of nanoparticles is given to aid the reader in understanding the use of such properties in molecular recognition.In the main section the various types of capping agents for molecular recognition;nucleic acid coatings,protein coatings and molecules from the family of supramolecular chemistry are described along with their numerous applications.Emphasis for the nucleic acids is on complementary oligonucleotide and aptamer recognition.For the proteins the recognition properties of antibodies form the core of the section.With respect to the supramolecular systems the cyclodextrins,calix[n]arenes,dendrimers,crown ethers and the cucurbitales are treated in depth.Finally a short section deals with the possible toxicity of the nanoparticles,a concern in public health.

  18. Influence of dipole moment of capping molecules on the optoelectronic properties of ZnO nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiol-stabilized zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized via an aqueous route under moderate temperature to obtain better crystalline material. The work has been focused to study the effect of molecular dipole moment on optoelectronic properties of these nanoparticles. Three different organic thiols such as 1-thioglycerol, thioglycolic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol possessing different dipole moment were used as capping molecules. These nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, photoluminescence, energy dispersive analyses of X-ray, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction results revealed that as-synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles had pure hexagonal wurtzite structure and 2-mercaptoethanol capping gives smallest particle size. Colloids of these nanoparticles clearly emit violet color under ultraviolet light irradiation. The role of dipole moment and its orientation on ZnO surface has been investigated. It has been observed that a static electric field due to dipole moment on these nanoparticles significantly affects the photoluminescence properties. - Highlights: • The effect of dipole moment of capping molecules on optoelectronic properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles has been studied. • Three different thiol molecules, such as 1-thioglycerol, thioglycolic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol, have been chosen for the above purpose. • The dipole moment of these molecules is estimated by DFT calculations and these posses different magnitude and direction. • Molecularly capped zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by colloidal route at moderate temperature (80 °C) having a better cystallinity. • The static electric field due to dipole moment orientation of capping molecules significantly affects the photoluminescence properties

  19. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  20. Charging gold nanoparticles in ZnO by electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obradovic, M; Di Vece, M; Grandjean, D; Houben, K; Lievens, P

    2016-01-27

    Controlling the plasmon resonance frequency of metal nanostructures holds promise for both fundamental and applied research in optics. The plasmon resonance frequency depends on the number of free electrons in the metal. By adding or removing electrons to a metal nano-object, the plasmon resonance frequency shifts. In this study we indirectly change the number of free electrons in gold nanoparticles by applying an electrical potential difference over a heterostructure consisting of a ZnO layer with embedded gold nanoparticles. The potential difference induces shifts of defect energy levels in the ZnO by the electric field. This results in an exchange of electrons between particles and matrix which in turn modifies the gold nanoparticle plasmon properties. The positive charge shifts the ZnO optical absorption peak from 377 nm to 386 nm and shifts the nanoparticle plasmon from 549 nm to 542 nm. This electro-optical effect is a promising way to obtain fast optical switching in a solid state composition. PMID:26732742

  1. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au-CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au-BSPP, Au-TDSP, Au-MPA and Au-MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values. (paper)

  2. Charging gold nanoparticles in ZnO by electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlling the plasmon resonance frequency of metal nanostructures holds promise for both fundamental and applied research in optics. The plasmon resonance frequency depends on the number of free electrons in the metal. By adding or removing electrons to a metal nano-object, the plasmon resonance frequency shifts. In this study we indirectly change the number of free electrons in gold nanoparticles by applying an electrical potential difference over a heterostructure consisting of a ZnO layer with embedded gold nanoparticles. The potential difference induces shifts of defect energy levels in the ZnO by the electric field. This results in an exchange of electrons between particles and matrix which in turn modifies the gold nanoparticle plasmon properties. The positive charge shifts the ZnO optical absorption peak from 377 nm to 386 nm and shifts the nanoparticle plasmon from 549 nm to 542 nm. This electro-optical effect is a promising way to obtain fast optical switching in a solid state composition. (paper)

  3. One-pot size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped iron oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debanjan Guin; Sunkara V Manorama; S Radha; A K Nigam

    2006-11-01

    We report here the capping of iron oxide nanoparticles with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to make chloroform soluble iron oxide nanoparticles. Size and shape of the capped iron oxide nanoparticles are well controlled by simply varying the reaction parameters. The synthesized nanocrystallites were characterized by thermal analysis (TG–DTA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for evaluating phase, structure and morphology. 1H NMR spectra of the synthesized samples confirm DMSO, and the capping of DMSO on the ferrite samples. Shift of the S=O stretching frequency in Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectra indicates that the bonding between DMSO and ferrite is through an oxygen moiety. The magnetic measurements of all the synthesized samples were investigated with a SQUID magnetometer which shows that the magnetic properties are strongly dependent on the size as well as shape of the iron oxide.

  4. Gold nanoparticles embedded silicon channel biosensor for improved sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H. Y.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Fathil, M. F. M.; Hashim, U.

    2016-07-01

    This project discusses the fabrication steps of a biosensor device on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. Conventional photolithography technique is used to fabricate the device. The gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are then used to enhance the sensitivity of the device. By incorporating the GNPs, it is expected to get higher current compared with the device without GNPs due to better conductivity of gold and higher volume-to-ratio. Hence, with the addition of GNPs, it may boost up the signal and enhance the sensitivity of the device.

  5. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Renal Clearable Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Goel, Shreya; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Shi, Sixiang; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-01

    Optical imaging has been the primary imaging modality for nearly all of the renal clearable nanoparticles since 2007. Due to the tissue depth penetration limitation, providing accurate organ kinetics non-invasively has long been a huge challenge. Although a more quantitative imaging technique has been developed by labeling nanoparticles with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes, the low temporal resolution of SPECT still limits its potential for visualizing the rapid dynamic process of renal clearable nanoparticles in vivo. The dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of renal clearable gold (Au) nanoparticles by labeling them with copper-64 ((64) Cu) to form (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is reported. Systematic nanoparticle synthesis and characterizations are performed to demonstrate the efficient renal clearance of as-prepared nanoparticles. A rapid renal clearance of (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is observed (>75%ID at 24 h post-injection) with its elimination half-life calculated to be less than 6 min, over 130 times shorter than previously reported similar nanoparticles. Dynamic PET imaging not only addresses the current challenges in accurately and non-invasively acquiring the organ kinetics, but also potentially provides a highly useful tool for studying renal clearance mechanism of other ultra-small nanoparticles, as well as the diagnosis of kidney diseases in the near future. PMID:27062146

  6. Modeling the atomistic growth behavior of gold nanoparticles in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C. Heath; Lei, Yu; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    The properties of gold nanoparticles strongly depend on their three-dimensional atomic structure, leading to an increased emphasis on controlling and predicting nanoparticle structural evolution during the synthesis process. In order to provide this atomistic-level insight and establish a link to the experimentally-observed growth behavior, a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation (KMC) approach is developed for capturing Au nanoparticle growth characteristics. The advantage of this approach is that, compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, the atomistic nanoparticle structural evolution can be tracked on time scales that approach the actual experiments. This has enabled several different comparisons against experimental benchmarks, and it has helped transition the KMC simulations from a hypothetical toy model into a more experimentally-relevant test-bed. The model is initially parameterized by performing a series of automated comparisons of Au nanoparticle growth curves versus the experimental observations, and then the refined model allows for detailed structural analysis of the nanoparticle growth behavior. Although the Au nanoparticles are roughly spherical, the maximum/minimum dimensions deviate from the average by approximately 12.5%, which is consistent with the corresponding experiments. Also, a surface texture analysis highlights the changes in the surface structure as a function of time. While the nanoparticles show similar surface structures throughout the growth process, there can be some significant differences during the initial growth at different synthesis conditions.

  7. Enhanced anion sensing by γ-irradiated polyphenol capped iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method was designed for the synthesis of polyphenol capped amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles (ION) using an agro waste (peanut skin). The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by absorption spectroscopy, TEM, SEM, IR, Raman and XRD. An increased rate of formation of the nanoparticles is observed upon low dose gamma irradiation. ION shows specific spectral features with perchlorate anion even in presence of other anions selected for the anion sensing study. The nanoparticles formed in presence of irradiation was found even more sensitive to lower concentration of perchlorate owing to its finely dispersed nature and increased surface area. (author)

  8. Shape and surface effects on the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles: Gold nanospheres versus gold nanostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favi, Pelagie Marlene; Gao, Ming; Johana Sepúlveda Arango, Liuda; Ospina, Sandra Patricia; Morales, Mariana; Pavon, Juan Jose; Webster, Thomas Jay

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles are materials with unique optical properties that have made them very attractive for numerous biomedical applications. With the increasing discovery of techniques to synthesize novel nanoparticles such as star-shaped gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications, the safety and performance of these new nanomaterials must be systematically assessed before use. In this study, gold nanostars (AuNSTs) with multibranched surface structures were synthesized, and their influence on the cytotoxicity of human skin fibroblasts and rat fat pad endothelial cells (RFPECs) were assessed and compared with that of gold nanospheres (AuNSPs) with unbranched surfaces. Results showed that the AuNSPs with diameters of approximately 61.46 nm showed greater toxicity with fibroblast cells and RFPECs compared with the synthesized AuNSTs with diameters of approximately 33.69 nm. The AuNSPs were lethal at concentrations of 40 μg/mL for both cell lines, whereas the AuNSTs were less toxic at higher concentrations (400 μg/mL). The calculated IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of the AuNSPs exposed to fibroblast cells were greater at 1 and 4 days of culture (26.4 and 27.7 μg/mL, respectively) compared with the RFPECs (13.6 and 13.8 μg/mL, respectively), indicating that the AuNSPs have a greater toxicity to endothelial cells. It was proposed that possible factors that could be promoting the reduced toxicity effects of the AuNSTs to fibroblast cells and RFPECs, compared with the AuNSPs may be size, surface chemistry, and shape of the gold nanoparticles. The reduced cell toxicity observed with the AuNSTs suggests that AuNSTs may be a promising material for use in biomedical applications. PMID:25904210

  9. Gold nanoparticles having dipicolinic acid imprinted nanoshell for Bacillus cereus spores recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueltekin, Aytac [Department of Chemistry, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey); Ersoez, Arzu; Huer, Deniz [Department of Chemistry, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Sarioezlue, Nalan Yilmaz [Department of Biology, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Say, Ridvan, E-mail: rsay@anadolu.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey); BIBAM (Plant, Drug and Scientific Research Center) Anadolu University (Turkey)

    2009-10-15

    Taking into account the recognition element for sensors linked to molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs), a proliferation of interest has been witnessed by those who are interested in this subject. Indeed, MIP nanoparticles are theme which recently has come to light in the literature. In this study, we have proposed a novel thiol ligand-capping method with polymerizable methacryloylamidocysteine (MAC) attached to gold nanoparticles, reminiscent of a self-assembled monolayer. Furthermore, a surface shell by synthetic host polymers based on molecular imprinting method for recognition has been reconstructed. In this method, methacryloyl iminodiacetic acid-chrome (MAIDA-Cr(III)) has been used as a new metal-chelating monomer via metal coordination-chelation interactions and dipicolinic acid (DPA) which is the main participant of Bacillus cereus spores has been used as a template. Nanoshell sensors with templates produce a cavity that is selective for DPA. The DPA can simultaneously chelate to Cr(III) metal ion and fit into the shape-selective cavity. Thus, the interaction between Cr(III) ion and free coordination spheres has an effect on the binding ability of the gold nanoparticles nanosensor. The interactions between DPA and MIP particles were studied observing fluorescence measurements. DPA addition caused significant decreases in fluorescence intensity because they induced photoluminescence emission from Au nanoparticles through the specific binding to the recognition sites of the crosslinked nanoshell polymer matrix. The binding affinity of the DPA imprinted nanoparticles has been explored by using the Langmuir and Scatchard methods and the analysis of the quenching results has been performed in terms of the Stern-Volmer equation.

  10. Gold nanoparticles having dipicolinic acid imprinted nanoshell for Bacillus cereus spores recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking into account the recognition element for sensors linked to molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs), a proliferation of interest has been witnessed by those who are interested in this subject. Indeed, MIP nanoparticles are theme which recently has come to light in the literature. In this study, we have proposed a novel thiol ligand-capping method with polymerizable methacryloylamidocysteine (MAC) attached to gold nanoparticles, reminiscent of a self-assembled monolayer. Furthermore, a surface shell by synthetic host polymers based on molecular imprinting method for recognition has been reconstructed. In this method, methacryloyl iminodiacetic acid-chrome (MAIDA-Cr(III)) has been used as a new metal-chelating monomer via metal coordination-chelation interactions and dipicolinic acid (DPA) which is the main participant of Bacillus cereus spores has been used as a template. Nanoshell sensors with templates produce a cavity that is selective for DPA. The DPA can simultaneously chelate to Cr(III) metal ion and fit into the shape-selective cavity. Thus, the interaction between Cr(III) ion and free coordination spheres has an effect on the binding ability of the gold nanoparticles nanosensor. The interactions between DPA and MIP particles were studied observing fluorescence measurements. DPA addition caused significant decreases in fluorescence intensity because they induced photoluminescence emission from Au nanoparticles through the specific binding to the recognition sites of the crosslinked nanoshell polymer matrix. The binding affinity of the DPA imprinted nanoparticles has been explored by using the Langmuir and Scatchard methods and the analysis of the quenching results has been performed in terms of the Stern-Volmer equation.

  11. Gold nanoparticles having dipicolinic acid imprinted nanoshell for Bacillus cereus spores recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, Aytaç; Ersöz, Arzu; Hür, Deniz; Sarıözlü, Nalan Yılmaz; Denizli, Adil; Say, Rıdvan

    2009-10-01

    Taking into account the recognition element for sensors linked to molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs), a proliferation of interest has been witnessed by those who are interested in this subject. Indeed, MIP nanoparticles are theme which recently has come to light in the literature. In this study, we have proposed a novel thiol ligand-capping method with polymerizable methacryloylamidocysteine (MAC) attached to gold nanoparticles, reminiscent of a self-assembled monolayer. Furthermore, a surface shell by synthetic host polymers based on molecular imprinting method for recognition has been reconstructed. In this method, methacryloyl iminodiacetic acid-chrome (MAIDA-Cr(III)) has been used as a new metal-chelating monomer via metal coordination-chelation interactions and dipicolinic acid (DPA) which is the main participant of Bacillus cereus spores has been used as a template. Nanoshell sensors with templates produce a cavity that is selective for DPA. The DPA can simultaneously chelate to Cr(III) metal ion and fit into the shape-selective cavity. Thus, the interaction between Cr(III) ion and free coordination spheres has an effect on the binding ability of the gold nanoparticles nanosensor. The interactions between DPA and MIP particles were studied observing fluorescence measurements. DPA addition caused significant decreases in fluorescence intensity because they induced photoluminescence emission from Au nanoparticles through the specific binding to the recognition sites of the crosslinked nanoshell polymer matrix. The binding affinity of the DPA imprinted nanoparticles has been explored by using the Langmuir and Scatchard methods and the analysis of the quenching results has been performed in terms of the Stern-Volmer equation.

  12. Surface-confined crown ether-capped gold nanoclusters: investigation on their electrochemical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new ligand 18-crown-6–aminoethanethiol (18C6–AET), in which crown ether–ammonium ion interaction was exploited, had been designed and synthesized. An estimated HOMO–LUMO gap of 0.259 eV for the 18C6–AET complex indicated a definite interaction between 18C6 and AET. Consequently, multivalent interactions interplayed for the stabilization of gold nanoclusters resulting in confined cationic clusters having a diameter in 2–5-nm range in aqueous medium. The modified indium tin oxide electrodes with immobilized 18C6–AET-capped gold nanoclusters represented a metal–insulator–semiconductor junction across which the characteristic interfacial electron transport was unraveled. A heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of 5.082 s−1 with a transfer coefficient of 0.51 was obtained for the quasi-reversible process, complying with a core-to-core electron hopping transport along with through-bond tunneling across the linker.

  13. Abroma augusta Linn bark extract-mediated green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its application in catalytic reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhajit; Bag, Braja Gopal; Basu, Ranadhir

    2014-11-01

    The bark extract of Abroma augusta Linn is rich in medicinally important phytochemicals including antioxidants and polyphenols. First one step green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been described utilizing the bark extract of Abroma augusta L. and chloroauric acid under very mild reaction conditions. The phytochemicals present in the bark extract acted both as a reducing as well as a stabilizing agent, and no additional stabilizing and capping agents were needed. Detailed characterizations of the stabilized AuNPs were carried out by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction studies. The catalytic activity of the freshly synthesized gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated for the sodium borohydride reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol, and the kinetics of the reduction reaction have been studied spectrophotometrically.

