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Sample records for capecitabine based postoperative

  1. Capecitabine based postoperative accelerated chemoradiation of pancreatic carcinoma. A dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Picardi, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Caravatta, Luciana; Tambaro, Rosa; Mignogna, Samantha; Cellini, Numa; Valentini, Vincenzo; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Di Lullo, Liberato; Giglio, Gianfranco; Caprino, Paola; Sofo, Luigi; Ingrosso, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of escalating up to 55 Gy within five weeks, the dose of external beam radiotherapy to the previous tumor site concurrently with a fixed daily dose of capecitabine, in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Material and methods. Patients with resected pancreatic carcinoma were eligible for this study. Capecitabine was administered at a daily dose of 1600 mg/m 2 . Regional lymph nodes received a total radiation dose of 45 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fractions. The starting radiation dose to the tumor bed was 50.0 Gy (2.0 Gy/fraction, 25 fractions). Escalation was achieved up to a total dose of 55.0 Gy by increasing the fraction size by 0.2 Gy (2.2 Gy/fraction), while keeping the duration of radiotherapy to five weeks (25 fractions). A concomitant boost technique was used. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any grade>3 hematologic toxicity, grade>2 liver, renal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, or skin toxicity, by RTOG criteria, or any toxicity producing prolonged (> 10 days) radiotherapy interruption. Results and discussion. Twelve patients entered the study (median age: 64 years). In the first cohort (six patients), no patient experienced DLT. Similarly in the second cohort, no DLT occurred. All 12 patients completed the planned regimen of therapy. Nine patients experienced grade 1-2 nausea and/or vomiting. Grade 2 hematological toxicity occurred in four patients. The results of our study indicate that a total radiation dose up to 55.0 Gy/5 weeks can be safely administered to the tumor bed, concurrently with capecitabine (1600 mg/m 2 ) in patients with resected pancreatic carcinoma.

  2. Capecitabine

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    ... other medications. Capecitabine is also used to treat colon or rectal cancer (cancer that begins in the large intestine) that has gotten worse or spread to other parts of the body. It is also used to prevent colon cancer from spreading in people who have had ...

  3. Gemcitabine-Based Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation With Capecitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreas Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sameer; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Griffith, Kent A.; Simeone, Diane; Greenson, Joel K.; Francis, Isaac R.; Hampton, Janet; Colletti, Lisa; Chang, Alfred E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Zalupski, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for patients with resected pancreas cancer treated with an adjuvant regimen consisting of gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy followed by capecitabine and radiation. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective review of a series of patients treated at a single institution with a common postoperative adjuvant program. Between January 2002 and August 2006, 43 resected pancreas cancer patients were offered treatment consisting of 4, 21-day cycles of gemcitabine 1 g/m 2 intravenously over 30 min on Days 1 and 8, with either cisplatin 35 mg/m 2 intravenously on Days 1 and 8 or capecitabine 1500 mg/m 2 orally in divided doses on Days 1-14. After completion of combination chemotherapy, patients received a course of radiotherapy (54 Gy) with concurrent capecitabine (1330 mg/m 2 orally in divided doses) day 1 to treatment completion. Results: Forty-one patients were treated. Median progression-free survival for the entire group was 21.7 months (95% confidence interval 13.9-34.5 months), and median overall survival was 45.9 months. In multivariate analysis a postoperative CA 19-9 level of ≥180 U/mL predicted relapse and death. Toxicity was mild, with only two hospitalizations during adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: A postoperative adjuvant program using combination chemotherapy with gemcitabine and either cisplatin or capecitabine followed by radiotherapy with capecitabine is tolerable and efficacious and should be considered for Phase III testing in this group of patients.

