WorldWideScience

Sample records for capillary pressure saturation

  1. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  2. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  3. Capillary saturation and desaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilfer, R.; Armstrong, R. T.; Berg, S.; Georgiadis, A.; Ott, H.

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment.

  4. Establishing a quantitative functional relationship between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'There is a fundamental knowledge gap associated with the in situ remediation of non-aqueous phase pollutants. Currently it is not possible to accurately determine the interfacial surface area of non-aqueous contaminants. As a result it is impossible to (1) accurately establish the health and environmental risk associated with the pollution: (2) precisely quantify and evaluate the potential efficacy of various in situ treatment technologies; and (3) conduct reliable performance assessments of the applied remediation technology during and after the clean-up. The global goal of this investigation is to try to remedy these shortcomings through the development of a formalized functional relationship between interfacial area (a), phase saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). The development of this relationship will allow the direct determination of the fluid-fluid interfacial area from field measurements. Quantitative knowledge of the surface area of the non-aqueous phase pollutant facilitates accurate predictions of both the rate of dissolution and the contact area available for treatment. In addition. if saturation and capillary pressure measurements are made during the remediation process. both the spatial and temporal effectiveness of the remediation technology can be quantified. This information can then be used to optimize the restoration program. The project objective will be achieved through an integrated and focused research program that is comprised of theoretical computational and experimental efforts. These efforts are organized into a framework of four tasks: (1) improve on newly developed laboratory techniques to quantify and directly measure the functional relationship between phase interfacial area (a), saturation (S) and capillary pressure (P). (2) Develop new computational algorithms in conjunction with laboratory measurements to predict P, S and a. (3) Test existing theory and develop new theory to describe the relationship between P, S and a at

  5. Establishing a quantitative functional relationship between capillary pressure saturation and interfacial area. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Through an integrated and focused research program that is comprised of theoretical, computational and experimental efforts this research effort is directed at: (1) improving on newly developed laboratory techniques to quantify and directly measure the functional relationship between phase interfacial area (a), saturation (S) and capillary pressure (Pc), (2) developing new computational algorithms in conjunction with laboratory measurements to predict Pc, S and a, (3) testing existing theory and developing new theory to describe the relationship between Pc, S and a at the large scale, and (4) synthesizing the results of the experimental, computational and theoretical investigative efforts to develop a generic model based upon an intrinsic soil metric to describe the functional dependence of Pc, S and a. The results of this research could be used to generate a site specific soil moisture characteristic surface. Ultimately the results of this research could serve as the foundation upon which the true health and safety risk of a site could be evaluated, the applicability of various remediation technologies examined, and the performance of implemented treatment strategies controlled. This report summarizes work after 18 months of a 3-year project. The authors are working to integrate the theory, experiments, and numerical simulations into a coherent approach to study the role of interfacial areas in porous media flow physics. The recent efforts have focused on quantifying the relationship between capillary pressure, saturation, and interfacial areas. The theory developed by Gray et al. (1998) indicates clearly that the traditional relationship between capillary pressure and saturation is incomplete, and interfacial area per unit volume must be added to the functional dependence. The theory does not, however, provide the form of that functional dependence; determination of this relationship must be done experimentally. To this end, both the network modelling and the

  6. Border control! Capillary pressure / saturation relationships in a diphasic flow in a random medium: Influence of the boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Toussaint, Renaud; Moura, Marcel; Jankov, Mihailo; Schäfer, Gerhard; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2013-04-01

    Solving problems involving biphasic flows in porous media, at a scale larger than the pore one, normally requires the use of relationships between pressure and saturation. These allow the closure of generalized Darcy flow models for two phases, commonly used in hydrology or large scale problems of diphasic flow in porous media. There are mathematical models which approximate experimental records with curve-fitting equations. The two most common models are the Brooks-Corey and van Genüchten ones, they are used to complete a system of generalized Darcy equations. The purpose of the current study is the influence of the boundary conditions on the relationship between pressure and saturation. We perform numerical simulations of drainage experiments. Water is the wetting fluid and air is the non wetting fluid. The results highlight the fact that a filter which allows only water to flow at the exit face of the system modifies both the shape of the curve and the value of the residual saturation. The pressure of the models that are commonly used does not match with the pressure of real flows since there is no filter to cross, to flow from an elementary volume to another. Experiments performed in transparent Hele-Shaw cells exhibit the same features, showing the influence of the semi permeable boundary conditions on the pressure-saturation measures obtained. This effect corresponding to the formation of localized plugging clusters at the boundaries, is obtained in slow flow conditions, and is independent of any dynamic fingering, also known to affect such relations (1,2,3). Modeling flows in open media thus would require to use the central part of the curves pressure saturation where the effect of the boundaries is the least important, or to modify properly these relationships to extract the behavior unaffected by boundaries. References: (1) Two-phase flow: structure, upscaling, and consequences for macroscopic transport properties Renaud Toussaint ; Knut Jørgen M

  7. Capillary pressure-saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in limestone/dolomite sands: implications for geologic carbon sequestration in carbonate reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shibo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2015-06-16

    In geologic carbon sequestration, capillary pressure (Pc)-saturation (Sw) relations are needed to predict reservoir processes. Capillarity and its hysteresis have been extensively studied in oil-water and gas-water systems, but few measurements have been reported for supercritical (sc) CO2-water. Here, Pc-Sw relations of scCO2 displacing brine (drainage), and brine rewetting (imbibition) were studied to understand CO2 transport and trapping behavior under reservoir conditions. Hysteretic drainage and imbibition Pc-Sw curves were measured in limestone sands at 45 °C under elevated pressures (8.5 and 12.0 MPa) for scCO2-brine, and in limestone and dolomite sands at 23 °C (0.1 MPa) for air-brine using a new computer programmed porous plate apparatus. scCO2-brine drainage and imbibition curves shifted to lower Pc relative to predictions based on interfacial tension, and therefore deviated from capillary scaling predictions for hydrophilic interactions. Fitting universal scaled drainage and imbibition curves show that wettability alteration resulted from scCO2 exposure over the course of months-long experiments. Residual trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined at Pc = 0 during imbibition. Amounts of trapped scCO2 were significantly larger than for those for air, and increased with pressure (depth), initial scCO2 saturation, and time. These results have important implications for scCO2 distribution, trapping, and leakage potential. PMID:25945400

  8. Measurement and evaluation of the relationships between capillary pressure, relative permeability, and saturation for surrogate fluids for laboratory study of geological carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, H.; Trevisan, L.; Sakaki, T.; Cihan, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Multiphase flow models can be used to improve our understanding of the complex behavior of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in deep saline aquifers to make predictions for the stable storage strategies. These models rely on constitutive relationships such as capillary pressure (Pc) - saturation (Sw) and relative permeability (kr) - saturation (Sw) as input parameters. However, for practical application of these models, such relationships for scCO2 and brine system are not readily available for geological formations. This is due to the complicated and expensive traditional methods often used to obtain these relationships in the laboratory through high pressure and/or high-temperature controls. A method that has the potential to overcome the difficulty in conducting such experiments is to replicate scCO2 and brine with surrogate fluids that capture the density and viscosity effects to obtain the constitutive relationships under ambient conditions. This study presents an investigation conducted to evaluate this method. An assessment of the method allows us to evaluate the prediction accuracy of multiphase models using the constitutive relationships developed from this approach. With this as a goal, the study reports multiple laboratory column experiments conducted to measure these relationships. The obtained relationships were then used in the multiphase flow simulator TOUGH2 T2VOC to explore capillary trapping mechanisms of scCO2. A comparison of the model simulation to experimental observation was used to assess the accuracy of the measured constitutive relationships. Experimental data confirmed, as expected, that the scaling method cannot be used to obtain the residual and irreducible saturations. The results also showed that the van Genuchten - Mualem model was not able to match the independently measured kr data obtained from column experiments. Simulated results of fluid saturations were compared with saturation measurements obtained using x-ray attenuations. This

  9. Impacts on oil recovery from capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bognoe, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The main conclusions drawn from this thesis are; 7 scientific papers are published on a broad variety of subjects, and describes in detail the experiments and research treated in this thesis. Scientific research has been performed, investigating the subjects of capillary pressure and capillary heterogeneities from different angles. This thesis discusses the findings in this study and aims to illustrate the benefits of the results obtained for further development of other experiments, and/or even the industrial benefits in field development. The methods for wettability alteration have developed throughout the work. From producing heterogeneous wettability alterations, the methods have improved to giving both radial and lateral uniform wettability alterations, which also remains unaltered throughout the duration of the experimental work. The alteration of wettability is dependent on initial water saturation, flow rate, aging time and crude oil composition. Capillary pressure and relative permeability curves have been measured for core plugs at different wettabilities using conventional centrifuge methods. The trends observed are mostly consistent with theory. The production mechanisms of strongly and moderately water wet chalk has been investigated. At strongly water wet conditions in fractured chalk; the flow is governed by capillary forces, showing strong impact from the fractures. At moderately water wet conditions, the impact of the fractures are absent, and a dispersed water front is observed during the displacement. The oil recovery is about the same, at the two wettabilities. Fracture crossing mechanisms at the same wettability conditions have been mapped. And the observations are consistent with those of the water floods. During strongly water wet displacement, the fracture crossing is occurring once the inlet core has reached endpoint of spontaneous imbibition. At moderately water wet conditions the fracture crossing is less abrupt, and creation of wetting

  10. A Fractal Model for Capillary Pressure of Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boqi Xiao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Capillary pressure is a basic parameter in the study of the behavior of porous media containing two or more immiscible fluid phases. In this study, the capillary pressure of porous media is predicted based on based on fractal property of pore in porous media. The formula of calculating the capillary pressure of porous media is given. The capillary pressure of porous media is expressed as a function of porosity, fractal dimension of pore and saturation. Based on the parametric effect analysis, we conclude that the capillary pressure of porous media is negatively correlated with the porosity and saturation. Besides, it is shown that the capillary pressure of unsaturated porous media decreases with the increase of saturation. No additional empirical constant is introduced. This model contains less empirical constants than the conventional correlations. The model predictions are compared with the existing experimental data and good agreement between the model predictions and experimental data is found. The validity of the present fractal model is thus verified.

  11. Primary Drainage Capillary Pressure Curves in Heterogeneous Carbonates with Ultracentrifuge and NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Sylta, Karl-Erik Holm

    2010-01-01

    Capillary pressure is one of the most fundamental rock-fluid characteristics in multi-phase flow, critically influencing both the initial reservoir fluid distribution and the dynamic processes of oil recovery. Thus, it is of great importance to obtain accurate capillary pressure-saturation relationships when examining reservoir rocks. This work investigates a new method for obtaining the primary drainage capillary pressure curve for heterogeneous carbonates in air-brine and oil-brine systems....

  12. Development of a numerical workflow based on μ-CT imaging for the determination of capillary pressure-saturation-specific interfacial area relationship in 2-phase flow pore-scale porous-media systems: a case study on Heletz sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peche, Aaron; Halisch, Matthias; Bogdan Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this case study, we present the implementation of a finite element method (FEM)-based numerical pore-scale model that is able to track and quantify the propagating fluid-fluid interfacial area on highly complex micro-computed tomography (μ-CT)-obtained geometries. Special focus is drawn to the relationship between reservoir-specific capillary pressure (pc), wetting phase saturation (Sw) and interfacial area (awn). The basis of this approach is high-resolution μ-CT images representing the geometrical characteristics of a georeservoir sample. The successfully validated 2-phase flow model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations, including the surface tension force, in order to consider capillary effects for the computation of flow and the phase-field method for the emulation of a sharp fluid-fluid interface. In combination with specialized software packages, a complex high-resolution modelling domain can be obtained. A numerical workflow based on representative elementary volume (REV)-scale pore-size distributions is introduced. This workflow aims at the successive modification of model and model set-up for simulating, such as a type of 2-phase problem on asymmetric μ-CT-based model domains. The geometrical complexity is gradually increased, starting from idealized pore geometries until complex μ-CT-based pore network domains, whereas all domains represent geostatistics of the REV-scale core sample pore-size distribution. Finally, the model can be applied to a complex μ-CT-based model domain and the pc-Sw-awn relationship can be computed.

  13. On the propagation of a coupled saturation and pressure front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D. W.

    2010-12-01

    Using an asymptotic technique, valid for a medium with smoothly varying heterogeneity, I derive an expression for the velocity of a propagating, coupled saturation and pressure front. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing equations, the velocity of the propagating front depends upon the magnitude of the saturation and pressure changes across the front in addition to the properties of the medium. Thus, the expression must be evaluated in conjunction with numerical reservoir simulation. The propagation of the two-phase front is governed by the background saturation distribution, the saturation-dependent component of the fluid mobility, the porosity, the permeability, the capillary pressure function, the medium compressibility, and the ratio of the slopes of the relative permeability curves. Numerical simulation of water injection into a porous layer saturated with a nonaqueous phase liquid indicates that two modes of propagation are important. The fastest mode of propagation is a pressure-dominated disturbance that travels through the saturated layer. This is followed, much later, by a coupled mode with a large saturation change. These two modes are also observed in a simulation using a heterogeneous porous layer. A comparison between the propagation times estimated from the results of the numerical simulation and predictions from the asymptotic expression indicates overall agreement.

  14. Reference values of capillary blood saturation in neonates and its difference from pulse oximetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ješić Miloš M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Haemoglobin saturation is an obligatory oxygen parameter in the assessment of neonatal oxygenation. Although, pulse oximetry is currently one of the major methods in the determination of haemoglobin saturation, capillary blood saturation is still present in the diagnostic process. As well known, haemoglobin saturation value of capillary blood is insufficiently accurate, but not as much as the difference in relation to the values determined by pulse oximetry. Until now published studies have reported that capillary samples are obtained according to a protocol by the principle of free blood outflow, which is practically almost unachievable in the neonate. Objective Determination of the reference values of oxygen saturation (ScO2 and partial pressure (pcO2 of capillary blood by squeezing of the foot. The determination of difference between ScO2 and pulse oximetry (SpO2. Methods In 134 term newborns, we determined SpO2 . Subsequently, we measured the values of ScO2 and pcO2 from the same extremity. While withdrawing a capillary sample, we exerted multiple squeezing of the foot. The mean value of ScO2, pcO2, SpO2 and the difference between ScO2 and SpO2 were determined. Results Mean ScO2 value was 80.5}8.5%, pcO2 was 48.2}11.4 mm Hg and SpO2 was 98}1.9%. The difference between ScO2 and SpO2 values was 17.5}8.6% (t=23.568; p=0.000. Conclusion There is a statistically highly significant difference between the values of ScO2 and SpO2. Having the knowledge of this difference can increase the accuracy of clinical evaluation and further diagnostics. Comparison in up-to-now conducted studies suggests that the squeezing of the foot for obtaining a capillary sample in relation to free blood outflow does not bear any significant influence on the resultant values of haemoglobin saturation. .

  15. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  16. Revisiting the applications of drainage capillary pressure curves in water-wet hydrocarbon systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, István

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of the paper is to introduce a new approach at studying and modelling the relationship of initial water saturation profile and capillarity in water-wet hydrocarbon reservoirs, and describe the available measurement methods and possible applications. As a side track it aims to highlight a set of derivable parameters of mercury capillary curves using the Thomeer-method. Since the widely used mercury capillary pressure curves themselves can lead to over-, or underestimations regarding in-place and technical volumes and misinterpreted reservoir behaviour, the need for a proper capillary curve is reasonable. Combining the results of mercury and centrifuge capillary curves could yield a capillary curve preserving the strengths of both methods, while overcoming their weaknesses. Mercury injection capillary curves were normalized by using the irreducible water saturations derived from centrifuge capillary pressure measurements of the same core plug, and this new, combined capillary curve was applied for engineering calculations in order to make comparisons with other approaches. The most significant benefit of this approach is, that all of the measured data needed for a valid drainage capillary pressure curve represents the very same sample piece.

  17. Separation of Peptides by Pressurized Capillary Electrochromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel gradient pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) instrument wasdeveloped to separate peptides. Two gradient elution modes, hydrophobic and hydrophilicinteraction mode in pCEC, were performed on this instrument. Baseline separation of sixpeptides was obtained on two gradient modes with C18 column and strong cationic exchangecolumn respectively. The effects of mixer volume and total flow rate of pumps on resolutionwere also discussed.

  18. Determining CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure simultaneously: an insight to capillary entrance and end effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Kianinejad, A.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    CO2-brine relative permeability relations are important parameters in modeling scenarios such as CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers and CO2 enhanced recovery in oil reservoir. Many steady-state experimental studies on CO2-brine relative permeability showed that the CO2-brine relative permeability differs greatly from typical oil-brine relative permeability. Particularly, they reported a very small endpoint CO2 relative permeability of 0.1~0.2 at a relative high residual water saturation of 0.4~0.6. In this study, we hypothesize the measured low endpoint CO2 relative permeability in previous studies was an experimental artifact that is primary due to low CO2 viscosity. We conducted steady-state CO2 drainage experiments by co-injecting equlibrated CO2 and brine into a long (60.8 cm) and low permeability (116-mD) Berea sandstone core at 20 °C and 1500 psi. During every experiment, both the overall pressure drop across the core and the pressure drops of the five independent and continuous sections of the core were monitored. The in-situ saturation was measured with a medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. In the center three sections where saturation was uniform, we determined the relative permeability to both brine and CO2 phases. In the entrance and exit sections, both measured pressure gradients and saturation were non-uniform. To cope with this, we make several self-consistent assumptions that reveal the nature of capillary entrance and effect in steady-state two-phase core flooding experiments. Based on these assumptions we determined the relative permeability to CO2 and CO2-brine capillary pressure simultaneously using measured pressure drops. We found: (1) a much higher endpoint CO2 relative permeability of 0.58 at a water saturation of 48%, (2) the entrance region with non-uniform saturation expanded CO2 relative permeability data to much lower water saturation, (3) the determined CO2-brine capillary pressure curve is self-consistent and matches

  19. The effect of capillary pressure for concave liquid-vapor interface on interfacial evaporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金涛; 王补宣; 彭晓峰

    2001-01-01

    The analysis in this paper demonstrates that the capillary pressure on the concave liquid-vapor interface will promote the interfacial evaporation, therefore clarifying the confusion over the great difference between the estimated and real rate of interfacial evaporation. This difference increases with decreasing capillary radius, and becomes more apparent for liquid with high latent heat. The present analysis also shows that the capillary pressure on the concave interface will result in a decrease in liquid phase equilibrium temperature, which can explain the possibility of vapor bubble formation on micro liquid layer interfacial evaporation under low superheat, or even below the nominal saturated temperature.

  20. An Amorphous Network Model for Capillary Flow and Dispersion in a Partially Saturated Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, C. S.; Rockhold, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Network models of capillary flow are commonly used to represent conduction of fluids at pore scales. Typically, a flow system is described by a regular geometric lattice of interconnected tubes. Tubes constitute the pore throats, while connection junctions (nodes) are pore bodies. Such conceptualization of the geometry, however, is questionable for the pore scale, where irregularity clearly prevails, although prior published models using a regular lattice have demonstrated successful descriptions of the flow in the bulk medium. Here a network is allowed to be amorphous, and is not subject to any particular lattice structure. Few network flow models have treated partially saturated or even multiphase conditions. The research trend is toward using capillary tubes with triangular or square cross sections that have corners and always retain some fluid by capillarity when drained. In contrast, this model uses only circular capillaries, whose filled state is controlled by a capillary pressure rule for the junctions. The rule determines which capillary participate in the flow under an imposed matric potential gradient during steady flow conditions. Poiseuille's Law and Laplace equation are used to describe flow and water retention in the capillary units of the model. A modified conjugate gradient solution for steady flow that tracks which capillary in an amorphous network contribute to fluid conduction was devised for partially saturated conditions. The model thus retains the features of classical capillary models for determining hydraulic flow properties under unsaturated conditions based on distribution of non-interacting tubes, but now accounts for flow exchange at junctions. Continuity of the flow balance at every junction is solved simultaneously. The effective water retention relationship and unsaturated permeability are evaluated for an extensive enough network to represent a small bulk sample of porous medium. The model is applied for both a hypothetically

  1. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  2. Functional capillary rarefaction in mild blood pressure elevation

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Cynthia; Diamond, James J.; Falkner, Bonita

    2008-01-01

    Capillary rarefaction is described in patients with moderate to severe hypertension. The study objective was to determine if structural and/or functional capillary rarefaction is detectable and associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with mild blood pressure elevation (HBP: Systolic blood pressure 130 – 160 mm Hg). Capillary density was quantified by direct capillaroscopy in 110 nondiabetic black and non-black subjects. Endothelial function was quantified by plethysmographic measu...

  3. A mimetic finite difference method for two-phase flow models with dynamic capillary pressure and hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Saturation overshoot and pressure overshoot are studied by incorporating dynamic capillary pressure, capillary pressure hysteresis and hysteretic dynamic coefficient with a traditional fractional flow equation. Using the method of lines, the discretizations are constructed by applying Castillo-Grone's mimetic operators in the space direction and explicit trapezoidal integrator in the time direction. Convergence tests and conservation property of the schemes are presented. Computed profiles capture both the saturation overshoot and pressure overshoot phenomena. Comparisons between numerical results and experiments illustrate the effectiveness and different features of the models.

  4. Exploring the pressure resistance limits of monolithic silica capillary columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takeshi; Eeltink, Sebastiaan; Desmet, Gert

    2016-05-13

    We report on an experimental approach to measure the pressure stability and mechanical strength of monolithic silica capillary columns with different diameters (50 and 100μm i.d.) and considering two different domain sizes, typical for the second generation monoliths or smaller. The approach consists of exposing the capillaries to ultra-high pressures (gradually stepwise increased from 20 to 80MPa), with intermediate measurements of the column efficiency, permeability and retention factors to check the mechanical stability of the bed. It was observed that all tested columns withstood the imposed pressure stress, i.e., all the tested parameters remained unaffected up till the maximal test pressure of 80MPa. The applied pressure gradient corresponded to 320MPa/m. The two 100μm i.d.-capillary columns were also exposed to pressures between 80 and 90MPa for a prolonged time (8h), and this did not cause any damage either. PMID:27086284

  5. A poroelastic medium saturated by a two-phase capillary fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelukhin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    By Landau's approach developed for description of superfluidity of 2He, we derive a mathematical model for a poroelastic medium saturated with a two-phase capillary fluid. The model describes a three-velocity continuum with conservation laws which obey the basic principles of thermodynamics and which are consistent with the Galilean transformations. In contrast to Biot' linear theory, the equations derived allow for finite deformations. As the acoustic analysis reveals, there is one more longitudinal wave in comparison with the poroelastic medium saturated with a one-phase fluid. We prove that such a result is due to surface tension.

  6. Three-Phase Capillary Pressure, Hysteresis and Trapping in a Porous Glass-Bead Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Schlüter, S.; Li, T.; Brown, K. I.; Helland, J. O.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) strategies employing water-alternate-gas (WAG) injections may improve oil mobility and production recovery. WAG injections for EOR create regions in the reservoir with simultaneous flow of oil, water and air dominated by capillary and gravity forces. As a result of the dynamics in the transition zones, the invading fluid may snap off compartments of the displaced fluid which could then be trapped in the pore space, contributing to the hysteresis of the three-phase capillary pressure curves. Three-phase capillary pressure curves are needed to model the three-phase transition zone movements in the reservoir. In reservoir simulation models, the common practice has been to implement three-phase capillary pressure curves based on two-phase gas-oil and oil-water capillary pressure data. However, experimental and modelling studies of three-phase fluid distributions at the pore scale have shown that this procedure is not always valid; three-phase capillary pressure curves exhibit hysteresis and depend on the saturation history of the three phases which cannot be derived from two-phase capillary pressure curves. We have developed three-phase experiments that provide capillary pressures and 3D-image data of fluid distributions in the entire saturation space of oil, water and air in water-wet porous glass-bead columns; a time-consuming and technically challenging exercise. The 3D data with a resolution of 6.38 μm were derived from high-resolution synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography (CMT), collected at the GSECARS beam line 13-BM-D at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. In particular, we discuss how three-phase pore-scale mechanisms, such as oil layer existence and multiple displacement events, affect the mobility and trapping of oil in the porous medium. We also show that wettability-alterations of the porous medium in contact with the three-phase fluid system and exposure to x-rays can be avoided by using iodine

  7. Pressure resistance of glass capillaries for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtappels, Kai; Beckmann-Kluge, Martin; Gebauer, Marek [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Eliezer, Dan

    2011-07-01

    A crucial problem in the development of new hydrogen technologies is the need for lightweight and safe storage of acceptable amounts of hydrogen, in particular for portable or mobile applications. A new and innovative technology based on capillary arrays has been developed. These systems ensure the safe infusion, storage, and controlled release of hydrogen gas, even when storage pressures of up to 1200 bar are applied. This technology enables the storage of a significantly higher amount of hydrogen than other approaches. It has already surpassed the US Department of Energy's 2010 target, and is expected to meet the DOE's 2015 target in the near future. The main determinant in this storage technology is the pressure resistance of glass capillaries. It is well known that quartz, for example, is three times stronger than steel. At the same time, the density is about three times lower which means that much less material is necessary to reach the same pressure resistance. The pressure resistance of single capillaries has been determined in relation to various capillary materials and dimensions, wall thicknesses etc. in order to find out optimal parameters for the 'final' capillaries. (orig.)

  8. Uniqueness of Specific Interfacial Area–Capillary Pressure–Saturation Relationship Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions in Two-Phase Porous Media Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, Vahid

    2012-02-23

    The capillary pressure-saturation (P c-S w) relationship is one of the central constitutive relationships used in two-phase flow simulations. There are two major concerns regarding this relation. These concerns are partially studied in a hypothetical porous medium using a dynamic pore-network model called DYPOSIT, which has been employed and extended for this study: (a) P c-S w relationship is measured empirically under equilibrium conditions. It is then used in Darcy-based simulations for all dynamic conditions. This is only valid if there is a guarantee that this relationship is unique for a given flow process (drainage or imbibition) independent of dynamic conditions; (b) It is also known that P c-S w relationship is flow process dependent. Depending on drainage and imbibition, different curves can be achieved, which are referred to as "hysteresis". A thermodynamically derived theory (Hassanizadeh and Gray, Water Resour Res 29: 3389-3904, 1993a) suggests that, by introducing a new state variable, called the specific interfacial area (a nw, defined as the ratio of fluid-fluid interfacial area to the total volume of the domain), it is possible to define a unique relation between capillary pressure, saturation, and interfacial area. This study investigates these two aspects of capillary pressure-saturation relationship using a dynamic pore-network model. The simulation results imply that P c-S w relation not only depends on flow process (drainage and imbibition) but also on dynamic conditions for a given flow process. Moreover, this study attempts to obtain the first preliminary insights into the global functionality of capillary pressure-saturation-interfacial area relationship under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions and the uniqueness of P c-S w-a nw relationship. © 2012 The Author(s).

  9. Impact of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation curves: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, M.; Fiorentino, E.-A.; Mâløy, K. J.; Schäfer, G.; Toussaint, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships, by analyzing the drainage of a two-phase flow from a quasi-2-D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the direct visualization of the invasion pattern during flow, and is initially saturated with a viscous liquid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the liquid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, displacing the liquid which leaves the system from an outlet on the opposite side. Pressure measurements and images of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. We show that this relationship depends on the system size and aspect ratio. The effects of the system's boundaries on this relationship are measured experimentally and compared with simulations produced using an invasion percolation algorithm. The pressure build up at the beginning and end of the invasion process are particularly affected by the boundaries of the system whereas at the central part of the model (when the air front progresses far from these boundaries), the invasion happens at a statistically constant capillary pressure. These observations have led us to propose a much simplified pressure-saturation relationship, valid for systems that are large enough such that the invasion is not influenced by boundary effects. The properties of this relationship depend on the capillary pressure thresholds distribution, sample dimensions, and average pore connectivity and its applications may be of particular interest for simulations of two-phase flow in large porous media.

  10. a Comprehensive Model for Capillary Pressure Difference across a Drop/bubble Flowing Through a Constricted Capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingchao; Wei, Junhong; Han, Hongmei; Fu, Chengguo; Liu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    The capillary pressure is one of the crucial parameters in many science and engineering applications such as composite materials, interface science, chemical engineering, oil exploration, etc. The drop/bubble formation and its mechanisms that affect the permeability of porous media have steadily attracted much attention in the past. When a drop/bubble moves from a larger capillary to a smaller one, it is often obstructed by an additional pressure difference caused by the capillary force. In this paper, a comprehensive model is derived for the capillary pressure difference when a drop/bubble flows through a constricted capillary, i.e. a geometrically constricted passage with an abrupt change in radius. The proposed model is expressed as a function of the smaller capillary radius, pore-throat ratio, contact angle, surface tension and length of the drop/bubble in the smaller capillary. The model predictions are compared with the available experimental data, and good agreement is found between them.

  11. Features concerning capillary pressure and the effect on two-phase and three-phase flow

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The effect of capillary pressure related to immiscible WAG (Water Alternate Gas) is studied by use of a numerical simulator. The capillary pressure is found to have a significant effect on the pressure gradient and the total oil production both in two-phase and three-phase flow situations. When the capillary pressure is included in the simulation the total oil production is considerably lower than when the capillary pressure is neglected. Experimentally measured two-phase capil...

  12. Influence of capillary forces on water injection into hot rock, saturated with superheated vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsypkin, G.G. [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, RAS, Vernadskogo Ave. 101, 119420 Moscow (Russian Federation); Calore, C. [Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse - CNR, Sezione di Firenze, via La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy)

    2007-07-15

    The results of a theoretical study and numerical analysis of the role of capillary pressure of cold water injection into depleted geothermal reservoirs are presented. A simplified 1-D mathematical model is developed, that describes the motion of a sharp vaporization front. Some asymptotic estimates for a wide range of parameters are given and a similarity solution is derived. Analytical results are then compared with those obtained from the numerical reservoir simulator TOUGH2, showing a good agreement between the two. (author)

  13. Uniaxial creep as a control on mercury intrusion capillary pressure in consolidating rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heath, Jason E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leigh, Christi D. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two - phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in oth er realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Mo dels for waste release scenarios in salt back - fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and vali date. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potent ial usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mech anics, using sieved run - of - mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (%7E900 psi) and temperatures to 90 o C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone "FY:15 Transport Properties of Run - of - Mine Salt Backfill - Unconsolidated to Consolidated". Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time - dependent consolidation, or creep, to various deg rees. Creep volume strain - time relations obey simple log - time behavior through the range of porosities (%7E50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as

  14. Measurement of capillary pressure in fuel cell diffusion media, micro-porous layers, catalyst layers, and interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManna, Jacob M.; Bothe, James V.; Zhang, Feng Yuan; Mench, Matthew M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, semi-empirical Leverett J-Function relationships relating capillary pressure and water saturation are experimentally derived for commercial and experimental polymer electrolyte fuel cell materials developed for automotive applications. Relationships were derived for Mitsubishi Rayon Corp. (MRC) U105 and General Motors (GM) experimental high tortuosity diffusion media (DM), the micro-porous layer (MPL), and the catalyst layer (CL). The standard Leverett J-Function under-predicted drainage curves for the DM at high saturation levels and significantly under-predicted the capillary pressure requirements for the MPL and CL across the entire saturation range. Composite structures were tested to understand interfacial effects for DM|MPL and MPL|CL. Each additional layer was found to superimpose its effects on capillary pressure onto the previous layers. The MPL formulation tested increased in porosity from a 136 nm peak average to a 153 nm peak average with increased surface porosity of the substrate. Additionally, small voids and pockets that accumulate liquid water were found to exist in the MPL|CL interface. The results of this work are useful for computational modelers seeking to enhance the resolution of their macroscopic multi-phase flow models which underestimate capillary pressure using the standard Leverett J-Function.

  15. RESEARCH METHODS OF SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE AND EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The static method is the most common, because it is applicable for measuring SVP of substances in wide ranges of temperatures and pressures. The essence of the method consists in measuring of vapor pressure in equilibrium with its liquid at a given temperature. Dynamic method is based on measurement of the boiling point of the liquid at a certain pressure. Saturation method of moving gas used in the case when the SVP does not exceed a few mm Hg. The method consists the following: the liquid is passed through the inert gas and saturated with vapor of liquids and then it flows into a cooler where the absorbed vapors are condensed. Knowing the amount of absorbed liquid and gas, as well as their molecular weight, allow us calculate saturated vapor pressure of the liquid. Knudsen effusion method is applicable for the measurement of very low pressures (up to 100 Pa. This method consists in researching of depending between the pressure and volume of saturated steam at a constant temperature. At the point of saturation an isotherm should have a break and turn into a straight line. Chromatographic method is based on complete chromatographic analysis of liquid and calculating the sum of partial pressures of all mixture components. Also, the article has a description of existing experimental installation for these researches and their advantages and disadvantages compared with each other

  16. Xenon excimer emission from pulsed high-pressure capillary microdischarges

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Rahaman, Hasibur; Petzenhauser, Isfried; Frank, Klaus; Giapis, Konstantinos P.

    2007-01-01

    Intense xenon vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission is observed from a high-pressure capillary cathode microdischarge in direct current operation, by superimposing a high-voltage pulse of 50 ns duration. Under stagnant gas conditions, the total VUV light intensity increases linearly with pressure from 400 to 1013 mbar for a fixed voltage pulse. At fixed pressure, however, the VUV light intensity increases superlinearly with voltage pulse height ranging from 0.8 to 2.8 kV. Gains in emission inten...

  17. MEASUREMENTS OF THE BLOOD CAPILLARY PRESSURE AND ARTERIAL ELASTICITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangMengcai; GuZhong; HangWenjing; ZhongQuan; TangFuyong

    1990-01-01

    Describe some new fully automatic instruments for the measurements of the blood capillary pressure (Pcap) and arterial elastic properties in human fingers using a photoelectric plethysmographic technique, With these instruments, the value of Pcap was in good agreement with those reported by other investigators, the arterial elastic properties in human fingers have been successfully measured. The measurements of Pcap and arterial elasticity are now required in clinics because they provide useful and important information for evaluating vascular haemodynamics.

  18. Stress dependent thermal pressurization of a fluid-saturated rock

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2008-01-01

    Temperature increase in saturated porous materials under undrained conditions leads to thermal pressurization of the pore fluid due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the solid matrix. This increase in the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. The equations governing the phenomenon of thermal pressurization are presented and this phenomenon is studied experimentally for a saturated granular rock in an undrained heating test under constant isotropic stress. Careful analysis of the effect of mechanical and thermal deformation of the drainage and pressure measurement system is performed and a correction of the measured pore pressure is introduced. The test results are modelled using a non-linear thermo-poro-elastic constitutive model of the granular rock with emphasis on the stress-dependent character of the rock compressibility. The effects of stress and temperature on therma...

  19. Evaluation and comparison of routes to obtain pressure coefficients from high-pressure capillary rheometry data

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinaels, Ruth; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Moldenaers, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A capillary rheometer equipped with a pressure chamber is used to measure the pressure-dependent viscosity of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), poly-alpha-methylstyrene-co-acrylonitrile (P alpha MSAN), and low-density polyethylene (LDPE). Data analysis schemes are discussed to obtain pressure coefficients at constant shear rate and at constant shear stress. It is shown that the constant shear stress pressure coefficients have the advantage of being shear stress independent for the three polymers...

  20. Atmospheric sugar alcohols: evaporation rates and saturation vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilde, Merete; Zardini, Alessandro Alessio; Hong, Juan;

    allowed to evaporate in a laminar flow reactor, and changes in particle size as function of evaporation time are determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. In this work saturation vapor pressures of sugar alcohols at several temperatures have been inferred from such measurements using...

  1. Effect of Implementing Three-Phase Flow Characteristics and Capillary Pressure in Simulation of Immiscible WAG

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, Elisabeth Iren; Skauge, Arne

    2008-01-01

    The effect of including a three-phase representation of the flow parameters and capillary pressure has been investigated using a black oil simulator. The simulation approaches include the complexity of three-phase flow, relative permeability hysteresis, dynamic phase trapping functions and capillary pressure. A WAG simulation case was used to study the effect of three-phase flow parameters and capillary pressure on the size of the three-phase zone, breakthrough time of the inje...

  2. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-02-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems.

  3. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  4. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%--samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  5. Capillary electrophoresis: Imaging of electroosmotic and pressure driven flow profiles in fused silica capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George O., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This study is a continuation of the summer of 1994 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. This effort is a portion of the ongoing work by the Biophysics Branch of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The work has focused recently on the separation of macromolecules using capillary electrophoresis (CE). Two primary goals were established for the effort this summer. First, we wanted to use capillary electrophoresis to study the electrohydrodynamics of a sample stream. Secondly, there was a need to develop a methodology for using CE for separation of DNA molecules of various sizes. In order to achieve these goals we needed to establish a procedure for detection of a sample plug under the influence of an electric field Detection of the sample with the microscope and image analysis system would be helpful in studying the electrohydrodynamics of this stream under load. Videotaping this process under the influence of an electric field in real time would also be useful. Imaging and photography of the sample/background electrolyte interface would be vital to this study. Finally, detection and imaging of electroosmotic flow and pressure driven flow must be accomplished.

  6. Density, viscosity, and saturated vapor pressure of ethyl trifluoroacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Density of ethyl trifluoroacetate was measured and its thermal expansion coefficient was determined. • Viscosity of ethyl trifluoroacetate was measured and fitted to the Andrade equation. • Saturated vapor pressure of ethyl trifluoroacetate was reported. • The Clausius–Clapeyron equation was used to calculate the molar evaporation enthalpy of ethyl trifluoroacetate. - Abstract: The properties of ethyl trifluoroacetate (CF3COOCH2CH3) were measured as a function of temperature: density (278.08 to 322.50) K, viscosity (293.45 to 334.32) K, saturated vapor pressure (293.35 to 335.65) K. The density data were fitted to a quadratic polynomial equation, and the viscosity data were regressed to the Andrade equation. The correlation coefficient (R2) of equations for density and viscosity are 0.9997 and 0.9999, respectively. The correlation between saturated vapor pressures and temperatures was achieved with a maximum absolute relative deviation of 0.142%. In addition, the molar evaporation enthalpy in the range of T = (293.35 to 335.65) K was estimated by the Clausius–Clapeyron equation

  7. A numerical study of two-phase flow with dynamic capillary pressure using an adaptive moving mesh method

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by observations of saturation overshoot, this paper investigates numerical modeling of two-phase flow incorporating dynamic capillary pressure. The effects of the dynamic capillary coefficient, the infiltrating flux rate and the initial and boundary values are systematically studied using a travelling wave ansatz and efficient numerical methods. The travelling wave solutions may exhibit monotonic, non-monotonic or plateau-shaped behaviour. Special attention is paid to the non-monotonic profiles. The travelling wave results are confirmed by numerically solving the partial differential equation using an accurate adaptive moving mesh solver. Comparisons between the computed solutions using the Brooks-Corey model and the laboratory measurements of saturation overshoot verify the effectiveness of our approach.

  8. Residual liquids saturation development during two and three phase flow under gravity in square capillaries at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Residual liquid saturations under gravity at different temperatures were analyzed. • If NT < 2.7E−2, residual oil saturation (Sor) was independent of viscous/gravity forces. • At T = 55 and 85 °C, the initial water saturation did not affect the amount of retained oil. • An empirical correlation for Sor was developed for free-fall gravity drainage. • This data will be useful in the assessment of thermal heavy-oil recovery applications. - Abstract: An experimental study on heavy oil with air (two phase flow) and water and air (three phase flow) at different temperatures was carried out in square capillaries under gravity drainage conditions. Fluid retention characteristics (in the corners of capillaries) were determined and evaluated using the trapping number (NT). In air–heavy oil systems, when NT < 2.7E−2, the residual oil saturation (Sor) was constant and equal at 55 and 85 °C. The Sor was controlled by capillary forces regardless of viscous and gravity forces, including free fall gravity drainage (FFGD). For higher NT, the Sor was a function of competition between gravity, viscous and capillary forces. The Sor was always higher at 85 °C compared to 55 °C for the same gas injection rate and the difference increased as the NT augmented. FFGD experiments demonstrated that heavy oil retention depended on the Bond number and increased linearly as the Bond number increased. In the three phase systems (air–heavy oil–water) the oil retention did not diminish with the presence of water, which was also constant for the entire interval of NT at 55 and 85 °C. High viscous forces originated from heavy oil were responsible for no change in the Sor. However, due to the water-wet nature of the capillary tubes, water was not completely swept. More Sor and residual water saturation were observed in air–water–heavy oil configuration, especially at 85 °C, due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio oil/water and the negative spreading

  9. Evaluation of two-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure relations for unstable displacements in a pore network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Karl J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Changyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grate, Jay W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-29

    A series of displacement experiments was conducted using five wetting-nonwetting immiscible fluid pairs in a homogenous and uniform pore network. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or water as a wetting fluid, which was subsequently displaced by a nonwetting fluid (dodecane, hexadecane, or mineral oil) at different flow rates. The experiments were designed to allow determinations of nonwetting fluid relative permeabilities ( ), fluid saturations ( ), and capillary pressure heads ( ). In the displacements, nonwetting fluid saturations increased with increasing flow rates for all five fluid pairs, and viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement were observed. Viscous fingering occurred when PEG was displaced by either dodecane or hexadecane. For the water displacements, capillary fingers were observed at low capillary numbers. Due to unstable fingering phenomena, values for the PEG displacements were smaller than for the water displacements. A fitting exercise using the Brooks-Corey (1964) relationship showed that the fitted entry pressure heads are reasonably close to the computed entry pressure head. The fitted pore geometry factor, Sn values for the displacements are considerably lower than what is expected for displacements in homogeneous, highly uniform, porous systems, demonstrating the impact of unstable displacement on the apparent value of Sn. It was shown that a continuum-based multiphase model could be used to predict the average behavior for wetting fluid drainage in a pore network as long as independently fitted - and - relations are used. The use of a coupled approach through the Brooks-Corey pore geometry factor underpredicts observed values.

  10. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure capillary DBD oxygen plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, N C; Pramanik, B K

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure capillary dielectric barrier oxygen discharge plasma jet is developed to generate non-thermal plasma using unipolar positive pulse power supply. Both optical and electrical techniques are used to investigate the characteristics of the produced plasma as function of applied voltage and gas flow rate. Analytical results obtained from the optical emission spectroscopic data reveal the gas temperature, rotational temperature, excitation temperature and electron density. Gas temperature and rotational temperature are found to decrease with increasing oxygen flow rate but increase linearly with applied voltage. It is exposed that the electron density is boosting up with enhanced applied voltage and oxygen flow rate, while the electron excitation temperature is reducing with rising oxygen flow rate. Electrical characterization demonstrates that the discharge frequency is falling with flow rate but increasing with voltage. The produced plasma is applied preliminarily to study the inactivation yie...

  11. Saturated vapor pressure of lutetium tris-acetylacetonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the statical method using 177Lu radioactive isotope the saturated vapor pressure of anhydrous lutetium acetylacetonate at 130 to 160 deg is determined. The calculations are carried out assuming the vapor to be monomolecular. The equation of lgP versus 1/T takes the form: lg Psub((mmHg))=(8.7+-1.6)-(4110+-690)/T. The thermodynamical characteristics of LuA3 sublimation are calculated to be ΔHsub(subl.)=79+-13 kJ/mol; ΔSsub(subl.)=111+-20 J/kxmol

  12. Relating oxygen partial pressure, saturation and content: the haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie-Ann Collins

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of oxygen by arterial blood to the tissues of the body has a number of critical determinants including blood oxygen concentration (content, saturation (SO2 and partial pressure, haemoglobin concentration and cardiac output, including its distribution. The haemoglobin–oxygen dissociation curve, a graphical representation of the relationship between oxygen satur­ation and oxygen partial pressure helps us to understand some of the principles underpinning this process. Historically this curve was derived from very limited data based on blood samples from small numbers of healthy subjects which were manipulated in vitro and ultimately determined by equations such as those described by Severinghaus in 1979. In a study of 3524 clinical specimens, we found that this equation estimated the SO2 in blood from patients with normal pH and SO2 >70% with remarkable accuracy and, to our knowledge, this is the first large-scale validation of this equation using clinical samples. Oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2 is nowadays the standard clinical method for assessing arterial oxygen saturation, providing a convenient, pain-free means of continuously assessing oxygenation, provided the interpreting clinician is aware of important limitations. The use of pulse oximetry reduces the need for arterial blood gas analysis (SaO2 as many patients who are not at risk of hypercapnic respiratory failure or metabolic acidosis and have acceptable SpO2 do not necessarily require blood gas analysis. While arterial sampling remains the gold-standard method of assessing ventilation and oxygenation, in those patients in whom blood gas analysis is indicated, arterialised capillary samples also have a valuable role in patient care. The clinical role of venous blood gases however remains less well defined.

  13. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models

  14. The Phase Envelope of Multicomponent Mixtures in the Presence of a Capillary Pressure Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval Lemus, Diego Rolando; Yan, Wei; Michelsen, Michael Locht;

    2016-01-01

    Confined fluids such as oil and gas mixtures inside tight reservoirs are systems that can experience high capillary pressure difference between the liquid and gas phases. This capillary pressure difference has an effect on the phase equilibrium and in some cases is considerably high. We presented...... pressure, whereas the upper branch of the dew point shows an increase. The cricondentherm is shifted to a higher temperature. We also presented a mathematical analysis of the phase envelope shift due to capillary pressure based on linear approximations. The resulting linear approximation equations can...

  15. Direct measurement of the wetting front capillary pressure in a clay brick ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of a liquid into a rectangular bar of an initially dry porous material that is sealed on all surfaces except the inflow face is analysed in terms of Sharp Front theory. Sharp Front models are developed for both complete and incomplete displacement of air ahead of the advancing wetting front. Experiments are described from which a characteristic capillary potential of the material is obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure of the air displaced and compressed ahead of the advancing wetting front. Results for the absorption of water and n-heptane by a fired clay brick ceramic suggest that this wetting front capillary pressure (or capillary potential) scales approximately with the surface tension and also that the permeability scales inversely with the liquid viscosity. The pressure of the air trapped in the wetted region is found to be the same as the pressure of the displaced air. For this material the wetting front capillary pressure for water at 20 C is 0.113 MPa, equivalent to a hydraulic tension head of 11.5 m and to a Young-Laplace pore diameter of 2.6 μm. The capillary pressure so measured is apparently a fundamental percolation property of the material that can be interpreted as the air pressure at which liquid phase continuity and unsaturated conductivity both vanish. The method described can be applied generally to porous materials

  16. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as

  17. Effects of intermediate wettability on entry capillary pressure in angular pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Harris Sajjad; Joekar-Niasar, Vahid; Shokri, Nima

    2016-07-01

    Entry capillary pressure is one of the most important factors controlling drainage and remobilization of the capillary-trapped phases as it is the limiting factor against the two-phase displacement. It is known that the entry capillary pressure is rate dependent such that the inertia forces would enhance entry of the non-wetting phase into the pores. More importantly the entry capillary pressure is wettability dependent. However, while the movement of a meniscus into a strongly water-wet pore is well-defined, the invasion of a meniscus into a weak or intermediate water-wet pore especially in the case of angular pores is ambiguous. In this study using OpenFOAM software, high-resolution direct two-phase flow simulations of movement of a meniscus in a single capillary channel are performed. Interface dynamics in angular pores under drainage conditions have been simulated under constant flow rate boundary condition at different wettability conditions. Our results shows that the relation between the half corner angle of pores and contact angle controls the temporal evolution of capillary pressure during the invasion of a pore. By deviating from pure water-wet conditions, a dip in the temporal evolution of capillary pressure can be observed which will be pronounced in irregular angular cross sections. That enhances the pore invasion with a smaller differential pressure. The interplay between the contact angle and pore geometry can have significant implications for enhanced remobilization of ganglia in intermediate contact angles in real porous media morphologies, where pores are very heterogeneous with small shape factors. PMID:27042823

  18. Effects of the magnitude of pressure on the severity of injury and capillary closure in rat experimental pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Seiichi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kubori, Yohei; Muramoto, Hiroaki; Honkawa, Yuta

    2015-03-01

    Experimental pressure ulcers were successfully produced in the rat abdominal wall at 100 mmHg in our previous study. We hypothesized that injury is less severe when pressures are lower than 100 mmHg and explored a critical pressure in the production of pressure ulcers. At 70 and 60 mmHg, repeated compressions for 4 h daily for 5 consecutive days resulted in partial skin necrosis and eschar formation in the majority of rats, whereas skin injuries were absent or very mild in most of the rats at 50 mmHg. The extent of ischemia was also examined by visualization of capillary blood flow using intravascular infusion of Lycopersicon esculentum lectin. Rat abdominal walls were compressed in the range from 0 (control) to 100 mmHg. The percentages of open capillaries were 62.8 ± 10.1% at 0 mmHg and 34.7 ± 18.5% at 10 mmHg. The ratio of open capillaries was further decreased with increasing pressure, but not pressure dependently. In conclusion, the severity of injury at 50 mmHg was drastically milder than that at 60 mmHg or higher, whereas the extent of ischemia (capillary closure) was not significantly different. The pressure is vitally important; however, other factor(s) besides ischemia is likely to promote the development of pressure ulcers. PMID:24676460

  19. Asymptotic Behaviour of Capillary Problems governed by Disjoining Pressure Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Thomys, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Capillarity describes the effects caused by the surface tension on liquids. When considering small amounts ofliquid,thesurfacetension becomes the dominating parameter. In this situation the arising mathematical task is to determine the occurring capillary surface. At the beginning of the research on this topic, problems such as the ascent of fluids in a circular tube, on a vertical wall or on a wedge were some of the first problems scientists were concerned with. At the beginning...

  20. Simultaneous determination of capillary pressure and relative permeability curves from core-flooding experiments with various fluid pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally M.

    2013-06-01

    Capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are simultaneously measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely gCO 2/water, gN2/water and scCO 2/brine. This novel technique possesses many of the characteristics of a conventional steady-state relative permeability experiment and consists of injecting the nonwetting fluid at increasingly higher flow rates in a core that is initially saturated with the wetting phase, while observing fluid saturations with a medical x-ray CT scanner. Injection flow rates (0.5-75 mL/min) are varied so as to generate a large range of capillary pressures (up to 18 kPa), whereas fluid-pairs and experimental conditions are selected in order to move across a range interfacial tension values (γ12=40-65 mN/m), while maintaining a constant viscosity ratio (μw/μnw ≈30). Moreover, these experiments, carried out at moderate pressures (P=2.4 MPa and T=50°C), can be compared directly with results for gas/liquid pairs reported in the literature and they set the benchmark for the experiment at a higher pressure (P=9 MPa and T=50°C), where CO 2 is in the supercritical state. Contrary to some prior investigations, from these experiments we find no evidence that the scCO 2/brine system behaves differently than any of these other fluid pairs. At the same time, capillary pressure data show a significant (but consistent) effect of the different values for the interfacial tension. The fact that the three different fluid pairs yield the same drainage relative permeability curve is consistent with observations in the petroleum literature. Additionally, the observed end-point values for the relative permeability to the nonwetting phase (kr,nw ≈0.9) and the corresponding irreducible water saturations (Sw,irr ≈0.35) suggest that water-wet conditions are maintained in each experiment. The reliability of the measured relative permeability curves is supported by the very good agreement with data from

  1. Simultaneous analysis of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids present in pequi fruits by capillary electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia M. de Castro Barra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, an alternative method has been proposed for simultaneous analysis of palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE using indirect detection. The background electrolyte (BGE used for the analysis of these fatty acids (FAs consisted of 15.0 mmol L−1 NaH2PO4/Na2HPO4 at pH 6.86, 4.0 mmol L−1 SDBS, 8.3 mmol L−1 Brij 35, 45% v/v acetonitrile (can, and 2.1% n-octanol. The FAs quantification of FAs was performed using a response factor approach, which provided a high analytical throughput for the real sample. The CZE method, which was applied successfully for the analysis of pequi pulp, has advantages such as short analysis time, absence of lipid fraction extraction and derivatization steps, and no significant difference in the 95% confidence intervals for FA quantification results, compared to the gas chromatography official method (AOCS Ce 1h-05.

  2. Prediction of Three-Phase Capillary Pressure using a Network Model Anchored to Two-Phase Data

    OpenAIRE

    Dale, Elisabeth Iren; Dijke, Marinus I. J. van; Skauge, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Three-phase capillary pressure is difficult to measure experimentally and therefore has to be estimated by other methods. In this work a network model was applied to generate a consistent set of two-phase and three-phase capillary pressure curves. Experimental data for two-phase, gas-oil and oil-water, capillary pressure from a North Sea reservoir was used in this study. The network model was anchored to the measured two-phase data, and three-phase capillary pressure was constr...