  14. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion [Nanobiophotonics Center, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Nanobioscience, Babes-Bolyai University, Treboniu Laurian 42, 400271 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela [Department of Biochemistry, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur 3-5, 400372, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian, E-mail: sanda.boca@phys.ubbcluj.ro, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Electron Microscopy Center, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-02-04

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  15. Aptamer biosensor for dopamine based on a gold electrode modified with carbon nanoparticles and thionine labeled gold nanoparticles as probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a biosensor for dopamine that is based on the use of a gold electrode modified with carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) coupled to thionine labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) acting as signal amplifiers. The biosensor was constructed by first modifying the CNPs on the gold electrode and adsorbing the thionine on the surface of the AuNPs, and then linking the complementary strand of the dopamine aptamer to the AuNPs via gold-thiol chemistry. Next, dopamine aptamer is added and the duplex is formed on the surface. On addition of a sample containing dopamine, it will interact with aptamer and cause the release of the electrochemical probe which then will be adsorbed on the surface of the CNP-modified gold electrode and detected by differential pulse voltammetry. The current is linearly related to the concentration of dopamine in the 30 nM to 6.0 μM ranges. The detection limit is as low as 10 nM, and the RSD is 3.1 % at a 0.3 μM level (for n = 11). The protocol was successfully applied to the determination of dopamine in spiked human urine samples. We perceive that this method holds promise as a widely applicable platform for aptamer-based electrochemical detection of small molecules. (author)

  16. Enhanced chemiluminescence-based detection on gold substrate after electrografting of diazonium precursor-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmed Adabo, Ali; Zeggari, Rabah; Mohamed Saïd, Nasser; Bazzi, Rana; Elie-Caille, Céline; Marquette, Christophe; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Perriat, Pascal; Chaix, Carole; Boireau, Wilfrid; Roux, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Since it was demonstrated that nanostructured surfaces are more efficient for the detection based on the specific capture of analytes, there is a real need to develop strategies for grafting nanoparticles onto flat surfaces. Among the different routes for the functionalization of a surface, the reduction of diazonium salts appears very attractive for the covalent immobilization of nanoparticles because this method does not require a pre-treatment of the surface. For achieving this goal, gold nanoparticles coated by precursor of diazonium salts were synthesized by reduction of gold salt in presence of mercaptoaniline. These mercaptoaniline-coated gold nanoparticles (Au@MA) were successfully immobilized onto various conducting substrates (indium tin oxide (ITO), glassy carbon (GC) and gold electrodes with flat terraces) after addition of sodium nitrite at fixed potential. When applied onto the gold electrodes, such a grafting strategy led to an obvious enhancement of the luminescence of luminol used for the biodetection. PMID:26803605

  17. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M.; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles (198Au) and engineered an 111In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for 198Au and 111In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While 198Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the 111In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated 111In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo.

  18. Solution-processable carboxylate-capped CuO nanoparticles obtained by a simple solventless method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboxylate-capped CuO nanoparticles were obtained via a simple solventless route, based on the thermal decomposition at 120 °C of solid precursors. The reaction mixture consisted of copper acetate monohydrate, acting as the CuO precursor, and different organic carboxylic acids (lauric, phenylvaleric or 3,6,9-trioxadecanoic acid) used as the capping agent. The proposed method, in good agreement with environmentally friendly practices, produced dry nanoparticles, thereby totally eliminating the need of washing, filtration, or other downstream steps. Transmission electron micrographs show crystalline roughly spherical CuO nanoparticles with average diameters between 3.1 and 5.5 nm depending on the capping ligand. The laurate-capped CuO nanoparticles showed a paramagnetic behaviour at room temperature, while a weak ferromagnetic component was detected at low temperature (<40 K). It was also proved that the chemical structure of the carboxylic acid tail enabled the straightforward dispersibility of nanoparticles in common solvents and assisted in the deposition of the material as thin films.

  19. The detection of HBV DNA with gold nanoparticle gene probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Xi; Xiaoping Luo; Qin Ning; Qianghua Lu; Kailun Yao; Zuli Liu

    2007-01-01

    Objective:Gold nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Methods:Alkanethiol modified oligonucleotide was bound with self-made Au nanoparticles to form nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes, through covalent binding of Au-S. By using a fluorescence-based method, the number of thiol-derivatized, single-stranded oligonucleotides and their hybridization efficiency with complementary oligonucleotides in solution was determined. With the aid of Au nanoparticle-supported mercapto-modified oligonucleotides serving as detection probes, and oligonucleotides immobilized on a nylon membrane surface acting as capturing probes,HBV DNA was detected visually by sandwich hybridization based on highly sensitive aggregation and silver staining. The modified nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were also used to detect the HBV DNA extracted from serum in patients with hepatitis B. Results:Compared with bare Au nanoparticles, oligonucleotide modified nanoparticles had a higher stability in NaCl solution or under high temperature environment and the absorbance peak of modified Au nanoparticles shifted from 520nm to 524nm. For Au nanoparticles, the maximal oligonucleotide surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotide was (132 ± 10) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and the percentage of hybridization strands on nanoparticles was (22 ± 3% ). Based on a two-probe sandwich hybridization/nanoparticle amplification/silver staining enhancement method, Au nanoparticle gene probes could detect as low as 10-11 mol/L composite HBV DNA molecules on a nylon membrane and the PCR products of HBV DNA visually. As made evident by transmission electron microscopy, the nanoparticles assembled into large network aggregates when nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were applied to detect HBV DNA molecules in liquid. Conclusion:Our results showed that successfully prepared Au nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes could be used to

  20. Enhanced photoacoustic signal from DNA assembled gold nanoparticle networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an experimental finding of photoacoustic signal enhancement from finite sized DNA–gold nanoparticle networks. We synthesized DNA-functionalized hollow and solid gold nanospheres (AuNS) to form finite sized networks, which were characterized by means of optical extinction spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy in transmission mode. It is shown that the signal amplification scales with network size for networks comprising either hollow or solid AuNS as well as networks consisting of both types of nanoparticles. The laser intensities applied in our multispectral setup (λ = 650 nm, 850 nm, 905 nm) were low enough to maintain the structural integrity of the networks. This reflects that the binding and recognition properties of the temperature-sensitive cross-linking DNA-molecules are retained. (paper)

  1. Paper-based tuberculosis diagnostic devices with colorimetric gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Shen, Shu-Wei; Cheng, Chao-Min; Chen, Chien-Fu

    2013-08-01

    A colorimetric sensing strategy employing gold nanoparticles and a paper assay platform has been developed for tuberculosis diagnosis. Unmodified gold nanoparticles and single-stranded detection oligonucleotides are used to achieve rapid diagnosis without complicated and time-consuming thiolated or other surface-modified probe preparation processes. To eliminate the use of sophisticated equipment for data analysis, the color variance for multiple detection results was simultaneously collected and concentrated on cellulose paper with the data readout transmitted for cloud computing via a smartphone. The results show that the 2.6 nM tuberculosis mycobacterium target sequences extracted from patients can easily be detected, and the turnaround time after the human DNA is extracted from clinical samples was approximately 1 h.

  2. Paper-based tuberculosis diagnostic devices with colorimetric gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A colorimetric sensing strategy employing gold nanoparticles and a paper assay platform has been developed for tuberculosis diagnosis. Unmodified gold nanoparticles and single-stranded detection oligonucleotides are used to achieve rapid diagnosis without complicated and time-consuming thiolated or other surface-modified probe preparation processes. To eliminate the use of sophisticated equipment for data analysis, the color variance for multiple detection results was simultaneously collected and concentrated on cellulose paper with the data readout transmitted for cloud computing via a smartphone. The results show that the 2.6 nM tuberculosis mycobacterium target sequences extracted from patients can easily be detected, and the turnaround time after the human DNA is extracted from clinical samples was approximately 1 h. (paper)

  3. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  4. Laser-based transfection with conjugated gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cuiping Yao; Xiaochao Qu; Zhenxi Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The irradiation of cells combined with the immunoconjugate of gold nanoparticles by the short pulse laser can make the plasma membrane be transiently permeabilized,which can be used to transfer exogenous molecules into the cells.We explore this technique as a novel gene transfection method for floating cells.Three different floating cells exposed to the laser are selectively transfected with fluorescein isothiocyanatedextran,antibody,and green fluorescent protein (GFP) coding plasmids,and the viability of cells are determined by propidium iodide.For fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran,the best transfection efficiency of 65% is obtained;for the antibody,it is 74%;whereas for the green fluorescent protein coding plasmids,a very small transfection efficiency is gained.If the transfection efficiency is improved,gold nanoparticles will be very useful as mediator for gene transfection in living cells.

  5. Towards thiol functionalization of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes using gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Template-directed synthesis is a promising route to realize vanadate-based 1-D nanostructures, an example of which is the formation of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes and associated nanostructures. In this work, we report the interchange of long-chained alkyl amines with alkyl thiols. This reaction was followed using gold nanoparticles prepared by the Chemical Liquid Deposition (CLD) method with an average diameter of ∼0.9nm and a stability of ∼85 days. V2O5 nanotubes (VOx-NTs) with lengths of ∼2μm and internal hollow diameters of 20-100nm were synthesized and functionalized in a Au-acetone colloid with a nominal concentration of ∼4x10-3mol dm-3. The interchange reaction with dodecylamine is found only to occur in polar solvents and incorporation of the gold nanoparticles is not observed in the presence of n-decane

  6. Solution-Stable Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles via Surfactant-Free, Hyperbranched Polyglycerol-b-polystyrene Unimolecular Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iocozzia, James; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-07-19

    Hyperbranched polyglycerol-block-polystyrene copolymers, denoted HPG-b-PS, are synthesized and employed as a new and effective unimolecular template for synthesizing colloidal gold (Au) nanoparticles. The coordination of noble metal precursors with polyether within the inner HPG core and subsequent in situ reduction enables the formation of well-dispersed and stable PS-capped Au nanoparticles. The inner HPG core is produced via ring opening multibranching polymerization (ROMBP) and subsequently converted into atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) macroinitiators for the controlled growth of polystyrene (PS) arms possessing low polydispersity (PDI numbers (98 and 117) and different PS chain lengths (i.e., molecular weight = 3500-13400 g/mol). It was found that the PS chain length and solvent conditions affect the quality of the resulting PS-capped colloidal Au nanoparticles. This work demonstrates, for the first time, a simple, lower-cost approach for templating nonpolar solvent-soluble PS-capped Au nanoparticles on the order of 10-30 nm in diameter. PMID:27357478

  7. Sulfonsuccinate (AOT Capped Pure and Mn-Doped CdS Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CdS nanoparticles and thin films are well known for their excellent semiconducting properties. When transition metal ions are doped into the CdS, it exhibits magnetic properties in addition to semiconducting properties and they are termed as dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs. In this paper, we discuss the preparation of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl sulfonsuccinate (AOT capped CdS nanoparticles and thin films doped with magnetic impurity Mn. Sodium bis(2-ethulexyl sulfonsuccinate (AOT, capping agent promotes the uniform formation of nanoparticles. Optical characterizations are made using the UV-Vis spectrometer, PL, and FTIR. XRD shows the hexagonal structure of the CdS. SEM images and EDS measurements were made for the thin films. EPR shows the clear hyperfine lines corresponding to Mn2+ ion in the CdS nanoparticles.

  8. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten;

    2013-01-01

    from redox potential, pH, conductivity, and turbidity of the solution enables distinct observation of reduction and nucleation/growth of AuNPs phases. The dynamics of the electrochemical potential shows that reduction of gold salt (HAuCl 4 and its hydrolyzed forms) occurs via intermediate [AuCl 2......Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... have been employed in the present report to monitor time-dependent physical and chemical properties in aqueous solution during the chemical synthesis. Chemical synthesis of AuNPs is a reduction process accompanied by release of ions and protons, and formation of solid particles. Dynamic information...

  9. Hybrid silica coated magnetic nanoparticles decorated with gold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koktan, Jakub; Kaman, Ondřej; Veverka, Miroslav; Veverka, Pavel; Herynek, V.; Řezanka, P.

    Dresden : Technische Universität, 2014. s. 98-98. [International Conference on the Scientific and Clinical Applications of Magnetic Carriers /10./. 10.06.2014-14.06.2014, Dresden] R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI3/521; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0807 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic nanoparticles * cobalt-zinc ferrite * silica encapsulation * manganite perovskites * gold decoration Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Electronic shell structure and chemisorption on gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Kleis, Jesper; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Nørskov, J. K.; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2013-01-01

    We use density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the electronic structure and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles. Different structural families of clusters are compared. For up to 60 atoms we optimize structures using DFT-based simulated annealing. Cluster geometries are found to distort considerably, creating large band gaps at the Fermi level. For up to 200 atoms we consider structures generated with a simple EMT potential and clusters based on cuboctahedra and icosahedra. All t...

  11. Cancer theranostics: multifunctional gold nanoparticles for diagnostics and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Conde, João Diogo Osório de Castro

    2013-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum in molecular diagnostics due to their unique physico-chemical properties these systems present huge advantages, such as increased sensitivity, reduced cost and potential for single-molecule characterisation. Because of their versatility and easy of functionalisation, multifunctional AuNPs have also been proposed as optimal delivery systems for therapy (nanovectors). Being able to produce such systems would mean the dawn of a n...

  12. Uptake of gold nanoparticles in primary human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingberg, Henrik; Oddershede, Lene B.; Löschner, Katrin;

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relevant in nanomedicine for drug delivery in the vascular system, where endothelial cells are the first point of contact. We investigated the uptake of 80 nm AuNPs in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by flow cytometry, 3D confocal microscopy....... Uptake of AuNPs in HUVECs occurred mainly by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficking to membrane enclosures in the form of single particles and agglomerates of 2–3 particles....

  13. Gold Nanoparticles Enhanced Electroporation for Mammalian Cell Transfection

    OpenAIRE

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Liao, Wei-Ching; Lu, Yang; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation figured prominently as an effective nonviral gene delivery approach for its balance on the transfection efficiency and cell viability, no restrictions of probe or cell type, and operation simplicity. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in the past two decades while still carry drawbacks associated with the high applied electric voltage, unsatisfied delivery efficiency, and/or low cell viability. By adding highly conductive gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)...

  14. Gold nanoparticles on MoS2 layered crystal flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic layered crystal MoS2 is considered as one of the most promising and efficient semiconductor materials for future transistors, photoelectronics, and electrocatalysis. To boost MoS2-based material applications, one direction is to grow physically and chemically reactive nanoparticles onto MoS2. Here we report on a simple route to synthesis crystalized MoS2–Au complexes. The gold nanoparticles were grown on MoS2 flakes through a wet method in the oxygen free environment at room temperature. Nanoparticles with diameters varying from 9 nm to 429 nm were controlled by the molar ratios of MoS2 and HAuCl4 precursors. MoS2 host flakes keep intrinsic honeycomb layered structures and the Au nanoparticles cubic-center crystal microstructures. From product chemical states analysis, the synthesis was found driven by redox reactions between the sulphide and the chloroauric acid. Photoluminescence measurement showed that introducing Au nanoparticles onto MoS2 stacks substantially prompted excitonic transitions of stacks, as an analogy for doping Si wafers with dopants. Such composites may have potential applications in wide ranges similar as the doped Si. - Highlights: • The Au nanoparticles were decorated on MoS2 in oxygen free ambiences via a wet method. • The Au nanoparticles are size-controllable and crystalized. • Chemical reaction scheme was clarified. • The MoS2–Au complexes have strong photoluminescent properties

  15. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  16. Biopolymer capped silver nanoparticles with potential for multifaceted applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanamudan, Ageetha; Sudhakar, P Padmaja

    2016-05-01

    A sustainable, green and low cost method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed using guargum as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles (GAg) were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, EDS, Raman, XRD and TEM. The interaction of the functional groups present in the biopolymer Guargum (G) with the silver nanoparticles (GAg) were responsible for the nanoparticle surface to function as active substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic (SERS) detection of cationic and anionic dyes. The catalytic degradation of a copper phthalocyanine based dye- Reactive blue - 21(RB-21), an azo dye- Reactive red 141(RR-141) and a xanthene dye- Rhodamine - 6G(Rh-6G) as well as binary mixtures of the three dyes was evaluated using the synthesized nanoparticles. The catalyst also caused a significant reduction in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) suggesting the formation of smaller degraded products. PMID:26800899

  17. Gold nanoparticles supported on magnesium oxide for CO oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanchikova Nina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Au was loaded (1 wt% on a commercial MgO support by three different methods: double impregnation, liquid-phase reductive deposition and ultrasonication. Samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -96°C, temperature-programmed reduction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Upon loading with Au, MgO changed into Mg(OH2 (the hydroxide was most likely formed by reaction with water, in which the gold precursor was dissolved. The size range for gold nanoparticles was 2-12 nm for the DIM method and 3-15 nm for LPRD and US. The average size of gold particles was 5.4 nm for DIM and larger than 6.5 for the other methods. CO oxidation was used as a test reaction to compare the catalytic activity. The best results were obtained with the DIM method, followed by LPRD and US. This can be explained in terms of the nanoparticle size, well known to determine the catalytic activity of gold catalysts.

