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Sample records for capnography

  1. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

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    Bhavani Shankar Kodali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO 2 . Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO 2 (PETCO 2 and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO 2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA. There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO 2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes.

  2. Needle Decompression of Tension Pneumothorax with Colorimetric Capnography.

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    Naik, Nimesh D; Hernandez, Matthew C; Anderson, Jeff R; Ross, Erika K; Zielinski, Martin D; Aho, Johnathon M

    2017-11-01

    The success of needle decompression for tension pneumothorax is variable, and there are no objective measures assessing effective decompression. Colorimetric capnography, which detects carbon dioxide present within the pleural space, may serve as a simple test to assess effective needle decompression. Three swine underwent traumatically induced tension pneumothorax (standard of care, n = 15; standard of care with needle capnography, n = 15). Needle thoracostomy was performed with an 8-cm angiocatheter. Similarly, decompression was performed with the addition of colorimetric capnography. Subjective operator assessment of decompression was recorded and compared with true decompression, using thoracoscopic visualization for both techniques. Areas under receiver operating curves were calculated and pairwise comparison was performed to assess statistical significance (P pneumothorax, that is, the absence of any pathologic/space-occupying lesion, in 100% of cases (10 of 10 attempts). Standard of care needle decompression was detected by operators in 9 of 15 attempts (60%) and was detected in 3 of 10 attempts when tension pneumothorax was not present (30%). True decompression, under direct visualization with thoracoscopy, occurred 15 of 15 times (100%) with capnography, and 12 of 15 times (80%) without capnography. Areas under receiver operating curves were 0.65 for standard of care and 1.0 for needle capnography (P = .002). Needle decompression with colorimetric capnography provides a rapid, effective, and highly accurate method for eliminating operator bias for tension pneumothorax decompression. This may be useful for the treatment of this life-threatening condition. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography in verification of endotracheal tube placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, P; Rudolph, S S; Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation.......This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation....

  4. Developing a Respiratory Depression Scorecard for Capnography Monitoring

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    Katie Felhofer, Pharm.D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse oximetry is the most common way to measure a patient’s respiratory status in the hospital setting; however, capnography monitoring is a more accurate and sensitive technique which can more comprehensively measure respiratory function. Due to the limited number of capnography monitoring equipment at the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview (UMMC-Fairview, we analyzed which patients should preferentially be chosen for capnography monitoring over pulse oximetry based on risk of respiratory depression. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all serious opioid-induced over-sedation events that occurred at UMMC-Fairview between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012. Thirteen risk factors were identified which predispose patients to respiratory depression. The average patient demonstrated 3.75 risk factors. The most commonly occurring risk factor was the concomitant use of multiple opioids or an opioid and a CNS-active sedative, followed by an ASA score ≥ 3. Based on this data, we developed a scorecard for choosing patients at the most risk of developing respiratory depression; these patients are the best candidates for capnography. Although further studies are necessary to corroborate this research, at this time giving extra consideration to patients demonstrating the previously stated risk factors is prudent when assessing those patients most in need of capnography.

  5. Developing a Respiratory Depression Scorecard for Capnography Monitoring

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    Katie Felhofer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse oximetry is the most common way to measure a patient's respiratory status in the hospital setting; however, capnography monitoring is a more accurate and sensitive technique which can more comprehensively measure respiratory function. Due to the limited number of capnography monitoring equipment at the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview (UMMC-Fairview, we analyzed which patients should preferentially be chosen for capnography monitoring over pulse oximetry based on risk of respiratory depression. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all serious opioid-induced over-sedation events that occurred at UMMCFairview between January 1, 2008 and June 30, 2012. Thirteen risk factors were identified which predispose patients to respiratory depression. The average patient demonstrated 3.75 risk factors. The most commonly occurring risk factor was the concomitant use of multiple opioids or an opioid and a CNS-active sedative, followed by an ASA score 䊫 3. Based on this data, we developed a scorecard for choosing patients at the most risk of developing respiratory depression; these patients are the best candidates for capnography. Although further studies are necessary to corroborate this research, at this time giving extra consideration to patients demonstrating the previously stated risk factors is prudent when assessing those patients most in need of capnography.   Type: Student Project

  6. Capnography in the Emergency Department: A Review of Uses, Waveforms, and Limitations.

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    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex; Vivirito, Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Capnography has many uses in the emergency department (ED) and critical care setting, most commonly cardiac arrest and procedural sedation. This review evaluates several indications concerning capnography beyond cardiac arrest and procedural sedation in the ED, as well as limitations and specific waveforms. Capnography includes the noninvasive measurement of CO 2 , providing information on ventilation, perfusion, and metabolism in intubated and spontaneously breathing patients. Since the 1990s, capnography has been utilized extensively for cardiac arrest and procedural sedation. Qualitative capnography includes a colorimetric device, changing color on the amount of CO 2 present. Quantitative capnography provides a numeric value (end-tidal CO 2 ), and capnography most commonly includes a waveform as a function of time. Conditions in which capnography is informative include cardiac arrest, procedural sedation, mechanically ventilated patients, and patients with metabolic acidemia. Patients with seizure, trauma, and respiratory conditions, such as pulmonary embolism and obstructive airway disease, can benefit from capnography, but further study is needed. Limitations include use of capnography in conditions with mixed pathophysiology, patients with low tidal volumes, and equipment malfunction. Capnography should be used in conjunction with clinical assessment. Capnography demonstrates benefit in cardiac arrest, procedural sedation, mechanically ventilated patients, and patients with metabolic acidemia. Further study is required in patients with seizure, trauma, and respiratory conditions. It should only be used in conjunction with other patient factors and clinical assessment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The role of capnography in endoscopy patients undergoing nurse-administered propofol sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagelse, Charlotte; Vilmann, Peter; Hornslet, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    . The existing literature on capnography for endoscopy patients sedated with nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) is limited. Can the addition of capnography to standard monitoring during endoscopy with NAPS reduce the number, duration, and level of hypoxia. Materials and methods. This study...... capnography, were included in the analysis. The number and total duration of hypoxia was reduced by 39.3% and 21.1% in the intervention group compared to the control group (p > 0.05). No differences in actions taken against insufficient respiration were found. Changes in end-tidal carbon dioxide (R = 0.177, p......-value 0.05). Capnography is able to detect insufficient respiration that may lead to hypoxia prior to changes in pulse oximetry. However, due to a limited clinical benefit and additional costs associated with capnography, we do not find capnography necessary during the use of NAPS....

  8. Capnography for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting compliance with subsequent noninvasive ventilation in patients with ALS.

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    Sung-Min Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS suffer from hypoventilation, which can easily worsen during sleep. This study evaluated the efficacy of capnography monitoring in patients with ALS for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting good compliance with subsequent noninvasive ventilation (NIV treatment. METHODS: Nocturnal monitoring and brief wake screening by capnography/pulse oximetry, functional scores, and other respiratory signs were assessed in 26 patients with ALS. Twenty-one of these patients were treated with NIV and had their treatment compliance evaluated. RESULTS: Nocturnal capnography values were reliable and strongly correlated with the patients' respiratory symptoms (R(2 = 0.211-0.305, p = 0.004-0.021. The duration of nocturnal hypercapnea obtained by capnography exhibited a significant predictive power for good compliance with subsequent NIV treatment, with an area-under-the-curve value of 0.846 (p = 0.018. In contrast, no significant predictive values for nocturnal pulse oximetry or functional scores for nocturnal hypoventilation were found. Brief waking supine capnography was also useful as a screening tool before routine nocturnal capnography monitoring. CONCLUSION: Capnography is an efficient tool for assessing nocturnal hypoventilation and predicting good compliance with subsequent NIV treatment of ALS patients, and may prove useful as an adjunctive tool for assessing the need for NIV treatment in these patients.

  9. Capnography as a tool to detect metabolic changes in patients cared for in the emergency setting

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    Francisco José Cereceda-Sánchez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the usefulness of capnography for the detection of metabolic changes in spontaneous breathing patients, in the emergency and intensive care settings. Methods: in-depth and structured bibliographical search in the databases EBSCOhost, Virtual Health Library, PubMed, Cochrane Library, among others, identifying studies that assessed the relationship between capnography values and the variables involved in blood acid-base balance. Results: 19 studies were found, two were reviews and 17 were observational studies. In nine studies, capnography values were correlated with carbon dioxide (CO2, eight with bicarbonate (HCO3, three with lactate, and four with blood pH. Conclusions: most studies have found a good correlation between capnography values and blood biomarkers, suggesting the usefulness of this parameter to detect patients at risk of severe metabolic change, in a fast, economical and accurate way.

  10. Patient safety during procedural sedation using capnography monitoring : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, Rhodri; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Pollock, Richard F.; Mestek, Michael; Lightdale, Jenifer R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of capnography monitoring on sedation-related adverse events during procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) administered for ambulatory surgery relative to visual assessment and pulse oximetry alone. Design and setting: Systematic literature review and random

  11. Capnography monitoring during procedural sedation and analgesia: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Aaron; Douglas, Clint; Sutherland, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background An important potential clinical benefit of using capnography monitoring during procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is that this technology could improve patient safety by reducing serious sedation-related adverse events, such as death or permanent neurological disability, which are caused by inadequate oxygenation. The hypothesis is that earlier identification of respiratory depression using capnography leads to a change in clinical management that prevents hypoxaemia. As inade...

  12. Temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography in verification of endotracheal tube placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P; Rudolph, S S; Børglum, J; Isbye, D L

    2011-11-01

    This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung ultrasound with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation. A prospective, paired, and investigator-blinded study carried out in the operating theatre. Twenty-five adult patients requiring endotracheal intubation were included. During intubation, transtracheal ultrasound was performed to visualize passage of the endotracheal tube. During bag ventilation, bilateral lung ultrasound was performed for the detection of lung sliding as a sign of ventilation simultaneous with capnography and auscultation of the epigastrium and chest. Primary outcome measure was time difference to confirmed endotracheal intubation between ultrasound and auscultation alone. Secondary outcome measure was time difference between ultrasound and auscultation combined with capnography. Both methods verified endotracheal tube placement in all patients. In 68% of patients, endotracheal tube placement was visualized by real-time transtracheal ultrasound. Comparing ultrasound with the combination of auscultation and capnography, there was a significant difference between the two methods. Median time for ultrasound was 40 s [interquartile range (IQR) 35-48 s] vs. 48 s (IQR 45-53 s), P auscultation alone. Median time for auscultation alone was 42 s (IQR 37-47 s), P = 0.6, with a mean difference of -0.88 s in favour of ultrasound (95% CI -4.2-2.5 s). Verification of endotracheal tube placement with ultrasound is as fast as auscultation alone and faster than the standard method of auscultation and capnography. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  13. Capnography and the Bispectral Index—Their Role in Pediatric Sedation: A Brief Review

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    Maria Sammartino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedation in children is increasingly emerging as a minimally invasive technique that may be associated with local anaesthesia or diagnostic and therapeutic procedures which do not necessarily require general anaesthesia. Standard monitoring requirements are not sufficient to ensure an effective control of pulmonary ventilation and deep sedation. Capnography in pediatric sedation assesses the effect of different drugs on the occurrence of respiratory failure and records early indicators of respiratory impairment. The Bispectral index (BIS allows the reduction of dose requirements of anaesthetic drugs, the reduction in the time to extubation and eye opening, and the reduction in the time to discharge. In the field of pediatric sedation, capnography should be recommended to prevent respiratory complications, particularly in spontaneous ventilation. The use of the BIS index, however, needs further investigation due to a lack of evidence, especially in infants. In this paper, we will investigate the role of capnography and the BIS index in improving monitoring standards in pediatric sedation.

  14. Evaluation of the Use of Capnography during the Transport of Critically Ill Mechanically Ventilated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-15

    DISCUSSION: Gervais et a13 demonstrated that respiratory alkalosis developed when ICU patients were manually ventilated, without 7 spirometric...developed a respiratory acidosis. Use of the non-invasive monitor, the capnograph prevented this adverse effect and resulted in inIproved patient safety...ventilation, all patients developed respiratory acidoses. Capnography uniformly prevented the development of respiratory acidosis during transport. We

  15. Verification of endotracheal intubation in obese patients - temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography.

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    Pfeiffer, P; Bache, S; Isbye, D L; Rudolph, S S; Rovsing, L; Børglum, J

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasound (US) may have an emerging role as an adjunct in verification of endotracheal intubation. Obtaining optimal US images in obese patients is generally regarded more difficult than for other patients. This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung US with auscultation and capnography for verifying endotracheal intubation in obese patients. A prospective, paired and investigator-blinded study performed in the operating theatre. Twenty-four adult patients requiring endotracheal intubation for bariatric surgery were included. During post-intubation bag ventilation, bilateral lung US was performed for detection of lungsliding indicating lung ventilation simultaneous with capnography and auscultation of epigastrium and chest. Primary outcome measure was the time difference to confirmed endotracheal intubation between US and auscultation alone. The secondary outcome measure was time difference between US and auscultation combined with capnography. Both methods verified endotracheal tube placement in all patients. No significant difference was found between US compared with auscultation alone. Median time for verification by auscultation alone was 47.5 s [interquartile (IQR) 40-51 s], with a mean difference of -0.3 s in favor of US (95% confidence interval -3.5-2.9 s) P = 0.87. Comparing US with the combination of auscultation and capnography, there was a significant difference between the two methods. Median time for verification by US was 43 s (IQR 40-51 s) vs. 55 s (IQR 46-65 s), P auscultation alone and faster than the standard method of auscultation and capnography. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  16. Volumetric capnography: In the diagnostic work-up of chronic thromboembolic disease

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    Marcos Mello Moreira

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Marcos Mello Moreira1, Renato Giuseppe Giovanni Terzi1, Laura Cortellazzi2, Antonio Luis Eiras Falcão1, Heitor Moreno Junior2, Luiz Cláudio Martins2, Otavio Rizzi Coelho21Department of Surgery, 2Department of Internal Medicine, State University of Campinas, School of Medical Sciences, Campinas, Sao Paulo, BrazilAbstract: The morbidity and mortality of pulmonary embolism (PE have been found to be related to early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The examinations used to diagnose PE are expensive and not always easily accessible. These options include noninvasive examinations, such as clinical pretests, ELISA D-dimer (DD tests, and volumetric capnography (VCap. We report the case of a patient whose diagnosis of PE was made via pulmonary arteriography. The clinical pretest revealed a moderate probability of the patient having PE, and the DD result was negative; however, the VCap associated with arterial blood gases result was positive. The patient underwent all noninvasive exams following admission to hospital and again eight months after discharge. Results gained from invasive tests were similar to those produced by image exams, highlighting the importance of VCap as an important noninvasive tool.Keywords: pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, volumetric capnography, d-dimers, pretest probability

  17. Physiologically based indices of volumetric capnography in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

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    Romero, P V; Lucangelo, U; Lopez Aguilar, J; Fernandez, R; Blanch, L

    1997-06-01

    Several indices of ventilatory heterogeneity can be identified from the expiratory CO2 partial pressure or CO2 elimination versus volume curves. The aims of this study were: 1) to analyse several computerizable indices of volumetric capnography in order to detect ventilatory disturbances; and 2) to establish the relationship between those indices and respiratory system mechanics in subjects with normal lungs and in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), both receiving mechanical ventilation. We studied six normal subjects and five patients with early ARDS mechanically ventilated at three levels of tidal volume (VT). Respiratory system mechanics were assessed by end-expiratory and end-inspiratory occlusion methods, respectively. We determined Phase III slopes, Fletcher's efficiency index, Bohr's dead space (VD,Bohr/VT), and the ratio of alveolar ejection volume to tidal volume (VAE/VT) from expiratory capnograms, as a function of expired volume. Differences between normal subjects and ARDS patients were significant both for capnographic and mechanical parameters. Changes in VT significantly altered capnographic indices in normal subjects, but failed to change ventilatory mechanics and VAE/VT in ARDS patients. After adjusting for breathing pattern, VAE/VT exhibited the best correlation with the mechanical parameters. In conclusion, volumetric capnography, and, specifically, the ratio of alveolar ejection volume to tidal volume allows evaluation and monitoring of ventilatory disturbances in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  18. Capnography as a tool to detect metabolic changes in patients cared for in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereceda-Sánchez, Francisco José; Molina-Mula, Jesús

    2017-05-15

    to evaluate the usefulness of capnography for the detection of metabolic changes in spontaneous breathing patients, in the emergency and intensive care settings. in-depth and structured bibliographical search in the databases EBSCOhost, Virtual Health Library, PubMed, Cochrane Library, among others, identifying studies that assessed the relationship between capnography values and the variables involved in blood acid-base balance. 19 studies were found, two were reviews and 17 were observational studies. In nine studies, capnography values were correlated with carbon dioxide (CO2), eight with bicarbonate (HCO3), three with lactate, and four with blood pH. most studies have found a good correlation between capnography values and blood biomarkers, suggesting the usefulness of this parameter to detect patients at risk of severe metabolic change, in a fast, economical and accurate way. avaliar a utilidade da capnografia para a detecção de alterações metabólicas em pacientes com respiração espontânea, no contexto das emergências e dos cuidados intensivos. pesquisa bibliográfica estruturada aprofundada, nas bases de dados EBSCOhost, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde, PubMed, Cochrane Library, entre outras, identificando estudos que avaliavam a relação entre os valores da capnografia e as variáveis envolvidas no equilíbrio ácido-base sanguíneo. foram levantados 19 estudos, dois eram revisões e 17 eram estudos observacionais. Em nove estudos, os valores capnográficos foram correlacionados com o dióxido de carbono (CO2), em oito com o bicarbonato (HCO3), em três com o lactato, e em quatro com o pH sanguíneo. na maioria dos estudos foi observada uma correlação adequada entre os valores capnográficos e os biomarcadores sanguíneos, sugerindo a utilidade deste parâmetro para a identificação de pacientes com risco de sofrer uma alteração metabólica grave, de uma forma rápida, econômica e precisa. explorar la utilidad de la capnografía para la detecci

  19. Spirometry and volumetric capnography in lung function assessment of obese and normal-weight individuals without asthma.