  3. Method to calculate reservoir permeability using nuclear magnetic resonance logging and capillary pressure data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the problems of SDR and Tim-Coates models in calculating permeability using nuclear magnetic resonance logging data, based on the fact that nuclear magnetic resonance T2 distribution and capillary pressure curves reflect the reservoir pore structure, a method was presented to calculate reservoir permeability using nuclear magnetic resonance logging and capillary pressure data. The correlation between Swanson parameter and permeability was established by comparing 31 core samples which were measured by mercury penetration and nuclear magnetic resonance logging. Considering the problem that capillary pressure data are limited by their quantity, the good correlativity between T2 geometric mean value of lateral relaxation time of nuclear magnetic resonance and Swanson parameter can be used to determine the Swanson parameter and to calculate reservoir permeability consecutively. The processing of the data in well A yields a permeability closer to the result of core analysis, and this indicates the accuracy of the method. (authors)

  4. Synthesis of capillary pressure curves from post-stack seismic data with the use of intelligent estimators: A case study from the Iranian part of the South Pars gas field, Persian Gulf Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsanami, Naser; Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi, Ali; Erfani, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Capillary pressure curves are important data for reservoir rock typing, analyzing pore throat distribution, determining height above free water level, and reservoir simulation. Laboratory experiments provide accurate data, however they are expensive, time-consuming and discontinuous through the reservoir intervals. The current study focuses on synthesizing artificial capillary pressure (Pc) curves from seismic attributes with the use of artificial intelligent systems including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Fuzzy logic (FL) and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFISs). The synthetic capillary pressure curves were achieved by estimating pressure values at six mercury saturation points. These points correspond to mercury filled pore volumes of core samples (Hg-saturation) at 5%, 20%, 35%, 65%, 80%, and 90% saturations. To predict the synthetic Pc curve at each saturation point, various FL, ANFIS and ANN models were constructed. The varying neural network models differ in their training algorithm. Based on the performance function, the most accurately functioning models were selected as the final solvers to do the prediction process at each of the above-mentioned mercury saturation points. The constructed models were then tested at six depth points of the studied well which were already unforeseen by the models. The results show that the Fuzzy logic and neuro-fuzzy models were not capable of making reliable estimations, while the predictions from the ANN models were satisfyingly trustworthy. The obtained results showed a good agreement between the laboratory derived and synthetic capillary pressure curves. Finally, a 3D seismic cube was captured for which the required attributes were extracted and the capillary pressure cube was estimated by using the developed models. In the next step, the synthesized Pc cube was compared with the seismic cube and an acceptable correspondence was observed.

  5. Dependence of the saturation level of magnetorotational instability on gas pressure and magnetic Prandtl number

    CERN Document Server

    Minoshima, Takashi; Sano, Takayoshi

    2015-01-01

    A large set of numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is presented. Revisiting the previous survey conducted by Sano et al. (2004), we investigate the gas pressure dependence of the saturation level. In ideal MHD simulations, the gas pressure dependence is found to be very sensitive to the choice of a numerical scheme. This is because the numerical magnetic Prandtl number varies according to the scheme as well as the pressure, which considerably affects the results. The saturation level is more sensitive to the numerical magnetic Prandtl number than the pressure. In MHD simulations with explicit viscosity and resistivity, the saturation level increases with the physical magnetic Prandtl number, and it is almost independent of the gas pressure when the magnetic Prandtl number is constant. This is indicative of the incompressible turbulence saturated by the secondary tearing instability.

  6. X-ray computed-tomography imaging of gas migration in water-saturated sediments: From capillary invasion to conduit opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Hoon; Seol, Yongkoo; Boswell, Ray; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-09-01

    The strong coupling between multiphase flow and sediment mechanics determines the spatial distribution and migration dynamics of gas percolating through liquid-filled soft granular media. Here, we investigate, by means of controlled experiments and computed tomography (CT) imaging, the preferential mode of gas migration in three-dimensional samples of water-saturated silica-sand and silica-silt sediments. Our experimental system allowed us to independently control radial and axial confining stresses and pore pressure while performing continuous x-ray CT scanning. The CT image analysis of the three-dimensional gas migration provides the first experimental confirmation that capillary invasion preferentially occurs in coarse-grained sediments whereas grain displacement and conduit openings are dominant in fine-grained sediments. Our findings allow us to rationalize prior field observations and pore-scale modeling results, and provide critical experimental evidence to explain the means by which conduits for the transit of methane gas may be established through the gas hydrate stability zone in oceanic sediments, and cause large episodic releases of carbon into the deep ocean.

  7. A Relatioship between Capillary Pressure and Permeability as Revealed by a Pore Network Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, P.; Hejtmánek, Vladimír

    Praha : Process Engineering Publisher, 2004, s. 857. ISBN 80-86059-40-5. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2004 /16./. Praha (CZ), 22.08.2004-26.08.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : pore network model * capillary pressure curve * slip flow Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone submitted to a range of confining pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using the forced oscillation method, we measure the extensional-mode attenuation and Young's modulus of a Berea sandstone sample at seismic frequencies (0.5-50 Hz) for varying levels of water saturation (~0-100%) and confining pressures (2-25 MPa). Attenuation is negligible for dry conditions and saturation levels <80%. For saturation levels between ~91% and ~100%, attenuation is significant and frequency dependent in the form of distinct bell-shaped curves having their maxima between 1 and 20 Hz. Increasing saturation causes an increase of the overall attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to lower frequencies. On the other hand, increasing the confining pressure causes a reduction in the attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to higher frequencies. For saturation levels above ~98%, the fluid pressure increases with increasing confining pressure. When the fluid pressure is high enough to ensure full water saturation of the sample, attenuation becomes negligible. A second series of comparable experiments reproduces these results satisfactorily. Based on a qualitative analysis of the data, the frequency-dependent attenuation meets the theoretical predictions of mesoscopic wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) in response to a heterogeneous water distribution in the pore space, so-called patchy saturation. These results show that mesoscopic WIFF can be an important source of seismic attenuation at reservoir conditions.

  9. Capillary liquid chromatography-microchip atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Pekka; Jäntti, Sirkku; Grigoras, Kestas; Saarela, Ville; Ketola, Raimo A; Franssila, Sami; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2006-07-01

    A miniaturized nebulizer chip for capillary liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS) is presented. The APCI chip consists of two wafers, a silicon wafer and a Pyrex glass wafer. The silicon wafer has a DRIE etched through-wafer nebulizer gas inlet, an edge capillary insertion channel, a stopper, a vaporizer channel and a nozzle. The platinum heater electrode and pads for electrical connection were patterned on to the Pyrex glass wafer. The two wafers were joined by anodic bonding, creating a microchip version of an APCI-source. The sample inlet capillary from an LC column is directly connected to the vaporizer channel of the APCI chip. The etched nozzle in the microchip forms a narrow sample plume, which is ionized by an external corona needle, and the formed ions are analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The nebulizer chip enables for the first time the use of low flow rate separation techniques with APCI-MS. The performance of capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS was tested with selected neurosteroids. The capillary LC-microchip APCI-MS provides quantitative repeatability and good linearity. The limits of detection (LOD) with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3 in MS/MS mode for the selected neurosteroids were 20-1000 fmol (10-500 nmol l(-1)). LODs (S/N = 3) with commercial macro APCI with the same compounds using the same MS were about 10 times higher. Fast heat transfer allows the use of the optimized temperature for each compound during an LC run. The microchip APCI-source provides a convenient and easy method to combine capillary LC to any API-MS equipped with an APCI source. The advantages and potentials of the microchip APCI also make it a very attractive interface in microfluidic APCI-MS. PMID:16804601

  10. Properties of Plasma Jets Emitted in Pulsed Capillary Discharges at Low Pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic geometry of a pulsed capillary discharge (PCD), a narrow open end tube with a large aspect ratio, establishes natural conditions for the generation of plasma jets, that propagate in the neutral background gas surrounding the capillary. We have investigated the plasma jet emission in a PCD, with electron beam assisted on-axis initiation. A local storage capacitor, coaxial with the capillary assembly, is pulse charged up to a maximum of -11 kV, which results in an initial ∼ 10 ns, ∼ 2 kA current pulse. The discharge is operated in Argon and Nitrogen, in a continuous pulsing mode, at frequencies between 5 to 20 Hz, and in a pressure range between 300 to 1100 Torr. A fast Langmuir probe, placed at the anode side, close to the capillary exit, is used to measure the characteristic electron temperature (Te) and electron density (Ne) of the plasma jets. Results obtained in Nitrogen at 10 Hz indicate that Te is in the 10 to 60 eV range with Ne of the order of 1014 (cm-3). Significant changes in the probe floating potential are observed for a fixed operating pressure when the pulsing frequency is varied, which can be ascribed to the presence of metastables in the gas fed into the capillary, which result from the interaction of the plasma jet with the plenum gas, at the cathode side. The presence of metastables reduces the energy cost involved in the capillary plasma production, which results in a pulsing frequency dependence of the plasma parameters

  11. Negative capillary-pressure-induced cavitation probability in nanochannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capillarity-induced negative pressure of water flow has been investigated in nanochannels of a rectangular cross section by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. As a consequent effect of negative pressure, the cavitation probability has been analyzed numerically. The numerical relation between the critical radius of cavitation (Rc) and geometrical characteristics of channels shows that cavitation does not occur in channels of uniform cross section (UCS), since 2Rc is larger than the smallest dimension of the channel. However, it may occur in channels of non-uniform cross section (NUCS), except for planar or high aspect ratio channels. The inequality in height and width is favorable for the absence of cavitation. The findings can also be applied to channels of elliptical or circular cross section. The results show the influence of geometrical characteristics of channels on the cavitation probability, which is important to engineer the channel geometrical structure in order to avoid undesirable filling problem 'cavitation' during the flow process.

  12. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented

  13. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petrova, Ts [Berkeley Research Associate, Inc., Beltsville MD 20705 (United States); Benova, E [Department of Language Learning, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-07-15

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  14. Modelling of microwave sustained capillary plasma columns at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Petrova, Ts; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we present a model of argon microwave sustained discharge at high pressure (1 atm), which includes two self-consistently linked parts - electrodynamic and kinetic ones. The model is based on a steady-state Boltzmann equation in an effective field approximation coupled with a collisional-radiative model for high-pressure argon discharge numerically solved together with Maxwell's equation for an azimuthally symmetric TM surface wave and wave energy balance equation. It is applied for the purpose of theoretical description of the discharge in a stationary state. The phase diagram, the electron energy distribution function as well as the dependences of the electron and heavy particles densities and the mean input power per electron on the electron number density and wave number are presented.

  15. The Interface Conditions for Pressures at Oil-water Flood Front in the Porous Media Considering Capillary Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiaolong; Du, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Flood front is the jump interface where fluids distribute discontinuously, whose interface condition is the theoretical basis of a mathematical model of the multiphase flow in porous medium. The conventional interface condition at the jump interface is expressed as the continuous Darcy velocity and fluid pressure (named CPVCM). This paper has inspected it via the studying the water-oil displacement in one dimensional reservoir with considering capillary pressure but ignoring the compressibility and gravity. It is proved theoretically that the total Darcy velocity and total pressure (defined by Antoncev etc.), instead of the Darcy velocities and pressures of water and oil, are continuous at the flood front without considering the compressibility of fluid and porous media. After that, new interface conditions for the pressures and Darcy velocity of each fluid are established, which are collectively named as Jump Pressures and Velocities Conditions Model (JPVCM) because the model has shown the jump pressures and...

  16. A method for measuring saturated vapor pressure and dissociation of metal halogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method was developed for measuring the pressure of saturated vapor and the dissociation of various halogenides from 500 mm Hg to 0.01-0.09 mm Hg. For this purpose the construction of the glass diaphragm zeromanometer was modified. The method was tested by measuring the saturated vapor pressure of hafnium tetraiodide. For this compound the dependence of vapor pressure on temperature was obtained from the equation calculated by the least squares method: Psub(mm Hg) = 10.500 - 5237.23/T (208-323 deg C). The obtained results are in good agreement with known data

  17. Simulation of coupled flow and mechanical deformation using IMplicit Pressure-Displacement Explicit Saturation (IMPDES) scheme

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    The problem of coupled structural deformation with two-phase flow in porous media is solved numerically using cellcentered finite difference (CCFD) method. In order to solve the system of governed partial differential equations, the implicit pressure explicit saturation (IMPES) scheme that governs flow equations is combined with the the implicit displacement scheme. The combined scheme may be called IMplicit Pressure-Displacement Explicit Saturation (IMPDES). The pressure distribution for each cell along the entire domain is given by the implicit difference equation. Also, the deformation equations are discretized implicitly. Using the obtained pressure, velocity is evaluated explicitly, while, using the upwind scheme, the saturation is obtained explicitly. Moreover, the stability analysis of the present scheme has been introduced and the stability condition is determined.

  18. Poor agreement between pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in a veteran population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bitar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate determination of left ventricular filling pressure is essential for differentiation of pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH from pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH. Previous data suggest only a poor correlation between left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP and its commonly used surrogate, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP. However, no data exist on the diagnostic accuracy of PCWP in veterans. Furthermore, the effects of age and comorbidities on the PCWP-LVEDP relationship remain unknown. METHODS: We investigated the PCWP-LVEDP relationship in 101 patients undergoing simultaneous right and left heart catherization at a large VA hospital. PCWP performance was evaluated using correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Area under Receiver Operating Characteristics curves (AUROC for PCWP were determined. RESULTS: PCWP-LVEDP correlation was moderate (r = 0.57. PCWP-LVEDP calibration was poor (Bland-Altman limits of agreement -17.2 to 11.4 mmHg; mean bias -2.87 mmHg. 59 patients (58.4% had pulmonary hypertension; 15 (25.4% of those met pre-capillary PH criteria based on PCWP. However, if LVEDP was used instead of PCWP, 7/15 patients (46.6% met criteria for PVH rather than pre-capillary PH. When restricting analysis to patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance of >3 Wood units (n = 22, 10 patients (45.4% were classified as pre-capillary PH based on PCWP ≤15 mmHg. However, if LVEDP was used, 4/10 patients (40% were reclassified as PVH. Among patients with any type of pulmonary hypertension, PCWP discriminated moderately between high and normal LVEDP (AUROC, 0.81; 95%CI 0.69-0.94. PCWP-LVEDP correlation was particularly poor in patients with COPD or obesity. CONCLUSION: Reliance on PCWP rather than LVEDP results in misclassification of veterans as having pre-capillary PH rather than PVH in almost 50% of cases. This is clinically relevant, as

  19. Continuous positive airway pressure increases haemoglobin O2 saturation after acute but not prolonged altitude exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    p. Agostoni, Caldara G, Bussotti M, Revera M, Valentini M, Gregorini F, Faini A, Lombardi C, Bilo G, Giuliano A, Veglia F, Savia G, P.A. Modesti, Mancia G, Parati G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: It is unknown whether subclinical high-altitude pulmonary oedema reduces spontaneously after prolonged altitude exposure. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) removes extravascular lung fluids and improves haemoglobin oxygen saturation in acute cardiogenic oedema. We evaluated the presence of pulmonary extravascular fluid increase by assessing CPAP effects on haemoglobin oxygen saturation under acute and prolonged altitude exposure. We applied 7 cm H2O CPAP for 30 min to he...

  20. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text

  1. The influence of low-permeability cap on capillary pressure during pumping in unconfined aquifer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄辉; 钱家忠; 匡星星; 陈冰宇; 马雷; 吴亚楠

    2013-01-01

    The pumping test in an unconfined aquifer with and without a low-permeability soil was studied experimentally to reveal the influence of the negative air pressure (NP) caused by the upper layer on the water content(w), the water pressure(Pw), as well as on the capillary pressure(Pc). The study demonstrates that the NP generated in the vadose zone during pumping in the capper aquifer has a significant influence onw,wP andPc. ThecP obtained from the capped aquifer is smaller than that without the upper layer. After the NP reaches a peak, the influence of the NP onPc is gradually declined as the air inflows through the upper layer which makes the NP gradually return to zero. When the air pressure returns to the atmospheric pressure,Pc in the vadose zone is only correlated withPw, the same as the case with no upper layer.

  2. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriacou, P A [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Shafqat, K [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University, London EC1V 0HB (United Kingdom); Pal, S K [St Andrew' s Centre for Plastic Surgery and Burns, Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, CM1 7ET (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO{sub 2}) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO{sub 2} sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures

  3. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriacou, P. A.; Shafqat, K.; Pal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  4. Arterial blood oxygen saturation during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse oximetry has been one of the most significant technological advances in clinical monitoring in the last two decades. Pulse oximetry is a non-invasive photometric technique that provides information about the arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate, and has widespread clinical applications. When peripheral perfusion is poor, as in states of hypovolaemia, hypothermia and vasoconstriction, oxygenation readings become unreliable or cease. The problem arises because conventional pulse oximetry sensors must be attached to the most peripheral parts of the body, such as finger, ear or toe, where pulsatile flow is most easily compromised. Pulse oximeters estimate arterial oxygen saturation by shining light at two different wavelengths, red and infrared, through vascular tissue. In this method the ac pulsatile photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal associated with cardiac contraction is assumed to be attributable solely to the arterial blood component. The amplitudes of the red and infrared ac PPG signals are sensitive to changes in arterial oxygen saturation because of differences in the light absorption of oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin at these two wavelengths. From the ratios of these amplitudes, and the corresponding dc photoplethysmographic components, arterial blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is estimated. Hence, the technique of pulse oximetry relies on the presence of adequate peripheral arterial pulsations, which are detected as photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion on photoplethysmographic signals and arterial blood oxygen saturation using a custom made finger blood oxygen saturation PPG/SpO2 sensor and a commercial finger pulse oximeter. Blood oxygen saturation values from the custom oxygen saturation sensor and a commercial finger oxygen saturation sensor were recorded from 14 healthy volunteers at various induced brachial pressures. Both pulse

  5. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm−1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm

  6. Saturated steams pressure of HfCl4-KCl molten mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bellows null pressure gauge and the dynamic method were used to measure the total and partial pressures of saturated vapors of individual components of molten HfCl4-KCl mixtures, as a function of temperature (260 to 1000 deg C) and composition (1.9 to 64.3 mol.% HfCl4). Empirical equations expressing the relationship between pressure and temperature are presented. It is shown that in molten mixtures of hafnium tetrachloride with chlorides of alkaline metals its partial pressure dramatically increases when potassium chloride substitutes for cesium chloride

  7. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Wooseok; Barrett, Matthew; Brooks, Carla; Rivera, Andrew; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Wagner, David M.; Zenhausern, Frederic

    2015-12-01

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30-100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis.

  8. An air-pressure-free elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new elastomeric valve for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The valve functions include metering to capture a designated volume of biological sample into a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, sealing to preserve the sample during PCR cycling, and transfer of the PCR-products and on-chip formamide post-processing for the analysis of DNA fragments by capillary gel electrophoresis. This new valve differs from prior art polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) valves in that the valve is not actuated externally by air-pressure or vacuum so that it simplifies a DNA analysis system by eliminating the need for an air-pressure or vacuum source, and off-cartridge solenoid valves, control circuit boards and software. Instead, the new valve is actuated by a thermal cycling peltier assembly integrated within the hardware instrument that tightly comes in contact with a microfluidic cartridge for thermal activation during PCR, so that it spontaneously closes the valve without an additional actuator system. The valve has bumps in the designated locations so that it has a self-alignment that does not require precise alignment of a valve actuator. Moreover, the thickness of the new valve is around 600 μm with an additional bump height of 400 μm so that it is easy to handle and very feasible to fabricate by injection molding compared to other PDMS valves whose thicknesses are around 30–100 μm. The new valve provided over 95% of metering performance in filling the fixed volume of the PCR chamber, preserved over 97% of the sample volume during PCR, and showed very comparable capillary electrophoresis peak heights to the benchtop assay tube controls with very consistent transfer volume of the PCR-product and on-chip formamide. The new valve can perform a core function for integrated nucleic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. (paper)

  9. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO2 gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO2 flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO2 injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO2 relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO2/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO2/oil ratio show CO2-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO2. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected CO2 than are any of the individual images of change in

  10. Saturated vapor pressure above the amalgam of alkali metals in discharge lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, S. V.

    2011-12-01

    A theoretical and numerical analysis of the evaporation process of two-component compounds in vapors of alkali metals in discharge lamps is presented. Based on the developed mathematical model of calculation of saturated vapor pressure of the metal above the amalgam, dependences of mass fractions of the components in the discharge volume on design parameters and thermophysical characteristics of the lamp are obtained.

  11. MODEL FOR HYSTERETIC CONSTITUTIVE RELATIONS GOVERNING MULTIPHASE FLOW. 1. SATURATION-PRESSURE RELATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In these companion papers, a general theoretical model is presented for the description of functional relationships between relative permeability k, fluid saturation S, and pressure P in two- or three-phase (e.g., air-water or air-oil-water) porous media systems subject to arbitr...

  12. Constant pressure-assisted head-column field-amplified sample injection in combination with in-capillary derivatization for enhancing the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Na; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Zaifang; Zhang, Huige; Zhou, Ximin; Chen, Xingguo

    2009-05-15

    In this work, a novel method combining constant pressure-assisted head-column field-amplified sample injection (PA-HC-FASI) with in-capillary derivatization was developed for enhancing the sensitivity of capillary electrophoresis. PA-HC-FASI uses an appropriate positive pressure to counterbalance the electroosmotic flow in the capillary column during electrokinetic injection, while taking advantage of the field amplification in the sample matrix and the water of the "head column". Accordingly, the analytes were stacked at the stationary boundary between water and background electrolyte. After 600s PA-HC-FASI, 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole as derivatization reagent was injected, followed by an electrokinetic step (5kV, 45s) to enhance the mixing efficiency of analytes and reagent plugs. Standing a specified time of 10min for derivatization reaction under 35 degrees C, then the capillary temperature was cooled to 25 degrees C and the derivatives were immediately separated and determined under 25 degrees C. By investigating the variables of the presented approach in detail, on-line preconcentration, derivatization and separation could be automatically operated in one run and required no modification of current CE commercial instrument. Moreover, the sensitivity enhancement factor of 520 and 800 together with the detection limits of 16.32 and 6.34pg/mL was achieved for model compounds: glufosinate and aminomethylphosphonic acid, demonstrating the high detection sensitivity of the presented method. PMID:19342058

  13. Impact of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation curves: experiments and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Moura, M; Måløy, Knut Jørgen; Schäfer, G; Toussaint, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the influence of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships, by analyzing the drainage of a two-phase flow from a quasi-2D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the direct visualization of the invasion pattern during flow, and is initially saturated with a viscous liquid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the liquid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, displacing the liquid which leaves the system from an outlet on the opposite side. Pressure measurements and images of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. We show that this relationship depends on the system size and aspect ratio. The effects of the system's boundaries on this relationship are measured experimentally and compared with simulations produced using an invasion percolation algorithm. The pressure build up at the beginning and end of the invasion process are particularly affected by the boundaries of...

  14. CONSTRUCTION OF EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION FOR RESEARCHING OF DENSITY AND SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE (SVP OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko P. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The most important physical properties that characterize the substance are density and saturated vapor pressure (SVP. These parameters are required for the development of new technical processes in the petroleum and chemical industries, design of pipelines, pumping and fuel equipment, etc. Existing methods for calculating of density near and on the saturation lines are imperfect, and finding of the analytic dependence of SVP of petroleum products from all defining parameters associated with great difficulties. The purpose of present work is an experimental research and development of methods for calculating the density (specific volume near and on saturation lines, and saturated vapor pressure of gasoline straight-run fraction derived from petroleums from three fields: Mangyshlaksky, Trinity-Anastasevsky and West Siberian. The choice of objects for research is due to the necessity of creating methods for calculating of density and SVP of oils obtained from various hydrocarbon group composition petroleums. Area of state parameters in the present work by temperature (20 ÷ 320°C and pressure (0,03 ÷ 30 MPa provides the ability to research gasoline fractions to supercritical regions. Measurement of density and SVP of petroleum fractions performed with help of a specially created for this purpose experimental installation

  15. The influence of impurities on the saturated vapor pressure hydrocarbon media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.Б. Степанов

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  Here are presented experimental result due to the research of the impact non – volatile admixture on the pressure of saturated steam of Hydrocarbonic medium. It is showed, that in their presence is watched the positive deflection from ideal state due to the Raul's low. Also is watched an appropriate decrease of the quantity of positive deflection of saturated steam from Raul's law in Hydrocarbonic consequence C­6H14 - C13H28 – C16H34,, which could be explained by increasing of depressive intermolecula cooperation energy with increasing of molecule's possibility to polarize.

  16. Establishing a Quantitative Functional Relationship between Capillary Pressure Saturation and Interfacial Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to continue our collaborative research focused on advanced technologies for subsurface contamination problems. Our approach combines new multi-phase flow theory, novel laboratory experiments, and non-traditional computational simulators to investigate practical approaches to include interfacial areas in descriptions of subsurface contaminant transport and remediation. Because all inter-phase mass transfer occurs at fluid-fluid interfaces, and it is this inter-phase mass transfer that leads to the difficult, long-term ground-water contamination problems, it is critical to include interfacial behavior in the problem description. This is currently lacking in all standard models of complex ground-water contamination problems. In our earlier project, we developed tools appropriate for inclusion of interfacial areas under equilibrium conditions. These include advanced laboratory techniques and targeted computational experiments that validated certain key theoretical conjecture s. However, it has become clear that to include interfacial behavior fully into a description of the multi-phase flow and contamination problems, the fully dynamic case must be considered. Therefore, we need to develop both experimental and computational tools that can capture the dynamic nature of interfacial movements. Development and application of such tools will allow the theory to be evaluated, and will lead to significant improvements in our understanding of complex subsurface contamination problems, thereby allowing us to develop and evaluate improved remediation technologies

  17. Establishing a Quantitative Functional Relationship between Capillary Pressure Saturation and Interfacial Area; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to continue our collaborative research focused on advanced technologies for subsurface contamination problems. Our approach combines new multi-phase flow theory, novel laboratory experiments, and non-traditional computational simulators to investigate practical approaches to include interfacial areas in descriptions of subsurface contaminant transport and remediation. Because all inter-phase mass transfer occurs at fluid-fluid interfaces, and it is this inter-phase mass transfer that leads to the difficult, long-term ground-water contamination problems, it is critical to include interfacial behavior in the problem description. This is currently lacking in all standard models of complex ground-water contamination problems. In our earlier project, we developed tools appropriate for inclusion of interfacial areas under equilibrium conditions. These include advanced laboratory techniques and targeted computational experiments that validated certain key theoretical conjecture s. However, it has become clear that to include interfacial behavior fully into a description of the multi-phase flow and contamination problems, the fully dynamic case must be considered. Therefore, we need to develop both experimental and computational tools that can capture the dynamic nature of interfacial movements. Development and application of such tools will allow the theory to be evaluated, and will lead to significant improvements in our understanding of complex subsurface contamination problems, thereby allowing us to develop and evaluate improved remediation technologies

  18. Properties of meso-Erythritol; phase state, accommodation coefficient and saturation vapour pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, Eva; Tschiskale, Morten; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Saturation vapour pressure and the associated temperature dependence (enthalpy ΔH), are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. Generally, the atmospheric aerosol community lack experimentally determined values of these properties for relevant organic aerosol compounds (Bilde et al., 2015). In this work we have studied the organic aerosol component meso-Erythritol. Methods Sub-micron airborne particles of meso-Erythritol were generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, dried, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol was selected using a differential mobility analyser. The particles were then allowed to evaporate in the ARAGORN (AaRhus Atmospheric Gas phase OR Nano particle) flow tube. It is a temperature controlled 3.5 m long stainless steel tube with an internal diameter of 0.026 m (Bilde et al., 2003, Zardini et al., 2010). Changes in particle size as function of evaporation time were determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. Physical properties like air flow, temperature, humidity and pressure were controlled and monitored on several places in the setup. The saturation vapour pressures were then inferred from the experimental results in the MATLAB® program AU_VaPCaP (Aarhus University_Vapour Pressure Calculation Program). Results Following evaporation, meso-Erythriol under some conditions showed a bimodal particle size distribution indicating the formation of particles of two different phase states. The issue of physical phase state, along with critical assumptions e.g. the accommodation coefficient in the calculations of saturation vapour pressures of atmospheric relevant compounds, will be discussed. Saturation vapour pressures from the organic compound meso-Erythritol will be presented at temperatures between 278 and 308 K, and results will be discussed in the context of atmospheric chemistry. References Bilde, M. et al., (2015), Chemical Reviews, 115 (10), 4115-4156. Bilde, M. et. al., (2003

  19. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten type capillary pressure curves

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Dominic, David F; Mehnert, Edward; Okwen, Roland T

    2015-01-01

    Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Previously we showed how the dynamics of a CO2 plume is influenced by the multi-scale stratal architecture in deep saline reservoirs. The results strongly suggest that representing small-scale features is critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. Here we present the result of simulation of CO2 trapping using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, for the capillary pressure curves. We showed that capillary trapping and dissolution rates are very different for the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches when heterogeneity and hysteresis are both represented.

  20. A FORTRAN program for interpretation of relative permeability from unsteady-state displacements with capillary pressure included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udegbunam, E.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a FORTRAN program for the determination of two-phase relative permeabilities from unsteady-state displacement data with capillary pressure terms included. The interpretative model employed in this program combines the simultaneous solution of a variant of the fractional flow equation which includes a capillary pressure term and an integro-differential equation derived from Darcy's law without assuming the simplified Buckley-Leverett flow. The incorporation of capillary pressure in the governing equations dispenses with the high flowrate experimental requirements normally employed to overcome capillarity effects. An illustrative example is presented herein which implements this program for the determination of oil/water relative permeabilities from a sandstone core sample. Results obtained compares favorably with results previously given in the literature. ?? 1991.

  1. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-06-10

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO{sub 2} flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO{sub 2} injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO{sub 2} relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio show CO{sub 2}-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO{sub 2}. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of

  2. Critical flow in small nozzles for saturated and subcooled water at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critical flow rate measurements of 4 mm and 16 mm nozzles have been performed with saturated and subcooled water at high pressure. The steady state and transient critical flow tests were conducted by discharging the fluid from a pressurized vessel through a blowdown leg. The fluid stagnation conditions upstream of the nozzle were measured by a gamma densitometer, thermocouple, and pressure transducer. The pressure and temperature of the tests range from 4.5 MPa to 15.0 MPa and from 530 K to 560 K, respectively. The results show that the flow upstream of the nozzle is stratified. The discharge mass flux obtained by this experiment is in good agreement with General Electric (GE) critical flow test data and Henry-Fauske and Burnell critical flow model predictions using a multiplier of 1.0 +- 0.3

  3. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, P.; Piotrowska, E.; Gary, G.

    2015-09-01

    Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm) Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about - 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  4. Saturated fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in laminar high-pressure flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Campbell D.; King, Galen B.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) for OH concentration measurements in high pressure flames was studied theoretically and experimentally. Using a numerical model describing the interaction of hydroxyl with nonuniform laser excitation, the effect of pressure on the validity of the balanced cross-rate model was studied along with the sensitivity of the depopulation of the laser-coupled levels to the ratio of rate coefficients describing: (1) electronic quenching to (sup 2) Sigma (+) (v double prime greater than 0), and (2) vibrational relaxation from v double prime greater than 0 to v double prime = 0. At sufficiently high pressures and near-saturated conditions, the total population of the laser-coupled levels reaches an asymptotic value, which is insensitive to the degree of saturation. When the ratio of electronic quenching to vibrational relaxation is small and the rate of coefficients for rotational transfer in the ground and excited electronic states are nearly the same, the balanced cross-rate model remains a good approximation for all pressures. When the above ratio is large, depopulation of the laser-coupled levels becomes significant at high pressures, and thus the balanced cross-rate model no longer holds. Under these conditions, however, knowledge of the depletion of the laser-coupled levels can be used to correct the model. A combustion facility for operation up to 20 atm was developed to allow LSF measurements of OH in high pressure flames. Using this facility, partial saturation in laminar high pressure (less than or equal to 12.3 atm) C2H6/O2/N2 flames was achieved. To evaluate the limits of the balanced cross-rate model, absorption and calibrated LSF measurements at 3.1 and 6.1 atm were compared. The fluorescence voltages were calibrated with absorption measurements in an atmospheric flame and corrected for their finite sensitivity to quenching with: (1) estimated quenching rate coefficients, and (2) an in situ measurement from a

  5. Solubility of hydrogen in high temperature liquid water at pressures above saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved hydrogen is a key component in PWR primary chemistry. In many cases (calculation of an hydrogen electrode potential, estimation of solid phase stability), the hydrogen fugacity is a starting point. This value can be calculated from the dissolved hydrogen concentration by using Henry's law coefficient. A robust semi-empirical correlation is available to estimate Henry’s law coefficient for hydrogen in water as a function of temperature from 273.15 K to 636 K, but it is valid only on the saturation curve. A correction term for the effect of pressure (Poynting effect), can be added if the partial molar volume of dissolved hydrogen is know. However this is a complex procedure which is not widely used. An important feature of correlations for Henry's law coefficient is the asymptotic behavior near the critical point. Asymptotic equations were theoretically derived and show a linear dependence on the density of liquid water along the saturation curve. It was experimentally observed that this linear dependence is still observed far away from the critical point, and a correlation was derived based on the asymptotic behavior. It was later shown that this correlation was valid for any direction from the critical point, except for the critical isochore. The correlation has the following form: T In (kH/f1) = A + B(ρ1 - ρ1c) + CTρ1 exp[(273.15 - T)/τ]. Where T is the temperature in K, kH is Henry's law coefficient, f1 is the fugacity of pure water A , B , and C are coefficients, ρ1 is the density of pure water at the pressure of interest, ρ1c is the critical density (322 g.L-1) and τ is a parameter taken equal to 50 K. The density of water as a function of temperature and pressure can be found in steam tables, or calculated by the IAPWS 95 formulation of the properties of water and steam. The fugacity of pure water, f1, can also be calculated from the IAPWS 95 formulation. Here, we verify that this correlation can be used to predict Henry

  6. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J. [Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-11-02

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH{sub 4}/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H{sub 2} into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, CH, H{sub β}, and H{sub α} were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T{sub 2g} phonon at 1333 cm{sup −1} peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit “coral” and “cauliflower-like” morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  7. Measurements on Melting Pressure, Metastable Solid Phases, and Molar Volume of Univariant Saturated Helium Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysti, J.; Manninen, M. S.; Tuoriniemi, J.

    2014-06-01

    A concentration-saturated helium mixture at the melting pressure consists of two liquid phases and one or two solid phases. The equilibrium system is univariant, whose properties depend uniquely on temperature. Four coexisting phases can exist on singular points, which are called quadruple points. As a univariant system, the melting pressure could be used as a thermometric standard. It would provide some advantages compared to the current reference, namely pure He, especially at the lowest temperatures below 1 mK. We have extended the melting pressure measurements of the concentration-saturated helium mixture from 10 to 460 mK. The density of the dilute liquid phase was also recorded. The effect of the equilibrium crystal structure changing from hcp to bcc was clearly seen at mK at the melting pressure MPa. We observed the existence of metastable solid phases around this point. No evidence was found for the presence of another, disputed, quadruple point at around 400 mK. The experimental results agree well with our previous calculations at low temperatures, but deviate above 200 mK.

  8. Feasibility of hydroxyl concentration measurements by laser-saturated fluorescence in high-pressure flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Campbell D.; King, Galen B.; Laurendeau, Normand M.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus

    1987-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the laser-saturated fluorescence method for measuring OH concentration in high-pressure flames is studied using calculations for the burned-gas region of a stoichiometric H2-O2 flame at 2000 K. A numerical model of the excitation dynamics of OH is developed to explore the validity of the balanced cross-rate model at higher pressures. It is shown that depopulation of the laser-coupled levels is sensitive to collisions which depopulate v-double-prime (VDP) = 0 and to rate coefficients for rotational transfer in the ground state which are smaller than those in the excited state. In particular, it is shown that the depopulation of VDP = 0, and hence the laser-coupled levels, depends on the probability of electronic quenching to vibrational levels for which VDP is greater than 0 and vibrational relaxation to VDP = 0.

  9. Heating of a fully saturated darcian half-space: Pressure generation, fluid expulsion, and phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, P.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical solutions are developed for the pressurization, expansion, and flow of one- and two-phase liquids during heating of fully saturated and hydraulically open Darcian half-spaces subjected to a step rise in temperature at its surface. For silicate materials, advective transfer is commonly unimportant in the liquid region; this is not always the case in the vapor region. Volume change is commonly more important than heat of vaporization in determining the position of the liquid-vapor interface, assuring that the temperatures cannot be determined independently of pressures. Pressure increases reach a maximum near the leading edge of the thermal front and penetrate well into the isothermal region of the body. Mass flux is insensitive to the hydraulic properties of the half-space. ?? 1984.

  10. An experimental study of constant-pressure steam injection and transient condensing flow in an air-saturated porous medium

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwers, H.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the unsteady process of constant pressure steam injection into an air–saturated porous medium is studied experimentally. To this end, vertical glass tubes are packed with dry quartz sand and injected with dry steam. The propagation of the steam front appears to be proportional to t. It is observed that the water saturation is homogeneously distributed and remains below the irreducible water saturation. Furthermore, the theoretical model of Brouwers and Li (1994) of the process i...

  11. Chart-Recorded Capillary Pulse Pressure Measurement as an Unobtrusive Means of Detecting Unspecified Frame-Specific Flaws in Programmed Instruction Sequences: An Experimental Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Lawrence E., Jr.

    Capillary pulse pressure measurement may have potential as a covert but direct means of determining a subject's level of affect as he encounters the frame-by-frame content of programed instruction. An experiment was designed which called for recording the capillary pulse pressure of subjects as they worked through some programed instruction…

  12. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    The permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs are controlled by their porosity and specific surface area. Measured permeabilities are in the range 0.025-5.3 mD and are successfully predicted by use of the Kozeny equation. In this paper we focus on the factors that control spec...

  13. Saturated vapor pressure over molten mixtures of GaCl3 and alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volatilities of GaCl3 and alkali metal chlorides over diluted (up to 3 mol %) solutions of GaCl3 in LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl were measured at 1100 K by dynamic and indirect static methods. Chemical composition of saturated vapor over the mixed melts was determined. Partial pressures of the components were calculated. Their values depend essentially on specific alkali metal cation and on concentration of GaCl3; their variation permits altering parameters of GaCl3 distillation from the salt melt in a wide range

  14. Analysis of multiple herbicides in soybeans using pressurized liquid extraction and capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several herbicides commonly used on soybeans are often difficult to extract, isolate, and quantify from the complex soybean matrix at low concentrations. Typical analytical methods for herbicide residues in soybeans are single analyte procedures using HPLC or GC after chemical derivatization. In this study, method development for the analysis of six polar herbicides in soybeans was performed using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), which is also known by the trade name, Accelerated Solvent Extraction, and capillary electrophoresis (CE). In CE, a 50 mM ammonium acetate running buffer, pH 4.75, was able to separate imazaquin (Scepter), chlorimuron-ethyl (Classic), thifensulfuronmethyl (Harmony), acifluorfen (Blazer), bentazon (Basagran), and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in a 75 mum i.d., 83 cm capillary (65 cm to detector) within 30 min at 17 kV applied voltage. Chlorsulfuron (Glean) was used as an internal standard in the analysis, and detection was by UV absorbance at 240 nm in a high-sensitivity optical cell. PLE extracts required extensive cleanup prior to CE/UV analysis. Several cleanup techniques were investigated and compared, including liquid-liquid partitioning, gel-permeation chromatography, semipreparative HPLC, and solid-phase extraction with a variety of stationary and mobile phase combinations. A combination of techniques that provided the most efficient cleanup was selected in the final method. Four of the six herbicides could be determined by the method in samples fortified at tolerance levels with average recoveries of 71% and relative standard deviation (RSD) of 11%. At a higher spiking level, all of the herbicide recoveries were 70% with %RSDs 10%, except for acifluorfen which gave more variable recoveries

  15. Measurements of the capillary trapping of super-critical carbon dioxide in Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Christopher H.; El-Maghraby, Rehab; Iglauer, Stefan; Blunt, Martin J.

    2011-03-01

    We measure primary drainage capillary pressure and the relationship between initial and residual non-wetting phase saturation for a supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2)-brine system in Berea sandstone. We use the semi-permeable disk (porous-plate) coreflood method. Brine and CO2 were equilibrated prior to injection to ensure immiscible displacement. A maximum CO2 saturation of 85% was measured for an applied capillary pressure of 296 kPa. After injection of brine the CO2 saturation dropped to 35%; this is less than the maximum trapped saturation of 48% measured in an equivalent n-decane (oil)-brine experiment. The dimensionless capillary pressure is the same to within experimental error for supercritical CO2-brine, n-decane-brine and a mercury-air system. CO2 is the non-wetting phase and significant quantities can be trapped by capillary forces. We discuss the implications for CO2 storage.

  16. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure I. Self-consistent modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, P.; Guerra, V.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents the self-consistent modeling of micro-plasmas generated in dry air using microwaves (2.45 GHz excitation frequency), within capillaries (theory for low to intermediate pressures, taking into account the presence of O‑ ions in addition to several positive ions, the dominant species being O{}2+ , NO+ and O+ . The low-pressure small-radius conditions considered yield very-intense reduced electric fields (∼600–1500 Td), coherent with species losses controlled by transport and wall recombination, and kinetic mechanisms strongly dependent on electron-impact collisions. The charged-particle transport losses are strongly influenced by the presence of the negative ion, despite its low-density (∼10% of the electron density). For electron densities in the range (1–≤ft. 4\\right)× {{10}12} cm‑3, the system exhibits high dissociation degrees for O2 (∼20–70%, depending on the working conditions, in contrast with the  ∼0.1% dissociation obtained for N2), a high concentration of O2(a) (∼1014 cm‑3) and NO(X) (5× {{10}14} cm‑3) and low ozone production (<{{10}-3}% ).

  17. The capillary hysteresis model HYSTR: User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential disposal of nuclear waste in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has generated increased interest in the study of fluid flow through unsaturated media. In the near future, large-scale field tests will be conducted at the Yucca Mountain site, and work is now being done to design and analyze these tests. As part of these efforts a capillary hysteresis model has been developed. A computer program to calculate the hysteretic relationship between capillary pressure φ and liquid saturation (S1) has been written that is designed to be easily incorporated into any numerical unsaturated flow simulator that computes capillary pressure as a function of liquid saturation. This report gives a detailed description of the model along with information on how it can be interfaced with a transport code. Although the model was developed specifically for calculations related to nuclear waste disposal, it should be applicable to any capillary hysteresis problem for which the secondary and higher order scanning curves can be approximated from the first order scanning curves. HYSTR is a set of subroutines to calculate capillary pressure for a given liquid saturation under hysteretic conditions

  18. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forquin P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about − 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  19. Vibration pore water pressure characteristics of saturated fine sand under partially drained condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王炳辉; 陈国兴

    2008-01-01

    Vibration pore water pressure characteristics of saturated fine sand under partially drained condition were investigated through stress-controlled cyclic triaxial tests employed varied fine content of samples and loading frequency. In order to simulate the partially drained condition, one-way drainage for sample was implemented when cyclic loading was applied. The results show that the vibration pore water pressure’s response leads the axial stress and axial strain responses, and is lagged behind or simultaneous with axial strain-rate’s response for all samples in this research. In addition, the satisfactory linear relationship between vibration pore water pressure amplitude and axial strain-rate amplitude is also obtained. It means that the direct cause of vibration pore water pressure generation under partially drained conditions is not the axial stress or axial strain but the axial strain-rate. The lag-phase between pore water pressure and axial strain-rate increases with the increase of the fine content or the loading frequency.

  20. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apelblat, Alexander [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: apelblat@bgu.ac.il; Korin, Eli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2007-07-15

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems.

  1. The vapour pressures over saturated aqueous solutions of cadmium chloride, cadmium bromide, cadmium iodide, cadmium nitrate, and cadmium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapour pressures of water over saturated solutions of cadmium salts (chloride, bromide, iodide, nitrate, and sulphate) were determined over the temperature range 280 K to 322 K and compared with the literature data. The vapour pressures determined were used to obtain the water activities, osmotic coefficients and the molar enthalpies of vaporization in the (cadmium salt + water) systems

  2. The influence of polydimethylsiloxane curing ratio on capillary pressure in microfluidic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viola, Ilenia, E-mail: ilenia.viola@nano.cnr.it [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Zacheo, Antonella [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dip. Matematica e Fisica ' Ennio De Giorgi' , via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, Valentina [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arico, Antonino S. [CNR-ITAE Institute, via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse, I-98126 Messina (Italy); Cortese, Barbara [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Manca, Michele [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Italian Institute of Technology (IIT), Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies (Italy); Zocco, Anna [STMicroelectronics, MFD Division, Application Laboratory Lecce, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, Antonietta [CNR, Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Rinaldi, Ross [National Nanotechnology Laboratory-Institute Nanoscience-CNR (NNL-CNR NANO), via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Universita del Salento, Dip. Matematica e Fisica ' Ennio De Giorgi' , via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Investigations on surface properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are justified by its large application ranges especially as coating polymer in fluidic devices. At a micrometer scale, the liquid dynamics is strongly modified by interactions with a solid surface. A crucial parameter for this process is microchannel wettability that can be tuned by acting on surface chemistry and topography. In literature, a number of multi-step, time and cost consuming chemical and physical procedures are reported. Here we selectively modify both wetting and mechanical properties by a single step treatment. Changes of PDMS surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy and the effects of interface properties on the liquid displacement inside a microfluidic system were evaluated. The negative capillary pressure obtained tailoring the PDMS wettability is believed to be promising to accurately control sample leakage inside integrated lab-on-chip by acting on the liquid confinement and thus to reduce the sample volume, liquid drying as well as cross-contamination during the operation.

  3. Saturated vapour pressure of tris-hexafluoroacetylacetonates of metals of the first transition series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cr, Co, Mn, V, Fe tris-hexafluoroacetylacetonates are synthesized. Compounds prepared are characterized by the data of element analysis, IR-spectroscopy, measuring the melting point. The saturated vapour pressure of the compounds prepared has been measured by the statistical method with a membrane zero-gage. Thermodynamic parameters ΔHT0 and ΔST0 are calculated for compound sublimation and evaporation processes. The conclusion is made that the main factor determining complex volatility is the ligand structure, the second one is the nature of a central atom. The degree of oxidation of the central atom, stoichiometry of the complex, the type of a donor atom, the presence of additional ligands affect volatility of these compounds

  4. Capillary flow through heat-pipe wicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are obtained for the capillary-pressure limit and permeability of a fibrous wick in terms of the porosity and fiber diameter. Hysteresis in capillary pressure is included through the introduction of an empirical hysteresis constant. A partial-saturation model based on the statistical distribution of local porosity requires an additional empirical constant, the standard deviation. The theory is compared to results of a beta-ray absorption experiment that measured the liquid content of a partially saturated wick and to results of permeability measurements on partially and fully saturated wicks. A simple wick-weighing experiment is described that yields values for the empirical hysteresis constant and the standard deviation. Theoretical results are used to design an optimum wick.

  5. Pressurized liquid extraction–capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry for the analysis of polar antioxidants in rosemary extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero, Miguel; Arráez-Román, David; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Kendler, Ernst; Gius, Beatrice; Raggi, Maria Augusta; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    A method based on capillary electrophoresis–electrospray–mass spectrometry (CE–ESI–MS) was developed to qualitatively characterize natural antioxidants from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) in different fractions obtained by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using subcritical water. The parameters of CE–ESI–MS were adjusted allowing the separation and characterization of different compounds from rosemary in the PLE fractions. These parameters for CE are kind, pH and concentrati...

  6. An examination of the saturation microstructures achieved in ultrafine-grained metals processed by high-pressure torsion

    OpenAIRE

    Shima Sabbaghianrad; Jittraporn Wongsa-Ngam; Megumi Kawasaki; Terence G. Langdon

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on two commercial alloys, a Cu–0.1%Zr alloy and an Al-7075 aluminum alloy, to investigate the significance of the saturation microstructure which is achieved after processing by high-pressure torsion (HPT). Samples were processed by HPT and also by a combination of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) followed by HPT. The results show that the saturation conditions are dependent upon the grain size in the material immediately prior to the HPT processing. Additional...

  7. Flow paths and chemical reactivity of CO2 in carbonates using Mercury-Intrusion Capillary Pressure data and dimensionless numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, S.; Dvorkin, J. P.; Mavko, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Experiments performed earlier by Vialle and Vanorio (2011) [1] have showed that the injection of CO2-rich water (pH=3.2) in various calcite limestones lead to heterogeneous dissolution of the pore structure, inducing secondary porosity and changing the rock stiffness. The presence of oil in the pore space affects the magnitude of these changes by lowering the reactive surface area. We present here a semi-quantitative analysis at the mesoscale to investigate how different initial pore microgeometries and heterogeneities in pore microgeometry affect the fluid-rock interactions. In particular, we aim at quantitatively explaining (1) why, in clean samples, higher-porosity micrite with rounded grains appears to be more affected by dissolution than tight micrite and spar cement and (2) why, for the same number of pore volumes of fluid injected, the magnitude of the changes in porosity (and subsequently elastic properties) differs among the studied rock samples. Rock microgeometry is studied by classical rock-physics methods, He-pycnometry and Mercury-Intrusion Capillary Pressure (MICP) tests, as well as by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging. Experiments were performed on subsamples (~0.5cm3) extracted from core plugs (~12cm3): two Fontainebleau sandstones, to serve as benchmarks, and two calcite carbonates from two different geological formations. In order to relate pore microgeometry to flow paths and chemical reactivity of CO2 in carbonate rocks, we chose to work at a scale that lies between the pore scale and the core scale. The method consists of physically subdividing the core plugs under examination into subsets based on the pore-throat sizes; these subsets correspond to three types of microstructure: "macropores", "microporous rounded micrite", and "spar cement"/"tight micrite". The dimensionless Péclet (Pe) and Damkhöler (Da) numbers, defined as the ratio between the advection rate and the diffusion rate, and as the ratio between the reaction rate and

  8. Reducing Mechanical Formation Damage by Minimizing Interfacial Tension and Capillary Pressure in Tight Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tight gas reservoirs incur problems and significant damage caused by low permeability during drilling, completion, stimulation and production. They require advanced improvement techniques to achieve flow gas at optimum rates. Water blocking damage (phase Trapping/retention of fluids) is a form of mechanical formation damage mechanism, which is caused by filtrate invasion in drilling operations mostly in fracturing. Water blocking has a noticeable impact on formation damage in gas reservoirs which tends to decrease relative permeability near the wellbore. Proper evaluation of damage and the factors which influence its severity is essential to optimize well productivity. Reliable data regarding interfacial tension between gas and water is required in order to minimize mechanical formation damage potential and to optimize gas production. This study was based on the laboratory experiments of interfacial tension by rising drop method between gas-brine, gas-condensate and gas-brine. The results showed gas condensate has low interfacial tension value 6 – 11 dynes/cm when compared to gas-brine and gas- diesel which were 44 – 58 dynes/cm and 14 – 19 dynes/cm respectively. In this way, the capillary pressure of brine-gas system was estimated as 0.488 psi, therefore diesel-gas system was noticed about 0.164 psi and 0.098 psi for condensate-gas system. A forecast model was used by using IFT values to predict the phase trapping which shows less severe phase trapping damage in case of condensate than diesel and brine. A reservoir simulation study was also carried out in order to better understand the effect of hysteresis on well productivity and flow efficiency affected due to water blocking damage in tight gas reservoirs

  9. The relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity of pressure cores obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Jin, Y.; Kida, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Fujii, T.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    P-wave velocity is an important parameter to estimate gas hydrate saturation in sediments. In this study, the relationship between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity have been analyzed using natural hydrate-bearing-sediments obtained in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The sediment samples were collected by the Hybrid Pressure Coring System developed by Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology during June-July 2012, aboard the deep sea drilling vessel CHIKYU. P-wave velocity was measured on board by the Pressure Core Analysis and Transfer System developed by Geotek Ltd. The samples were maintained at a near in-situ pressure condition during coring and measurement. After the measurement, the samples were stored core storage chambers and transported to MHRC under pressure. The samples were manipulated and cut by the Pressure-core Non-destructive Analysis Tools or PNATs developed by MHRC. The cutting sections were determined on the basis of P-wave velocity and visual observations through an acrylic window equipped in the PNATs. The cut samples were depressurized to measure gas volume for saturation calculations. It was found that P-wave velocity correlates well with hydrate saturation and can be reproduced by the hydrate frame component model. Using pressure cores and pressure core analysis technology, nondestructive and near in-situ correlation between gas hydrate saturation and P-wave velocity can be obtained. This study was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan.

  10. Measurements of capillary pressure and electric permittivity of gas-water systems in porous media at elevated pressures: application to geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and wetting behavior in coal

    OpenAIRE

    Plug, W.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in aquifers and coal layers is a promising technique to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Considering the reservoir properties, e.g. wettability, heterogeneity and the caprocks sealing capacity, the capillary pressure is an important measure to evaluate the efficiency, the success and the safety of storage applications. In this research, the capillary pressure behavior was investigated for the CO2-water system in quartz and coal. Measurements were conducted at pressures an...

  11. A rocking multianvil: elimination of chemical segregation in fluid-saturated high-pressure experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Max W.; Ulmer, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Fluid saturated high-pressure experiments often result in strongly zoned experimental charges, this hinders experimentation in chemically homogeneous systems which in turn has serious consequences on equilibration, reaction progress, and (apparent) phase stabilities. In order to overcome these problems, a 600-ton press accommodating either a multianvil or end-loaded piston cylinder module has been mounted in such a way that it can be turned by 180°, thus inverting its position in the gravity field. During turning, hydraulic pressure, heating power, and cooling water remain connected allowing fully controlled pressures and temperatures during experiments. A series of experiments at 13 GPa, 950°C, on a serpentine bulk composition in the MgO-SiO 2-H 2O system demonstrates that continuous turning at a rate of 2 turns/min results in a nearly homogeneous charge composed of phase E + enstatite. The same experiment at static conditions resulted in four mineral zones: quench phase E, enstatite, enstatite + phase E, and phase E + phase A. Phase A disappears in experiments at a turning rate ≥1 turn/min. A static 15-min experiment shows that zonation already forms within this short time span. Placing two short capsules within a single static experiment reveals that the fluid migrates to the hot spot in each capsule and is not gravitationally driven toward the top. The zonation pattern follows isotherms within the capsule, and the degree of zonation increases with temperature gradient (measured as 10 °C within a capsule) and run time. Our preferred interpretation is that Soret diffusion causes a density-stratified fluid within the capsule that does not convect in a static experiment and results in temperature dependant chemical zonation. The aggravation of zonation and appearance of additional phases with run time can be explained with a dissolution-reprecipitation process where the cold spot of the capsule is relatively MgO enriched and the hot spot relatively SiO 2 and H

  12. Thermodynamics of the multicomponent vapor-liquid equilibrium under capillary pressure difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    , not for the multicomponent mixtures. The importance is emphasized on the space of the intensive variables P, T and mu (i), where the laws of capillary equilibrium have a simple geometrical interpretation. We formulate thermodynamic problems specific to such an equilibrium, and outline changes to be...