  4. Pilot study of postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation for advanced gastric cancer: Adjuvant 5-FU/cisplatin and chemoradiation with capecitabine

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    Lee, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Youngmin; Hur, Won-Joo; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Jung, Ghap-Joong; Kim, Min-Chan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of postoperative chemoradiation using FP chemotherapy and oral capecitabine during radiation for advanced gastric cancer following curative resection. METHODS: Thirty-one patients who had underwent a potentially curative resection for Stage III and IV (M0) gastric cancer were enrolled. Therapy consists of one cycle of FP (continuous infusion of 5-FU 1000 mg/m2 on d 1 to 5 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on d 1) followed by 4500 cGy (180 cGy/d) with capecitabine (1650 mg/m2 daily throughout radiotherapy). Four wk after completion of the radiotherapy, patients received three additional cycles of FP every three wk. The median follow-up duration was 22.2 mo. RESULTS: The 3-year disease free and overall survival in this study were 82.7% and 83.4%, respectively. Four patients (12.9%) showed relapse during follow-up. Eight patients did not complete all planned adjuvant therapy. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia in 50.2%, anemia in 12.9%, thrombocytopenia in 3.2% and nausea/vomiting in 3.2%. Neither grade 3/4 hand foot syndrome nor treatment related febrile neutropenia or death were observed. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results suggest that this postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation regimen of FP before and after capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy appears well tolerated and offers a comparable toxicity profile to the chemoradiation regimen utilized in INT-0116. This treatment modality allowed successful loco-regional control rate and 3-year overall survival. PMID:16489675

  5. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of S-1-based and capecitabine-based regimens in gastrointestinal cancer: a meta-analysis.

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    Xunlei Zhang

    Full Text Available Oral fluoropyrimidine (S-1, capecitabine has been considered as an important part of various regimens. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of S-1-based therapy versus capecitabine -based therapy in gastrointestinal cancers.Eligible studies were identified from Pubmed, EMBASE. Additionally, abstracts presented at American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO conferences held between 2000 and 2013 were searched to identify relevant clinical trials. The outcome included overall survival (OS, progression-free survival (PFS, overall response rate (ORR, disease control rate (DCR and advent events.A total of 6 studies (4 RCTs and 2 retrospective analysis studies containing 790 participants were included in this meta-analysis, including 401 patients in the S-1-based group and 389 patients in the capecitabine-based group. Results of our meta-analysis indicated that S-1-based and capecitabine-based regimens showed very similar efficacy in terms of PFS (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.78-1.09, P = 0.360, OS (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.84-1.21, P = 0.949, ORR (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.87-1.25, P = 0.683 and DCR (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.94-1.10, P = 0.639. There was also no significant difference in toxicity between regimens other than mild more hand-foot syndrome in capecitabine-based regimens.Both the S-1-based and capecitabine-based regimens are equally active and well tolerated, and have the potential of backbone chemotherapy regimen in further studies of gastrointestinal cancers.

  6. Cost minimization analysis of capecitabine versus 5-fluorouracil-based treatment for gastric cancer patients in Hong Kong.

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    Zhou, Keary R; Cheng, Ashley; Ng, W T; Kwok, T Y; Yip, Elton Y P; Yao, Rosa; Leung, P Y; Lee, V W Y

    2017-05-01

    EOX (epirubicin, oxaliplatin, Xeloda; capecitabine) and FOLFOX4 (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin, oxaliplatin) are the common chemotherapy regimens used in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (aGC) in Hong Kong. This study aimed to compare the costs of these therapies for aGC patients from both the healthcare and societal perspectives. It should be noted that, while FOLFOX4 is routinely administered in an outpatient setting in North America and Europe, inpatient setting is adopted in Hong Kong instead, incurring hospitalization cost as a result. Fifty-eight patients were identified from the electronic records in two public tertiary hospitals, with 45 and 13 receiving EOX and FOLFOX4 regimens, respectively. Healthcare cost was direct medical costs including drugs, clinic follow-up, hospitalization, diagnostic laboratories, and radiographs. Societal cost refers to indirect costs such as patient time and travel costs. Cost items were further classified as "expected" or "unexpected". All cost data was expressed in US dollars. Patients in the EOX and FOLFOX4 arm received an average of 5.3 and 7.8 cycles of treatment, respectively. The capecitabine-based regimen group had a higher expected medication cost per cycle when compared to the 5-FU-based treatment group (US$290.3 vs US$66.9, p < .001), but lower expected hospitalization costs (US$76.9 vs US$1,269.2, p < .001). The total healthcare cost and total societal cost per patient was reduced by 67.2% (US$5,691.9 vs US$17,357.4, p < .001) and 25.3% (US$3,090.5 vs US$4,135.1, p = .001), respectively, in the capecitabine-based regimen group. Sensitivity analyses based on full cycle regimen costs and net capecitabine or 5-FU/leucovorin costs still showed EOX to be less costly than FOLFOX4. The capecitabine-based regimen, EOX, was found to generate significant cost saving from both the healthcare and societal perspectives in regions in which FOLFOX4 is given in an inpatient setting.