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    Ferreira, Mariana S; Mendes, Roberto T; Marson, Fernando A L; Zambon, Mariana P; Antonio, Maria A R G M; Paschoal, Ilma A; Toro, Adyléia A D C; Severino, Silvana D; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Ribeiro, José D

    To analyze and compare lung function of obese and healthy, normal-weight children and adolescents, without asthma, through spirometry and volumetric capnography. Cross-sectional study including 77 subjects (38 obese) aged 5-17 years. All subjects underwent spirometry and volumetric capnography. The evaluations were repeated in obese subjects after the use of a bronchodilator. At the spirometry assessment, obese individuals, when compared with the control group, showed lower values of forced expiratory volume in the first second by forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC) and expiratory flows at 75% and between 25 and 75% of the FVC (p11 years (p<0.05). Even without the diagnosis of asthma by clinical criteria and without response to bronchodilator use, obese individuals showed lower FEV 1 /FVC values and forced expiratory flow, indicating the presence of an obstructive process. Volumetric capnography showed that obese individuals had higher alveolar tidal volume, with no alterations in ventilation homogeneity, suggesting flow alterations, without affecting lung volumes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of respiratory dynamics by volumetric capnography during submaximal exercise protocol of six minutes on treadmill in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzi, Paloma L F; Marson, Fernando A L; Ribeiro, Maria A G O; Schivinski, Camila I S; Ribeiro, José D

    2017-11-29

    Volumetric capnography provides the standard CO 2 elimination by the volume expired per respiratory cycle and is a measure to assess pulmonary involvement. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory dynamics of healthy control subjects and those with cystic fibrosis in a submaximal exercise protocol for six minutes on the treadmill, using volumetric capnography parameters (slope 3 [Slp3], Slp3/tidal volume [Slp3/TV], and slope 2 [Slp2]). This was a cross-sectional study with 128 subjects (cystic fibrosis, 64 subjects; controls, 64 subjects]. Participants underwent volumetric capnography before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman, Mann-Whitney, and Kruskal-Wallis tests, considering age and sex. An alpha=0.05 was considered. Six minutes on the treadmill evaluation: in cystic fibrosis, volumetric capnography parameters were different before, during, and after six minutes on the treadmill; the same was observed for the controls, except for Slp2. Regarding age, an Slp3 difference was observed in cystic fibrosis patients regardless of age, at all moments, and in controls for age≥12 years; a difference in Slp3/TV was observed in cystic fibrosis and controls, regardless of age; and an Slp2 difference in the cystic fibrosis, regardless of age. Regarding sex, Slp3 and Slp3/TV differences were observed in cystic fibrosis regardless of sex, and in controls in male participants; an Slp2 difference was observed in the cystic fibrosis and female participants. The analysis between groups (cystic fibrosis and controls) indicated that Slp3 and Slp3/TV has identified the CF, regardless of age and sex, while the Slp2 showed the CF considering age. Cystic fibrosis showed greater values of the parameters before, during, and after exercise, even when stratified by age and sex, which may indicate ventilation inhomogeneity in the peripheral pathways in the cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2017

  1. Volumetric capnography for the evaluation of pulmonary disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis and noncystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronez, L; Moreira, M M; Soares, S T P; Pereira, M C; Ribeiro, M A G O; Ribeiro, J D; Terzi, R G G; Martins, L C; Paschoal, I A

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to use volumetric capnography to evaluate the breathing pattern and ventilation inhomogeneities in patients with chronic sputum production and bronchiectasis and to correlate the phase 3 slope of the capnographic curve to spirometric measurements. Twenty-four patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 21 patients with noncystic fibrosis idiopathic bronchiectasis (BC) were serially enrolled. The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was based on the finding of at least two abnormal sweat chloride concentrations (iontophoresis sweat test). The diagnosis of bronchiectasis was made when the patient had a complaint of chronic sputum production and compatible findings at high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan of the thorax. Spirometric tests and volumetric capnography were performed. The 114 subjects of the control group for capnographic variables were nonsmoker volunteers, who had no respiratory symptoms whatsoever and no past or present history of lung disease. Compared with controls, patients in CF group had lower SpO(2) (P volumes normalized for weight (V(E)/kg) (P volume (P3Slp/V(E)) (P capacities and both groups had very similar abnormalities. The capnographic variables in the patient group suggest a restrictive respiratory pattern (greater respiratory rates, smaller expiratory times and expiratory volumes, normal peak expiratory flows). Both groups of patients showed increased phase III slopes compared with controls, which probably indicates the presence of diffuse disease of small airways in both conditions leading to inhomogeneities of ventilation.

  2. A novel application of capnography during controlled human exposure to air pollution

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    Fila Michael

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to determine the repeatability and stability of capnography interfaced with human exposure facility. Methods Capnographic wave signals were obtained from five healthy volunteers exposed to particle-free, filtered air during two consecutive 5 min intervals, 10 min apart, within the open and then the sealed and operational human exposure facility (HEF. Using a customized setup comprised of the Oridion Microcap® portable capnograph, DA converter and AD card, the signal was acquired and saved as an ASCII file for subsequent processing. The minute ventilation (VE, respiratory rate (RR and expiratory tidal volume (VTE were recorded before and after capnographic recording and then averaged. Each capnographic tracing was analyzed for acceptable waves. From each recorded interval, 8 to 19 acceptable waves were selected and measured. The following wave parameters were obtained: total length and length of phase II and III, slope of phase II and III, area under the curve and area under phase III. In addition, we recorded signal measures including the mean, standard deviation, mode, minimum, maximum – which equals end-tidal CO2 (EtCO2, zero-corrected maximum and true RMS. Results Statistical analysis using a paired t-test for means showed no statistically significant changes of any wave parameters and wave signal measures, corrected for RR and VTE, comparing the measures when the HEF was open vs. sealed and operational. The coefficients of variation of the zero-corrected and uncorrected EtCO2, phase II absolute difference, signal mean, standard deviation and RMS were less than 10% despite a sub-atmospheric barometric pressure, and slightly higher temperature and relative humidity within the HEF when operational. Conclusion We showed that a customized setup for the acquisition and processing of the capnographic wave signal, interfaced with HEF was stable and repeatable. Thus, we expect that analysis of capnographic

  3. Physiological effects of mechanical pain stimulation at the lower back measured by functional near-infrared spectroscopy and capnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holper, Lisa; Gross, Andrea; Scholkmann, Felix; Humphreys, B Kim; Meier, Michael L; Wolf, Ursula; Wolf, Martin; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2014-03-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of mechanical pain stimulation at the lower back on hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and on the partial pressure of end-tidal carbon dioxide ( PetCO 2) measured by capnography. 13 healthy subjects underwent three measurements (M) during pain stimulation using pressure pain threshold (PPT) at three locations, i.e., the processus spinosus at the level of L4 (M1) and the lumbar paravertebral muscles at the level of L1 on the left (M2) and the right (M3) side. Results showed that only in the M2 condition the pain stimulation elicited characteristic patterns consisting of (1) a fNIRS-derived decrease in oxy- and total hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen saturation, an increase in deoxy-hemoglobin concentration, (2) a decrease in the PetCO 2 response and (3) a decrease in coherence between fNIRS parameters and PetCO 2 responses in the respiratory frequency band (0.2-0.5 Hz). We discuss the comparison between M2 vs. M1 and M3, suggesting that the non-significant findings in the two latter measurements were most likely subject to effects of the different stimulated tissues, the stimulated locations and the stimulation order. We highlight that PetCO 2 is a crucial parameter for proper interpretation of fNIRS data in experimental protocols involving pain stimulation. Together, our data suggest that the combined fNIRS-capnography approach has potential for further development as pain monitoring method, such as for evaluating clinical pain treatment.

  4. A Comparison of Carbon Dioxide Elimination Measurements Between a Portable Indirect Calorimeter and Volumetric Capnography Monitor: An In Vitro Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Craig D; Martinez, Enid E; Mehta, Nilesh M

    2016-03-01

    Gas exchange measurements for carbon dioxide elimination (V̇CO2 ) and oxygen consumption (V̇O2 ) have been used to derive resting energy expenditure and guide energy prescription. Volumetric capnography is used in intensive care units and provides V̇CO2 measurements that could be used for titrating respiratory and nutritional support. We have recently suggested that measuring V̇CO2 may be sufficient to obtain a reasonable estimate of energy expenditure. However, data describing the accuracy of gas exchange measurement devices are limited. We used an in vitro simulation model to test the accuracy of gas exchange measurements by 2 devices: the CCM Express indirect calorimeter and the NM3, a volumetric capnography monitor. A Huszczuk gas injection system combined with a high-fidelity lung simulator was used to simulate V̇O2 and V̇CO2 values in the pediatric and adult range. Bland-Altman analysis was used to examine the agreement between the measured and simulated values across a range of tidal volumes and gas exchange values. Additionally, agreement between the 2 devices was examined. During the adult simulation with the CCM Express, the mean bias (95% CI) for V̇CO2 values was -12.6% (-16.4 to -8.8%) and -17.5% (-19.9 to -15.1%) for V̇O2 values. For the pediatric simulation with the CCM Express, mean bias for V̇O2 was -14.7% (-16.4 to -13.0%) and V̇CO2 was -10.9% (-13.5 to -8.3%). For the adult and pediatric simulations with the NM3, the bias for V̇CO2 was -8.2% (-15.7 to -0.7%) and -8.3% (-19.4 to -2.8%), respectively. Between the 2 devices, the mean bias was -4.4% (-10.2 to 1.3%) and -2.3% (-11.4 to 6.8%) for the adult and pediatric V̇CO2 simulations, respectively. Currently available portable gas exchange monitors demonstrated acceptable agreement with reference V̇O2 and V̇CO2 values in an in vitro simulation. The devices demonstrated good agreement with each other. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  5. Correspondence in relation to the case report "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note." published in May issue of Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakta Pradipta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comment on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008

  6. Capnography is superior to pulse oximetry for the detection of respiratory depression during colonoscopy La capnografía es superior a la pulsioximetría en la detección de depresión respiratoria durante las colonoscopias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cacho

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: pulse oximetry is a widely accepted procedure for ventilatory monitoring during gastrointestinal endoscopy, but this method provides an indirect measurement of the respiratory function. In addition, detection of abnormal ventilatory activity can be delayed, especially if supplemental oxygen is provided. Capnography offers continuous real-time measurement of expiratory carbon dioxide. Objective: we aimed at prospectively examining the advantages of capnography over the standard pulse oximetry monitoring during sedated colonoscopies. Patients and methods:fifty patients undergoing colonoscopy were simultaneously monitored with pulse oximetry and capnography by using two different devices in each patient. Several sedation regimens were administered. Episodes of apnea or hypoventilation detected by capnography were compared with the occurrence of hypoxemia. Results: twenty-nine episodes of disordered respiration occurred in 16 patients (mean duration 54.4 seconds. Only 38% of apnea or hypoventilation episodes were detected by pulse oximetry. A mean delay of 38.6 seconds was observed in the events detected by pulse oximetry (two episodes of disturbed ventilation were simultaneously detected by capnography and pulse oximetry. Conclusions: apnea or hypoventilation commonly occurs during colonoscopy with sedation. Capnography is more reliable than pulse oximetry in early detection of respiratory depression in this setting.

  7. Influência da insuflação de gás traqueal sobre a capnografia de pacientes anestesiados Influencia de la insuflación de gas traqueal sobre la capnografía de pacientes anestesiados Influence of tracheal gas insufflation during capnography in anesthetized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ortiz

    2008-10-01

    in anesthetized patients. METHODS: Eleven patients, ages 18 to 60 years, ASA I or II, without lung diseases were evaluated prospectively. After tracheal intubation, a TGI catheter was inserted 2 to 3 cm from the carina. Patients underwent volume-controlled ventilation. The volumetric capnography curve was recorded during 20 minutes and blood was drawn to determine the PaCO2. Twenty minutes after TGI was instituted, the capnograph curve was recorded and blood was drawn once more to measure PaCO2. The end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (P ET CO2 and PaCO2 were evaluated before and after TGI. The capnography curve was observed before and during TGI. RESULTS: PaCO2 and P ET CO2 without TGI were: 33.48 ± 6.81 and 36.91 ± 6.54 mmHg (mean ± standard deviation, respectively, and after TGI, 33.85 ± 8.31 and 36.55 ± 7.93 mmHg, respectively. Parameters were not statistically different before and after TGI, both for PaCO2 and P ET CO2 (p = 0.65 and 0.82. The capnography curve showed changes in alveolar air during expiration. CONCLUSIONS: The use of TGI did not result in a reduction in PaCO2 or P ET CO2, but it altered the morphology of the capnography curve.

  8. Capnografia volumétrica como meio de detectar obstrução pulmonar periférica precoce em pacientes com fibrose cística Volumetric capnography as a tool to detect early peripheric lung obstruction in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ângela G. O. Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a espirometria e a capnografia volumétrica (CapV para determinar se os valores amostrados pela capnografia acrescentam informações sobre doenças pulmonares precoces em pacientes com fibrose cística (FC. MÉTODOS: Este foi um estudo do tipo corte transversal envolvendo pacientes com FC: Grupo I (42 pacientes, 6-12 anos de idade e Grupo II (22 pacientes, 13-20 anos de idade. Os grupos controle correspondentes eram formados por 30 e 50 indivíduos saudáveis, respectivamente. A capacidade vital forçada (CVF, o volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo (VEF1 e a relação VEF1/CVF foram determinados pela espirometria. Através da CapV, medimos a saturação periférica de oxigênio (SpO2, a frequência respiratória (FR, o tempo inspiratório (TI, o tempo expiratório (TE e o slope da fase III normalizado pelo volume corrente (slope da fase III/Vc. RESULTADOS: Em comparação com os grupos controle, todos os pacientes com FC apresentaram valores de slope da fase III/Vc (p OBJECTIVE: To compare spirometry and volumetric capnography (VCap to determine if the capnographic values add more information about early lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving CF patients: Group I (42 patients, 6-12 years of age; and Group II (22 patients, 13-20 years of age. The corresponding control groups were comprised of 30 and 50 healthy subjects, respectively. Forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, and the FEV1/FVC ratio was determined by spirometry. Using VCap, we measured peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2, respiratory rate (RR, inspiratory time (IT, expiratory time (ET, and the phase III slope normalized by expiratory volume (phase III slope/Ve. RESULTS: In comparison with control groups, all CF patients presented higher phase III slope/Ve values (p < 0.001 independent of the pulmonary disease stage. The phase III slope/Ve was significantly

  9. Verification of endotracheal intubation in obese patients - temporal comparison of ultrasound vs. auscultation and capnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, P; Bache, Stefan Holst; Isbye, D L

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) may have an emerging role as an adjunct in verification of endotracheal intubation. Obtaining optimal US images in obese patients is generally regarded more difficult than for other patients. This study compared the time consumption of bilateral lung US with auscultation and capno...