  13. Phase Envelope Calculations for Reservoir Fluids in the Presence of Capillary Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemus, Diego; Yan, Wei; Michelsen, Michael L.;

    2015-01-01

    Reservoir fluids are multicomponent mixtures in confined spaces, where the role of capillary force becomes important when the average pore size is on the order of tens of nanometers, such as in tight rocks and shale. We present an algorithm for calculating the phase envelope of multicomponent mix...

  14. Determination of acid dissociation constants of triazole fungicides by pressure assisted capillary electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konášová, R.; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Kašička, Václav

    Ljubljana: National Institute of Chemistry, 2015 - (Vovk, I.; Glavnik, V.; Albreht, A.). s. 102 ISBN 978-961-6104-28-9. [ISSS 2015. International Symposium on Separation Sciences /21./. 30.06.2015-03.07.2015, Ljubljana] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : solvent effect * stability constant * affinity capillary electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  15. Influence of clay and silica on permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Birte; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2002-01-01

    The permeability and capillary entry pressure of chalk reservoirs are controlled by their porosity and specific surface area. Measured permeabilities are in the range 0.025-5.3 mD and are successfully predicted by use of the Kozeny equation. In this paper we focus on the factors that control...... specific surface area. Fifty-nine Tor and Ekofisk Formation chalk samples from five North Sea chalk reservoirs were investigated. All contain quartz and clay minerals, most commonly kaolinite and smectite, with trace amounts of illite. The contents of calcite and quartz are inversely correlated and both...

  16. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment. (paper)

  17. An examination of the saturation microstructures achieved in ultrafine-grained metals processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Sabbaghianrad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were conducted on two commercial alloys, a Cu–0.1%Zr alloy and an Al-7075 aluminum alloy, to investigate the significance of the saturation microstructure which is achieved after processing by high-pressure torsion (HPT. Samples were processed by HPT and also by a combination of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP followed by HPT. The results show that the saturation conditions are dependent upon the grain size in the material immediately prior to the HPT processing. Additional grain refinement may be achieved in HPT by initially processing the material to produce an ultrafine-grain size before conducting the processing by HPT.

  18. Vapor Pressure of Saturated Aqueous Solutions of Potassium Sulfate from 310 K to 345 K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias O. Maggiolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental evaluation of the vapor pressure of saturated aqueous solutions of potassium sulfate was carried out in the range of temperatures 310 K≤T≤345 K. The experimental data were used to determine the corresponding values of the water activity in such solutions. The analytical expressions as a function of temperature of both, vapor pressure and water activity, were obtained from the correlation of the experimental results. The vapor pressure expression was also extrapolated to a different temperature range in order to make a comparison with the results obtained by other authors.

  19. Tilting oil-water contact in the chalk of Tyra Field as interpreted from capillary pressure data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Rana, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    logging data in the remaining wells. A westerly dipping oil–water contact was found from logging data. Comparison of the depth-wise trends in normalized water saturation among the different wells indicates a regional pattern: in the western side of the field, the trends correspond to a situation of...... imbibition, where the free water level overlies an interval of residual oil, whereas in the eastern part of the field, the depth-wise trends in normalized water saturation correspond to a situation of drainage. The free water level apparently dips to the east due either to hydrodynamic action or to pressure......The Tyra Field in the central North Sea is located in Palaeogene and Upper Cretaceous chalk. It contains a natural gas zone underlain by an oil leg. Based on analysis of logs and core data from ten wells drilled prior to the field being put into production, normalized water saturation depth...

  20. Determination of acid dissociation constants of triazole fungicides by pressure assisted capillary electrophoresis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konášová, Renáta; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Kašička, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1408, Aug 21 (2015), s. 243-249. ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-17224S; GA ČR GP13-21409P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : triazole fungicides * acid dissociation constant * pK(a) * capillary electrophoresis * ionic mobility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.169, year: 2014

  1. Applications Rheology of Foam Iin Porous Media At the Limiting Capillary Pressure Rhéologie des mousses en milieux poreux à la pression capillaire finale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossen W. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that, for some strongfoams, foam texture, which controls foam rheology, is in turn closely controlled by capillary pressure pc. In particular, at steady state these foams flow under conditions in which pc is nearly constant at the limiting capillary pressurepc*, water saturation and water relative permeability are virtually invariant, and the pressure gradient is proportional to water flow rate and independent of gas flow rate. This report examines some implications of these statements for cases of steady foam flow. In steady, 1D radial flow without phase change, this hypothesis implies that foam behaves as a Newtonian fluid, even though foam rheology at constant texture is strongly non-Newtonian. In a steamflood, however, evaporation of water as pressure declines in flow from an injection well could make foam appear to be shear-thickening. Complete plugging cannot occur at steady-state in a foam at pc*. Temporary plugging is possible, however, with the duration of plugging governed by the rate of water transport and rise of capillary pressure. The capillary end effect can strongly affect coreflood results at low pressure gradient. Diversion between layers differing in permeability depends on contact between the layers. If two layers are separated by an impermeable barrier, then limited data on the effect of permeability on pc* suggests there is diversion of flow into the low-permeability layer. However, if the layers are in capillary equilibrium, the difference in pc* between layers can mean virtually complete flow diversion into the high-permeability layer. Des recherches récentes laissent entendre que, pour certaines mousses fortes , la texture de la mousse, dont dépend son comportement rhéologique, est à son tour étroitement liée à la pression capillaire pc. En particulier, en régime permanent, l'écoulement de ces mousses se fait dans des conditions de pc presque constante à la pression capillaire finalepc

  2. Measurement of soil saturated hydraulic conductivity: The method of constant pressure tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field method to measure the saturated soil hydraulic conductivity is presented that does not require expensive equipment and preserves natural water flow pathways that may be bloked during soil core sampling for laboratory measurements. Vegetation must be removed from the plot prior the measurement...

  3. A fully-coupled discontinuous Galerkin method for two-phase flow in porous media with discontinuous capillary pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Bastian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we formulate and test numerically a fully-coupled discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for incompressible two-phase flow with discontinuous capillary pressure. The spatial discretization uses the symmetric interior penalty DG formulation with weighted averages and is based on a wetting-phase potential / capillary potential formulation of the two-phase flow system. After discretizing in time with diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta schemes the resulting systems of nonlinear algebraic equations are solved with Newton's method and the arising systems of linear equations are solved efficiently and in parallel with an algebraic multigrid method. The new scheme is investigated for various test problems from the literature and is also compared to a cell-centered finite volume scheme in terms of accuracy and time to solution. We find that the method is accurate, robust and efficient. In particular no post-processing of the DG velocity field is necessary in contrast to results reported by several authors for d...

  4. Determination of N-Methylcarbamate Pesticides in Vegetables by Solid-phase Extraction and Pressurized Capillary Electrochromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction Capillary electrochromatography(CEC) is a hybrid technique that couples the good selectivity of high-performance liquid chromatography ( HPLC ) and the high separation efficiency of capillary electrophoresis (CE).

  5. A qualitative analysis of the dynamics of a sheared and pressurized layer of saturated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Dell'Isola, Francesco; Hutter, Kolumban

    1998-01-01

    International audience A layer of a saturated binary mixture of soil and water, both of which are true density preserving, is considered. This layer is subjected from above to normal and shear tractions and an inflow of water, and from below to drainage of water and abrasion of till from the rock bed. Sliding processes along the top and bottom interfaces, as well as deformational creep of the sediment and water constituents within the layer generate heat, but here the purely mechanical pro...

  6. Atmospheric pressure ionization waves propagating through a flexible high aspect ratio capillary channel and impinging upon a target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure ionization waves (IWs) propagating in flexible capillary tubes are a unique way of transporting a plasma and its active species to remote sites for applications such as biomedical procedures, particularly in endoscopic procedures. The propagation mechanisms for such IWs in tubes having aspect ratios of hundreds to thousands are not clear. In this paper, results are discussed from a numerical investigation of the fundamental properties of ionization waves generated by nanosecond voltage pulses inside a 15 cm long, 600 µm wide (aspect ratio 250), flexible dielectric channel. The channel, filled with a Ne/Xe = 99.9/0.1 gas mixture at 1 atm, empties into a small chamber separated from a target substrate by 1 cm. The IWs propagate through the entire length of the channel while maintaining similar strength and magnitude. Upon exiting the channel into the chamber, the IW induces a second streamer discharge at the channel–chamber junction. This streamer then propagates across the chamber and impinges upon the target. The average speeds of the capillary-bounded IW are about 5 × 107 cm s−1 and 1 × 108 cm s−1 for positive and negative polarities, respectively. The propagation speed is sensitive to the curvature of the channel. In both cases, the peak in ionization tends to be located along the channel walls and alternates from side-to-side depending on the direction of the local instantaneous electric field and curvature of the channel. The ionization region following the IW extends up to several centimeters inside the channel, as opposed to being highly localized at the ionization front in unconstrained, atmospheric pressure IWs. The maximum speed of the IW in the chamber is about twice that in the channel. (paper)

  7. Measurement of rotational temperatures in high-pressure microhollow cathode (MHC) and capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report of rotational temperature (TR) measurements in high-pressure (400 Torr) microhollow cathode (MHC) discharges in Ne with a trace admixture of N2 using the unresolved N2 second positive band and the N+2 first negative band. Significantly different values for TR were obtained for respectively N2 and N+2. The rotational temperatures obtained from the analysis of the N2 band system are slightly above room temperature, increase with increasing discharge current, and may be interpreted as the gas kinetic temperature in the MHC discharge plasma. By contrast, the analysis of the N+2 band system yielded rotational temperatures of more than 900 K, which are the result of collisional reaction processes leading to the formation of rotationally excited N+2 ions. The effective lifetime of these ions is comparable to the rotational relaxation time, so that the ions retain much of their rotational excitation prior to emission and are not in thermal equilibrium with the bulk gas. Thus, the TR values obtained for N+2 cannot be equated with the gas kinetic temperature in the plasma. We also carried out a rotational analysis of the unresolved N2 second positive system emitted by an atmospheric-pressure capillary plasma electrode (CPE) discharge in ambient air and measured a temperature of 545 K. This temperature may be close to the gas kinetic temperature as the rotational analysis utilized N2 emissions from inside the capillary which is the region of highest plasma density and highest gas temperature in a CPE discharge (Authors)

  8. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, as inferred from lung areas in gated blood-pool scintigrams: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether the apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume, as obtained from gated cardiac blood-pool scans, could be used as a noninvasive method to estimate mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), gated blood-pool scans were analyzed in 77 patients who also had PCWP measurements at cardiac catheterization. Ten of these patients had gated cardiac blood-pool scans and PCWP measurements both at rest and during exercise. The apex-to-base distribution of pulmonary blood volume was determined from the end-systolic frame of the left anterior oblique view by placing equal-sized regions of interest over the apex and base of the right lung. The ratio of apex counts over base counts (A/B ratio) was considered abnormal if greater than unity. The mean A/B ratio was 1.15 +/- 0.27 (1 s.d.) for the 32 studies associated with an abnormal mean PCWP (greater than 12 mm Hg). The mean A/B ratio was 0.85 +/- 0.23 for the 55 studies associated with a normal mean PCWP (p less than 0.01 comparing normal group with abnormal). The sensitivity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than 12 mm Hg was 81%R (26/32). The specificity of the A/B ratio for a mean PCWP greater than or equal to 12 mm Hg was 89% (49/55). Thus, noninvasive determination of the pulmonary apex-to-base ratio from gated cardiac blood-pool scans appears to differentiate subjects with normal and abnormal mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressures

  9. Determination of Minimum Miscibility Pressure in supercritical extractor using oil saturated sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Abbasi, Waqas A.;

    2009-01-01

      The main parameter for determination of the possibilities to enhance oil recovery by e.g. CO2 injection into a specific oil field is the measurement of Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP). This pressure is the lowest pressure for which a gas can obtain miscibility through a multi contact process...... the breakover point criterion the MMP read from the plot was found equal to 20 MPa.  ...

  10. Propagation of pore pressure diffusion waves in saturated dual-porosity media (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Duoxing; Li, Qi; Zhang, Lianzhong

    2016-04-01

    A mechanism has been established for pressure diffusion waves in dual-porosity media. Pressure diffusion waves are heavily damped with relatively low velocities and short wavelengths. The characteristic frequency dominates the attenuation behavior of pressure diffusions and separates wave fields into two asymptotic regimes: relaxed and unrelaxed. Characteristic delay times control the pressure diffusion between the matrix and the fractures. The transition zones in wavelength and attenuation peak shift toward high frequencies when the characteristic delay time decreases. In contrast, the transition zones in both phase and group velocity shift toward low frequencies as the characteristic time of the delay increases. In a spatially dependent diffusivity field, the pressure diffusion waves in dual-porosity media obey an accumulation-depletion law.

  11. Impaired microvascular dilatation and capillary rarefaction in young adults with a predisposition to high blood pressure.

    OpenAIRE

    Noon, J P; Walker, B. R.; Webb, D. J.; Shore, A C; Holton, D.W.; Edwards, H V; Watt, G.C.

    1997-01-01

    Increased vascular resistance in essential hypertension occurs mainly in microvessels with luminal diameters < 100 microm. It is not known whether abnormalities in these vessels are a cause or consequence of high blood pressure (BP). We studied 105 men (aged 23-33 yr) in whom predisposition to high blood pressure has been characterized by both their own BP and those of their parents. Factors that are secondary to high BP correlate with offspring BP irrespective of parental BP, but factors tha...

  12. [Preparation of 1 µm non-porous C18 silica gel stationary phase for chiral-pressurized capillary electrochromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yangfang; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guiming; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Non-porous C18 silica gel stationary phase (1 µm) was prepared and applied to chiral separation in pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) for the enantioseparation of various basic compounds. The non-porous silica particles (1 µm) were synthesized using modified St6ber method. C18 stationary phase (1 µm) was prepared by immobilization of chloro-dimethyl-octadecylsilane. Using carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) as the chiral additive, the pCEC conditions including the content of acetonitrile (ACN), concentration of buffer, pH, the concentration of chiral additive and flow rate as well as applied voltage were investigated to obtain the optimal pCEC conditions for the separation of four basic chiral compounds. The column provided an efficiency of up to 190,000 plates/m. Bupropion hydrochloride, clenbuterol hydrochloride, metoprolol tartrate, and esmolol hydrochloride were baseline separated under the conditions of 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer at pH 4. 0 with 20% (v/ v) acetonitrile, and 15 mmol/L CM-β-CD as the chiral additive. The applied voltage was 2 kV and flow rate was 0.03 mL/min with splitting ratio of 300:1. The resolution were 1.55, 2.82, 1. 69, 1. 70 for bupropion hydrochloride, clenbuterol hydrochloride, metoprolol tartrate, esmolol hydrochloride, respectively. The C18 coverage was improved by repeating silylation method. The synthesized 1 µm C18 packings have better mechanical strength and longer service life because of the special, non-porous structure. The column used in pCEC mode showed better separation of the racemates and a higher rate compared with those used in the capillary liquid chromatography (cLC) mode. This study provided an alternative way for the method of pCEC enantioseparation with chiral additives in the mobile phase and demonstrated the feasibility of micron particle stationary phase in chiral separation. PMID:26182460

  13. Experimental sizing and assessment of two-phase pressure drop correlations for a capillary tube with transcritical and subcritical carbon dioxide flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last years, CO2 was proposed as an alternative refrigerant for different refrigeration applications (automotive air conditioning, heat pumps, refrigerant plants, etc.) In the case of low power refrigeration applications, as a household refrigerator, the use of too expensive components is not economically sustainable; therefore, even if the use of CO2 as the refrigerant is desired, it is preferable to use conventional components as much as possible. For these reasons, the capillary tube is frequently proposed as expansion system. Then, it is necessary to characterize the capillary in terms of knowledge of the evolving mass flow rate and the associate pressure drop under all possible operative conditions. For this aim, an experimental campaign has been carried out on the ENEA test loop 'CADORE' to measure the performance of three capillary tubes having same inner diameter (0.55 mm) but different lengths (4, 6 and 8 meters). The test range of inlet pressure is between about 60 and 110 bar, whereas external temperatures are between about 20 to 42 °C. The two-phase pressure drop through the capillary tube is detected and experimental values are compared with the predictions obtained with the more widely used correlations available in the literature. Correlations have been tested over a wide range of variation of inlet flow conditions, as a function of different inlet parameters.

  14. Experimental sizing and assessment of two-phase pressure drop correlations for a capillary tube with transcritical and subcritical carbon dioxide flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, R.; Boccardi, G.; Calabrese, N.; Celata, G. P.; Zummo, G.

    2014-04-01

    In the last years, CO2 was proposed as an alternative refrigerant for different refrigeration applications (automotive air conditioning, heat pumps, refrigerant plants, etc.) In the case of low power refrigeration applications, as a household refrigerator, the use of too expensive components is not economically sustainable; therefore, even if the use of CO2 as the refrigerant is desired, it is preferable to use conventional components as much as possible. For these reasons, the capillary tube is frequently proposed as expansion system. Then, it is necessary to characterize the capillary in terms of knowledge of the evolving mass flow rate and the associate pressure drop under all possible operative conditions. For this aim, an experimental campaign has been carried out on the ENEA test loop "CADORE" to measure the performance of three capillary tubes having same inner diameter (0.55 mm) but different lengths (4, 6 and 8 meters). The test range of inlet pressure is between about 60 and 110 bar, whereas external temperatures are between about 20 to 42 °C. The two-phase pressure drop through the capillary tube is detected and experimental values are compared with the predictions obtained with the more widely used correlations available in the literature. Correlations have been tested over a wide range of variation of inlet flow conditions, as a function of different inlet parameters.

  15. Effects of Capillary Pressure on Multiphase Flow during CO2 Injection in Saline Aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau J.S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focused on supercritical CO2 injection into saline aquifer, in particular its capillarity’s effects on the plume migration, reservoir pressure alteration and CO2 flux density. The numerical method used to solve the incompressible two-phase flow equations is based on the mimetic method, which conserves the mass and fluxes simultaneously. The investigation showed that exclusion of capillarity can greatly underestimate the CO2 plume migration and resulted in distinctive reservoir pressure distribution. It is found that capillarity showed no significant effect on the flux intensity of CO2.

  16. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly benefit the quality of life here on our home planet. The techniques addressed in the current research involving multiphase transport in porous media and gas-liquid phase separation using capillary pressure gradients are also a logical candidate for a future International Space Station (ISS) flight experiment. Importantly, the novel and potentially very accurate Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multiphase transport in porous media developed in this work offers significantly improved predictions of real world fluid physics phenomena, thereby promoting advanced process designs for both space and terrestrial applications.This 3-year research effort has culminated in the design and testing of a zero-g demonstration prototype. Both the hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (Teflon) media Capillary Pressure Gradient (CPG) cartridges prepared during the second years work were evaluated. Results obtained from ground testing at 1-g were compared to those obtained at reduced gravities spanning Martian (13-g), Lunar (16-g) and zero-g. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the relative strength of the CPG phenomena and the efficacy of its application to meet NASAs unique gas-liquid separation (GLS) requirements in non-terrestrial environments.LB modeling software, developed concurrently with the zero-g test effort, was shown to accurately reproduce observed CPG driven gas-liquid separation

  17. Effect of Pressure, Water Depth and Water Flow Rate on Oxygen Saturation Level in Activated Sludge Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil N. Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The role of aeration in activated sludge process is to provide oxygen to microorganisms as they assimilate the organic carbon compounds and digest a portion of them to carbon dioxide and water, sulfate and nitrate compounds. The water aeration equipment used in this process consumes as much as 60-80% of total power requirements in modern wastewater treatment plants. Approach: The objective of this study is to enhance the oxygen transfer in aeration tank in activated sludge process by increasing pressure inside the part of aeration tank to increase the saturation level of dissolved oxygen in wastewater. The diffuser cap model is the experimental model which was used to show the effect of increasing pressure on oxygen transfer level. Three cases were considered, the first used without diffuser cap, the second with diffuser cap and the third with diffuser cap and plastic strips. Results: Obtained results show that in case of using the model with diffuser cap enhanced the oxygen level by about 5% than in case of without diffuser cap while that of adding plastic strips enhanced the oxygen level by about 7%. The variation of water flow showed that increasing water flow rate from 1-2 L min-1 decreased the oxygen saturation level by about 6%. Furthermore, increasing water depth from 15-60 cm increased the oxygen level by about 40%. Conclusion: The diffuser cap model showed that the increase of pressure and water depth increased the dissolved oxygen level while increasing water flow rate decreased the dissolved oxygen level.

  18. The influence of chemical composition on the saturated vapor pressure in biological motor fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Є.В. Полункін

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available  Volatility fuels fraction of the estimated parameters and letkosti. Volatility characterizes the ability to switch fuels in vaporous state. Selecting indicators to assess the volatility depends on the chemical composition of fuel. The main measure letkosti etanolnogo fuel is vapor pressure. The most simple and cost-effective to improve cold start is putting in fuel lehkoletyuchyh components: butane, izopentanu, gas and other petroleum. It was investigated the influence of DEE on alcohol-gasoline blend, the results show that DEE positive impact on increasing vapor pressure to the desired minimum for starting the engine. But because the ether to 19%, then at such high levels can actively formed peroxide compounds, which is undesirable. Very promising is the use of propane-butane gas mixture as lehkoletyuchoyi gaseous component. Butanizovani spirit-petrol mixture can be recommended for use as alternative fuel vehicles after further study of their stability and himmotolohichnyh characteristics.

  19. Effective stress and water pressure in saturated clays during heating-cooling cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments with heating and cooling cycles in undrained constant total stress conditions in triaxial apparatus are presented. Heating induces a large pore-water pressure increase, which eventually leads to a large irreversible strain and possible mechanical failure. Subsequent cooling produces a drop in water pressure. In one test the drop during cooling was more than two times higher than the previous increase during heating, reaching values of up to 2.30 MPa. An analysis of these findings in terms of a thermoplastic model is presented. The interpretation of these tests relies heavily on the kind of stress-partitioning hypothesis that is used. It was found that the phenomena described can be quantitatively dealt with using the classical effective stress principle, if the shear stress and consolidation are described in terms of temperature-dependent plastic yield limit

  20. The impact of rock and fluid uncertainties in the estimation of saturation and pressure from a 4D petro elastic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazetti, Bruno; Davolio, Alessandra; Schiozer, Denis J.; UNICAMP

    2015-08-01

    The integration of 4D seismic (4DS) attributes and reservoir simulation is used to reduce risks in the management of petroleum fields. One possible alternative is the saturation and pressure domain. In this case, we use estimations of saturation and pressure changes from 4D seismic data as input in history matching processes to yield more reliable production predictions in simulation models. The estimation of dynamic changes from 4DS depends on the knowledge of reservoir rock and fluid properties that are uncertain in the process of estimation. This paper presents a study of the impact of rock and fluid uncertainties on the estimation of saturation and pressure changes achieved through a 4D petro-elastic inversion. The term impact means that the saturation and pressure estimation can be perturbed by the rock and fluid uncertainties. The motivation for this study comes from the necessity to estimate uncertainties in saturation and pressure variation to incorporate them in the history matching procedures, avoiding the use of deterministic values from 4DS, which may not be reliable. The study is performed using a synthetic case with known response from where it is possible to show that the errors of estimated saturation and pressure depend on the magnitude of rock and fluid uncertainties jointly with the reservoir dynamic changes. The main contribution of this paper is to show how uncertain reservoir properties can affect the reliability of pressure and saturation estimation from 4DS and how it depends on reservoir changes induced by production. This information can be used in future projects which use quantitative inversion to integrate reservoir simulation and 4D seismic data.

  1. The Generation of Gravity-Capillary Solitary Waves by a Pressure Source Moving at a Trans-critical Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Masnadi, Naeem

    2016-01-01

    The unsteady response of a water free surface to a localized pressure source moving at constant speed $U$ in the range $0.95c_\\mathrm{min} \\lesssim U \\leq 1.02 c_\\mathrm{min}$, where $c_\\mathrm{min}$ is the minimum phase speed of linear gravity-capillary waves in deep water, is investigated through experiments and numerical simulations. This unsteady response state, which consists of a V-shaped pattern behind the source and features periodic shedding of pairs of depressions from the tips of the V, was first observed qualitatively by Diorio et al. (Phys. Rev. Let., 103, 214502, 2009) and called state III. In the present investigation, cinematic shadowgraph and refraction-based techniques are utilized to measure the temporal evolution of the free surface deformation pattern downstream of the source as it moves along a towing tank, while numerical simulations using the model equation proposed by Cho et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 672, 288-306, 2011) are used to extend the experimental results over longer times than are...

  2. Extraction of pore-morphology and capillary pressure curves of porous media from synchrotron-based tomography data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feifei; Hingerl, Ferdinand F; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Yijin; Wu, Ziyu; Benson, Sally M; Toney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The elevated level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has caused serious concern of the progression of global warming. Geological sequestration is considered as one of the most promising techniques for mitigating the damaging effect of global climate change. Investigations over wide range of length-scales are important for systematic evaluation of the underground formations from prospective CO2 reservoir. Understanding the relationship between the micro morphology and the observed macro phenomena is even more crucial. Here we show Synchrotron based X-ray micro tomographic study of the morphological buildup of Sandstones. We present a numerical method to extract the pore sizes distribution of the porous structure directly, without approximation or complex calculation. We have also demonstrated its capability in predicting the capillary pressure curve in a mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurement. The method presented in this work can be directly applied to the morphological studies of heterogeneous systems in various research fields, ranging from Carbon Capture and Storage, and Enhanced Oil Recovery to environmental remediation in the vadose zone. PMID:26039795

  3. Analysis of factors which affect the relationship between inspired oxygen partial pressure and arterial oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, P G; Jones, J G

    1993-10-01

    The adoption of pulse oximetry in anaesthesia and intensive care has resulted in oxyhaemoglobin saturation (SaO2) becoming an important and widely used clinical descriptor of gas exchange, although its full potential has not been realized. We have explored the effect of impaired gas exchange on the relationship between PIO2 and SaO2. A curve of oxygen content vs PIO2 for an ideal lung was constructed using the oxygen dissociation curve and allowing for the effect of dissolved oxygen in plasma. A plot of PIO2 vs SaO2 was derived from this content curve. The effect of impaired gas exchange (shunt and V/Q effects) on this relationship was then modelled using for shunt the equation Qs/Qt = (Cc' O2-CaO2)/(Cc' O2-CvO2) and for V/Q, a graphical method using the equation V/Q = k(Cc' O2-CvO2)/ (PIO2-PAO2) and the oxygen content curve to model the effect of a spread of V/Q ratios. A total of nine compartments were used to model the scatter of V/Q, and the size of these compartments were determined by their relative blood supply. Plots of PIO2 vs SaO2 were derived for different values of shunt and V/Q. The PIO2 vs SaO2 curve reflected the shape of the oxygen dissociation curve but lay to the right by PIO2-PAO2. Shunt caused a depression of the plateau of this curve with relatively little lateral movement, whereas a low mean V/Q ratio caused a marked rightwards lateral displacement. Increased IogSD Q caused a flattening of the relationship. The combined effect of shunt and a spread of V/Q ratios caused both lateral and vertical displacements. Thus a series of simple measurements of PIO2 and SaO2 gave information about both shunt and V/Q abnormality. PMID:8260294

  4. Measurements of capillary pressure and electric permittivity of gas-water systems in porous media at elevated pressures: application to geological storage of CO2 in aquifers and wetting behavior in coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plug, W.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 in aquifers and coal layers is a promising technique to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Considering the reservoir properties, e.g. wettability, heterogeneity and the caprocks sealing capacity, the capillary pressure is an important measure to evaluate the efficiency, the succes

  5. Condensation heat transfer and pressure drop of R-134a saturated vapour inside a brazed compact plate fin heat exchanger with serrated fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana Murthy, K. V.; Ranganayakulu, C.; Ashok Babu, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the experimental heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop measured during R-134a saturated vapour condensation inside a small brazed compact plate fin heat exchanger with serrated fin surface. The effects of saturation temperature (pressure), refrigerant mass flux, refrigerant heat flux, effect of fin surface characteristics and fluid properties are investigated. The average condensation heat transfer coefficients and frictional pressure drops were determined experimentally for refrigerant R-134a at five different saturated temperatures (34, 38, 40, 42 and 44 °C). A transition point between gravity controlled and forced convection condensation has been found for a refrigerant mass flux around 22 kg/m2s. In the forced convection condensation region, the heat transfer coefficients show a three times increase and 1.5 times increase in frictional pressure drop for a doubling of the refrigerant mass flux. The heat transfer coefficients show weak sensitivity to saturation temperature (Pressure) and great sensitivity to refrigerant mass flux and fluid properties. The frictional pressure drop shows a linear dependence on the kinetic energy per unit volume of the refrigerant flow. Correlations are provided for the measured heat transfer coefficients and frictional pressure drops.

  6. Differential equations governing slip-induced pore-pressure fluctuations in a water-saturated granular medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Macroscopic frictional slip in water-saturated granular media occurs commonly during landsliding, surface faulting, and intense bedload transport. A mathematical model of dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations that accompany and influence such sliding is derived here by both inductive and deductive methods. The inductive derivation shows how the governing differential equations represent the physics of the steadily sliding array of cylindrical fiberglass rods investigated experimentally by Iverson and LaHusen (1989). The deductive derivation shows how the same equations result from a novel application of Biot's (1956) dynamic mixture theory to macroscopic deformation. The model consists of two linear differential equations and five initial and boundary conditions that govern solid displacements and pore-water pressures. Solid displacements and water pressures are strongly coupled, in part through a boundary condition that ensures mass conservation during irreversible pore deformation that occurs along the bumpy slip surface. Feedback between this deformation and the pore-pressure field may yield complex system responses. The dual derivations of the model help explicate key assumptions. For example, the model requires that the dimensionless parameter B, defined here through normalization of Biot's equations, is much larger than one. This indicates that solid-fluid coupling forces are dominated by viscous rather than inertial effects. A tabulation of physical and kinematic variables for the rod-array experiments of Iverson and LaHusen and for various geologic phenomena shows that the model assumptions commonly are satisfied. A subsequent paper will describe model tests against experimental data. ?? 1993 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  7. A two-dimensional model of the pressing section of a paper machine including dynamic capillary effects

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg P.

    2013-05-15

    Paper production is a problem with significant importance for society; it is also a challenging topic for scientific investigation. This study is concerned with the simulation of the pressing section of a paper machine. A two-dimensional model is developed to account for the water flow within the pressing zone. A Richards-type equation is used to describe the flow in the unsaturated zone. The dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relation is adopted for the paper production process. The mathematical model accounts for the coexistence of saturated and unsaturated zones in a multilayer computational domain. The discretization is performed by the MPFA-O method. Numerical experiments are carried out for parameters that are typical of the production process. The static and dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relations are tested to evaluate the influence of the dynamic capillary effect. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  8. CT-scan-monitored electrical resistivity measurements show problems achieving homogeneous saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray CT scans obtained during measurement of the electrical resistivity of core samples revealed some problems in obtaining uniform saturation along the length of the sample. In this paper the electrical resistivity of core samples is measured as a function of water saturation to determine the saturation exponent, which is used in electric log interpretation. An assumption in such tests is that the water saturation is uniformly distributed. Failure of this assumption can result in errors in the determination of the saturation exponent. Three problems were identified in obtaining homogeneous water saturation in two samples of a Middle Eastern carbonate grainstone. A stationary front formed in one sample at 1 psi oil/brine capillary pressure. A moving front formed at oil/brine capillary pressures of 4 psi or less in both samples tested, in both a fresh mixed-wettability state and in a cleaned water-wet state. In these samples, the heterogeneous fluid distribution caused by a rapidly moving front did not dissipate when the capillary pressure was eliminated

  9. CT-scan-monitored electrical resistivity measurements show problems achieving homogeneous saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray CT scans obtained during measurement of the electrical resistivity of core samples revealed some problems in obtaining uniform saturation along the length of the samples. In this paper the electrical resistivity of core samples is measured as a function of water saturation to determine the saturation exponent, which is used in electric log interpretation. An assumption in such tests is that the water saturation is uniformly distributed. Failure of this assumption can result in errors in the determination of the saturation exponent. Three problems were identified in obtaining homogeneous water saturation in two samples of a Middle Eastern carbonate grainstone. A stationary front formed in one sample at 1 psi oil/brine capillary pressure. A moving front formed at oil/brine capillary pressures of 4 psi or less in both samples tested, in both a fresh mixed-wettability state and in a cleaned water-wet state. In these samples, the heterogeneous fluid distribution caused by a rapidly moving front did not dissipate when the capillary pressure was eliminated

  10. CT-scan-monitored electrical-resistivity measurements show problems achieving homogeneous saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on x-ray computerized tomography (CT) scans obtained during measurement of the electrical resistivity of core samples which revealed some problems in obtaining uniform saturation along the lengths of the samples. The electrical resistivity of core samples is measured as a function of water saturation to determine the saturation exponent used in electric-log interpretation. An assumption in such tests is that the water saturation is uniformly distributed. Failure of this assumption can result in errors in the determination of the saturation exponent. Three problems were identified in obtaining homogeneous water saturation in two samples of a Middle Eastern carbonate grainstone: a stationary front formed in one sample at 1-psi oil/brine capillary pressure, a moving front formed at oil/brine capillary pressure ≤4 psi in samples tested in fresh mixed-wettability and cleaned water-wet states, and the heterogeneous fluid distribution caused by a rapidly moving front did not dissipate when the capillary pressure was eliminated in the samples

  11. Saturated fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in laminar high-pressure C2H6/O2/N2 flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Campbell D.; King, Galen B.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1992-01-01

    Saturation of a transition of the OH molecule in high-pressure flames is demonstrated by obtaining saturation curves in C2H6/O2/N2 laminar flames at 1, 6.1, 9.2, and 12.3 atm. Quantitative fluorescence measurements of OH number density at pressures to 12.3 atm are presented. To assess the efficacy of the balanced cross-rate model for high-pressure flames, laser-saturated fluorescence measurements, which were calibrated in an atmospheric-pressure flame, are compared with absorption measurements at 3.1 and 6.1 atm. At 3.1 atm the absorption and fluorescence measurements compare well. At 6.1 atm, however, the concentrations given by lasre-saturated fluorescence are about 25 percent lower than the absorption values, indicating some depletion of the laser-coupled levels beyond that at atmospheric pressure. By using a reasonable estimate for the finite sensitivity to quenching, it is anticipated that fluorescence measurements that are calibrated at 1 atm can be applied to flames at about 10 atm with absolute errors within +/- 50 percent.

  12. Application of capillary pressure curve construction method in the reservoir evaluation of A oilfield%构造毛管压力曲线法在A油田储层评价中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵毅; 施振飞; 朱立华; 沈金松; 王先荣; 张路崎; 肖亮

    2014-01-01

    苏北盆地A油田的中低孔渗储层,由于受不同成岩作用的影响,孔隙结构复杂,且储层段存在不同流体时的电性关系复杂,基于电法测井的解释图版难于识别储层含油性,测井储层参数的计算精度也偏低。在现有研究成果的基础上,引入综合物性指数C分类选取毛管压力曲线的进汞压力初始点,分类构造相应每一个进汞饱和度下的进汞压力与孔隙度和渗透率之间的对应函数关系,再逐点构造新的毛管压力曲线。通过与实测毛管压力曲线对比可知,该方法所构造的毛管压力曲线可较好地适用于中低孔渗储层。采用该方法计算的含水饱和度与核磁共振计算的束缚水饱和度综合,建立了储层流体的识别图版,在苏北盆地A油田的中低孔渗砂泥岩储层评价中取得了较好效果。%Because of the impact of different diagenesis ,the medium to low porosity and permeability reservoirs of A oilfield in Subei basin have complex pore structures and electrical properties of reservoir sections under the condition of different fluids .It is difficult to identify the oil bearing property of reservoirs by the interpretation chart based on electrical logging .And the accuracy of reservoir logging parameters is also low .On the basis of existing researches ,a comprehensive physical index C was introduced to select initial points of mercury injection pressures of capillary pressure curves ,and con-struct corresponding functional relationship between the mercury injection pressures corresponding to mercury injection sat -urations,and porosity and permeability .And then the new capillary pressure curves were established .In comparison with the measured capillary pressure curves ,the method was better suited for low porosity and permeability reservoirs .A reser-voir fluid identification plate was set up by combining water saturation ,calculated by the method ,with irreducible water

  13. A comparison of ground and satellite observations of cloud cover to saturation pressure differences during a cold air outbreak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliss, R.J.; Raman, S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The role of clouds in the atmospheric general circulation and the global climate is twofold. First, clouds owe their origin to large-scale dynamical forcing, radiative cooling in the atmosphere, and turbulent transfer at the surface. In addition, they provide one of the most important mechanisms for the vertical redistribution of momentum and sensible and latent heat for the large scale, and they influence the coupling between the atmosphere and the surface as well as the radiative and dynamical-hydrological balance. In existing diagnostic cloudiness parameterization schemes, relative humidity is the most frequently used variable for estimating total cloud amount or stratiform cloud amount. However, the prediction of relative humidity in general circulation models (GCMs) is usually poor. Even for the most comprehensive GCMs, the predicted relative humidity may deviate greatly from that observed, as far as the frequency distribution of relative humidity is concerned. Recently, there has been an increased effort to improve the representation of clouds and cloud-radiation feedback in GCMs, but the verification of cloudiness parameterization schemes remains a severe problem because of the lack of observational data sets. In this study, saturation pressure differences (as opposed to relative humidity) and satellite-derived cloud heights and amounts are compared with ground determinations of cloud cover over the Gulf Stream Locale (GSL) during a cold air outbreak.

  14. Seven-Day Mortality Can Be Predicted in Medical Patients by Blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory Rate, Loss of Independence, and Peripheral Oxygen Saturation (the PARIS Score)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Knudsen, Torben;

    2015-01-01

    . The outcome was defined as seven-day all-cause mortality. 76 patients (2.5%) met the endpoint in the development cohort, 57 (2.0%) in the first validation cohort, and 111 (4.3%) in the second. Systolic blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory rate, loss of Independence, and peripheral oxygen Saturation were...

  15. Normative Values of Retinal Oxygen Saturation in Rhesus Monkeys: The Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jing LI; Yang, Yiquan; Yang, Diya; Liu, Xiangxiang; Sun, Yunxiao; Wei, Shifei; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the normal values of the retinal oxygen saturation in Rhesus monkeys and to evaluated repeatability and reproducibility of retinal oxygen saturation measurements. Methods Eighteen adult Rhesus macaque monkeys were included in this experimental study. An Oxymap T1 retinal oximeter (Oxymap, Reykjavik, Iceland) was used to perform oximetry on all subjects. Global arterial (SaO2) and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), arteriovenous difference in SO2 were measured. In the first ex...

  16. Measurements of seismic attenuation and transient fluid pressure in partially saturated Berea sandstone: evidence of fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz

    2013-10-01

    A novel laboratory technique is proposed to investigate wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale as a mechanism for seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks. This technique combines measurements of seismic attenuation in the frequency range from 1 to 100 Hz with measurements of transient fluid pressure as a response of a step stress applied on top of the sample. We used a Berea sandstone sample partially saturated with water. The laboratory results suggest that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale is dominant in partially saturated samples. A 3-D numerical model representing the sample was used to verify the experimental results. Biot's equations of consolidation were solved with the finite-element method. Wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale was the only attenuation mechanism accounted for in the numerical solution. The numerically calculated transient fluid pressure reproduced the laboratory data. Moreover, the numerically calculated attenuation, superposed to the frequency-independent matrix anelasticity, reproduced the attenuation measured in the laboratory in the partially saturated sample. This experimental-numerical fit demonstrates that wave-induced fluid flow on the mesoscopic scale and matrix anelasticity are the dominant mechanisms for seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone.

  17. Preparation and evaluation of monodispersed, submicron, non-porous silica particles functionalized with β-CD derivatives for chiral-pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangfang, Lu; Hui, Wang; Yun, Xue; Xue, Gu; Yan, Wang; Chao, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Submicron, non-porous, chiral silica stationary phase has been prepared by the immobilization of functionalized β-CD derivatives to isocyanate-modified silica via chemical reaction and applied to the pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) enantio-separation of various chiral compounds. The submicron, non-porous, cyclodextrin-based chiral stationary phases (sub_μm-CSP2) exhibited excellent chiral recognition of a wide range of analytes including clenbuterol hydrochloride, mexiletine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate, esmolol hydrochloride, and metoprolol tartrate. The synthesized submicron particles were regularly spherical and uniformly non-porous with an average diameter of around 800 nm and a mean pore size of less than 2 nm. The synthesized chiral stationary phase was packed into 10 cm × 100 μm id capillary columns. The sub_μm-CSP2 column used in the pCEC system showed better separation of the racemates and at a higher rate compared to those used in the capillary liquid chromatography mode (cLC) system. The sub_μm-CSP2 possessed high mechanical strength, high stereoselectivity, and long lifespan, demonstrating rapid enantio-separation and good resolution of samples. The column provided an efficiency of up to 170,000 plates/m for n-propylbenzene. PMID:25990895

  18. Performance and characteristics of a high pressure, high temperature capillary cell with facile construction for operando x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the use of commercially available fused silica capillary and fittings to construct a cell for operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for the study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions under high pressure (up to 200 bars) and high temperature (up to 280 °C) conditions. As the first demonstration, the cell was used for CO2 hydrogenation reaction to examine the state of copper in a conventional Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst. The active copper component of the catalyst was shown to remain in the metallic state under supercritical reaction conditions, at 200 bars and up to 260 °C. With the coiled heating system around the capillary, one can easily change the length of the capillary and control the amount of catalyst under investigation. With precise control of reactant(s) flow, the cell can mimic and serve as a conventional fixed-bed micro-reactor system to obtain reliable catalytic data. This high comparability of the reaction performance of the cell and laboratory reactors is crucial to gain insights into the nature of actual active sites under technologically relevant reaction conditions. The large length of the capillary can cause its bending upon heating when it is only fixed at both ends because of the thermal expansion. The degree of the bending can vary depending on the heating mode, and solutions to this problem are also presented. Furthermore, the cell is suitable for Raman studies, nowadays available at several beamlines for combined measurements. A concise study of CO2 phase behavior by Raman spectroscopy is presented to demonstrate a potential of the cell for combined XAS-Raman studies

  19. Performance and characteristics of a high pressure, high temperature capillary cell with facile construction for operando x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansode, Atul; Guilera, Gemma; Cuartero, Vera; Simonelli, Laura; Avila, Marta; Urakawa, Atsushi

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of commercially available fused silica capillary and fittings to construct a cell for operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for the study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions under high pressure (up to 200 bars) and high temperature (up to 280 °C) conditions. As the first demonstration, the cell was used for CO2 hydrogenation reaction to examine the state of copper in a conventional Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst. The active copper component of the catalyst was shown to remain in the metallic state under supercritical reaction conditions, at 200 bars and up to 260 °C. With the coiled heating system around the capillary, one can easily change the length of the capillary and control the amount of catalyst under investigation. With precise control of reactant(s) flow, the cell can mimic and serve as a conventional fixed-bed micro-reactor system to obtain reliable catalytic data. This high comparability of the reaction performance of the cell and laboratory reactors is crucial to gain insights into the nature of actual active sites under technologically relevant reaction conditions. The large length of the capillary can cause its bending upon heating when it is only fixed at both ends because of the thermal expansion. The degree of the bending can vary depending on the heating mode, and solutions to this problem are also presented. Furthermore, the cell is suitable for Raman studies, nowadays available at several beamlines for combined measurements. A concise study of CO2 phase behavior by Raman spectroscopy is presented to demonstrate a potential of the cell for combined XAS-Raman studies. PMID:25173285

  20. Performance and characteristics of a high pressure, high temperature capillary cell with facile construction for operando x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansode, Atul; Guilera, Gemma; Cuartero, Vera; Simonelli, Laura; Avila, Marta; Urakawa, Atsushi

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of commercially available fused silica capillary and fittings to construct a cell for operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for the study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions under high pressure (up to 200 bars) and high temperature (up to 280 °C) conditions. As the first demonstration, the cell was used for CO2 hydrogenation reaction to examine the state of copper in a conventional Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol synthesis catalyst. The active copper component of the catalyst was shown to remain in the metallic state under supercritical reaction conditions, at 200 bars and up to 260 °C. With the coiled heating system around the capillary, one can easily change the length of the capillary and control the amount of catalyst under investigation. With precise control of reactant(s) flow, the cell can mimic and serve as a conventional fixed-bed micro-reactor system to obtain reliable catalytic data. This high comparability of the reaction performance of the cell and laboratory reactors is crucial to gain insights into the nature of actual active sites under technologically relevant reaction conditions. The large length of the capillary can cause its bending upon heating when it is only fixed at both ends because of the thermal expansion. The degree of the bending can vary depending on the heating mode, and solutions to this problem are also presented. Furthermore, the cell is suitable for Raman studies, nowadays available at several beamlines for combined measurements. A concise study of CO2 phase behavior by Raman spectroscopy is presented to demonstrate a potential of the cell for combined XAS-Raman studies.

  1. Performance and characteristics of a high pressure, high temperature capillary cell with facile construction for operando x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi, E-mail: aurakawa@iciq.es [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), Av. Països Catalans 16, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Guilera, Gemma; Simonelli, Laura; Avila, Marta [ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Crta. BP 1413, Km. 3.3, 08290 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); Cuartero, Vera [ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Crta. BP 1413, Km. 3.3, 08290 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona (Spain); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS40220, F-38043, Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of commercially available fused silica capillary and fittings to construct a cell for operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for the study of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions under high pressure (up to 200 bars) and high temperature (up to 280 °C) conditions. As the first demonstration, the cell was used for CO{sub 2} hydrogenation reaction to examine the state of copper in a conventional Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. The active copper component of the catalyst was shown to remain in the metallic state under supercritical reaction conditions, at 200 bars and up to 260 °C. With the coiled heating system around the capillary, one can easily change the length of the capillary and control the amount of catalyst under investigation. With precise control of reactant(s) flow, the cell can mimic and serve as a conventional fixed-bed micro-reactor system to obtain reliable catalytic data. This high comparability of the reaction performance of the cell and laboratory reactors is crucial to gain insights into the nature of actual active sites under technologically relevant reaction conditions. The large length of the capillary can cause its bending upon heating when it is only fixed at both ends because of the thermal expansion. The degree of the bending can vary depending on the heating mode, and solutions to this problem are also presented. Furthermore, the cell is suitable for Raman studies, nowadays available at several beamlines for combined measurements. A concise study of CO{sub 2} phase behavior by Raman spectroscopy is presented to demonstrate a potential of the cell for combined XAS-Raman studies.

  2. Speciation of High-Pressure Carbon-Saturated COH Fluids at Buffered fO2 Conditions: An Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Recchia, S.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    The quantitative assessment of species in COH fluids is crucial in modelling mantle processes. For instance, H2O/CO2 ratio in the fluid phase influences the location of the solidus and of carbonation/decarbonation reactions in peridotitic systems . In the scientific literature, the speciation of COH fluids has been generally assumed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations using equations of state of simple H2O-non-polar gas systems (e.g., H2O-CO2-CH4). Only few authors dealt with the experimental determination of high-pressure COH fluid species at different conditions, using diverse experimental and analytical approaches (e.g., piston cylinder+capsule-piercing+gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry; cold-seal+silica glass capsules+Raman). We performed experiments on COH fluids using a capsule-piercing device coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometry. This type of analyzer ensures superior performances in terms of selectivity of molecules to be detected, high acquisition rates and extended linear response range. Experiments were carried out in a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressure of 1 GPa and temperatures from 800 to 900°C. Carbon-saturated fluids were generated through the addition of oxalic acid dihydrate and graphite. Single/double capsules and different packing materials (BN and MgO) were used to evaluate the divergence from the thermodynamic speciation model. Moreover, to assess the effect of solutes on COH fluid speciation we also performed a set of experiments adding synthetic forsterite to the charge. To determine the speciation we assembled a capsule-piercing device that allows to puncture the capsule in a gas-tight vessel at 80°C. The extraction Teflon vessel is composed of a base part, where the capsule is allocated on a steel support, and a top part where a steel drill is mounted. To release the quenched fluids from the capsule, the base part of vessel is hand-tighten to the top part, allowing the steel pointer to pierce the capsule. The

  3. Visualization and void fraction measurement of decompressed boiling flow in a capillary tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A capillary tube is often used as a throttle for a refrigerating cycle. Subcooled refrigerant usually flows from a condenser into the capillary tube. Then, the refrigerant is decompressed along the capillary tube. When the static pressure falls below the saturation pressure for the liquid temperature, spontaneous boiling occurs. A vapor-liquid two-phase mixture is discharged from the tube. In designing a capillary tube, it is necessary to calculate the flow rate for given boundary conditions on pressure and temperature at the inlet and exit. Since total pressure loss is dominated by frictional and acceleration losses during two-phase flow, it is first necessary to specify the boiling inception point. However, there will be a delay in boiling inception during decompressed flow. This study aimed to clarify the boiling inception point and two-phase flow characteristics of refrigerant in a capillary tube. Refrigerant flows in a coiled copper capillary tube were visualized by neutron radiography. The one-dimensional distribution of volumetric average void fraction was measured from radiographs through image processing. From the void fraction distribution, the boiling inception point was determined. Moreover, a simplified CT method was successfully applied to a radiograph for cross-sectional measurements. The experimental results show the flow pattern transition from intermittent flow to annular flow that occurred at a void fraction of about 0.45.

  4. Visualization and void fraction measurement of decompressed boiling flow in a capillary tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, H.; Murakawa, H.; Takenaka, N.; Takiguchi, K.; Okamoto, M.; Tsuchiya, T.; Kitaide, Y.; Maruyama, N.

    2011-09-01

    A capillary tube is often used as a throttle for a refrigerating cycle. Subcooled refrigerant usually flows from a condenser into the capillary tube. Then, the refrigerant is decompressed along the capillary tube. When the static pressure falls below the saturation pressure for the liquid temperature, spontaneous boiling occurs. A vapor-liquid two-phase mixture is discharged from the tube. In designing a capillary tube, it is necessary to calculate the flow rate for given boundary conditions on pressure and temperature at the inlet and exit. Since total pressure loss is dominated by frictional and acceleration losses during two-phase flow, it is first necessary to specify the boiling inception point. However, there will be a delay in boiling inception during decompressed flow. This study aimed to clarify the boiling inception point and two-phase flow characteristics of refrigerant in a capillary tube. Refrigerant flows in a coiled copper capillary tube were visualized by neutron radiography. The one-dimensional distribution of volumetric average void fraction was measured from radiographs through image processing. From the void fraction distribution, the boiling inception point was determined. Moreover, a simplified CT method was successfully applied to a radiograph for cross-sectional measurements. The experimental results show the flow pattern transition from intermittent flow to annular flow that occurred at a void fraction of about 0.45.

  5. Determination of diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water between 268 and 473 K in a high-pressure capillary optical cell with in situ Raman spectroscopic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wanjun; Guo, Huirong; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Li, Lanlan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate values of diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide in water and brine at reservoir conditions are essential to our understanding of transport behavior of carbon dioxide in subsurface pore space. However, the experimental data are limited to conditions at low temperatures and pressures. In this study, diffusive transfer of carbon dioxide in water at pressures up to 45 MPa and temperatures from 268 to 473 K was observed within an optical capillary cell via time-dependent Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least-squares method for the measured variations in carbon dioxide concentration in the cell at various sample positions and time. At the constant pressure of 20 MPa, the measured diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water increase with increasing temperature from 268 to 473 K. The relationship between diffusion coefficient of carbon dioxide in water [D(CO2) in m2/s] and temperature (T in K) was derived with Speedy–Angell power-law approach as: D(CO2)=D0[T/Ts-1]m where D0 = 13.942 × 10−9 m2/s, Ts = 227.0 K, and m = 1.7094. At constant temperature, diffusion coefficients of carbon dioxide in water decrease with pressure increase. However, this pressure effect is rather small (within a few percent).