  18. Enhanced lifetime characteristics in flexible polymer light-emitting devices by encapsulation of epoxy/silica-coated gold nanoparticles resin (ESGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the effects of a new multilayer encapsulation for the lifetime of flexible PLEDs on plastic substrate. The multilayer encapsulation consisted of a novel epoxy/silica-coated gold nanoparticles resin (ESGR) as the pre-encapsulation layer and a SiO2 layer as the encapsulation cap. The ESGR was prepared by mixing UV-curable epoxy resin and powders of silica-coated gold nanoparticles. The silica-coated gold nanoparticles is a necessity because the epoxy resin is not a good moisture barrier. The flexible PLEDs with multilayer encapsulation exhibited no dark spots after being stored for over 300 h at 25 deg. C and 60% relative humidity. Also, the operational half-luminance decay time of device was 1360 h, seven times longer than that of a device without encapsulation. These results confirmed that the multilayer encapsulation, which restricted the moisture that penetrated into the devices, could be applied to the encapsulation of flexible PLEDs.

  19. Dual plasmonic gold nanoparticles for multispectral photoacoustic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Vijay; Subhash, Hrebesh; Breathnach, Aedán.; Leahy, Martin; Dockery, Peter; Olivo, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular targeted imaging have widespread interest in diagnostic applications with cellular resolution, specificity and selectivity for visualization and assessment of various disease processes. Of particular interest is gold nanoparticle owing to its tunability of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and its relative inertness. Here we present the synthesis of anisotropic multi-branched star shaped gold nanoparticles exhibiting dual-band plasmon absorption peaks and its application as a contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic imaging. The transverse plasmon absorption peak of the synthesised dual plasmonic gold nanostar (DPGNS) was around 700 nm and that of longitudinal plasmon absorption in the longer wavelength region around 1050-1150 nm. Unlike most reported PA contrast agent with surface plasmon absorption in the range of 700 to 800 nm showing moderate tissue penetration, 1050-1200 nm range lies in the farther region of the optical window of biological tissue where scattering and the intrinsic optical extinction of endogenous chromophores is at its minimum. We also present a proof of principle demonstration of DPGNS as contrast agent for multispectral photoacoustic animal imaging. Our results show that DPGNS are promising for PA imaging with extended-depth imaging applications.

  20. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. Optimization of Optical Properties of Polycarbonate Film with Thiol Gold-Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Larosa; Enrico Stura; Roberto Eggenhöffner; Claudio Nicolini

    2009-01-01

    A new nanostructured composite film based on thiol gold nanoparticles dispersed in polycarbonate and prepared by evaporating a solution of 1-dodecanthiol gold nanoparticles and polycarbonate was developed for applications as optical lenses. Lenses with superior mechanical properties, coloring and UV ray absorption and with the same transparency as the matrix were obtained. The supporting highly transparent polycarbonate matrix and the chloroform solution of thiol gold nanoparticles, 3 nm mean...

  3. Fabrication of porous silicon by metal-assisted etching using highly ordered gold nanoparticle arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Scheeler, Sebastian P; Ullrich, Simon; Kudera, Stefan; Pacholski, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    A simple method for the fabrication of porous silicon (Si) by metal-assisted etching was developed using gold nanoparticles as catalytic sites. The etching masks were prepared by spin-coating of colloidal gold nanoparticles onto Si. An appropriate functionalization of the gold nanoparticle surface prior to the deposition step enabled the formation of quasi-hexagonally ordered arrays by self-assembly which were translated into an array of pores by subsequent etching in HF solution containing H...

  4. Preparation, Physicochemical Characterization and Performance Evaluation of Gold Nanoparticles in Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Kamiar; Reza Ghotaslou; Hadi Valizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was preparation, physicochemical characterization and performance evaluation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in radiotherapy. Another objective was the investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy of gold nanoparticle against E. coli clinical strains. Methods: Gold nanoparticles prepared by controlled reduction of an aqueous HAuCl4 solution using Tri sodium citrate. Particle size analysis and Transmission electron microscopy were used for physicochemical char...

  5. Biosynthesis Of Gold Nanoparticles By Marine Purple Non Sulphur Bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas Sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Abirami. G; Asmathunisha. N; Kathiresan. K

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time that an anaerobic marine bacterium is capable of producing gold nanoparticles. A marine purple non-sulphur bacterium was isolated from mangrove sediment and identified as Rhodopseudomonas sp. . The bacterial culture was tested for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using aqueous HAuCl4 solution as substrate in darkness. The gold nanoparticles synthesized were found to be of cubical structure in the size range of 10–20 nm.

  6. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense JT1, a Plant Pathogenic Fungus

    OpenAIRE

    Thakker, Janki N.; Pranay Dalwadi; Dhandhukia, Pinakin C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of reliable processes for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles is an important aspect of current nanotechnology research. Recently, reports are published on the extracellular as well as intracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using microorganisms. However, these methods of synthesis are rather slow. In present study, rapid and extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using a plant pathogenic fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense JT1 (FocJT1) is reported. Incubation o...

  7. Analytical detection and biological assay of antileukemic drug using gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    V. Selvaraj; Alagar, M.; Hamerton, I

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are reported and evaluated as probes for the detection of anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU). The nature of binding between 5FU and gold nanoparticles via complexation is investigated using ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The bound antileukemic drug is fluorescent and the quenching property of gold nanoparticles could be exploited for biological in...

  8. Green Synthesis of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Using Averrhoa bilimbi Fruit Extract

    OpenAIRE

    R. S. Rimal Isaac; Sakthivel, G.; Ch. Murthy

    2013-01-01

    We report on rapid one-step green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using fruit extract of Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the quantitative formation of gold and silver nanoparticles. The characteristics of the obtained gold and silver nanoparticles were studied using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy (UV/Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). UV/Vis spe...

  9. Gold Nanoparticles Impinge on Nucleoli and the Stress Response in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Kodiha; Hicham Mahboubi; Dusica Maysinger; Ursula Stochaj

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can take up gold nanoparticles of different morphologies. These particles interact with the plasma membrane and often travel to intracellular organelles. Among organelles, the nucleus is especially susceptible to the damage that is inflicted by gold nanoparticles. Located inside the nucleus, nucleoli are specialized compartments that transcribe ribosomal RNA genes, produce ribosomes and function as cellular stress sensors. Nucleoli are partic‐ ularly prone to gold nanoparticle-in...

  10. Highly sensitive colorimetric determination of amoxicillin in pharmaceutical formulations based on induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhond, Morteza; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Ershadifar, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    A novel, simple and highly sensitive colorimetric method is developed for determination of Amoxicillin (AMX). The system is based on aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in acetate buffer (pH = 4.5) in the presence of the degradation product of Amoxicillin (DPAMX). It was found that the color of gold nanoparticles changed from red to purple and the intensity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak of AuNPs decreased. A new absorption band was appeared in the wavelength range of 600-700 nm upon addition of DPAMX. The absorbance ratio at the wavelength of 660 and 525 nm (A660/A525) was chosen as the analytical signal indirectly related to AMX concentration. The linearity of the calibration graph was found over the concentration range of 0.3-4.5 μM AMX with a correlation coefficient of 0.9967. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limit was found to be 0.15 μM. The applicability of the method was successfully demonstrated by analysis of AMX in pharmaceutical formulations including capsules and oral suspensions.

  11. Infrared light-absorbing gold/gold sulfide nanoparticles induce cell death in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Li Y; Gobin AM; Dryden GW; Kang X; Xiao D; Li SP; Zhang G; Martin RCG

    2013-01-01

    Yan Li,1 Andre M Gobin,2 Gerald W Dryden,3 Xinqin Kang,1 Deyi Xiao,1 Su Ping Li,1 Guandong Zhang,2 Robert CG Martin11Department of Surgery, 2Department of Bioengineering, 3Division of Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: Gold nanoparticles and near infrared-absorbing light are each innocuous to tissue but when combined can destroy malignant tissue while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. This study investigated the feasibility of photothermal ablat...

  12. Gold and silver nanoparticles conjugated with heparin derivative possess anti-angiogenesis properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver and gold nanoparticles display unique physical and biological properties that have been extensively studied for biological and medical applications. Typically, gold and silver nanoparticles are prepared by chemical reductants that utilize excess toxic reactants, which need to be removed for biological purposes. We utilized a clean method involving a single synthetic step to prepare metal nanoparticles for evaluating potential effects on angiogenesis modulation. These nanoparticles were prepared by reducing silver nitrate and gold chloride with diaminopyridinyl (DAP)-derivatized heparin (HP) polysaccharides. Both gold and silver nanoparticles reduced with DAPHP exhibited effective inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis, with an enhanced anti-angiogenesis efficacy with the conjugation to DAPHP (P<0.01) as compared to glucose conjugation. These results suggest that DAPHP-reduced silver nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles have potential in pathological angiogenesis accelerated disorders such as cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  13. A Novel Synthesis of Malic Acid Capped Silver Nanoparticles using Solanum lycopersicums Fruit Extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Umadevi; M.R.Bindhu; V.Sathe

    2013-01-01

    Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research.The development of the concept of green nanoparticle preparation has been growingly needed for environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications.Keep this in mind,in the present study,silver nanoparticles were synthesized using Solanum lycopersicums fruit extract.The prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,Raman spectroscopy,scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques.The surface plasmon resonance peak was found at 445 nm.The synthesized silver nanoparticles were spherical in shape with the average size of 10 nm.The citric acid present in S.lycopersicums fruit extract acted as reducing agent and malic acid was responsible for capping of the bioreduced silver nanoparticles.

  14. Direct synthesis of water dispersible superparamagnetic TGA capped FePt nanoparticles: One pot, one shot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped hydrophilic fcc-FePt magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were directly synthesized by a facile one pot polyol method. Thioglycolic acid (TGA) was used to functionalize the nanoparticles by incorporating thiol group onto the surface. It helped in the preparation of highly stable dispersions of nanoparticles with spherical morphology. A possible formation mechanism for these FePt MNPs, depending on the role of TGA, was proposed. The as-prepared FePt MNPs possessed a face centered cubic structure with an average size of 6 ± 1 nm and superparamagnetic property at room temperature. MRI study showed that these MNPs exhibited a transverse relaxivity of ∼600 mg−1 ml s−1, superior to that of reported iron oxide nanoparticles. - Highlights: • One pot synthesis of TGA capped hydrophilic FePt superparamagnetic nanoparticles. • Role of TGA molecules in the formation of FePt nanoparticles. • EDX reveals the equiatomic ratio of Fe and Pt atoms in FePt nanoparticles. • The HR-TEM exhibits spherical nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution. • High transverse relaxivity suggesting as potential MRI contrast agent

  15. Acute hematologic, hepatologic, and nephrologic changes after intraperitoneal injections of 18 nm gold nanoparticles in hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Hazem Mohamed; Soliman, Omar A; Elshazly, Mohamed Osama; Raafat, Alaa; Gohar, Adel K; Salaheldin, Taher A

    2016-01-01

    In vivo responses to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) vary not only according to the size, shape, surface charge, and capping agent of GNPs but also according to the animal model, the route of administration, and the exposure frequency and duration. We illustrate here the changes in some hematologic parameters, in the hepatic and renal functions, and in the histopathology of solid organs after multiple intraperitoneal injections of 18 nm GNPs in adult male Syrian golden hamsters. We scored the histopathological changes in the liver and kidneys to grade the deleterious effects. Multiple intraperitoneal injections of 18 nm GNPs in hamsters were nonlethal in the short term but resulted in macrocytosis and hypochromasia, leukocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, and monocytosis. The hepatic and renal functions showed nonsignificant changes; however, histopathological examination showed hepatic and renal alterations ranging from mild to marked degeneration, with occasional necrosis of hepatocytes and tubular epithelium. PMID:27354788

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of interaction between bovine gamma globulin and gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ankita; Ghosh, Kalyan S.; Singh, Bhanu P.; Gathania, Arvind K.

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of Citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with Bovine gamma globulin (BGG) was studied using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-Visible and Fluorescence spectroscopy. FTIR has confirmed the conjugation of AuNPs and BGG. Fluorescence quenching of tryptophan has confirmed the strong interaction between BGG and AuNPs. UV-Visible and Fluorescence spectroscopy have investigated the extent of interaction by determining the binding constants. Binding constants evaluated from UV-Visible and Fluorescence data are in good agreement with each other. An independent class of binding site on BGG for AuNPs has been predicted, where AuNPs interact with a highly solvent accessible tryptophan residue.

  17. Comparison of galvanic displacement and electroless methods for deposition of gold nanoparticles on synthetic calcite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chamarthi K Srikanth; P Jeevanandam

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been deposited on synthetic calcite substrate by galvanic displacement reaction and electroless deposition methods. A comparative study has shown that electroless deposition is superior compared to galvanic displacement reaction for uniform deposition of gold nanoparticles on calcite. Characterization of the samples, prepared by two different deposition methods, was carried out by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements. FE–SEM studies prove that smaller nanoparticles of gold are deposited uniformly on calcite if electroless deposition method was employed and DRS measurements show the characteristic surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles.

  18. Morphokinetics of mesenterial lymphatic node cell populations in exposure of gold nanoparticles within experimental work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dykman L.A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate the influence of gold nanoparticles with different size (1-3 nm, 15 nm and 50 nm on the morphokinetics of mesenterial lymphatic node cell populations of healthy laboratory animals. Experiment included 24 white rats. The investigation was conducted in 4 groups of animals. The animals were administered the gold nanoparticles orally for 15 days. It was established that the oral administration of gold nanoparticles caused the changes of morphokinetics of mesenterial lymphatic node cell populations. The morphological alterations in the mesenterial lymphatic nodes assisted in activation of migration processes, the proliferation and differentiation. The immu-nomodulatory action of gold nanoparticles was proved

  19. Crystal Growth of Thiol-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles by Heat-Induced Coalescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon SookYoung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A monolayer of dodecanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles changed into two-dimensional and three-dimensional self-organized structures by annealing at 323 K. Subsequent crystal growth of gold nanoparticles occurred. Thiol molecules, although chemisorbed, form relatively unstable bonds with the gold surface; a few thiols desorbed from the surface and oxidized to disulfides at 323 K, because the interaction energy between thiol macromolecules is larger than that between a thiol and a nanoparticle. The gold nanoparticles approached each other and grew into large single or twinned crystals because of the van der Waals attraction and the heat generated by the exothermic formation of disulfides.

  20. Self-assembly of lysozyme on the surfaces of gold nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Hui Xiang; Xiao Xu; Na Li; Ke An Li

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of lysozyme (Lys) and gold nanoparticles was investigated via UV-vis absorption and resonance light-scattering method. There are some changes of the plasmon absorption and resonance light-scattering of gold nanoparticles that were observed via the addition of Lys. The normalized plasmon absorption and resonance light-scattering intensity with gold nanoparticles were both linear with 1-20 nmol/L Lys. A simple model about the component of the gold nanoparticles and Lys complex was established and the calculated result was fitted well in their concentration ratio. Furthermore, the activity analysis of Lys showed that the interaction was weak and nondestructive.

  1. Size-dependent radiosensitization of PEG-coated gold nanoparticles for cancer radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wu, Di; Shen, Xiu; Chen, Jie; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Liu, Pei-Xun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been conceived as a radiosensitizer in cancer radiation therapy, but one of the important questions for primary drug screening is what size of gold nanoparticles can optimally enhance radiation effects. Herein, we perform in vitro and in vivo radiosensitization studies of 4.8, 12.1, 27.3, and 46.6 nm PEG-coated gold nanoparticles. In vitro results show that all sizes of the PEG-coated gold nanoparticles can cause a significant decrease in cancer cell survival after gam...