  10. Implementation of a novel postoperative monitoring system using automated Modified Early Warning Scores (MEWS) incorporating end-tidal capnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankush, Joseph M; Freeman, Robbie; McIlvaine, Joy; Tran, Trung; Nassani, Stephen; Leitman, I Michael

    2017-10-01

    Modified Early Warning Scores (MEWS) provide real-time vital sign (VS) trending and reduce ICU admissions in post-operative patients. These early warning calculations classically incorporate oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic blood pressure, and temperature but have not previously included end-tidal CO2 (EtCO 2 ), more recently identified as an independent predictor of critical illness. These systems may be subject to failure when physiologic data is incorrectly measured, leading to false alarms and increased workload. This study investigates whether the implementation of automated devices that utilize ongoing vital signs monitoring and MEWS calculations, inclusive of a score for end-tidal CO 2 (EtCO 2 ), can be feasibly implemented on the general care hospital floor and effectively identify derangements in a post-operative patient's condition while limiting the amount of false alarms that would serve to increase provider workload. From July to November 2014, post-operative patients meeting the inclusion criteria (BMI > 30 kg/m 2 , history of obstructive sleep apnea, or the use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or epidural narcotics) were monitored using automated devices that record minute-by-minute VS included in classic MEWS calculations as well as EtCO 2 . Automated messages via pagers were sent to providers for instances when the device measured elevated MEWS, abnormal EtCO 2 , and oxygen desaturations below 85 %. Data, including alarm and message details from the first 133 patients, were recorded and analyzed. Overall, 3.3 alarms and pages sounded per hour of monitoring. Device-only alarms sounded 2.7 times per hour-21 % were technical alarms. The remaining device-only alarms for concerning VS sounded 2.0/h, 70 % for falsely recorded VS. Pages for abnormal EtCO 2 sounded 0.4/h (82 % false recordings) while pages for low blood oxygen saturation sounded 0.1/h (55 % false alarms). 143 times (0.1 pages/h) the devices calculated a MEWS warranting a page (rise in MEWS by 2 or 5 or greater)-62 % were false scores inclusive of falsely recorded VS. An abnormal EtCO 2 value resulted in or added to an elevated MEWS score in 29 % of notifications, but 50 % of these included a falsely abnormal EtCO 2 value. To date, no adverse events have occurred. There were no statistically significant demographic, post-operative condition, or pre-existing comorbidity differences between patients who had a majority of true alarms from those who had mostly false-positive alarms. Although not statistically significant, the group of patients in whom automated MEWS suggested greater utility included those with a history of hypertension (p = 0.072) and renal disease (p = 0.084). EtCO 2 monitoring was more likely to be useful in patients with a history of type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and obstructive sleep apnea (p automated MEWS system, modified to include end-tidal CO2 can be feasibly implemented in a hospital ward. Further study is needed to evaluate its clinical utility, including an end-tidal CO 2 score, is feasibly implemented and can be useful in monitoring select post-operative patients for derangements in physiologic metrics. Like any other monitoring system, false alarms may occur at high rates. While further study is needed to determine the additive utility of EtCO 2 in MEWS calculations, this study suggests utility of EtCO 2 in select post-operative patients.

  11. Accuracy of acoustic respiration rate monitoring in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Mario; Redford, Daniel T; Quigley, Thomas W; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Kurth, C Dean; Szmuk, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Rainbow acoustic monitoring (RRa) utilizes acoustic technology to continuously and noninvasively determine respiratory rate from an adhesive sensor located on the neck. We sought to validate the accuracy of RRa, by comparing it to capnography, impedance pneumography, and to a reference method of counting breaths in postsurgical children. Continuous respiration rate data were recorded from RRa and capnography. In a subset of patients, intermittent respiration rate from thoracic impedance pneumography was also recorded. The reference method, counted respiratory rate by the retrospective analysis of the RRa, and capnographic waveforms while listening to recorded breath sounds were used to compare respiration rate of both capnography and RRa. Bias, precision, and limits of agreement of RRa compared with capnography and RRa and capnography compared with the reference method were calculated. Tolerance and reliability to the acoustic sensor and nasal cannula were also assessed. Thirty-nine of 40 patients (97.5%) demonstrated good tolerance of the acoustic sensor, whereas 25 of 40 patients (62.5%) demonstrated good tolerance of the nasal cannula. Intermittent thoracic impedance produced erroneous respiratory rates (>50 b·min(-1) from the other methods) on 47% of occasions. The bias ± SD and limits of agreement were -0.30 ± 3.5 b·min(-1) and -7.3 to 6.6 b·min(-1) for RRa compared with capnography; -0.1 ± 2.5 b·min(-1) and -5.0 to 5.0 b·min(-1) for RRa compared with the reference method; and 0.2 ± 3.4 b·min(-1) and -6.8 to 6.7 b·min(-1) for capnography compared with the reference method. When compared to nasal capnography, RRa showed good agreement and similar accuracy and precision but was better tolerated in postsurgical pediatric patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Estimation of respiratory rates based on photoplethysmographic measurements at the sternum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chreiteh, Shadi; Belhage, Bo; Hoppe, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    rate is extracted using photoplethysmography (PPG) on the chest bone (sternum). Sternal PPG signals were acquired from 10 healthy subjects resting in a supine position. As reference signals, finger PPG, electrocardiogram (ECG), and capnography were simultaneously recorded during spontaneous and paced...... breathing. The sternal PPG signals were then compared with the reference signals in terms of Bland-Altman analysis, the power spectrum analysis and the magnitude squared coherence. The Bland-Altman analysis showed an average bias of 0.21 breaths/min between RR extracted from sternal PPG and capnography....... The respiratory power content at the sternum was 78.8 (38) % in terms of the median and (the interquartile range). The cardiac content was 19 (18.4) % within the cardiac region. The results from the magnitude squared coherence analysis was 0.97 (0.09) in the respiratory region (6 to 27 breaths/min) and 0.98 (0...

  13. Reliability of Ultrasonography in Confirming Endotracheal Tube Placement in an Emergency Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Vimal Koshy; Paul, Cherish; Rajeev, Punchalil Chathappan; Palatty, Babu Urumese

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Over the past few years, ultrasonography is increasingly being used to confirm the correct placement of endotracheal tube (ETT). In our study, we aimed to compare it with the traditional clinical methods and the gold standard quantitative waveform capnography. Two primary outcomes were measured in our study. First was the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography against the other two methods to confirm endotracheal intubation. The second primary outcome assessed was the time taken for each method to confirm tube placement in an emergency setting. Methods: This is a single-centered, prospective cohort study conducted in an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital. We included 100 patients with indication of emergency intubation by convenient sampling. The intubation was performed as per standard hospital protocol. As part of the study protocol, ultrasonography was used to identify ETT placement simultaneously with the intubation procedure along with quantitative waveform capnography (end-tidal carbon dioxide) and clinical methods. Confirmation of tube placement and time taken for the same were noted by three separate health-care staffs. Results and Discussion: Out of the 100 intubation attempts, five (5%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis using ultrasonography were 97.89% and 100%, respectively. This was statistically comparable with the other two modalities. The time taken to confirm tube placement with ultrasonography was 8.27 ± 1.54 s compared to waveform capnography and clinical methods which were 18.06 ± 2.58 and 20.72 ± 3.21 s, respectively. The time taken by ultrasonography was significantly less. Conclusions: Ultrasonography confirmed tube placement with comparable sensitivity and specificity to quantitative waveform capnography and clinical methods. But then, it yielded results considerably faster than the other two modalities. PMID:28584427

  14. Validation study of two-microphone acoustic reflectometry for determination of breathing tube placement in 200 adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, David T; Benbassat, Maxim; Arnaudov, Dimiter; Bohorquez, Alex; Nasseri, Bita

    2002-12-01

    Acoustic reflectometry allows the construction of a one-dimensional image of a cavity, such as the airway or the esophagus. The reflectometric area-distance profile consists of a constant cross-sectional area segment (length of endotracheal tube), followed either by a rapid increase in the area beyond the carina (tracheal intubation) or by an immediate decrease in the area (esophageal intubation). Two hundred adult patients were induced and intubated, without restrictions on anesthetic agents or airway adjunct devices. A two-microphone acoustic reflectometer was used to determine whether the breathing tube was placed in the trachea or esophagus. A blinded reflectometer operator, seated a distance away from the patient, interpreted the acoustic area-distance profile alone to decide where the tube was placed. Capnography was used as the gold standard. Of 200 tracheal intubations confirmed by capnography, the reflectometer operator correctly identified 198 (99% correct tracheal intubation identification rate). In two patients there were false-negative results, patients with a tracheal intubation were interpreted as having an esophageal intubation. A total of 14 esophageal intubations resulted, all correctly identified by reflectometry, for a 100% esophageal intubation identification rate. Acoustic reflectometry is a rapid, noninvasive method by which to determine whether breathing tube placement is correct (tracheal) or incorrect (esophageal). Reflectometry determination of tube placement may be useful in airway emergencies, particularly in cases where visualization of the glottic area is not possible and capnography may fail, as in patients with cardiac arrest.

  15. Ventilator waveforms on anesthesia machine: a simple tool for intraoperative mapping of phrenic nerve and mid-cervical roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, George; Papagrigoriou, Eirini; Sindou, Marc

    2015-12-01

    A crucial aspect of surgery on the supraclavicular region, lateral neck, and mid-cervical vertebral region is the identification and sparing of the phrenic nerve and cervical (C4) root that are responsible for diaphragmatic innervation. Therefore intraoperative mapping of these nerve structures can be useful for difficult cases. Electrical stimulation with simultaneous observation of the ventilator waveforms of the anesthesia machine provides an effective method for the precise intraoperative mapping of these structures. In the literature, there is only one publication reporting the use of one of the waveforms (capnography) for this purpose. Capnography and pressure-time waveforms, two mandatory curves in anesthesiological monitoring, were studied under electrical stimulation of the phrenic nerve (one patient) and the C4 root (eight patients). The aim was to detect changes that would verify diaphragmatic contraction. No modifications in anesthesia or surgery and no additional maneuvers were required. In all patients, stimulation was followed by identifiable changes in the two waveforms, compatible with diaphragmatic contraction: acute reduction in amplitude on capnography and repetitive saw-like elevations on pressure-time curve. Frequency of patterns on pressure-time curve coincided with the frequency of stimulation; therefore the two recordings were complementary. This simple method proved effective in identifying the neural structures responsible for diaphragmatic function. We therefore suggest that it should be employed in the various types of surgery where these structures are at risk.

  16. Calculation of the capnographic index based on expiratory molar mass-volume-curves--a suitable tool to screen for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Junge, Sibylle; Ellemunter, Helmut; Ballmann, Manfred; Gappa, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Volumetric capnography reflecting the course of CO2-exhalation is used to assess ventilation inhomogeneity. Calculation of the slope of expiratory phase 3 and the capnographic index (KPIv) from expirograms allows quantification of extent and severity of small airway impairment. However, technical limitations have hampered more widespread use of this technique. Using expiratory molar mass-volume-curves sampled with a handheld ultrasonic flow sensor during tidal breathing is a novel approach to extract similar information from expirograms in a simpler manner possibly qualifying as a screening tool for clinical routine. The aim of the present study was to evaluate calculation of the KPIv based on molar mass-volume-curves sampled with an ultrasonic flow sensor in patients with CF and controls by assessing feasibility, reproducibility and comparability with the Lung Clearance Index (LCI) derived from multiple breath washout (MBW) used as the reference method. Measurements were performed in patients with CF and healthy controls during a single test occasion using the EasyOne Pro, MBW Module (ndd Medical Technologies, Switzerland). Capnography and MBW were performed in 87/96 patients with CF and 38/42 controls, with a success rate of 90.6% for capnography. Mean age (range) was 12.1 (4-25) years. Mean (SD) KPIv was 6.94 (3.08) in CF and 5.10 (2.06) in controls (p=0.001). Mean LCI (SD) was 8.0 (1.4) in CF and 6.2 (0.4) in controls (p=molar mass-volume-curves is feasible. KPIv is significantly different between patients with CF and controls and correlates with the LCI. However, individual data revealed a relevant overlap between patients and controls requiring further evaluation, before this method can be recommended for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PETCO2 measurement and feature extraction of capnogram signals for extubation outcomes from mechanical ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasera, Carmen C; Gewehr, Pedro M; Domingues, Adriana Maria T

    2015-01-01

    Capnography is a continuous and noninvasive method for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) measurement, and it has become the standard of care for basic respiratory monitoring for intubated patients in the intensive care unit. In addition, it has been used to adjust ventilatory parameters during mechanical ventilation (MV). However, a substantial debate remains as to whether capnography is useful during the process of weaning and extubation from MV during the postoperative period. Thus, the main objective of this study was to present a new use for time-based capnography data by measuring the end-tidal CO 2 pressure (PET CO 2 ), partial pressure of arterial CO 2 (Pa CO 2 ) and feature extraction of capnogram signals before extubation from MV to evaluate the capnography as a predictor of outcome extubation in infants after cardiac surgery. Altogether, 82 measurements were analysed, 71.9% patients were successfully extubated, and 28.1% met the criteria for extubation failure within 48 h. The ROC-AUC analysis for quantitative measure of the capnogram showed significant differences (p < 0.001) for: expiratory time (0.873), slope of phase III (0.866), slope ratio (0.923) and ascending angle (0.897). In addition, the analysis of PET CO 2 (0.895) and Pa CO 2   (0.924) obtained 30 min before extubation showed significant differences between groups. The PET CO 2 mean value for success and failure extubation group was 39.04 mmHg and 46.27 mmHg, respectively. It was also observed that high CO 2 values in patients who had returned MV was 82.8  ±  21 mmHg at the time of extubation failure. Thus, PET CO 2 measurements and analysis of features extracted from a capnogram can differentiate extubation outcomes in infant patients under MV, thereby reducing the physiologic instability caused by failure in this process. (paper)

  18. Diagnosis and management of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Van; Slack, Donald; McCurdy, Michael T; Shah, Nirav G; Gupta, Nachi; Nusbaum, Jeffrey

    2017-10-20

    Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a clinical diagnosis that is based on changes in dyspnea, cough, and/or sputum production in a COPD patient; however, patients presenting with an acute exacerbation may be undiagnosed or have a variety of comorbid conditions that can complicate diagnosis. This issue presents strategies and algorithms for the early use of evidence-based interventions, including appropriate use of antibiotics, bronchodilators, and corticosteroids, along with noninvasive ventilation with capnography, to minimize morbidity and mortality associated with this disease. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  19. Risks of Using Bedside Tests to Verify Nasogastric Tube Position in Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Ni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasogastric (NG tubes are commonly used for enteral feeding. Complications of feeding tube misplacement include malnutrition, pulmonary aspiration, and even death. We built a Bayesian network (BN to analyse the risks associated with available bedside tests to verify tube position. Evidence on test validity (sensitivity and specificity was retrieved from a systematic review. Likelihood ratios were used to select the best tests for detecting tubes misplaced in the lung or oesophagus. Five bedside tests were analysed including magnetic guidance, aspirate pH, auscultation, aspirate appearance, and capnography/colourimetry. Among these, auscultation and appearance are non-diagnostic towards lung or oesophagus placements. Capnography/ colourimetry can confirm but cannot rule out lung placement. Magnetic guidance can rule out both lung and oesophageal placement. However, as a relatively new technology, further validation studies are needed. The pH test with a cut-off at 5.5 or lower can rule out lung intubation. Lowering the cut-off to 4 not only minimises oesophageal intubation but also provides extra safety as the sensitivity of pH measurement is reduced by feeding, antacid medication, or the use of less accurate pH paper. BN is an effective tool for representing and analysing multi-layered uncertainties in test validity and reliability for the verification of NG tube position. Aspirate pH with a cut-off of 4 is the safest bedside method to minimise lung and oesophageal misplacement.

  20. Setting individualized positive end-expiratory pressure level with a positive end-expiratory pressure decrement trial after a recruitment maneuver improves oxygenation and lung mechanics during one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Mugarra, Ana; Gutierrez, Andrea; Carbonell, Jose Antonio; García, Marisa; Soro, Marina; Tusman, Gerardo; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2014-03-01

    We investigated whether individualized positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation, ventilation, and lung mechanics during one-lung ventilation compared with standardized PEEP. Thirty patients undergoing thoracic surgery were randomly allocated to the study or control group. Both groups received an alveolar recruitment maneuver at the beginning and end of one-lung ventilation. After the alveolar recruitment maneuver, the control group had their lungs ventilated with a 5 cm·H2O PEEP, while the study group had their lungs ventilated with an individualized PEEP level determined by a PEEP decrement trial. Arterial blood samples, lung mechanics, and volumetric capnography were recorded at multiple timepoints throughout the procedure. The individualized PEEP values in study group were higher than the standardized PEEP values (10 ± 2 vs 5 cm·H2O; P decrement trial than with a standardized 5 cm·H2O of PEEP.