  6. Phase field modeling of partially saturated deformable porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Giulio

    2016-09-01

    A poromechanical model of partially saturated deformable porous media is proposed based on a phase field approach at modeling the behavior of the mixture of liquid water and wet air, which saturates the pore space, the phase field being the saturation (ratio). While the standard retention curve is expected still^ to provide the intrinsic retention properties of the porous skeleton, depending on the porous texture, an enhanced description of surface tension between the wetting (liquid water) and the non-wetting (wet air) fluid, occupying the pore space, is stated considering a regularization of the phase field model based on an additional contribution to the overall free energy depending on the saturation gradient. The aim is to provide a more refined description of surface tension interactions. An enhanced constitutive relation for the capillary pressure is established together with a suitable generalization of Darcy's law, in which the gradient of the capillary pressure is replaced by the gradient of the so-called generalized chemical potential, which also accounts for the "force", associated to the local free energy of the phase field model. A micro-scale heuristic interpretation of the novel constitutive law of capillary pressure is proposed, in order to compare the envisaged model with that one endowed with the concept of average interfacial area. The considered poromechanical model is formulated within the framework of strain gradient theory in order to account for possible effects, at laboratory scale, of the micro-scale hydro-mechanical couplings between highly localized flows (fingering) and localized deformations of the skeleton (fracturing).

  7. Effect of Initial Hydraulic Conditions on Capillary Rise in a Porous Medium: Pore-Network Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, V.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of capillary rise in a porous medium have been mostly studied in initially dry systems. As initial saturation and initial hydraulic conditions in many natural and industrial porous media can be variable, it is important to investigate the influence of initial conditions on the dynamics of the process. In this study, using dynamic pore-network modeling, we simulated capillary rise in a porous medium for different initial saturations (and consequently initial capillary pressures). Furthermore, the effect of hydraulic connectivity of the wetting phase in corners on the height and velocity of the wetting front was studied. Our simulation results show that there is a trade-off between capillary forces and trapping due to snap-off, which leads to a nonlinear dependence of wetting front velocity on initial saturation at the pore scale. This analysis may provide a possible answer to the experimental observations in the literature showing a non-monotonic dependency between initial saturation and the macroscopic front velocity. © Soil Science Society of America.

  8. Urinary cortisol is inversely associated with capillary recruitment in women: a potential explanation for the cortisol-blood pressure relationship

    OpenAIRE

    De Jongh, Renate T; Ijzerman, Richard G.; Serné, Erik H.; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; Voordouw, Jasper J; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A.; Stehouwer, Coen DA

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The relationships of cortisol with elevated blood pressure and insulin resistance are likely to be the result of a complex interplay of different mechanisms. We hypothesized that cortisol is associated with microvascular dysfunction and that this contributes to cortisol-associated high blood pressure and insulin resistance. We examined 24h urinary free cortisol excretion in 56 healthy adults (26 women). Blood pressure was assessed by 24h ambulatory measurements. Insulin se...

  9. Use of ion-pairing reagent for improving iodine speciation analysis in seaweed by pressure-driven capillary electrophoresis and ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiannan; Wang, Dan; Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanchao; Xu, Zigang

    2015-01-30

    This study achieved resolution improvement for iodine speciation in the presence of an ion-pairing reagent by a pressure-driven capillary electrophoresis (CE) system. Addition of 0.01mM tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide (TBAH) as the ion-pairing reagent into the electrophoretic buffer resulted in the complete separation of four iodine species (I(-), IO3(-), mono-iodothyrosine-MIT and di-iodothyrosine-DIT), because of the electrostatic interaction between TBAH and the negatively charged analytes. A +16kV separation voltage was applied along the separation capillary (50μm i.d., 80cm total and 60cm effective) with the inlet grounded. The detection wavelength was fixed at 210nm, and the pressure-driven flow rate was set at 0.12mLmin(-1) with an injected volume of 2μL. The optimal electrolyte consisted of 2mM borate, 2mM TBAH and 80% methanol with pH adjusted to 8.5. Baseline separation of iodine species was achieved within 7min. The detection limits for I(-), IO3(-), MIT and DIT were 0.052, 0.040, 0.032 and 0.025mgL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations of peak heights and areas were all below 3% for 5mgL(-1) and 5% for 1mgL(-1). Application of the proposed method was demonstrated by speciation analysis of iodine in two seaweed samples. The developed method offered satisfactory recoveries in the 91-99% range and good precisions (HPLC-ICP-MS method was also obtained. All results proved its great potential in routine analysis of iodine speciation in environmental, food and biological samples. PMID:25577649

  10. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousan Valizadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs, massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with coconut and sunflower oils on oxygen saturation of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP. Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 90 newborns who were admitted to Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran. The infants were divided into control and massage therapy groups (massage with coconut and sunflower oils. Data was collected using a hospital documentation form. A 15-minute daily massage was performed for 3 days. Respiratory rate (RR, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 and oxygen saturation were measured 5 minutes before the massage, 3 times during the massage, and 5 minutes after the massage. The collected data was analyzed using a mixed model. Results: In comparison to coconut oil and control groups, mean oxygen saturation of sunflower oil group was improved. In addition, the coconut massage group showed lower oxygen saturation than the control group but was all values were within the normal range. Although massage decreased oxygen saturation, there was no need to increase FiO2. Conclusion: Massage therapy can provide developmental care for infants treated with NCPAP.

  11. Conditional stability for thermal convection in a rotating couple-stress fluid saturating a porous medium with temperature and pressure dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonlinear stability threshold for rotation in a couple-stress fluid heated from below saturating a porous medium with temperature and pressure dependent viscosity is exactly the same as the linear instability boundary. This optimal result is important because it shows that linearized instability theory has captured completely the physics of the onset of convection. The effects of couple-stress parameter, variable dependent viscosity, medium permeability, Taylor number and Darcy–Brinkman number on the onset of convection are also analysed. (paper)

  12. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Mohnke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. These assessments are based on the proportionality of NMR signal amplitude and relaxation time to porosity (water content and pore size, respectively. The relationship between pore size and NMR relaxation time depends on pore shape, which is usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks differs strongly from the response calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes cannot account for water menisci remaining in the corners of de-saturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross-sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of de-saturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, NMR amplitude and NMR relaxation time at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape even so the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface to volume ratio of the pore. The pore-shape-dependence at partial saturation arises from the pore shape and capillary pressure dependent water distribution in pores with triangular cross-sections. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation dependent relaxation time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  13. Experimental study of heterogeneity-induced capillary trapping in the context of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, B.; Clarens, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Leakage of CO2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites could undermine the long-term goal of reducing emissions to the atmosphere. Despite this, leakage processes, especially the vertical transport of gases through geologic formations overlaying target repositories, are poorly characterized. The goal of this work was to experimentally assess how sub-basin scale heterogeneity in overlaying formations could reduce CO2 leakage. High-pressure columns packed with sand and glass beads of different sizes were used to create a capillary barrier, which is an analog of low-permeability inter-beds. Transport of the resulting plume was recorded in real time using electrical resistivity. The effect of pressure, temperature, permeability, surface wettability, and CO2 flow rate were all assessed. Real-time monitoring and quantification of CO2 saturation suggests that capillary heterogeneity trapping is primarily controlled by permeability contrast, pressure, temperature and water/CO2 wettability on mineral surfaces. The amount of trapping was considerably enhanced when permeability contrasted increased, showing a good agreement with equilibrium capillary pressure - saturation analysis in the literature. Temperature and pressure controlled experiments demonstrated the sensitivity of capillary trapping to geothermal and pressure gradient. Wettability alterations also increased initial trapping when more CO2-philic materials is presented and a much greater increase in residual trapping (defined as 10 pore volume water re-imbibition). Variation of leakage rate was not shown to result in significant difference in the overall saturation values, but the stability of the trapped plume was reduced at high CO2 injection rates. These results suggest that local capillary trapping could contribute to secondary trapping and slow the buoyancy-driven rise of CO2. These measurements could have important implications for minimizing risk associated with leakage from carbon sequestration sites.

  14. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting

  15. Capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short historical introduction, the different modes of separation in capillary electrophoresis are explained and illustrated by practical examples. In addition, the most important parameters that can be used to optimize the selectivity of the separation, are discussed. (author) 27 refs.; 8 figs

  16. Influence of local capillary trapping on containment system effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven [University Of Texas At Austin, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering

    2014-03-31

    Immobilization of CO2 injected into deep subsurface storage reservoirs is a critical component of risk assessment for geologic CO2 storage (GCS). Local capillary trapping (LCT) is a recently established mode of immobilization that arises when CO2 migrates due to buoyancy through heterogeneous storage reservoirs. This project sought to assess the amount and extent of LCT expected in storage formations under a range of injection conditions, and to confirm the persistence of LCT if the seal overlying the reservoir were to lose its integrity. Numerical simulation using commercial reservoir simulation software was conducted to assess the influence of injection. Laboratory experiments, modeling and numerical simulation were conducted to assess the effect of compromised seal integrity. Bench-scale (0.6 m by 0.6 m by 0.03 m) experiments with surrogate fluids provided the first empirical confirmation of the key concepts underlying LCT: accumulation of buoyant nonwetting phase at above residual saturations beneath capillary barriers in a variety of structures, which remains immobile under normal capillary pressure gradients. Immobilization of above-residual saturations is a critical distinction between LCT and the more familiar “residual saturation trapping.” To estimate the possible extent of LCT in a storage reservoir an algorithm was developed to identify all potential local traps, given the spatial distribution of capillary entry pressure in the reservoir. The algorithm assumes that the driving force for CO2 migration can be represented as a single value of “critical capillary entry pressure” Pc,entrycrit, such that cells with capillary entry pressure greater/less than Pc,entrycrit act as barriers/potential traps during CO2 migration. At intermediate values of Pc,entrycrit, the barrier regions become more laterally extensive in the reservoir

  17. ESTIMATES OF THE ERROR OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA AT STUDIES OF DENSITY AND THE SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE (SVP) PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Kharchenko P. M.; Timofeev V. P.; Chizhov D. S.; Khristichienko V. V.

    2015-01-01

    At calculations, we have used the next assumptions: 1. Not excluded systematic errors distributed with equal probability; 2. Random errors are normally distributed; 3. Total error is the composition of not excluded systematic and random errors. In calculating of measurement error of pressure, we proceeded from working formula. The confidence interval of each variable less than instrumental error, therefore, to characterize the total error of the measured value P, we use the instrumental error...

  18. Preliminary capillary hysteresis simulations in fractured rocks, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, A.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    1988-12-01

    Preliminary simulations have been carried out to address the question of how hysteretic (history-dependent) capillary pressure-liquid saturation relation may affect the flow and liquid saturation distribution in a fractured rock system. Using a hysteresis model modified from the theoretically based dependent domain model of Mualem (1984), a system consisting of discrete fractures and rock matrix parts was simulated under periodically occurring infiltration pulses. Comparisons were made between the hysteretic case and the non-hysteretic case using the main drying curve alone. Material properties used represent values reported for the densely welded tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since no actual hysteresis measurements were available for the welded tuffs, the necessary data was derived based on information available in the soils literature The strongly hysteretic behavior in the uppermost layer of the matrix along with the overall lower matrix capillary suctions, generated higher fracture flows and a more "smeared" matrix liquid saturation vs. depth distribution for the hysteretic case. While the actual amounts of water being absorbed into the matrix were very similar, the distributions of this absorbed water were different and the matrix was affected up to greater depths in the hysteretic case in comparison to the non-hysteretic case.

  19. CO2 Capillary-Trapping Processes in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Soltanian, Mohamadreza; Ritzi, Robert W., Jr.; Dominic, David F.

    2014-05-01

    The idea of reducing the Earth's greenhouse effect by sequestration of CO2 into the Earth's crust has been discussed and evaluated for more than two decades. Deep saline aquifers are the primary candidate formations for realization of this idea. Evaluation of reservoir capacity and the risk of CO2 leakage require a detailed modeling of the migration and distribution of CO2 in the subsurface structure. There is a finite risk that structural (or hydrodynamic) trapping by caprock may be compromised (e.g. by improperly abandoned wells, stratigraphic discontinuities, faults, etc.). Therefore, other trapping mechanisms (capillary trapping, dissolution, and mineralization) must be considered. Capillary trapping may be very important in providing a "secondary-seal", and is the focus of our investigation. The physical mechanism of CO2 trapping in porous media by capillary trapping incorporates three related processes, i.e. residual trapping, trapping due to hysteresis of the relative permeability, and trapping due to hysteresis of the capillary pressure. Additionally CO2 may be trapped in heterogeneous media due to difference in capillary pressure entry points for different materials. The amount of CO2 trapped by these processes is a complicated nonlinear function of the spatial distribution of permeability, permeability anisotropy, capillary pressure, relative permeability of brine and CO2, permeability hysteresis and residual gas saturation (as well as the rate, total amount and placement of injected CO2). Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs [1, 2]. We investigated how the dynamics of a CO2 plume, during and after injection, is influenced by the hierarchical and multi-scale stratal architecture in such

  20. Separation and determination of coumarins in Fructus cnidii extracts by pressurized capillary electrochromatography using a packed column with a monolithic outlet frit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Danxia; Wang, Jiajing; Jiang, Yunyun; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong; Wu, Yutian

    2009-12-01

    The pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) was utilized for the separation and determination of coumarins in Fructus cnidii extracts from 12 different regions. After a thorough study of analytical parameters such as acetonitrile content of the mobile phase, the concentration and pH of the buffer, and the applied voltage, a methodology was proposed to separate and determine six coumarins of F. cnidii extracts in less than 15 min. The experiments were performed in an in-house packed column with a monolithic outlet frit under the optimal conditions: pH 4.0 ammonium acetate buffer at 10 mM containing 50% acetonitrile at -6kV applied voltage. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 10.0-100.0 microg/mL for bergapten, 20.0-200.0 microg/mL for imperatorin, 5.0-400.0 microg/mL for osthole, 10.0-100.0 microg/mL for 2'-acetylangelicin, 10.0-200.0 microg/mL for oroselone, and 10.0-200.0 microg/mL for O-acetylcolumbianetin. The correlation coefficients were between 0.9967 and 0.9995. With this pCEC system, fingerprints of F. cnidii extracts were preliminarily established to distinguish three types of coumarins by characteristic peaks, and the quality of various sources of raw materials was evaluated by determining the contents of six coumarins. PMID:19608371

  1. Rapid fabrication of ionic liquid-functionalized monolithic column via in-situ urea-formaldehyde polycondensation for pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiabin; Wu, Fangling; Xia, Ruirui; Zhao, Qi; Lin, Xucong; Xie, Zenghong

    2016-06-01

    A novel strategy for rapidly fabricating ionic liquid (IL)-bonded multifunctional monolithic stationary phase has been developed by an in-situ polycondensation of urea-formaldehyde (UF) and a lab-made acylamino-functionalized IL (1-acetylamino-propyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide, [AAPMIm]Br). Two polycondensation processes of UF with 1-amino-propyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide or [AAPMIm]Br were evaluated. Several parameters including mass ratio of urea-formaldehyde, amount of [AAPMIm]Br, polycondensation time and reaction temperature were optimized, and the [AAPMIm]Br-bonded monolithic stationary phase could be rapidly synthesized in 10min with a satisfactory permeability and mechanical stability. Used for pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC), a typical hydrophilic interaction (HI) retention could be obtained in the resultant [AAPMIm]Br-bonded monolith when the content of acetonitrile (ACN) in mobile phase exceeded 20%. Multiple retention mechanisms such as hydrophilic interaction (HI), hydrogen bond (HH), anion-exchange and cation-exclude interactions, were acheived in the [AAPMIm]Br-bonded monolith. Various polar compounds including phenols, benzoic acid and its homologues, and enkephalins have been well separated and thus demonstrated a satisfactory separation performance of the obtained monolith. A facile access is lighted for rapid preparation of ionic liquid-bonded monoliths with multiple retention mechanisms for pCEC. PMID:27156751

  2. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, R.C.; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (??, cm-1) and CO2 density (??, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2 fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9cm-1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ??=47513.64243-1374.824414????+13.25586152????2-0.04258891551????3 (r2=0.99835, ??=0.0253g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. ESTIMATES OF THE ERROR OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA AT STUDIES OF DENSITY AND THE SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE (SVP PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko P. M.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available At calculations, we have used the next assumptions: 1. Not excluded systematic errors distributed with equal probability; 2. Random errors are normally distributed; 3. Total error is the composition of not excluded systematic and random errors. In calculating of measurement error of pressure, we proceeded from working formula. The confidence interval of each variable less than instrumental error, therefore, to characterize the total error of the measured value P, we use the instrumental errors of all variables. In estimating of temperature measurement error was consider the systematic and random error. To estimate random error we used measurement data of the specific volume of water on six isotherms. Obtained values were compared with published data. As an approximate estimate of the random error of our experimental data, we can take it as a total for all the isotherms of the specific volume in comparison with the published data. For studied fractions confidence limit of total error of measurement results located in the range of 0,03 ч 0,1%. At temperatures close to the critical increasing influence of errors of reference and the error associated with the introduction of corrections on the thermal expansion of the piezometer. In the two-phase area confidence limit of total error increases and located between 0,08 ч 0,15%. This is due to the sharp increase in this area of reference error of pressure and error in determining to the weight of the substance in the piezometer

  4. Local OH concentration measurement in atmospheric pressure flames by a laser-saturated fluorescence method: two-optical path laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgroux, P; Cottereau, M J

    1991-01-01

    The first (to our knowledge) measurements of number density of OH in flames at atmospheric pressure by TOPLIF are reported. TOPLIF (acronym for two optical paths laser-induced fluorescence) improves the accuracy of LIF measurements by taking into account both the spatial profile of the exciting laser intensity and the collisional transfer rate. The method is based on simultaneously recording the LIF signals from focal volumes of two different shapes. The ratio of the signals is a measure of the saturation parameter (which depends on the laser intensity and the quenching) using which accurate determination of the species number density can be deduced from the fluorescence signals. The method is valid as far as at least partial saturation is reached. First, experimental verification of the theoretical basis of the method is reported. The population of a single rovibronic level is measured as it is in most of the spectroscopic methods. TOPLIF measures this population relative to this level's population in a chosen reference flame. Absolute value can therefore be obtained if the value in the reference flame is known or measured. Absolute [OH] profiles obtained in flat flames burning at 60 and 1000 mb are presented and compared to laser absorption measurements. PMID:20581952

  5. The saturation of the electron beam filamentation instability by the self-generated magnetic field and magnetic pressure gradient-driven electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, M E; Kourakis, I; Borghesi, M

    2008-01-01

    Two counter-propagating cool and equally dense electron beams are modelled with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The electron beam filamentation instability is examined in one spatial dimension. The box length resolves one pair of current filaments. A small, a medium-sized and a large filament are considered and compared. The magnetic field amplitude at the saturation time of the filamentation instability is proportional to the filament size. It is demonstrated, that the force on the electrons imposed by the electrostatic field, which develops during the nonlinear stage of the instability, oscillates around a mean value that equals the magnetic pressure gradient force. The forces acting on the electrons due to the electrostatic and the magnetic field have a similar strength. The electrostatic field reduces the confining force close to the stable equilibrium of each filament and increases it farther away. The confining potential is not sinusoidal, as assumed by the magnetic trapping model, and it permits an...

  6. The effect of hydrate saturation on water retention curves in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabadi, Nariman; Zheng, Xianglei; Jang, Jaewon

    2016-05-01

    The experimental measurement of water retention curve in hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behavior of hydrate dissociation and gas production. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is selected as hydrate former. The pore habit of THF hydrates is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel. It is confirmed that THF hydrates are not wetting phase on the quartz surface of the micromodel and occupy either an entire pore or part of pore space resulting in change in pore size distribution. And the measurement of water retention curves in THF hydrate-bearing sediments with hydrate saturation ranging from Sh = 0 to Sh = 0.7 is conducted for excess water condition. The experimental results show that the gas entry pressure and the capillary pressure increase with increasing hydrate saturation. Based on the experimental results, fitting parameters for van Genuchten equation are suggested for different hydrate saturation conditions.

  7. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  8. Numerical treatment of two-phase flow in capillary heterogeneous porous media by finite-volume approximations

    OpenAIRE

    Evje, Steinar; Friis, Helmer André

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines two-phase flow in porous media with heterogeneous capillary pressure functions. This problem has received very little attention in the literature, and constitutes a challenge for numerical discretization, since saturation discontinuities arise at the interface between the different homogeneous regions in the domain. As a motivation we first consider a one-dimensional model problem, for which a semi-analytical solution is known, and examine some different fin...

  9. Modeling of carbon sequestration in coal-beds: A variable saturated simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storage of carbon dioxide in deep coal seams is a profitable method to reduce the concentration of green house gases in the atmosphere while the methane as a byproduct can be extracted during carbon dioxide injection into the coal seam. In this procedure, the key element is to keep carbon dioxide in the coal seam without escaping for a long term. It is depended on many factors such as properties of coal basin, fracture state, phase equilibrium, etc., especially the porosity, permeability and saturation of the coal seam. In this paper, a variable saturation model was developed to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide sequestration and coal-bed methane recovery. This variable saturation model can be used to track the saturation variability with the partial pressures change caused by carbon dioxide injection. Saturation variability is a key factor to predict the capacity of carbon dioxide storage and methane recovery. Based on this variable saturation model, a set of related variables including capillary pressure, relative permeability, porosity, coupled adsorption model, concentration and temperature equations were solved. From results of the simulation, historical data agree with the variable saturation model as well as the adsorption model constructed by Langmuir equations. The Appalachian basin, as an example, modeled the carbon dioxide sequestration in this paper. The results of the study and the developed models can provide the projections for the CO2 sequestration and methane recovery in coal-beds within different regional specifics

  10. Generation of saturation functions for simulation models of carbonate reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingfeng

    A rock type is the unit of rock deposited under similar conditions, which went through similar diagenetic processes, producing analogous rock fabric, with distinct set of pore types, and pore throat size distribution, having specific range of porosity and permeability. Rock typing can generally be used as a guide to assign petrophysical characteristics to different zones for detailed reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, which provide valid frames for reservoir development. It is often assumed that conventional rock types are capable of assigning multiphase flow characteristics, such as capillary pressure and relative permeability to the cells of dynamic simulation models. However, these conventional rock types, or static reservoir rock types (SRRT) fail to capture the actual variability of capillary pressure and relative permeability, due to lack of representation of wettability difference at different elevation above the free water level (FWL) in carbonate reservoirs, especially in the highly heterogeneous reservoirs. This should be resolved through dynamic reservoir rock types (DRRT), in which wettability effect is imposed on the SRRTs to generate saturation functions for simulation models. This research studies Ghedan's comprehensive DRRT model7, and proposes a modified Ghedan's model. First, the defined static rock types are sub-divided into sub-static rock types based on porosity frequency. Second, three curve-fitting programs are coded to generate the related saturation-height functions. These are the modified Ghedan-Okuyiga equation, Cuddy function and Power Law function. Developed from Ghedan-Okuyiga function113, the recommended modified Ghedan-Okuyiga function has been proposed with saturation and implicit porosity as a function of height above FWL in the transition zone. Third, each sub-static rock type is divided into a number of DRRTs by determining the capillary pressure and relative permeability curves in the oil zone from gas

  11. Impact of gender and healthy aging on pulmonary capillary wedge pressure estimated by the kinetics-tracking index using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Masanori; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Ono, Koji; Minatoguchi, Shingo; Watanabe, Takatomo; Arai, Masazumi; Nishigaki, Kazuhiko; Noda, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Sachiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-05-01

    Risk stratification in heart failure (HF) among patients and healthy subjects using pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) is important for understanding when and why HF develops. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of gender and healthy aging on estimated PCWP using a kinetics-tracking index in patients and in healthy subjects without hypertension. The study population consisted of 198 healthy subjects without cardiovascular or other systemic diseases and who were not taking any medications. Echocardiographic studies were performed using an ACUSON Sequoia 512 ultrasound system. Active left atrial (LA) emptying function (EF) was defined as (pre-atrial contraction LA volume-minimum LA volume)/pre-atrial contraction LA volume × 100%. With an increase in age, the E/A and E/e' ratios (markers of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction (DD)) showed a similar decrease in males and females. PCWP was maintained at 8.3±1.8 mm Hg in males and 8.2±2.3 mm Hg in females because of compensation by an increase in active LA EF. In contrast, the compensation for LV DD with an increase in active LA EF in females tended to be more gradual (slope=0.11) than in males (slope=0.18, P=0.060 vs. female). The parameters that indicated LV DD deteriorated with advancing age. PCWP might be maintained because of compensation, namely an increase in active LA EF in both males and females. The compensation in female septuagenarians and octogenarians was weaker than in male septuagenarians and octogenarians. This difference in compensation may explain why HF with preserved LV ejection fraction occurs more frequently in females than in males. PMID:26791012

  12. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

  13. Determination of Wastewater Compounds in Sediment and Soil by Pressurized Solvent Extraction, Solid-Phase Extraction, and Capillary-Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Zaugg, Steven D.; Smith, Steven G.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the determination of 61 compounds in environmental sediment and soil samples is described. The method was developed in response to increasing concern over the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in wastewater and wastewater-impacted sediment on aquatic organisms. This method also may be used to evaluate the effects of combined sanitary and storm-sewer overflow on the water and sediment quality of urban streams. Method development focused on the determination of compounds that were chosen on the basis of their endocrine-disrupting potential or toxicity. These compounds include the alkylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and their degradates, food additives, fragrances, antioxidants, flame retardants, plasticizers, industrial solvents, disinfectants, fecal sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and high-use domestic pesticides. Sediment and soil samples are extracted using a pressurized solvent extraction system. The compounds of interest are extracted from interfering matrix components by high-pressure water/isopropyl alcohol extraction. The compounds were isolated using disposable solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges containing chemically modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. The cartridges were dried with nitrogen gas, and then sorbed compounds were eluted with methylene chloride (80 percent)-diethyl ether (20 percent) through Florisil/sodium sulfate SPE cartridge, and then determined by capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Recoveries in reagent-sand samples fortified at 4 to 72 micrograms averaged 76 percent ?13 percent relative standard deviation for all method compounds. Initial method reporting levels for single-component compounds ranged from 50 to 500 micrograms per kilogram. The concentrations of 20 out of 61 compounds initially will be reported as estimated with the 'E' remark code for one of three reasons: (1) unacceptably low-biased recovery (less than 60 percent) or highly variable method performance

  14. Application of Low-pressure Saturated Steam Power Generating Technology in Steel Enterprises%低压饱和蒸汽发电技术在钢铁企业的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖; 马永锋

    2016-01-01

    介绍了钢铁企业饱和蒸汽发电主要的应用技术,并通过某钢厂的低压饱和蒸汽利用方案,对比了饱和蒸汽汽轮机和饱和蒸汽螺杆发电机应用的优缺点.%The main application technology of saturated steam power generating in steel enterprises is introduced. Taking the utilization program of low-pressure saturated steam pow-er generating of some steelmaker as an example, the advantages and disadvantages of saturat-ed steam turbine generator and saturated steam screw generator are compared.

  15. PLANNING OF AN EXPERIMENT AND METHODICAL PRACTICE ON INSTALLATION FOR RESEARCHING OF DENSITY AND SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE (SVP OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko P. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the methods of calibration and working measurements, planning of experiment and experimental data processing, characterized objects of study and provides illustrations of research results of P-t depending for petroleum fractions. We have described the results of generalization of density (specific volume of the examined samples in the liquid and on the saturation line and SVP in the two-phase region. The article shows that existing methods of calculation based primarily on the results of the study of the density and SVP of individual hydrocarbons and extremely limited experimental data of petroleum products. We have detected a necessity of creation calculation methods based on reliable experimental data, providing greater accuracy, substantiated choice of directions for research SVP and density of petroleum products. Modern technology of petroleum processing and using of petroleum products requires the creation of more perfect installation for the study of SVP of substances and obtaining experimental data with greater accuracy. Generalized analytic dependence of SVP of petroleum products from all determining parameters have not yet been received. Therefore, experimental determination of this pressure should be the basis of the calculation of any device, because the calculations of petroleum products by the formulas and nomograms obtained with considerable error

  16. Optimization of pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) for rapid determination of mineral oil saturated (MOSH) and aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) in cardboard and paper intended for food contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Sabrina; Sander, Maren; Purcaro, Giorgia; Scolaro, Marianna; Barp, Laura; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2013-10-15

    Packaging can represent a primary source of food contamination with mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH) and aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH), especially when recycled cardboard or mineral oil based printing inks are used. A pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method, followed by on-line LC-GC analysis, has been optimized for rapid mineral oil determination in cardboard and paper samples. The proposed method involves extraction with hexane (2 cycles) at 60°C for 5 min, and allows for the processing of up to 6 samples in parallel with minimal sample manipulation and solvent consumption. It gave good repeatability (coefficient of variation lower than 5%) and practically quantitative extraction yield (less than 2% of the total contamination found in a third separate cycle). The method was applied to different cardboards and paper materials intended for food contact. Results obtained were similar to those obtained by applying classical solvent extraction with hexane/ethanol 1:1 (v/v) as described by Lorenzini et al. [20]. PMID:24054587

  17. Capillary condensation onto titania (TiO2) nanoparticle agglomerates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonmin; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-02-27

    A capillary condensation process was developed for the purpose of forming interconnections between nanoparticles at low temperatures. The process was performed in a temperature-controlled flow chamber on nanoparticle agglomerates deposited at submonolayer coverage on a transmission electron microscope grid. The partial pressure of the condensing species, tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the temperature of the chamber were adjusted in order to obtain the various saturation conditions for capillary condensation. The modified samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, BET surface area method, and scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy-loss spectrometry. Experimental results show that bridge-shaped layers were dominantly formed in the neck region between particles and were composed of amorphous silica. The analysis of TEM micrographs verified that the coverage of the layers is strongly dependent on the saturation ratio. Image analysis of TEM micrographs shows that this dependency is qualitatively in agreement with theoretical predictions based on the classical Kelvin equation for the specific geometries in our system. PMID:17243733

  18. Nuclear determination of saturation profiles in core plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to determine liquid saturations in core plugs during flooding is of importance when the relative permeability and capillary pressure function are to be determined. This part of the EFP-95 project uses transmission of γ-radiation to determine these saturations. In γ-transmission measurements, the electron density of the given substance is measured. This is an advantage as compared to methods that use electric conductivity, since neither oil nor gas conducts electricity. At the moment a single 137Cs-source is used, but a theoretical investigation of whether it is possible to determine three saturations, using two radioactive sources with different γ-energies, has been performed. Measurements were made on three core plugs. To make sure that the measurements could be reproduced, all the plugs had a point of reference, i.e. a mark so that it was possible to place the plug same way every time. Two computer programs for calculation of saturation and porosity and the experimental setup are listed. (EG)

  19. Temporal changes in surface partial pressure of carbon dioxide and carbonate saturation state in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean during the 1962-2012 period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Yu, W.; Wang, H.; Jiang, L.-Q.; Feng, L.; Gao, L.; Li, K.; Li, Z.; Wei, Q.; Ning, C.

    2014-11-01

    Information on changes in the oceanic carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and air-sea CO2 flux as well as on ocean acidification in the Indian Ocean is very limited. In this study, temporal changes of the inorganic carbon system in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO, 5° N-5° S, 90-95° E) are examined using partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) data collected in May 2012, historical pCO2 data since 1962, and total alkalinity (TA) data calculated from salinity. Results show that sea surface pCO2 in the equatorial belt (2° N-2° S, 90-95° E) increased from ∼307 μatm in April 1963 to ∼373 μatm in May 1999, ∼381 μatm in April 2007, and ∼385 μatm in May 2012. The mean rate of pCO2 increase in this area (∼1.56 μatm yr-1) was close to that in the atmosphere (∼1.46 μatm yr-1). Despite the steady pCO2 increase in this region, no significant change in air-sea CO2 fluxes was detected during this period. Ocean acidification as indicated by pH and saturation states for carbonate minerals has indeed taken place in this region. Surface water pH (total hydrogen scale) and saturation state for aragonite (Ωarag), calculated from pCO2 and TA, decreased significantly at rates of -0.0016 ± 0.0001 and -0.0095 ± 0.0005 yr-1, respectively. The respective contributions of temperature, salinity, TA, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) to the increase in surface pCO2 and the decreases in pH and Ωarag are quantified. We find that the increase in DIC dominated these changes, while contributions from temperature, salinity, and TA were insignificant. The increase in DIC was most likely associated with the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, and the transport of accumulated anthropogenic CO2 from a CO2 sink region via basin-scale ocean circulations. These two processes may combine to drive oceanic DIC to follow atmospheric CO2 increase.

  20. Saturation curve of SiO2 component in rutile-type GeO2: A recoverable high-temperature pressure standard from 3 GPa to 10 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy and precision of pressure measurements and the pursuit of reliable and readily available pressure scales at simultaneous high temperatures and pressures are still topics in development in high pressure research despite many years of work. In situ pressure scales based on x-ray diffraction are widely used but require x-ray access, which is lacking outside of x-ray beam lines. Other methods such as fixed points require several experiments to bracket a pressure calibration point. In this study, a recoverable high-temperature pressure gauge for pressures ranging from 3 GPa to 10 GPa is presented. The gauge is based on the pressure-dependent solubility of an SiO2 component in the rutile-structured phase of GeO2 (argutite), and is valid when the argutite solid solution coexists with coesite. The solid solution varies strongly in composition, mainly in pressure but also somewhat in temperature, and the compositional variations are easily detected by x-ray diffraction of the recovered products because of significant changes in the lattice parameters. The solid solution is measured here on two isotherms, one at 1200 °C and the other at 1500 °C, and is developed as a pressure gauge by calibrating it against three fixed points for each temperature and against the lattice parameter of MgO measured in situ at a total of three additional points. A somewhat detailed thermodynamic analysis is then presented that allows the pressure gauge to be used at other temperatures. This provides a way to accurately and reproducibly evaluate the pressure in high pressure experiments and applications in this pressure-temperature range, and could potentially be used as a benchmark to compare various other pressure scales under high temperature conditions. - Graphical abstract: The saturation curve of SiO2 in TiO2 shows a strong pressure dependence and a strong dependence of unit cell volume on composition. This provides an opportunity to use this saturation curve as a measurement

  1. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissocation in a Partially Saturated Sand--Measurements and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

    2005-03-01

    We performed a sequence of tests on a partially water-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminum pressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT) observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation of thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and the sand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kinetic nature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermal perturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of the sand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations with hydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermal stimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociation through depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changes throughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation and dissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes that altered local water saturation.

  2. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured over a range of confining pressures while injecting CO2 and brine into the samples. Pore fluid pressure was also varied and monitored together with porosity during injection. Effective medium models were developed to understand the mechanisms and impact of observed changes and to provide the means for implementation of the interpretation methodologies in the field. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in carbonate rocks show as much as 20-50% decrease after injection of the reactive CO2-brine mixture; the changes were caused by permanent changes to the rock elastic frame associated with dissolution of mineral. Velocity decreases were observed under both dry and fluid-saturated conditions, and the amount of change was correlated with the initial pore fabrics. Scanning Electron Microscope images of carbonate rock microstructures were taken before and after injection of CO2-rich water. The images reveal enlargement of the pores, dissolution of micrite (micron-scale calcite crystals), and pitting of grain surfaces caused by the fluid- solid chemical reactivity. The magnitude of the changes correlates with the rock microtexture – tight, high surface area samples showed the largest changes in permeability and smallest changes in porosity and elastic stiffness compared to those in rocks with looser texture and larger intergranular pore space. Changes to the pore space also occurred from flow of fine particles with the injected fluid. Carbonates with grain-coating materials, such as residual oil, experienced very little permanent change during injection. In the tight micrite/spar cement component, dissolution is controlled by diffusion: the mass transfer of products and reactants is thus slow and the fluid is expected to be close to thermodynamical equilibrium with the calcite, leading to very little dissolution, or even precipitation. In the microporous rounded micrite and macropores, dissolution is controlled by

  3. Dependence of mountain moisture retention on downstream saturation

    CERN Document Server

    November, L J

    2007-01-01

    We derive 1D steady equilibria for partially saturated downslope flow as a solution to the reposed vadose-zone problem. The equilibria are determined by two free parameters: a mean flow and a downstream saturation. Where there is no downstream saturation, a uniform outflow of constant saturation is obtained, but if an isolated zone of excess downstream saturation exists, the upstream flow speed is reduced and saturation increased. The saturated zone produces a capillary head jump that blocks the downward percolation. With a fully saturated downstream zone in medium clay mixtures, flow backs up more than 20 km projected vertically, but with 90% downstream saturation, the back up is reduced to less than a km. The drying of downstream saturated zones with the increased rate of mountain moisture outflow gives a viable quantitative explanation for the mysterious 56% unaccounted drop seen in the output of the southern NM La Luz / Fresnal Watershed at Alamogordo's upstream spring-box diversions.

  4. Capillary Micro-Flow Through a Fiber Bundle(Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying-dan; WANG Ji-hui; TAN Hua; GAO Guo-qiang

    2004-01-01

    The present work considered the capillary micro-flow through a fiber bundle. The resin heights in the fiber bundle as a function of time were used to determine the experimental values of capillary pressure and the permeability by the nonlinear regression fitting method. The fitting curves showed a good agreement with experiments. However, these values of capillary pressure from short- time experiments were much lower than the theoretical results from the Yang-Laplace Equation. More accurate capillary pressure was predicted from the presented long-run experiment.

  5. Viscosity measurement in the capillary tube viscometer under unsteady flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present study is to develop a new device that the viscous characteristics of fluids are determined by applying the unsteady flow concept to the traditional capillary tube viscometer. The capillary tube viscometer consists of a small cylindrical reservoir, capillary tube, a load cell system that measures the mass flow rate, interfaces, and computer. Due to the small size of the reservoir the height of liquid in the reservoir decreases as soon as the liquid in the reservoir drains out through the capillary and the mass flow rate in the capillary decreases as the hydrostatic pressure in the reservoir decreases resulting in a decrease of the shear rate in the capillary tube. The instantaneous shear rate and driving force in the capillary tube are determined by measuring the mass flow rate through the capillary, and the fluid viscosity is determined from the measured flow rate and the driving force

  6. Design and performance test of miniature capillary pumped loop for electronics cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万珍平; 皮丕辉; 付永清; 汤勇

    2008-01-01

    Considering two characteristics of compact heat dissipation room and high heat flux, a novel miniature capillary pumped loop (MCPL) for electronics cooling was proposed. MCPL consists of evaporator, condenser, vapor and liquid line dissipates heat by boiling and condensation of working fluids with no extra power consumption. Working fluid circulation is ensured by vapor pressure and capillary head. Saturated wick screens vapor and liquid, and ensures one-way flow of working fluid with no extra valve. In order to promote heat dissipation capacity of MCPL, the intensified boiling and condensation structures are embedded into evaporator and condenser respectively, which are useful to increasing boiling and condensation efficiency. Startup and run characteristics are tested by experiments in the condition of different power inputs and working fluids. MCPL is capable of dissipating 80 W of thermal energy and keeping the bottom substrate temperature of evaporator at 80 ℃.

  7. Saturated fat (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food ... saturated fats. Vegetable sources of saturated fat include coconut and palm oils. When looking at a food ...

  8. Sulfur Concentration of Martian Magmas at Sulfide Saturation at High Pressures and Temperatures - Implications for Martian Magma Ocean and Magmatic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2012-12-01

    Sulfur is critical for a wide range of processes of terrestrial planets including thermal evolution of core and atmosphere and geochemistry of mantle and crust. For Mars, sulfur is particularly important because it may be abundant in the core [1] while SO 2 and H2 S might have exerted a strong greenhouse climate in the past [2]. A critical parameter that affects sulfur distribution during differentiation is the sulfur carrying capacity of mantle melts. However, most experiments constraining sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) are conducted on FeO poor (~5-12 wt.%) basalts [3] and recent experiments on high-FeO (~16-22 wt.%, [4]) Martian basalts are restricted to ≤0.8 GPa [5]. To constrain SCSS of Martian magmas at mantle conditions, we simulated basalt-sulfide melt equilibria (S added as 15-30 wt.% FeS) in Gr capsules using a piston cylinder at 1-3 GPa and 1500-1700 °C. Two starting compositions, equivalent to olivine-phyric shergottites Yamato980459 (Y98; ~17.53 wt.% FeO) and NWA 2990 (NWA; ~16.42 wt.% FeO) and thought to be primary magma [6] were used. A composition Y98+1.4 wt.% H2O was also explored to constrain the effect of water on SCSS. All experiments produced quenched sulfide and silicate melts ± opx . FeS species in the NWA glasses was confirmed from peaks at 300-400 cm-1 in Raman spectra [7]. At 1600 °C, SCSS, measured using EPMA, decreases with pressure, 4800 to 3500 ppm from 1 to 2.5 GPa for Y98, ~5440 to 4380 ppm from 1 to 2 GPa for Y98+1.4 wt.% H2O, and 5000 to 3000 ppm from 1 to 3 GPa for NWA. At 2 GPa, SCSS of NWA increases with temperature, 3300 to 4600 ppm from 1500 to 1700 °C. Combining new and previous experiments on Martian basalts [5] (a total of 28 SCSS data with FeO* of 9.3-32.78 wt.%), a preliminary equation of the form LnS (ppm) = a + b.P + c/T +d.XSiO2 + e.XAl2O3 + f.LnXFeO was fitted, where P is in GPa, T in K, and X represents mole fraction of a given oxide. Our study suggests that at conditions of final melt

  9. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  10. Porosity, single-phase permeability, and capillary pressure data from preliminary laboratory experiments on selected samples from Marker Bed 139 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1 of 3: Main report, appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three groups of core samples from Marker Bed 139 of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were analyzed to provide data to support the development of numerical models used to predict the long-term hydrologic and structural response of the WIPP repository. These laboratory experiments, part of the FY93 Experimental Scoping Activities of the Salado Two-Phase Flow Laboratory Program, were designed to (1) generate WIPP-specific porosity and single-phase permeability data, (2) provide information needed to design and implement planned tests to measure two-phase flow properties, including threshold pressure, capillary pressure, and relative permeability, and (3) evaluate the suitability of using analog correlations for the Salado Formation to assess the long-term performance of the WIPP. This report contains a description of the boreholes core samples, the core preparation techniques used, sample sizes, testing procedures, test conditions, and results of porosity and single-phase permeability tests performed at three laboratories: TerraTek, Inc. (Salt Lake City, UT), RE/SPEC, Inc. (Rapid City, SD), and Core Laboratories-Special Core Analysis Laboratory (Carrollton, TX) for Rock Physics Associates. In addition, this report contains the only WIPP-specific two-phase-flow capillary-pressure data for twelve core samples. The WIPP-specific data generated in this laboratory study and in WIPP field-test programs and information from suitable analogs will form the basis for specification of single- and two-phase flow parameters for anhydrite markers beds for WIPP performance assessment calculations

  11. Capillary Interactions between a Probe Tip and a Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-Ning; WANG Le-Feng; RONG Wei-Bin

    2008-01-01

    To understand capillary interactions between probe tips and nanoparticles under ambient conditions,a theoretical model of capillary forces between them is developed based on the geometric relations. It is found that the contribution of surface tension force to the total capillary force attains to similar order of magnitude as the capillary pressure force in many cases.It is also shown that the tip shape and the radial distance of the meniscus have great influence on the capillary force.The capillary force decreases with the increasing separation distances,and the variance of the contact angles may change the magnitudes of capillary forces several times at large radial distances.The applicability of the symmetric meniscus approximation is discussed.

  12. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in a PartiallySaturated Core-Scale Sand Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Moridis, George J.; Seol,Yongkoo; Freifeld, Barry M.; Taylor, Charles E.; Gupta, Arvind

    2005-11-03

    We performed a sequence of tests on a partiallywater-saturated sand sample contained in an x-ray transparent aluminumpressure vessel that is conducive to x-ray computed tomography (CT)observation. These tests were performed to gather data for estimation ofthermal properties of the sand/water/gas system and thesand/hydrate/water/gas systems, as well as data to evaluate the kineticnature of hydrate dissociation. The tests included mild thermalperturbations for the estimation of the thermal properties of thesand/water/gas system, hydrate formation, thermal perturbations withhydrate in the stability zone, hydrate dissociation through thermalstimulation, additional hydrate formation, and hydrate dissociationthrough depressurization with thermal stimulation. Density changesthroughout the sample were observed as a result of hydrate formation anddissociation, and these processes induced capillary pressure changes thataltered local water saturation.

  13. Saturation dependence of the streaming potential during drainage and imbibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, J.; Leinov, E.; Jackson, M.

    2012-12-01

    The rock pore space in many subsurface settings is saturated with water and one or more immiscible fluid phases; examples include NAPLs in contaminated aquifers, supercritical CO2 during sequestration in deep saline aquifers, the vadose zone, and hydrocarbon reservoirs. To interpret spontaneous potential measurements for groundwater flow and hydraulic properties in these settings requires an understanding of the saturation dependence of the streaming potential. Vinogradov and Jackson [2011] recently reported measurements of the streaming potential during drainage and, for the first time, imbibition in sandstone plugs saturated with water and either undecane or nitrogen. However, they reported effective values of the streaming potential coupling coefficient (C) at partial saturation (Sw), because Sw in the plugs was not uniform during drainage or imbibition. The aim of this study is to determine the true value of C as a function of Sw. We use a three-step approach in which hydraulic and electrical parameters are determined using numerical simulation and either Nelder-Mead simplex unconstrained optimisation or Active-set constrained optimisation algorithm. In the first step, we determine the saturation dependence of the relative permeability and capillary pressure, assuming these are simple exponential functions of Sw (Corey-type) and using an objective function which is a weighted average of the measured (i) pressure drop across the plug, (ii) liquid rate flowing out of the plug, and (iii) fraction of water flowing out of the plug. In the second, we determine the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity, using the measured conductivity of the plug as the objective function. In the final step, we determine the saturation dependence of the streaming potential, using the measured streaming potential across the plug as the objective function. We obtain a good match between simulated and measured values of C, and find that it (i) exhibits hysteresis, (ii) can

  14. PLANNING OF AN EXPERIMENT AND METHODICAL PRACTICE ON INSTALLATION FOR RESEARCHING OF DENSITY AND SATURATED VAPOR PRESSURE (SVP) OF PETROLEUM PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Kharchenko P. M.; Timofeev V. P.; Chizhov D. S.; Lazareva A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the methods of calibration and working measurements, planning of experiment and experimental data processing, characterized objects of study and provides illustrations of research results of P-t depending for petroleum fractions. We have described the results of generalization of density (specific volume) of the examined samples in the liquid and on the saturation line and SVP in the two-phase region. The article shows that existing methods of calculation based primarily...

  15. Advances in Capillary Chromatography%毛细管色谱的进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Capillary columns are used in both capillary liquid chromatography and capillary electrochromatography. The design for capillary liquid chromatography is discussed in comparison with capillary gas chromatography. The difference of diffusion coefficient in gas and liquid phase is a key role. The study for obtaining a high performance capillary liquid chromatography is discussed. Capillary electrochromatography is recently interesting for its instinct ability to realize a high performance chromatography. Capillary electrochromatography with and without pressurized flow is reviewed briefly. Instrumentation for capillary electrochromatography with pressurized flow is discussed. The port of splitting, and gradient elution of both solution and potential are described. The new findings of both the variation of column resistance and capacity factor according to the value of applied electric voltage are also discussed.

  16. Uptake of water droplets by nonwetting capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Willmott, Geoff R; Hendy, Shaun C

    2010-01-01

    We present direct experimental evidence that water droplets can spontaneously penetrate non-wetting capillaries, driven by the action of Laplace pressure due to high droplet curvature. Using high-speed optical imaging, microcapillaries of radius 50 to 150 micron, and water microdroplets of average radius between 100 and 1900 micron, we demonstrate that there is a critical droplet radius below which water droplets can be taken up by hydrophobised glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) capillaries. The rate of capillary uptake is shown to depend strongly on droplet size, with smaller droplets being absorbed more quickly. Droplet size is also shown to influence meniscus motion in a pre-filled non-wetting capillary, and quantitative measurements of this effect result in a derived water-PTFE static contact angle between 96 degrees and 114 degrees. Our measurements confirm recent theoretical predictions and simulations for metal nanodroplets penetrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results are relevant to a wide ...

  17. 大厚高压油藏物理模型饱和度分布测量方法%Investigating the Saturation Distribution Measurement Method for the Physical Model of High-pressure and Large-thick Reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴柏林; 曾鸣; 刘程

    2013-01-01

      当前针对物理模型饱和度分布的研究主要针对于一维小岩样和二维小薄模型,针对大厚高压油藏物理模型的方法无人涉及。针对大厚高压油藏物理模型的特点,选取γ射线吸收法和lambert定律进行单个测试点的饱和度测量和计算,然后利用二维数控移动定位系统完成对整个物理模型所有测试点饱和度的测量和计算,最终利用数学插分方法得到油藏物理模型的饱和度分布等值线图,实现对大厚高压油藏二维饱和度分布的预测。通过单点精确度实验及简单验证实验研究表明,利用γ射线吸收法预测大厚高压油藏二维饱和度分布可行性强。%Current research on saturation distribution of physical model focuses on the one-dimensional small rock sample and two-dimensional thin model,and research on high-pressure and large-thick reservoirs model has been involved. In this paper, the timing stable gamma ray test to each model grid node is implemented with high precision two-dimension Computerized Numerical Control(CNC)mobile positioning system,and then the saturation of each grid node is calculated through Lambert Law. Afterwards,reservoir saturation profile is obtained using mathematical drawing method and the prediction of saturation distribution measurement in high-pressure and big-thick reservoir physical model is finally realized. After a single point testing and a simple replication experiment,this method is proved to be feasible and accurate and significant to predict the saturation distribution of high-pressure and large-thick reservoir model.

  18. Capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection and sequential injection analysis in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electro-chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Thanh Duc

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the applications of capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D) in capillary electrophoresis (CE) hybridized with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), i.e. in capillary electrochromatography and pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis, as well as on the development and applications of an extension of CE-C4D with sequential injection analysis (SIA). At first, the in-house built C4D was used for electro-chromatographic determinations of...

  19. Intramedullary capillary haemangioma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, T

    2012-02-03

    Intramedullary capillary haemangioma is extremely rare and only four cases have been previously reported. We describe a further case, outlining the clinical, radiological, surgical and pathological features.

  20. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also known as blood vessels and capillaries. The pressure --- blood pressure --- is the result of two forces. The ... was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  1. Nitrogen incorporation in saturated aliphatic C6-C8 hydrocarbons and ethanol in low-pressure nitrogen plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Chen, Lee Chuin; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Wada, Hiroshi; Nonami, Hiroshi; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2016-06-01

    Ion/molecule reactions of saturated hydrocarbons (n-hexane, cyclohexane, n-heptane, n-octane and isooctane) in 28-Torr N2 plasma generated by a hollow cathode discharge ion source were investigated using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. It was found that the ions with [M+14](+) were observed as the major ions (M: sample molecule). The exact mass analysis revealed that the ions are nitrogenated molecules, [M+N](+) formed by the reactions of N3 (+) with M. The reaction, N3 (+) + M → [M+N](+) + N2 , were examined by the density functional theory calculations. It was found that N3 (+) abstracts the H atom from hydrocarbon molecules leading to the formation of protonated imines in the forms of R'R″CNH2 (+) (i.e. C-H bond nitrogenation). This result is in accord with the fact that elimination of NH3 is the major channel for MS/MS of [M+N](+) . That is, nitrogen is incorporated in the C-H bonds of saturated hydrocarbons. No nitrogenation was observed for benzene and acetone, which was ascribed to the formation of stable charge-transfer complexes benzene⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) and acetone⋅⋅⋅⋅N3 (+) revealed by density functional theory calculations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27270868

  2. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  3. MRI investigation of water-oil two phase flow in straight capillary, bifurcate channel and monolayered glass bead pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Zhu, Ningjun; Zhao, Yuechao; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Dayong; Yang, Mingjun; Zhao, Jiafei; Song, Yongchen

    2015-09-01

    The study of immiscible fluid displacement between aqueous-phase liquids and non-aqueous-phase liquids in porous media is of great importance to oil recovery, groundwater contamination, and underground pollutant migration. Moreover, the attendant viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces are essential to describing the two-phase flows. In this study, magnetic resonance imaging was used to experimentally examine the detailed effects of the viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces on water-oil flows through a vertical straight capillary, bifurcate channel, and monolayered glass-bead pack. Water flooding experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and 37.8°C, and the evolution of the distribution and saturation of the oil as well as the characteristics of the two-phase flow were investigated and analyzed. The results showed that the flow paths, i.e., the fingers of the displacing phase, during the immiscible displacement in the porous medium were determined by the viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces as well as the sizes of the pores and throats. The experimental results afford a fundamental understanding of immiscible fluid displacement in a porous medium. PMID:25940392

  4. An axial approach to detection in capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    Our approach involves on-axis illumination of the compounds inside the capillary detection region and is applied to absorbance and fluorescence detection. Absorbance measurements were made by focussing an incident laser beam into one capillary end; by using signals collected over the entire length of analyte band, this enhances the analytical path length of conventional absorbance detection 60x. This instrument offers a 15x improvement in detection limits. Three fluorescence detection experiments are discussed, all of which involve insertion of an optical fiber into capillary. The first uses a high refractive index liquid phase to obtain total internal reflectance along capillary axis, this reducing light scatter. The second uses a charge-coupled device camera for simultaneous imaging of a capillary array (this may be useful in genome sequencing, etc.). The third is a study of fluid motion inside the capillary under pressure-driven and electroosmotic flow. The thesis is divided into four parts. Figs, tabs.

  5. An Integrated Capillary, Buoyancy, and Viscous-Driven Model for Brine/CO2Relative Permeability in a Compositional and Parallel Reservoir Simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, X.