  7. S-1-Based versus capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer: a matched-pair analysis.

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    Meng Su

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to compare the efficacy and safety of S-1-based and capecitabine-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimens in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer through a retrospective matched-pair analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between Jan 2010 and Mar 2014, 24 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative radiotherapy concurrently with S-1 were individually matched with 24 contemporary patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who received preoperative radiotherapy concurrently with capecitabine according to clinical stage (as determined by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and age (within five years. All these patients performed mesorectal excision 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy. RESULTS: The tumor volume reduction rates were 55.9±15.1% in the S-1 group and 53.8±16.0% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.619. The overall downstaging, including both T downstaging and N downstaging, occurred in 83.3% of the S-1 group and 70.8% of the capecitabine group (p = 0.508. The significant tumor regression, including regression grade I and II, occurred in 33.3% of S-1 patients and 25.0% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.754. In the two groups, Grade 4 adverse events were not observed and Grade 3 consisted of only two cases of diarrhea, and no patient suffered hematologic adverse event of Grade 2 or higher. However, the incidence of diarrhea (62.5% vs 33.3%, p = 0.014 and hand-foot syndrome (29.2% vs 0%, p = 0.016 were higher in capecitabine group. Other adverse events did not differ significantly between two groups. CONCLUSIONS: The two preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimens were effective and safe for patients of locally advanced rectal cancer, but regimen with S-1 exhibited a lower incidence of adverse events.

  8. Renal function, body surface area, and age are associated with risk of early-onset fluoropyrimidine-associated toxicity in patients treated with capecitabine-based anticancer regimens in daily clinical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulendijks, Didier; van Hasselt, J G Coen; Huitema, Alwin D R; van Tinteren, Harm; Deenen, Maarten J; Beijnen, Jos H; Cats, Annemieke; Schellens, Jan H M

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this analysis was to determine the factors associated with early onset treatment-related toxicity in patients treated with capecitabine-based anticancer regimens in daily clinical care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 1463 patients previously included in a prospective

  9. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

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    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved

  10. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

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    Esnaola, Nestor F. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O' Brien, Paul [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth [Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Camp, E. Ramsay [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Thomas, Melanie B. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Cole, David J. [Department of Surgery, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Montero, Alberto J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Orwat, Kelly P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States); Marshall, David T., E-mail: marshadt@musc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  11. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study.

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    Tsuruta, Atsushi; Yamashita, Kazuki; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Akihito; Inukai, Michio; Yamakawa, Toshiki; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Yoshimitsu, Masanori; Toyota, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Taketoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Okajima, Masazumi

    2016-01-01

    Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were eligible. Patients were treated with folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) or capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CAPOX) for 3 months followed by capecitabine (2,500 mg/m 2 on days 1-14 every 3 weeks) for 3 months. Primary end points were frequency and the grade of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity as evaluated using the physician-based Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE) grading and the patient-based scale, self-reported Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire. Ninety-one patients were enrolled and 86 patients assessed. Eighty-four percent of patients completed the planned oxaliplatin-based therapy for 3 months, and 63% of patients completed all treatments for the full 6 months. Overall incidences of grade 3 or 4 peripheral sensory or motor neuropathy according to the CTCAE were 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. Regarding the peripheral sensory neuropathy, the proportion of Patient Neurotoxicity Questionnaire (grade C-E) and CTCAE (grade 2-4) at months 1.5/3/6 were 11.3/22.1/29.4% and 5.3/4.4/11.3%, respectively (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.47). A sequential approach to adjuvant chemotherapy with 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine was tolerated by patients and associated with a low incidence of neuropathy.