  1. MRI of ventilated neonates and infants: respiratory pressure as trigger signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, J.; Reiffen, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: motivated by the difficulties often encountered in the setup of respiratory trigger in MR imaging of mechanical ventilated pediatric patients, a simplified approach in terms of time and reliability was sought. Method: with the help of a male-to-male Luer-Lock adapter in combination with a 3-way adapter the tube of the respiratory compensation bellow was fixed to the output channel for capnography of the airway filter. Ten patients (age 4 months to 6 years) were tested with spin echo imaging and either respiration compensation (T1-weighted imaging) or respiratory triggered (T2-weighted imaging). Results: a clear trigger signal was achieved in all cases. No negative influence on the quality or security of the mechanical ventilation of the patients was observed. Summary: the proposed adapter is safe, efficient and fast to install in patients undergoing MR imaging in general anaesthesia. (orig.) [de

  2. Data supporting the use of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2 measurement to guide management of cardiac arrest: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison F. Paiva

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article, “The Use of End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide (ETCO2 Measurement to Guide Management of Cardiac Arrest: A Systematic Review” [1]. This article is a systematic review and meta-analysis of existing data on the subject of whether any level of end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2 measured during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR correlates with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC or survival in adult patients experiencing cardiac arrest in any setting. These data are made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyses. Keywords: Cardiac arrest, End tidal carbon dioxide, Prognostication, Advanced cardiac life support, Capnography, Systematic review, Meta-analysis

  3. Hypocapnia and hyperoxia induction using a hyperventilation protocol in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arriba-Arnau, Aida; Dalmau, Antonia; Salvat-Pujol, Neus; Soria, Virginia; Bocos, Javier; Menchón, José Manuel; Urretavizcaya, Mikel

    Hyperventilation in electroconvulsive therapy sessions has been associated with seizure threshold, seizure characteristics, and cognitive effects. There is no consensus on the optimal procedure of applying hyperventilation manoeuvres during electroconvulsive therapy. Prospective evaluation of the effects of systematic use of hyperventilation manoeuvres with facial mask and capnography (protocolized hyperventilation [pHV]), on ventilation parameters and on seizures. The study included a sample of 130 sessions (65 performed according to hyperventilation standard practice and 65 successive sessions, with pHV) of 35 patients over a period of 10 weeks. The pHV manoeuvres reduced exhaled CO 2 and increased O 2 saturation significantly (Pelectroconvulsive therapy procedure without adding costs. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiorespiratory monitoring during neonatal resuscitation for direct feedback and audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Johannes van Vonderen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant’s condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, colour and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can be used directly to guide care, but can also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this review we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation.

  5. ACCURACY OF NONINVASIVE ANESTHETIC MONITORING IN THE ANESTHETIZED GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Grøndahl, Carsten; Stegmann, George F

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of pulse oximetry, capnography, and oscillometric blood pressure during general anesthesia in giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). Thirty-two giraffes anesthetized for physiologic experiments were instrumented with a pulse oximeter transmittance probe positioned...... on the tongue and a capnograph sampling line placed at the oral end of the endotracheal tube. A human size 10 blood pressure cuff was placed around the base of the tail, and an indwelling arterial catheter in the auricular artery continuously measured blood pressure. Giraffes were intermittently ventilated...... using a Hudson demand valve throughout the procedures. Arterial blood for blood gas analysis was collected at multiple time points. Relationships between oxygen saturation as determined by pulse oximetry and arterial oxygen saturation, between arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure and end...

  6. [Prehospital airway management of laryngeal tubes. Should the laryngeal tube S with gastric drain tube be preferred in emergency medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, V; Wilde, P; Byhahn, C; Mack, M G; Schalk, R

    2011-02-01

    Laryngeal tubes (LT) are increasingly being used for emergency airway management. This article reports on two patients in whom out-of-hospital intubation with a single-lumen LT was associated with massive pulmonary aspiration in one patient and gastric overinflation in the other. In both cases peak inspiratory pressures exceeded the LT leak pressure of approximately 35 mbar. This resulted in gastric inflation and decreased pulmonary compliance and increased inspiratory pressure further, thereby creating a vicious circle. It is therefore recommended that laryngeal tube suction (LTS) should be used in all cases of emergency airway management and a gastric drain tube be inserted through the dedicated second lumen. Apart from gastric overinflation, incorrect LT/LTS placement must be detected and immediately corrected, e.g. in cases of difficult or impossible gastric tube placement, permanent drainage of air from the gastric tube, decreasing minute ventilation or an ascending capnography curve.

  7. Use of Microcuff ® endotracheal tubes in paediatric laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar Mhamane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Traditionally, uncuffed endotracheal tubes have been used in children. Cuffed tubes may be useful in special situations like laparoscopy. Microcuff ® endotracheal tube is a specifically designed cuffed endotracheal tube for the paediatric airway. We studied the appropriateness of Microcuff ® tube size selection, efficacy of ventilation, and complications, in children undergoing laparoscopy. Methods: In a prospective, observational study, 100 children undergoing elective laparoscopy were intubated with Microcuff ® tube as per recommended size. We studied appropriateness of size selection, sealing pressure, ability to ventilate with low flow, quality of capnography and post-extubation laryngospasm or stridor. Results: Mean age of the patients was 5.44 years (range 8 months 5 days-9 years 11 months. There was no resistance for tube passage during intubation in any patient. Leak on intermittent positive pressure ventilation at airway pressure ≤20 cm H 2 O was present in all patients. Mean sealing pressure was 11.72 (1.9 standard deviation [SD] cm H 2 O. With the creation of pnemoperitoneum, mean intracuff pressure increased to 12.48 (3.12 SD cm H 2 O. With head low positioning, mean cuff pressure recorded was 13.32 (2.92 SD. Ventilation at low flow (mean flow 1 L/min, plateau-type capnography was noted in all patients. Mean duration of intubation was 83.50 min. Coughing at extubation occurred in 6 patients. Partial laryngospasm occurred in 4 patients, which responded to continuous positive airway pressure via face mask. Severe laryngospasm or stridor was not seen in any patient. Conclusion: Microcuff ® tubes can be safely used in children if size selection recommendations are followed and cuff pressure is strictly monitored. Advantages are better airway seal and effective ventilation, permitting use of low flows.

  8. Detection of Respiratory Adverse Events in Pediatric Dental Patients Sedated With 0.75mg/Kg of Midazolam and Oxygen by Continuous Pretracheal Auscultation: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somri, Mostafa; Matter, Ibrahim; Hadjittofi, Christopher; Hoash, Naser; Moaddi, Bian; Kharouba, Johnny; Parisinos, Constantinos A; Peretz, Benjamin

    Sedation is becoming more commonplace for pediatric patients undergoing minor procedures. Fortunately, electronic monitors have contributed to a reduction in the associated respiratory adverse events (RAEs). To test the hypothesis that adding the pretracheal stethoscope (PTS) to standard monitoring methods (SMMs) may improve RAE detection in sedated pediatric dental patients, the frequency of RAEs detected by SMMs (i.e. visual observation, capnography, and pulse oximetry) was compared to that detected by SMMs alongside continuous PTS auscultation. A prospective, randomised, controlled trial was performed with 100 pediatric patient participants of ASA≤2, who were scheduled to receive dental treatment under 0.75 mg/kg and oxygen. Patients were randomised into Groups A (n=50; SMMs) and B (n=50; SMMs+PTS). Inclusion criteria were behavioral management problems and intolerance to dental treatment despite behavioral management techniques or nitrous oxide administration. Exclusion criteria were high-risk conditions for RAEs, altered mental status, gastrointestinal disorders, parental refusal of conscious sedation and failure of previous conscious sedation. An anesthesist was present throughout the dental treatments. RAEs were detected in 10 (20%) and 22(44%) Group A and B patients respectively (p=0.01). The majority of RAEs within Group B were detected by PTS auscultation (n=19). Capnography produced 13 and 15 false-positive results in Groups A and B respectively, whereas the PTS produced 4(8%) false-positive results in Group B (p=0.009). PTS was found to be useful for detecting RAEs during pediatric dental sedation with 0.75mg/kg midazolam and oxygen, in the presence of an anesthesist.

  9. COPD phenotypes on computed tomography and its correlation with selected lung function variables in severe patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva SMD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Maria Doria da Silva, Ilma Aparecida Paschoal, Eduardo Mello De Capitani, Marcos Mello Moreira, Luciana Campanatti Palhares, Mônica Corso PereiraPneumology Service, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Computed tomography (CT phenotypic characterization helps in understanding the clinical diversity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but its clinical relevance and its relationship with functional features are not clarified. Volumetric capnography (VC uses the principle of gas washout and analyzes the pattern of CO2 elimination as a function of expired volume. The main variables analyzed were end-tidal concentration of carbon dioxide (ETCO2, Slope of phase 2 (Slp2, and Slope of phase 3 (Slp3 of capnogram, the curve which represents the total amount of CO2 eliminated by the lungs during each breath.Objective: To investigate, in a group of patients with severe COPD, if the phenotypic analysis by CT could identify different subsets of patients, and if there was an association of CT findings and functional variables.Subjects and methods: Sixty-five patients with COPD Gold III–IV were admitted for clinical evaluation, high-resolution CT, and functional evaluation (spirometry, 6-minute walk test [6MWT], and VC. The presence and profusion of tomography findings were evaluated, and later, the patients were identified as having emphysema (EMP or airway disease (AWD phenotype. EMP and AWD groups were compared; tomography findings scores were evaluated versus spirometric, 6MWT, and VC variables.Results: Bronchiectasis was found in 33.8% and peribronchial thickening in 69.2% of the 65 patients. Structural findings of airways had no significant correlation with spirometric variables. Air trapping and EMP were strongly correlated with VC variables, but in opposite directions. There was some overlap between the EMP and AWD

  10. Difficult airway equipment in departments of emergency medicine in Ireland: results of a national survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Adverse effects associated with difficult airway management can be catastrophic and include death, brain injury and myocardial injury. Closed-malpractice claims have shown prolonged and persistent attempts at endotracheal intubation to be the most common situation leading to disastrous respiratory events. To date, there has been no evaluation of the types of difficult airway equipment currently available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. The objective of this survey was to identify the difficult airway equipment available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. METHODS: Departments of emergency medicine in the Republic of Ireland with at least one dedicated Emergency Medicine consultant were surveyed via telephone. RESULTS: All of the departments contacted held at least one alternative device on site for both ventilation and intubation. The most common alternative ventilation device was the laryngeal mask airway (89%). The most common alternative intubating device was the surgical airway device (100%). CONCLUSIONS: Irish departments of emergency medicine compare well with those in the UK and USA, when surveyed concerning difficult airway equipment. However, we believe that this situation could be further improved by training inexperienced healthcare providers in the use of the laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway, by placing greater emphasis on the ready availability of capnography and by the increased use of portable difficult airway storage units.

  11. Robust remote monitoring of breathing function by using infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carina B; Yu, Xinchi; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An abnormal breathing rate (BR) is one of the strongest markers of physiological distress. Moreover, it plays an important role in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome, as well as in the diagnosis of respiratory disorders. However, the current measuring modalities can cause discomfort to the patient, since attachment to the patient's body is required. This paper proposes a new approach based on infrared thermography to remotely monitor BR. This method allows to (1) detect automatically the nose, (2) track the associate region of interest (ROI), and (3) extract BR. To evaluate the performance of this method, thermal recording of 5 healthy subjects were acquired. Results were compared with BR obtained by capnography. The introduced approach demonstrated an excellent performance. ROIs were precisely segmented and tracked. Furthermore, a Bland-Altman diagram showed a good agreement between estimated BR and gold standard. The mean correlation and mean absolute BR error are 0.92 ± 0.07 and 0.53 bpm, respectively. In summary, infrared thermography seems to be a great, clinically relevant alternative to attached sensors, due to its outstanding characteristics and performance.

  12. Treatment response of airway clearance assessed by single-breath washout in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Chiara; Singer, Florian; Yammine, Sophie; Casaulta, Carmen; Latzin, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    We studied the ability of 4 single-breath gas washout (SBW) tests to measure immediate effects of airway clearance in children with CF. 25 children aged 4-16 years with CF performed pulmonary function tests to assess short-term variability at baseline and response to routine airway clearance. Tidal helium and sulfur hexafluoride (double-tracer gas: DTG) SBW, tidal capnography, tidal and vital capacity nitrogen (N2) SBW and spirometry were applied. We analyzed the gasses' phase III slope (SnIII--normalized for tidal volume) and FEV1 from spirometry. SnIII from tidal DTG-SBW, SnIII from vital capacity N2-SBW, and FEV1 improved significantly after airway clearance. From these tests, individual change of SnIII from tidal DTG-SBW and FEV1 exceeded short-term variability in 10 and 6 children. With the tidal DTG-SBW, an easy and promising test for peripheral gas mixing efficiency, immediate pulmonary function response to airway clearance can be assessed in CF children. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reproducibility of task activation using the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination in healthy controls: A functional Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beishon, L; Williams, C A L; Panerai, R B; Robinson, T G; Haunton, V J

    2017-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) changes occurring with cognitive stimulation can be measured by Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of CBFv changes to the Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE-III). 13 volunteers underwent bilateral TCD (middle cerebral artery), continuous heart rate (HR, 3-lead ECG, Finometer), beat-to-beat mean arterial pressure (MAP, Finometer), and end-tidal CO 2 (ETCO 2 , capnography). After 5min baseline, all ACE-III tasks were performed in 3 domains (A/B/C). Data presented are population CBFv peak normalised changes and area under the curve (AUC). Statistical analysis was by 2-way repeated measures (ANOVA), intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and coefficient of variation (CV). 12 bilateral data sets were obtained (10 right hand dominant, 6 female). Baseline parameters (MAP, HR, ETCO 2 ) did not differ between visits. All tasks increased CBFv. Only domain A on AUC analysis differed significantly on ANOVA, and one task on post hoc testing (p examine reproducibility of CBFv changes to a complete cognitive assessment tool. Reproducibility of CBFv measurements to the ACE-III was variable. AUC may provide more reliable estimates than peak CBFv responses. These data need validating in patient populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nocturnal hypoxia in ALS is related to cognitive dysfunction and can occur as clusters of desaturations.

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    Su-Yeon Park

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to progressive weakness of the respiratory and limb muscles. Consequently, most patients with ALS exhibit progressive hypoventilation, which worsens during sleep. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between nocturnal hypoxia and cognitive dysfunction and to assess the pattern of nocturnal hypoxia in patients with ALS.Twenty-five patients with definite or probable ALS underwent neuropsychologic testing, nocturnal pulse oximetry, and capnography. Patients were grouped according to the presence of nocturnal hypoxia (SpO2<95% for ≥10% of the night and their clinical characteristics and cognitive function were compared.Compared to patients without nocturnal hypoxia, those with nocturnal hypoxia (n = 10, 40% had poor memory retention (p = 0.039 and retrieval efficiency (p = 0.045. A cluster-of-desaturation pattern was identified in 7 patients (70% in the Hypoxia Group.These results suggest that nocturnal hypoxia can be related to cognitive dysfunction in ALS. In addition, a considerable number of patients with ALS may be exposed to repeated episodes of deoxygenation-reoxygenation (a cluster-of-desaturation pattern during sleep, which could be associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species. Further studies are required to define the exact causal relationships between these phenomena, the exact manifestations of nocturnal cluster-of-desaturation patterns, and the effect of clusters of desaturation on ALS progression.