  2. Electron and photon emissions from gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we develop a totally new probabilistic model for the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons. This model allows direct applications to recent researches about the radiotherapy enhancement by gold nanoparticles in the context of cancer treatment. Our model uses, in a complete original way, simulated Auger cascade and stopping power to compute electron emission spectra, photon emission spectra and released energy inside the material of gold nanoparticles. It allows us to present new results about the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticle irradiated by hard X-rays

  3. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaorong; He Xiaoxiao; Wang Kemin; Ren Fang; Qin Zhihe, E-mail: kmwang@hnu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, College of Biology, Hunan University, Key Laboratory for Bio-Nanotechnology and Molecule Engineering of Hunan Province, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-09-02

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, {alpha}-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and {alpha}-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  4. High-Yield Synthesis and Applications of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigderman, Leonid

    This work will describe research directed towards the synthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles as well as their functionalization and biological applications. The thesis will begin by describing a new technique for the high-yield synthesis of gold nanorods using hydroquinone as a reducing agent. This addresses important limitations of the traditional nanorod synthesis including low yield of gold ions conversion to metallic form and inability to produce rods with longitudinal surface plasmon peak above 850 nm. The use of hydroquinone was also found to improve the synthesis of gold nanowires via the nanorod-seed mediated procedure developed in our lab. The thesis will next present the synthesis of novel starfruitshaped nanorods, mesorods, and nanowires using a modified nanorod-seed mediated procedure. The starfruit particles displayed increased activity as surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates as compared to smooth structures. Next, a method for the functionalization of gold nanorods using a cationic thiol, 16-mercaptohexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), will be described. By using this thiol, we were able to demonstrate the complete removal of toxic surfactant from the nanorods and were also able to precisely quantify the grafting density of thiol molecules on the nanorod surface through a combination of several analytical techniques. Finally, this thesis will show that MTABfunctionalized nanorods are nontoxic and can be taken up in extremely high numbers into cancer cells. The thesis will conclude by describing the surprising uptake of larger mesorods and nanowires functionalized with MTAB into cells in high quantities.

  5. Drastic nickel ion removal from aqueous solution by curcumin-capped Ag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, S.; Pagano, R.; Valli, L.; Giancane, G.

    2014-08-01

    A completely green synthesis protocol has been adopted to obtain silver nanoaggregates capped by the natural compound (1E, 6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-diene), also known as curcumin. The synthesis has been monitored by infrared, Raman, visible and fluorescence spectroscopies. Characterization confirms that curcumin reduces and caps the nanoparticles, and such a procedure allows its solubility in water and drastically increases curcumin stability. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/curcumin complex has been dispersed in a water solution containing a known nickel ion concentration. After three days, a grey precipitate is observed and nickel concentration in the solution is reduced by about 70%.A completely green synthesis protocol has been adopted to obtain silver nanoaggregates capped by the natural compound (1E, 6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-diene), also known as curcumin. The synthesis has been monitored by infrared, Raman, visible and fluorescence spectroscopies. Characterization confirms that curcumin reduces and caps the nanoparticles, and such a procedure allows its solubility in water and drastically increases curcumin stability. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/curcumin complex has been dispersed in a water solution containing a known nickel ion concentration. After three days, a grey precipitate is observed and nickel concentration in the solution is reduced by about 70%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02583k

  6. Anti-amyloidogenic activity of glutathione-covered gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antosova, Andrea [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Moyzesova 11, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Gazova, Zuzana; Fedunova, Diana; Valusova, Eva [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Bystrenova, Eva; Valle, Francesco [Institute for Nanostructured Materials ISMN-CNR, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Daxnerova, Zuzana [Institute of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, P. J. Safarik University, Moyzesova 11, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Biscarini, Fabio [Institute for Nanostructured Materials ISMN-CNR, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Antalik, Marian, E-mail: antalik@saske.sk [Department of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, Watsonova 47, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Moyzesova 11, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2012-12-01

    This study is an investigation of the effect of biocompatible glutathione-covered gold nanoparticles (AuSG{sub 7}) with an average size of 3 nm on the amyloid fibrils of hen egg-white lysozyme. The anti-amyloid activity of AuSG{sub 7} nanoparticles on this protein was monitored with thioflavin T assay, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The study found that AuSG{sub 7} nanoparticles in vitro depolymerize the amyloid aggregates and inhibit lysozyme aggregate formation. The ability to inhibit amyloid formation and promote amyloid disassembly has concentration-dependent characteristics: the concentration of nanoparticles at which inhibition is half maximal (IC{sub 50}) was found to be 6.19 {mu}g/mL, and the concentration at which depolymerization is half maximal (DC{sub 50}) was found to be 8.26 {mu}g/mL. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AuSG{sub 7} nanoparticles are able to interact with lysozyme amyloids at acidic pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These nanoparticles reduce the amyloid aggregates by promoting depolymerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AuSG{sub 7} nanoparticles display inhibitory action on lysozyme amyloid aggregation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The half inhibition concentration (IC{sub 50}) for AuSG{sub 7} nanoparticles is 6.19 {mu}g/ml. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The half depolymerization nanoparticles concentration (DC{sub 50}) is 8.26 {mu}g/ml.

  7. Coalescence and Collisions of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez-Tijerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the assembling of small gold clusters subject to collisions and close contact coalescence by using molecular dynamics simulations to simulate events that occur typically in the sputtering process of synthesis. Our results support the notion that the kinetics of coalescence processes strongly determine the geometry and structure of the final particle. While impact velocities, relative orientations, and the initial shape of the interacting particles are unlikely to strictly determine the structural details of the newly formed particle, we found that high initial temperatures and/or impact velocities increase the probability of appearance of icosahedral-like structures, Wulff polyhedra are likely to be formed as a product of the interactions between nanospheres, while the appearance of fcc particles of approximately cuboctahedral shape is mainly due to the interaction between icosahedra.

  8. Gold Nanoparticles Decorated with Mannose-6-phosphate Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Combemale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, the preparation of neoglycoconjugates bearing mannose-6-phosphate analogues is described by: (a synthesis of a cyclic sulfate precursor to access the carbohydrate head-group by nucleophilic displacement with an appropriate nucleophile; (b introduction of spacers on the mannose-6-phosphate analogues via Huisgen’s cycloaddition, the Julia reaction, or the thiol-ene reaction under ultrasound activation. With the resulting compounds in hand, gold nanoparticles could be functionalized with various carbohydrate derivatives (glycoconjugates and then tested for angiogenic activity. It was observed that the length and flexibility of the spacer separating the sugar analogue from the nanoparticle have little influence on the biological response. One particular nanoparticle system substantially inhibits blood vessel growth in contrast to activation by the corresponding monomeric glycoconjugate, thereby demonstrating the importance of multivalency in angiogenic activity.

  9. Luminescence quantum yields of gold nanoparticles varying with excitation wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuqing; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Shen, Hongming; Zhao, Jingyi; Xia, Keyu; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence quantum yields (QYs) of gold nanoparticles including nanorods, nanobipyramids and nanospheres are measured elaborately at a single nanoparticle level with different excitation wavelengths. It is found that the QYs of the nanostructures are essentially dependent on the excitation wavelength. The QY is higher when the excitation wavelength is blue-detuned and close to the nanoparticles' surface plasmon resonance peak. A phenomenological model based on the plasmonic resonator concept is proposed to understand the experimental findings. The excitation wavelength dependent QY is attributed to the wavelength dependent coupling efficiency between the free electron oscillation and the intrinsic plasmon resonant radiative mode. These studies should contribute to the understanding of one-photon luminescence from metallic nanostructures and plasmonic surface enhanced spectroscopy.

  10. Laser-fabricated castor oil-capped silver nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Zamiri, Reza; Zakaria, Azmi; Abbastabar, Hossein; Darroudi, Majid; Husin, Mohd Shahril; Mahdi, Mohd. Adzir

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were fabricated by ablation of a pure silver plate immersed in castor oil. A Nd:YAG-pulsed Q-switch laser with 1064-nm wavelength and 10-Hz frequency was used to ablate the plate for 10 minutes. The sample was characterized by ultraviolet-visible, atomic absorption, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopies, and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the fabricated sample showed that the nanoparticles in castor oil were about 5-nm in diameter, well dispersed, an...

  11. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Taylor

    Full Text Available We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake.

  12. Preparation of gold nanoparticle dimers via streptavidin-induced interlinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zon, Vera B.; Sachsenhauser, Matthias; Rant, Ulrich, E-mail: rant@wsi.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Walter Schottky Institut (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    There is great interest in establishing efficient means of organizing nanoparticles into complex structures, especially in fields like nano-optical devices. One of the demonstrated routes uses biomolecular scaffolds, like the streptavidin-biotin system, to deterministically separate and structure particle complexes. However, controlled formation of streptavidin-linked nanoparticle dimers or trimers is challenging, and large aggregates are often formed under conditions that are difficult to regulate. Here, we studied the aggregates and interlinking kinetics of biotin-functionalized 20 nm gold nanoparticles in the presence of the interlinking protein, streptavidin. We found two different protein-linker concentration regions where small stable particle aggregates are formed: when the protein and nanoparticle concentrations are similar and when the protein to nanoparticle concentration ratio exceeds intermediate concentrations (10:1-100:1) that promote precipitation of large aggregates. We attribute this behavior to the limited availability of free-linker molecules and the limited availability of free ligand (biotin) on the particle surface for low and high protein concentrations, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the product can be additionally enriched up to 25 % through either centrifugation in sucrose or size-exclusion chromatography. These results provide additional understanding into the assembly of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles with water-soluble linkers and provide a facile way to produce well-defined small aggregates for potential use in, for instance, surface-enhanced spectroscopy.

  13. Selective gold nanoparticles formation by pulsed laser interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, R.J., E-mail: rpelaez@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Baraldi, G.; Afonso, C.N. [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Riedel, S.; Boneberg, J.; Leiderer, P. [Faculty of Physics, University of Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure of discontinuous gold films to laser interference produces 2D and 1D patterns of round nanoparticles surrounded by non-transformed areas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optical response of the patterns is dominated by the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The accumulation of metal at some areas of the pattern is consistent with mass transport towards the lower temperature regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the nanoparticles depends on the initial effective thickness; the thicker the films the bigger the nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple laser exposures produce in alternating areas with different nanoparticle dimensions. - Abstract: Discontinuous Au films are prepared on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition with two different metal coverages that lead to a film being formed by irregular coalesced nanoparticles (NPs) and to another film close to the percolation limit. The films are exposed to three interfering beams at different intensities produced by the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 10 ns). Scanning electron microscopy and extinction spectra are used respectively to study the structural and optical properties before and after the laser structuring. Round metal NPs appear in the laser transformed areas due to melting followed by rapid solidification that is reflected in the extinction spectra by the appearance of a surface plasmon resonance around 530-540 nm. The areas with NPs are surrounded by non-transformed areas forming a periodic pattern that evolves from a 2D array to parallel lines when local laser intensity increases to cover the whole sample at high intensity. The accumulation of several pulses at low fluence can also transform the metal film almost completely by creating alternating areas having different NP dimensions. The accumulation of metal in some areas of the pattern is consistent with mass

  14. Selective gold nanoparticles formation by pulsed laser interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Exposure of discontinuous gold films to laser interference produces 2D and 1D patterns of round nanoparticles surrounded by non-transformed areas. ► The optical response of the patterns is dominated by the surface plasmon resonance of the gold nanoparticles. ► The accumulation of metal at some areas of the pattern is consistent with mass transport towards the lower temperature regions. ► The size of the nanoparticles depends on the initial effective thickness; the thicker the films the bigger the nanoparticles. ► Multiple laser exposures produce in alternating areas with different nanoparticle dimensions. - Abstract: Discontinuous Au films are prepared on glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition with two different metal coverages that lead to a film being formed by irregular coalesced nanoparticles (NPs) and to another film close to the percolation limit. The films are exposed to three interfering beams at different intensities produced by the fourth harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (266 nm, 10 ns). Scanning electron microscopy and extinction spectra are used respectively to study the structural and optical properties before and after the laser structuring. Round metal NPs appear in the laser transformed areas due to melting followed by rapid solidification that is reflected in the extinction spectra by the appearance of a surface plasmon resonance around 530–540 nm. The areas with NPs are surrounded by non-transformed areas forming a periodic pattern that evolves from a 2D array to parallel lines when local laser intensity increases to cover the whole sample at high intensity. The accumulation of several pulses at low fluence can also transform the metal film almost completely by creating alternating areas having different NP dimensions. The accumulation of metal in some areas of the pattern is consistent with mass transport towards the lower temperature regions.

  15. Effect of pH and biological media on polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chew Ping; Abdul-Wahab, Mohd Firdaus; Jaafar, Jafariah; Chan, Giek Far; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul

    2016-07-01

    Toxicity and mobility of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) vary in different surrounding environments. Surface coatings or functionalization, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, nanoparticle concentration, the presence of organic matter, and ionic strength are factors which dictate the transformation of AgNPs in terms of aggregation and stabilization. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate the behavior of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-capped AgNPs at different pHs (pH 2 to 10) and in different biological media (0.1 M phosphate buffer, nutrient broth, P5 and modified P5 media) analyzed using UV-Vis spectroscopy and zeta potential analyzer. The PVP-capped AgNPs changed its behavior in the presence of varying media, after 24 h incubation with shaking at 200 rpm at 30°C. No aggregation was observed at pH 4 to 10, but distinctive at very low pH of 2. Low pH further destabilized PVP-capped AgNPs after 24 h of incubation. High ionic strength 0.1 M phosphate buffer also resulted in slow aggregation and eventually destabilized the nanoparticles. Biological media (nutrient broth, P5 and modified P5 media) containing organic components caused aggregation of the PVP-capped AgNPs. The increase in glucose and nutrient broth concentrations led to increased aggregation. However, PVP-capped AgNPs stabilized after 24 h incubation in media containing a high concentration of glucose and nutrient broth. The results demonstrate that low pH value, high ionic strength and the content of the biological media can influence the stability of AgNPs. This provides information on the aggregation behavior of PVP-capped AgNPs and can possibly further predict the fate, transport as well as the toxicity of silver nanoparticles after being released into the aquatic environment.

  16. Investigation of Electrochemical Charging Behaviors of“Naked” Gold Nanoparticles Ensembles in Aqueous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程文龙; 韩晓军; 彭章泉; 董绍俊; 汪尔康

    2002-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were imnoobilized onto the electrode surface by simple self-assembly technique.Interestingly,the ensembles of these nanoparticles exhibit quantized charging behaviors in aqueous solution.Possible mechanism for such behaviors was proposed.

  17. Investigation of Electrochemical Charging Behaviors of "Naked" Gold Nanoparticles Ensembles in Aqueous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG,Wen-Long(程文龙); HAN,Xiao-Jun(韩晓军); PENG,Zhang-Quan(彭章泉); DOGN,Shao-Jun(董绍俊); WANG,Er-Kang(汪尔康)

    2002-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were immobilized onto the electrode surface by simple self-assembly technique. Interestingly, the ensmbles of these nanoparticles exhibit quantized charging behaviors in aqueous solution. Possible mechanism for such behaviors was proposed.

  18. Formation of CdS nanoparticles using starch as capping agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, P.; Muñoz-Aguirre, N.; Martínez, E. San-Martin; Gonzalez, G.; Zelaya, O.; Mendoza, J.

    2008-11-01

    CdS nanoparticles have been synthesized using starch as capping agent in aqueous solution. The morphology and crystalline structure of such samples were measured by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The average grain size of the nanoparticles determined by these techniques was of the order of 5 nm. Photoluminescence of CdS nanoparticles shows a strong emission peak below to the band gap bulk semiconductor attributed to center trap states, also the broadening peak was interpreted in terms of electron-phonon interaction.

  19. Formation of CdS nanoparticles using starch as capping agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CdS nanoparticles have been synthesized using starch as capping agent in aqueous solution. The morphology and crystalline structure of such samples were measured by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. The average grain size of the nanoparticles determined by these techniques was of the order of 5 nm. Photoluminescence of CdS nanoparticles shows a strong emission peak below to the band gap bulk semiconductor attributed to center trap states, also the broadening peak was interpreted in terms of electron-phonon interaction

  20. Synthesis and Applications of Fluoroalkyl End-capped Oligomeric Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hideo; Sawada

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Considerable interest has been devoted in recent years to block copolymers containing fluoroalkyl groups owing to exhibiting the low surface energy and the self-assembled polymeric aggregates resembling micelle in aqueous and organic media, which cannot be achieved in the corresponding randomly fluorinated copolymers[1].In these fluorinated block copolymers, we have found that ABA triblock-type fluoroalkylated oligomers and dendritic-type fluoroalkyl end-capped block copolymers can be prepared...