  12. NEOSCOPE: A randomised phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by oxaliplatin/capecitabine or carboplatin/paclitaxel based pre-operative chemoradiation for resectable oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

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    Mukherjee, Somnath; Hurt, Christopher Nicholas; Gwynne, Sarah; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Radhakrishna, Ganesh; Gollins, Simon; Hawkins, Maria; Grabsch, Heike I; Jones, Gareth; Falk, Stephen; Sharma, Ricky; Bateman, Andrew; Roy, Rajarshi; Ray, Ruby; Canham, Jo; Griffiths, Gareth; Maughan, Tim; Crosby, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Oxaliplatin-capecitabine (OxCap) and carboplatin-paclitaxel (CarPac) based neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) have shown promising activity in localised, resectable oesophageal cancer. A non-blinded, randomised (1:1 via a centralised computer system), 'pick a winner' phase II trial. Patients with resectable oesophageal adenocarcinoma ≥ cT3 and/or ≥ cN1 were randomised to OxCapRT (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m 2  day 1, 15, 29; capecitabine 625 mg/m 2 bd on days of radiotherapy) or CarPacRT (carboplatin AUC2; paclitaxel 50 mg/m 2  day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29). Radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks. Both arms received induction OxCap chemotherapy (2 × 3 week cycles of oxaliplatin 130 mg/m 2  day 1, capecitabine 625 mg/m 2 bd days 1-21). Surgery was performed 6-8 weeks after nCRT. Primary end-point was pathological complete response (pCR). Secondary end-points included toxicity, surgical morbidity/mortality, resection rate and overall survival. Based on pCR ≤ 15% not warranting future investigation, but pCR ≥ 35% would, 76 patients (38/arm) gave 90% power (one-sided alpha 10%), implying that arm(s) having ≥10 pCR out of first 38 patients could be considered for phase III trials. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01843829. Funder: Cancer Research UK (C44694/A14614). Eighty five patients were randomised between October 2013 and February 2015 from 17 UK centres. Three of 85 (3.5%) died during induction chemotherapy. Seventy-seven patients (OxCapRT = 36; CarPacRT = 41) underwent surgery. The 30-d post-operative mortality was 2/77 (2.6%). Grade III/IV toxicity was comparable between arms, although neutropenia was higher in the CarPacRT arm (21.4% versus 2.6%, p = 0.01). Twelve of 41 (29.3%) (10 of first 38 patients) and 4/36 (11.1%) achieved pCR in the CarPacRT and OxcapRT arms, respectively. Corresponding R0 resection rates were 33/41 (80.5%) and 26/36 (72.2%), respectively. Both regimens were well tolerated. Only CarPacRT passed the predefined p

  13. Randomized Phase III Trial of Trastuzumab Plus Capecitabine With or Without Pertuzumab in Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Experienced Disease Progression During or After Trastuzumab-Based Therapy.

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    Urruticoechea, Ander; Rizwanullah, Mohammed; Im, Seock-Ah; Ruiz, Antonio Carlos Sánchez; Láng, István; Tomasello, Gianluca; Douthwaite, Hannah; Badovinac Crnjevic, Tanja; Heeson, Sarah; Eng-Wong, Jennifer; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2017-09-10