    2012-11-03

    The effectiveness of CO2 storage in the saline aquifers is governed by the interplay of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. Recent experimental study reveals the impact of pressure, temperature, and salinity on interfacial tension (IFT) between CO2 and brine. The dependence of CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure on pressure (IFT) is also clearly evident in published experimental results. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the migration and trapping of CO2 in subsurface is crucial to design future storage projects that warrant long-term and safe containment. Simulation studies ignoring the buoyancy and also variation in interfacial tension and the effect on the petrophysical properties such as trapped CO2 saturations, relative permeability, and capillary pressure have a poor chance of making accurate predictions of CO2 injectivity and plume migration. We have developed and implemented a general relative permeability model that combines effects of pressure gradient, buoyancy, and IFT in an equation of state (EOS) compositional and parallel simulator. The significance of IFT variations on CO2 migration and trapping is assessed.

  6. Saturated poroelastic actuators generated by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the fluid-structure interaction problem of a saturated porous media is considered. The pressure coupling properties of porous saturated materials change with the microstructure and this is utilized in the design of an actuator using a topology optimized porous material. By maximizin...

  7. Performance Evaluation of Automated Passive Capillary Sampler for Estimating Water Drainage in the Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive capillary samplers (PCAPs) are widely used to monitor, measure and sample drainage water under saturated and unsaturated soil conditions in the vadose zone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and accuracy of automated passive capillary sampler for estimating drainage...

  8. A capillary network model for coupled gas and water flow in engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional capillary network model for gas migration through a water-saturated medium is presented. The model is an extension of previously developed capillary bundle models, and provides a discrete alternative to classical continuum Darcy models. The need for such an alternative has become apparent from recent experimental results that suggest gas migrates through low permeability water-saturated media via a small number of preferential pathways

  9. Sedimentological control on saturation distribution in Arctic gas-hydrate-bearing sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behseresht, Javad; Bryant, Steven L.

    2012-08-01

    A mechanistic model is proposed to predict/explain hydrate saturation distribution in “converted free gas” hydrate reservoirs in sub-permafrost formations in the Arctic. This 1-D model assumes that a gas column accumulates and subsequently is converted to hydrate. The processes considered are the volume change during hydrate formation and consequent fluid phase transport within the column, the descent of the base of gas hydrate stability zone through the column, and sedimentological variations with depth. Crucially, the latter enable disconnection of the gas column during hydrate formation, which leads to substantial variation in hydrate saturation distribution. One form of variation observed in Arctic hydrate reservoirs is that zones of very low hydrate saturations are interspersed abruptly between zones of large hydrate saturations. The model was applied to data from Mount Elbert well, a gas hydrate stratigraphic test well drilled in the Milne Point area of the Alaska North Slope. The model is consistent with observations from the well log and interpretations of seismic anomalies in the area. The model also predicts that a considerable amount of fluid (of order one pore volume of gaseous and/or aqueous phases) must migrate within or into the gas column during hydrate formation. This paper offers the first explanatory model of its kind that addresses “converted free gas reservoirs” from a new angle: the effect of volume change during hydrate formation combined with capillary entry pressure variation versus depth.

  10. Tension-saturated and unsaturated flows from line sources in subsurface irrigation: Riesenkampf's and Philip's solutions revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacimov, A. R.; Obnosov, Yu. V.

    2016-03-01

    Riesenkampf's (1938), R-38 (referred to here as R-38), analytical solution for steady 2-D flow from a buried line source in a homogeneous Green-Ampt soil, with a wetting plume bounded by a free surface (capillary fringe), is compared with Philip's (1969), (P-69), one for genuinely unsaturated wetting of Gardner's infinite-extension soil. Conformal mappings are used in R-38, from which we derived the flow net, pore-water isobars, isochrones, fields of Darcian velocity and resultant force acting on saturated porous skeleton, fine geometry (shape and size) of the constant-head contour encompassing a mole-emitter or leaky-pipe, as well as the dependence of the total discharge per unit pipe length on uniform pressure in the pipe, capillarity of the soil, radius of the pipe, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. An ovalic "water table" isobar, encompassing P-69 source, is compared with one of R-38 for a fixed discharge and saturated conductivity but adjusted sorptive numbers. The Whisler and Bouwer (1970) relation between the static height of capillary rise and sorptive number is shown to give a good match between R-38 and P-69 isobars. This allows to use R-38 in the source vicinity and P-69 in the far-field zone. Computer algebra (Mathematica) routines are used for visualization of the known and extended R-38 and P-69 solutions.

  11. Enhanced critical heat flux by capillary driven liquid flow on the well-designed surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Eok; Park, Su Cheong; Yu, Dong In; Kim, Moo Hwan; Ahn, Ho Seon

    2015-07-01

    Based on the unique design of the surface morphology, we investigated the effects of gravity and capillary pressure on Critical heat flux (CHF). The micro-structured surfaces for pool boiling tests were comprised with both the rectangular cavity and microchannel structures. The microcavity structures could intrinsically block the liquid flow by capillary pressure effect, and the capillary flow into the boiling surface was one-dimensionally induced only through the microchannel region. Thus, we could clearly establish the relationship between the CHF and capillary wicking flow. The driving potentials for the liquid inflow can be classified into the hydrostatic head by gravitational force, and the capillary pressure induced by the interactions of vapor bubbles, liquid film, and surface solid structures. Through the analysis of the experimental data and visualization of vapor bubble behaviors, we present that the liquid supplement to maintain the nucleate boiling regime in pool boiling condition is governed by the gravitational pressure head and capillary pressure effect.

  12. A comparative study on analytical method of total alkaloids from cortex Phellodendri amurens by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC method with post-column detection cell has been developed for the analysis of total alkaloids of cortex Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Rutaceae. The separation of total alkaloids (berberine, palmatine, oatrorrhizine, magnoflorine, phellodendrine, candicine, menisperine was optimized by compositions of the mobile phase, ionic strength of buffers, pH value, and applied voltage. Separation of total alkaloids was achieved within 11 min by using a mobile phase of Na2HPO4-citric acid solution-acetonitrile (pH 4.00; 3 mM (60:40, v/v and applying a voltage of -10 kV. This method showed satisfactory retention times and peak shapes. Meanwhile, a reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC has also been established for the separation of total alkaloids extracted from cortex Phellodendri amurens. Baseline separation of total alkaloids was achieved within 25 min by using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-0.1% phosphoric acid with 0.1 g sodium dodecanesulphonate per 100 mL (35:65, v/v. Compared to conventional RP-HPLC, pCEC led to higher column efficiency, less consumption of reagent, and shorter analysis time.

  13. Application of Power Generation Technology with Low-pressure Saturated Steam in Xuanhua Steel%低压饱和蒸汽发电技术在宣钢的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫新明

    2014-01-01

    利用低压饱和蒸汽发电已成为钢铁企业的共识,就2013年宣钢新建一台14 MW级间再热补凝汽式汽轮发电机的成功典例,说明余热蒸汽发电的节能效益和推广价值。%The technology of power generation with low-pressure saturated steam has been generally accepted in domestic steel industry. The energy saving effect and promotion value of power generation with vapour from waste heat are demonstrated with the successful example of the 14 MW reheat condensing steam turbine newly built in Xuanhua Steel.

  14. Improved Refrigerant Characteristics Flow Predictions in Adiabatic Capillary Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shodiya Sulaimon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents improved refrigerant characteristics flow predictions using homogenous flow model in adiabatic capillary tube, used in small vapor compression refrigeration system. The model is based on fundamental equations of mass, momentum and energy. In order to improve the flow predictions, the inception of vaporization in the capillary tube is determined by evaluating initial vapor quality using enthalpy equation of refrigerant at saturation point and the inlet entrance effect of the capillary tube is also accounted for. Comparing this model with experimental data from open literature showed a reasonable agreement. Further comparison of this new model with earlier model of Bansal showed that the present model could be use to improve the performance predictions of refrigerant flow in adiabatic capillary tube.

  15. Experimental Study on Hydrate Induction Time of Gas-Saturated Water-in-Oil Emulsion using a High-Pressure Flow Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv X.F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate is one of the critical precipitates which have to be controlled for subsea flow assurance. The induction time of hydrate is therefore a significant parameter. However, there have been few studies on the induction time of the natural gas hydrate formation in a flow loop system. Consequently, a series of experiments were firstly performed, including water, natural gas and Diesel oil, on the hydrate induction time under various conditions such as the supercooling and supersaturation degree, water cut, anti-agglomerant dosage, etc. The experiments were conducted in a high-pressure hydrate flow loop newly constructed in the China University of Petroleum (Beijing, and dedicated to flow assurance studies. Then, based on previous research, this study puts forward a method for induction time, which is characterized by clear definition, convenient measurement and good generality. Furthermore, we investigated the influences of the experimental parameters and analyzed the experimental phenomena for the hydrate induction time in a flowing system.

  16. Dynamic Micro-CT Study of Fracture-Matrix Flow During Capillary Imbibition in Layered Berea Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpyn, Z. T.; Halleck, P. M.; Grader, A. S.; Elsworth, D.

    2004-12-01

    Studies concerning flow in fractured rocks have important applications in hydrocarbon recovery, hydrogeology, and environmental remediation of subsurface spills, such as DNAPLs. To properly design immiscible flow processes in those systems, it is crucial to understand fracture-matrix transfer mechanisms. The goal of this work is to provide a mechanistic description of capillary-driven imbibition in fractured media and the effects of fluid occupancy in the fracture and of matrix heterogeneity on saturation distribution. Capillary imbibition experiments where performed in a layered Berea sample, 4.75 cm long and 2.54 cm in diameter, with a single longitudinal fracture. The artificially created fracture was oriented perpendicular to the natural bedding of the rock. The sample was initially vacuum saturated with non-wetting phase. Small amounts of a wetting phase were introduced into the bottom of the fracture, allowing it to imbibe and exchange places with the resident non-wetting phase through the fracture-matrix interface. Progress of the imbibition process was monitored after each injection using high-resolution Micro Computed Tomography (CT). Micro-CT also provided non-destructive means to characterize the fracture structure and rock properties. A series of simulation scenarios were also tested using a commercially available package developed by the Computer Modeling Group (CMG). Experimental observations combined with simulation results indicate that the fracture itself exhibits a strong capillary behavior. Its rough-walled nature, leads to a two-phase flow similar to that in porous media. Experimental observations also show a strong correspondence between fluid invasion in the matrix and variations in porosity in the rock's bedding planes. Our results suggest that different porosities correspond to different permeabilities and capillary pressure curves. Fluid accessibility in the fracture space is also an important factor governing imbibition in fractured media

  17. Influence of pore morphology and topology on capillary trapping in geological carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Harper, E.; Herring, A. L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2012-12-01

    Current carbon capture and storage (CCS) techniques could reduce the release of anthropogenic CO2 into the atmosphere by subsurface sequestration of CO2 in saline aquifers. In geological storage CO2 is injected into deep underground porous formations where CO2 is in the supercritical state. Deep saline aquifers are particularly attractive because of their abundance and potentially large storage volumes. Despite very broad research efforts there are still substantial uncertainties related to the effectiveness of the trapping, dissolution, and precipitation processes controlling the permanent storage of CO2. After injection of CO2 the saline water (brine) will imbibe back and reoccupy the pore space as the CO2 moves upwards, trapping a large part of the CO2. This trapping mechanism is known as capillary trapping and occurs as isolated CO2 bubbles are locked in the brine inside the pores of the porous rock. The large-scale movement of CO2 within the brine is thereby prevented. This mechanism thus constitutes an important storage mechanism after the CO2 injection until the subsequent dissolution trapping and precipitation of carbonate mineral. The capillary trapping of CO2 depends largely on the shape and interconnectivity of the pore space and it is therefore important to study the influence of pore scale morphology and topology to understand and optimize large scale capillary trapping. We use a high pressure set-up, designed for supercritical CO2 conditions, with a flow cell compatible with synchrotron-based X-ray computed micro-tomography (CMT) to generate high-resolution images to study capillary trapping. We use sintered glass bead columns as an approximation for unconsolidated reservoir systems. The smooth surface glass bead data allow us to separate the chemistry and surface roughness effects of the porous medium from the effect of the morphology and topology on the capillary trapping. We will relate these aspects of the pore space to the distribution of the

  18. EUV radiation from nitrogen capillary discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav

    2014-08-01

    In the last decade EUV sources attract interest from researchers over the world. One of the main motivations is EUV lithography, which could lead to further miniaturization in electronics. Nitrogen recombination laser at wavelength of 13.4 nm based on capillary discharge Z-pinch configuration could be used in experiments with testing of resolution of photoresist for EUV lithography (close to wavelength of 13.5 nm Si/Mo multilayer mirrors have a high reflectivity at normal incidence angles). In this work, pinching of nitrogen-filled capillary discharge is studied for the development of EUV laser, which is based on recombination pumping scheme. The goal of this study is achieving the required plasma conditions using a capillary discharge Z-pinch apparatus. In experiments with nitrogen, the capillary length was shortened from 232 mm to 90 mm and current quarter-period was changed from 60 ns to 50 ns in contrast with early experiments with Ne-like argon laser. EUV radiation from capillary discharge was registered by X-ray vacuum diode for different pressure, amplitude and duration of pre-pulse and charging voltage of the Marx generator.

  19. In-line solid-phase extraction preconcentration in capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry for the multiresidue detection of quinolones in meat by pressurized liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Francisco J; García-Campaña, Ana M; Alés-Barrero, Fermín; Bosque-Sendra, Juan M

    2008-05-01

    We have developed and validated a CE-MS/MS method using an in-line SPE device (analyte concentrator, AC) to determine eight quinolones of veterinary use whose maximum residue levels in animal edible tissues are established by the EU Council Regulation 2377/90, i.e., danofloxacin, sarafloxacin, ciprofloxacin, marbofloxacin, enrofloxacin, difloxacin, oxolinic acid, and flumequine. Different parameters affecting the AC performance, such as its design (in this case frit-free), the kind of sorbent (Oasis MCX), sample pH, volume, and composition of the elution plug and injection time were studied. The method was validated using standard solutions obtaining LODs between 17 and 59 ng/L. Finally, a pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method was developed to determine these antibiotics in chicken muscle samples. The whole analytical method was validated in terms of linearity (r2 >or= 0.992), recoveries (63-112%), repeatability and intermediate precision (RSD

  20. Investigation of the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, H.; Andersen, M. S.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C. E.; Acworth, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    Several processes have been proposed to describe the low recovery of hydraulic fracturing fluid in unconventional shale reservoirs which has caused both technical and environmental concerns. This study describes novel hydraulic experiments to quantitatively investigate the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shale through investigating the pressure response of injecting fluids (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 with different ionic concentrations) into crushed and sieved shale fragments. The results of the study indicate that the cumulative water uptake under pressure is likely to be controlled by three processes: surface hydration, capillary hydration including advective flow, and osmotic hydration. Each of these processes is a function of the differences between the in situ pore fluid and the injection fluid (solution chemistry and concentration) and the shale physicochemical properties, in particular the contact surface area, pore diameter, and the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). The uptake is not instantaneous, but is diffusion limited, with the rate governed by a number of kinetic processes. Uptake proceeds in three stages, each associated with a different process: (1) predominantly surface hydration, (2) predominantly capillary hydration and finally, (3) predominantly osmotic hydration. It was also shown that shale can take up a significant amount of water compared to its available solid volume. However, contrary to the conventional understanding, the increase in salinity of the injection fluid does not necessarily lead to reduced water uptake into shales, but is dependent on the type and concentration of cations within the shale and injecting fluid.

  1. How Capillary Rafts Sink

    CERN Document Server

    Protiere, S; Aristoff, J; Stone, H

    2010-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video showing how capillary rafts sink. Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. Thanks to Archimedes principle we can easily predict whether an object sinks or floats. But what happens when several small particles are placed at an interface between two fluids. In this case surface tension also plays an important role. These particles self-assemble by capillarity and thus form what we call a "capillary raft". We show how such capillary rafts sink for varying sizes of particles and define how this parameter affects the sinking process.

  2. Saturated Switching Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Benzaouia, Abdellah

    2012-01-01

    Saturated Switching Systems treats the problem of actuator saturation, inherent in all dynamical systems by using two approaches: positive invariance in which the controller is designed to work within a region of non-saturating linear behaviour; and saturation technique which allows saturation but guarantees asymptotic stability. The results obtained are extended from the linear systems in which they were first developed to switching systems with uncertainties, 2D switching systems, switching systems with Markovian jumping and switching systems of the Takagi-Sugeno type. The text represents a thoroughly referenced distillation of results obtained in this field during the last decade. The selected tool for analysis and design of stabilizing controllers is based on multiple Lyapunov functions and linear matrix inequalities. All the results are illustrated with numerical examples and figures many of them being modelled using MATLAB®. Saturated Switching Systems will be of interest to academic researchers in con...

  3. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  4. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T.; Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems.

  5. Modeling variably saturated multispecies reactive groundwater solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and RT3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ryan T; Morway, Eric D; Niswonger, Richard G; Gates, Timothy K

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model was developed that is capable of simulating multispecies reactive solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This model consists of a modified version of the reactive transport model RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3 Dimensions) that is linked to the Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF1) package and MODFLOW. Referred to as UZF-RT3D, the model is tested against published analytical benchmarks as well as other published contaminant transport models, including HYDRUS-1D, VS2DT, and SUTRA, and the coupled flow and transport modeling system of CATHY and TRAN3D. Comparisons in one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional variably saturated systems are explored. While several test cases are included to verify the correct implementation of variably saturated transport in UZF-RT3D, other cases are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the code in terms of model run-time and handling the reaction kinetics of multiple interacting species in variably saturated subsurface systems. As UZF1 relies on a kinematic-wave approximation for unsaturated flow that neglects the diffusive terms in Richards equation, UZF-RT3D can be used for large-scale aquifer systems for which the UZF1 formulation is reasonable, that is, capillary-pressure gradients can be neglected and soil parameters can be treated as homogeneous. Decreased model run-time and the ability to include site-specific chemical species and chemical reactions make UZF-RT3D an attractive model for efficient simulation of multispecies reactive transport in variably saturated large-scale subsurface systems. PMID:23131109

  6. Capillary electrophoresis - electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in small diameter capillaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, J.H.; Goodlett, D.R.; Udseth, H.R.; Smith, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    Methods (such as small inner diameter capillaries) are being explored to increase analyte sensitivity in capillary electrophoresis- electrospray ionization/mass spectroscopy(CE-ESI/MS). Results are reported for melittin in a protein mixture, with 10 to 100 {mu}m ID capillaries; and for a mixture of aprotinin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and carbonic anhydrase, with 5 to 50 {mu}m ID capillaries. It is shown that an increase in solute sensitivity occurs when small ID capillaries ({lt} 20 {mu}m) are used in CE-ESI/MS for both a peptide and a protein mixture. 3 figs. (DLC)

  7. Determination of Four Aflatoxins by Pressurized Capillary Electrochromatography-Laser Induced Fluorescence Detection%加压毛细管电色谱-激光诱导荧光法检测4种黄曲霉毒素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万青云; 茹鑫; 王晓曦; 王彦; 闫超

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, reliable and sensitive pressurized capillary electrochromatography-Laser induced fluorescence ( pCEC/LIF ) method with trifluoroacetic acid ( TFA ) pre-column derivation for simultaneous determination of four aflatoxin ( AFB1 , AFB2 , AFG1 , AFG2 ) was developed. This method included separation on a capillary column packed with 1. 8μm C18 particles using 0. 05% FA aqueous solution/methanol (55:45, V/V) as mobile phase at a pump flow rate of 0. 05 mL/min when the split ratio was 1:300. Under the optimum conditions including running voltage of 15 kV, excitation wavelength of 375 nm and emission wavelength of 450 nm, the baseline separation of four aflatoxins was achieved within 10 minutes. The limits of detection (LODs) were 0. 02, 0. 016, 0. 008 and 0. 01 μg/L for AFG1, AFB1, AFG2, AFB2(S/N=3), respectively. The linear detection ranges of AFG1 , AFB1 , AFG2 , AFB2 were 0. 1-10, 0. 1-10, 0. 1-3 and 0. 1-3 μg/L with correlation coefficients (R2) of 0. 9999, 1. 0000, 0. 9995 and 0. 9997, respectively. The established method was applied to analyze the peanut butter, and the recoveries of standard addition experiment were between 90 . 0% and 112 . 0% for all analytes ( RSDs=0 . 5%-1 . 9%) .%建立了三氟乙酸( TFA)柱前衍生,加压毛细管电色谱-激光诱导荧光( pCEC-LIF)快速测定黄曲霉毒素B1、B2、G1、G2方法。使用粒径1.8μm的C18毛细管色谱柱,以甲醇-水(45:55, V/V,含0.05%甲酸)为流动相,泵流速为0.05 mL/min,分离电压为15 kV,激发波长为375 nm,发射波长为450 nm,黄曲霉毒素B1, B2, G1, G2达到基线分离。各组分的检出限(S/N=3)分别为0.02,0.016,0.008和0.01μg/L,在0.1~10μg/L,0.1~10μg/L,0.1~3.0μg/L,0.1~3.0μg/L 范围内分别呈线性相关,相关系数 R2分别为0.9999,1.0000,0.9995,0.9997。将本方法应用于花生酱的分析,加标回收率在90.0%~112.0%之间,RSD在0.5%~1.9%之间。

  8. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-07-01

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of QsA2, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  9. Gluon saturation in a saturated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bootstrap equation for self-quenched gluon shadowing leads to a reduced magnitude of broadening for partons propagating through a nucleus. Saturation of small-x gluons in a nucleus, which has the form of transverse momentum broadening of projectile gluons in pA collisions in the nuclear rest frame, leads to a modification of the parton distribution functions in the beam compared with pp collisions. In nucleus-nucleus collisions all participating nucleons acquire enhanced gluon density at small x, which boosts further the saturation scale. Solution of the reciprocity equations for central collisions of two heavy nuclei demonstrate a significant, up to several times, enhancement of QsA2, in AA compared with pA collisions.

  10. Lipid order, saturation and surface property relationships: a study of human meibum saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Yappert, Marta C; Duran, Diana; Cox, Gregory W; Smith, Ryan J; Bhola, Rahul; Dennis, Gary R; Whitehall, John S

    2013-11-01

    Tear film stability decreases with age however the cause(s) of the instability are speculative. Perhaps the more saturated meibum from infants may contribute to tear film stability. The meibum lipid phase transition temperature and lipid hydrocarbon chain order at physiological temperature (33 °C) decrease with increasing age. It is reasonable that stronger lipid-lipid interactions could stabilize the tear film since these interactions must be broken for tear break up to occur. In this study, meibum from a pool of adult donors was saturated catalytically. The influence of saturation on meibum hydrocarbon chain order was determined by infrared spectroscopy. Meibum is in an anhydrous state in the meibomian glands and on the surface of the eyelid. The influence of saturation on the surface properties of meibum was determined using Langmuir trough technology. Saturation of native human meibum did not change the minimum or maximum values of hydrocarbon chain order so at temperatures far above or below the phase transition of human meibum, saturation does not play a role in ordering or disordering the lipid hydrocarbon chains. Saturation did increase the phase transition temperature in human meibum by over 20 °C, a relatively high amount. Surface pressure-area studies showing the late take off and higher maximum surface pressure of saturated meibum compared to native meibum suggest that the saturated meibum film is quite molecularly ordered (stiff molecular arrangement) and elastic (molecules are able to rearrange during compression and expansion) compared with native meibum films which are more fluid agreeing with the infrared spectroscopic results of this study. In saturated meibum, the formation of compacted ordered islands of lipids above the surfactant layer would be expected to decrease the rate of evaporation compared to fluid and more loosely packed native meibum. Higher surface pressure observed with films of saturated meibum compared to native meibum

  11. Estimating seismic velocities at ultrasonic frequencies in partially saturated rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, G.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics)

    1994-02-01

    Seismic velocities in rocks at ultrasonic frequencies depend not only on the degree of saturation but also on the distribution of the fluid phase at various scales within the pore space. Two scales of saturation heterogeneity are important: (1) saturation differences between thin compliant pores and larger stiffer pores, and (2) differences between saturated patches and undersaturated patches at a scale much larger than any pore. The authors propose a formalism for predicting the range of velocities in partially saturated rocks that avoids assuming idealized pore shapes by using measured dry rock velocity versus pressure and dry rock porosity versus pressure. The pressure dependence contains all of the necessary information about the distribution of pore compliance for estimating effects of saturation at the finest scales where small amounts of fluid in the thinnest, most compliant parts of the pore space stiffen the rock in both compression and shear (increasing both P- and S-wave velocities) in approximately the same way that confining pressure stiffens the rock by closing the compliant pores. Large-scale saturation patches tend to increase only the high-frequency bulk modulus by amounts roughly proportional to the saturation. The pore-scale effects will be most important at laboratory and logging frequencies when pore-scale pore pressure gradients are unrelaxed. The patchy-saturation effects can persist even at seismic field frequencies if the patch sizes are sufficiently large and the diffusivities are sufficiently low for the larger-scale pressure gradients to be unrelaxed.

  12. Estimating hydraulic conductivities of the soil aggregates and their clay-organic coatings using numerical inversion of capillary rise data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fér, Miroslav; Kodešová, Radka

    2012-10-01

    SummarySoil aggregates are in some soils and their horizons covered by organomineral coatings, which may significantly influence water and solute transfer into the aggregates. Knowledge of a coating occurrence, their structure and hydraulic properties is required for a more precise description of water flow and contaminant transport in soils. The aim of this study was to describe hydraulic properties of clay and organic matter coatings in the iluvial (Bt2) horizon of Haplic Luvisol. Sets of 30 unsorted aggregates, 24 aggregates with mostly clay coatings and 24 aggregates with clay-organic coatings, respectively, were studied to evaluate an impact of various coating composition. The coatings were removed from a half of the aggregates of each set. First, the wetting soil-water retention curve was measured on all soil aggregates. Then the capillary rise from the saturation pan into the multiple aggregates (set of 14 or 15 aggregates) without and with coatings was measured. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program were applied to estimate the saturated hydraulic conductivities of the aggregates, Ks,aggr, and their coatings, Ks,coat. Results were compared with saturated hydraulic conductivities evaluated analytically using the sorptivity method, which was proposed previously. Data of the soil-water retention curves, measured on aggregates with and without coatings, did not allow distinguishing between retention curve parameters of the soil aggregates and their coatings. Therefore the same parameters were evaluated for both. Capillary rise into the soil aggregates without coatings was always faster than into the aggregates with coatings. As result the optimized saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks,coat, of the clay and the organic matter coatings (the average values for unsorted, mostly clay and clay-organic coatings were 3.69 × 10-7, 2.76 × 10-7 and 1.81 × 10-7 cm min-1, respectively) were one to two order of

  13. Pore-scale modelling of the effect of viscous pressure gradients during heavy oil depletion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondino, I. [Total E and P UK Ltd., London (United Kingdom); McDougall, S.R. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Hamon, G. [Total E and P Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    In solution gas drive, when the reservoir pressure is lowered below the bubble point, bubbles nucleate and grow within saturated oil. A period of internal gas-phase expansion maintains reservoir pressure, driving oil to the wellbore region. Continued pressure reduction eventually leads to the formation of a connected gas phase that is capable of being produced along with the oleic phase. As a result, the total produced gas-oil ratio in the well begins to increase. Once the connected gas phase develops, oil production begins to decrease. This general description can be inadequate in the context of heavy oils where additional characteristics, such as foamy oil, and atypically high recoveries are observed. In order to improve the simulation of solution gas drive for heavy oil in the framework of a pre-existing pore-scale network simulator, a dynamic gas-oil interface tracking algorithm was used to determine the mobilization of bubbles under intense pressure gradients. The model was used to characterize both the stationary capillary controlled growth of bubbles characteristic of slow depletion rates in the far wellbore region and the flow phenomena in the near wellbore region. A rationale for interpreting a range of flow mechanism, their associated gas relative permeabilities and critical gas saturations was also proposed. The paper first presented a description of the dynamic pore network model in terms of its' ability to model the porous space; and mobilize gas under viscous pressure gradients and unsteady-state gas relative permeabilities. The dynamic network modelling of heavy oil depletion experiments at different rates and the prediction of the experimental gas saturations were then presented along with a discussion on critical gas saturations. It was concluded that foamy oil behaviour can be observed in situations where capillary pressures are overcome by viscous pressure gradients. 47 refs., 5 tabs., 17 figs.

  14. Saturated Domino Coverings

    CERN Document Server

    Buchanan, Andrew; Ryba, Alex

    2011-01-01

    A domino covering of a board is saturated if no domino is redundant. We introduce the concept of a fragment tiling and show that a minimal fragment tiling always corresponds to a maximal saturated domino covering. The size of a minimal fragment tiling is the domination number of the board. We define a class of regular boards and show that for these boards the domination number gives the size of a minimal X-pentomino covering. Natural sequences that count maximal saturated domino coverings of square and rectangular boards are obtained. These include the new sequences A193764, A193765, A193766, A193767, and A193768 of OEIS.

  15. Ground and microgravity results of a circumferentially microgrooved capillary evaporator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A circumferentially microgrooved capillary evaporator is here proposed as a reliable alternative for ground and spacecraft thermal control system applications. In this paper, experimental results concerning the start-up and thermal behavior of a capillary evaporator at steady state operation are presented. A capillary pumped loop was developed and tested at ground and microgravity conditions, using deionized water as the working fluid. The capillary evaporator has internally machined circumferential grooves with an average opening of 33 μm opening at 215 μm step into a 19.05 mm (3/4 in) diameter aluminum tube. The corresponding capillary pumping pressure is about 1.5 kPa. In both tests, power inputs up to 10 W (4.55 kW/m2) were successfully applied to the external surface of the evaporator, showing good performance under ground and microgravity conditions. The capillary evaporator as proposed proved to be a reliable alternative for industrial and space applications. - Highlights: • Circumferentially grooved capillary evaporators as alternative for thermal control. • Successful start-up operation at ground and microgravity conditions. • Successful steady state operation at ground and microgravity conditions. • Easy repriming in case of dry-out

  16. Effect of capillary pressure on water flooding development in low permeability reservoir%低渗透油藏毛管压力对水驱开发效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周能德

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic effect of capillary force during oil-water phase seepage in low permeability reservoir is crucial in two-phase flow mechanism and water flooding effect.The research on the rules helps to improve the water flooding development effect in this reservoir.This article presents the influential factors of dynamic effect of capillary force and dynamic capillary force,as well as impacts of dynamic capillary force,water injection intensity,well spacing on water flooding effects in low permeability reservoir.%低渗透油藏油水两相渗流过程中毛管力的动态效应是影响两相渗流机理及水驱油效果的重要因素,掌握其规律有助于提高这一特殊油藏的水驱开发效果。分析了低渗透油藏油水两相渗流中毛管力的动态效应以及动态毛管力的影响因素,以及动态毛管力、注水强度、井距等因素对低渗透油藏水驱油效果的影响。

  17. Storm pulse chemographs of saturation index and carbon dioxide pressure: implications for shifting recharge sources during storm events in the karst aquifer at Fort Campbell, Kentucky/Tennessee, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Dorothy J.; White, William B.

    Continuous records of discharge, specific conductance, and temperature were collected through a series of storm pulses on two limestone springs at Fort Campbell, western Kentucky/Tennessee, USA. Water samples, collected at short time intervals across the same storm pulses, were analyzed for calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, total organic carbon, and pH. Chemographs of calcium, calcite saturation index, and carbon dioxide partial pressure were superimposed on the storm hydrographs. Calcium concentration and specific conductance track together and dip to a minimum either coincident with the peak of the hydrograph or lag slightly behind it. The CO2 pressure continues to rise on the recession limb of the hydrograph and, as a result, the saturation index decreases on the recession limb of the hydrograph. These results are interpreted as being due to dispersed infiltration through CO2-rich soils lagging the arrival of quickflow from sinkhole recharge in the transport of storm flow to the springs. Karst spring hydrographs reflect not only the changing mix of base flow and storm flow but also a shift in source of recharge water over the course of the storm. L'enregistrement en continu du débit, de la conductivité et de la température de l'eau a été réalisé au cours d'une série de crues à deux sources émergeant de calcaires, à Fort Campbell (Kentucky occidental, Tennessee, États-Unis). Des échantillons d'eau, prélevés à de courts pas de temps lors de ces crues, ont été analysés pour le calcium, le magnésium, les bicarbonates, le carbone organique total et le pH. Les chimiogrammes de calcium, d'indice de saturation de la calcite et de la pression partielle en CO2 ont été superposés aux hydrogrammes de crue. La concentration en calcium et la conductivité de l'eau se suivent bien et passent par un minimum correspondant au pic de l'hydrogramme ou légèrement retardé. La pression partielle en CO2 continue de croître au cours de la récession de l

  18. Capillary action in a crack on the surface of asteroids with an application to 433 Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Baoyin, Hexi

    2016-08-01

    Some asteroids contain water ice, and a space mission landing on an asteroid may take liquid to the surface of the asteroid. Gas pressure is very weak on the surface of asteroids. Here we consider the capillary action in a crack on the surface of irregular asteroids. The crack is modeled as a capillary which has a fixed radius. An asteroid's irregular gravitational potential influences the height of the liquid in the capillary. The height of the liquid in the capillary on the surface of such asteroids is derived from the asteroid's irregular gravitational potential. Capillary mechanisms are expected to produce an inhomogeneaous distribution of emergent liquid on the surface. This result is applied to asteroid 433 Eros, which has an irregular, elongated, and concave shape. Two cases are considered: (1) we calculate the height of the liquid in the capillary when the direction of the capillary is perpendicular to the local surface of the asteroid; (2) we calculate the height of the liquid in the capillary when the direction of the capillary is parallel to the vector from the center of mass to the surface position. The projected height in the capillary on the local surface of the asteroid seems to depend on the assumed direction of the capillary.

  19. Seven-day mortality can be predicted in medical patients by blood pressure, age, respiratory rate, loss of independence, and peripheral oxygen saturation (the PARIS score: a prospective cohort study with external validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Brabrand

    Full Text Available Most existing risk stratification systems predicting mortality in emergency departments or admission units are complex in clinical use or have not been validated to a level where use is considered appropriate. We aimed to develop and validate a simple system that predicts seven-day mortality of acutely admitted medical patients using routinely collected variables obtained within the first minutes after arrival.This observational prospective cohort study used three independent cohorts at the medical admission units at a regional teaching hospital and a tertiary university hospital and included all adult (≥ 15 years patients. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify the clinical variables that best predicted the endpoint. From this, we developed a simplified model that can be calculated without specialized tools or loss of predictive ability. The outcome was defined as seven-day all-cause mortality. 76 patients (2.5% met the endpoint in the development cohort, 57 (2.0% in the first validation cohort, and 111 (4.3% in the second. Systolic blood Pressure, Age, Respiratory rate, loss of Independence, and peripheral oxygen Saturation were associated with the endpoint (full model. Based on this, we developed a simple score (range 0-5, ie, the PARIS score, by dichotomizing the variables. The ability to identify patients at increased risk (discriminatory power and calibration was excellent for all three cohorts using both models. For patients with a PARIS score ≥ 3, sensitivity was 62.5-74.0%, specificity 85.9-91.1%, positive predictive value 11.2-17.5%, and negative predictive value 98.3-99.3%. Patients with a score ≤ 1 had a low mortality (≤ 1%; with 2, intermediate mortality (2-5%; and ≥ 3, high mortality (≥ 10%.Seven-day mortality can be predicted upon admission with high sensitivity and specificity and excellent negative predictive values.

  20. Adsorption of Human Serum Albumin onto PVA-coated Affinity Microporous PTFE Capillary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Gu; YAO Oi-zhi; ZHANG Lei

    2008-01-01

    Affinity dye-ligand Cibacron Blue F3GA(CB F3GA)was covalently coupled with poly(vinyl alcohol)(PVA) coated on the inner surface of microporous poly(tetra-fluoroethylene)(MPTFE)membranous capillary.The PVA-coated PTFE capillary surface WaS characterized by XPS and FESEM.The grafting degree of PVA and the amount of CB F3GA immobilized onto the membranous capillary were 23.5 mg/g and 89.6 μmol/g,respectively.These dyed membranous capillaries were chemically and mechanically stable,and could be reproducibly prepared.Human serum albumin(HSA)was selected as model protein.The saturation adsorbance of the dye attached membranous capillary was 85.3 mg HSA/g,while the capacity of non-specific adsorption for HSA was less than 0.3 mg/g.

  1. Capillary permeability in adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, W P; Nielsen, S L

    1976-01-01

    A method for measurement of capillary permeability using external registration of gamma emitting isotopes after close arterial bolus injection was applied to the isolated inguinal fat pad in slightly fasting rabbits. An average extraction of 26 per cent for 51Cr-EDTA was found at a plasma flow of...... about 7 ml/100 g-min. This corresponds to a capillary diffusion capacity of 2.0 ml/100 g-min which is half the value reported for vasodilated skeletal muscle having approximately twice as great capillary surface area. Thus, adipose tissue has about the same capillary permeability during slight metabolic...

  2. Modelling capillary trapping using finite-volume simulation of two-phase flow directly on micro-CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    We study capillary trapping in porous media using direct pore-scale simulation of two-phase flow on micro-CT images of a Berea sandstone and a sandpack. The trapped non-wetting phase saturations are predicted by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework to simulate primary drainage followed by water injection. Using these simulations, we analyse the effects of initial non-wetting-phase saturation, capillary number and flow direction on the residual saturation. The predictions from our numerical method are in agreement with published experimental measurements of capillary trapping curves. This shows that our direct simulation method can be used to elucidate the effect of pore structure and flow pattern of capillary trapping and provides a platform to study the physics of multiphase flow at the pore scale.

  3. Relationship between streaming potential and water saturation during drainage and imbibition in sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Vinogradov, J.; Jackson, M.

    2013-12-01

    The rock pore space in many subsurface settings is saturated with water and one or more immiscible fluid phases; examples include NAPLs in contaminated aquifers, supercritical CO2 during sequestration in deep saline aquifers, the vadose zone and hydrocarbon reservoirs. To interpret spontaneous potential measurements for groundwater flow and hydraulic properties in these settings requires an understanding of the saturation dependence of the streaming potential. Vinogradov and Jackson [2011] reported measurements of the streaming potential during drainage and, for the first time, imbibition in two different sandstone plugs saturated with water and undecane. However, they reported effective values of the streaming potential coupling coefficient (C) at partial saturation (Sw), because Sw in the plugs was not uniform. The aim of this study is to determine the true value of C as a function of Sw in both samples. We use a three-step approach in which hydraulic and electrical parameters are determined using numerical simulation and Nelder-Mead simplex unconstrained optimisation or active-set constrained optimisation. In the first step, we determine the relative permeability and capillary pressure, assuming these are simple exponential functions of Sw (Corey-type) and using an objective function which is a weighted average of the measured (i) pressure drop across the plug, (ii) total fluid flow rate and (iii) water flow rate. In the second, we determine the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity, assuming Archie's Law and using the measured conductivity of the plug as the objective function. In the final step, we determine the saturation dependence of the streaming potential, using the measured streaming potential across the plug as the objective function. We obtain a good match between simulated and measured values of C, and find that it (i) exhibits hysteresis, (ii) can vary non-monotonically with saturation, (iii) is non-zero when undecane flows at the

  4. Tapered capillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  5. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  6. The order of condensation in capillary grooves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Nürnberg, Robert; Pozzato, Alessandro; Tormen, Massimo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Mistura, Giampaolo

    2013-05-15

    We consider capillary condensation in a deep groove of width L. The transition occurs at a pressure p(co)(L) described, for large widths, by the Kelvin equation p(sat) - p(co)(L) = 2σ cosθ/L, where θ is the contact angle at the side walls and σ is the surface tension. The order of the transition is determined by the contact angle of the capped end θcap; it is continuous if the liquid completely wets the cap, and first-order otherwise. When the transition is first-order, corner menisci at the bottom of the capillary lead to a pronounced metastability, determined by a complementary Kelvin equation Δp(L) = 2σ sinθcap/L. On approaching the wetting temperature of the capillary cap, the corner menisci merge and a single meniscus unbinds from the bottom of the groove. Finite-size scaling shifts, crossover behaviour and critical singularities are determined at mean-field level and beyond. Numerical and experimental results showing the continuous nature of condensation for θcap = 0 and the influence of corner menisci on adsorption isotherms are presented. PMID:23611878

  7. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  8. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using 58Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics

  9. Capillary Flows along Open Channel Conduits: the Open-Star Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, Mark; Chen, Yongkang; Nguyen, Thanh; Geile, John; Callahan, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Capillary rise in tubes, channels, and grooves has received significant attention in the literature for over 100 years. In yet another incremental extension of related work, a transient capillary rise problem is solved for spontaneous flow along an interconnected array of open channels forming what is referred to as an ``open-star'' section. This geometry possesses several attractive characteristics including passive phase separations and high diffusive gas transport rates. Despite the complex geometry, novel and convenient approximations for capillary pressure and viscous resistance enable closed form predictions of the flow. As part of the solution, a combined scaling approach is applied that identifies unsteady-inertial-capillary, convective-inertial-capillary, and visco-capillary transient regimes in a single parameter. Drop tower experiments are performed employing 3-D printed conduits to corroborate all findings. NASA NNX09AP66A, Glenn Research Center.

  10. High speed drying of saturated steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of the drying process for the saturated steam used in the PWR nuclear plant turbines in order to prevent negative effects of water on turbine efficiency, maintenance costs and equipment lifetime. The high speed drying concept is based on rotating the incoming saturated steam in order to separate water which is more denser than the steam; the water film is then extracted through an annular slot. A multicellular modular equipment has been tested. Applications on high and low pressure extraction of various PWR plants are described (Bugey, Loviisa)

  11. Advances in capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1980s, capillary electrophoresis (CE) developed rapidly into a first-class analytical separation technique. Its advances in instru-mentation and method development will not only enhance or complement existing mature separation techniques such as liquid chromatography and conventional slab gel electrophoresis, but will also severely challenge these separation methods. A brief overview of most striking achievement of CE in the 1980s is given, which illustrates the challenge to liquid chromatography and conventional slab gel electrophoresis, and some detailed discussions are presented to highlight the advantages of CE. New developments in CE that can be expected for the 1990s include especially column technology, separation chemistry and instrumentation, which will serve further to diversify and improve the applicability of this technique in areas which are poorly addressed by other separation methods. This paper considers and speculates on the technological advancements that can be expected to emerge for CE in the 1990s. (author). 95 refs.; 14 figs

  12. Infinite saturated orders

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhafarov, Damir D

    2010-01-01

    We generalize the notion of saturated order to infinite partial orders and give both a set-theoretic and an algebraic characterization of such orders. We then study the proof theoretic strength of the equivalence of these characterizations in the context of reverse mathematics, showing that depending on one's choice of definitions it is either provable in $\\mathsf{RCA}_0$ or equivalent to $\\mathsf{ACA}_0$.

  13. Pressure Effect on Extensional Viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jens Horslund; Kjær, Erik Michael

    1999-01-01

    The primary object of these experiments was to investigate the influence of hydrostatic pressure on entrance flow. The effect of pressure on shear and extensional viscosity was evaluated using an axis symmetric capillary and a slit die where the hydrostatic pressure was raised with valves. The...... experiments show a significant increase in extensional viscosity with increasing pressure....

  14. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  15. Evaluating the Influence of Pore Architecture and Initial Saturation on Wettability and Relative Permeability in Heterogeneous, Shallow-Shelf Carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrnes, Alan P.; Bhattacharya, Saibal; Victorine, John; Stalder, Ken

    2007-09-30

    Thin (3-40 ft thick), heterogeneous, limestone and dolomite reservoirs, deposited in shallow-shelf environments, represent a significant fraction of the reservoirs in the U.S. midcontinent and worldwide. In Kansas, reservoirs of the Arbuckle, Mississippian, and Lansing-Kansas City formations account for over 73% of the 6.3 BBO cumulative oil produced over the last century. For these reservoirs basic petrophysical properties (e.g., porosity, absolute permeability, capillary pressure, residual oil saturation to waterflood, resistivity, and relative permeability) vary significantly horizontally, vertically, and with scale of measurement. Many of these reservoirs produce from structures of less than 30-60 ft, and being located in the capillary pressure transition zone, exhibit vertically variable initial saturations and relative permeability properties. Rather than being simpler to model because of their small size, these reservoirs challenge characterization and simulation methodology and illustrate issues that are less apparent in larger reservoirs where transition zone effects are minor and most of the reservoir is at saturations near S{sub wirr}. These issues are further augmented by the presence of variable moldic porosity and possible intermediate to mixed wettability and the influence of these on capillary pressure and relative permeability. Understanding how capillary-pressure properties change with rock lithology and, in turn, within transition zones, and how relative permeability and residual oil saturation to waterflood change through the transition zone is critical to successful reservoir management and as advanced waterflood and improved and enhanced recovery methods are planned and implemented. Major aspects of the proposed study involve a series of tasks to measure data to reveal the nature of how wettability and drainage and imbibition oil-water relative permeability change with pore architecture and initial water saturation. Focus is placed on

  16. 高温高压下饱和湿空气焓与湿度的预测%PREDICTION OF SATURATED HUMIDITY AND ENTHALPY OF HUMID AIR AT HIGH TEMPERATURE AND PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁皓; 吉晓燕; 秦建华; 陆小华; 严晋跃

    2002-01-01

    Design and calculation of humid air turbine cycle need saturated humidity and enthalpy of humid air at 423K,5MPa. However, the models proposed by previous workers are available only up to 373K,5MPa. In this paper,a method based on Helgeson Model is proposed.The saturated composition of N2-H2O system at 336.15—636.35K,1.74—25.6MPa and O2-H2O system at 373—533K,0.99—5.77MPa are predicted. The deviations from the experimental data are less than 5%. The predictions for humid air at 273—372℃,0.1MPa are comparable with the results using the Hyland and Wexler model. The saturated composition and enthalpy of humid air at 473—573K,5—15MPa,are also presented.

  17. High-resolution x-ray tomography imaging of supercritical CO2: Investigating capillary trapping under reservoir conditions and addressing wettability alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L.; Herring, A. L.; Newell, D. L.; Carey, B.; Wildenschild, D.

    2013-12-01

    In geological carbon sequestration, CO2 is stored in a supercritical state in subsurface reservoirs. Deep saline aquifers are particularly attractive because of their abundance and potentially large storage volumes. Despite very broad research efforts there are still substantial uncertainties related to the effectiveness of the trapping processes controlling the permanent storage of CO2. After injection of CO2 the saline water (brine) will imbibe back and reoccupy the pore space as the buoyant CO2 moves upwards. Some of the CO2 will remain behind in a trapping mechanism known as capillary trapping that occurs as CO2 bubbles are isolated by the brine inside some of the pore space. The large-scale movement of the trapped CO2 within the brine is thereby prevented. Capillary trapping thus constitutes an important storage mechanism following CO2 injection until subsequent aqueous dissolution and precipitation of carbonate minerals depletes the reservoir of free-phase CO2. We present pressure-saturation curves derived from drainage and imbibition experiments with brine and supercritical CO2 at 1200 PSI and at 36°C for Bentheimer sandstone cores. We compare the supercritical CO2 experiments with ambient pressure and temperature experiments using water and air (supercritical CO2 proxy fluid) for Bentheimer sandstone. The pressure-saturation curves are accompanied with quantitative results on non-wetting phase saturation, topology and connectivity as determined from three-dimensional (3D) images. The 3D data with a resolution of 4.65 μm were derived from high-resolution synchrotron x-ray computed micro-tomography (CMT), collected at the GSECARS beam line 13-BM-D at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Drainage and imbibition experiments, performed under ambient pressure and temperature conditions, indicate that the topology of the non-wetting phase after drainage correlates with the final trapping of the non-wetting phase, after imbibition. Pressure-saturation

  18. A Device for Measurement of Capillary Refilling Time

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsudin, Nebil

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design, construct and validate a portable prototype of a device that is capable of performing a test to accurately measure Capillary Refilling Time (CRT), and to analyze the results with defined parameters; force, area, pressure (compression) and time. This prototype is dedicated to study and evaluate CRT readouts for different pressure values, collected from healthy subjects.The presented prototype of this study is capable of producing skin compressin...

  19. A Unified Elastoplastic Model of Unsaturated Soils Considering Capillary Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiantian Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike its saturated counterparts, the mechanical behavior of an unsaturated soil depends not only upon its stress history but also upon its hydraulic history. In this paper, a soil-water characteristic relationship which is capable of describing the effect of capillary hysteresis is introduced to characterize the influence of hydraulic history on the skeletal deformation. The capillary hysteresis is viewed as a phenomenon associated with the internal structural rearrangements in unsaturated soils, which can be characterized by using a set of internal state variables. It is shown that both capillary hysteresis and plastic deformation can be consistently addressed in a unified theoretical framework. Within this context, a constitutive model of unsaturated soils is developed by generalizing the modified Cam-Clay model. A hardening function is introduced, in which both the matric suction and the degree of saturation are explicitly included as hardening variables, so that the effect of hydraulic history on the mechanical response can be properly addressed. The proposed model is capable of capturing the main features of the unsaturated soil behavior. The new model has a hierarchical structure, and, depending upon application, it can describe the stress-strain relation and the soil-water characteristics in a coupled or uncoupled manner.

  20. Acoustic wave propagation simulation in a poroelastic medium saturated by two immiscible fluids using a staggered finite-difference with a time partition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO HaiBo; WANG XiuMing

    2008-01-01

    Based on the three-pheee theory proposed by Santos, acoustic wave propagation in a poroelastic medium saturated by two immiscible fluids was simulated using a staggered high-order finite-difference algorithm with a time partition method, which is firstly applied to such a three-phase medium. The partition method was used to solve the stiffness problem of the differential equations in the three-pheee theory. Considering the effects of capillary pressure, reference pressure and coupling drag of two fluids in pores, three compressional waves and one shear wave predicted by Santos have been correctly simulated. Influences of the parameters, porosity, permeability and gas saturation on the velocities and amplitude of three compres-sional waves were discussed in detail. Also, a perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition was firstly implemented in the three-phase equations with a staggered-grid high-order finite-difference. Comparisons between the proposed PML method and a commonly used damping method were made to validate the efficiency of the proposed boundary absorption scheme. It was shown that the PML works more efficiently than the damping method in this complex medium.Additionally, the three-phase theory is reduced to the Blot's theory when there is only one fluid left in the pores, which is shown in Appendix. This reduction makes clear that three-phase equation systems are identical to the typical Blot's equations if the fluid saturation for either of the two fluids in the pores approaches to zero.

  1. Acoustic wave propagation simulation in a poroelastic medium saturated by two immiscible fluids using a staggered finite-difference with a time partition method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the three-phase theory proposed by Santos, acoustic wave propagation in a poroelastic medium saturated by two immiscible fluids was simulated using a staggered high-order finite-difference algorithm with a time partition method, which is firstly applied to such a three-phase medium. The partition method was used to solve the stiffness problem of the differential equations in the three-phase theory. Considering the effects of capillary pressure, reference pressure and coupling drag of two fluids in pores, three compressional waves and one shear wave predicted by Santos have been correctly simulated. Influences of the parameters, porosity, permeability and gas saturation on the velocities and amplitude of three compressional waves were discussed in detail. Also, a perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition was firstly implemented in the three-phase equations with a staggered-grid high-order finite-difference. Comparisons between the proposed PML method and a commonly used damping method were made to validate the efficiency of the proposed boundary absorption scheme. It was shown that the PML works more efficiently than the damping method in this complex medium. Additionally, the three-phase theory is reduced to the Biot’s theory when there is only one fluid left in the pores, which is shown in Appendix. This reduction makes clear that three-phase equation systems are identical to the typical Biot’s equations if the fluid saturation for either of the two fluids in the pores approaches to zero.