  1. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using streptomyces fulvissimus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Soltani Nejad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In recent years, the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles has been the focus of interest because of their emerging application in a number of areas such as biomedicine. In the present study we report the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs by using a positive bacterium named Streptomyces fulvissimus isolate U from rice fields of Guilan Province, Iran. Materials and Methods: From over 20 Streptomyces isolates collected, isolate U showed high AuNPs biosynthesis activity. To determine its taxonomical identity, its morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscope and partial molecular analysis performed by PCR. In this regard, 16S rDNA of isolate U was amplified using universal bacterial primers FD1 and RP2. The PCR products were purified and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA was then conducted using NCBI BLAST method. In biosynthesis of AuNPs by this bacterium, the biomass of bacterium exposed to the HAuCl4 solution. Results: The nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD analyses. Our results indicated that Streptomyces fulvissimus isolateU bio-synthesizes extracellular AuNPs in the range of 20-50 nm. Conclusions: This technique of green synthesis of AuNPs by a microbial source may become a promising method because of its environmental safety. Its optimization may make it a potential procedure for industrial production of gold nanoparticles.

  2. A novel route to size and shape controlled synthesis of DMSO capped ruthenium dioxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthenium dioxide nanoparticles (RuO2) with an average particle size of 54-95 nm are readily synthesized from RuCl3.xH2O via the formation of ruthenium acetylacetone. The particle size of RuO2 nanoparticle increases with increase in calcination time at 800 deg C. The ruthenium dioxide nanoparticles have also been capped with DMSO to make them soluble in common organic solvents. These synthesized nanocrystallites have been characterized by FTIR, UV-vis, SEM-EDX, 1H NMR, magnetic measurements and XRD techniques. The XRD pattern demonstrates the crystalline nature of these nanoparticles. The downfield shift of vs=o frequency (Δv=74 cm-1 ) in FTIR, as well as SEM-EDX and 1H NMR spectra of the capped RuO2 nanoparticle confirm the capping with DMSO. UV-vis analysis shows that the absorption peak is blue-shifted with decrease of particle size. Magnetic measurements show that these nano oxides have nearly zero magnetic remanence, a linear response of magnetization and finally reach saturation magnetization at low external field in the range 2625-2650 Oe. (author)

  3. Gold Nanoparticles Generated in Ethosome Bilayers, As Revealed by Cryo-Electron-Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    de la Presa, Patricia; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Chichon, F Javier; Arranz, Rocio; Valpuesta, Jose Maria; Hernando, Antonio; 10.1021/jp808650e

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been synthesized inside ethosomes, vesicles composed of phospholipid, ethanol and water, which could be very efficient not only in delivery probes to the skin but also as diagnostic and therapeutic multimodal agents. High efficiency encapsulation of gold nanoparticles is achieved by a simple strategy: the nanoparticles synthesis occurs simultaneously with the ethosomes formation, in the absence of any undesirable reducing agents. A three-dimensional reconstruction of a gold-embedded ethosome generated by cryoelectron tomography reveals that the gold particle is localized inside the lipid bilayer, leaving the ethosome surface and core free for further functionalization. The resulting gold nanoparticles are homogeneous in size and shape and, depending on synthesis temperature, the size ranges from 10 to 20 nm, as revealed by TEM. The ethosome-nanoparticles hybrids size has been investigated by means of dynamic light scattering and has been found to vary with temperature and gold salt con...

  4. An in-vitro studies on green synthesis of gold nanoparticles against pathogens and cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a most promising field for generating new applications in medicine. It is imperative to integrate nanoscience and medicine. The present investigation is highly warranted to through more light upon the gold nanoparticles reduced from gold salt through the active principle of medicinal plant. The special emphasis of investigation is the active principle along with gold nanoparticles against for cancer cells. The 70 - 90 nm sized particles were synthesized by using Diospyros ferrea and this confirmed by SEM. These gold nanoparticles showed a characteristic absorption peak at 540 nm in UV spectra. The possibility of protein as a stabilizing material in gold nanoparticles is revealed by FTIR analysis. Remarkably, as a result of wide screening on the application of newly synthesized gold nanoparticles their anticancer potential has been discovered using MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of AuNPs showed effective against bacteria than the fungal strains.

  5. Optimal Size of Gold Nanoparticles for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy under Different Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Seongmin Hong; Xiao Li

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been used as effective surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for decades. However, the origin of the enhancement and the effect of the size of nanoparticles still need clarification. Here, gold nanoparticles with different sizes from 17 to 80 nm were synthesized and characterized, and their SERS enhancement toward both 4-aminothiophenol and 4-nitrothiophenol was examined. For the same number of nanoparticles, the enhancement factor generated from the go...

  6. Gold nanoparticle wire and integrated wire array for electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Diao; Qing Cao

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle wire and integrated nanoparticle wire array have been prepared through a green technique: discontinuous vertical evaporation-driven colloidal deposition. The conducting gold nanoparticle wire made by this technique shows ability for the sensitive electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules due to its high surface to volume ratio. Furthermore, we also demonstrate a potential usage of integrated gold nanoparticle wire array for the localized detection.

  7. Gold nanoparticle wire and integrated wire array for electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Diao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle wire and integrated nanoparticle wire array have been prepared through a green technique: discontinuous vertical evaporation-driven colloidal deposition. The conducting gold nanoparticle wire made by this technique shows ability for the sensitive electronic detection of chemical and biological molecules due to its high surface to volume ratio. Furthermore, we also demonstrate a potential usage of integrated gold nanoparticle wire array for the localized detection.

  8. Hydrogen-induced electrical and optical switching in Pd capped Pr nanoparticle layers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shubhra Kala; B R Mehta

    2008-06-01

    In this study, modification in the properties of hydrogen-induced switchable mirror based on Pr nanoparticle layers is reported. The reversible changes in hydrogen-induced electrical and optical properties of Pd capped Pr nanoparticle layers have been studied as a function of hydrogenation time and compared with the conventional device based on Pd capped Pr thin films. Faster electrical and optical response, higher optical contrast and presence of single absorption edge corresponding to Pr trihydride state in hydrogen loaded state have been observed in the case of nanoparticle layers. The improvement in the electrical and optical properties have been explained in terms of blue shift in the absorption edge due to quantum confinement effect, larger number of interparticle boundaries, presence of defects, loose adhesion to the substrate and enhanced surface to volume atom ratio at nanodimension.

  9. The effect of visible light on gold nanoparticles and some bioeffects on environmental fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, Maria; Pricop, Daniela; Oprica, Lacramioara; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia; Iacomi, Felicia

    2016-05-30

    The oxidative stress induced by light exposed gold nanoparticles in some microorganism cells was investigated. Gold nanoparticles are currently used in biomedical and pharmaceutical research. For this study citrate-gold nanoparticles were synthesized in alkaline conditions at constant temperature of 85°C under magnetic stirring. Equal volumes of such prepared colloidal solution, were exposed to visible light at different wavelengths for 90min at room temperature. The spectra in the visible and ultraviolet range have revealed an increase in the intensity of the absorption band for gold nanoparticles exposed to light, due to the effect of surface plasmon resonance. Versatility of gold nanoparticles photocatalytic action was shown by means of manipulating wavelengths of incident light, which evidenced differences in the bioeffects induced in cellulolytic fungi - known for their environmental role but also for other applications such as in cosmetics industry. The comparative analysis of fungal response to gold nanoparticle stressors has revealed different enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation when fungi were supplied with gold nanoparticles exposed to different wavelength lights. The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase were remarkably increased for green light exposure of gold nanoparticles suggesting fungi adaption to increased oxidative stress induced by irradiated particles; increased level of lipid peroxidation was showed by high concentration of malondialdehyde for white light exposed gold particles since antioxidant enzymes were less active. PMID:27063667

  10. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarathi Kundu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001 substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  11. Biosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extracts of tamarindus indica L leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, S. N.; Naranjo, A. M.; Herrera, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using an extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves. Phenols, ketones and carboxyls were present in the leaves of T. indica. These organic compounds that allowed the synthesis of nanoparticles were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC). Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed with the extract of T. indica leaves and an Au+3 aqueous solutions (HAuCl4) at room temperature with one hour of reaction time. Characterization of gold nanoparticles was performed by UV visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX. The results indicated the formation of gold nanoparticles with a wavelength of 576nm and an average size of 52±5nm. The EDX technique confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles with 12.88% in solution.

  12. Green synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles using Fagopyrum esculentum leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Punuri Jayasekhar; Sharma, Pragya; Kalita, Mohan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the use of ethnolic extract of Fagopyrum esculentum leaves for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. UV-visible spectroscopy analysis indicated the successful formation of gold nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and were found to be spherical, hexagonal and triangular in shape with an average size of 8.3 nm. The crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) suggested the presence of organic biomolecules on the surface of the gold nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity tests against human HeLa, MCF-7 and IMR-32 cancer cell lines revealed that the gold nanoparticles were non-toxic and thus have potential for use in various biomedical applications.

  13. Eco-Friendly Synthesis of Fucoidan-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriengsak Lirdprapamongkol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Metallic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs are widely used in many applications including medical, pharmaceutical, diagnostics and sensors. The chemical synthesis of AuNPs normally requires synthetic materials which might cause the toxicological concerns. The use of naturally occurring materials like fucoidans for successful synthesis of AuNPs is of interests. Approach: Fucoidans as sulfated polysaccharides from marine algae Cladosiphon okamuranus (o-fucoidan and Kjellamaniella crassifolia (t-fucoidan were used for synthesis of AuNPs. The suitable condition for the synthesis was investigated to obtain the nanometric size of AuNPs. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized for the size, morphology and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR. Results: The fucoidan-stabilized AuNPs containing optimum weight ratio of gold atom to fucoidan yielded the spherical sizes with an average of 8-10 nm and the absorption maxima of SPR band around 527-530 nm. The AuNPs stabilized by o-fucoidan structured as linear polymer were more monodisperse than those stabilized by t-fucoidan structured as branched polymer. Conclusion: Fucoidan can be employed solely for AuNP synthesis and the sulfate constituent in fucoidan is important for gold reduction and stabilization. The simple yet eco-friendly synthesis of AuNPs stabilized by fucoidans would be attractive for application use of metallic nanoparticles.

  14. Peptide-coated gold nanoparticles for modulation of angiogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Heuer-Jungemann, Amelie; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Kanaras, Antonios G; Baptista, Pedro V

    2016-01-01

    In this work, peptides designed to selectively interact with cellular receptors involved in the regulation of angiogenesis were anchored to oligo-ethylene glycol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and used to evaluate the modulation of vascular development using an ex ovo chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. These nanoparticles alter the balance between naturally secreted pro- and antiangiogenic factors, under various biological conditions, without causing toxicity. Exposure of chorioallantoic membranes to AuNP–peptide activators of angiogenesis accelerated the formation of new arterioles when compared to scrambled peptide-coated nanoparticles. On the other hand, antiangiogenic AuNP–peptide conjugates were able to selectively inhibit angiogenesis in vivo. We demonstrated that AuNP vectorization is crucial for enhancing the effect of active peptides. Our data showed for the first time the effective control of activation or inhibition of blood vessel formation in chick embryo via AuNP-based formulations suitable for the selective modulation of angiogenesis, which is of paramount importance in applications where promotion of vascular growth is desirable (eg, wound healing) or ought to be contravened, as in cancer development. PMID:27354794

  15. Synthesis of mercaptothiadiazole-functionalized gold nanoparticles and their self-assembly on Au substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized with mercaptothiadiazole ligands, 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (DMT), 5-amino-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (AMT) and 5-methyl-2-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (MMT), were prepared by the reaction of the respective ligands with HAuCl4 and NaBH4 in an aqueous medium. TEM images show that the average size of AuNPs was 6.5 ± 0.5 nm, irrespective of the capping ligands. The colloidal solution of both DMT-capped AuNPs (DMT-AuNPs) and AMT-capped AuNPs (AMT-AuNPs) were highly stable for several months. However, several changes were noticed for MMT-capped AuNPs (MMT-AuNPs) after 2 h from its formation. The SPR band intensity at 518 nm decreases and the narrow SPR absorption band slowly changes into a flat absorption pattern with a broad peak from 518 to 1000 nm which was accompanied by a colour change of the solution from red to purple and then blue and thereafter unchanged. The TEM image of MMT-AuNPs after 96 h shows that most of the spherical shape of the AuNPs assembled to form a nanowire-like structure. The observed changes may be due to the absence of a strong stabilizing force on the surface of the MMT-AuNPs. The amino and thiolate groups on the surface of the AMT-AuNPs and DMT-AuNPs, respectively, were directly self-assembled on Au electrodes. They exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of AA by enhancing its oxidation current twice in addition to more than 200 mV negative shift in the oxidation potential in contrast to bare Au electrode

  16. Cell-specific optoporation with near-infrared ultrafast laser and functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Eric; Boutopoulos, Christos; Martel, Rosalie; Torres, Alexandre; Rodriguez, Camille; Niskanen, Jukka; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Winnik, Françoise M.; Sapieha, Przemyslaw; Meunier, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Selective targeting of diseased cells can increase therapeutic efficacy and limit off-target adverse effects. We developed a new tool to selectively perforate living cells with functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond (fs) laser. The receptor CD44 strongly expressed by cancer stem cells was used as a model for selective targeting. Citrate-capped AuNPs (100 nm in diameter) functionalized with 0.01 orthopyridyl-disulfide-poly(ethylene glycol) (5 kDa)-N-hydroxysuccinimide (OPSS-PEG-NHS) conjugated to monoclonal antibodies per nm2 and 5 μM HS-PEG (5 kDa) were colloidally stable in cell culture medium containing serum proteins. These AuNPs attached mostly as single particles 115 times more to targeted CD44+ MDA-MB-231 and CD44+ ARPE-19 cells than to non-targeted CD44- 661W cells. Optimally functionalized AuNPs enhanced the fs laser (800 nm, 80-100 mJ cm-2 at 250 Hz or 60-80 mJ cm-2 at 500 Hz) to selectively perforate targeted cells without affecting surrounding non-targeted cells in co-culture. This novel highly versatile treatment paradigm can be adapted to target and perforate other cell populations by adapting to desired biomarkers. Since living biological tissues absorb energy very weakly in the NIR range, the developed non-invasive tool may provide a safe, cost-effective clinically relevant approach to ablate pathologically deregulated cells and limit complications associated with surgical interventions.Selective targeting of diseased cells can increase therapeutic efficacy and limit off-target adverse effects. We developed a new tool to selectively perforate living cells with functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond (fs) laser. The receptor CD44 strongly expressed by cancer stem cells was used as a model for selective targeting. Citrate-capped AuNPs (100 nm in diameter) functionalized with 0.01 orthopyridyl-disulfide-poly(ethylene glycol) (5 kDa)-N-hydroxysuccinimide (OPSS

  17. Modulating Gold Nanoparticle in vivo Delivery for Photothermal Therapy Applications Using a T Cell Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Laura Carpin

    This thesis reports new gold nanoparticle-based methods to treat chemotherapy-resistant and metastatic tumors that frequently evade conventional cancer therapies. Gold nanoparticles represent an innovative generation of diagnostic and treatment agents due to the ease with which they can be tuned to scatter or absorb a chosen wavelength of light. One area of intensive investigation in recent years is gold nanoparticle photothermal therapy (PTT), in which gold nanoparticles are used to heat and destroy cancer. This work demonstrates the utility of gold nanoparticle PTT against two categories of cancer that are currently a clinical challenge: trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer and metastatic cancer. In addition, this thesis presents a new method of gold nanoparticle delivery using T cells that increases gold nanoparticle tumor accumulation efficiency, a current challenge in the field of PTT. I ablated trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer in vitro for the first time using anti-HER2 labeled silica-gold nanoshells, demonstrating the potential utility of PTT against chemotherapy-resistant cancers. I next established for the first time the use of T cells as gold nanoparticle vehicles in vivo. When incubated with gold nanoparticles in culture, T cells can internalize up to 15000 nanoparticles per cell with no detrimental effects to T cell viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine secretion). These AuNP-T cells can be systemically administered to tumor-bearing mice and deliver gold nanoparticles four times more efficiently than by injecting free nanoparticles. In addition, the biodistribution of AuNP-T cells correlates with the normal biodistribution of T cell carrier, suggesting the gold nanoparticle biodistribution can be modulated through the choice of nanoparticle vehicle. Finally, I apply gold nanoparticle PTT as an adjuvant treatment for T cell adoptive transfer immunotherapy (Hyperthermia-Enhanced Immunotherapy or HIT) of distant tumors in a melanoma mouse