  15. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Aylin Pıhtılı

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. Aims: To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study Methods: Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Results: Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001, oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001 and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001 were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001 and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001 were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Conclusion: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high

  16. Influence of chest compression artefact on capnogram-based ventilation detection during out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leturiondo, Mikel; Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; Ruiz, Jesus M; Julio Gutiérrez, J; Leturiondo, Luis A; González-Otero, Digna M; Russell, James K; Zive, Dana; Daya, Mohamud

    2018-03-01

    Capnography has been proposed as a method for monitoring the ventilation rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A high incidence (above 70%) of capnograms distorted by chest compression induced oscillations has been previously reported in out-of-hospital (OOH) CPR. The aim of the study was to better characterize the chest compression artefact and to evaluate its influence on the performance of a capnogram-based ventilation detector during OOH CPR. Data from the MRx monitor-defibrillator were extracted from OOH cardiac arrest episodes. For each episode, presence of chest compression artefact was annotated in the capnogram. Concurrent compression depth and transthoracic impedance signals were used to identify chest compressions and to annotate ventilations, respectively. We designed a capnogram-based ventilation detection algorithm and tested its performance with clean and distorted episodes. Data were collected from 232 episodes comprising 52 654 ventilations, with a mean (±SD) of 227 (±118) per episode. Overall, 42% of the capnograms were distorted. Presence of chest compression artefact degraded algorithm performance in terms of ventilation detection, estimation of ventilation rate, and the ability to detect hyperventilation. Capnogram-based ventilation detection during CPR using our algorithm was compromised by the presence of chest compression artefact. In particular, artefact spanning from the plateau to the baseline strongly degraded ventilation detection, and caused a high number of false hyperventilation alarms. Further research is needed to reduce the impact of chest compression artefact on capnographic ventilation monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Regional Cerebral Oximetry During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Useful or Useless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genbrugge, Cornelia; Dens, Jo; Meex, Ingrid; Boer, Willem; Eertmans, Ward; Sabbe, Marc; Jans, Frank; De Deyne, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 375,000 people annually experience sudden cardiac arrest (CA) in Europe. Most patients who survive the initial hours and days after CA die of postanoxic brain damage. Current monitors, such as electrocardiography and end-tidal capnography, provide only indirect information about the condition of the brain during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In contrast, cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy provides continuous, noninvasive, real-time information about brain oxygenation without the need for a pulsatile blood flow. It measures transcutaneous cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2). This information could supplement currently used monitors. Moreover, an evolution in rSO2 monitoring technology has made it easier to assess rSO2 in CA conditions. We give an overview of the literature regarding rSO2 measurements during CPR and the current commercially available devices. We highlight the feasibility of cerebral saturation measurement during CPR, its role as a quality parameter of CPR, predictor of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and neurologic outcome, and its monitoring function during transport. rSO2 is feasible in the setting of CA and has the potential to measure the quality of CPR, predict ROSC and neurologic outcome, and monitor post-CA patients during transport. The literature shows that rSO2 has the potential to serve multiple roles as a neuromonitoring tool during CPR and also to guide neuroprotective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring gaseous exchange: implications for nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Susan; Wilson, Michael

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether a relationship exists between arterial and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2 and PETCO2 respectively) in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), and what the implications it has for nursing care. PaCO2 and PETCO2 are indicators of ventilatory adequacy which is an important aspect of respiratory function. These measures of carbon dioxide tension are obtained via invasive and non-invasive monitoring tools. Measurement of PETCO2 has only recently been introduced into ICUs and its usefulness in these environments is open to debate. A population of 30 intubated patients had 214 simultaneous measurements of PaCO2 and PETCO2 taken over a period of 10 months. The findings indicate that, despite strong significant correlations, PETCO2 cannot be used safely as a substitute for PaCO2 as the arterial/end-tidal carbon dioxide gradient is not constant, nor does capnography provide a consistently reliable indicator of PaCO2.

  19. Anesthetic Management and Complications of Percutaneous Aortic Valve Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tailur Alberto Grando

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Aortic stenosis is a highly prevalent and life-threatening disease. In elderly patients with comorbidities, percutaneous valve implantation is an option. The aim of the study was to describe the anesthetic management and complications of general anesthesia Method: Case series with 30-day and 24-month follow-ups after implantation of the CoreValve device performed at the Institute of Cardiology/University Foundation of Cardiology between December 2008 and January 2012. The patients underwent general anesthesia monitored with mean arterial pressure (PAM, electrocardiogram (ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, transesophageal echocardiography, thermometry, and transvenous pacemaker. Results: Twenty-eight patients, mean age 82.46 years, 20.98% mean EuroSCORE, functional class III/IV, successfully underwent valve implantation. Nine patients required permanent pacemaker implantation. During follow-up, two patients died: one during surgery due to LV perforation and the other on the third day of unknown causes. At 24 months, one patient diagnosed with multiple myeloma died. This anesthetic technique proved to be safe. Conclusion: The initial experience with percutaneous aortic valve implantation under general anesthesia has proven to be safe and effective, with no significant anesthetic complications during this procedure. Keywords: Aesthesia, General, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Aortic Valve Stenosis, Aged.

  20. Awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway-Proseal™ as alternative to awake fiberoptic intubation in management of anticipated difficult airway in ambulatory surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Zaballos

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives The decision whether to manage an ambulatory patient with a previously documented difficult airway with a supraglottic device remain controversial. We report an awake insertion of a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ in a patient with known difficult airway scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Case report A 46-yr-old woman was programmed as a day case surgery for breast nodule resection. Her anesthetic record included an impossible intubation with cancelation of surgery and subsequent awake fibroscopic intubation. She reported emotional distress with the previous experience and declined this approach. In view of the previous experience, an awake airway control with a Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was planned after explaining and reassuring the patient. After adequate topicalisation, a size 4 Laryngeal Mask Airway Proseal™ was successfully inserted after two attempts, and their patency was confirmed by capnography. Anesthesia was induced intravenously and the surgery was uneventful. Conclusion We describe a feasible alternative strategy to awake intubation in a patient with known difficult airway undergoing ambulatory surgery. In this specific clinical situation, if tracheal intubation is deemed unnecessary, awake supraglottic airway might allow adequate ventilation and their use should be considered.

  1. Pulmonary function responses to ozone in smokers with a limited smoking history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Melissa L.; Brenza, Timothy M.; Ben-Jebria, Abdellaziz; Bascom, Rebecca; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Ultman, James S.

    2014-01-01

    In non-smokers, ozone (O 3 ) inhalation causes decreases in forced expiratory volume (FEV 1 ) and dead space (V D ) and increases the slope of the alveolar plateau (S N ). We previously described a population of smokers with a limited smoking history that had enhanced responsiveness to brief O 3 boluses and aimed to determine if responsiveness to continuous exposure was also enhanced. Thirty smokers (19 M, 11 F, 24 ± 4 years, 6 ± 4 total years smoking,4 ± 2 packs/week) and 30 non-smokers (17 M, 13 F, 25 ± 6 years) exercised for 1 h on a cycle ergometer while breathing 0.30 ppm O 3 . Smokers and non-smokers were equally responsive in terms of FEV 1 (− 9.5 ± 1.8% vs − 8.7 ± 1.9%). Smokers alone were responsive in terms of V D (− 6.1 ± 1.2%) and S N (9.1 ± 3.4%). There was no difference in total delivered dose. Dead space ventilation (V D /V T ) was not initially different between the two groups, but increased in the non-smokers (16.4 ± 2.8%) during the exposure, suggesting that the inhaled dose may be distributed more peripherally in smokers. We also conclude that these cigarette smokers retain their airway responsiveness to O 3 and, uniquely, experience changes in V D that lead to heterogeneity in airway morphometry and an increase in S N . - Highlights: • We previously found lung function responses to O 3 bolus exposure in smokers. • Here, we describe their responsiveness to continuous O 3 exposure with exercise. • Spirometry and capnography were used to assess pulmonary function changes. • Enhanced bronchoconstriction in smokers increases parenchymal delivery of O 3

  2. Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dailson Mamede Bezerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. Case report A male patient, 39 years old, 71 kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0 mm followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30 min, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conclusions Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin,including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunc-tion in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered asa differential diagnosis.

  3. Open lung approach versus standard protective strategies: Effects on driving pressure and ventilatory efficiency during anesthesia - A pilot, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Suarez-Sipmann, Fernando; Tusman, Gerardo; León, Irene; Romero, Esther; Gracia, Estefania; Mugarra, Ana; Arocas, Blanca; Pozo, Natividad; Soro, Marina; Belda, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Low tidal volume (VT) during anesthesia minimizes lung injury but may be associated to a decrease in functional lung volume impairing lung mechanics and efficiency. Lung recruitment (RM) can restore lung volume but this may critically depend on the post-RM selected PEEP. This study was a randomized, two parallel arm, open study whose primary outcome was to compare the effects on driving pressure of adding a RM to low-VT ventilation, with or without an individualized post-RM PEEP in patients without known previous lung disease during anesthesia. Consecutive patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery were submitted to low-VT ventilation (6 ml·kg-1) and standard PEEP of 5 cmH2O (pre-RM, n = 36). After 30 min estabilization all patients received a RM and were randomly allocated to either continue with the same PEEP (RM-5 group, n = 18) or to an individualized open-lung PEEP (OL-PEEP) (Open Lung Approach, OLA group, n = 18) defined as the level resulting in maximal Cdyn during a decremental PEEP trial. We compared the effects on driving pressure and lung efficiency measured by volumetric capnography. OL-PEEP was found at 8±2 cmH2O. 36 patients were included in the final analysis. When compared with pre-RM, OLA resulted in a 22% increase in compliance and a 28% decrease in driving pressure when compared to pre-RM. These parameters did not improve in the RM-5. The trend of the DP was significantly different between the OLA and RM-5 groups (p = 0.002). VDalv/VTalv was significantly lower in the OLA group after the RM (p = 0.035). Lung recruitment applied during low-VT ventilation improves driving pressure and lung efficiency only when applied as an open-lung strategy with an individualized PEEP in patients without lung diseases undergoing major abdominal surgery. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02798133.

  4. Impact of post-intubation interventions on mortality in patients boarding in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rahul; Goyal, Munish; Graf, Shannon; Bhooshan, Anu; Teferra, Eshetu; Dubin, Jeffrey; Frohna, Bill

    2014-09-01

    Emergency physicians frequently perform endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The impact of instituting early post-intubation interventions on patients boarding in the emergency department (ED) is not well studied. We sought to determine the impact of post-intubation interventions (arterial blood gas sampling, obtaining a chest x-ray (CXR), gastric decompression, early sedation, appropriate initial tidal volume, and quantitative capnography) on outcomes of mortality, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator days, and intensive care unit (ICU) length-of-stay (LOS). This was an observational, retrospective study of patients intubated in the ED at a large tertiary-care teaching hospital and included patients in the ED for greater than two hours post-intubation. We excluded them if they had incomplete data, were designated "do not resuscitate," were managed primarily by the trauma team, or had surgery within six hours after intubation. Of 169 patients meeting criteria, 15 died and 10 developed VAP. The mortality odds ratio (OR) in patients receiving CXR was 0.10 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.98), and 0.11 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.46) in patients receiving early sedation. The mortality OR for patients with 3 or fewer interventions was 4.25 (95% CI 1.15 to 15.75) when compared to patients with 5 or more interventions. There was no significant relationship between VAP rate, ventilator days, or ICU LOS and any of the intervention groups. The performance of a CXR and early sedation as well as performing five or more vs. three or fewer post-intubation interventions in boarding adult ED patients was associated with decreased mortality.

  5. Agreement between arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide and saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen values obtained by direct arterial blood measurements versus noninvasive methods in conscious healthy and ill foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David M; Alcott, Cody J; Wang, Chong; Bornkamp, Jennifer L; Young, Jessica L; Sponseller, Brett A

    2011-11-15

    To determine agreement between indirect measurements of end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PetCO(2)) and saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO(2)) with direct measurements of PaCO(2) and calculated saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen in arterial blood (SaO(2)) in conscious healthy and ill foals. Validation study. 10 healthy and 21 ill neonatal foals. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed on healthy and ill foals examined at a veterinary teaching hospital to determine direct measurements of PaCO(2) and PaO(2) along with SaO(2). Concurrently, PetCO(2) was measured with a capnograph inserted into a naris, and SpO(2) was measured with a reflectance probe placed at the base of the tail. Paired values were compared by use of Pearson correlation coefficients, and level of agreement was assessed with the Bland-Altman method. Mean ± SD difference between PaCO(2) and PetCO(2) was 0.1 ± 5.0 mm Hg. There was significant strong correlation (r = 0.779) and good agreement between PaCO(2) and PetCO(2). Mean ± SD difference between SaO(2) and SpO(2) was 2.5 ± 3.5%. There was significant moderate correlation (r = 0.499) and acceptable agreement between SaO(2) and SpO(2). Both PetCO(2) obtained by use of nasal capnography and SpO(2) obtained with a reflectance probe are clinically applicable and accurate indirect methods of estimating and monitoring PaCO(2) and SaO(2) in neonatal foals. Indirect methods should not replace periodic direct measurement of corresponding parameters.

  6. Integration of point-of-care ultrasound during rapid sequence intubation in trauma resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Ranjan Mishra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Airway and breathing management play critical role in trauma resuscitation. Early identification of esophageal intubation and detection of fatal events is critical. Authors studied the utility of integration of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS during different phases of rapid sequence intubation (RSI in trauma resuscitation. Methods: It was prospective, randomized single-centered study conducted at the Emergency Department of a level one trauma center. Patients were divided into ultrasonography (USG and clinical examination (CE arm. The objectives were to study the utility of POCUS in endotracheal tube placement and confirmations and identification of potentially fatal conditions as tracheal injury, midline vessels, paratracheal hematoma, vocal cord pathology, pneumothorax, and others during RSI. Patient >1 year of age were included. Time taken for procedure, number of incorrect intubations, and pathologies detected were noted. The data were collected in Microsoft Excel spread sheets and analyzed using Stata (version 11.2, Stata Corp, Texas, U. S. A software. Results: One hundred and six patients were recruited. The mean time for primary survey USG versus CE arm was (20 ± 10.01 vs. 18 ± 11.03 seconds. USG detected four pneumothorax, one tracheal injury, and one paratracheal hematoma. The mean procedure time USG versus CE arm was (37.3 ± 21.92 vs. 58 ± 32.04 seconds. Eight esophageal intubations were identified in USG arm by POCUS and two in CE arm by EtCO2 values. Conclusion: Integration of POCUS was useful in all three phases of RSI. It identified paratracheal hematoma, tracheal injury, and pneumothorax. It also identified esophageal intubation and confirmed main stem tracheal intubation in less time compared to five-point auscultation and capnography.

  7. Placebo versus low-dose ketamine infusion in addition to remifentanil target-controlled infusion for conscious sedation during oocyte retrieval: A prospective, double-blinded, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morue, Hélène I; Raj-Lawrence, Shalini; Saxena, Sarah; Delbaere, Anne; Engelman, Edgard; Barvais, Luc A

    2018-04-30

    Currently, there is no gold standard for monitored anaesthesia care during oocyte retrieval. In our institution, the standard is a conscious sedation technique using a target-controlled infusion (TCI) of remifentanil, titrated to maintain a visual analogue pain score less than 30 mm. This protocol is well accepted by patients but is associated with frequent episodes of respiratory depression. The main objective of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of a continuous intravenous infusion of ketamine could reduce these episodes. Controlled, randomised, prospective, double-blinded study. The current study was conducted in a tertiary-level hospital in Brussels (Belgium) from December 2013 to June 2014. Of the 132 women undergoing oocyte retrieval included, 121 completed the study. After randomisation, patients received either a ketamine infusion (40 μg kg min over 5 min followed by 2.5 μg kg min) or a 0.9% saline infusion in addition to the variable remifentanil TCI. The primary outcome was the number of respiratory depression episodes. Effect site target remifentanil concentrations, side effects, pain score, patient satisfaction and incidence of pregnancy were also recorded. No significant difference in the incidence of respiratory events was noted (pulse oximetry oxygen saturation the ketamine group and 63% in the control group; P = 0.121). No patient required ventilatory support. In the ketamine group, visual analogue pain score and remifentanil concentrations were significantly reduced, but the latter remained above 2 ng ml. Postoperative nausea was less frequent in the ketamine group, 4 versus 15% (P = 0.038). The addition of ketamine did not influence length of stay nor patient satisfaction. The addition of low plasma levels of ketamine to a TCI remifentanil conscious sedation technique did not decrease the incidence nor the severity of respiratory depression. Continuous monitoring of capnography and oxygen saturation is

  8. Marked hypercapnia during cardiopulmonary bypass for myocardial revascularization. Case report.

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    Nascimento, Maurício Serrano; Bernardes, Cassiano Franco; de Medeiros, Roberta Louro

    2002-04-01

    Bypassing heart blood and returning it oxygenated to systemic circulation is achieved at the expenses of major cardiopulmonary physiologic changes. The aim of this report was to present an anesthetic complication during CPB and to warn for the need of interaction of the whole anesthetic-surgical team to prevent adverse perioperative events. A brown female patient, 56 years old, 95 kg, height 1.65 m, physical status ASA IV, with chronic renal failure under hemodialysis was admitted for myocardial revascularization. Monitoring consisted of ECG, invasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry, capnography, esophageal temperature, central venous pressure and anesthetic gases analysis. Patient was premedicated with intravenous midazolam (0.05 mg kg(-1)). Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (16 microg kg(-1)), etomidate (0.3 mg kg(-1)) and pancuronium (0.1 mg kg(-1)), and was maintained with O2, isoflurane (0.5 - 1 MAC) and fentanyl continuous infusion. Blood gas analysis after induction has shown: pH: 7.41; PaO2: 288 mmHg; PaCO2: 38 mmHg; HCO3: 24 mmol L(-1); BE: 0 mmol L(-1); SatO2 100%. A second blood gases analysis, sampled soon after CPB, returned in 30 minutes, showing: pH 7.15; PaO2: 86 mmHg; PaCO2 224 mmHg; HCO3: 29 mmol L(-1); BE: -3 mmol L(-1); SatO2 99%. Thorough and urgent checking of anesthetic and perfusion equipment was performed and revealed that the gas blender was connected to the O2 line and to a CO2 cylinder, when it should be connected to the compressed air cylinder. Bypass circuit mechanical problems may occur in the intraoperative period, and demand prompt repairs. Technological advances in anesthesia equipment, monitoring and safety standards will lessen the possibility of cases such as this to be repeated, but will never replace anesthesiologists surveillance.