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab plus capecitabine with or without pertuzumab in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer who experienced disease progression during or after trastuzumab-based therapy and received a prior taxane. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to arm A: trastuzumab 8 mg/kg → 6 mg/kg once every 3 weeks plus capecitabine 1,250 mg/m 2 twice a day (2 weeks on, 1 week off, every 3 weeks); or arm B: pertuzumab 840 mg → 420 mg once every 3 weeks plus trastuzumab at the same dose and schedule as arm A plus capecitabine 1,000 mg/m 2 on the same schedule as arm A. The primary end point was independent review facility-assessed progression-free survival (IRF PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and safety. Hierarchical testing procedures were used to control type I error for statistical testing of IRF PFS, OS, and objective response rate. Results Randomly assigned (intent-to-treat) populations were 224 and 228 patients in arms A and B, respectively. Median IRF PFS at 28.6 and 25.3 months' median follow-up was 9.0 v 11.1 months (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.02; P = .0731) and interim OS was 28.1 v 36.1 months (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.90). The most common adverse events (all grades; incidence of ≥ 10% in either arm and ≥ 5% difference between arms) were hand-foot syndrome, nausea, and neutropenia in arm A, and diarrhea, rash, and nasopharyngitis in arm B. Conclusion The addition of pertuzumab to trastuzumab and capecitabine did not significantly improve IRF PFS. An 8-month increase in median OS to 36.1 months with pertuzumab was observed. Statistical significance for OS cannot be claimed because of the hierarchical testing of OS after the primary PFS end point; however, the magnitude of OS difference is in keeping with prior experience of pertuzumab in metastatic breast cancer. No new safety signals were identified.

  14. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% ± 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% ± 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed

  15. Feasibility of sequential adjuvant chemotherapy with a 3-month oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine in patients with stage III and high-risk stage II colorectal cancer: JSWOG-C2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuruta A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Atsushi Tsuruta,1,* Kazuki Yamashita,2,* Hiroaki Tanioka,3 Akihito Tsuji,4,5 Michio Inukai,6 Toshiki Yamakawa,7 Tomoki Yamatsuji,8 Masanori Yoshimitsu,9 Kazuhiro Toyota,10 Taketoshi Yamano,11 Takeshi Nagasaka,12 Masazumi Okajima13 On behalf of the Japan Southwest Oncology Group (JSWOG 1Department of Digestive Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School Hospital, 2Department of Surgery, 3Department of Medical Oncology, Okayama Rosai Hospital, Okayama, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, 5Department of Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University Hospital, Kagawa, 6Department of Medicine, Okayama Saiseikai General Hospital, Okayama, 7Department of Surgery, Kagawa Prefectural Central Hospital, Takamatsu, 8Department of General Surgery, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, 9Department of Surgery, Hiroshima City Asa Hospital, Hiroshima, 10Department of Surgery, National Hospital Organization Higashihirosima Medical Center, Higashihiroshima, 11Department of Surgery, Kurashiki Medical Center, 12Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, 13Department of Surgery, Hiroshima City Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Six months of oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected stage III colorectal cancer (CRC. Also, patients with stage II CRC who are considered to be at high risk of disease recurrence often receive the same adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. We prospectively investigated the extent and degree of neuropathy suffered by stage III and high-risk stage II resectable CRC patients who underwent sequential approach involving 3 months of an oxaliplatin-based regimen followed by 3 months of capecitabine. Patients and methods: Patients with completely resected stage III and high-risk stage II CRC aged ≥20 years were

  16. Capecitabine induced hypertriglyceridaemia: An underreported and potentially severe side effect

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    Tabchi S; Joseph K

    2014-01-01

    A 57 year-old-woman, with no previous history of dyslipedemia, developed severe hypertriglyceridemia while being treated with capecitabine for metastatic breast cancer. Capecitabine was not discontinued and serum triglyceride levels were normalized after 4 weeks of treatment with fenofibrate. Capecitabine induced hypertriglyceridemia, as a rare drug-related side effect, seems to be often overlooked by clinicians.

  17. Capecitabine induced hypertriglyceridaemia: An underreported and potentially severe side effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabchi S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 57 year-old-woman, with no previous history of dyslipedemia, developed severe hypertriglyceridemia while being treated with capecitabine for metastatic breast cancer. Capecitabine was not discontinued and serum triglyceride levels were normalized after 4 weeks of treatment with fenofibrate. Capecitabine induced hypertriglyceridemia, as a rare drug-related side effect, seems to be often overlooked by clinicians.