  2. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  3. Reactivity of dolomite in water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide: Significance for carbon capture and storage and for enhanced oil and gas recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Dolomite reactivity with wet and dry supercritical CO2 were evaluated. ► Dolomite does not react with dry CO2. ► H2O-saturated supercritical CO2 dissolves dolomite and precipitates carbonate mineral. ► Temperature/reaction time control morphology and extent of carbonate mineralization. ► Reaction with wet CO2 may impact trapping, caprock integrity, and CCS/EOR injectivity. - Abstract: Carbon dioxide injection in porous reservoirs is the basis for carbon capture and storage, enhanced oil and gas recovery. Injected carbon dioxide is stored at multiple scales in porous media, from the pore-level as a residual phase to large scales as macroscopic accumulations by the injection site, under the caprock and at reservoir internal capillary pressure barriers. These carbon dioxide saturation zones create regions across which the full spectrum of mutual CO2–H2O solubility may occur. Most studies assume that geochemical reaction is restricted to rocks and carbon dioxide-saturated formation waters, but this paradigm ignores injection of anhydrous carbon dioxide against brine and water-alternating-gas flooding for enhanced oil recovery. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to evaluate the reactivity of the common reservoir mineral dolomite with water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide. Experiments were conducted at reservoir conditions (55 and 110 °C, 25 MPa) and elevated temperature (220 °C, 25 MPa) for approximately 96 and 164 h (4 and 7 days). Dolomite dissolves and new carbonate mineral precipitates by reaction with water-saturated supercritical carbon dioxide. Dolomite does not react with anhydrous supercritical carbon dioxide. Temperature and reaction time control the composition, morphology, and extent of formation of new carbonate minerals. Mineral dissolution and re-precipitation due to reaction with water-saturated carbon dioxide may affect the contact line between phases, the carbon dioxide contact angle, and the relative

  4. Gas transport through saturated bentonite and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The aim of this investigation was the determination of the gas transport properties of saturated compacted bentonite and its interfaces. The bentonite used was the Spanish FEBEX bentonite, which is mainly composed of montmorillonite (more than 90%). For a dry density of 1.6 g/cm3 the saturated permeability of the bentonite is about 5.10-14 m/s, with deionised water used as percolating fluid. The saturated swelling pressure for the same dry density has a value of about 6 MPa. To perform the gas breakthrough tests a series of stainless steel cells were designed and manufactured. The cells consisted of a body, in which the cylindrical sample was inserted, pistons with o-rings at both ends of the samples and threaded caps. The samples, of 3.8 and 5.0 cm in diameter and 2.5 or 5.0 in height, were obtained by uniaxial compaction of the bentonite with its hygroscopic water content directly inside the cell body. Saturation with deionised water was accomplished by applying injection pressures of between 2 and 10 bar. The water content of the bentonite after saturation was higher than 27% for all the dry densities. Once the samples saturated, the filters on top and bottom of the samples were replaced by dry ones, the cells were again closed, and they were connected to a setup specially designed to measure breakthrough pressure. It consisted of two stainless steel deposits connected to the ends of the cell. One of the deposits was pressurised with nitrogen at 2 bar, whereas vacuum was applied to the other one. The pressures were measured by means of pressure transmitters. If no changes in pressure were recorded during 24 h, the injection pressure in the upstream deposit was increased by 2 bar and kept constant for 24 h. The process was repeated until gas started to flow through the sample. The time required for the completion of a particular experiment was determined by the conditions of the sample being studied. Although

  5. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  6. Capillary Condensation in Confined Media

    CERN Document Server

    Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    We review here the physics of capillary condensation of liquids in confined media, with a special regard to the application in nanotechnologies. The thermodynamics of capillary condensation and thin film adsorption are first exposed along with all the relevant notions. The focus is then shifted to the modelling of capillary forces, to their measurements techniques (including SFA, AFM and crack tips) and to their influence on AFM imaging techniques as well as on the static and dynamic friction properties of solids (including granular heaps and sliding nanocontacts). A great attention is spent in investigating the delicate role of the surface roughness and all the difficulties involved in the reduction of the probe size to nanometric dimensions. Another major consequence of capillary condensation in nanosystems is the activation of several chemical and corrosive processes that can significantly alter the surface properties, such as dissolution/redeposition of solid materials and stress-corrosion crack propagati...

  7. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  8. Fractal analysis of fracture increasing spontaneous imbibition in porous media with gas-saturated

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Jianchao

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous imbibition (SI) of wetting liquid into matrix blocks due to capillary pressure is regarded as an important recovery mechanism in low permeability fractured reservoir. In this paper, an analytical model is proposed for characterizing SI horizontally from a single plane fracture into gas-saturated matrix blocks. The presented model is based on the fractal character of pores in porous matrix, with gravity force included in the entire imbibition process. The accumulated mass of wetting liquid imbibed into matrix blocks is related to a number of factors such as contact area, pore fractal dimension, tortuosity, maximum pore size, porosity, liquid density and viscosity, surface tension, contact angle, as well as height and tilt angle of the fracture. The mechanism of fracture-enhanced SI is analyzed accordingly. Because of the effect of fracture, the gravity force is positive to imbibition process. Additionally, the farther away from the fracture top of the pore, the more influential the hydrostatic pressure is upon the imbibition action. The presented fractal analysis of horizontal spontaneous imbibition from a single fracture could also shed light on the scaling study of the mass transfer function between matrix and fracture system of fractured reservoirs. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  9. New type of capillary for use as ion beam collimator and air-vacuum interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoytschew, V.; Schulte-Borchers, M.; Božičević Mihalića, Iva; Perez, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Glass capillaries offer a unique way to combine small diameter ion beam collimation with an air-vacuum interface for ambient pressure ion beam applications. Usually they have an opening diameter of a few microns, limiting the air inflow sufficiently to maintain stable conditions on the vacuum side. As the glass capillaries generally are quite thin and fragile, handling of the capillary in the experiment becomes difficult. They also introduce an X-ray background produced by the capillary wall material, which has to be shielded or subtracted from the data for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) applications. To overcome both drawbacks, a new type of conical glass capillary has been developed. It has a higher wall thickness eliminating the low energy X-ray background produced by common capillaries and leading to a more robust lens. The results obtained in first tests show, that this new capillary is suitable for ion beam collimation and encourage further work on the capillary production process to provide thick wall capillaries with an outlet diameter in the single digit micro- or even nanometre range.

  10. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries: role in lung and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Mathieu-Costello, O.

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary capillaries have extremely thin walls to allow rapid exchange of respiratory gases across them. Recently it has been shown that the wall stresses become very large when the capillary pressure is raised, and in anaesthetised rabbits, ultrastructural damage to the walls is seen at pressures of 40 mm Hg and above. The changes include breaks in the capillary endothelial layer, alveolar epithelial layer, and sometimes all layers of the wall. The strength of the thin part of the capillary wall can be attributed to the type IV collagen in the extracellular matrix. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries results in a high-permeability form of oedema, or even frank haemorrhage, and is apparently the mechanism of neurogenic pulmonary oedema and high-altitude pulmonary oedema. It also explains the exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage that occurs in all racehorses. Several features of mitral stenosis are consistent with stress failure. Overinflation of the lung also leads to stress failure, a common cause of increased capillary permeability in the intensive care environment. Stress failure also occurs if the type IV collagen of the capillary wall is weakened by autoantibodies as in Goodpasture's syndrome. Neutrophil elastase degrades type IV collagen and this may be the starting point of the breakdown of alveolar walls that is characteristic of emphysema. Stress failure of pulmonary capillaries is a hitherto overlooked and potentially important factor in lung and heart disease.

  11. Acupuncture Sample Injection for Microchip Capillary Electrophoresis and Electrokinetic Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ji Won; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2016-05-01

    A simple nanoliter-scale injection technique was developed for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices to form the well-defined sample plugs in microfluidic channels. Sample injection was achieved by performing acupuncture on a channel with a needle and applying external pressure to a syringe. This technique allowed us to achieve reproducible injection of a 3-nL segment into a microchannel for PDMS microchip-based capillary electrophoresis (CE). Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with bead packing were successfully performed by applying a single potential in the most simplified straight channel. The advantages of this acupuncture injection over the electrokinetic injection in microchip CE include capability of minimizing sample loss and voltage control hardware, capability of serial injections of different sample solutions into a same microchannel, capability of injecting sample plugs into any position of a microchannel, independence on sample solutions during the loading step, and ease in making microchips due to the straight channel, etc. PMID:27056036

  12. On the capillary self-focusing in a microfluidic system

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, M; Afkhami, S

    2016-01-01

    A computational framework is developed to address capillary self-focusing in Step Emulsification. The microfluidic system consists of a single shallow and wide microchannel that merges into a deep reservoir. A continuum approach coupled with a volume of fluid method is used to model the capillary self-focusing effect. The original governing equations are reduced using the Hele-Shaw approximation. We show that the interface between the two fluids takes the shape of a neck narrowing in the flow direction just before entering the reservoir, in agreement with our experimental observations. Our computational model relies on the assumption that the pressure at the boundary, where the fluid exits into the reservoir, is the uniform pressure in the reservoir. We investigate this hypothesis by comparing the numerical results with experimental data. We conjecture that the pressure boundary condition becomes important when the width of the neck is comparable to the depth of the microchannel. A correction to the exit pres...

  13. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, Rcol is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of Rcol that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, katt, and detachment rate constants, kdet, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate Rcol uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed

  14. The saturation and resulting swelling pressure of a deposition hole-tunnel system filled with bentonite under consideration of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) with the help of the two phase flow theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water saturation of the Bentonite buffer around the Cu canister in the deposition hole of the project 'Prototype Repository - ASPO' is significant with respect to the type of the bentonite and the spread of temperature. A fundamental question is how fast does the initially unsaturated bentonite becomes saturated with water and can sufficient water penetrate from the host granite rock into all areas of the bentonite. There are two possible paths, one being the path through the tunnel and the other hydraulically active fractures intersected by the deposition hole. The ingress of water is however immediately halted by the swelling of the bentonite. A path via the undisturbed compacted granite is deemed negligible due to its low permeability of K -23 m2. The inflowing water is distributed over the excavation disturbed zone EDZ, created during the construction of the deposition hole, Since the degree of disturbance of the granite is not unequivocally known, a time-dependent parameter study using appropriate permeability values was performed to consider the width of the EDZ. The non-steady state hydraulic behaviour of the system is controlled by the saturation of the bentonite, The calculations were performed using the Rockflow computer software, described below. (author)

  15. Saturation dynamics and working limits of saturated absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiek, Ibrahim; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2016-08-17

    Cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) in the linear absorption regime is a well-established method for sensitive trace gas detection, but only a few studies have addressed quantitative measurements in the presence of a saturated sample. In fact, saturation is usually avoided in order to escape from the required complex modeling of the saturation process that depends on the characteristics of the absorbing species, its interaction with the surrounding gas as well as on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the cavity excitation. Conversely, the novel saturated-absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy approach (SCAR/Sat-CRDS) takes advantage of sample saturation in order to allow one to extract both the gas absorption and the empty cavity loss rates from a single ringdown event. Using a new continuous-wave infrared CRD spectrometer equipped with a tunable narrow-bandwidth high-power OPO laser system and a 18 bit digitizer, the transient dynamics of absorption saturation and the working limits of the Sat-CRDS approach in terms of its ability to extract reliable trace gas concentrations have been experimentally studied in this work. Using a strong methane transition as a test case, the excitation power P0 and saturation power PS have been systematically varied to explore a wide range of saturation regimes. At pressures 5 μbar γc, a pronounced coupling between the two parameters has been observed. Finally, a standard error analysis was performed revealing that the Sat-CRDS approach holds its advantages over conventional CRDS implementations in particular when the attainable ultimate detection sensitivity is limited by uncertainties in the empty cavity ringdown constant. PMID:27488884

  16. Laser-based capillary polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, K; Hankins, J; Bornhop, D J

    1999-01-01

    A laser-based capillary polarimeter has been configured to allow for the detection of optically active molecules in capillary tubes with a characteristic inner diameter of 250 microm and a 39-nL (10(-9)) sample volume. The simple optical configuration consists of a HeNe laser, polarizing optic, fused-silica capillary, and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera in communication with a laser beam analyzer. The capillary scale polarimeter is based on the interaction between a polarized laser beam and a capillary tube, which results in a 360 degree fan of scattered light. This array of scattered light contains a set of interference fringe, which respond in a reproducible manner to changes in solute optical activity. The polarimetric utility of the instrument will be demonstrated by the analysis of two optically active solutes, R-mandelic acid and D-glucose, in addition to the nonoptically active control, glycerol. The polarimetric response of the system is quantifiable with detection limits facilitating 1.7 x 10(-3) M or 68 x 10(-12) nmol (7 psi 10(-9) g) sensitivity. PMID:11315158

  17. Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2-water displacement in a homogeneous pore network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing brine from the pore space by supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio between the invading scCO(2) and the resident brine. The mechanisms that affect scCO(2)-water displacement under reservoir conditions (41 °C, 9 MPa) were investigated in a homogeneous micromodel. A large range of injection rates, expressed as the dimensionless capillary number (Ca), was studied in two sets of experiments: discontinuous-rate injection, where the micromodel was saturated with water before each injection rate was imposed, and continuous-rate injection, where the rate was increased after quasi-steady conditions were reached for a certain rate. For the discontinuous-rate experiments, capillary fingering and viscous fingering are the dominant mechanisms for low (logCa ≤ -6.61) and high injection rates (logCa ≥ -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91 to -5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO(2) saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (J. Fluid Mech.1988, 189, 165-187). Capillary fingering was the dominant mechanism for all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, resulting in monotonic increase in scCO(2) saturation. PMID:22676368

  18. Experimental and simulation investigation of ion transfer in different sampling capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Quan; Jiang, Tao; Ni, Kai; Qian, Xiang; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure interfaces were a fundamental structure for transferring air generated ions into the vacuum manifold of a mass spectrometer. This work is devoted to the characterization of ion transfer in metal capillaries through both experimental and simulated investigations. The impact of capillary configurations on ion transmission efficiency was evaluated using an electrospray mass spectrometer with various bent capillaries as the transfer devices. In addition, a numerical model has been set up by coupling the SIMION 8.0 and the computational flow dynamics for simulation study of ion migration in the complex atmospheric system. The transfer efficiency was found to be highly affected by the variation in electric field and the capillary geometry, revealing that the hydrodynamic and electric force were both dominant and interactional during the transmission process. The consistency of the results from the experimental analysis and simulation modeling proved the validity of the model, which was helpful for understanding ion activity in transfer capillaries. PMID:26634970

  19. Streaming Potential In Rocks Saturated With Water And Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvin, J. A.; Caston, A.

    2011-12-01

    Fluids flowing through porous media generate electrical currents. These currents cause electric potentials, called "streaming potentials." Streaming potential amplitude depends on the applied pressure gradient, on rock and fluid properties, and on the interaction between rock and fluid. Streaming potential has been measured for rocks saturated with water (1) and with water-gas mixtures. (2) Few measurements (3) have been reported for rocks saturated with water-oil mixtures. We measured streaming potential for sandstone and limestone saturated with a mixture of brine and laboratory oil. Cylindrical samples were initially saturated with brine and submerged in oil. Saturation was changed by pumping oil from one end of a sample to the other and then through the sample in the opposite direction. Saturation was estimated from sample resistivity. The final saturation of each sample was determined by heating the sample in a closed container and measuring the pressure. Measurements were made by modulating the pressure difference (of oil) between the ends of a sample at multiple frequencies below 20 Hz. The observed streaming potential is a weak function of the saturation. Since sample conductivity decreases with increasing oil saturation, the electro-kinetic coupling coefficient (Pride's L (4)) decreases with increasing oil saturation. (1) David B. Pengra and Po-zen Wong, Colloids and Surfaces, vol., p. 159 283-292 (1999). (2) Eve S. Sprunt, Tony B. Mercer, and Nizar F. Djabbarah, Geophysics, vol. 59, p. 707-711 (1994). (3) Vinogradov, J., Jackson, M.D., Geophysical Res. L., Vol. 38, Article L01301 (2011). (4) Steve Pride, Phys. Rev. B, vol. 50, pp. 15678-15696 (1994).

  20. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  1. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Gruner, Sol M.

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  2. Permeability of compacted saturated clays from high stress consolidation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the past years, compacted bentonites have been proposed as suitable barrier and backfilling materials in the toxic waste repositories. In the waste disposal repositories at depths ranging from 500 m to 1000 m, the saturated host rock serves as the source for supplying fluid to the compacted bentonites and also acts as confinement against the volume increase. Considering the stress level at the location of the waste disposal repositories and the stress convergence of the host rock with the compacted saturated bentonites, it is necessary to study the permeability of compacted saturated bentonites for these conditions. The behaviour of compacted expansive clays has been intensively studied since last three decades with respect to key aspects such as swelling pressure, swell potential, compressibility, water absorption and desorption, temperature dependent behaviour of the material, micro-structural features. In contrast, less information about fluid flow in compacted bentonites is available in literature. In the present study, the permeability was determined indirectly based on consolidation tests of compacted saturated clay specimens. The material used was Calcigel bentonite and Spergau kaolin in order to investigate the effect of different mineralogy. De-ionised water was used as the fluid. The initial dry densities?d (in Mg/m3) and water contents w (in %) of the compacted bentonite specimens (CB1 to CB9) and those of the compacted Spergau kaolin specimens (CK1 to CK6) are presented. The initially compacted clay specimens were allowed to saturate at constant volume condition (phase 1) and were then submitted to vertical stresses higher than the swelling pressure measured (phase 2). Maximum applied vertical stress was 25 MPa. The special high stress odometer device used is described in detail in Baille et al. (2010). For each loading step, the coefficient of consolidation, cv was determined from the time

  3. Non-Aqueous Capillary Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumski, Michał; Buszewski, Bogusław

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are special variants of these techniques. Here, organic solvents or their mixtures with or without dissolved electrolytes are used as separation buffer or mobile phase, respectively. The most important features of non-aqueous systems are: better solubility of more hydrophobic ionic substances (many natural products) than in water, much less current and Joule heating allows for using highly concentrated buffers and/or larger capillary internal diameters, polar interactions are enhanced in organic solvents which is often highly advantageous in chiral separation systems. This chapter presents most frequently used solvents, their properties, as well as shows pH* scale which is often used in non-aqueous systems.

  4. Effect of nifedipine on coronary capillary geometry in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Kazda, S; Turek, Z

    1994-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe quantitatively changes in the coronary capillary network resulting from hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and a potential effect of long-term treatment of these animals with nifedipine. Age-matched male SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated for 27 weeks. Four experimental groups were analyzed: (1) untreated SHR, (2) nifedipine-treated SHR, (3) untreated control WKY rats, and (4) nifedipine-treated WKY rats. Treatment significantly decreased systolic blood pressure in SHR, although normotensive pressures were not reached. SHR had significantly higher cardiac weight, which decreased in nifedipine-treated rats, but values remained above those in control animals. Morphometric evaluation revealed lower capillary density and larger capillary domain area in hearts from SHR, which were partially attenuated by treatment with nifedipine. Capillary domain area was also significantly larger at arteriolar portions compared with domains supplied at venular portions. Capillary segment length was consistently shorter on the venular than arteriolar portion of the capillary, whereas no differences were observed between hearts from WKY rats and SHR. Treatment with nifedipine resulted in a prolongation of segment length. Reconstruction of the three-dimensional capillary supply unit (capillary domain area times capillary segment length) revealed significant differences between the amount of tissue supplied by a capillary at its arteriolar portion than more distally, which was detectable in all experimental groups. In hypertrophic hearts from SHR this tissue volume is increased mainly because of longer intercapillary distances and larger domains, especially on arteriolar portions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8039845

  5. Micro droplet driven by thermocapillary and capillary valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and testing of the capillary-induced pressure drop valve, thermocapillary pumping of liquid droplet in hydrophilic channels and the splitting of droplet. The capillary-induced pressure drop is derived with thermodynamic approach considering three-dimensional meniscus shape which is essential for calculating pressure drop in the diverging shape channel when the aspect ratio is close to one. The micro channel is fabricated via MEMS processes, which consists of the liquid stop valve to retard the liquid droplet, thermocapillary pumping region and the bifurcation region. Also the micro heaters are fabricated to drive the droplet by thermocapillary. The theoretical approaches agree well with the experimental data. The functionality of capillary valve is confirmed to be valid when the aspect ratio is smaller than one. To overcome the difficulty in splitting of the droplet due to the pressure drop in the general Y-shape channel, the protrusion shape is employed for easy splitting in the bifurcation channel

  6. Linewidth measurement of external grating cavity quantum cascade laser using saturation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Go, Rowel; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2008-03-01

    A room temperature external grating cavity (EGC) quantum cascade laser (QCL) is characterized using saturation spectroscopy of NO2. The presence of two strong EGC QCL waveguide modes is evident from the saturation spectra. A linewidth of 21MHz for each EGC-QCL mode is measured from the width of the saturation peak at 10mTorr pressure of NO2.

  7. Numerical studies of fluid and heat flow near high-level nuclear waste packages emplaced in partially saturated fractured tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous rock. Formation parameters were chosen as representative of the potential repository horizon in the Topopah Spring Unit of the Yucca Mountain tuffs. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator ''TOUGH'' used for our flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions for handling the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. We model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, we develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account the fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 35 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Equilibrium partial pressure of CO2 in Callovian-Oxfordian argillite as a function of relative humidity: Experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassin, Arnault; Marty, Nicolas C. M.; Gailhanou, Hélène; Henry, Benoît; Trémosa, Joachim; Lerouge, Catherine; Madé, Benoît; Altmann, Scott; Gaucher, Eric C.

    2016-08-01

    Having previously demonstrated that the mineral assemblage of claystone can impose its pCO2 under saturated conditions, we here study the effect of rock desaturation, i.e. the evaporation of pore water, on the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in Callovian-Oxfordian argillite from the Paris Basin (France). In this new study, which combines experiments at room temperature and geochemical modelling, we examine the primary role of capillary forces on chemical equilibria for relative humidity values ranging between 50% and 100%. In particular we are able, without any fitting parameters, to model the experimental decrease of pCO2 as a function of decreasing water content in the argillite. This application to a complex natural system not only confirms the theoretical concepts of geochemistry in capillary contexts, but is promising with respect to other systems, both natural (soil, rock) and industrial (ceramics, granular material).

  9. Brine Distribution after Vacuum Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Kathrine; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs......Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs...

  10. [A novel multiple-channel apparatus for packing capillary chromatographic column and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Yayao; Hao, Feiran; Wang, Huanhuan; Fu, Bin; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-11-01

    A novel multiple-channel apparatus for packing capillary chromatographic column was designed and manufactured for packing six capillary chromatographic columns with close column efficiency at the same time. Briefly, it consists of a magnetic stirrer, a liquid chromatographic pump and a multiple-channel can. The reagents used for preparing ODS (C18) slurry and stirring condition of the magnetic stirrer were optimized in the study. Two batches of capillary chromatographic columns were packed under the optimum condition, and these packed capillary chromatographic columns were evaluated in the terms of peak capacity, sequence coverage, retention times of three peptide ions and column pressure using the tryptic digest of a bovine serum albumin (BSA) and detected by LC-MS in electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. The experimental results showed that the six capillary chromatographic columns packed at the same time had close column efficiencies, however, the column efficiencies of twelve capillary chromatographic columns packed at two times were significantly different. In addition, there was no significant column efficiency difference when packing one or six capillary chromatographic columns at the same time. The multiple-channel apparatus designed by us is simple, time-saving, and can be applied to pack capillary chromatographic columns with similar column efficiencies, thus it is of evident advantage over traditional one-channel apparatus. PMID:26939361

  11. Capillary Action in a Crack on the Surface of Asteroids with an Application to 433 Eros

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Some asteroids contain water ice, and a space mission landing on an asteroid may take liquid to the surface of the asteroid. Gas pressure is very weak on the surface of asteroids. Here we consider the capillary action in a crack on the surface of irregular asteroids. The crack is modelled as a capillary which has a fixed radius. An asteroid s irregular gravitational potential influences the height of the liquid in the capillary. The height of the liquid in the capillary on the surface of such asteroids is derived from the asteroid s irregular gravitational potential. Capillary mechanisms are expected to produce an inhomogeneaous distribution of emergent liquid on the surface. This result is applied to asteroid 433 Eros, which has an irregular, elongated, and concave shape. Two cases are considered 1) we calculate the height of the liquid in the capillary when the direction of the capillary is perpendicular to the local surface of the asteroid; 2) we calculate the height of the liquid in the capillary when the...

  12. Zircon Saturation Re-Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, P.; Trail, D.; Schmitt, A. K.; Watson, E. B.; Harrison, M.

    2011-12-01

    Zircon saturation in silicate melts has been utilized for magma thermometry and predicting the survival of zircon xenocrysts in crustal melts for nearly 30 years. The original calibration, which assumed only compositional (M = [2Ca+Na+K]/[AlxSi]) and temperature controls, was bolstered by subsequent experimental investigations and thermometry of volcanic rocks and glasses. These latter studies, while confirming the general predictions of the model, suggested that other environmental parameters (e.g., pressure, H 2O, halogens, [Fe], oxygen fugacity, etc.) might have second-order effects. Given the tremendous advances in micro-analytical capabilities over the intervening three decades, we have returned to this question with a view to obtaining a refined zircon solubility calibration as a function of P, T, [H2O] and FM (= [Na+K+2(Ca+Mg+Fe)]/[AlxSi]). Detailed SEM imaging of the original low-temperature crystallization experiments (1.2-2.1 kbar) revealed limitations of this approach and we chose instead to use a new experimental design in which shattered Mud Tank zircon is infiltrated by melts of selected composition and water contents. 10 kbar hydrothermal experiments (925o and 850oC) were run for sufficiently long durations (2 to 3 days) to ensure microscale diffusive equilibration of Zr released by zircon dissolution into the intercrystalline melt pools. Sectioned run products were analyzed by SIMS ion imaging of selected areas where glass is exposed in close proximity to or surrounded by Mud Tank zircon fragments. Ion imaging has the advantage of permitting high spatial resolution (3 μm) analysis of the glasses allowing assessment of Zr equilibration. Using synthetic glass standards, we found [Zr] in anhydrous glasses to be enhanced by ca. 20% relative to hydrous (at 6 wt.% H2O). Our new experiments and re-analysis of the earlier glasses broadly reproduce the original calibration, albeit with substantially enhanced (factor of five) precision compared to the

  13. Influence of the inner diameters of capillary on the Z-Pinch plasma of the capillary discharge soft X-ray laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shan; Zhao, Yong-peng; Cui, Huai-yu; Li, Lian-bo; Ding, Yu-jie; Zhang, Wen-hong; Li, Wei [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080, Heilongjiang (China)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of inner diameters on the Z-pinch plasma of capillary discharge soft X-ray laser were investigated with the 3.2 mm and 4.0 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries. The intensities of the laser emitted from the 3.2 mm and 4.0 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries were measured under different initial pressures. To understand the underlying physics of the experimental measurements, the Z-pinch plasma simulations had been conducted with a one-dimensional cylindrical symmetry Lagrangian magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) code. The parametric studies of Z-pinch plasma, such as the electron temperature, the electron density and the Ne-like Ar ion density, were performed with the MHD code. With the experimental and the simulated results, the discussions had been conducted on the Z-pinch plasma of Ne-like Ar 46.9 nm laser with the 3.2 mm and 4.0 mm inner diameter alumina capillaries. The analysis had been made on the difference of the gain coefficients under the optimum pressures with both capillaries. Then, the effects of inner diameters on the optimum pressure and the pressure domain were analyzed. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Optimized transcritical CO{sub 2} heat pumps: Performance comparison of capillary tubes against expansion valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Bhattacharyya, Souvik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2008-05-15

    A capillary tube based CO{sub 2} heat pump is unique because of the transcritical nature of the system. The transcritical cycle has two independent parameters, pressure and temperature, unlike the subcritical cycle. In the present study, a steady state simulation model has been developed to evaluate the performance of a capillary tube based transcritical CO{sub 2} heat pump system for simultaneous heating and cooling at 73 C and 4 C, respectively against optimized expansion valve systems. Capillary tubes of various configurations having diameters of 1.4, 1.5 and 1.6 mm along with internal surface roughness of 0.001-0.003 mm have been tested to obtain the optimum design and operating conditions. Subcritical and supercritical thermodynamic and transport properties of CO{sub 2} are calculated employing a precision in-house property code. It is observed that the capillary tube system is quite flexible in response to changes in ambient temperature, almost behaving to offer an optimal pressure control. System performance is marginally better with a capillary tube at higher gas cooler exit temperature. Capillary tube length turns out to be the critical parameter that influences system optimum conditions. A novel nomogram has been developed that can be employed as a guideline to select the optimum capillary tube. (author)

  15. Biodegradation of phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and iomeprol by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Norman; Reinwand, Christian; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2015-12-01

    Mass transfer and biological transformation phenomena in the capillary fringe were studied using phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and the iodinated X-ray contrast agent iomeprol as model organic compounds and the microorganism strain Pseudomonas fluorescens. Three experimental approaches were used: Batch experiments (uniform water saturation and transport by diffusion), in static columns (with a gradient of water saturation and advective transport in the capillaries) and in a flow-through cell (with a gradient of water saturation and transport by horizontal and vertical flow: 2-dimension flow-through microcosm). The reactors employed for the experiments were filled with quartz sand of defined particle size distribution (dp=200...600 μm, porosity ε=0.42). Batch experiments showed that phenol and salicylic acid have a high, whereas benzenesulfonic acid and iomeprol have a quite low potential for biodegradation under aerobic conditions and in a matrix nearly close to water saturation. Batch experiments under anoxic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor revealed that the biodegradation of the model compounds was lower than under aerobic conditions. Nevertheless, the experiments showed that the moisture content was also responsible for an optimized transport in the liquid phase of a porous medium. Biodegradation in the capillary fringe was found to be influenced by both the moisture content and availability of the dissolved substrate, as seen in static column experiments. The gas-liquid mass transfer of oxygen also played an important role for the biological activity. In static column experiments under aerobic conditions, the highest biodegradation was found in the capillary fringe (e.g. βt/β0 (phenol)=0 after t=6 d) relative to the zone below the water table and unsaturated zone. The highest biodegradation occurred in the flow-through cell experiment where the height of the capillary fringe was largest. PMID:26529301

  16. Biodegradation of phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and iomeprol by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the capillary fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Norman; Reinwand, Christian; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald; Frimmel, Fritz H.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transfer and biological transformation phenomena in the capillary fringe were studied using phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and the iodinated X-ray contrast agent iomeprol as model organic compounds and the microorganism strain Pseudomonas fluorescens. Three experimental approaches were used: Batch experiments (uniform water saturation and transport by diffusion), in static columns (with a gradient of water saturation and advective transport in the capillaries) and in a flow-through cell (with a gradient of water saturation and transport by horizontal and vertical flow: 2-dimension flow-through microcosm). The reactors employed for the experiments were filled with quartz sand of defined particle size distribution (dp = 200…600 μm, porosity ε = 0.42). Batch experiments showed that phenol and salicylic acid have a high, whereas benzenesulfonic acid and iomeprol have a quite low potential for biodegradation under aerobic conditions and in a matrix nearly close to water saturation. Batch experiments under anoxic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor revealed that the biodegradation of the model compounds was lower than under aerobic conditions. Nevertheless, the experiments showed that the moisture content was also responsible for an optimized transport in the liquid phase of a porous medium. Biodegradation in the capillary fringe was found to be influenced by both the moisture content and availability of the dissolved substrate, as seen in static column experiments. The gas-liquid mass transfer of oxygen also played an important role for the biological activity. In static column experiments under aerobic conditions, the highest biodegradation was found in the capillary fringe (e.g. βt/β0 (phenol) = 0 after t = 6 d) relative to the zone below the water table and unsaturated zone. The highest biodegradation occurred in the flow-through cell experiment where the height of the capillary fringe was largest.

  17. A capillary network model for gas migration in engineered barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas may be generated in a waste repository by a number of mechanisms, including anaerobic corrosion of metals and microbial degradation. Scoping calculations indicate that a free gas phase will probably form. Here attention is focused on two hazards this may pose. First, a gas pressure buildup may damage engineered barriers. Second, migrating gas may displace contaminated pore water. In previous studies, Darcy two-phase flow models have been used to calculate gas pressures and pore water displacement. A two-dimensional capillary network model has been developed and implemented in a numerical code, GARNET. Example calculations of the migration of gas from a point source have been undertaken to demonstrate its functionality and to indicate how phenomena, such as intermittent gas fluxes, may be modelled. Results indicate that the capillary network model reproduces behaviour observed in gas migration through low permeability media, and is a viable alternative to Darcy two-phase flow models

  18. Fluid Mechanics of Torch Appearance in Capillary Microplasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaegu; Matsuo, Keita; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Hosseini, S. Hamid R.; Namihira, Takao; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microplasma jets with long and fine torches have recently been used in industrial and medical applications, such as local dental treatment, inner surface treatment of capillaries, stimuli of microorganisms, and local cleaning of semiconductor devices. The final torch appearance is greatly dependent on both the plasma between electrodes and the gas flow that is also dominated by the configuration of the nozzle. In this study, the mechanisms of torch appearance in a dc-driven capillary microplasma jet using atmospheric-pressure air have been investigated. Experimentally measured visible torch lengths are analyzed on the basis of fluid mechanics using a fluid simulation code. The time evolution of the plasma torch is visualized with a high-speed camera, and the length and propagation velocity of the torch are presented.

  19. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then, th...

  20. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    The capillary thinning of a polymeric filament is analysed experimentally as well as by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially a liquid sample is kept between two cylindrical plates. Then the bottom plate is lowered under gravity to yield a given strain...

  1. Ion guiding in alumina capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhász, Z.; Sulik, B.; Biri, S.;

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of a few keV impact energy Ne ions through capillaries in anodic alumina membranes has been studied with different ion counting methods using an energy dispersive electrostatic spectrometer, a multichannel plate (MCP) array and sensitive current-measurement. In the present work, we...

  2. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  3. Complementary use of ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in combination with capillary high-pressure liquid chromatography: early characterization of in vivo metabolites of the cathepsin K inhibitor NVP-AAV490 in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Wolfgang; Buhl, Thomas; Altmann, Eva; Kühnöl, Jürgen; Ramstein, Philippe; Aichholz, Reiner

    2003-04-25

    Cathepsin K is a cysteine proteinase, primarily expressed in osteoclasts, which has a strong collagenolytic activity and plays an essential role involved in bone matrix degradation. Its inhibition could provide a novel approach to the treatment and prevention of osteoporosis. One structural class of lead compounds in our cathepsin K inhibitors program is based on an arylaminoethyl amide scaffold, which has potential metabolic weak points that might be stabilized by appropriate chemical modification(s). For the identification of potential metabolic "soft spots" and the rational design of improved derivatives, early biotransformation of a potent arylaminoethyl amide cathepsin K inhibitor (NVP-AAV490-NX) was investigated in plasma, urine and liver homogenates of rats after intravenous bolus administration of 10 mg/kg. The detection and identification of metabolites was achieved by high-resolution mass spectrometry (time-of-flight MS) and multi-dimensional mass spectrometry (ion trap MS). Both mass spectrometers were combined with reversed-phase capillary high-performance liquid chromatography columns. It was demonstrated that both mass analyzers complement each other and that, even in the sub-nanogram range, the resulting set of MS data can be successfully used to elucidate most of the metabolic changes unambiguously, solely by mass spectrometric techniques. The proposed metabolite structures were additionally corroborated by exact mass measurement of the protonated molecular ions to confirm the predicted elemental composition, by determination of the number of the exchangeable hydrogen atoms replacing water against deuterium oxide as mobile phase and, in one case, by an MS(3) product ion experiment in order to elucidate the site of conjugation. PMID:12650749

  4. Quantitative Proteomics Using Ultralow Flow Capillary Electrophoresis–Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Faserl, Klaus; Kremser, Leopold; Müller, Martin; Teis, David; Lindner, Herbert H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the incorporation of an ultralow flow interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) and mass spectrometry (MS), in combination with reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation as an alternate workflow for quantitative proteomics. Proteins, extracted from a SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) labeled and an unlabeled yeast strain were mixed and digested enzymatically in solution. The resulting peptides wer...

  5. An Experimental Comparison of the Refrigerant Flow through Adiabatic and Non-Adiabatic Helical Capillary Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Javidmand, Puya; Zareh, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Capillary tubes are used as refrigerant controlling devices, expansion devices and also as heart of a small vapor compression refrigeration cycle. It connects outlet condenser to the inlet evaporator and balances the refrigeration cycle pressure and controls the refrigerant mass flux. Capillary tubes are relatively cheap, resulting in extensive implementations in small household refrigerators and freezers with nearly constant refrigeration load. In general, the inner diameter and length of a ...

  6. Saturation and linear transport equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutak, K.

    2009-03-15

    We show that the GBW saturation model provides an exact solution to the one dimensional linear transport equation. We also show that it is motivated by the BK equation considered in the saturated regime when the diffusion and the splitting term in the diffusive approximation are balanced by the nonlinear term. (orig.)

  7. Saturation and linear transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the GBW saturation model provides an exact solution to the one dimensional linear transport equation. We also show that it is motivated by the BK equation considered in the saturated regime when the diffusion and the splitting term in the diffusive approximation are balanced by the nonlinear term. (orig.)

  8. Evaporative capillary instability for flow in porous media under the influence of axial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the linear analysis of electrohydrodynamic capillary instability of the interface between two viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluids in a fully saturated porous medium, when the phases are enclosed between two horizontal cylindrical surfaces coaxial with the interface and, when there is mass and heat transfer across the interface. The fluids are subjected to a constant electric field in the axial direction. Here, we use an irrotational theory in which the motion and pressure are irrotational and the viscosity enters through the jump in the viscous normal stress in the normal stress balance at the interface. A quadratic dispersion relation that accounts for the growth of axisymmetric waves is obtained and stability criterion is given in terms of a critical value of wave number as well as electric field. It is observed that heat transfer has stabilizing effect on the stability of the considered system while medium porosity destabilizes the interface. The axial electric field has dual effect on the stability analysis

  9. Adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisdi, Éva; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-03-01

    We study the joint adaptive dynamics of n scalar-valued strategies in ecosystems where n is the maximum number of coexisting strategies permitted by the (generalized) competitive exclusion principle. The adaptive dynamics of such saturated systems exhibits special characteristics, which we first demonstrate in a simple example of a host-pathogen-predator model. The main part of the paper characterizes the adaptive dynamics of saturated polymorphisms in general. In order to investigate convergence stability, we give a new sufficient condition for absolute stability of an arbitrary (not necessarily saturated) polymorphic singularity and show that saturated evolutionarily stable polymorphisms satisfy it. For the case [Formula: see text], we also introduce a method to construct different pairwise invasibility plots of the monomorphic population without changing the selection gradients of the saturated dimorphism. PMID:26676357

  10. Ionization source utilizing a multi-capillary inlet and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard D.; Kim, Taeman; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-10-12

    A multi-capillary inlet to focus ions and other charged particles generated at or near atmospheric pressure into a relatively low pressure region, which allows increased conductance of ions and other charged particles. The multi-capillary inlet is juxtaposed between an ion source and the interior of an instrument maintained at near atmospheric pressure, it finds particular advantages when deployed to improve the ion transmission between an electrospray ionization source and the first vacuum stage of a mass spectrometer, and finds its greatest advantages when deployed in conjunction with an electrodynamic (RF) ion funnel deployed within the interior of the mass spectrometer, particularly an ion funnel equipped with a jet disturber.

  11. Optimization geological sequestration of CO2 by capillary trapping mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenschild, D.; Harper, E.; Herring, A. L.; Armstrong, R. T.

    2012-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration, as a method of atmospheric greenhouse gas reduction, is at the technological forefront of the climate change movement. Sequestration is achieved by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) gas effluent from coal fired power plants and injecting it into saline aquifers. In an effort to fully understand and optimize CO2 trapping efficiency, the capillary trapping mechanisms that immobilize subsurface CO2 were analyzed at the pore scale. Pairs of analogous fluids representing the range of in situ supercritical CO2 and brine conditions were used during experimentation. The two fluids (identified as wetting and non wetting) were imbibed and drained from a flow cell apparatus containing a sintered glass bead column. Experimental and fluid parameters, such as interfacial tension, non-wetting fluid viscosity, and flow rate, were altered to characterize their impact on capillary trapping. Through the use of computed x-ray microtomography (CMT), we were able to quantify distinct differences between initial (post NW phase imbibition) and residual (post wetting fluid flood) non-wetting phase saturations. Alterations to the viscosity of the non-wetting and wetting fluid phases were made during experimentation; results indicate that the viscosity of the non-wetting fluid is the parameter of interest as residual saturations increased with increasing viscosity. These observed trends will be used to identify optimal conditions for trapping CO2 during subsurface sequestration.

  12. Optimal oxygen saturation in premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meayoung Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a delicate balance between too little and too much supplemental oxygen exposure in premature infants. Since underuse and overuse of supplemental oxygen can harm premature infants, oxygen saturation levels must be monitored and kept at less than 95% to prevent reactive oxygen species-related diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the same time, desaturation below 80 to 85% must be avoided to prevent adverse consequences, such as cerebral palsy. It is still unclear what range of oxygen saturation is appropriate for premature infants; however, until the results of further studies are available, a reasonable target for pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 is 90 to 93% with an intermittent review of the correlation between SpO2 and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2. Because optimal oxygenation depends on individuals at the bedside making ongoing adjustments, each unit must define an optimal target range and set alarm limits according to their own equipment or conditions. All staff must be aware of these values and adjust the concentration of supplemental oxygen frequently.

  13. Nonlinear analysis of multiphase transport in porous media in the presence of viscous, buoyancy, and capillary forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boxiao; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear convergence problems in numerical reservoir simulation can lead to unacceptably large computational time and are often the main impediment to performing simulation studies of large-scale problems. We analyze the nonlinearity of the discrete transport (mass conservation) equation for immiscible, incompressible, two-phase flow in porous media in the presence of viscous, buoyancy, and capillary forces. Although simulation problems are multi-dimensional with large numbers of cells and variables, we find that the essence of the nonlinear behavior can be understood by studying the discretized (numerical) flux function for the interface between two cells. The numerical flux is expressed in terms of the saturations of the two cells. Discontinuities in the first-order derivative of the flux function (referred to as kinks) and inflection lines are identified as the cause of convergence difficulty. These critical features (kinks and inflections) change the curvature of the numerical flux function abruptly, and can lead to overshoots, oscillations, or divergence in Newton iterations. Based on our understanding of the nonlinearity, a nonlinear solver is developed, referred to as the Numerical Trust Region (NTR) solver. The solver is able to guide the Newton iterations safely and efficiently through the different saturation 'trust-regions' delineated by the kinks and inflections. Specifically, overshoots and oscillations that often lead to convergence failure are avoided. Numerical examples demonstrate that our NTR solver has superior convergence performance compared with existing methods. In particular, convergence is achieved for a wide range of timestep sizes and Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) numbers spanning several orders of magnitude. In addition, a discretization scheme is proposed for handling heterogeneities in capillary-pressure-saturation relationship. The scheme has less degree of nonlinearity compared with the standard Single-point Phase-based Upstream

  14. Capillary hemangioma of palatal mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti, Vipin; Singh, Jagmohan

    2012-01-01

    Hemangiomas are common tumors characterized microscopically by proliferation of blood vessels. The congenital hemangioma is often present at birth and may become more apparent throughout life. They are probably developmental rather than neoplastic in origin. Despite their benign origin and behavior, hemangiomas in the oral cavity are always of clinical importance to the dental profession and require appropriate clinical management. This case report presents a case of capillary hemangioma of a...

  15. Exponential asymptotics and capillary waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S. J.; Vanden-Broeck, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recently developed techniques in exponential asymptotics beyond all orders are employed on the problem of potential flows with a free surface and small surface tension, in the absence of gravity. Exponentially small capillary waves are found to be generated on the free surface where the equipotentials from singularities in the flow (for example, stagnation points and corners) meet it. The amplitude of these waves is determined, and the implications are considered for many quite general flows....

  16. Nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosal, Sandip; Chen, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis the sample migrates in a microcapillary in the presence of a background electrolyte. When the ionic concentration of the sample is sufficiently high, the signal is known to exhibit features reminiscent of nonlinear waves including sharp concentration ‘shocks’. In this paper we consider a simplified model consisting of a ...

  17. Inertial Rise in Short Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Shardt, Orest; Derksen, J J; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2013-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show capillary rise experiments with diethyl ether in short tubes. The height of each short tube is less than the maximum height the liquid can achieve, and therefore the liquid reaches the top of the tube while still rising. Over a narrow range of heights, the ether bulges out from the top of the tube and spreads onto the external wall.

  18. Saturated Subgraphs of the Hypercube

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Robert; Pinto, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    We say $G$ is \\emph{$(Q_n,Q_m)$-saturated} if it is a maximal $Q_m$-free subgraph of the $n$-dimensional hypercube $Q_n$. A graph, $G$, is said to be $(Q_n,Q_m)$-semi-saturated if it is a subgraph of $Q_n$ and adding any edge forms a new copy of $Q_m$. The minimum number of edges a $(Q_n,Q_m)$-saturated graph (resp. $(Q_n,Q_m)$-semi-saturated graph) can have is denoted by $sat(Q_n,Q_m)$ (resp. $s\\text{-}sat(Q_n,Q_m)$). We prove that $ \\lim_{n\\to\\infty}\\frac{sat(Q_n,Q_m)}{e(Q_n)}=0$, for fixed...

  19. Properties of the microcirculation in capillary bundles of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Engebrecht, Cheryn; Metzger, Ian; Porterfield, Colin

    2006-11-01

    Properties of the microcirculation in capillary bundles of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia are investigated using microscope observations, empirical modeling, and numerical simulations. Capillary bundles consist of a network of feeding arterioles, draining venules, and capillary vessels. A dozen samples of muscle fascia tissue were prepared for microscope observation. The chosen method of preparation allows for the long-term preservation of the tissue samples for future studies. Capillary bundles are photographed under a microscope with 40x magnification. From the images, the microvasculature of the tissue samples is reconstructed. It was found, for example, that the distribution of vessel length in a capillary bundle follows a log-normal law. In addition to a statistical analysis of the vessel data, the network topology is used for numerical simulations of the flow in the capillary bundles. The numerical approach uses a sparse-matrix solver and it considers vessel elasticity and blood rheology. The numerical simulations show, for example, a strong pressure drop across the capillary vessels of the bundle.

  20. A low-cost, manufacturable method for fabricating capillary and optical fiber interconnects for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Daniel M; Nevill, J Tanner; Pettigrew, Kenneth I; Votaw, Gregory; Kung, Pang-Jen; Crenshaw, Hugh C

    2008-04-01

    Microfluidic chips require connections to larger macroscopic components, such as light sources, light detectors, and reagent reservoirs. In this article, we present novel methods for integrating capillaries, optical fibers, and wires with the channels of microfluidic chips. The method consists of forming planar interconnect channels in microfluidic chips and inserting capillaries, optical fibers, or wires into these channels. UV light is manually directed onto the ends of the interconnects using a microscope. UV-curable glue is then allowed to wick to the end of the capillaries, fibers, or wires, where it is cured to form rigid, liquid-tight connections. In a variant of this technique, used with light-guiding capillaries and optical fibers, the UV light is directed into the capillaries or fibers, and the UV-glue is cured by the cone of light emerging from the end of each capillary or fiber. This technique is fully self-aligned, greatly improves both the quality and the manufacturability of the interconnects, and has the potential to enable the fabrication of interconnects in a fully automated fashion. Using these methods, including a semi-automated implementation of the second technique, over 10,000 interconnects have been formed in almost 2000 microfluidic chips made of a variety of rigid materials. The resulting interconnects withstand pressures up to at least 800psi, have unswept volumes estimated to be less than 10 femtoliters, and have dead volumes defined only by the length of the capillary. PMID:18369517

  1. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties at elevated temperatures and pressures of saturated and aromatic high molecular weight solid and liquid hydrocarbons in kerogen, bitumen, petroleum, and other organic matter of biogeochemical interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, L.; Helgeson, H.C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1998-12-01

    To supplement the relatively sparse set of calorimetric data available for the multitude of high molecular weight organic compounds of biogeochemical interest, group additivity algorithms have been developed to estimate heat capacity power function coefficients and the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar of high molecular weight compounds in hydrocarbon source rocks and reservoirs, including crystalline and liquid isoprenoids, steroids, tricyclic diterpenoids, hopanoids, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A total of ninety-six group contributions for each coefficient and property were generated from the thermodynamic properties of lower molecular weight reference species for which calorimetric data are available in the literature. These group contributions were then used to compute corresponding coefficients and properties for {approximately}360 representative solid and liquid high molecular weight compounds in kerogen, bitumen, and petroleum for which few or no experimental data are available. The coefficients and properties of these high molecular weight compounds are summarized in tables, together with those of the groups and reference species from which they were generated. The tabulated heat capacity power function coefficients and standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25 C and 1 bar include selected crystalline and liquid regular, irregular and highly branched isoprenoids, tricyclic diterpanes, 17{alpha}(H)- and 17{beta}(H)-hopanes, 5{alpha}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{beta}(H),14{alpha}(H)-, 5{alpha}(H),14{beta}(H)-, and 5{beta}(H),14{beta}(H)-steranes, double ether- and ester-bonded n-alkanes, and various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including methylated biphenyls, naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes. However, corresponding coefficients and properties for many more saturated and unsaturated high molecular weight hydrocarbons can be estimated from the equations of state group additivity algorithms

  2. Calculation of the thermodynamic properties at elevated temperatures and pressures of saturated and aromatic high molecular weight solid and liquid hydrocarbons in kerogen, bitumen, petroleum, and other organic matter of biogeochemical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Laurent; Helgeson, Harold C.

    1998-12-01

    To supplement the relatively sparse set of calorimetric data available for the multitude of high molecular weight organic compounds of biogeochemical interest, group additivity algorithms have been developed to estimate heat capacity power function coefficients and the standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar of high molecular weight compounds in hydrocarbon source rocks and reservoirs, including crystalline and liquid isoprenoids, steroids, tricyclic diterpenoids, hopanoids, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A total of ninety-six group contributions for each coefficient and property were generated from the thermodynamic properties of lower molecular weight reference species for which calorimetric data are available in the literature. These group contributions were then used to compute corresponding coefficients and properties for ˜360 representative solid and liquid high molecular weight compounds in kerogen, bitumen, and petroleum for which few or no experimental data are available. The coefficients and properties of these high molecular weight compounds are summarized in tables, together with those of the groups and reference species from which they were generated. The tabulated heat capacity power function coefficients and standard molal thermodynamic properties at 25°C and 1 bar include selected crystalline and liquid regular, irregular and highly branched isoprenoids, tricyclic diterpanes, 17α(H)- and 17β(H)-hopanes, 5α(H),14α(H)-, 5β(H),14α(H)-, 5α(H),14β(H)-, and 5β(H),14β(H)-steranes, double ether- and ester-bonded n-alkanes, and various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including methylated biphenyls, naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, anthracenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes. However, corresponding coefficients and properties for many more saturated and unsaturated high molecular weight hydrocarbons can be estimated from the equations of state group additivity algorithms. Calculations of this kind permit comprehensive

  3. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions.

  4. Modelling the effect of pore structure and wetting angles on capillary rise in soils having different wettabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czachor, Henryk

    2006-09-01

    SummaryCapillary rise in axis symmetrical sinusoidal capillary (SC) has been modelled. Analytical formula for meniscus radius, capillary pressure and meniscus rate in SC have been found. Capillary shape described by wall waviness highly influences all of them. The limit between wettability and repellency in such capillary is described by critical value of contact angle θc which is related to the pore geometry by the equation ctg( θc) = πd2, where d2 - pore wall waviness. Kinetics of capillary rise in sinusoidal capillary has been determined by numerical integration of meniscus rate equation for a wide range of pore wall waviness and several values of contact angles. Application of Washburn theory to the data obtained from simulation gives the contact angle value much higher than the true one. In contrast, the obtained pore radius value is usually well correlated with capillary neck. However, in some cases a calculated radius can be even smaller. Above conclusions have been qualitatively confirmed by experiments performed on glass beads and soils. Contact angle measured on flat glass was 27.4°. The calculations concerning the data from capillary rise experiments on 90-1000 μm fraction of glass powder and Washburn theory gave values ca. 80°. The contact angle values for peat soils and loamy sand have close values, which supports the opinion that non-cylindrical shape of soil pores highly influences both the wettability/repellency and the water flux in soils.

  5. Burst behavior at a capillary tip: Effect of low and high surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agonafer, Damena D; Lopez, Ken; Palko, James W; Won, Yoonjin; Santiago, Juan G; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-10-01

    Liquid retention in micron and millimeter scale devices is important for maintaining stable interfaces in various processes including bimolecular separation, phase change heat transfer, and water desalination. There have been several studies of re-entrant geometries, and very few studies on retaining low surface tension liquids such as fluorocarbon-based dielectric liquids. Here, we study retention of a liquid with very low contact angles using borosilicate glass capillary tips. We analyzed capillary tips with outer diameters ranging from 250 to 840 μm and measured Laplace pressures up to 2.9 kPa. Experimental results agree well with a numerical model that predicts burst pressure (the maximum Laplace pressure for liquid retention), which is a function of the outer diameter (D) and capillary exit edge radius of curvature (r). PMID:26046980

  6. High-Throughput Proteomics Using High Efficiency Multiple-Capillary Liquid Chromatography With On-Line High-Performance ESI FTICR Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yufeng (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Tolic, Nikola (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Zhao, Rui (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Li, Lingjun (Illinois Univ Of-Urbana/Champa); Berger, Scott J.(ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Harkewicz, Richard (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Anderson, Gordon A.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Belov, Mikhail E.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Smith, Richard D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-12-01

    We report on the design and application of a high-efficiency multiple-capillary liquid chromatography (LC) system for high-throughput proteome analysis. The multiple-capillary LC system was operated at the pressure of 10,000 psi using commercial LC pumps to deliver the mobile phase and newly developed passive feedback valves to switch the mobile phase flow and introduce samples. The multiple-capillary LC system was composed of several serially connected dual-capillary column devices. The dual-capillary column approach was designed to eliminate the time delay for regeneration (or equilibrium) of the capillary column after its use under the mobile phase gradient condition (i.e. one capillary column was used in separation and the other was washed using mobile phase A). The serially connected dual-capillary columns and ESI sources were operated independently, and could be used for either''backup'' operation or with other mass spectrometer(s). This high-efficiency multiple-capillary LC system uses switching valves for all operations and is highly amenable to automation. The separations efficiency of dual-capillary column device, optimal capillary dimensions (column length and packed particle size), suitable mobile phases for electrospray, and the capillary re-generation were investigated. A high magnetic field (11.5 tesla) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was coupled on-line with this high-efficiency multiple-capillary LC system through an electrospray ionization source. The capillary LC provided a peak capacity of {approx}600, and the 2-D capillary LC-FTICR provided a combined resolving power of > 6 x 10 7 polypeptide isotopic distributions. For yeast cellular tryptic digests, > 100,000 polypeptides were typically detected, and {approx}1,000 proteins can be characterized in a single run.