  18. Highly stable noble metal nanoparticles dispersible in biocompatible solvents: synthesis of cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles in water and DMSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju-Nam, Yon; Abdussalam-Mohammed, Wanisa; Ojeda, Jesus J

    2016-04-12

    In this work, we report the synthesis of novel cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersible in water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for their potential use in biomedical applications. All the cationic-functionalising ligands currently reported in the literature are ammonium-based species. Here, the synthesis and characterisation of an alternative system, based on phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions and phosphonioalkylthioacetate were carried out. We have also demonstrated that our phosphonioalkylthiosulfate zwitterions readily disproportionate into phosphonioalkylthiolates in situ during the synthesis of gold nanoparticles produced by the borohydride reduction of gold(iii) salts. The synthesis of the cationic gold nanoparticles using these phosphonium ligands was carried out in water and DMSO. UV-visible spectroscopic and TEM studies have shown that the phosphonioalkylthiolates bind to the surface of gold nanoparticles which are typically around 10 nm in diameter. The resulting cationic-functionalised gold nanoparticles are dispersible in aqueous media and in DMSO, which is the only organic solvent approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for drug carrier tests. This indicates their potential future use in biological applications. This work shows the synthesis of a new family of phosphonium-based ligands, which behave as cationic masked thiolate ligands in the functionalisation of gold nanoparticles. These highly stable colloidal cationic phosphonium gold nanoparticles dispersed in water and DMSO can offer a great opportunity for the design of novel biorecognition and drug delivery systems. PMID:26796782

  19. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira dos Santos, Margarida, E-mail: margarida.santos@fct.unl.pt; Queiroz, Margarida Joao; Baptista, Pedro V. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, CIGMH, Departamento Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia (Portugal)

    2012-05-15

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 {+-} 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a {beta}-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle-antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  20. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Whole Cells of Geotrichum candidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mittal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanoparticles with desired size and shape is an important area of research in nanotechnology. Use of biological system is an alternative approach to chemical and physical procedures for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. An efficient environment-friendly approach for the biosynthesis of rapid and stable Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs using whole cells of Geotrichum candidum is discussed in this paper. The enzymes/proteins present in the microorganism might be responsible for the reduction of metal salts to nanoparticles. Various reaction parameters such as culture age, temperature, pH, metal salt, and cell mass concentrations were optimized. The AuNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Nanoparticles were isolated by sonicating the whole cells after treatment with Tween 80. The whole cell mediated process showed the simplistic, feasible, easy to scale up, and low-cost approach for the synthesis of AuNPs.

  1. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 ± 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  2. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, Sara [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Doyle, Hugh [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Blasco, Julian [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Marine Science Institute of Andalusia, Cadiz (Spain); Redmond, Gareth [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 {+-} 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  3. Quaternized Chitosan-Capped Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles as Nanocarriers for Controlled Pesticide Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidong Cao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology-based pesticide formulations would ensure effective utilization of agricultural inputs. In the present work, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs with particle diameters of ~110 nm and pore sizes of ~3.7 nm were synthesized via a liquid crystal templating mechanism. A water-soluble chitosan (CS derivative (N-(2-hydroxylpropyl-3-trimethyl ammonium CS chloride, HTCC was successfully capped on the surface of pyraclostrobin-loaded MSNs. The physicochemical and structural analyses showed that the electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding were the major forces responsible for the formation of HTCC-capped MSNs. HTCC coating greatly improved the loading efficiency (LC (to 40.3% compared to using bare MSNs as a single encapsulant (26.7%. The microstructure of the nanoparticles was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The pyraclostrobin-loaded nanoparticles showed an initial burst and subsequent sustained release behavior. HTCC-capped MSNs released faster than bare MSNs in the initial stage. Pyraclostrobin-loaded HTCC-capped MSNs with half doses of pyraclostrobin technical demonstrated almost the same fungicidal activity against Phomopsis asparagi (Sacc., which obviously reduced the applied pesticide and enhanced the utilization efficiency. Therefore, HTCC-decorated MSNs demonstrated great potential as nanocarriers in agrochemical applications.

  4. Singlet oxygen prediction in gold nanoparticles-assisted PDT applied to a squamous cell carcinoma in the esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Salas García, Irene; Fanjul Vélez, Félix; Ortega Quijano, Noé; Arce Diego, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    A predictive model for PDT singlet oxygen production in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas with gold nanoparticles is proposed. Differences enhance the ¹O₂ -mediated oxidative damage due to the optical absorption improvement by gold nanoparticles.

  5. XPS analysis of oleylamine/oleic acid capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized solvothermally using oleylamine and oleic acid as surfactants, and the surface composition was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as a function of temperature, from the as-synthesized nanoparticles to those annealed under vacuum at 883K. XPS of the as-synthesized nanoparticles was consistent with a surface composition of stoichiometric Fe3O4 capped with a mixture of monodentate carboxylate and chemisorbed amine, although the surface was enriched in carboxylate over that present in the synthesis reaction concentration. The method of synthesis and capping surfactants effectively protect the nanoparticle surface from detectable hydroxylation. The capped nanoparticle is stable for 24 h at 373K, and the capping agents persist to 523K, at which point the oleylamine decomposes to desorb nitrogen and deposit aliphatic carbon from the capping tail. The carboxylate decomposes over a wider range and at 883K some carboxylate remains on the surface. The iron oxide nanoparticle undergoes substantial reduction as the aliphatic capping tail decomposes. While the as-introduced nanoparticle is essentially Fe3O4, reduction to FeO, Fe and Fe3C occurs sequentially as the nanoparticle is heated to higher temperatures.

  6. Unique Gold Nanoparticle Aggregates as a Highly Active SERS Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartzberg, A M; Grant, C D; Wolcott, A; Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Bogomolni, R; Zhang, J Z

    2004-04-06

    A unique gold nanoparticle aggregate (GNA) system has been shown to be an excellent substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. Rhodamine 6G (R6G), a common molecule used for testing SERS activity on silver, but generally difficult to detect on gold substrates, has been found to readily bind to the GNA and exhibit strong SERS activity due to the unique surface chemistry afforded by sulfur species on the surface. This GNA system has yielded a large SERS enhancement of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} in bulk solution for R6G, on par with or greater than any previously reported gold SERS substrate. SERS activity has also been successfully demonstrated for several biological molecules including adenine, L-cysteine, L-lysine, and L-histidine for the first time on a gold SERS substrate, showing the potential of this GNA as a convenient and powerful SERS substrate for biomolecular detection. In addition, SERS spectrum of R6G on single aggregates has been measured. We have shown that the special surface properties of the GNA, in conjunction with strong near IR absorption, make it useful for SERS analysis of a wide variety of molecules.

  7. Surface geometry of tryptophan adsorbed on gold colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Pang, Yoonsoo

    2015-09-01

    Two distinct surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectra of tryptophan depending on the surface adsorption geometry were obtained by using colloidal gold nanoparticles reduced by borohydride and citrate ions. According to the vibrational assignments based on DFT simulations, the SER spectra of tryptamine and 3-indolepropionic acid, and the pH dependence of tryptophan SER spectrum, we found that some indole ring vibrations are very sensitive to the surface adsorption geometry of the molecules. With citrate-reduced gold colloids, tryptophan and related molecules mainly adsorb via the protonated amine group while maintaining a perpendicular geometry of the indole ring to the surface. However, a flat geometry of the indole ring to the surface is preferred on the borohydride-reduced gold colloids where the surface adsorption occurs mainly through the indole ring π electrons. By comparing our results with previous reports on the SER spectra of tryptophan on various silver and gold surfaces, we propose a general adsorption model of tryptophan on metal nanosurfaces.

  8. Fluorescence signals of core-shell quantum dots enhanced by single crystalline gold caps on silicon nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use nanoscale (20-300 nm in diameter) single crystalline gold (Au)-caps on silicon nanowires (NWs) grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism to enhance the fluorescence photoluminescence (PL) signals of highly dilute core/shell CdSeTe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous solution (10-5 M). For NWs without Au-caps, as they appear, for example, after Au etching in aqua regia or buffered KI/I2-solution, essentially no fluorescence signal of the same diluted QDs could be observed. Fluorescence PL signals were measured using excitation with a laser wavelength of 633 nm. The signal enhancement by single crystalline, nanoscale Au-caps is discussed and interpreted based on finite element modeling (FEM).

  9. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Pseudomonas veronii AS41G inhabiting Annona squamosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Syed; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2015-11-01

    Biogenic principles to nanotechnology have generated tremendous attention in recent past owing eco friendly benign process for synthesis of nanoparticles. Present investigation reports extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using cell free supernatant of Pseudomonas veronii AS 41G, a novel endophyte isolated from Annona squamosa L. Gold nanoparticles formation was confirmed with UV-Visible spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis predicted various functional groups responsible for reduction of metal salts and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were crystalline in nature as shown in XRD pattern. TEM analysis revealed morphological characteristics of nanoparticles with different size. Thus the present study attributes for facile process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles as an alternative for conventional methods. The study also highlights the new role of novel bacterium Pseudomonas veronii AS41G which will be very valuable as a record for the researchers working on it. PMID:26093965

  10. Controlling the morphology of multi-branched gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Waqqar; Stefan Kooij, E; Van Silfhout, Arend; Poelsema, Bene, E-mail: e.s.kooij@tnw.utwente.nl [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, NL-7500AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2010-03-26

    We demonstrate a simple and versatile way to achieve high yield synthesis of shape- and size-controlled multi-branched gold nanoparticles (MBNPs). Control over the shape of the MBNPs was achieved by varying the ratio of gold to the mild reducing agent ascorbic acid, using a seed-mediated growth approach. Higher ascorbate concentrations resulted in the smoothing of branches, leading to the yield of relatively more isotropic particles. Furthermore, we found that using much higher silver concentrations in the growth solution resulted in the formation of rod-shaped micro-features together with MBNPs; we postulate them to be cetyltrimethyl ammonium silver bromide crystals. The as-prepared MBNPs show interesting tunable optical properties that are strongly influenced by the particle shape. The results are discussed in terms of plasmon coupling between the core and branches of the MBNPs.

  11. Antibody immobilized cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles for aflatoxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Aditya; Matharu, Zimple; Sumana, G.; Solanki, Pratima R. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kim, C.G. [Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Malhotra, B.D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.co [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-30

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} antibody (aAFB{sub 1}) covalently attached to cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles (C-AuNP) has been immobilized onto 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) based self assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode (MBA/Au), for the fabrication of BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode. This immunoelectrode has been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical characterization techniques. The electrochemical response studies reveal that the BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode can be used to detect AFB{sub 1} in the range of 10-100 ng dL{sup -1} and has sensitivity as 0.45 {mu}A ng{sup -1} dL, limit of detection as 17.90 ng dL{sup -1} and a response time of 60 s.

  12. Antibody immobilized cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles for aflatoxin detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflatoxin B1 antibody (aAFB1) covalently attached to cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles (C-AuNP) has been immobilized onto 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) based self assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode (MBA/Au), for the fabrication of BSA/aAFB1-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode. This immunoelectrode has been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical characterization techniques. The electrochemical response studies reveal that the BSA/aAFB1-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode can be used to detect AFB1 in the range of 10-100 ng dL-1 and has sensitivity as 0.45 μA ng-1 dL, limit of detection as 17.90 ng dL-1 and a response time of 60 s.

  13. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  14. Gold Nanoparticles and Their Alternatives for Radiation Therapy Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Daniel; Bekah, Devesh; Nadeau, Jay

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79). However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy. Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions.

  15. Study of size dependent photoluminescence properties of copper doped sodium hexametaphosphate capped ZnS nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper doped ZnS nanoparticles stabilized by sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) have been prepared via the wet chemical method using thiourea and sodium sulphide as chalcogenide sources. The XRD pattern showed that ZnS nanoparticles had zinc blende structure and line broadening suggests the formation of an amorphous compound. Absorption measurements were done for three different concentrations of dopant concentrations. The PL spectrum for the sample synthesized using Na2S·9H2O showed a sharp emission peak around 510 nm with full width at half maximum (FWHM)<10 nm. The role of the capping agent and sulphide source on optical properties of as synthesized nanoparticles by steady-state photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has been studied. - Highlights: ► SHMP capped ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were prepared by wet the chemical method. ► Particle size depended on the chalcogenide source. ► PL spectrum shows variation with different chalcogenide sources. ► Luminescence mechanism arises due to complex interaction between host-dopant and capping agent.

  16. Cytotoxicity evaluation and antimicrobial studies of starch capped water soluble copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Bactericidal action of water soluble starch copper nanoconjugate was investigated. ► Mode of action comparable to ampicillin and MIC as low as 1.6 μg/ml. ► The SCuNPs were non-toxic to mouse embryonic fibroblasts. ► Cell viability was higher than uncapped CuNPs and cupric ions. ► Promising biomedical applications due to high therapeutic index. - Abstract: Water soluble monodisperse copper nanoparticles of about 10 nm diameter were prepared by microwave irradiation using starch as green capping agent. The resulting Cu–starch conjugate were characterized by FTIR and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The study confirmed the presence of copper embedded in polysaccharide matrix. The aqueous solution of starch capped copper nanoparticles (SCuNPs) exhibited excellent bactericidal action against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of the nanoparticles was carried out using mouse embryonic fibroblast (3T3L1) cells by MTT cell viability assay, extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and dark field microscopy imaging. The capped nanoparticles exhibited cytotoxicity at much higher concentration compared to cupric ions. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of SCuNPs was well below the in vitro cytotoxic concentration. Statistical analysis demonstrated p 0.05 for non-significant ones as compared to untreated cells. The non-cytotoxic green Cu–starch conjugate offers a rational approach towards antimicrobial application and for integration to biomedical devices.

  17. Capsaicin-capped silver nanoparticles: its kinetics, characterization and biocompatibility assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amruthraj, Nagoth Joseph; Preetam Raj, John Poonga; Lebel, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Capsaicin was used as a bio-reductant for the reduction of silver nitrate to form silver nanoparticles. The formation of the silver nanoparticles was initially confirmed by color change and Tyndall effect of light scattering. It was characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, FTIR and TEM. Hemagglutination (H) test and H-inhibition assay were performed in the presence of AgNPs-capsaicin conjugates. The silver colloid solution after complete reduction turned into pale gray color. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) was observed at 450 nm. Time taken for complete bio-reduction of silver nitrate and capping was found to be 16 hours. The amount of capsaicin required to reduce 20 ml of 1 mM silver nitrate solution was found to be 40 μg approximately. The FTIR results confirmed the capping of capsaicin on the silver metal. The particle size was within the range of 20-30 nm. The hemagglutination and H-inhibition test was negative for all the blood groups. The capsaicin-capped silver nanoparticles were compatible with blood cells in hemagglutination test implying biocompatibility as future therapeutic drug.

  18. High coercivity of oleic acid capped CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Mukta V; Singh, Shashi B; Date, Sadgopal K; Kothari, Deepti; Reddy, V Raghavendra; Gupta, Ajay; Sathe, Vasant; Choudhary, Ram Jane; Kulkarni, Sulabha K

    2009-07-01

    High coercivity (9.47 kOe) has been obtained for oleic acid capped chemically synthesized CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles of crystallite size approximately 20 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the formation of spinel phase in these nanoparticles. Thermal annealing at various temperatures increases the particle size and ultimately shows bulk like properties at particle size approximately 56 nm. The nature of bonding of oleic acid with CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles and amount of oleic acid in the sample is determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogrvimetric analysis, respectively. The Raman analysis suggests that the samples are under strain due to capping molecules. Cation distribution in the sample is studied using Mossbauer spectroscopy. Oleic acid concentration dependent studies show that the amount of capping molecules plays an important role in achieving such a high coercivity. On the basis of above observations, it has been proposed that very high coercivity (9.47 kOe) is the result of the magnetic anisotropy, strain, and disorder of the surface spins developed by covalently bonded oleic acid to the surface of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles. PMID:19522478

  19. Effect on nerve structures of functionalized gold-chitosan nanoparticles obtained by one pot synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Dobromir

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. In this study we observed significant effects of functionalized gold-chitosan nanoparticles obtained by one pot synthesis on nerve structures of Wistar rats.