  9. Critical incidents and near misses during anesthesia: A prospective audit

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    Pamela Onorame Agbamu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A critical incident is any preventable mishap associated with the administration of anesthesia and which leads to or could have led to an undesirable patients' outcome. Patients' safety can be improved by learning from reported critical incidents and near misses. Materials and Methods: All perioperative critical incidents (excluding obstetrics occurring over 5 months were voluntarily documented in a pro forma. Age of patient, urgency of surgery, grade of anesthetist, and patients' outcome was noted. Results: Seventy-three critical incidents were recorded in 42 patients (incidence 6.1% of 1188 procedures with complete recovery in 88.1% (n = 37 and mortality in 11.9% (n = 5. The highest incidents occurred during elective procedures (71.4%, which were all supervised by consultants, and in patients aged 0–10 years (40.1%. Critical incident categories documented were cardiovascular (41.1%, respiratory (23.25%, vascular access (15.1%, airway/intubation (6.85%, equipment errors (6.85%, difficult/failed regional technique (4.11%, and others (2.74%. The monitors available were: pulse oximetry (100%, precordial stethoscope (90.5%, sphygmomanometer (90.5%, capnography (54.8%, electrocardiogram (31%, and temperature (14.3%. The most probable cause of critical incident was patient factor (38.7% followed by human error (22.5%. Equipment error, pharmacological factor, and surgical factor accounted for 12.9%. Conclusion: Critical incidents can occur in the hands of the highly skilled and even in the presence of adequate monitoring. Protocols should be put in place to avoid errors. Critical incident reporting must be encouraged to improve patients' safety and reduce morbidity and mortality.

  10. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography in the assessment of neurovascular coupling responses to cognitive examination in healthy controls: A feasibility study.

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    Williams, C A L; Panerai, R B; Robinson, T G; Haunton, V J

    2017-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that paradigms from the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-III), including those that had not been studied using TCD previously (novel) versus those which had been (established), would elicit changes in CBF velocity (CBFv). Healthy subjects were studied with bilateral transcranial Doppler (TCD), beat-to-beat blood pressure (Finapres), continuous electrocardiogram (ECG), and end-tidal CO 2 (nasal capnography). After a 5-min baseline recording, cognitive tests of the ACE-III were presented to subjects, covering attention (SUB7, subtracting 7 from 100 sequentially), language (REP, repeating words and phrases), fluency (N-P, naming words), visuospatial (DRAW, clock-drawing), and memory (MEM, recalling name and address). An event marker noted question timing. Forty bilateral data sets were obtained (13 males, 37 right-hand dominant) with a median age of 31 years (IQR 22-52). Population normalized mean peak CBFv% in the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres, respectively, were: SUB7 (11.3±9.6%, 11.2±10.5%), N-P (12.7±11.7%, 11.5±12.0%), REP (12.9±11.7%, 11.6±11.6%), DRAW (13.3±11.7%, 13.2±15.4%) and MEM (13.2±10.3%, 12.0±10.1%). There was a significant difference between the dominant and non-dominant CBFv responses (pCognitive paradigms derived from the ACE-III led to significant lateralised changes in CBFv that were not distinct for novel paradigms. Further work is needed to assess the potential of paradigms to improve the interpretation of cognitive assessments in patients at risk of mild cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The assessment of neurovascular coupling with the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination: a functional transcranial Doppler ultrasonographic study.

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    Beishon, Lucy C; Williams, Claire A L; Panerai, Ronney B; Robinson, Thompson G; Haunton, Victoria J

    2018-03-01

    Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs early in dementia and can be identified by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (TCD). Few studies have examined cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) responses to a detailed cognitive battery. This study aimed to characterize all CBFv responses, and the effect of hemispheric dominance, to the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-III) in healthy volunteers. Forty volunteers underwent continuous bilateral TCD, beat-to-beat blood pressure (MAP; Finapres), heart rate (HR; electrocardiogram), and end-tidal CO 2 (ETCO 2 ; capnography) monitoring. After a 5-min baseline period, all tasks from the ACE-III were performed in 3 sections (A: attention, fluency, memory; B: language; C: visuospatial, memory). Data are population mean normalized percentage (PM%) change from a 20-s baseline period before task initiation. Forty bilateral data sets were obtained (27 women, 37 right-hand dominant). All paradigms produced a sharp increase in CBFv in both dominant (PM% range: 3.29 to 9.70%) and nondominant (PM% range: 4.34 to 11.63%) hemispheres at task initiation, with associated increases in MAP (PM% range: 3.06 to 16.04%). ETCO 2 did not differ significantly at task initiation (PM% range: -1.1 to 2.4%, P > 0.05). HR differed significantly across A and C tasks at initiation (PM% range: -1.1 to 2.4%, P cognitively impaired population. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study is the first to provide a normative data set of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) responses to a complete cognitive assessment (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination, ACE-III) in a large sample ( n = 40) of healthy volunteers. All tasks produced peak and sustained increases in CBFv to different extents. The ACE-III is a feasible tool to assess neurovascular coupling with transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. These data can be used to inform the most appropriate cognitive task to elicit CBFv responses for future studies.

  12. The effect of low dose rocuronium on globe position, muscle relaxation and ventilation in dogs: a clinical study.

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    Auer, Ulrike; Mosing, Martina; Moens, Yves P S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate globe position, muscle relaxation and changes in ventilatory parameters after intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg rocuronium. Prospective clinical study. Sixteen dogs of different breeds, with a body weight of 22.1 +/- 13 kg and age of 5.6 +/- 2.8 years (mean +/- SD), were anesthetized for a short ophthalmic examination requiring central position of the globe. All dogs were premedicated with 0.005 mg/kg medetomidine and 0.1 mg/kg methadone IV. Anesthesia was induced with propofol to effect and maintained with 10 mg/kg/h propofol by continuous rate infusion. Following endotracheal intubation all dogs breathed 100% oxygen via an anesthetic circle system. Neuromuscular function was assessed with an acceleromyograph (TOF-Guard, Organon Teknika NV, Turnhout, Belgium) and by stimulation of the nervus peroneus superficialis. The ventilation parameters were measured using spirometry and capnography. After baseline measurements 0.1 mg/kg rocuronium was administered IV. Minute volume (MV), tidal volume (Vt), respiratory rate (RR), end expiratory carbon dioxide concentration (PE'CO(2)) and maximal depression of the response of the first twitch (T1) of train-of-four (TOF) stimulation and train-of-four ratio (TOFR) was measured. The change in the position of the globe was recorded. T1 decreased to 61 +/- 18% and the TOF ratio to 45 +/- 21% of baseline values. Both parameters returned to baseline after 9 min. There was no significant reduction in MV, TV and RR and no increase in PE'CO(2). The globe rotated to a central position of 45 +/- 7.7 s after administration of rocuronium and remained there for 23 +/- 10.8 min in all dogs. Rocuronium administered intravenously at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg to dogs causes a central position of the globe but minimal impairment of ventilation parameters.

  13. Noninvasive ventilation improves sleep in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a prospective polysomnographic study.

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    Vrijsen, Bart; Buyse, Bertien; Belge, Catharina; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Decramer, Marc; Testelmans, Dries

    2015-04-15

    To evaluate the effects of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on sleep in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after meticulous titration with polysomnography (PSG). In this prospective observational study, 24 ALS patients were admitted to the sleep laboratory during 4 nights for in-hospital NIV titration with PSG and nocturnal capnography. Questionnaires were used to assess subjective sleep quality and quality of life (QoL). Patients were readmitted after one month. In the total group, slow wave sleep and REM sleep increased and the arousal-awakening index improved. The group without bulbar involvement (non-bulbar) showed the same improvements, together with an increase in sleep efficiency. Nocturnal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels improved in the total and non-bulbar group. Except for oxygen saturation during REM sleep, no improvement in respiratory function or sleep structure was found in bulbar patients. However, these patients showed less room for improvement. Patient-reported outcomes showed improvement in sleep quality and QoL for the total and non-bulbar group, while bulbar patients only reported improvements in very few subscores. This study shows an improvement of sleep architecture, carbon dioxide, and nocturnal oxygen saturation at the end of NIV titration and after one month of NIV in ALS patients. More studies are needed to identify the appropriate time to start NIV in bulbar patients. Our results suggest that accurate titration of NIV by PSG improves sleep quality. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 511. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  14. Effects of non-invasive ventilation on objective sleep and nocturnal respiration in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Boentert, Matthias; Brenscheidt, Inga; Glatz, Christian; Young, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is indicated if sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), daytime hypercapnia, or significant diaphragmatic weakness is present. We investigated both short-term and long-term effects of NIV on objective measures of sleep and nocturnal respiration in patients with ALS. Polysomnography (PSG) and transcutaneous capnography were conducted for diagnosis of SDB (T0), for treatment initiation (T1), and follow-up 3, 9, and 15 months later (T2, T3, and T4, respectively). Records from 65 patients were retrospectively analyzed at T0 and T1. At subsequent timepoints, the number of full data sets decreased since follow-up sleep studies frequently included polygraphy rather than PSG (T2, 38 patients, T3, 17 patients, T4, 11 patients). At T0, mean age was 63.2 years, 29 patients were female, and 22 patients had bulbar ALS. Immediate sequelae of NIV initiation included significant increases of slow wave sleep, rapid eye movement sleep, and oxygen saturation. Mean apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory rate, and the maximum transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension were reduced. At T2-T4, normoxia and normocapnia were preserved. Sleep quality measures showed no alteration as diurnal use of NIV gradually increased reflecting disease progression. In contrast to previous reports, improvement of sleep and respiratory outcomes was found in both non-bulbar and bulbar patients. NIV significantly improves objective sleep quality and SDB in the first night of treatment in patients with bulbar and non-bulbar ALS. NIV warrants nocturnal normoventilation without deterioration of sleep quality in the long run with only minor changes to ventilator settings.

  15. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography for confirmation of endotracheal tube placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

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    Chou, Hao-Chang; Chong, Kah-Meng; Sim, Shyh-Shyong; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Liu, Shih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Wu, Meng-Che; Fu, Chia-Ming; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chien-Chang; Lien, Wan-Ching; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography for assessing endotracheal tube position during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We performed a prospective observational study of patients undergoing emergency intubation during CPR. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography was performed during the intubation with the transducer placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch, to assess for endotracheal tube positioning and exclude esophageal intubation. The position of trachea was identified by a hyperechoic air-mucosa (A-M) interface with posterior reverberation artifact (comet-tail artifact). The endotracheal tube position was defined as endotracheal if single A-M interface with comet-tail artifact was observed. Endotracheal tube position was defined as intraesophageal if a second A-M interface appeared, suggesting a false second airway (double tract sign). The gold standard of correct endotracheal intubation was the combination of clinical auscultation and quantitative waveform capnography. The main outcome was the accuracy of tracheal ultrasonography in assessing endotracheal tube position during CPR. Among the 89 patients enrolled, 7 (7.8%) had esophageal intubations. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of tracheal ultrasonography were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.4-100%), 85.7% (95% CI: 42.0-99.2%), 98.8% (95% CI: 92.5-99.0%) and 100% (95% CI: 54.7-100%), respectively. Positive and negative likelihood ratios were 7.0 (95% CI: 1.1-43.0) and 0.0, respectively. Real-time tracheal ultrasonography is an accurate method for identifying endotracheal tube position during CPR without the need for interruption of chest compression. Tracheal ultrasonography in resuscitation management may serve as a powerful adjunct in trained hands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between musical characteristics and temporal breathing pattern in piano performance

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    Yutaka Sakaguchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Although there is growing evidence that breathing is modulated by various motor and cognitive activities, the nature of breathing in musical performance has been little explored. The present study examined the temporal breath pattern in piano performance, aiming to elucidate how breath timing is related to musical organization/events and performance. In the experiments, the respiration of 15 professional and amateur pianists, playing 10 music excerpts in total (from four-octave C major scale, Hanon’s exercise, J. S. Bach’s Invention, Mozart’s Sonatas, and Debussy’s Clair de lune, was monitored by capnography. The relationship between breathing and musical characteristics was analyzed. Five major results were obtained. 1 Mean breath interval was shortened for excerpts in faster tempi. 2 Fluctuation of breath intervals was reduced for the pieces for finger exercise and those in faster tempi. Pianists showing large within-trial fluctuation also exhibited large inter-excerpt difference. 3 Inter-trial consistency of the breath patterns depended on the excerpts. Consistency was generally reduced for the excerpts that could be performed mechanically (i.e., pieces for finger exercise, but interestingly, one third of the participant showed consistent patterns for the simple scale, correlated with the ascending/descending sequences. 4 Pianists tended to exhale just after the music onsets, inhale at the rests, and inhibit inhale during the slur parts. There was correlation between breathing pattern and two-voice polyphonic structure for several participants. 5 Respiratory patterns were notably different among the pianists. Every pianist showed his or her own characteristic features commonly for various musical works. These findings suggest that breathing in piano performance depends not only on musical parameters and organization written in the score but also some pianist-dependent factors which might be ingrained to individual pianists.

  17. Relationship between Musical Characteristics and Temporal Breathing Pattern in Piano Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Aiba, Eriko

    2016-01-01

    Although there is growing evidence that breathing is modulated by various motor and cognitive activities, the nature of breathing in musical performance has been little explored. The present study examined the temporal breath pattern in piano performance, aiming to elucidate how breath timing is related to musical organization/events and performance. In the experiments, the respiration of 15 professional and amateur pianists, playing 10 music excerpts in total (from four-octave C major scale, Hanon's exercise, J. S. Bach's Invention, Mozart's Sonatas, and Debussy's Clair de lune), was monitored by capnography. The relationship between breathing and musical characteristics was analyzed. Five major results were obtained. (1) Mean breath interval was shortened for excerpts in faster tempi. (2) Fluctuation of breath intervals was reduced for the pieces for finger exercise and those in faster tempi. Pianists showing large within-trial fluctuation also exhibited large inter-excerpt difference. (3) Inter-trial consistency of the breath patterns depended on the excerpts. Consistency was generally reduced for the excerpts that could be performed mechanically (i.e., pieces for finger exercise), but interestingly, one third of the participant showed consistent patterns for the simple scale, correlated with the ascending/descending sequences. (4) Pianists tended to exhale just after the music onsets, inhale at the rests, and inhibit inhale during the slur parts. There was correlation between breathing pattern and two-voice polyphonic structure for several participants. (5) Respiratory patterns were notably different among the pianists. Every pianist showed his or her own characteristic features commonly for various musical works. These findings suggest that breathing in piano performance depends not only on musical parameters and organization written in the score but also some pianist-dependent factors which might be ingrained to individual pianists.