  7. Phase Behaviors of Reservoir Fluids with Capillary Eff ect Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Zhiwei

    2013-05-06

    The study of phase behavior is important for the oil and gas industry. Many approaches have been proposed and developed for phase behavior calculation. In this thesis, an alternative method is introduced to study the phase behavior by means of minimization of Helmholtz free energy. For a system at fixed volume, constant temperature and constant number of moles, the Helmholtz free energy reaches minimum at the equilibrium state. Based on this theory, a stochastic method called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm, is implemented to compute the phase diagrams for several pure component and mixture systems. After comparing with experimental and the classical PT-ash calculation, we found the phase diagrams obtained by minimization of the Helmholtz Free Energy approach match the experimental and theoretical diagrams very well. Capillary effect is also considered in this thesis because it has a significant influence on the phase behavior of reservoir fluids. In this part, we focus on computing the phase envelopes, which consists of bubble and dew point lines. Both fixed and calculated capillary pressure from the Young-Laplace equation cases are introduced to study their effects on phase envelopes. We found that the existence of capillary pressure will change the phase envelopes. Positive capillary pressure reduces the dew point and bubble point temperatures under the same pressure condition, while the negative capillary pressure increases the dew point and bubble point temperatures. In addition, the change of contact angle and pore radius will affect the phase envelope. The effect of the pore radius on the phase envelope is insignificant when the radius is very large. These results may become reference for future research and study. Keywords: Phase Behavior; Particle Swarm Optimization; Capillary Pressure; Reservoir Fluids; Phase Equilibrium; Phase Envelope.

  8. Study of capillary experiments and hydrologic factors under subsurface drip irrigation with fractal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil spatial variability is one of the primary environmental factors that influences the hydraulic factors and technical indicators of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI), whose emitters are buried in the soil. This paper aimed at evaluating these effects of soil spatial variability on hydrologic factors under SDI. And some SDI emitter and capillary experiments were designed to obtain test data and distribution of pressure and emitter discharge. First, The results of labyrinth non-turbulent mosaic drip emitter test and fractal theory were used to research the fractal and quantitative relationship between single emitter hydrologic factors and soil physical parameters; and then, the capillary experiments and the relationship among hydrologic factors of capillary were used to analyze the fractal and quantitative relationship between hydrologic factors of capillary and soil physical parameters, which explained the inner relationship between spatial variability of soil and hydrologic factors of filed pipeline network under SDI, and provide theory support for the plan, design, management and production of SDI.

  9. High pressure gas metering project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial research and development of a system that uses high pressure helium gas to pressurize vessels over a wide range of pressurization rates, vessel volumes, and maximum test pressures are described. A method of controlling the mass flow rate in a test vessel was developed by using the pressure difference across a capillary tube. The mass flow rate is related to the pressurization rate through a real gas equation of state. The resulting mass flow equation is then used in a control algorithm. Plots of two typical pressurization tests run on a manually operated system are included

  10. A Simulation of Blood Cells in Branching Capillaries

    CERN Document Server

    Isfahani, Amir H G; Freund, Jonathan B

    2008-01-01

    The multi-cellular hydrodynamic interactions play a critical role in the phenomenology of blood flow in the microcirculation. A fast algorithm has been developed to simulate large numbers of cells modeled as elastic thin membranes. For red blood cells, which are the dominant component in blood, the membrane has strong resistance to surface dilatation but is flexible in bending. Our numerical method solves the boundary integral equations built upon Green's functions for Stokes flow in periodic domains. This fluid dynamics video is an example of the capabilities of this model in handling complex geometries with a multitude of different cells. The capillary branch geometries have been modeled based upon observed capillary networks. The diameter of the branches varies between 10-20 mum. A constant mean pressure gradient drives the flow. For the purpose of this fluid dynamics video, the red blood cells are initiated as biconcave discs and white blood cells and platelets are initiated as spheres and ellipsoids resp...

  11. Fast capillary discharge: plasma dynamics and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in a small and fast capillary discharge have been performed. Submillimeter capillaries with centimeters length were used. The discharge is operated in argon, with a cathode pressure of 100-500 mtorr. For an applied voltage of 10 kV, a peak current of 4 to 5 k A with a rise time of 2 to 5 ns is obtained (1012 A/s). In addition to usual electrical diagnostics, time-space resolution pinhole images and spectra in the region of 20 to 80 nm were performed. Dynamics of plasma compression can be studied from time resolved pinhole images. Detected spectra show that plasma consists of argon ions with ionization potential from Ar VII to Ar X.. (Author)

  12. Anomalous capillary filling and wettability reversal in nanochannels

    CERN Document Server

    Gravelle, Simon; Bocquet, Lydéric; Joly, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    This work revisits capillary filling dynamics in the regime of nanometric to subnanometric channels. Using molecular dynamics simulations of water in carbon nanotubes, we show that for tube radii below one nanometer, both the filling velocity and the Jurin rise vary non-monotonically with the tube radius. Strikingly, with fixed chemical surface properties, this leads to confinement-induced reversal of the tube wettability from hydrophilic to hydrophobic for specific values of the radius. By comparing with a model liquid metal, we show that these effects are not specific to water. Using complementary data from slit channels, we then show that they can be described using the disjoin-ing pressure associated with the liquid structuring in confinement. This breakdown of the standard continuum framework is of main importance in the context of capillary effects in nanoporous media, with potential interests ranging from membrane selectivity to mechanical energy storage.

  13. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  14. Microfluidic PMMA interfaces for rectangular glass capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and fabrication of a polymeric capillary fluidic interface fabricated by micro-milling. The design enables the use of glass capillaries with any kind of cross-section in complex microfluidic setups. We demonstrate two different designs of the interface; a double-inlet interface for hydrodynamic focusing and a capillary interface with integrated pneumatic valves. Both capillary interfaces are presented together with examples of practical applications. This communication shows the design optimization and presents details of the fabrication process. The capillary interface opens up for the use of complex microfluidic systems in single-use glass capillaries. They also enable simple fabrication of glass/polymer hybrid devices that can be beneficial in many research fields where a pure polymer chip negatively affects the device's performance, e.g. acoustofluidics. (technical note)

  15. Heterogeneous Nucleation Induced by Capillary Wave During Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The rapid solidification of acoustically levitated drops of Pb-61.9 wt. %Sn eutectic alloy is accomplished. A surface morphology of spreading ripples is observed on a sample undercooled by 15 K. The ripples originate from the centre of sample surface, which is also the heterogeneous nucleation site for eutectic growth. The Faraday instability excited by forced surface vibration has brought about these ripples. They are retained in the solidified sample if the sound pressure level exceeds the threshold pressure required for the appearance of capillary waves.Theoretical calculations indicate that both the pressure and displacement maxima exist in the central part of a levitated drop. The pressure near the sample centre can promote heterogeneous nucleation, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental results.

  16. Law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays and radial consolidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It was derived that micro-scale amount level of average pore radius of clay changed from 0.01 to 0.1 micron by an equivalent concept of flow in porous media. There is good agreement between the derived results and test ones. Results of experiments show that flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays follows law of nonlinear flow. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that an interaction of solid-liquid interfaces varies inversely with permeability or porous radius. The interaction is an important reason why nonlinear flow in saturated clays occurs. An exact mathematical model was presented for nonlinear flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays. Dimension and physical meanings of parameters of it are definite. A new law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays was established. It can describe characteristics of flow curve of the whole process of the nonlinear flow from low hydraulic gradient to high one. Darcy law is a special case of the new law. A mathematical model was presented for consolidation of nonlinear flow in radius direction in saturated clays with constant rate based on the new law of nonlinear flow. Equations of average mass conservation and moving boundary, and formula of excess pore pressure distribution and average degree of consolidation for nonlinear flow in saturated clay were derived by using an idea of viscous boundary layer, a method of steady state in stead of transient state and a method of integral of an equation. Laws of excess pore pressure distribution and changes of average degree of consolidation with time were obtained. Results show that velocity of moving boundary decreases because of the nonlinear flow in saturated clay. The results can provide geology engineering and geotechnical engineering of saturated clay with new scientific bases. Calculations of average degree of consolidation of the Darcy flow are a special case of that of the nonlinear flow.

  17. A New Conductivity Detector for Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new conductivity detector for capillary electrophoresis consisting of an electrochemical cell and a conductive meter was developed. In the cell, the microelectrode and capillary were inserted through the cell wall and fixed by screws and sealing ring, the ends of microelectrode and capillary were located by a guide with two cross holes. LOD for K+ was 1.5×10-5 mol/L.

  18. Serum proteins analysis by capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Uji, Yoshinori; Okabe, Hiroaki

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of multi-capillary electrophoresis instrument in clinical laboratory. An automated clinical capillary electrophoresis system was evaluated for performing serum proteins electrophoresis and immuno-fixation electrophoresis by subtraction. In this study the performance of capillary electrophoresis was compared with the cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis and agarose gel immunofixation electrophoresis for serum proteins. The results of...

  19. Cytokine Analysis by Immunoaffinity Capillary Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonca, Mark; Kalish, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Immunoaffinity capillary electrophoresis (ICE) is a powerful tool used to detect and quantify target proteins of interest in complex biological fluids. The target analyte is captured and bound to antibodies immobilized onto the wall of a capillary, labeled in situ with a fluorescent dye, eluted and detected online using laser-induced fluorescence following electrophoretic separation. Here, we illustrate how to construct an immunoaffinity capillary and utilize it to run ICE in order to capture...

  20. Elastic laboratory measurements and modeling of saturated basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Ludmila; Otheim, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the elastic behavior of basalt is important to seismically monitor volcanoes, subsea basalts, and carbon sequestration in basalt. We estimate the elastic properties of basalt samples from the Snake River Plain, Idaho, at ultrasonic (0.8 MHz) and seismic (2-300 Hz) frequencies. To test the sensitivity of seismic waves to the fluid content in the pore structure, measurements are performed at three saturation conditions: saturated with liquid CO2, water, and dry. When CO2 replaces water, the P-wave velocity drops, on average, by 10%. Vesicles and cracks, observed in the rock microstructure, control the relaxation of pore-fluid pressures in the rock as a wave propagates. The bulk and shear moduli of basalts saturated with liquid CO2 are not frequency dependent, suggesting that fluid pore pressures are in equilibrium between 2 Hz and 0.8 MHz. However, when samples are water saturated, the bulk modulus of the rock is frequency dependent. Modeling with Gassmann's equations predicts the measured saturated rock bulk modulus for all fluids for frequencies below 20 Hz but underpredicts the water-saturated basalt bulk modulus for frequencies greater than 20 Hz. The most likely reason is that the pore-fluid pressures are unrelaxed. Instead, the ultrasonic frequency rock moduli are modeled with high-frequency elastic theories of squirt flow and Kuster-Toksöz (KT). Although KT's model is based on idealized pore shapes, a combination of spheres (vesicles) and penny-shaped cracks (fractures) interpreted and quantified from petrographical data predicts the ultrasonic dry and saturated rock moduli for the measured basalts.

  1. Slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾永君; 张杰; 王岩峰

    2010-01-01

    Capillary and capillary-gravity waves possess a random character, and the slope wavenumber spectra of them can be used to represent mean distributions of wave energy with respect to spatial scale of variability. But simple and practical models of the slope wavenumber spectra have not been put forward so far. In this article, we address the accurate definition of the slope wavenumber spectra of water surface capillary and capillary-gravity waves. By combining the existing slope wavenumber models and using th...

  2. Cyclic Shearing Deformation Behavior of Saturated Clays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The apparatus for static and dynamic universal triaxial and torsional shear soil testing is employed to perform stress-controlled cyclic single-direction torsional shear tests and two-direction coupled shear tests under unconsolidated-undrained conditions. Through a series of tests on saturated clay, the effects of initial shear stress and stress reversal on the clay's strain-stress behavior are examined, and the behavior of pore water pressure is studied. The experimental results indicate that the patterns of stress-strain relations are distinctly influenced by the initial shear stress in the cyclic single-direction shear tests. When the initial shear stress is large and no stress reversal occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by an accumulative effect. When the initial shear stress is zero and symmetrical cyclic stress occurs, the predominant deformation behavior is characterized by a cyclic effect. The pore water pressure fluctuates around the confining pressure with the increase of cycle number. It seems that the fluctuating amplitude increases with the increase of the cyclic stress. But a buildup of pore water pressure does not occur. The deformations of clay samples under the complex initial and the cyclic coupled stress conditions include the normal deviatoric deformation and horizontal shear deformation, the average deformation and cyclic deformation. A general strain failure criterion taking into account these deformations is recommended and is proved more stable and suitable compared to the strain failure criteria currently used.

  3. The experiment on the saturation polarization of Rb vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Xiang-You; You Pei-Lin; Du Wei-Min

    2004-01-01

    @@ A cylindrical capacitor containing rubidium vapour is made. The capacitance of it at. different voltages is measured under a certain Rb vapour pressure. The experimental C-V curve shows that the saturation polarization of Rb vapour is easily observed. The experiment further supports the idea that the Rb atom has a large permanent electric dipole moment.

  4. Pore-Scale Study of the Effect of the Saturation History on Fluid Saturation and Relative Permeability of Three-Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. Y.; Tsai, J. P.; Chang, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    The flow of three immiscible fluids - water, NAPL, air - in porous media is important in many subsurface processes. To model the three-fluid flow, the relation of relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure (k-S-P) of three fluids is of central importance. In this experimental study, we directly measure the k-S-P of the water (wetting phase) when three fluids are coexist in a micromodel during the water drainage and imbibition. The results show that the sequence of the non-wetting fluids (air and NAPL) entering into the micromodel affects the fluid distributions as well as the relative permeability of water. During the drainage process, the relative permeability of water dropped drastically when the pathway of water from inlet to outlet of the micromodel was visually blocked by the non-wetting fluids. At this stage, the relative permeability of water was low but not down to zero. The water was still able to move via corner flows or thin-film flows. During the imbibition process, the water displaced two non-wetting liquids via both "snap-off" and "piston-type" motions. The relative permeability of water jumped when the water pathway was formed again. In addition, we found that the well-known scaling format proposed by Parker et al. [1] might fail when the interfaces between the most non-wetting (air) and the most wetting (water) fluids occurs in the three-fluids system. References[1] J. C. Parker, R. J. Lenhard, and T. Kuppusamy, Water Resources Research, 23, 4, 618-624 (1987)

  5. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Marini, A; de Abajo, F J Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Saturable absorption is a non-perturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a non-perturbative single-particle approach, describing conduction-electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics non-perturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. The results are in excellent agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations including high...

  6. Electromigration dispersion in Capillary Electrophoresis

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhen; 10.1007/s11538-011-9708-7

    2012-01-01

    In a previous paper (S. Ghosal and Z. Chen Bull. Math. Biol. 2010, vol. 72, pg. 2047) it was shown that the evolution of the solute concentration in capillary electrophoresis is described by a nonlinear wave equation that reduced to Burger's equation if the nonlinearity was weak. It was assumed that only strong electrolytes (fully dissociated) were present. In the present paper it is shown that the same governing equation also describes the situation where the electrolytic buffer consists of a single weak acid (or base). A simple approximate formula is derived for the dimensionless peak variance which is shown to agree well with published experimental data.

  7. Microbeam-coupled capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the first few microseconds following a charged particle traversal of a cell, numerous oxygen and nitrogen radicals are formed along the track. Presented here is a method, using capillary electrophoresis, for simultaneous measurement, within an individual cell, of specific reactive oxygen species, such as the superoxide radical (O2-*) as well as the native and oxidised forms of glutathione, an ubiquitous anti-oxidant that assists the cell in coping with these species. Preliminary data are presented as well as plans for integrating this system into the charged particle microbeam at Columbia University. (authors)

  8. Capillary electrophoresis theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Paul D

    1992-01-01

    This book is designed to be a practical guide, used by wide audience, including those new to CE, those more experienced, routine users, those interested in technology development, and those involved with applications research. References have been emphasized to allow the reader to explore the detailed specifics and theoretical foundations.This book draws together the rapidly evolving, diverse, and multidisciplinary subject of capillary electrophoresis (CE). It is designed as a practical guide to be used by a wide audience, including those new to CE as well as more experienced users. T

  9. Exotic containers for capillary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses 'exotic' rotationally symmetric containers that admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium capillary free surfaces. The paper extends earlier work to a larger class of parameters and clarifies and simplifies the governing differential equations, while expressing them in a parametric form appropriate for numerical integration. A unified presentation suitable for both zero and nonzero gravity is given. Solutions for the container shapes are depicted graphically along with members of the free-surface continuum, and comments are given concerning possible physical experiments.

  10. Microfluidic and Capillary Tube Experimental Study of Forsterite Carbonation by CO2 Bearing Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Steefel, C. I.; Bechtel, H.

    2013-12-01

    The kinetic reactions of minerals and CO2 bearing fluids in the subsurface are critical to predict long term fate and stability of the injected CO2 in the subsurface. It is very challenging, however, to apply the baseline kinetic information obtained from conventional batch reactors directly and predict mineral carbonation reactions in subsurface porous media environments where minerals are in contact with reactive fluids within tiny pores of a few to hundreds microns in diameter characterized by very different solid/solution ratios and hydrodynamic flow conditions. In this study, kinetic experiments were conducted using high temperature and pressure microfluidic and micro-capillary tube reactors to investigate the coupled dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation associated with reaction between olivine (forsterite) and CO2 bearing fluids within a simulated micro-porous environment. Channels (pores) of 100 μm with sub-micron apertures were constructed on surfaces of forsterite discs and were reacted with solution saturated with CO2 at 80 bars and 95 C for more than three weeks. A highly incongruent dissolution was observed with magnesium preferentially leached out of forsterite surfaces relative to silica. However, no effects of surface passivation due to the apparent precipitation of amorphous silica at the higher temperature were observed, with magnesium dissolution rates reaching a steady state after one week of reaction. Solid phase analysis by RAMAN spectroscopy showed no detectable secondary carbonates in the primary 100μm diameter pore of the microfluidic reactor, although abundant hydromagnesite had precipitated on forsterite surfaces in the sub-micron diameter pores of the microfluidic reactor along its O-ring seals, indicating a diffusion control on rates in the local micro-environment. To further understand these processes, micro-capillary tube experiments with novel T-design were carried out using forsterite grains packed inside 200 μm I

  11. Computational micro-scale model of control of extravascular water and capillary perfusion in the air blood barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Enrico; Aliverti, Andrea; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    A computational model of a morphologically-based alveolar capillary unit (ACU) in the rabbit is developed to relate lung fluid balance to mechanical forces between capillary surface and interstitium during development of interstitial edema. We hypothesize that positive values of interstitial liquid pressure Pliq impact on capillary transmural pressure and on blood flow. ACU blood flow, capillary recruitment and filtration are computed by modulating vascular and interstitial pressures. Model results are compared with experimental data of Pliq increasing from ~-10 (control) up to ~4cmH2O in two conditions, hypoxia and collagenase injection. For hypoxia exposure, fitting data requires a linear increase in hydraulic conductivity Lp and capillary pressure PC, that fulfils the need of increase in oxygen delivery. For severe fragmentation of capillary endothelial barrier (collagenase injection), fitting requires a rapid increase in both hydraulic and protein permeability, causing ACU de-recruitment, followed by an increase in PC as a late response to restore blood flow. In conclusion, the model allows to describe the lung adaptive response to edemagenic perturbations; the increase in Pliq, related to the low interstitial compliance, provides an efficient control of extravascular water, by limiting microvascular filtration. PMID:27059893

  12. Decentralized control with input saturation

    OpenAIRE

    Saberi, Ali; Stoorvogel, Anton A.; Sannuti, Peddapullaiah

    2004-01-01

    In decentralized control it is known that the system can be stabilized only if the so-called fixed modes are all stable. If we have input constraints then (semi-)global stability requires all poles to be in the closed left half plane. This paper establishes that these two requirements are necessary and sufficient for stabilizability of a decentralized system with input saturation.

  13. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  14. Diagnostics of a high current capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated that thin (10 to 25 μm diameter) capillaries can be fabricated in suitably configured insulators for use in pulse power machines. Large currents can be used to heat these capillaries which produce photons with an energies greater than 1 keV

  15. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis in a premature infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder characterized by widespread capillary proliferation in the lung, infiltrating the interstitium and the alveolar walls. We present the HRCT features of PCH in a surviving ex-premature infant. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of the radiological features of PCH in a young living infant. (orig.)

  16. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis in a premature infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cicero J.T.A.; Massie, John; Mandelstam, Simone A. [University of Melbourne, Royal Children' s Hospital, Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder characterized by widespread capillary proliferation in the lung, infiltrating the interstitium and the alveolar walls. We present the HRCT features of PCH in a surviving ex-premature infant. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of the radiological features of PCH in a young living infant. (orig.)

  17. Capillary force between a probe tip with a power-law profile and a surface or a nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a method to exactly calculate the capillary bridge profile and capillary force between a probe tip with a power-law profile and a surface or nanoparticle at various humidities. The shape of the probe tip is denoted by a power-law profile including a shape index, which is a general extension of the usual parabolids. The accuracy of the usual circular approximation of the capillary bridge is investigated, and it is found that great deviations may occur for capillary bridges and capillary forces at nanoscales, especially for the probe tip with a small shape index. The proportion of the capillary pressure force and the surface tension force which constitute the capillary force is also considered. The results show that the surface tension force can even be dominant at nanoscales. The influences of various parameters, including the shape index, equivalent radius of the tip, relative humidity, contact angles and separation distances, on the capillary force between a probe tip with a power-law profile and a surface or nanoparticle are studied. The rupture distances of the liquid bridges at condensation equilibrium and constant volume conditions are also compared. (paper)

  18. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Microbiological Growth in the Capillary Fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hron, P.; Jost, D.; Engwer, C.; Ippisch, O.; Bastian, P.

    2012-04-01

    The capillary fringe (CF) is a highly dynamic zone in a porous media at the interface between water-saturated aquifer and vadose zone, where steep biogeochemical gradients and thus high bioactivities are expected. In recent years, considerable effort has been undertaken to deepen the understanding of the physical (flow, diffusion, dispersion), geochemical (dissolution, precipitation) and biological (metabolism, excretion, biofilm formation) processes in the CF. We developed a numerical simulator for multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media which is able to consider simultaneously multiphase flow, component transport, phase exchange, geochemical reactions and microbiological processes. A splitting approach for phase transport, component transport and reaction/phase exchanges allows the usage of higher-order discretizations for the component transport. This reduces numerical dispersion significantly, which is especially important in the simulation of reactive flow. In a flow-through laboratory experiment performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, within the project "Dynamic Capillary Fringes - A Multidisciplinary Approach", the oxygen phase transfer, the growth and the transport of a bacteria (green fluorescent Escherichia coli) were investigated. The results of numerical simulations of the E. coli growth in the CF with a high nutrient supply under steady-state and transient flow conditions are compared to the experimental data.

  20. Effect of anemia on cardiac function, microvascular structure, and capillary hematocrit in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Kolar, F

    2001-03-01

    The effect of anemia on the coronary microcirculation was studied in young male rats. Chronic anemia resulted in increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and decreased functional reserve. Cardiac mass in anemic animals increased by 25%. Capillary and arteriolar densities in these hearts remained unchanged, indicating angiogenesis in this experimental situation (estimated aggregate capillary length in the left ventricle of anemic hearts was 3.06 km compared with 2.35 km in control hearts). Capillary hematocrit was decreased in chronic anemia less than systemic hematocrit: from 25 to 18% in anemia versus 45 to 28% in controls. Capillary hematocrit and red blood cell spacing were also studied after acute blood withdrawal. Here, capillary hematocrit was preserved even more: 22 versus 24% in systemic hematocrit. Finally, the same was studied in isolated hearts perfused with solutions of various hematocrits. After perfusion with low-hematocrit solution (14%), the capillary hematocrit (24%) was even higher than the perfusate hematocrit! In conclusion, we found evidence of angiogenesis in cardiomegaly induced by chronic anemia. Microvascular growth was accompanied by advantageous regulation of red blood cell spacing within these vessels. This was even more pronounced during acute hemodilution and in isolated perfused hearts. PMID:11179091

  1. Experimental study and mechanical modelling of the effects of water-driving in an oil saturated chalk. Application to the petroleum industry; Etude experimentale et modelisation mecanique des effets du balayage a l'eau dans une craie saturee d'huile. Application a l'industrie petroliere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata, C.

    2001-01-01

    The production of hydrocarbons may sometimes lead to compaction of the oil-reservoir layers with substantial collapse of the soil surface; this mechanism is usually mentioned as Subsidence. Classical remedy to this problem is to sustain the fluid pressure with the help of water injection. However, in presence of high porosity chalk (porosity > 30%), this technique does not give effective results: the subsidence rate at North Sea reservoirs (Ekofisk field), after injection, has remained unchanged. Some justify the subsistence in the chalk as caused by phenomena of dissolution of the carbonates; others think it is connected to the destruction of capillary menisci. In this research, we follow this second approach. This study is finalized to a better understanding of the compaction mechanisms in pure carbonates when water is injected. This is done by proposing -in micro-scale first and in macro-scale after- a physical model that agrees with empirical observations. In order to meet this target, IFP skills and experience in physical and chemical measurements (taken before, after and during mechanical tests) have proficiently joined ENPC laboratory (CERMMO) knowledge of micro and macro modelling. The soft rock studied is a Paris basin's white chalk (Craie de Guerville). Its physical and chemical characterisation (i.e.: silica content, porosity, permeability) is very similar to North Sea chalk, but Guerville chalk has never been in contact with oil and generally it crops out of the ground surface. Strength parameters of this rock have been first determined by standard triaxial tests. Three different saturation configurations have been examined: dry, fully oil-saturated and fully water-saturated. As literature clearly state, dry chalk is stronger than oil saturated chalk and the first two are largely stronger than water saturated chalk. Therefore uniaxial strain water injection tests have been performed on oil saturated samples. Results, coupled with previous physical

  2. Experimental methods for the simulation of supercritical CO2 injection at laboratory scale aimed to investigate capillary trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, L.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Rodriguez, D.; Sakaki, T.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations is being considered as a technical option to reduce greenhouse gas loading to the atmosphere. The processes associated with the movement and stable trapping are complex in deep naturally heterogeneous formations. Three primary mechanisms contribute to trapping; capillary entrapment due to immobilization of the supercritical fluid CO2 within soil pores, liquid CO2 dissolving in the formation water and mineralization. Natural heterogeneity in the formation is expected to affect all three mechanisms. A research project is in progress with the primary goal to improve our understanding of capillary and dissolution trapping during injection and post-injection process, focusing on formation heterogeneity. It is expected that this improved knowledge will help to develop site characterization methods targeting on obtaining the most critical parameters that capture the heterogeneity to design strategies and schemes to maximize trapping. This research combines experiments at the laboratory scale with multiphase modeling to upscale relevant trapping processes to the field scale. This paper presents the results from a set of experiments that were conducted in an intermediate scale test tanks. Intermediate scale testing provides an attractive alternative to investigate these processes under controlled conditions in the laboratory. Conducting these types of experiments is highly challenging as methods have to be developed to extrapolate the data from experiments that are conducted under ambient laboratory conditions to high temperatures and pressures settings in deep geologic formations. We explored the use of a combination of surrogate fluids that have similar density, viscosity contrasts and analogous solubility and interfacial tension as supercritical CO2-brine in deep formations. The extrapolation approach involves the use of dimensionless numbers such as Capillary number (Ca) and the Bond number (Bo). A set of

  3. Nonlinear Stability and Saturation of Ballooning Modes in Tokamaks*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, C. J.; Cowley, S. C.; Brochard, G.; Wilson, H. R.

    2016-06-01

    The theory of tokamak stability to nonlinear "ballooning" displacements of elliptical magnetic flux tubes is presented. Above a critical pressure profile the energy stored in the plasma may be lowered by finite (but not infinitesimal) displacements of such tubes (metastability). Above a higher pressure profile, the linear stability boundary, such tubes are linearly and nonlinearly unstable. The predicted saturated flux tube displacement can be of the order of the pressure gradient scale length. Plasma transport from these displaced flux tubes may explain the rapid loss of confinement in some experiments.

  4. Vibrating Liquefaction Experiment and Mechanism Study in Saturated Granular Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianhua; Xu Ming; Ju Haiyan; Zhao Jiangqian; Huang Hongyuan; Sun Yezhi

    2006-01-01

    By the vibrating liquefaction experiment of tailings and fine-ores of iron, it is observed and noted that the change of pore water pressure when the vibrating liquefaction takes place. Based on relevant suppositions, the equation of wave propagation in saturated granular media is obtained. This paper postulates the potential vector equation and the velocity expression of three kinds of body waves under normal conditions.Utilizing the wave theory and the experimental results, the influence of three body waves on pore water pressure and granules has been analyzed in detail. This revealed the rapid increment mechanism of pore water pressure and the wave mechanism of vibrating liquefaction.

  5. C18 silica packed capillary columns with monolithic frits prepared with UV light emitting diode: usefulness in nano-liquid chromatography and capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Giovanni; Fanali, Salvatore

    2012-04-01

    In this paper the potential of fused silica capillaries packed with RP18 silica particles entrapped with monolithic frits using both nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) was investigated. Frits were prepared after removing a short part of the polyimide layer on the capillary wall and irradiating the polymerization mixture with an UV-light emitter diode (LED) at 370 nm. The capillary, was rotated during the polymerization procedure in order to obtain a homogeneous monolith. The distance of the LED from the capillary and the exposure time to UV light were studied in order to obtain frits with good porosity and high robustness. A mixture containing five alkylbenzenes was selected as sample and analyzed by both nano-LC and CEC. The standard mixture was baseline separated with good efficiency in the range 78,000-93,000 and 99,000-113,000 plates/m in nano-LC and CEC, respectively. The columns resulted to be very robust and the prepared monolithic frits allowed working with backpressure as high as 400 bar (nano-LC). In addition high voltages were applied in CEC (25-30 kV) without bubbles formation in absence of pressure assistance during runs. PMID:22189300

  6. Improving the Detection Limit in a Capillary Raman System for In Situ Gas Analysis by Means of Fluorescence Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Rupp; Andreas Off; Hendrik Seitz-Moskaliuk; James, Timothy M.; Telle, Helmut H.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy for low-pressure or trace gas analysis is rather challenging, in particular in process control applications requiring trace detection and real-time response; in general, enhancement techniques are required. One possible enhancement approach which enjoys increasing popularity makes use of an internally-reflective capillary as the gas cell. However, in the majority of cases, such capillary systems were often limited in their achievable sensitivity by a significant fluorescenc...

  7. Capillary Discharge XUV Radiation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nevrkla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A device producing Z-pinching plasma as a source of XUV radiation is described. Here a ceramic capacitor bank pulse-charged up to 100 kV is discharged through a pre-ionized gas-filled ceramic tube 3.2 mm in diameter and 21 cm in length. The discharge current has amplitude of 20 kA and a rise-time of 65 ns. The apparatus will serve as experimental device for studying of capillary discharge plasma, for testing X-ray optics elements and for investigating the interaction of water-window radiation with biological samples. After optimization it will be able to produce 46.9 nm laser radiation with collision pumped Ne-like argon ions active medium. 

  8. Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partially saturated soil materials undergo consolidation, heave, collapse and failure due to changes in pore fluid pressure. The precise nature of the mechanics of such deformations is only poorly understood at present. Experimental evidence has shown that the volume change behavior of unsaturated soils cannot be adequately explained through changes in effective stress, even when a saturation dependent parameter is incorporated into the definition of effective stress. Two independent stress-state variables, involving combinations of total stress, pore air pressure and pore water pressure, are required to characterize volume changes and saturation changes in the partially saturated state. In general, two coupled conservation equations, one for the water-phase and the other for the air-phase need to be solved in order to predict the deformation behavior of unsaturated soils. If directional displacements and changes in the stress-field are required, then the conservation equations are to be integrated with an additional set of multi-dimensional force balance equations. For lack of a sufficient understanding of elastic constants such as Poisson's Ratio and Lame's constants as applied to unsaturated soils, little has been achieved so far in integrating the conservation equations and the force balance equations. For the long-term modeling of consolidation with respect to uranium mill tailings, it may be acceptable and economical to solve a single conservation equation for water, assuming that the air-phase is continuous and is at atmospheric pressure everywhere in the soil. The greatest challenge to modeling consolidation in the unsaturated zone at the presnt time is to develop enough experimental data defining the variation of void ratio and saturation with reference to the two chosen stress-state variables

  9. Analysis of effect of electrolyte types on electrokinetic energy conversion in nanoscale capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, Reiyu; Tsai, Kunyong; Yeh, Liying

    2010-01-01

    An analytical study on the effect of electrolyte types on the electrokinetic energy conversion is presented using nanoscale cylindrical capillary, which is either positively or negatively charged. The sign of surface charge determines the role and concentration magnitude of ions in the capillary and the energy conversion performance. Our study shows that the electrokinetic energy conversion performance (maximum efficiency, pressure rise and streaming potential) are approximately identical for 1:1 (KCl), 2:1 (CaCl2) and 3:1 (LaCl3) electrolytes when capillary is positively charged. For negatively charged capillary, energy conversion performance degrades significantly with the increase of counter-ion valence. For both positively and negatively charged capillaries, higher maximum efficiency can be resulted in low bulk concentration and surface charge density regimes. However, high maximum pressure rise generation for the pumping is found in the low bulk concentration and high surface charge density regimes. For the electric power generation, higher maximum streaming potential is found when both bulk concentration and surface charge density are low. PMID:20119963

  10. Geometry of the capillary net in human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Spatenka, J; Samánek, M

    1997-01-01

    The geometry of the coronary capillary bed in human hearts was studied using samples obtained during cardiac surgery of children operated for tetralogy of Fallot and samples from fresh normal hearts used for valve harvesting. The results revealed a similar coronary capillary density and heterogeneity of capillary spacing in samples from both groups. A double-staining method was used to distinguish between capillary segments close to the feeding arteriole (proximal capillaries) and segments distant from the arteriole (distal capillaries). In both groups of hearts, capillary segment length was consistently shorter on the venular than the arteriolar portion of the capillary. Similarly, capillary domain areas were also smaller and the resulting capillary supply unit was smaller along venular portions compared to arteriolar regions of the capillary bed. This distinctive geometry would provide advantageous geometric conditions for tissue oxygen supply. PMID:9176723

  11. Theoretical Design of adiabatic capillary tube of a domestic refrigerator using refrigerant R-600a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo. K. C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a more accurate theoretical procedure for the design of adiabatic capillary tube of a domestic refrigerator considering a rigorous pressure drop analysis on the refrigerant R-600a while expanding through that tube accompanied with phase change through flash vaporization. Here this eliminates the contradiction of existing concepts on the negative value of the frictional pressure drop after a short distance of expansion due to a large part contribution of the actual pressure drop towards the momentum gain pressure drop. Also this verifies that the momentum gain through phase change is by consumption of internal energy part of the enthalpy and no part of the actual pressure drop energy is used in this respect. So with the concept of nearly total pressure drop being used in overcoming the friction the design of an adiabatic capillary tube of available I mm diameter for 0.1 ton refrigeration capacity has been carried out here. This design procedure causes some increase in the required length of the capillary for a given refrigeration capacity due to the omission of momentum pressure drop concept of different references, but is more accurate with consideration of actual changes involved in the expansion. The procedure is applicable for any other refrigerant of any refrigeration capacity

  12. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  13. Existence for a global pressure formulation of water-gas flow in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Amaziane

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a model of water-gas flow in porous media with an incompressible water phase and a compressible gas phase. Such models appear in gas migration through engineered and geological barriers for a deep repository for radioactive waste. The main feature of this model is the introduction of a new global pressure and it is fully equivalent to the original equations. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation as a degenerate parabolic system with the global pressure and the saturation potential as the main unknowns. The major difficulties related to this model are in the nonlinear degenerate structure of the equations, as well as in the coupling in the system. Under some realistic assumptions on the data, including unbounded capillary pressure function and non-homogeneous boundary conditions, we prove the existence of weak solutions of the system. Furthermore, it is shown that the weak solution has certain desired properties, such as positivity of the saturation. The result is proved with the help of an appropriate regularization and a time discretization of the coupled system. We use suitable test functions to obtain a priori estimates and a compactness result in order to pass to the limit in nonlinear terms.

  14. Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation in partially saturated rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of seismic attenuation and transient pore fluid pressure are performed on partially saturated Berea sandstone and synthetic borosilicate samples. Various degrees of water (liquid) and nitrogen (gas) saturation are considered. These measurements are carried out at room temperature and under confining pressures varying from ambient conditions up to 25 MPa. The cylindrical samples are 25 cm long and have a diameter of 7.6 cm. In the context of the experimental setup, the solid frames of both the Berea sandstone and the borosilicate samples can be considered homogenous, which in turn allows for isolating and exploring the effects of partial saturation on seismic attenuation. We employ the sub-resonance method, which is based on the application of a time-harmonic vertical stress to the top of the sample and the measurement of the thus resulting strain. For any given frequency, the attenuation is then inferred as the tangent of the phase shift between the applied stress and the observed strain. Using five equally spaced sensors along the central axis of the cylindrical sample, we measure the transient fluid pressure induced by the application of a step-function-type vertical stress to the top of the sample. Both the sensors and the sample are sealed off with the regard to the confining environment. Together with the numerical results from corresponding compressibility tests based on the quasi-static poroelastic equations, these transient fluid pressure measurements are then used to assist the interpretation of the seismic attenuation measurements.

  15. Dual swelling mechanism model for saturated and unsaturated compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the current concept of repository for radioactive waste disposal, compacted bentonite as well as bentonite-based material will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Since compacted bentonite swells when it is saturated, dry density of compacted bentonite will be redistributed and container of radioactive wastes will move during infiltration of underground water. Accurate evaluation of these events is effective in decreasing uncertainty in long term safety evaluation of radioactive waste facilities. However, sufficient evaluation is not conducted because behaviour of bentonite material during saturation process is not clarified sufficiently. Thus, stress-strain model of bentonite material during saturation process is proposed and applicability of the model is investigated. It is well known that compacted bentonite swells with large deformation by infiltration of water. Swelling behaviour of bentonite is mainly attributable to osmotic pressure caused by the difference between concentration of ions inside of montmorillonite flakes and that outside of montmorillonite flakes. Thus, swelling which is attributable to osmotic pressure is named 'swelling by osmotic pressure' here. By contrast, unsaturated ordinary clay swells or shrinks during infiltration of water without effect of osmotic pressure. Since this phenomenon is mainly attributable to reduction of suction during infiltration of water, it is reasonable to assume that unsaturated bentonite swells or shrinks during infiltration of water by reduction of suction. Thus, swelling which is attributable to reduction of suction is named 'swelling by reduction of suction' here. It is assumed in this paper that swelling by osmotic pressure occurs when bentonite is fully saturated, while swelling by reduction of suction occurs when bentonite is unsaturated. Swelling deformation under a constant vertical load is measured

  16. Network Modelling of Capillary Pressure Curves, Permeability, and Diffusivity.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, P.; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Brabec, Libor; Zikánová, Arlette; Kočiřík, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 62, 18-20 (2007) , s. 5117-5122. ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0347 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : porous media * pore network model * stochastic reconstruction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.775, year: 2007

  17. Study of lyophobic capillary-porous systems and development of energy devices on their base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermophysical properties of lyophobic capillary-porous systems (LCPS) and peculiarities of their thermodynamics are considered. It is shown that LCPS have some characteristics differ from their component ones, in other words they have pronounced synergetic effect. The unique LCPS properties provide the prospectiveness of development of new energy facilities of various functionality, first of all of temperature and pressure protection devices. The calculational and experimental justification of characteristics of fast reactor passive shutdown systems, pulsation damper and liquid pressure compensators is conducted

  18. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  19. On-line coupling of cyclodextrin mediated nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis to mass spectrometry for the determination of salbutamol enantiomers in urine

    OpenAIRE

    Servais, Anne-Catherine; Fillet, Marianne; Mol, Roelof; Somsen, G. W.; Chiap, Patrice; de Jong, G.J.; Crommen, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of the on-line coupling of nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) with electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) using heptakis(2,3-di-O-acetyl-6-O-sulfo)-beta-cyclodextrin (HDAS-beta-CD) was demonstrated for the enantioselective determination of low concentrations of salbutamol in human urine. After optimization of several parameters, such as sheath-liquid composition and flow rate, nebulizing gas pressure, CE counter-pressure and position of the CE capillary o...

  20. Spectral Properties of Saturation Pressure Filled Iodine Absorption Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabina, Jan; Holá, Miroslava; Lazar, Josef; Šarbort, Martin; Číp, Ondřej

    Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 2014, s. 839-842. ISBN 978-3-642-36358-0. [International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology /7./. Nürtingen (DE), 08.09.2013-11.09.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016; GA TA ČR TA02010711; GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA TA ČR TA01010995 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser spectroscopy * metrology * molecular iodine * absorption cells Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s

  1. Metal saturation in the upper mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Arno; Ballhaus, Chris; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Ulmer, Peter; Kamenetsky, Vadim S; Kuzmin, Dmitry V

    2007-09-27

    The oxygen fugacity f(O2)of the Earth's mantle is one of the fundamental variables in mantle petrology. Through ferric-ferrous iron and carbon-hydrogen-oxygen equilibria, f(O2) influences the pressure-temperature positions of mantle solidi and compositions of small-degree mantle melts. Among other parameters, f(O2) affects the water storage capacity and rheology of the mantle. The uppermost mantle, as represented by samples and partial melts, is sufficiently oxidized to sustain volatiles, such as H2O and CO2, as well as carbonatitic melts, but it is not known whether the shallow mantle is representative of the entire upper mantle. Using high-pressure experiments, we show here that large parts of the asthenosphere are likely to be metal-saturated. We found that pyroxene and garnet synthesized at >7 GPa in equilibrium with metallic Fe can incorporate sufficient ferric iron that the mantle at >250 km depth is so reduced that an (Fe,Ni)-metal phase may be stable. Our results indicate that the oxidized nature of the upper mantle can no longer be regarded as being representative for the Earth's upper mantle as a whole and instead that oxidation is a shallow phenomenon restricted to an upper veneer only about 250 km in thickness. PMID:17898766

  2. An osmotic approach to gas and water pressure response in bentonite - experiments and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The pore volume of water saturated compacted bentonite is dominated by montmorillonite interlayer spaces. A natural starting point for a quantitative description of bentonite is therefore an interlayer-only approach, where the entire pore volume is postulated to be distributed in these interlayers. Such an approach has been successfully applied to describe e.g. pressure response due to external salt solutions, freezing, and ion diffusion. Here the same approach is applied for a description of flow- and pressure response due to externally applied gas- and water pressure gradients. A distinguishing feature of the interlayer-only model is that the equilibrium pressure response of the sample due to applied external gas pressure is absent as long as the applied pressure is below the total pressure of the system. Thus, a confined bentonite sample of constant volume in contact with a nonpressurized water reservoir and a gas reservoir of pressure has an equilibrium pressure P Ps0, Pgs0 (1) where denotes the intrinsic swelling pressure. The flow of gas through the sample is in this state fully governed by dissolution and diffusion. The response due to external water pressure gradients is more complex. By making the approximation of zero shear strength a general equation for the steady state porosity distribution in a water pressure gradient has been derived. This equation has been solved for the one dimensional case using the additional approximation of exponential porosity dependence of the hydraulic conductivity and the intrinsic swelling pressure. The resulting sample pressure is P = Pw/2 + √((Ps0)2+Pw2/4) (2) where it is assumed that one side of the sample is pressurized with water of pressure Pw while the other is at zero pressure. The corresponding steady-state volumetric water flow is q [(2.Ch0.Ps0)/L].asinh(Pw/2Ps0) (3) where Ch0 denotes hydraulic conductivity at the mean density of the sample. The theory has been

  3. Experimental study on nonmonotonicity of capillary desaturation curves in a 2-D pore-network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriquez de Castro, Antonio [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Shokri, Nima [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Karadimitriou, Nikolaos [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joekar-Niasar, Vahid [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-28

    Immiscible displacement in a porous medium is important in many applications such as soil remediation and enhanced oil recovery. When gravitational forces are negligible, two-phase immiscible displacement at the pore level is controlled by capillary and viscous forces whose relative importance is quantified through the dimensionless capillary number Ca and the viscosity ratio M between liquid phases. Depending on the values of Ca and M, capillary fingering, viscous fingering, or stable displacement may be observed resulting in a variety of patterns affecting the phase entrapment. The Capillary Desaturation Curve (CDC), which represents the relationship between the residual oils saturation and Ca, is an important relation to describe the phase entrapment at a given Ca. In the present study, we investigate the CDC as influenced by the viscosity ratio. A comprehensive series of experiments using a high-resolution microscope and state-of-the-art micromodels were conducted. The CDCs were calculated and the effects of Ca and M on phase entrapments were quantified. The results show that CDCs are not necessarily monotonic for all M.

  4. Gaseous saturable absorbers for the Helios CO2 laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saturable absorbers are widely used to suppress parasitic oscillations in large-aperture, high-power CO2 fusion-laser systems. We report experimental results on SF6-based gaseous saturable absorbers used for parasitic suppression in the eight-beam, 10 kJ Helios fusion-laser system. The gas mix effectively quenches self-lasing in the 9 and 10 μm branches of the CO2 laser spectrum while simultaneously allowing high transmission of subnanosecond multiwavelength pulses for target-irradiation experiments. The gas isolator now in use consists of SF6 and the additional fluorocarbons: 1, 1-difluoroethane (FC-152a); dichlorodifluoromethane (FC-12); chloropentafluoroethane (FC-115); 1,1-dichloro 2,2-difluoroethylene (FC-1112a); chlorotrifluoroethylene (FC-1113); and perfluorocyclobutane (FC-C318). The saturation of the mix was studied as a function of incident fluence, pressure, cell length, and incident wavelength. Experimental results are presented on the saturation properties of pure SF6 and FC-152a and compared with the saturation behavior of CO2 at 4000C

  5. 3-D DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC SATURATED SOILS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-gang; HUANG Yi

    2005-01-01

    A study on dynamic response of transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media under a circular non-axisymmetrical harmonic source has been presented by Huang Yi et al.using the technique of Fourier expansion and Hankel transform. However, the method may not always be valid. The work is extended to the general case being in the rectangular coordinate. The purpose is to study the 3-d dynamic response of transversely isotropic saturated soils under a general source distributing in arbitrary rectangular zoon on the medium surface. Based on Biot's theory for fluid-saturated porous media, the 3-d wave motion equations in rectangular coordinate for transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media were transformed into the two uncoupling governing differential equations of 6-order and 2-order respectively by means of the displacement functions. Then, using the technique of double Fourier transform, the governing differential equations were easily solved. Integral solutions of soil skeleton displacements and pore pressure as well as the total stresses for poroelastic media were obtained. Furthermore, a systematic study on half-space problem in saturated soils was performed. Integral solutions for surface displacements under the general harmonic source distributing on arbitrary surface zone,considering both case of drained surface and undrained surface,were presented.

  6. Microjet formation in a capillary by laser-induced cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-11-01

    A vapor bubble is created by focusing a laser pulse inside a capillary that is partially filled with water. Upon creation of the bubble, a shock wave travels through the capillary. When this shock wave meets the meniscus of the air-water interface, a thin jet is created that travels at very high speeds. A crucial ingredient for the creation of the jet is the shape of the meniscus, which is responsible for focusing the energy provided by the shock wave. We examine the formation of this jet numerically using a boundary integral method, where we prepare an initial interface at rest inside a tube with a diameter ranging from 50 to 500 μm. To simulate the effect of the bubble we then apply a short, strong pressure pulse, after which the jet forms. We investigate the influence of the shape of the meniscus, and pressure amplitude and duration on the jet formation. The jet shape and velocity obtained by the simulation compare well with experimental data, and provides good insight in the origin of the jet.

  7. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  8. Saturation of repeated quantum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapasalo, Erkka; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kuramochi, Yui

    2016-08-01

    We study sequential measurement scenarios where the system is repeatedly subjected to the same measurement process. We first provide examples of such repeated measurements where further repetitions of the measurement do not increase our knowledge on the system after some finite number of measurement steps. We also prove, however, that repeating the Lüders measurement of an unsharp two-outcome observable never saturates in this sense, and we characterize the observable measured in the limit of infinitely many repetitions. Our result implies that a repeated measurement can be used to correct the inherent noise of an unsharp observable.

  9. Saturation Physics: Probes and Signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hadron wavefunction at high energy contains many gluons which carry a small fraction x of the valence quark energy. At fixed impact parameters as one increases the hadron energy, the gluon occupation number in the wavefunction eventually saturates and becomes of order of 1/αs, the maximum allowed by QCD. The resulting hadron state at high energy is then called a Color Glass Condensate (CGC). Signatures and predictions of the formalism are reviewed and compared with the experimental data at RHIC.

  10. Gluon Evolution and Saturation Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLerran, L.D.

    2010-05-26

    Almost 40 years ago, Gribov and colleagues at the Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute developed the ideas that led to the Dokhsitzer-Gribov-Altarelli-Parisi the Baltisky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov equations. These equations describe the evolution of the distributions for quarks and gluon inside a hadron to increased resolution scale of a probe or to smaller values of the fractional momentum of a hadronic constituent. I motivate and discuss the generalization required of these equations needed for high energy processes when the density of constituents is large. This leads to a theory of saturation realized by the Color Glass Condensate

  11. Measurement of residual CO2 saturation at a geological storage site using hydraulic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rötting, T. S.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Carrera, J.; Russian, A.; Dentz, M.; Cubillo, B.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating long term capillary trapping of CO2 in aquifers remains a key challenge for CO2 storage. Zhang et al. (2011) proposed a combination of thermal, tracer, and hydraulic experiments to estimate the amount of CO2 trapped in the formation after a CO2 push and pull test. Of these three types of experiments, hydraulic tests are the simplest to perform and possibly the most informative. However, their potential has not yet been fully exploited. Here, a methodology is presented to interpret these tests and analyze which parameters can be estimated. Numerical and analytical solutions are used to simulate a continuous injection in a porous medium where residual CO2 has caused a reduction in hydraulic conductivity and an increase in storativity over a finite thickness (a few meters) skin around the injection well. The model results are interpreted using conventional pressure build-up and diagnostic plots (a plot of the drawdown s and the logarithmic derivative d s / d ln t of the drawdown as a function of time). The methodology is applied using the hydraulic parameters estimated for the Hontomin site (Northern Spain) where a Technology Demonstration Plant (TDP) for geological CO2 storage is planned to be set up. The reduction of hydraulic conductivity causes an increase in observed drawdowns, the increased storativity in the CO2 zone causes a delay in the drawdown curve with respect to the reference curve measured before CO2 injection. The duration (characteristic time) of these effects can be used to estimate the radius of the CO2 zone. The effects of reduced permeability and increased storativity are well separated from wellbore storage and natural formation responses, even if the CO2-brine interface is inclined (i.e. the CO2 forms a cone around the well). We find that both skin hydraulic conductivity and storativity (and thus residual CO2 saturation) can be obtained from the water injection test provided that water flow rate is carefully controlled and head build

  12. Capillary Electrophoresis coupled with Automated Fraction Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Huge, Bonnie Jaskowski; Flaherty, Ryan; Dada, Oluwatosin O.; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2014-01-01

    A fraction collector based on a drop-on-demand ink-jet printer was developed to interface capillary zone electrophoresis with a 96 well microtiter plate. We first evaluated the performance of the collector by using capillary zone electrophoresis to analyze a 1 mM solution of tetramethylrhodamine; a fluorescent microtiter plate reader was then used to detect the analyte and characterize fraction carryover between wells. Relative standard deviation in peak height was 20% and the relative standa...

  13. The capillary electrophoresis of the influenza viruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, Marie; Kubesová, Anna; Kubíček, O.; Kubíčková, Z.; Rosenbergová, K.; Šlais, Karel

    Tallinn: Tallinn University of Technology, 2009 - (Borissova, M.; Vaher, M.). s. 93 ISBN 978-9985-59-930-3. [Nordic Separation Science Society (NoSSS) International Conference /5./. 26.08.2009-29.08.2009, Tallinn] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00310701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : capillary isoelectric focusing * capillary electrophoresis * influenza swine and equine viruses Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  14. Selectivity and detection in capillary electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Khaled, Maha Yehia

    1994-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the minimization of some of the selectivity and detection limitations in capillary electrophoresis. A more practical design of an electrochemical detector is introduced with simultaneous on-line UV detection (1), for the selective detection of a number of pungent and neurological compounds, the piperines and the capsacinoids. Commercially available microelectrodes together with large 25 μm id fused silica capillary columns are used for the fir...

  15. CFD simulation and optimization of the capillary throttling of air-flotation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Huang; Yi, Jiajing; Tao, Jiayue; Lu, Rongsheng

    2016-01-01

    With respect to orifice throttling or compensating, capillary throttling has following advantages: smaller mass flow rate and stronger anti-interference ability. This paper firstly gives the required average pressure of air-film when shipping a piece of LCD glass. Then, dimensional flow model of the capillary throttling of air-flotation unit is established. Based on the model, we firstly analyze the flowing process of the lubricated air through the capillary. Secondly, the pressure distribution equation of air-film is derived from the Navier-Stokes Equation. Furthermore, the approximate functional relations between model parameters and static characteristics of the air-film, such as mass flow rate, static bearing capacity, are obtained and then influence of the former on the latter is analyzed . Finally, according to the continuity of air flow, the function relation between model parameters and pressure of core nodes in the air-film is also derived. On foundation of theoretical analysis, the impacts of each model parameter on static characteristics of the air-film flow field, are respectively simulated and analyzed by CFD software Fluent. Based on these simulations and analysis, radius and length of the capillary, density of the gas supply orifices and other model parameters are optimized. Finally, the best unit model is acquired, which greatly improves the static working performance of air-film in air-flotation unit. Research results of this paper can provide guidance and basis for the design and optimization of air-flotation transporting system.