  20. Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles containing multiple nanopores for enhanced photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisoo; Kang, Heesung; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Tae Geol; Wi, Jung-Sub

    2016-08-25

    Physically-synthesized gold nanoparticles having a narrow size distribution and containing multiple nanopores have been utilized as photothermal converters and imaging contrast agents. Nanopores within the gold nanoparticles make it possible to increase the light-absorption cross-section and consequently exhibit distinct improvements in photothermal conversion and photoacoustic imaging efficiencies. PMID:27527067

  1. Synthesis and anticancer properties of fucoidan-mimetic glycopolymer coated gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Tengdelius, Mattias; Gurav, Deepanjali; Konradsson, Peter; Påhlsson, Peter; Griffith, May; Oommen, Oommen P.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles coated with fucoidan-mimetic glycopolymers were synthesized that displayed good colloidal stability and promising anti-cancer properties. Fucoidan mimetic glycopolymers on their own were nontoxic, while glycopolymer coated gold nanoparticles displayed selective cytotoxicity to human colon cancer cell lines (HCT116) while it was non-toxic to mouse fibroblast cells (NIH3T3).

  2. Radical Scavenging Efficacy of Thiol Capped Silver Nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kumudini Chandraker; Sandeep Kumar Vaishanav; Rekha Nagwanshi; Manmohan L Satnami

    2015-12-01

    Radical scavenging efficacy of L-cysteine (L-Cys), glutathione (GSH) and thioctic acid (TA) in the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were determined by 1,1-diphenyl 2-picryl hydrazil (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals as spectrophotometric assay. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging efficacy has been determined by titration method. Ascorbic acid has been used as standard for all radical scavenging efficacies. In general, antioxidant activity decreases in the presence of AgNPs. The covalent interactions of thiols (-SH) were found to be a key factor for the decreases in scavenging activity. The effect of thiol concentrations has been discussed. The size and shape of the nanoparticles and AgNP-SR interactions have been characterized through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively.

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Gold Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In presented work we report results of simple and viable method for producing Au/CNT composites. Chemical composition and crystallographic structure of the Au/CNT composites was confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements, while transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of nanocrystals as well as the distribution of nanocrystals in the composite. The obtained particles with relatively small diameter (less than 9 nm) were found to be spatially well dispersed on the carbon nanotubes. The density of attached Au-nanoparticles is not sufficient, and cannot be improved by simple increasing gold loading. (authors)

  4. Assembly of gold nanoparticles of different diameters between nanogap electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) of different diameters i.e., 5, 10, and 20 nm, were assembled between 20 nm gap electrodes using ac dielectrophoresis (DEP) process. DEP parameters, such as frequency, trapping time, and voltage of value 1 MHz, 1 s, and 2-3 V, respectively, led to the pearl-chain assembly corresponding to each type of NPs between 20 nm gap electrodes. Mutual DEP could be attributed to the NPs chaining in low field regions and subsequently the DEP force directs these chains to the trapping region. Such controlled assembly of individual NPs may find application in fabricating devices for molecular electronics.

  5. Enhanced Photoluminescence Property for Quantum Dot-Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Qianqian; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Jian; Pan, Jiangyong; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Zichen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we have synthesized ZnCdSeS quantum dots (QDs)-gold nanoparticle (Au NPs) hybrids in aqueous solution via bi-functional linker mercaptoacetic acid (MPA). The absorption peaks of ZnCdSeS QDs and Au are both located at 520 nm. It is investigated that PL intensity of QD-Au hybrid can be affected by the amounts of Au and pH value of hybrid solution. The located surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of QD-Au NPs has been demonstrated by increased fluorescence intensity. The phenom...

  6. Gold Nanoparticles Catalyze Hydrogen Evolution on Mercury Electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovský, Michael; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Korshunov, A.

    Praha : Ústav fyzikální chemie J. Heyrovského AV ČR, v.v.i, 2011 - (Mansfeldová, V.; Tarábková, H.). s. 17-18 ISBN 978-80-87351-17-8. [Heyrovský Discussion. Nanostructures on Electrodes /44./. 26.06.2011-30.06.2011, Třešť] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/1638; GA AV ČR IAA400400806; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : gold nanoparticles * mercury electrode Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  7. Utilizing Gold Nanoparticle Probes to Visually Detect DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kui; Zhang, Mingyi; Chang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Lin; Gu, Weihong; Qin, Yanxia; Li, Juan; Cui, Suxia; Xing, Gengmei

    2016-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect endows gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with the ability to visualize biomolecules. In the present study, we designed and constructed a GNP probe to allow the semi-quantitative analysis of methylated tumor suppressor genes in cultured cells. To construct the probe, the GNP surfaces were coated with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by forming Au–S bonds. The ssDNA contains a thiolated 5′-end, a regulatory domain of 12 adenine nucleotides, and a functional domain ...

  8. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Heide, Susan; RUSSELL, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP...

  9. PXRF characterization of gold nanoparticles in human cancer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: Nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and nanotubes, have been widely used in biotechnology and medicine. Applications include systems for controlled release of drugs, biomarkers, biosensors and devices for diagnosis of various diseases like cancer, tuberculosis and Chagas. In the case of cancer, the success of current anti-cancer therapy depends on the speed of diagnosis. Gold nanoparticles can be used to visualize lesions or to destroy cancer cells. In this study, was developed a methodology for identification and quantification of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) deposited on polymer films and matrices that simulate the human skin with pH 7.4, as well as determining the radiation dose of the measures. The nanoparticles were chemically synthesized at the Laboratory of Nanomedicine and nanotoxicology the IFSC/USP and used in concentrations from 1 ppm to 1000 ppm. The measurements were performed with the portable system of the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics (LFNA-UEL), composed of X-ray detector type S-PIN with a resolution of 149 eV for the line at 5.9 keV Mn (AMPTEK) and an X-ray detector type Si-Drift with a resolution of 139 eV for 5.9 keV line of Fe (AMPTEK) and standard electronics, the excitation of samples was performed with a mini X-ray tube with target Silver operated at 28 kV and 10μ A (MOXTEK). Filters were used for silver and aluminum in the output of X-ray tube. The positioner for the set of excitation-detection allows degrees of freedom of translation and rotation. The lower limit of quantification was 5 ppm of gold, using measurement times of 300 s to 1000 s, with R2 ranging from 0.92 to 0.96. X-ray fluorescence lines of gold were analyzed by 8.5 keV, 9.7 keV and 11.4 keV showing a statistical deviation of 0.24. (author)

  10. PXRF characterization of gold nanoparticles in human cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Fabio; Estevam, Marcelo; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Panis, Carolina; Galvao, Tiago Dutra [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil); Zucolotto, Valtencir [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text: Nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and nanotubes, have been widely used in biotechnology and medicine. Applications include systems for controlled release of drugs, biomarkers, biosensors and devices for diagnosis of various diseases like cancer, tuberculosis and Chagas. In the case of cancer, the success of current anti-cancer therapy depends on the speed of diagnosis. Gold nanoparticles can be used to visualize lesions or to destroy cancer cells. In this study, was developed a methodology for identification and quantification of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) deposited on polymer films and matrices that simulate the human skin with pH 7.4, as well as determining the radiation dose of the measures. The nanoparticles were chemically synthesized at the Laboratory of Nanomedicine and nanotoxicology the IFSC/USP and used in concentrations from 1 ppm to 1000 ppm. The measurements were performed with the portable system of the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics (LFNA-UEL), composed of X-ray detector type S-PIN with a resolution of 149 eV for the line at 5.9 keV Mn (AMPTEK) and an X-ray detector type Si-Drift with a resolution of 139 eV for 5.9 keV line of Fe (AMPTEK) and standard electronics, the excitation of samples was performed with a mini X-ray tube with target Silver operated at 28 kV and 10{mu} A (MOXTEK). Filters were used for silver and aluminum in the output of X-ray tube. The positioner for the set of excitation-detection allows degrees of freedom of translation and rotation. The lower limit of quantification was 5 ppm of gold, using measurement times of 300 s to 1000 s, with R2 ranging from 0.92 to 0.96. X-ray fluorescence lines of gold were analyzed by 8.5 keV, 9.7 keV and 11.4 keV showing a statistical deviation of 0.24. (author)

  11. Laser-fabricated castor oil-capped silver nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Zamiri, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Reza Zamiri1, Azmi Zakaria1, Hossein Abbastabar2, Majid Darroudi3, Mohd Shahril Husin1, Mohd Adzir Mahdi41Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, 2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, 3Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), 4Wireless and Photonics Networks Research Center, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, MalaysiaAbstract: Silver nanoparticles were fabricated by ablation of a pure silver plate ...

  12. Colorimetric sensor array based on gold nanoparticles and amino acids for identification of toxic metal ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Gulsu; Uzun, Lokman; Denizli, Adil

    2014-01-01

    A facile colorimetric sensor array for detection of multiple toxic heavy metal ions (Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Cu(2+), and Cr(3+)) in water is demonstrated using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and five amino acids (lysine, cysteine, histidine, tyrosine, and arginine). The presence of amino acids (which have functional groups that can form complexes with metal ions and MUA) regulates the aggregation of MUA-capped particles; it can either enhance or diminish the particle aggregation. The combinatorial colorimetric response of all channels of the sensor array (i.e., color change in each of AuNP and amino acid couples) enables naked-eye discrimination of all of the metal ions tested in this study with excellent selectivity. PMID:25330256

  13. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bang, Nipaporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a `green chemistry' approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round shape and uniform size with diameter at around 48 to 117 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy result proved that the carboxylate groups obtained from alkaline degradation of SS would be a reducing agent for the generation of AgNPs while COO- and NH2 + groups stabilized the AgNPs and prevented their precipitation or aggregation. Furthermore, the SS-capped AgNPs showed potent anti-bacterial activity against various gram-positive bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.008 mM) and gram-negative bacteria (MIC ranging from 0.001 to 0.004 mM). Therefore, the SS-capped AgNPs would be a safe candidate for anti-bacterial applications.

  14. Isolation and identification of gold nanoparticles synthesizing fungi from Indian Kolar Gold Field mine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V Jhansi; Kannan, K P

    2016-07-01

    An indigenous fungal strain was isolated from Indian Kolar Gold Field mine soil. The isolate was heterothallic, branched septate, deeply floccose, fast-growing, dull green with white background conidial columnar mycelium from Aspergillus section Fumigati. Diverse metabolic patterns of the isolate exhibit high metal, thermal resistance which grews well from 28 ± 1 degrees C to 37 degrees C and pH concentration was significant on the growth of isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of 16srRNA β-Tubulin gene sequence established relationship among isolate and other taxa. Molecular identification and morphological features of fungal isolate were consistent with those of Neosartorya udagawae. Heterothallic N. udagawae FJ830683 strain was closely related to homothallic N. aureola EF661890. Fungal isolate extract synthesized narrow sized stable Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). PMID:27498502

  15. Dielectric Anisotropy of Gold Nanoparticle Colloids in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Angelo; Foust, Jon; Mahmood, Rizwan

    We present electrical and optical studies of hexanethiol-treated gold nanoparticle (GNPs) colloids in 4-cyano-4 '-pentyl-biphenyl (5CB) liquid crystals. Preliminary data analysis suggests an unusual behavior of sudden drop and then rise in the dielectric anisotropy at a critical concentration of 0.0862% by wt. GNPs and a sudden rise and then drop in the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. Above the critical concentration the data level off to within the uncertainty of the experimental errors. This colloidal system will help us to understand the interaction and the effects of nanoparticles on the self-assembly of LC molecules and the manner in which these particles organize in LC. This study is important for further developments in nanotechnology, sharp and fast display panels, and within the medical field.

  16. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  17. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Eyleen; Olmedo, Ivonne; Bastus, Neus G.; Guerrero, Simón; Puntes, Víctor F.; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J.

    2008-11-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesising, Characterizing and Reviewing Novel Application in Recent Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granmayeh Rad, Adeleh; Abbasi, Hamed; Afzali, Mohammad Hossein

    In this paper we report the synthesis of gold nanoparticles during laser ablation of a metal gold plate in distilled water. The experiments were performed with a first harmonic (1064 nm, 6 ns, 10 Hz) output of a Nd:YAG laser varying the operative fluency between 5 Jcm-2 and 15 Jcm-2. The results indicate that gold nanoparticles are synthesized at room temperature.In this paper we give an overview of the properties of gold relevant to its potential application in molecular-scale devices absorption spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were employed to determine the optical properties and size of gold nanoparticles. And novel applications of gold nanoparticles have been studied in various fields.

  19. Biosynthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles using Maduca longifolia extract and their potential in infrared absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayaz, A Mohammed; Girilal, M; Venkatesan, R; Kalaichelvan, P T

    2011-11-01

    Metal nanoparticles, in general, and gold nanoparticles, in particular, are very attractive because of their size- and shape-dependent properties. Biosynthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Madhuca longifolia and their potential as IR blockers has been demonstrated. The tyrosine residue was identified as the active functional group for gold ion reduction. These gold nanoparticles were characterized by of UV-Vis spectrophotometer, FTIR, TEM and HrTEM. The presence of proteins was identified by FTIR, SDS-PAGE, UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The micrograph revealed the formation of anisotropic gold nanoaprticles. The biologically synthesized gold nanotriangles can be easily coated in the glass windows which are highly efficient in absorbing IR radiations. PMID:21802261

  20. Highly stable gelatin layer-protected gold nanoparticles as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changwon; Zhang, Peng

    2014-06-01

    Amine and carboxylic groups rich gelatin was used as reducing and stabilizing agent to form highly stable gold nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. The size of the particle was determined to be 13 nm by TEM with mono-dispersity. The size of the gold nanoparticles was little affected by the initial gelatin concentration. The gelatin-gold nanoparticles show strong SERS activity with Rhodamine 6G and Ruthenium bipyridine as reporter molecules. Both carboxylic acid groups and amine groups were identified by FT-IR to be present on the gelatin-gold nanoparticle surface, providing the possibility of further conjugation with other molecules. The gelatin-protected gold nanoparticles prepared by this simple, green, method displayed very good solubility and stability in many solvents, and good monodispersity, all desirable features as good SERS substrates. PMID:24738391

  1. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liau Ian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  2. Gold and silver nanoparticles based superquenching of fluorescence: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The short review highlights the recent advances on the gold and silver nanoparticles induced efficient quenching of fluorescence from various fluorophores looking at their promising use as optical rulers and chemo-/bio- sensors. The fluorescence quenching often leads to the increase in the Stern–Volmer constant (KSV~107–1010 mol−1 dm3) several orders of magnitude higher than the values observed for the normal photochemical quenching processes (~102 mol−1 dm3). This amplified quenching has been termed as “super-quenching” or “hyper-quenching”. Energy transfer (ET) is established from the donor to the metal nanoparticles rationalizing these fast quenching processes. Considering the distance dependence of the ET process, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) are ascribed to take place. These sensitive distance dependent phenomena serve as the spectroscopic ruler to measure the intra- or intermolecular distances between the interacting partners. In this account focus has been laid on the size dependent energy transfer and super- and hyper- quenching of the fluorescence of the donor moieties by the nanometals and their probable applications in sensing. Rationalization has been made for the nanoparticle induced huge enhancement in the quenching efficiency. The impact of this review lies in the possible application of these amplified quenching processes in designing high sensitive chemical and biological sensors. - Highlights: • Super efficient quenching of fluorescence of probes by gold and silver nanoparticles is highlighted. • The amplified fluorescence quenching of dyes and polymers is rationalized. • Energy transfer is assigned to be responsible for the efficient quenching process. • Amplified quenching has its potential use in designing sensitive chemical/biological sensors

  3. Gold and silver nanoparticles based superquenching of fluorescence: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Chattopadhyay, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.chattopadhyay@yahoo.com

    2015-04-15

    The short review highlights the recent advances on the gold and silver nanoparticles induced efficient quenching of fluorescence from various fluorophores looking at their promising use as optical rulers and chemo-/bio- sensors. The fluorescence quenching often leads to the increase in the Stern–Volmer constant (K{sub SV}~10{sup 7}–10{sup 10} mol{sup −1} dm{sup 3}) several orders of magnitude higher than the values observed for the normal photochemical quenching processes (~10{sup 2} mol{sup −1} dm{sup 3}). This amplified quenching has been termed as “super-quenching” or “hyper-quenching”. Energy transfer (ET) is established from the donor to the metal nanoparticles rationalizing these fast quenching processes. Considering the distance dependence of the ET process, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) are ascribed to take place. These sensitive distance dependent phenomena serve as the spectroscopic ruler to measure the intra- or intermolecular distances between the interacting partners. In this account focus has been laid on the size dependent energy transfer and super- and hyper- quenching of the fluorescence of the donor moieties by the nanometals and their probable applications in sensing. Rationalization has been made for the nanoparticle induced huge enhancement in the quenching efficiency. The impact of this review lies in the possible application of these amplified quenching processes in designing high sensitive chemical and biological sensors. - Highlights: • Super efficient quenching of fluorescence of probes by gold and silver nanoparticles is highlighted. • The amplified fluorescence quenching of dyes and polymers is rationalized. • Energy transfer is assigned to be responsible for the efficient quenching process. • Amplified quenching has its potential use in designing sensitive chemical/biological sensors.