  18. International online survey to assess current practice in equine anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfender, F D; Doherr, M G; Driessen, B; Hartnack, S; Johnston, G M; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R

    2015-01-01

    Multicentre Confidential Enquiries into Perioperative Equine Fatalities (CEPEF) have not been conducted since the initial CEPEF Phases 1-3, 20 years ago. To collect data on current practice in equine anaesthesia and to recruit participants for CEPEF-4. Online questionnaire survey. An online questionnaire was prepared and the link distributed internationally to veterinarians possibly performing equine anaesthesia, using emails, posters, flyers and an editorial. The questionnaire included 52 closed, semiclosed and open questions divided into 8 subgroups: demographic data, anaesthetist, anaesthesia management (preoperative, technical equipment, monitoring, drugs, recovery), areas of improvements and risks and motivation for participation in CEPEF-4. Descriptive statistics and Chi-squared tests for comparison of categorical variables were performed. A total of 199 questionnaires were completed by veterinarians from 14 different countries. Of the respondents, 43% worked in private hospitals, 36% in private practices and 21% in university teaching hospitals. In 40 institutions (23%) there was at least one diplomate of the European or American colleges of veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia on staff. Individual respondents reported routinely employ the following anaesthesia monitoring modalities: electrocardiography (80%), invasive arterial blood pressures (70%), pulse oximetry (60%), capnography (55%), arterial blood gases (47%), composition of inspired and expired gases (45%) and body temperature (35%). Drugs administered frequently or routinely as part of a standard protocol were: acepromazine (44%), xylazine (68%), butorphanol (59%), ketamine (96%), diazepam (83%), isoflurane (76%), dobutamine (46%), and, as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, phenylbutazone (73%) or flunixin meglumine (66%). Recovery was routinely assisted by 40%. The main factors perceived by the respondents to affect outcome of equine anaesthesia were the preoperative health status of the

  19. [Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Dailson Mamede; Bezerra, Eglantine Mamede; Silva Junior, Antonio Jorge; Amorim, Marco Aurélio Soares; Miranda, Denismar Borges de

    Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. A male patient, 39 years old, 71kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0mm) followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30minutes, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin, including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunction in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered as a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. The use of a volatile anesthetic regimen protects against acute normovolemic hemodilution induced myocardial depression in patients with coronary artery disease

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    Lorsomradee Sratwadee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies indicated that acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH was associated with a depression of myocardial function in coronary surgery patients with baseline heart rate faster than 90 bpm. It was suggested that this phenomenon could be explained by the occurrence of myocardial ischemia. In the present study, we hypothesized that the cardioprotective properties of a volatile anesthetic regimen might protect against the ANH related myocardial functional impairment. Materials and Methods: Forty elective coronary surgery patients with baseline heart rate faster than 90 bpm were randomly allocated to receive different anesthetic regimens. Group A (n = 20 received midazolam-based anesthesia. Group B (n = 20 received a sevoflurane-based anesthesia. Five-lead electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, capnography, radial arterial pressure, and Swan Ganz continuous thermodilution cardiac output via right internal jugular vein were monitored. Measurements were obtained before and after ANH. Data were compared using paired t test. All data were expressed as mean ± SD. Data were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results: After ANH, systemic vascular resistance was slightly decreased in group A while there was a significant decrease in group B. In group A, cardiac output was slightly decreased from 5.07±1.17 l/min to 5.02±1.28 l/min after ANH, whereas in group B, cardiac output was significantly increased from 4.84±1.21 l/min to 6.02±1.28 l/min after ANH. Conclusion: In coronary surgery patients, with baseline heart rate faster than 90 bpm, anesthesia with sevoflurane during ANH was associated with an improvement in myocardial function after ANH, which was not present in patients anesthetized with midazolam.

  1. A critical incident reporting system in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzimbamuto, F D; Chiware, R

    2001-01-01

    To audit the recently established Critical Incident Reporting System in the Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, University of Zimbabwe Medical School. The system was set up with the purpose of improving the quality of care delivered by the department. Cross sectional study. A critical incident was defined as 'any adverse and reversible event in theatre, during or immediately after surgery that if it persisted without correction would cause harm to the patient'. The anaesthetic or recovery room staff filled a critical incident form anonymously. Data was collected from critical incident reporting forms for analysis. The anaesthetic service in the two teaching hospitals of Harare Central and Parirenyatwa General Hospitals. Between May and October 2000, 62 completed critical incident forms were collected. The nature of the incident and the monitoring used were recorded, the cause was classified as human, equipment or monitoring failure and the outcome for each patient reported. There was no formal system for reminding staff to fill in their critical incident forms. A total of 14,165 operations were performed over the reporting period: 62 critical incident forms were collected, reporting 130 incidents, giving a rate of 0.92% (130/14,165). Of these, 42 patients were emergencies and 20 elective. The incidents were hypotension, hypoxia, bradycardia, ECG changes, aspiration, laryngospasm, high spinal, and cardiac arrest. Monitoring present on patients who had critical incidents was: capnography 57%, oxymetry 90% and ECG 100%. Other monitors are not reported. Human error contributed in 32/62 of patients and equipment failure in 31/62 of patients. Patient outcome showed 15% died, 23% were unplanned admissions to HDU while 62% were discharged to the ward with little or no adverse outcome. Despite some under reporting, the critical incident rate was within the range reported in the literature. Supervision of juniors is not adequate, especially on call. The

  2. Open lung approach versus standard protective strategies: Effects on driving pressure and ventilatory efficiency during anesthesia - A pilot, randomized controlled trial.

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    Carlos Ferrando

    Full Text Available Low tidal volume (VT during anesthesia minimizes lung injury but may be associated to a decrease in functional lung volume impairing lung mechanics and efficiency. Lung recruitment (RM can restore lung volume but this may critically depend on the post-RM selected PEEP. This study was a randomized, two parallel arm, open study whose primary outcome was to compare the effects on driving pressure of adding a RM to low-VT ventilation, with or without an individualized post-RM PEEP in patients without known previous lung disease during anesthesia.Consecutive patients scheduled for major abdominal surgery were submitted to low-VT ventilation (6 ml·kg-1 and standard PEEP of 5 cmH2O (pre-RM, n = 36. After 30 min estabilization all patients received a RM and were randomly allocated to either continue with the same PEEP (RM-5 group, n = 18 or to an individualized open-lung PEEP (OL-PEEP (Open Lung Approach, OLA group, n = 18 defined as the level resulting in maximal Cdyn during a decremental PEEP trial. We compared the effects on driving pressure and lung efficiency measured by volumetric capnography.OL-PEEP was found at 8±2 cmH2O. 36 patients were included in the final analysis. When compared with pre-RM, OLA resulted in a 22% increase in compliance and a 28% decrease in driving pressure when compared to pre-RM. These parameters did not improve in the RM-5. The trend of the DP was significantly different between the OLA and RM-5 groups (p = 0.002. VDalv/VTalv was significantly lower in the OLA group after the RM (p = 0.035.Lung recruitment applied during low-VT ventilation improves driving pressure and lung efficiency only when applied as an open-lung strategy with an individualized PEEP in patients without lung diseases undergoing major abdominal surgery.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02798133.

  3. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism

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    J.H.T. Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the ventilation/perfusion ratio that contributes to hypoxemia in pulmonary embolism by analyzing blood gases and volumetric capnography in a model of experimental acute pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolization with autologous blood clots was induced in seven pigs weighing 24.00 ± 0.6 kg, anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Significant changes occurred from baseline to 20 min after embolization, such as reduction in oxygen partial pressures in arterial blood (from 87.71 ± 8.64 to 39.14 ± 6.77 mmHg and alveolar air (from 92.97 ± 2.14 to 63.91 ± 8.27 mmHg. The effective alveolar ventilation exhibited a significant reduction (from 199.62 ± 42.01 to 84.34 ± 44.13 consistent with the fall in alveolar gas volume that effectively participated in gas exchange. The relation between the alveolar ventilation that effectively participated in gas exchange and cardiac output (V Aeff/Q ratio also presented a significant reduction after embolization (from 0.96 ± 0.34 to 0.33 ± 0.17 fraction. The carbon dioxide partial pressure increased significantly in arterial blood (from 37.51 ± 1.71 to 60.76 ± 6.62 mmHg, but decreased significantly in exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle (from 35.57 ± 1.22 to 23.15 ± 8.24 mmHg. Exhaled air at the end of the respiratory cycle returned to baseline values 40 min after embolism. The arterial to alveolar carbon dioxide gradient increased significantly (from 1.94 ± 1.36 to 37.61 ± 12.79 mmHg, as also did the calculated alveolar (from 56.38 ± 22.47 to 178.09 ± 37.46 mL and physiological (from 0.37 ± 0.05 to 0.75 ± 0.10 fraction dead spaces. Based on our data, we conclude that the severe arterial hypoxemia observed in this experimental model may be attributed to the reduction of the V Aeff/Q ratio. We were also able to demonstrate that V Aeff/Q progressively improves after embolization, a fact attributed to the alveolar ventilation redistribution

  4. Breath-to-breath variability of exhaled CO2 as a marker of lung dysmaturity in infancy.

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    Fouzas, Sotirios; Theodorakopoulos, Ilias; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar; Latzin, Philipp; Frey, Urs

    2017-12-01

    The concept of diffusional screening implies that breath-to-breath variations in CO 2 clearance, when related to the variability of breathing, may contain information on the quality and utilization of the available alveolar surface. We explored the validity of the above hypothesis in a cohort of young infants of comparable postmenstrual age but born at different stages of lung maturity, namely, in term-born infants ( n = 128), preterm-born infants without chronic lung disease of infancy (CLDI; n = 53), and preterm infants with moderate/severe CLDI ( n = 87). Exhaled CO 2 volume (V E,CO2 ) and concentration (F E,CO2 ) were determined by volumetric capnography, whereas their variance was assessed by linear and nonlinear variability metrics. The relationship between relative breath-to-breath change of V E,CO2 (ΔV E,CO2 ) and the corresponding change of tidal volume (ΔV T ) was also analyzed. Nonlinear F E,CO2 variability was lower in CLDI compared with term and non-CLDI preterm group ( P variability was attributed to the variability of V T ( r 2 = 0.749), whereas in term and healthy preterm infants this relationship was weaker ( r 2 = 0.507 and 0.630, respectively). The ΔV E,CO2 - ΔV T slope was less steep in the CLDI group (1.06 ± 0.07) compared with non-CLDI preterm (1.16 ± 0.07; P variability that can be quantified by nonlinear variability metrics and may reflect the degree of lung dysmaturity. In infants with moderate/severe chronic lung disease of infancy (CLDI), the variability of the exhaled CO 2 is mainly driven by the variability of breathing, whereas in term-born and healthy preterm infants this relationship is less strong. The slope of the relative CO 2 -to-volume change is less steep in CLDI infants, suggesting that dysmature lungs are less efficient in eliminating CO 2 under tidal breathing conditions.

  5. Pulmonary function responses to ozone in smokers with a limited smoking history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Melissa L., E-mail: mlbates@pediatrics.wisc.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Critical Care Division, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Brenza, Timothy M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ben-Jebria, Abdellaziz [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bascom, Rebecca [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Eldridge, Marlowe W. [Department of Pediatrics, Critical Care Division, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Ultman, James S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In non-smokers, ozone (O{sub 3}) inhalation causes decreases in forced expiratory volume (FEV{sub 1}) and dead space (V{sub D}) and increases the slope of the alveolar plateau (S{sub N}). We previously described a population of smokers with a limited smoking history that had enhanced responsiveness to brief O{sub 3} boluses and aimed to determine if responsiveness to continuous exposure was also enhanced. Thirty smokers (19 M, 11 F, 24 ± 4 years, 6 ± 4 total years smoking,4 ± 2 packs/week) and 30 non-smokers (17 M, 13 F, 25 ± 6 years) exercised for 1 h on a cycle ergometer while breathing 0.30 ppm O{sub 3}. Smokers and non-smokers were equally responsive in terms of FEV{sub 1} (− 9.5 ± 1.8% vs − 8.7 ± 1.9%). Smokers alone were responsive in terms of V{sub D} (− 6.1 ± 1.2%) and S{sub N} (9.1 ± 3.4%). There was no difference in total delivered dose. Dead space ventilation (V{sub D}/V{sub T}) was not initially different between the two groups, but increased in the non-smokers (16.4 ± 2.8%) during the exposure, suggesting that the inhaled dose may be distributed more peripherally in smokers. We also conclude that these cigarette smokers retain their airway responsiveness to O{sub 3} and, uniquely, experience changes in V{sub D} that lead to heterogeneity in airway morphometry and an increase in S{sub N}. - Highlights: • We previously found lung function responses to O{sub 3} bolus exposure in smokers. • Here, we describe their responsiveness to continuous O{sub 3} exposure with exercise. • Spirometry and capnography were used to assess pulmonary function changes. • Enhanced bronchoconstriction in smokers increases parenchymal delivery of O{sub 3}.

  6. [European Resuscitation Council guidelines for resuscitation 2010].

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    Hunyadi-Anticević, Silvija; Colak, Zeljko; Funtak, Ines Lojna; Lukić, Anita; Filipović-Grcić, Boris; Tomljanović, Branka; Kniewald, Hrvoje; Protić, Alen; Pandak, Tatjana; Poljaković, Zdravka; Canadija, Marino

    2011-01-01

    All rescuers trained or not, should provide chest compressions to victims of cardiac arrest. The aim should be to push to a depth of at least 5 cm at a rate of at least 100 compressions per minute, to allow full chest recoil, and to minimise interruptions in chest compressions. Trained rescuers should also provide ventilations with a compression-ventilation ratio of 30:2. ELECTRICAL THERAPIES: Much greater emphasis on minimising the duration of the pre-shock and post-shock pauses; the continuation of compressions during charging of the defibrillator is recommended. Further development of AED programmes is encouraged. ADULT ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT: Increased emphasis on high-quality chest compressions throughout any ALS intervention paused briefly only to enable specific interventions. Removal of the recommendation for a pre-specified period of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before out-of-hospital defibrillation following cardiac arrest unwitnessed by the EMS. The role of precordial thump is de-emphasized. Delivery of drugs via a tracheal tube is no longer recommended, drugs should be given by the intraosseous (IO) route. Atropine is no longer recommended for routine use in asystole or pulseless electrical activity. Reduced emphasis on early tracheal intubation unless achieved by highly skilled individuals with minimal interruptions in chest compressions. Increased emphasis on the use of capnography. Recognition of potential harm caused by hyperoxaemia. Revision of the recommendation of glucose control. Use of therapeutic hypothermia to include comatose survivors of cardiac arrest associated initially with shockable rhythms, as well as non-shockable rhythms, with a lower level of evidence acknowledged for the latter. INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES: The term non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction-acute coronary syndrome (non-STEMI-ACS) has been introduced for both NSTEMI and unstable angina pectoris. Primary PCI (PPCI) is the preferred reperfusion

  7. Variáveis capnográficas pré e pós-tromboendarterectomias pulmonares Pre and post-pulmonary thromboendarterectomies campnographic variables

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    Marcos Mello Moreira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este relato de dois casos com os resultados da fração tardia de espaço morto (fDlate, fração do espaço morto alveolar end-tidal (AVDSf, gradiente artério-alveolar de CO2 [P(a-etCO2] e slope da fase 3 do espirograma, submetidos à tromboendarterectomia pulmonar por tromboembolismo pulmonar (TEP. O TEP foi diagnosticado pela cintilografia pulmonar, tomografia helicoidal computadorizada e por arteriografia pulmonar. O cálculo da fDlate, AVDSf e P(a-etCO2 baseou-se na capnografia volumétrica associada à gasometria arterial. A fDlate préoperatória do primeiro paciente foi de 0,16 (cutoff de 0,12 e a AVDSf = 0,30 (cutoff de 0,15. Já a fDlate do segundo paciente resultou falso-negativa (0,01, embora a AVDSf resultasse positiva (0,28. A fDlate pós-operatória do primeiro paciente foi de -0,04 e a AVDSf de 0,16; a fDlate do segundo paciente foi de 0,07 e a AVDSf = 0,28. A associação destas variáveis com os exames por imagem reforça a importância deste método como ferramenta diagnóstica não-invasiva no diagnóstico de TEP.In these case report, the results of late dead space fraction (fDlate, end-tidal alveolar dead space fraction (AVDSf, arterial-alveolar gradient CO2 [P(a-etCO2], and slope phase 3 of spirogram of two patients who underwent thromboendarterectomy for pulmonary embolism (PE are shown. PE was diagnosed by pulmonary scintigraphy, helical tomography, and pulmonary angiography. The calculation of fDlate, AVDSf and P(a-etCO2 was based on volumetric capnography associated with arterial blood gas analysis. The pre-operative fDlate of the first patient was 0.16 (cutoff 0.12 and AVDSf was 0.30 (cutoff 0.15. However, the fDlate of the second patient was false-negative (0.01 but, the AVDSf was positive (0.28. Postoperative fDlate of the first patient was -0.04 and AVDSf was 0.16; for the second patient, the values were 0.07 and 0.28, respectively. The association of these capnographic variables with image exams reinforces the

  8. Comparison of Postoperative Respiratory Monitoring by Acoustic and Transthoracic Impedance Technologies in Pediatric Patients at Risk of Respiratory Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Mario; Kalin, Megan; Griffin, Allison; Minhajuddin, Abu; Ding, Lili; Williams, Timothy; Ishman, Stacey; Mahmoud, Mohamed; Kurth, C Dean; Szmuk, Peter