  16. Compositional numerical simulation with implicit formulation and gravitational and capillary effects; Simulacao numerica composicional com formulacao implicita e efeitos gravitacional e capilar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caminha, Romulo de Athayde

    1999-03-01

    This work aims to present an isothermal, one-dimensional, compositional numerical simulator. A two-phase (oil and gas) multicomponent flow is treated implicitly in pressure, saturation and compositions. Flow terms consider gravitational effect, which allows the study of flow in inclined reservoir. The highly non-linear equations, which are necessary to equate the problem, require a numerical solution, which is obtained by the Newton-Raphson method. The one-dimensional treatment given to the problem yields a tridiagonal block Jacobian matrix. It is assumed that the two-phase flow is dominated by convection and that the dispersive effects are neglected. No mobile water is considered in the porous media, and the original gas-oil capillary pressure curve, obtained from the laboratory, is modified to include the variations of interfacial tensions. Instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium is admitted and it is computed by means of the Peng and Robinson equation of state. The fluids densities are calculated with the equation of state. Gas and oil viscosities are computed using the Lohrenz method. The medium is considered incompressible, homogeneous and isotropic, chemically and physically inert to the fluids. (author)

  17. Transverse vertical dispersion coefficients in the capillary fringe determined by a high resolution non-invasive method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberer, C. M.; Grathwohl, P.

    2009-12-01

    Mass transfer from the unsaturated to the saturated zone across the capillary fringe is a common mechanism for groundwater contamination by volatile compounds (McCarthy and Johnson 1993) but also for oxygen supply. Oxygen plays an important role for microbial processes in groundwater - either by influencing the redox conditions directly or by replenishing electron acceptors needed for microbial growth and respiration. Hydrodynamic transverse dispersion was found to be essential for the mass transfer of vapor phase compounds across the capillary fringe (Klenk and Grathwohl 2002). Thus the objective of this work was to determine transverse vertical dispersion coefficients in this transition zone and a non-invasive method was developed to measure oxygen gradients across the saturated/unsaturated interface at grain scale resolution. Bench-scale 2D-flow through experiments have been conducted and different horizontal flow velocities, grain sizes, water table fluctuation amplitudes and frequencies have been applied. Vertical oxygen concentration profiles across the capillary fringe were subsequently measured at distinct positions in flow direction and evaluated with regard to mass transfer of oxygen from the unsaturated to the saturated zone. To the authors knowledge this is the first time where the fibre optical sensor technique to measure oxygen concentrations is applied to this transition zone. Transverse dispersion coefficients were calculated for steady state flow conditions. Under transient conditions, i.e. having changed the position of the water table, the measured concentration profiles are different with regard to the process of imbibition or drainage. Whereas drainage does not produce a significant change in concentration profiles compared to the stationary case, increasing water tables result in entrapment of air bubbles, and thus also a flatter gradient in oxygen concentrations. The gradual dissolution of entrapped oxygen into the bypassing oxygen

  18. Density measurement in air with saturable absorbing seed gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baganoff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches which have the potential to make density measurements in a compressible flow, where one or more laser beams are used as probes, were investigated. Saturation in sulfur hexafluoride iodine and a crossed beam technique where one beam acts as a saturating beam and the other is at low intensity and acts as a probe beam are considered. It is shown that a balance between an increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing pressure from line broadening and the normal decrease in intensity with increasing pressure from quenching can be used to develop a linear relation between fluorescence intensity and number density and lead to a new density measurement scheme. The method is used to obtain a density image of the cross section of an iodine seeded underexpanded supersonic jet of nitrogen, by illuminating the cross section by a sheet of laser light.

  19. A phenomenological modeling of critical condensate saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, F.; Firoozabadi, A.; Abbaszadeh, M. [and others

    1996-12-31

    We have developed a phenomenological model for critical condensate saturation. This model reveals that critical condensate saturation is a function of surface tension and contact angle hysteresis. On the other hand, residual oil saturation does not have such a dependency. Consequently, the selection of fluids in laboratory measurements for gas condensate systems should be made with care.

  20. A study of capillary discharge lamps in Ar-Hg and Xe-Hg mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, N [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Novosibirsk, Institutskaja str. 4/1 (Russian Federation); Gavare, Z; Revalde, G; Skudra, Ja; Veilande, R [Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, Raina blvd. 19, Riga (Latvia)

    2011-04-20

    Low-pressure capillary discharge lamps in Ar-Hg and Xe-Hg mixtures are studied. The discharge size is 0.5 mm (500 {mu}m) in radius. According to the literature, such types of plasma sources are classified as microplasmas. The studies include spectrally resolved optical measurements, tomographic reconstructions and numerical simulations using the collisional-radiative model for an Ar-Hg plasma. We discuss the problems of theoretical modelling and experimental diagnostics of microplasma sources. It is shown that the conventional collisional-radiative model, based on the assumption that transportation of atoms in the highly excited states can be neglected, has limitations in modelling a capillary discharge in an Ar-Hg mixture. It is found that diffusion of highly excited mercury atoms to the wall influences the emission properties of the capillary discharge. We have concluded that applications of the emission tomography method to microplasmas require a special analysis in each particular case.

  1. Test results of reliable and very high capillary multi-evaporators / condenser loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oost, S.; Dubois, M.; Bekaert, G. [Societe Anonyme Belge de Construction Aeronautique - SABCA (Belgium)

    1996-12-31

    The paper present the results of various SABCA activities in the field of two-phase heat transport system. These results have been based on a critical review and analysis of the existing two-phase loop and of the future loop needs in space applications. The research and the development of a high capillary wick (capillary pressure up to 38 000 Pa) are described. These activities have led towards the development of a reliable high performance capillary loop concept (HPCPL), which is discussed in details. Several loop configurations mono/multi-evaporators have been ground tested. The presented results of various tests clearly show the viability of this concept for future applications. Proposed flight demonstrations as well as potential applications conclude this paper. (authors) 7 refs.

  2. Capillary length in a fluid-fluid demixed colloid-polymer mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, D G A L

    2005-04-21

    We report measurements of the interfacial profile close to a vertical wall in a fluid-fluid demixed colloid-polymer mixture. The profile is measured by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. It is accurately described by the interplay between the Laplace and hydrostatic pressure and from this description the capillary length is obtained. For different statepoints approaching the critical point the capillary length varies from 50 to 5 microm. These results are compared to theory. The mass density difference Deltarho is calculated from the bulk phase behavior, which is described within free volume theory with polymers modeled as penetrable hard spheres. The interfacial tension gamma is calculated within a squared gradient approximation. The capillary length is then given through with g equal to the Earth's acceleration. Predictions from theory are in overall qualitative agreement with experiment without the use of any adjustable parameter. PMID:16851848

  3. Using Neutron Radiography to Quantify Water Transport and the Degree of Saturation in Entrained Air Cement Based Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Catherine L.; Bentz, Dale P.; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; Weiss, W. Jason

    Air entrainment is commonly added to concrete to help in reducing the potential for freeze thaw damage. It is hypothesized that the entrained air voids remain unsaturated or partially saturated long after the smaller pores fill with water. Small gel and capillary pores in the cement matrix fill quickly on exposure to water, but larger pores (entrapped and entrained air voids) require longer times or other methods to achieve saturation. As such, it is important to quantitatively determine the water content and degree of saturation in air entrained cementitious materials. In order to further investigate properties of cement-based mortar, a model based on Beer's Law has been developed to interpret neutron radiographs. This model is a powerful tool for analyzing images acquired from neutron radiography. A mortar with a known volume of aggregate, water to cement ratio and degree of hydration can be imaged and the degree of saturation can be estimated.

  4. NOTE: A haemodynamic model for the physiological interpretation of in vivo measurements of the concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio

    2002-09-01

    We present a model that describes the effect of physiological parameters such as the speed of blood flow, local oxygen consumption, capillary recruitment, and vascular dilation/constriction on the concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in tissue. This model can be used to guide the physiological interpretation of haemodynamic and oximetric data collected in vivo with techniques such as optical imaging, near-infrared spectroscopy and functional magnetic resonance imaging. In addition to providing a formal description of well-established results (exercise-induced hyperemia, reperfusion hyperoxia, decrease in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin induced by brain activity, measurement of arterial saturation by pulse oximetry, etc.), this model suggests that the superposition of asynchronous contributions from the arterial, capillary and venous haemoglobin compartments may be at the origin of observed out-of-phase oscillations of the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations in tissue.

  5. Elasto-capillary collapse of floating structures - Non-linear response of elastic structures under capillary forces

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, N; Roman, B; Bico, J; Caps, H

    2013-01-01

    Flexible rings and rectangle structures floating at the surface of water are prone to deflect under the action of surface pressure induced by the addition of surfactant molecules on the bath. While the frames of rectangles bend inward or outward for any surface pressure difference, circles are only deformed by compression beyond a critical buckling load. However, compressed frames also undergo a secondary buckling instability leading to a rhoboidal shape. Following the pioneering works of \\cite{Hu} and \\cite{Zell}, we describe both experimentally and theoretically the different elasto-capillary deflection and buckling modes as a function of the material parameters. In particular we show how this original fluid structure interaction may be used to probe the adsorption of surfactant molecules at liquid interfaces.

  6. Capillary Trapping of CO2 in Oil Reservoirs: Observations in a Mixed-Wet Carbonate Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Menhali, Ali S; Krevor, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Early deployment of carbon dioxide storage is likely to focus on injection into mature oil reservoirs, most of which occur in carbonate rock units. Observations and modeling have shown how capillary trapping leads to the immobilization of CO2 in saline aquifers, enhancing the security and capacity of storage. There are, however, no observations of trapping in rocks with a mixed-wet-state characteristic of hydrocarbon-bearing carbonate reservoirs. Here, we found that residual trapping of supercritical CO2 in a limestone altered to a mixed-wet state with oil was significantly less than trapping in the unaltered rock. In unaltered samples, the trapping of CO2 and N2 were indistinguishable, with a maximum residual saturation of 24%. After the alteration of the wetting state, the trapping of N2 was reduced, with a maximum residual saturation of 19%. The trapping of CO2 was reduced even further, with a maximum residual saturation of 15%. Best-fit Land-model constants shifted from C = 1.73 in the water-wet rock to C = 2.82 for N2 and C = 4.11 for the CO2 in the mixed-wet rock. The results indicate that plume migration will be less constrained by capillary trapping for CO2 storage projects using oil fields compared with those for saline aquifers. PMID:26812184

  7. Saturation of the MRI in Strongly Radiation Dominated Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Davis, Shane W

    2013-01-01

    The saturation level of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in a strongly radiation dominated accretion disk is studied using a new Godunov radiation MHD code in the unstratified shearing box approximation. Since vertical gravity is neglected in this work, our focus is on how the MRI saturates in the optically thick mid-plane of the disk. We confirm that turbulence generated by the MRI is very compressible in the radiation dominated regime, as found by previous calculations using the flux-limited diffusion approximation. We also find little difference in the saturation properties in calculations that use a larger horizontal domain (up to four times the vertical scale height in the radial direction). However, in strongly radiation pressure dominated disks (one in which the radiation energy density reaches 1% of the rest mass energy density of the gas), we find Maxwell stress from the MRI turbulence is larger than the value produced when radiation pressure is replaced with the same amount of gas pressure. ...

  8. Avalanches in dry and saturated disordered media at fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Enrico; Yılmaz, Okan; Molinari, Jean-François; Schrefler, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes fracturing in inhomogeneous media under dry and fully saturated conditions. We adopt a central force model with continuous damage to study avalanche behavior in a two-dimensional truss lattice undergoing dilation. Multiple fractures can develop at once and a power-law distribution of the avalanche size is observed. The values for the power-law exponent are compared with the ones found in the literature and scale-free behavior is suggested. The fracture evolves intermittently in time because only some avalanches correspond to fracture advancement. A fully saturated model with continuous damage based on the extended Biot's theory is developed and avalanche behavior is studied in the presence of fluid, varying the fluid boundary conditions. We show that power-law behavior is destroyed when the fluid flux governs the problem. Fluid pressure behavior during intermittent crack tip advancement is studied for the continuous-damage fully saturated model. It is found that when mechanical loading prevails, the pressure rises when the crack advances, while when fluid loading prevails, the pressure drops when the crack advances.

  9. Avalanches in dry and saturated disordered media at fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Enrico; Yılmaz, Okan; Molinari, Jean-François; Schrefler, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes fracturing in inhomogeneous media under dry and fully saturated conditions. We adopt a central force model with continuous damage to study avalanche behavior in a two-dimensional truss lattice undergoing dilation. Multiple fractures can develop at once and a power-law distribution of the avalanche size is observed. The values for the power-law exponent are compared with the ones found in the literature and scale-free behavior is suggested. The fracture evolves intermittently in time because only some avalanches correspond to fracture advancement. A fully saturated model with continuous damage based on the extended Biot's theory is developed and avalanche behavior is studied in the presence of fluid, varying the fluid boundary conditions. We show that power-law behavior is destroyed when the fluid flux governs the problem. Fluid pressure behavior during intermittent crack tip advancement is studied for the continuous-damage fully saturated model. It is found that when mechanical loading prevails, the pressure rises when the crack advances, while when fluid loading prevails, the pressure drops when the crack advances. PMID:27176380

  10. Effect of carbon dioxide on the utilization of brain capillary reserve and flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, H.; Dribben, J.; Kissen, I.; Gerlock, T.; Weiss, H.R. (Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (USA))

    1989-12-01

    This study investigated effects of increased arterial carbon dioxide on the brain capillary perfusion pattern. Conscious rats were exposed to a 0%, 8% or 12% CO{sub 2} in air gas mixture. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial blood gases and pH were recorded, and either regional cerebral blood flow or the percent of capillary volume/mm3 or number/mm2 perfused were determined in cortical, hypothalamic, pontine or medullary regions of the brain. Arterial PCO{sub 2} increased from 37 +/- 1 in control to 74 +/- 1 torr in the high CO{sub 2} group. A position linear relationship was found between cerebral blood flow and arterial PCO{sub 2} in all examined regions. Approximately half of the capillaries in the examined regions were perfused under normocapnic conditions. Increasing arterial PCO{sub 2} had no effect on the percent of the capillary bed perfused in the cortex or hypothalamus. However, there was a significant linear relationship between carbon dioxide tension and the percent of the microvasculature perfused in the hindbrain. The percent of capillaries/mm2 perfused increased significantly in the medulla (to 60 +/- 5%) and pons (70 +/- 4%) with 12% CO{sub 2} in air. These data suggest that carbon dioxide may have differential effects on diffusion distances affecting the hindbrain to a greater extent than the forebrain.

  11. Cardiac function, microvascular structure, and capillary hematocrit in hearts of polycythemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Kolar, F

    2001-12-01

    The effect of polycythemia on the coronary microcirculation was studied in young male rats. Two experimental models of polycythemia were employed: cobalt-induced polycythemia, which mimics hypoxia-induced changes, and erythropoietin-induced polycythemia, which circumvents these changes. In both models, baseline left ventricular function was normal, whereas maximal systolic and developed pressures were decreased. In cobalt-treated rats the left ventricular functional reserve was also compromised. Morphometric analysis of the left ventricle confirmed previously described improved geometric conditions for oxygen supply at the distal portions of capillaries (smaller domain areas and shorter capillary segments). In cobalt-treated but not in erythropoietin-treated rats, increased capillary angiogenesis was also detected. In the hearts from rats with both types of polycythemia, a small but significant increase in the formation of arterioles was found. Capillary linear hematocrit was within the normal range in both types of polycythemia despite sizeable increases in systemic hematocrit. Significant differences in red blood cell distribution within capillaries were found between proximal and distal portions in all experimental groups. PMID:11709408

  12. Reduced capillary density in the myocardium of uremic rats--a stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, K; Wiest, G; Zimmer, G; Gretz, N; Ritz, E; Mall, G

    1992-11-01

    Using stereological techniques capillaries, interstitium and myocardial fibers were analyzed in perfusion-fixed hearts of subtotally nephrectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats with uremia of 14 months duration (or their sham-operated controls). Uremic rats had higher systolic blood pressure (140 +/- 20.3 mm Hg vs. 119 +/- 6.61 mm Hg) and left ventricular weight/body weight ratio (3.37 +/- 0.09 mg/kg vs. 2.01 +/- 0.12 mg/kg) than controls, and had slight anemia (Hct 35.0 +/- 3.16% vs. 40.4 +/- 3.3%). Length density (Lv) of capillaries, that is, capillary length per unit myocardial volume, was significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in uremia (2485 +/- 264 mm/mm3 vs. 3329 +/- 194 mm/mm3) versus controls. In parallel, surface density and volume density of the capillary lumina were also reduced (7.95 +/- 1.69 cm3/cm3 vs. 11.4 +/- 1.8 cm3/cm3) in the uremic rats. We conclude that in experimental uremia, cardiac hypertrophy is not accompanied by a commensurate increase in capillaries. PMID:1453595

  13. Mechanics of non-saturated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the different ways to approach the mechanics of non saturated soils, from the physico-chemical aspect to the mechanical aspect, from the experiment to the theoretical modeling, from the laboratory to the workmanship, and from the microscopic scale to the macroscopic one. Content: water and its representation; experimental bases of the behaviour of non-saturated soils; transfer laws in non-saturated environment; energy approach of the behaviour of non-saturated soils; homogenization for the non-saturated soils; plasticity and hysteresis; dams and backfilling; elaborated barriers. (J.S.)

  14. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in the terahertz THz frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum...... states, due to conduction band onparabolicity and scattering into satellite valleys in strong THz fields. Saturable absorber parameters, such as linear and nonsaturable transmission, and saturation fluence, are extracted by fits to a classic saturable absorber model. Further, we observe THz pulse...

  15. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  16. A 3D lattice Boltzmann effective media study: understanding the role of C-S-H and water saturation on the permeability of cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D lattice Boltzmann model is developed and used to calculate the water and gas permeabilities of model cement pastes at different degrees of water saturation. In addition to permeable micron-sized capillary pores and impermeable solid inclusions, the lattice Boltzmann model comprises weakly-permeable nano-porous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H). The multi-scale problem is addressed by using an effective media approach based on the idea of partial bounce-back. The model cement paste microstructures are generated with the platform µic. The critical parameters, C-S-H density and capillary porosity, are taken from 1H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis. The distribution of water and air is defined according to the Kelvin–Laplace law. It is found that when the capillary porosity is completely saturated with a fluid (either water or gas), the calculated intrinsic permeability is in good agreement with measurements of gas permeability on dried samples (10−17–10−16 m2). However, as the water saturation is reduced, the calculated apparent water permeability decreases and spans the full range of experimentally measured values (10−16–10−22 m2). It is concluded that the degree of capillary water saturation is the major cause for variation in experimental permeability measurements. It is further concluded that the role of the weakly-permeable C-S-H, omitted in earlier modelling studies, is critical for determining the permeability at low capillary saturation. (paper)

  17. Use of capillary electrophoresis and indirect detection to quantitate in-capillary enzyme-catalyzed microreactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; el-Maghrabi, M R; Gomez, F A

    2000-04-01

    The use of capillary electrophoresis and indirect detection to quantify reaction products of in-capillary enzyme-catalyzed microreactions is described. Migrating in a capillary under conditions of electrophoresis, plugs of enzyme and substrate are injected and allowed to react. Capillary electrophoresis is subsequently used to measure the extent of reaction. This technique is demonstrated using two model systems: the conversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate by fructose-biphosphate aldolase (ALD, EC 4.1.2.13), and the conversion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to fructose-6-phosphate by fructose-1,6-bisphospatase (FBPase, EC 3.1.3.11). These procedures expand the use of the capillary as a microreactor and offer a new approach to analyzing enzyme-mediated reactions. PMID:10892022

  18. A Novel Polybrene/Chondroitin Sulfate C Double Coated Capillary and Its Application in Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU,Ying-Xiang(杜迎翔); HONDA,Susumu; TAGA,Atsushi; LIU,Wen-Ying(刘文英); SUZUKI,Shigeo

    2002-01-01

    A new capillary coated by double polymer, polybrene/chondroitin sulfate C (P/CC), was developed using a simple procedure. The P/CC double coated capillary showed long lifetime,strong chemical stability and good reproducibility. It endured during more than 100 replicated analyses and was also tolerant to HCl (1 mol/L), NaOH (0.01 mol/L), CH3OH and CH3CN. The P/CC double coated capillary can be applied to basic drug analyses. The adsorption of basic drugs to the capillary wall was suppressed and the peak tailing greatly decreased. The use of the P/CC double coated capillary allowed excelent separation of the enantiomers of some basic drugs by using chondroitin sulfate C as the chiral selector, ami the peak symmetry of basic drugs was further improved under these conditions.

  19. Nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation of proteins in polymer capillaries under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.; Harwigsson, I.; Becker, K.;

    2010-01-01

    of nanoparticles, i.e. in CE mode, the protein samples adsorbed completely to the capillary walls and could not be recovered. In contrast, nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation resolved green fluorescent protein from several of its impurities within I min. Furthermore, a mixture of native green...... fluorescent protein and two of its single-amino-acid-substituted variants was separated within 2.5 min with efficiencies of 400 000 plates/m. The nanoparticles prevent adsorption by introducing a large interacting surface and by obstructing the attachment of the protein to the capillary wall. A one......Totally porous lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles were used as pseudostationary phase for capillary electroseparation with LIF detection of proteins at physiological conditions using unmodified cyclic olefin copolymer capillaries (Topas (R), 6.7 cm effective length). In the absence...

  20. Capillary-Tube Model and Experiment of Multiphase Flow in Capillary Fringes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武晓峰; 唐杰; 吕贤弼

    2002-01-01

    Contamination of soil and groundwater by organic substances is causing more and more problems worldwide. Analysis of the movement and distribution of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in subsurface domain is critical for contaminant remediation. Two-dimensional experiments were conducted in a transparent plexiglass trough (105.0 cm×70.0 cm×1.5 cm) to simulate the release and redistribution of gasoline and kerosene in porous media. The results show that before the contaminant distribution reaches equilibrium, the movement of light NAPLs (LNAPLs) can be divided into four sub-stages. After the contaminant front reaches the upper boundary of the capillary fringe, contaminant movement along the upper boundary of the capillary fringe is the primary transport process. Most of the contaminants then move into the capillary fringe except for the residual part. One-dimensional and two-dimensional capillary tube models were developed to analyze the movement of LNAPLs in the capillary fringe.

  1. Impact of the Bienestar School-Based Diabetes Mellitus Prevention Program on Fasting Capillary Glucose Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Roberto P.; Yin, Zenong; Hernandez, Arthur; Hale, Daniel E.; Garcia, Oralia A.; Mobley, Connie

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a school-based diabetes mellitus prevention program on low-income fourth-grade Mexican American children. Design A randomized controlled trial with 13 intervention and 14 control schools. Setting Elementary schools in inner-city neighborhoods in San Antonio, Tex. Participants Eighty percent of participants were Mexican American and 94% were from economically disadvantaged households. Baseline and follow-up measures were collected from 1419 (713 intervention and 706 control) and 1221 (619 intervention and 602 control) fourth-grade children, respectively. Intervention The Bienestar Health Program consists of a health class and physical education curriculum, a family program, a school cafeteria program, and an after-school health club. The objectives are to decrease dietary saturated fat intake, increase dietary fiber intake, and increase physical activity. Main Outcome Measures The primary end point was fasting capillary glucose level, and the secondary end points were percentage of body fat, physical fitness level, dietary fiber intake, and dietary saturated fat intake. Fasting capillary glucose level, bioelectric impedance, modified Harvard step test, three 24-hour dietary recalls, weight, and height were collected at baseline and 8 months later. Results Children in the intervention arm attended an average of 32 Bienestar sessions. Mean fasting capillary glucose levels decreased in intervention schools and increased in control schools after adjusting for covariates (−2.24 mg/dL [0.12 mmol/L]; 95% confidence interval, −6.53 to 2.05 [−0.36 to 0.11 mmol/L]; P = .03). Fitness scores (P = .04) and dietary fiber intake (P = .009) significantly increased in intervention children and decreased in control children. Percentage of body fat (P = .56) and dietary saturated fat intake (P = .52) did not differ significantly between intervention and control children. Conclusion This intervention showed some positive results, but additional

  2. Validity of retinal oxygen saturation analysis: Hyperspectral imaging in visible wavelength with fundus camera and liquid crystal wavelength tunable filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirohara, Yoko; Okawa, Yoshitaka; Mihashi, Toshifumi; Yamaguchi, Tatsuo; Nakazawa, Naoki; Tsuruga, Yasuko; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Naoyuki; Uchida, Ichiro; Fujikado, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the feasibility of a newly developed hyperspectral fundus imaging camera with a liquid crystal tunable filter. The intensities of different wavelengths of light transmitted through an artery, vein, and the area surrounding these vessels and reflected out were measured, and the differential spectral absorptions were analyzed. Measurements were made from 16 normal eyes and from two artificial capillaries. The ratios of absorption (ROA) of arteries to veins from 500 to 580 nm (range 1) and from 600 to 720 nm (range 2) were calculated. For all eyes, the ROArange1 was larger than ROArange2. The ROA obtained from the artificial capillary filled with blood saturated with oxygen or nitrogen was similar to that of simulated data of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin extinction rate. Most ROAs of human eyes were lower than those of the simulated data and the artificial capillaries. Oxygen saturation analysis by hyperspectral fundus imaging of retinal vessels were qualitatively in agreement with the in vitro analysis or simulated values. However, further improvements are necessary to evaluate the oxygen saturation quantitatively in the retinal blood vessels.

  3. NMR study comparing capillary trapping in Berea sandstone of air, carbon dioxide, and supercritical carbon dioxide after imbibition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Cody A.; Bray, Joshua M.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were used to study the capillary trapping mechanisms relevant to carbon sequestration. Capillary trapping is an important mechanism in the initial trapping of supercritical CO2 in the pore structures of deep underground rock formations during the sequestration process. Capillary trapping is considered the most promising trapping option for carbon sequestration. NMR techniques noninvasively monitor the drainage and imbibition of air, CO2, and supercritical CO2 with DI H2O at low capillary numbers in a Berea sandstone rock core under conditions representative of a deep underground saline aquifer. Supercritical CO2 was found to have a lower residual nonwetting (NW) phase saturation than that of air and CO2. Supercritical CO2 behaves differently than gas phase air or CO2 and leads to a reduction in capillary trapping. NMR relaxometry data suggest that the NW phase, i.e., air, CO2, or supercritical CO2, is preferentially trapped in larger pores. This is consistent with snap-off conditions being more favorable in macroscale pores, as NW fluids minimize their contact area with the solid and hence prefer larger pores.

  4. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100-1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  5. The effect of contact angles and capillary dimensions on the burst frequency of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms, a CFD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:24069169

  6. The effect of contact angles and capillary dimensions on the burst frequency of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms, a CFD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Kazemzadeh

    Full Text Available This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

  7. Measuring tissue oxygen saturation using NIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircan-Kucuksayan, Aslinur; Uyuklu, Mehmet; Canpolat, Murat

    2014-05-01

    Tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is known quite useful parameter for medical applications. A spectroscopic method has been developed to diagnose pathologic tissues due to lack of normal blood circulation by measuring tissue oxygen saturation. In the study, human blood samples with different level of oxygen saturations have been prepared and spectra were taken using an optical fiber probe to investigate correlation between the oxygen saturations and the spectra. The experimental set up for the spectroscopic measurements was consists of a miniature NIR light spectrometer, an optical fiber probe, a halogen-tungsten light source and a laptop. A linear correlation between the oxygen saturation of the blood samples and the ratio of the light of wavelengths 660 nm to 790 nm has been found from the spectra. Then, oxygen saturations of the blood samples were estimated from the spectroscopic measurements within an error of 2.9%. Furthermore, it has been shown that the linear dependence between the ratio and the oxygen saturation of the blood samples was valid for the blood samples with different hematocrits. Tissue oxygen saturation has been estimated from the spectroscopic measurements were taken from the fingers of healthy volunteers using the correlation between the spectra and blood oxygen saturation. The tissue StO2 measured was 80% as expected. The technique developed to measure tissue oxygen saturation has potential to diagnose premalignant tissues, follow up prognosis of cancerous tissues, and evaluation of ischemia reperfusion tissues.

  8. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H2) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  9. Effects of oleic acid on pulmonary capillary leak and thromboxanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of arachidonic acid metabolites in oleic acid-induced lung injury in anesthetized dogs was investigated. Oleic acid was administered as a bolus injection into the pulmonary artery after either indomethacin (10 mg/kg iv) or vehicle. Measurements of hemodynamic parameters, mean systemic (MAP), pulmonary capillary wedge, and pulmonary artery pressures (PAP), cardiac output, arterial blood gases, extravascular lung waters (EVLW) by thermaldye double indicator dilution techniques and plasma immunoreactive thromboxane B2 (iTxB2), by radioimmunoassay were obtained at zero time (baseline) and 20 min following each oleic acid injection. A new noninvasive technique was employed to measure pulmonary capillary protein leak by the scintigraphic analysis of intravenously administered technetium-99m radiolabeled human serum albumin (99mTc -HSA) in the cardiac and lung regions. Oleic acid injection caused a significant dose related fall in MAP, arterial pO2, and cardiac output, and increases in EVLW and plasma iTxB2 in the vehicle pretreated animals, while mean PAP remained unchanged. In contrast, in the indomethacin pretreated dogs, MAP, EVLW, cardiac output, and plasma iTxB2 levels did not change from baseline values and there was an increase in mean PAP. Pulmonary vascular resistance was significantly elevated in both groups

  10. Variables of state and charateristics for isentropic discharge phenomena of water, starting with saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudisch, H.

    1968-03-15

    The tables presented in this report contain the thermodynamic values of isentropic change of state for water in the two-phase region starting from the saturation line down to 0.01 at. The variables have been computed in the pressure range from 5-100 at. in equal pressure intervals of 5 at. and in the range from 100-170 at. in intervals of 10 at. Assuming a one-dimensional flow and a known saturation pressure, the dimensions of a discharge nozzle may be determined by interpolation of the calculated values for an isentropic discharge. 4 figs., 29 tabs., 23 refs.

  11. Water vapor pressure calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J R; Brouillard, R G

    1985-06-01

    Accurate calculation of water vapor pressure for systems saturated with water vapor can be performed using the Goff-Gratch equation. A form of the equation that can be adapted for computer programming and for use in electronic databases is provided. PMID:4008425

  12. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  13. Capillary filling in closed end nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Vinh Nguyen; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Yang, Chun; Joseph, Pierre; Djeghlaf, Lyes; Bourrier, David; Gue, Anne-Marie

    2010-08-17

    We investigated the interactions between liquid, gas, and solid phases in the capillary filling process of closed-end nanochannels. This paper presents theoretical models without and with absorption and diffusion of gas molecules in the liquid. Capillary filling experiments were carried out in closed-end silicon nanochannels with different lengths. The theoretical and measured characteristics of filling length versus time are compared. The results show that the filling process consists of two stages. The first stage resembles the capillary filling process in an open-end nanochannel. However, a remarkable discrepancy between the experimental results and the theory without gas absorption is observed in the second stage. A closer investigation of the second stage reveals that the dissolution of gas in the liquid is important and can be explained by the model with gas absorption and diffusion. PMID:20695566

  14. New concept of spray saturation tower for micro Humid Air Turbine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 2-Phase flow models were used to design a saturation tower for mHAT application. • Pressure drop and total saturator volume were set as design parameters. • Conventional saturator with packing was used as reference case. • Droplet diameter was identified as most crucial parameter for evaporation process. • We proposed a cross-current spray tower as saturator for the Turbec T100 mGT. - Abstract: The micro Humid Air Turbine (mHAT) has proven to have the highest potential of all mixed air/water micro Gas Turbines (mGTs). Turning a mGT into a mHAT however requires the installation of a saturation tower. Most common saturation towers use packing material to increase the contact area between compressed air and water. The packing material however causes a pressure drop, which has a severe negative effect on the mGT performance. To limit this pressure drop, we have developed a spray tower without packing that uses nozzles to inject water in the compressed air. In this paper, we propose a design for the spray tower based on 2-phase flow simulations. The two major constraints during the design were minimal pressure loss and tower size. A sensitivity analysis was performed in order to indicate the key parameters to obtain fully saturated air from the tower. Results of simulations showed that using a spray tower reduces the pressure losses when compared to a classic saturation tower. Sensitivity analysis showed that droplet diameter and injected water mass flow rate have the largest effect on the final size of the spray tower. Finally, a cross-current spray tower design was proposed for a Turbec T100 mGT because the sensitivity analysis showed that cross-current droplets injection meets the design constraints best

  15. Compressional and shear waves in saturated rock during water-stream transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured in water-filled Berea sandstone as a function of pore pressure, with a constant confining pressure of 300 bars. The measurements were made at room temperature, 1450C, and 1980C. At 1450C, compressional velocity increased from vapor-saturated (low pore pressure) to liquid-saturated (high pore pressure) conditions, whereas shear wave velocity decreased. For compressional waves there was a velocity minimum and increased attenuation near the liquid-vapor transition. The results at 1980C show decreases of both compressional and shear velocities and a small velocity minimum for compressional velocity without marked attenuation. At both temperatures, V/sub p//V/sub s/ and Poisson's ratios increased from steam- to water-saturated rock. The results are compatible with the mechanical effects of mixing steam and water in the pore space near the phase transition and may be applicable to in situ geothermal field evaluation

  16. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  17. Capillary interactions in nano-particle suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the structures formed by colloidal particles suspended in solvents at volume fractions below 10% and interacting through capillary bridges. Such systems resemble colloidal gas of sticky nano-spheres that form pearl-necklace like chains that, in turn, induce strong viscoelasticity due to the formation of 3-D fractal network. The capillary force dominates the electrostatic and Van der Waals forces in solutions and can bridge multiple particles depending of the volume of the capillary bridge. We have investigated the morphology of the structures formed at different fractions of the bridging fluid. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is used to study nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10 nm in polar and non-polar organic solvents at ambient temperatures. SANS intensity as a function of the scattering vector is analyzed as a product of a form factor, that depends on the particle shape, and a structure factor, that characterizes the interparticle inter reactions. The interaction of particles in polar solvents is considered to be through electrostatic repulsion and the data is successfully fitted by Hayter-Penfold mean spherical approximation (HPMSA). Computer simulations of a pearl necklace-like chain of spheres is conducted to explain the structure factor when capillary bridges are present. Alternatively, we have analyzed the slope of the intensity at low scattering vector in a double logarithmic plot to determine the dimension of the fractal structures formed by the particles at different volume fraction of the bridging fluid. We have also studied the properties of the capillary bridge between a pair of particles. The significance of this study is to explore the possibility of using capillary force as a tool to engineer new colloidal structures and materials in solutions and to optimize their viscoelastic properties. (author)

  18. CT imaging techniques for two-phase and three-phase in-situ saturation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.C.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of this research is to use the SUPRI 3D steam injection laboratory model to establish a reliable method for 3-phase in-situ saturation measurements, and thereafter investigate the mechanism of steamflood at residual oil saturation. Demiral et al. designed and constructed a three dimensional laboratory model that can be used to measure temperature, pressure and heat loss data. The model is also designed so that its construction materials are not a limiting factor for CT scanning. We have used this model for our study. In this study, we saturated the model with mineral oil, and carried out waterflood until residual oil saturation. Steamflood was then carried out. A leak appeared at the bottom of the model. Despite this problem, the saturation results, obtained by using 2-phase and 3-phase saturation equations and obtained from the Cat scanner, were compared with the saturations obtained from material balance. The errors thus obtained were compared with those obtained by an error analysis carried out on the saturation equations. This report gives details of the experimental procedures, the data acquisition and data processing computer programs, and the analysis of a steamflood experiment carried out at residual oil saturation.

  19. Can a Bose Gas Be Saturated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We scrutinize the concept of saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed trapped Bose gas. Using a 39K gas with tunable interactions, we demonstrate strong deviation from Einstein's textbook concept of a saturated vapor. However, the saturation picture can be recovered by extrapolation to the strictly noninteracting limit. We provide evidence for the universality of our observations through additional measurements with a different atomic species, 87Rb.

  20. Capillary Rise of Liquids in Nanopores

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick; Kityk, Andriy V

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements on the spontaneous imbibition (capillary rise) of water, a linear hydrocarbon (n-C16H34) and a liquid crystal (8OCB) into the pore space of monolithic, nanoporous Vycor glass (mean pore radius 5 nm). Measurements on the mass uptake of the porous hosts as a function of time, m(t), are in good agreement with the Lucas-Washburn square root of time prediction, typical of imbibition of liquids into porous hosts. The relative capillary rise velocities scale as expected from the bulk fluid parameters.

  1. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellachà, A; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C

    1999-09-01

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists. PMID:10494525

  2. Intracerebral Capillary Hemangioma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, In Young; Kim, Jae Kyun; Byun, Jun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eon Sub [Dept. of Radiology, Chung Ang University Medical Center, Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Intracerebral capillary hemangiomas are very rare benign vascular tumors that mostly occur during infancy. We described a 69-year-old man with generalized tonic-clonic seizures who was diagnosed with an intracranial mass. Multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography studies were performed for evaluation of brain, and there was a well-enhancing mass found in the right temporal lobe without a definite feeding vessel. The patient underwent surgery and the pathologic examination demonstrated marked proliferation of small vessels with a lobular pattern in the brain parenchyma, which was confirmed to be capillary hemangioma.

  3. Microfluidic chip-capillary electrophoresis devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Ying Sing; Du, Fuying; Guo, Wenpeng; Ma, Tongmei; Nie, Zhou; Sun, Hui; Wu, Ruige; Zhao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidic chip (MC) devices are relatively mature technologies, but this book demonstrates how they can be integrated into a single, revolutionary device that can provide on-site analysis of samples when laboratory services are unavailable. By introducing the combination of CE and MC technology, Microfluidic Chip-Capillary Electrophoresis Devices broadens the scope of chemical analysis, particularly in the biomedical, food, and environmental sciences.The book gives an overview of the development of MC and CE technology as well as technology that now allows

  4. TESTICULAR CAPILLARY HEMANGIOMA: DESCRIPTION OF A CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Markova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of testicular capillary hemangioma in a 24-year-old man undergone a partial resection of the testis with the intraoperative morphological examination. Testicular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of a vascular origin, which can be similar to malignant testicular tumors on the clinical presentation, as well as on the imaging methods, in particular to seminoma. The intraoperative histological study can assist in avoiding organ-removing surgical interventions in diagnostically ambiguous cases if a benign testicular tumor is diagnosed.

  5. Estimation of Fatty Acids in Corn Oil by Gas Capillary Chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatty acids provide energy as well as play important role in some cellular structures like cell membrane and certain hormones. Saturated fatty acids are usually found in animal products and in some vegetable oils as well. These saturated fatty acids may be a factor in weight gain and obesity but eating them in moderate amounts may not be damaging to health of every person. Monounsaturated fatty acids can lower blood levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol and have potential to increase blood levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and by this way plays protective role against heart disease. The omega 3 and 6 fatty acids have vital roles in many biological systems such as nervous, immune, cardiovascular, dermal and vision systems. Therefore, it is essential to optimize the instrumental conditions and column specification for the estimation of various fatty acids in the oil, which was considered in the current study using Gas Capillary Chromatography. (author)

  6. Quantification of nucleotides by ICPMS: coupling of ICPMS with capillary electrophoresis or capillary HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quantification of nucleotides in small volumes of biological samples has eagerly been demanded. A method using ICPMS coupled with capillary electrophoresis or capillary liquid chromatography is reported. A new interface system, which consists of a double tube nebulizer inserted with a fused silica capillary tube and a cylinder mini-chamber with a sheath gas inlet, was designed. Moreover, the surface conditions of the sampling and skimmer cones, and the introduction of H2 gas into the plasma were found to significantly improve the signal/background ratio for phosphorus determination at m/z 31. (author)

  7. Oxygen saturation imaging of human retinal vessels and measurement in eye disease patient for clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D.; Matsuoka, N.; Tatsuguchi, K.; Ogata, M.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Enaida, H.; Okada, T.; Ishibashi, T.

    2010-02-01

    We have proposed a new automatic visualization procedure based the ratio of optical densities (ODs) obtained at two different wavelength for the oxygen saturation imaging in human retinal vessels. This method utilized the morphological processing and the line convergence index filter to estimate the reflection image of outside vessels and extract the vessel structure from retinal image, respectively. In the experimental measurement, clear difference between retinal arteries and veins has been observed. In this study, the data processing technique of the line convergence index filter was applied to a color fundus image to investigate the ability of vessel extraction. In addition, four-wavelength imaging was proposed to evaluate oxygen saturation of the retinal capillary vessels and to decrease the influence of the melanin pigmentation.

  8. A model for wave propagation in a porous solid saturated by a three-phase fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Juan E; Savioli, Gabriela B

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a model to describe the propagation of waves in a poroelastic medium saturated by a three-phase viscous, compressible fluid. Two capillary relations between the three fluid phases are included in the model by introducing Lagrange multipliers in the principle of virtual complementary work. This approach generalizes that of Biot for single-phase fluids and allows to determine the strain energy density, identify the generalized strains and stresses, and derive the constitutive relations of the system. The kinetic and dissipative energy density functions are obtained assuming that the relative flow within the pore space is of laminar type and obeys Darcy's law for three-phase flow in porous media. After deriving the equations of motion, a plane wave analysis predicts the existence of four compressional waves, denoted as type I, II, III, and IV waves, and one shear wave. Numerical examples showing the behavior of all waves as function of saturation and frequency are presented. PMID:26936553

  9. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gocmen, Rahsan; Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed.

  10. High Vp/Vs ratio: Saturated cracks or anisotropy effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-Q.; Schubnel, A.; Fortin, J.; David, E. C.; Guéguen, Y.; Ge, H.-K.

    2012-06-01

    We measured Vp/Vs ratios of thermally cracked Westerly granite, thermally cracked Carrara marble and 4% porosity Fontainebleau sandstone, for an effective mean pressure ranging from 2 to 95 MPa. Samples were fluid-saturated alternatively with argon gas and water (5 MPa constant pore pressure). The experimental results show that at ultrasonic frequencies, Vp/Vs ratio of water saturated specimen never exceeded 2.15, even at effective mean pressure as low as 2 MPa, or for a lithology for which the Poisson's ratio of minerals is as high as 0.3 (calcite). In order to check these results against theoretical models: we examine first a randomly oriented cracked medium (with dispersion but without anisotropy); and second a medium with horizontally aligned cracks (with anisotropy but without dispersion). The numerical results show that experimental data agree well with the first model: at high frequency, Vp/Vs ratios range from 1.6 to 1.8 in the dry case and from 1.6 to 2.2 in the saturated case. The second model predicts both Vp/Sv and Vp/Sh to vary from 1.2 to 3.5, depending on the raypath angle relative to the crack fabric. In addition, perpendicular to the crack fabric, a high Vp/Vs ratio is predicted in the absence of shear wave splitting. From these results, we argue the possibility that high Vp/Vs ratio (>2.2) as recently imaged by seismic tomography in subduction zones, may come from zones presenting important crack anisotropy. The cumulative effects of crack anisotropy and high pore fluid pressure are required to get Vp/Vs ratios above 2.2.

  11. Automated dual capillary electrophoresis system with hydrodynamic injection for the concurrent determination of cations and anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Concurrent determination of cations and anions was carried out by electrophoretic separation. • Optimized conditions for each class of analystes was possible by using separate capillaries. • Simultaneous hydrodynamic injection was carried out. • Pneumatic actuation was used for flushing and sample handling. • The denitrification of drinking water was successfully demonstrated. - Abstract: The capillary electrophoresis instrument developed for the concurrent determination of cations and anions features two separate capillaries and individual detectors to allow independent optimization for each group of ions. The capillaries are joined in a common injector block. The sample is drawn into the injector with a small membrane pump and automated simultaneous injection into both capillaries is achieved by pressurization of the fluid with compressed air. Flushing of the injector and of the capillaries with the background electrolyte is also carried out automatically by the same means. The buffer consisted of 12 mM histidine and 2 mM 18-crown-6 adjusted to pH 4 with acetic acid and was suitable for the contactless conductivity detection employed. The system was optimized for the determination of cationic NH4+ and anionic NO3− and NO2−, and linear calibration curves from about 20 μM up to about 1.5 mM were obtained for these ions. In a test run over 8 h, the reproducibility for the peak areas was within ±7%. For demonstration, the instrument was successfully applied to the concurrent monitoring of the concentrations of the three ions during the biological removal of ammonium from contaminated groundwater in a sequencing batch reactor, where NO3− and NO2− are formed as intermediate products

  12. Automated dual capillary electrophoresis system with hydrodynamic injection for the concurrent determination of cations and anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thi Thanh Thuy; Mai, Thanh Duc [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Spitalstrasse 51, Basel 4056 (Switzerland); Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Nguyen Trai Street 334, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Thanh Dam [Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Nguyen Trai Street 334, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Sáiz, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Chemical Engineering – University of Alcalá, Ctra. Madrid-Barcelona km 33.6, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid 28871 (Spain); Pham, Hung Viet, E-mail: phamhungviet@hus.edu.vn [Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, Nguyen Trai Street 334, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hauser, Peter C., E-mail: Peter.Hauser@unibas.ch [University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, Spitalstrasse 51, Basel 4056 (Switzerland)

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • Concurrent determination of cations and anions was carried out by electrophoretic separation. • Optimized conditions for each class of analystes was possible by using separate capillaries. • Simultaneous hydrodynamic injection was carried out. • Pneumatic actuation was used for flushing and sample handling. • The denitrification of drinking water was successfully demonstrated. - Abstract: The capillary electrophoresis instrument developed for the concurrent determination of cations and anions features two separate capillaries and individual detectors to allow independent optimization for each group of ions. The capillaries are joined in a common injector block. The sample is drawn into the injector with a small membrane pump and automated simultaneous injection into both capillaries is achieved by pressurization of the fluid with compressed air. Flushing of the injector and of the capillaries with the background electrolyte is also carried out automatically by the same means. The buffer consisted of 12 mM histidine and 2 mM 18-crown-6 adjusted to pH 4 with acetic acid and was suitable for the contactless conductivity detection employed. The system was optimized for the determination of cationic NH{sub 4}{sup +} and anionic NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −}, and linear calibration curves from about 20 μM up to about 1.5 mM were obtained for these ions. In a test run over 8 h, the reproducibility for the peak areas was within ±7%. For demonstration, the instrument was successfully applied to the concurrent monitoring of the concentrations of the three ions during the biological removal of ammonium from contaminated groundwater in a sequencing batch reactor, where NO{sub 3}{sup −} and NO{sub 2}{sup −} are formed as intermediate products.

  13. Detection of glucocorticoids by pressurized capillary electrochromatography with ultra-violet detection and its application in hair analysis%加压毛细管电色谱-紫外检测法分析糖皮质激素及其在头发检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李博祥; 郑敏敏; 卢兰香; 吴晓苹

    2011-01-01

    An effective and convenient method for glucocorticoid analysis in hair by reversed-phase pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) with ultra-violet (UV) detection was developed. Eight glucocorticoids (betamethasone, dexamethasone, prednisone, predniso-lone, prednisolone acetate, hydrocortisone acetate, cortisone acetate and corticosterone) were separated within 20 min in an isocratic mode pCEC. The separations were performed on a reversed-phase C18 column, and with 245 nm as the UV detection wavelength. The mobile phase was composed of 1. 5 mmol/L Tris buffer (pH 8.0) and acetonitrile (65:35, v/v), at a pump flow rate of 0.05 mL/min. All of the compounds showed good linearity in the range of 0.036 -4.0 mmol/L. The limits of detection (LODs) for all glucocorticoids were of μg/g levels. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of hair samples. The interference of hair matrices was effectively eliminated by protein enzymatic digestion, followed by a methanol extraction and a solid phase extraction (SPE) clean up step. The average recoveries of 71% - 85% at different fortified levels of glucocorticoids were achieved. This non-invasive method is useful for rapidly estimating the level of drug exposure in drug chronic abuse and monitoring the compliance of therapeutic drugs.%采用反相加压毛细管电色谱与紫外检测联用技术,建立了一种高效、简便的糖皮质激素分析方法,适用于头发中糖皮质激素的检测.使用C18反相色谱柱,流动相为pH 8.0,1.5 mmol/L的Tris-乙腈(65:35,v/v),检测波长为245 nm、分离电压为-10 kV、反压为10.5 MPa、泵流速为0.05 mL/min,进行等度洗脱,倍他米松、地塞米松、泼尼松、泼尼松龙、醋酸泼尼松龙、醋酸氢化可的松、醋酸可的松、皮质脂酮等8种激素在20 min内实现快速分离.各组分的质量浓度线性范围达到3个数量级,检出限(S/N=3)在μg/g水平,迁移时间和峰面积的相对标准偏差(RSD)分别小于4.8

  14. Imaging characteristics of glass capillary plate gas detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glass capillary plate (CP) gas detector with gas mixtures of He, Ne, Ar, and Xe has been successfully operated as a visible and near-infrared (NIR) scintillation proportional counter. Gas gains of up to 104 can be achieved using these gas mixtures. The scintillation light emitted during the generation of electron avalanches can be observed using a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and a compact optical imaging system that consists of a CP gas detector and a cooled CCD camera coupled to lens optics. Using this optical imaging system, clearer X-ray images have been obtained with the above gas mixtures. The dependence of the imaging quality on the pressure in the range 0.25-1 atm was also investigated for the Ar (90%)+CF4 (10%) gas mixture. The successful operations using these gas mixtures have allowed us to realize a novel imaging device with a CP gas detector for gaseous PMTs sensitive to visible light.

  15. Does deformation saturate seismic anisotropy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, D. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Butler, R. W.; Casey, M.

    2006-12-01

    The progressive simple shear deformation that characterizes ductile fault zones in the crust involves both rotation and intensification of the strain ellipsoid. These mathematic predictions have been confirmed repeatedly by finite strain determinations in outcrop studies of natural shear zones and used to test geodynamic models of mountain belts. Seismic anisotropy (SA) methods offer the opportunity to pursue these approaches in situ. First however, we must calibrate the magnitude and orientation of the SA ellipsoid against naturally deformed tectonites of known strain state and microstructure. Here we present data from a field analogue of mafic ductile crust in an amphibolite-facies shear zone developed in a deformed mafic dyke embedded within the Lewisian Gneiss (Badcall, NW Scotland). Deflection of pre-existing linear and planar elements and attenuation of the dyke into the shear zone are used to determine the strain gradient. Specimens collected along this gradient were used to establish the geometric fabric intensity defined by different minerals (hornblende grain alignment and ellipticity of plagioclase clots). Finally, petrophysical properties were calculated for the specimens using the SEM-EBSD measured populations of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) for all mineral phases. It is the hornblende-plagioclase LPO, combined in their modal proportions and modulated by the individual mineral single crystal elastic properties, which define the SA profile across the shear zone. Hornblende develops a strong preferred dimensional orientation and hence LPO at shear strains of about 2, whereas the plagioclase LPO remains close to random regardless of bulk strain. The modelled SA of the samples is dominated therefore by the amphibole LPO. Although the values of bulk shear strain vary across the shear zone (0 at the margins to greater than 12 in the centre), the calculated intensity of SA saturates at a shear strain of about 2. These results, if typical of large

  16. LIQUEFACTION AND DISPLACEMENT OF SATURATED SAND UNDER VERTICAL VIBRATION LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaobing; TAN Qingming; CHENG C.M.; YU Shanbing; CUI Peng

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the vertical vibration loading on the liquefaction of saturated sand, one dimensional model for the saturated sand with a vertical vibration is presented based on the two phase continuous media theory. The development of the liquefaction and the liquefaction region are analyzed. It is shown that the vertical vibration loading could induce liquefaction.The rate of the liquefaction increases with the increase of the initial limit strain or initial porosity or amplitude and frequency of loading, and increases with the decrease of the permeability or initial modulus. It is shown also that there is a phase lag in the sand column. When the sand permeability distribution is non-uniform, the pore pressure and the strain will rise sharply where the permeability is the smallest, and fracture might be induced. With the development of liquefaction, the strength of the soil foundation becomes smaller and smaller. In the limiting case, landslides or debris flows could occur.

  17. A discrete element model for simulating saturated granular soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahan Lamei; Ali Asghar Mirghasemi

    2011-01-01

    A numerical model is developed to simulate saturated granular soil,based on the discrete element method.Soil particles are represented by Lagrangian discrete elements,and pore fluid,by appropriate discrete elements which represent alternately Lagrangian mass of water and Eulerian volume of space.Macroscale behavior of the model is verified by simulating undrained biaxial compression tests.Micro-scale behavior is compared to previous literature through pore pressure pattern visualization during shear tests,it is demonstrated that dynamic pore pressure patterns are generated by superposed stress waves.These pore-pressure patterns travel much faster than average drainage rate of the pore fluid and may initiate soil fabric change,ultimately leading to liquefaction in loose sands.Thus,this work demonstrates a tool to roughly link dynamic stress wave patterns to initiation of liquefaction phenomena.

  18. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  19. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.E. [Univ. of Wollongong (Australia); Stormont, J.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  20. Modeling of Throttling Process inside Capillary Tube

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinš, Václav; Vacek, V.

    Praha : ČVUT, 2009, s. 250-251. ISBN 978-80-01-04286-1. [ANNUAL CTU UNIVERSITY-WIDE SEMINAR /18./. Praha (CZ), 16.02.2009-20.02.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : capillary tube * numerical model * metastable flow Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics https://workshop.cvut.cz/2009/