  4. Characterization and catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles synthesized using ayurvedic arishtams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathy Aromal, S.; Dinesh Babu, K. V.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-10-01

    The development of new synthesis methods for monodispersed nanocrystals using cheap and nontoxic chemicals, environmentally benign solvents and renewable materials remains a challenge to the scientific community. The present work reports a new green method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Four different ayurvedic arishtams are used for the reduction of Au3+ to Au nanoparticles. This method is simple, efficient, economic and nontoxic. Gold nanoparticles having different sizes in the range from 15 to 23 nm could be obtained. The nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles is evident from bright circular spots in the SAED pattern and peaks in the XRD pattern. The synthesized gold nanoparticles show good catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by excess NaBH4. The synthesized nanoparticles are found to exhibit size dependent catalytic property, the smaller nanoparticles showing faster activity.

  5. Biogenic silver and gold nanoparticles synthesized using red ginseng root extract, and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon Ju; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; El-Agamy Farh, Mohamed; Yang, Deok Chun

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we report a green methodology for the synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles, using the root extract of the herbal medicinal plant Korean red ginseng. The silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized within 1 h and 10 min respectively. The nanoparticles generated were not aggregated, and remained stable for a long time, which suggests the nature of nanoparticles. The phytochemicals and ginsenosides present in the root extract assist in reducing and stabilizing the synthesized nanoparticles. The red ginseng root extract-generated silver nanoparticles exhibit antimicrobial activity against pathogenic microorganisms including Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Candida albicans. In addition, the silver nanoparticles exhibit biofilm degrading activity against S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, the present study opens up a new possibility of synthesizing silver and gold nanoparticles in a green and rapid manner using Korean red ginseng root extract, and explores their biomedical applications. PMID:25706249

  6. A Facile Route to Tailoring Peptide-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles Using Glutathione as a Synthon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosina Ho Wu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs of high purity and stability remains a major challenge for biological applications. This paper reports a simple synthetic strategy to prepare water-soluble peptide-stabilized AuNPs. Reduced glutathione, a natural tripeptide, was used as a synthon for the growth of two peptide chains directly on the AuNP surface. Both nonpolar (tryptophan and methionine and polar basic (histidine and dansylated arginine amino acids were conjugated to the GSH-capped AuNPs. Ultracentrifugation concentrators with polyethersulfone (PES membranes were used to purify precursor materials in each stage of the multi-step synthesis to minimize side reactions. Thin layer chromatography, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible, 1H-NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopies demonstrated that ultracentrifugation produces high purity AuNPs, with narrow polydispersity, and minimal aggregation. More importantly, it allows for more control over the composition of the final ligand structure. Studies under conditions of varying pH and ionic strength revealed that peptide length, charge, and hydrophobicity influence the stability as well as solubility of the peptide-capped AuNPs. The synthetic and purification strategies used provide a facile route for developing a library of tailored biocompatible peptide-stabilized AuNPs for biomedical applications.

  7. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Dillenia indica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sett, Arghya; Gadewar, Manoj; Sharma, Pragya; Deka, Manab; Bora, Utpal

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report a novel method of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis using aqueous fruit extract of Dillenia indica. The phytochemicals present in the fruit extract act as an effective reducing and capping agent to synthesize AuNPs. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized by spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. TEM studies revealed the particles of various sizes and mainly spherical in shape. Selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images confirmed the crystallinity of the particles. The XRD patterns showed peaks at (111), (200), (220) which exhibited preferential orientation of the AuNPs as face-centered cubic crystal. FTIR measurements confirmed the coating of phenolic compounds on the AuNPs indicating a possible role of biomolecules for the capping and efficient stabilization of the AuNPs. The synthesized AuNPs did not show any form of cytotoxicity in the normal fibroblast cell line L929.

  8. Optical absorption and photoluminescence studies of gold nanoparticles deposited on porous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Amran, Tengku Sarah Tengku; Hashim, Md Roslan; Al-Obaidi, Nihad K Ali; YAZID, Hanani; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-01-01

    We present an investigation on a coupled system consists of gold nanoparticles and silicon nanocrystals. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) embedded into porous silicon (PSi) were prepared using the electrochemical deposition method. Scanning electron microscope images and energy-dispersive X-ray results indicated that the growth of AuNPs on PSi varies with current density. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the presence of cubic gold phases with crystallite sizes around 40 to 58 nm. Size dependence o...

  9. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES BY JUSTICIA GENDARUSSA BURM F. LEAF EXTRACT

    OpenAIRE

    Ponnuswamy Renuka Devi et al.

    2012-01-01

    The unusual physio and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles are found to have more advantage in the field of medicine, diagnostics and biosensors. In the present document, it is reported that Justicia gendarussa leaf extract mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of gold ions. Three different phytochemical fractions were prepared from methanolic leaf extract by liquid-liquid extraction method using immiscible solvents. The total polyphenols, flavonoids and electron d...

  10. On Sensitivity of Molecular Specific Photoacoustic Imaging Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Joshi, Pratixa P.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    Functionalized gold nanospheres undergo receptor mediated aggregation on cancer cells that overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This phenomenon leads to a red shift in the plasmon resonance frequency of the EGFR-targeted gold nanoparticles. Previously we demonstrated that highly selective detection of cancer cells can be achieved using the combination of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging and molecular specific gold nanoparticles. In this study, we use tissue models to...

  11. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 ± 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a β-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle–antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  12. Electromagnetically assisted synthesis of highly concentrated gold nanoparticle colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Laura; Rosas, Walter; Naranjo, Guillermo; Peralta, Xomalin G.; Vargas, Watson L.

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of metallic nanoparticles is currently an extremely active area of research due to the multiple potential applications of nanomaterials to areas ranging from nano-medicine to catalysis. Some of the current challenges of nanoparticle synthesis protocols include synthesizing nanoparticles in high concentrations with a small polydispersity. The present study contrasts and compares the synthesis of highly concentrated colloidal gold using three different sources of electromagnetic radiation to assist the reaction. The first source was a Spectra Physics Mai Tai Ti:Sapphire laser made by Sperian, this laser generates 70 fs FWHM pulses with wavelengths in the range of 690-1040 nm. The second source was sun light; this was measured to have a power of 10W. The third source was a lowelDP lamp with a measured intensity of 25W. Both the solar light and the lamp's rays were concentrated using a 28cm x 28cm Fresnel lens. Results will be presented highlighting differences and similarities in size, shape, crystallinity and time of the reaction. We speculate about the role played by variations in wavelength, temporal profile of the electromagnetic source (pulsed vs. continuous), temperature of the reaction and excitation power in the final structure of the nanoparticles generated.

  13. Gold-Copper Nanoparticles: Nanostructural Evolution and Bifunctional Catalytic Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Petkov, Valeri; Cai, Fan; Ng, Mei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Bing H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-12-12

    Understanding of the atomic-scale structure is essential for exploiting the unique catalytic properties of any nanoalloy catalyst. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of the nanoscale alloying of gold-copper (AuCu) nanoparticles and its impact on the surface catalytic functions. Two pathways have been explored for the formation of AuCu nanoparticles of different compositons, including wet chemical synthesis from mixed Au- and Cu-precursor molecules, and nanoscale alloying via an evolution of mixed Au- and Cu-precursor nanoparticles near the nanoscale melting temperatures. For the evolution of mixed precursor nanoparticles, synchrotron x-ray based in-situ real time XRD was used to monitor the structural changes, revealing nanoscale alloying and reshaping towards an fcc-type nanoalloy (particle or cube) via a partial melting–resolidification mechanism. The nanoalloys supported on carbon or silica were characterized by in-situ high-energy XRD/PDFs, revealing an intriguing lattice "expanding-shrinking" phenomenon depending on whether the catalyst is thermochemically processed under oxidative or reductive atmosphere. This type of controllable structural changes is found to play an important role in determining the catalytic activity of the catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation reaction. The tunable catalytic activities of the nanoalloys under thermochemically oxidative and reductive atmospheres are also discussed in terms of the bifunctional sites and the surface oxygenated metal species for carbon monoxide and oxygen activation.

  14. Cytochrome c-Capped Fluorescent Gold Nanoclusters: Imaging of Live Cells and Delivery of Cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Amin, Md Asif; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-07-01

    Cytochrome c-capped fluorescent gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are used for imaging of live lung and breast cells. Delivery of cytochrome c inside the cells is confirmed by covalently attaching a fluorophore (Alexa Fluor 594) to cytochrome c-capped Au-NCs and observing fluorescence from Alexa 594 inside the cell. Mass spectrometry studies suggest that in bulk water, addition of glutathione (GSH) to cytochrome c-capped Au-NCs results in the formation of glutathione-capped Au-NCs and free apo-cytochrome c. Thus glutathione displaces cytochrome c as a capping agent. Using confocal microscopy, the emission spectra and decay of Au-NCs are measured in live cells. From the position of the emission maximum it is shown that the Au-NCs exist as Au8 in bulk water and as Au13 inside the cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from cytochrome c-Au-NC (donor) to Mitotracker Orange (acceptor) indicates that the Au-NCs localise in the mitochondria of live cells. PMID:27028215

  15. Synthesis of gold nanorod-embedded polymeric nanoparticles by a nanoprecipitation method for use as photothermal agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eunjung; Choi, Jihye; Haam, Seungjoo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jaemoon; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min, E-mail: ej.kim@yonsei.ac.k, E-mail: 177hum@yonsei.ac.k, E-mail: jjakji2@yonsei.ac.k, E-mail: jss@yuhs.a, E-mail: ymhuh@yuhs.a, E-mail: haam@yonsei.ac.k [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-09

    For the synthesis of biocompatible photothermal agents, gold nanorod-embedded polymeric nanoparticles (GPNs) were synthesized using a nanoprecipitation method. Uniform gold nanorods (GNRs), which are sensitive to a photothermal effect by near-infrared (NIR) light, with an aspect ratio of 4.0 were synthesized by a seed-mediated growth method. The hydroxyl groups of polycaprolactone diol (PCL diOH) were modified by esterification with mercaptopropionic acid to give a dithiol (polycaprolactone dithiol, PCL diSH) as a phase transfer and capping agent. Subsequently, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), a stabilizer of GNRs, was exchanged and/or removed by PCL diSH. PCL diSH-coated GNRs were further wrapped in a hydrophilic polymer, Pluronic F127, as a stabilizer. These newly formulated GPNs exhibit excellent stability in water and a maximum absorbance in the NIR region indicating a highly efficient surface plasmon resonance effect, phenomena useful for photothermal agents.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic Co nanoparticles: A comparison study of three different capping surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the performance of three long-chain acids-oleic and elaidic (both olefinic) and stearic (aliphatic)-as a capping agent in the synthesis of magnetic Co nanoparticles. The particles were formed through thermal decomposition of dicobalt octacarbonyl in toluene in the presence of the long-chain acid, and characterized by TEM, high-resolution TEM, and SQUID measurements. Infrared spectra revealed that some of the added olefinic acid was transformed from cis- to trans-configuration (for oleic acid) or from trans- to cis- (for elaidic acid) to facilitate the formation of a densely packed monolayer on the surface of Co nanoparticles. As compared to aliphatic acids, olefinic acids are advantageous for dense packing on small particles with high surface curvatures due to a bent shape of the cis-isomer. The presence of an olefinic acid is able to control particle growth, stabilize the colloidal suspension, and prevent the final product from oxidation by air. Our results indicate that oleic acid, elaidic acid, and a mixture of oleic/stearic acids or elaidic/stearic acids have roughly the same performance in serving as a capping agent for the synthesis of Co nanoparticles with a spherical shape and narrow size distribution. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic Co nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of different capping agents and the effect of their molecular structures on the morphology of Co nanoparticles was analyzed. The transformation between cis- and trans-isomers of olefinic acids was critical to the formation of a densely packed monolayer on the surface of small nanoparticles characterized by high curvatures

  17. Protein-coated pH-responsive gold nanoparticles: Microwave-assisted synthesis and surface charge-dependent anticancer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The biocompatibility and ease of functionalization of gold nanoparticles underlie significant potential in biotechnology and biomedicine. Eight different proteins were examined in the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs in aqueous medium under microwave irradiation. Six of the proteins resulted in the formation of AuNPs. The intrinsic pH of the proteins played an important role in AuNPs with strong surface plasmon bands. The hydrodynamic size of the nanoparticles was larger than the values observed by TEM and ImageJ. The formation of a protein layer on the AuNPs accounts for this difference. The AuNPs exhibited sensitivity towards varying pH conditions, which was confirmed by determining the difference in the isoelectric points studied by using pH-dependent zeta potential titration. Cytotoxicity studies revealed anticancerous effects of the AuNPs at a certain micromolar concentration by constraining the growth of cancer cells with different efficacies due to the use of different proteins as capping agents. The positively charged AuNPs are internalized by the cells to a greater level than the negatively charged AuNPs. These AuNPs synthesized with protein coating holds promise as anticancer agents and would help in providing a new paradigm in area of nanoparticles.

  18. Influence of surface capping on oxygen reduction catalysis: A case study of 1.7 nm Pt nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-06-01

    Organic and polymer capping agents are prevailingly used in the synthesis of metal nanocrystals to render size and shape controls for desirable catalytic properties. A general assumption in the electrocatalysis field is that the capping agents block active sites and hinder catalytic turnover. However there have been a number of experimental results suggesting otherwise. Investigation of the fundamental correlations between the surface capping and the catalytic kinetics of metal nanoparticles is of paramount importance yet still remains challenging in large part due to structural changes induced by capping agent removal or synthesis using different capping agents. Our approach involves a unique catalyst system comprising of 1.7 nm Pt nanoparticles with and without various surface capping. We find that surface capping affects both activity and selectivity of electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction. The influences can be positive, neutral or negative. The five capping agents studied fall into three groups. Polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) cappings do not change the onset potential or product selectivity, but increase the catalytic current density. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) cappings do not change the onset potential or product selectivity, but slightly decrease the catalytic current density. Oleylamine (OA) capping significantly decreases the onset potential and the catalytic current density as well as change the product selectivity by favoring a high percentage of 2-electron reduction.

  19. The Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using an aqueous root extract of Morinda citrifolia L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, T. Y.; Radhika Rajasree, S. R.; Ramkumar, R.; Rajthilak, C.; Perumal, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using an aqueous root extract of Morinda citrifolia. UV-vis spectroscopy, XRD, FTIR, FE-SEM, EDX and TEM were performed to characterize the formation of gold nanoparticles. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by a peak at 540 nm in the UV-vis spectrum. The XRD peaks at 38°, 44°, 64° and 77° can be indexed to the (1 1 1), (2 0 0), (2 2 0) and (3 1 1) Bragg's reflections of cubic structure of metallic gold, respectively. The FTIR result showed that extract containing protein might be responsible for the formation of the nanoparticles and may play an important role in the stabilization of the formed nanoparticles. FESEM images revealed that the particles were triangle and mostly spherical in shape. TEM images clearly revealed the size of the nanoparticles were 12.17-38.26 nm in size.

  20. Surface Plasmons and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectra of Aggregated and Alloyed Gold-Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fleger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of size, morphology, and composition of gold and silver nanoparticles on surface plasmon resonance (SPR and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS are studied with the purpose of optimizing SERS substrates. Various gold and silver films made by evaporation and subsequent annealing give different morphologies and compositions of nanoparticles and thus different position of the SPR peak. SERS measurements of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid obtained from these films reveal that the proximity of the SPR peak to the exciting laser wavelength is not the only factor leading to the highest Raman enhancement. Silver nanoparticles evaporated on top of larger gold nanoparticles show higher SERS than gold-silver alloyed nanoparticles, in spite of the fact that the SPR peak of alloyed nanoparticles is narrower and closer to the excitation wavelength. The highest Raman enhancement was obtained for substrates with a two-peak particle size distribution for excitation wavelengths close to the SPR.