    2017-06-01

    In children, postoperative respiratory rate (RR) monitoring by transthoracic impedance (TI), capnography, and manual counting has limitations. The rainbow acoustic monitor (RAM) measures continuous RR noninvasively by a different methodology. Our primary aim was to compare the degree of agreement and accuracy of RR measurements as determined by RAM and TI to that of manual counting. Secondary aims include tolerance and analysis of alarm events. Sixty-two children (2-16 years old) were admitted after tonsillectomy or receiving postoperative patient/parental-controlled analgesia. RR was measured at regular intervals by RAM, TI, and manual count. Each TI or RAM alarm resulted in a clinical evaluation to categorize as a true or false alarm. To assess accuracy and degree of agreement of RR measured by RAM or TI compared with manual counting, a Bland-Altman analysis was utilized showing the average difference and the limits of agreement. Sensitivity and specificity of RR alarms by TI and RAM are presented. Fifty-eight posttonsillectomy children and 4 patient/parental-controlled analgesia users aged 6.5 ± 3.4 years and weighting 35.3 ± 22.7 kg (body mass index percentile 76.6 ± 30.8) were included. The average monitoring time per patient was 15.9 ± 4.8 hours. RAM was tolerated 87% of the total monitoring time. The manual RR count was significantly different from TI (P = .007) with an average difference ± SD of 1.39 ± 10.6 but were not significantly different from RAM (P = .81) with an average difference ± SD of 0.17 ± 6.8. The proportion of time when RR measurements differed by ≥4 breaths was 22% by TI and was 11% by RAM. Overall, 276 alarms were detected (mean alarms/patient = 4.5). The mean number of alarms per patient were 1.58 ± 2.49 and 2.87 ± 4.32 for RAM and TI, respectively. The mean number of false alarms was 0.18 ± 0.71 for RAM and 1.00 ± 2.78 for TI. The RAM was found to have 46.6% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.64), 95

  9. The cardiovascular and respiratory effects of medetomidine and thiopentone anaesthesia in dogs breathing at an altitude of 1486 m

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    K. E. Joubert

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardio-respiratory effects of the combination of medetomidine and thiopentone followed by reversal with atipamezole as a combination for anaesthesia in 10 healthy German Shepherd dogs breathing spontaneously in a room at an altitude of 1486 m above sea level with an ambient air pressure of 651 mmHg. After the placement of intravenous and intra-arterial catheters, baseline samples were collected. Medetomidine (0.010 mg/kg was administered intravenously and blood pressure and heart rate were recorded every minute for 5 minutes. Thiopentone was then slowly administered until intubation conditions were ideal. An endotracheal tube was placed and the dogs breathed room air spontaneously. Blood pressure, pulse oximetry, respiratory and heart rate, capnography, blood gas analysis and arterial lactate were performed or recorded every 10 minutes for the duration of the trial. Thiopentone was administered to maintain anaesthesia. After 60 minutes, atipamezole (0.025 mg/kg was given intramuscularly. Data were recorded for the next 30 minutes. A dose of 8.7 mg/kg of thiopentone was required to anaesthetise the dogs after the administration of 0.010 mg/kg of medetomidine. Heart rate decreased from 96.7 at baseline to 38.5 5 minutes after the administration of medetomidine (P < 0.05. Heart rate then increased with the administration of thiopentone to 103.2 (P < 0.05. Blood pressure increased from 169.4/86.2 mmHg to 253.2/143.0 mmHg 5 minutes after the administration of medetomidine (P < 0.05. Blood pressure then slowly returned towards normal. Heart rate and blood pressure returned to baseline values after the administration of atipamezole. Arterial oxygen tension decreased from baseline levels (84.1 mmHg to 57.8 mmHg after the administration of medetomidine and thiopentone (P < 0.05. This was accompanied by arterial desaturation from 94.7 to 79.7 % (P < 0.05. A decrease in respiratory rate from 71.8 bpm to 12

  10. Insuficiência respiratória crônica nas doenças neuromusculares: diagnóstico e tratamento Chronic respiratory failure in patients with neuromuscular diseases: diagnosis and treatment

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    Ilma Aparecida Paschoal

    2007-02-01

    . Respiratory muscle impairment also affects cough efficiency and, according to the current knowledge regarding the type of treatment available in Brazil to these patients, it can be said that the high rates of morbidity and mortality in these individuals are more often related to the fact that they cough inefficiently rather than to the fact that they ventilate poorly. In this review, with the objective of presenting the options of devices available to support and substitute for natural ventilation in patients with neuromuscular diseases, we have compiled a brief history of the evolution of orthopedic braces and prostheses used to aid respiration since the end of the 19th century. In addition, we highlight the elements that are fundamental to the diagnosis of alveolar hypoventilation and of failure of the protective cough mechanism: taking of a clinical history; determination of peak cough flow; measurement of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures; spirometry in two positions (sitting and supine; pulse oximetry; capnography; and polysomnography. Furthermore, the threshold values available in the literature for the use of nocturnal ventilatory support and for the extension of this support through the daytime period are presented. Moreover, the maneuvers used to increase cough efficiency, as well as the proper timing of their introduction, are discussed.

  11. Comparison between insufflation with air or carbon dioxide during the colonoscopy in sedated patients with propofol Comparación entre la insuflación con aire ambiente o con dióxido de carbono durante la colonoscopia en pacientes sedados con propofol

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    Pilar Díez-Redondo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: compare the intensity of pain experienced after colonoscopy with air or with CO2 and evaluate the safety of CO2 in colonoscopies performed with moderate/deep sedation. Materials and methods: individuals undergoing ambulatory colonoscopy without exclusion criteria (severe respiratory disease, morbid obesity were randomized in air or CO2 group. We recorded different variables prior to, during and upon completion of the colonoscopy, performing monitoring using pulse oximetry and capnography. Each patient rated, using a visual numeric scale, the intensity of post-colonoscopy pain at different moments. Results: 141 individuals in the air group (sex M/F 63/78, age 24-83 and 129 in the CO2 group (sex M/F 59/70, age 24-82. No significant differences existed in the recorded variables in both groups except for the greater number of explorations performed by an endoscopist in training (TE in the air group compared to those by a more experienced endoscopist (SE. CO2 in expired air, episodes of oxygen desaturation and of apnoea and dose of propofol, of midazolam were similar in both groups. No episodes of hypercapnea or any complication requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation measures were recorded. The pain in the air group was significantly higher at 15 minutes and at 1, 3 and 6 hours after the endoscopy, equalising at 24 hours. After multivariant adjustment for type of doctor (TE vs. SE the differences observed in pain intensity for each group were maintained. Conclusions: a the use of CO2 in colonoscopy causes significantly less pain in the first 6 hours after the procedure; b its use in patients with moderate/deep sedation is safe; and c performance of the endoscopic technique is not modified, nor are times reduced.Objetivos: comparar la intensidad del dolor experimentado tras una colonoscopia con aire ambiente o con dióxido de carbono (CO2 y evaluar la seguridad del CO2 en pacientes con sedación moderada o profunda. Materiales y m

  12. Manejo anestésico e complicações no implante percutâneo de válvula aórtica Manejo anestésico y complicaciones en el implante percutáneo de válvula aórtica Anesthetic management and complications of percutaneous aortic valve implantation

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    Tailur Alberto Grando

    2013-06-01

    monitorizada con una presión arterial promedio (PAP, electrocardiograma (ECG, oximetría, capnografía, ecocardiograma transesofágico, termometría y marcapaso transvenoso. RESULTADOS: Fueron sometidos con éxito al implante valvular 28 pacientes, con una edad promedio de 82,46 años, EuroScore medio de 20,98%, clase funcional III/IV. Nueve pacientes necesitaron implante de marcapaso definitivo. En el seguimiento de los pacientes hubo dos decesos, uno en el transoperatorio por perforación del VI y uno al tercer día por causa desconocida. En 24 meses un paciente falleció con diagnóstico de mieloma múltiple. La técnica anestésica fue segura. CONCLUSIONES: La experiencia inicial con implante valvular aórtico percutáneo bajo anestesia general ha sido segura y eficaz sin complicaciones anestésicas importantes para ese procedimiento.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis is a highly prevalent and life-threatening disease. In elderly patients with comorbidities, percutaneous valve implantation is an option. The aim of the study was to describe the anesthetic management and complications of general anesthesia. METHOD: Case series with 30-day and 24-month follow-ups after implantation of the CoreValve device performed at the Institute of Cardiology/University Foundation of Cardiology between December 2008 and January 2012. The patients underwent general anesthesia monitored with mean arterial pressure (PAM, electrocardiogram (ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, transesophageal echocardiography, thermometry, and transvenous pacemaker. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients, mean age 82.46 years, 20.98% mean EuroSCORE, functional class III/IV, successfully underwent valve implantation. Nine patients required permanent pacemaker implantation. During follow-up, two patients died: one during surgery due to LV perforation and the other on the third day of unknown causes. At 24 months, one patient diagnosed with multiple myeloma died. This anesthetic technique proved to be safe

  13. Instabilidade hemodinâmica grave durante o uso de isoflurano em paciente portador de escoliose idiopática: relato de caso Severe hemodynamic instability during the use of isoflurane in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis: case report

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    Adriano Bechara de Souza Hobaika

    2007-04-01

    ámica grave causada por isoflurano en pacientes previamente saludables. Anafilaxia, taquicardia supraventricular con repercusión hemodinámica y sensibilidad cardiaca aumentada al isoflurano son discutidas como posibles causas de la inestabilidad hemodinámica. Actualmente, existen evidencias de que el isoflurano pude interferir en el sistema de acoplamiento y desacoplamiento de la contratilidad miocárdica a través de la reducción del Ca2+ citosólico y/o deprimiendo la función de las proteínas contráctiles. Los mecanismos moleculares fundamentales de este proceso deben ser elucidados todavía. El relato sugiere que la administración del isoflurano fue la causa de las alteraciones hemodinámicas presentadas por el paciente y que este, probablemente, presentó una sensibilidad cardiovascular no común al fármaco.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Isoflurane is considered a safe inhalational anesthetic. It has a low level of biotransformation, and low hepatic and renal toxicity. In clinical concentrations, it has minimal negative inotropic effect, causes a small reduction in systemic vascular resistance, and, rarely, can cause cardiac arrhythmias. The objective of this report was to present a case of severe hemodynamic instability in a patient with idiopathic scoliosis. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 13 years old, ASA physical status I, with no prior history of allergy to medications, scheduled for surgical repair of idiopathic scoliosis. After anesthetic induction with fentanyl, midazolam, propofol, and atracurium, 1% isoflurane with 100% oxygen was initiated for anesthesia maintenance. After five minutes, the patient presented severe hypotension (MAP = 26 mmHg associated with sinus tachycardia (HR = 166 bpm that did not respond to the administration of vasopressors and fluids. Lung and heart auscultation, pulse oxymetry, capnography, nasopharyngeal temperature, and arterial blood gases did not change. The patient was treated for anaphylaxis and the surgery was cancelled. The

  14. Remifentanil versus dexmedetomidina como coadjuvantes de técnica anestésica padronizada em pacientes com obesidade mórbida Remifentanil versus dexmedetomidina como coadyuvantes de técnica anestésica de modelo en pacientes con obesidad mórbida Remifentanil versus dexmedetomidine as coadjutants of standardized anesthetic technique in morbidly obese patients

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    Eliana Cristina Murari Sudré

    2004-04-01

    ás 30% para ambas luego después de la intubación traqueal. Los pacientes fueron monitorizados con presión arterial media invasiva, oximetría de pulso, BIS, capnografia, estimulador de nervio periférico y electrocardiograma. Fueron evaluados: 1 diferentes tiempos de recuperación anestésica (abertura de los ojos, reinicio de la respiración espontanea, tiempo de extubación traqueal, tiempo para el alta de la sala de recuperación pos-anestésica y hospitalar, 2 la evolución de la gasometria arterial, y 3 analgesia pos-operatoria. RESULTADOS: Ochenta y ocho pacientes fueron evaluados. Los pacientes del grupo R presentaron abertura ocular mas precoz (9,49 ± 5,61 min versus 18,25 ± 10,24 min, p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Two coadjuvant anesthetic drugs - remifentanil and dexmedetomidine - were compared in terms of anesthetic recovery, arterial pH and PaCO2 evolution, in morbidly obese patients submitted to Capella's surgery. METHODS: Participated in this prospective, randomized and double blind study 92 patients divided in two groups and submitted to standardized anesthetic technique (general/epidural. Remifentanil Group (Group R and Dexmedetomidine Group (Group D received continuous intravenous infusion of these drugs (0.1 µg.kg-1.min-1 and 0.5 µg.kg-1.h-1, ideal body weight plus 30% for both immediately after tracheal intubation. Monitoring consisted of invasive mean blood pressure, pulse oximetry, BIS EEG, capnography, peripheral nerve stimulator and EKG. The following parameters were evaluated: 1 different anesthetic recovery times (eye opening, return to spontaneous ventilation, tracheal extubation time, time for post anesthetic recovery unit and hospital discharge; 2 arterial blood gas analysis evolution; and 3 postoperative analgesia. RESULTS: Evaluation was possible in 88 patients. Patients group R had earlier eye opening (9.49 ± 5.61 min versus 18.25 ± 10.24 min, p < 0.0001, faster return to spontaneous ventilation (9.78 ± 5.80 min versus 16.58 ± 6

  15. Manuseio de grave diminuição de hemoglobina em paciente jovem, testemunha de Jeová, submetido à proctocolectomia total: relato de caso Manoseo de grave disminución de hemoglobina en paciente joven, testigo de Jehová, sometido a la proctocolectomia total: relato de caso Extreme intraoperative hemodilution in Jehovah’s witness patient submitted total proctocolectomy: case report

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    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2005-10-01

    family history of adenomatous polyposis. The disease was manifested at eight years of age, characterized by bleeding. At 13 years of age he was submitted to total colectomy. At 17 years of age he was submitted to total proctocolectomy. Patient was prepared with erythropoietin, folic acid, infusion of iron and vitamin B12. Red blood cell count revealed He = 4,200,000/mm³, hemoglobin = 10.5 g/dL, hematocrit = 37% platelets = 273,000/mm³ and normal prothrombin time. Patient was continuously monitored with NIBP, pulse oximetry, capnography and ECG. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, sufentanil, pancuronium and enflurane in closed system. Patient received 7,000 mL lactated Ringer’s and 150 mL of 20% human albumin. Total diuresis was 2,900 mL. Surgery lasted 10 hours and 30 minutes. Patient was referred to the ICU with 20% hematocrit, 2,300,000/mm³ red cells, 4,2 g/dL hemoglobin and was maintained with propofol and atracurium. Next day evaluation revealed 18% hematocrit, 2,050,000/mm³ red cells and 4 g/dL hemoglobin. Patient was extubated 18 hours after surgery and was referred to the ward. Patient started eating four days after surgery and was discharged the 10th postoperative day. Thirty days later patient presented 35% hematocrit, 4,000,000/mm³ red cells and 9.5 g/dL hemoglobin. Six months later he returned for ileostomy closing. Patient was submitted to 12 surgeries without a single blood transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: A good planning of the whole team (clinician, surgeon, anesthesiologist, intensive care staff allows us to perform surgical procedures associated to major blood losses without administering blood.

  16. Hipercapnia acentuada durante circulação extracorpórea em cirurgia para revascularização do miocárdio: relato de caso Hipercapnia acentuada durante circulación extracorpórea en cirugía para revascularización del miocárdio: relato de caso Marked hypercapnia during cardiopulmonary bypass for myocardial revascularization: case report

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    Maurício Serrano Nascimento

    2002-04-01

    ía estar conectado al cilindro de aire comprimido. CONCLUSIONES: Fallas mecánicas de los componentes del circuito de extracorpórea pueden ocurrir en el per-operatorio y exigen correcciones rápidas. Los avanzos tecnológicos en los equipamientos de anestesia, monitorización y normatizaciones de seguridad atenuaron la posibilidad de que casos como ese se repitan, más jamás substituirán la presencia vigilante del anestesiólogo.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bypassing heart blood and returning it oxygenated to systemic circulation is achieved at the expenses of major cardiopulmonary physiologic changes. The aim of this report was to present an anesthetic complication during CPB and to warn for the need of interaction of the whole anesthetic-surgical team to prevent adverse perioperative events. CASE REPORT: A brown female patient, 56 years old, 95 kg, height 1.65 m, physical status ASA IV, with chronic renal failure under hemodialysis was admitted for myocardial revascularization. Monitoring consisted of ECG, invasive blood pressure, pulse oximetry, capnography, esophageal temperature, central venous pressure and anesthetic gases analysis. Patient was premedicated with intravenous midazolam (0.05 mg.kg-1. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (16 µg.kg-1, etomidate (0.3 mg.kg-1 and pancuronium (0.1 mg.kg-1, and was maintained with O2, isoflurane (0.5 - 1 MAC and fentanyl continuous infusion. Blood gas analysis after induction has shown: pH: 7.41; PaO2: 288 mmHg; PaCO2: 38 mmHg; HCO3: 24 mmol.L-1; BE: 0 mmol.L-1; SatO2 100%. A second blood gases analysis, sampled soon after CPB, returned in 30 minutes, showing: pH 7.15; PaO2: 86 mmHg; PaCO2 224 mmHg; HCO3: 29 mmol.L-1; BE: -3 mmol.L-1; SatO2 99%. Thorough and urgent checking of anesthetic and perfusion equipment was performed and revealed that the gas blender was connected to the O2 line and to a CO2 cylinder, when it should be connected to the compressed air cylinder. CONCLUSIONS: Bypass circuit mechanical problems may