  18. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Radiation With Concurrent Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Bevacizumab Followed by Surgery and Postoperative 5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and Bevacizumab in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Clinical Outcomes ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group E3204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jerome C; Feng, Yang; Prabhu, Roshan S; Cohen, Steven J; Staley, Charles A; Whittington, Richard; Sigurdson, Elin Ruth; Nimeiri, Halla; Verma, Udit; Benson, Al Bowen

    2015-06-01

    The 5-year oncologic outcomes from the trial regimen were excellent. However, the neoadjuvant and surgical toxicity of this regimen was significant and was the primary reason for the low compliance with adjuvant systemic therapy.Due to the lack of an improvement in the pathologic complete response rate, the substantial associated toxicity, and the negative phase III trials of adjuvant bevacizumab in colon cancer, this regimen will not be pursued for further study. The addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy improves overall survival for metastatic colorectal cancer. We initiated a phase II trial to evaluate preoperative capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab with radiation therapy (RT) followed by surgery and postoperative 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and bevacizumab for locally advanced rectal cancer. The purpose of this report is to describe the 5-year oncologic outcomes of this regimen. In a phase II Simon two-stage design study, we evaluated preoperative treatment with capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) b.i.d. Monday-Friday), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) weekly), bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15, and 29), and RT (50.4 Gy). Surgery was performed by 8 weeks after RT. Beginning 8-12 weeks after surgery, patients received FOLFOX plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 12 cycles (oxaliplatin stopped after 9 cycles). The primary endpoint was a pathologic complete response (path-CR) rate of 30%. Fifty-seven patients with resectable T3/T4 rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled between 2006 and 2010. Of 57 enrolled patients, 53 were eligible and included in the analysis. Forty-eight (91%) patients completed preoperative therapy, all of whom underwent curative surgical resection. Nine patients (17%) achieved path-CR. There were 29 worst grade 3 events, 8 worst grade 4 events, and 2 patient deaths, 1 of which was attributed to study therapy. Twenty-six patients (54%) began adjuvant chemotherapy. After a median follow-up period of 41 months, the 5-year

  19. Capecitabine maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, W.; Zhu, Y.Y.; Li, Y.; Gao, P.; Han, C.; You, J.H.; Linghu, R.X.; Jiao, S.C.; Yang, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine maintenance therapy (CMT) after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The clinical data of 139 metastatic breast cancer patients treated from March 2008 to May 2012 with capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. When initial disease control was achieved by the combination chemotherapy, we used CMT for 50 patients, while 37 patients were treated with a different (non-CMT) maintenance therapy. We compared time to progression (TTP), objective response rate, disease control rate, clinical benefit rate, and safety of the two groups, and a sub-group analysis was performed according to pathological characteristics. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a median of six cycles of a docetaxel+capecitabine combination chemotherapy regimen (range 1-45); the median TTP (MTTP) for the complete treatment was 9.43 months (95%CI=8.38-10.48 months) for the CMT group and 4.5 months (95%CI=4.22-4.78 months; P=0.004) for the non-CMT group. The MTTPs for the maintenance therapies administered after the initial capecitabine combined chemotherapy were 4.11 months (95%CI=3.34-4.87 months) for the CMT group and 2.0 months (95%CI=1.63-2.38 months) for the non-CMT group. Gastrointestinal side effects, decreased white blood cells and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia were the main adverse reactions experienced with the combination chemotherapies, CMT and non-CMT treatments. No significant differences in the incidence of adverse reactions were detected in the CMT and non-CMT patients. After initial disease control was achieved with the capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy, CMT can significantly prolong TTP rates with a favorable safety profile

  20. Capecitabine maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, W. [General Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Medical Oncology, Haidian District, Beijing, China, Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Haidian District, Beijing (China); School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Zhu, Y.Y.; Li, Y.; Gao, P.; Han, C.; You, J.H.; Linghu, R.X.; Jiao, S.C.; Yang, J.L. [General Hospital of the Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Medical Oncology, Haidian District, Beijing, China, Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

    2013-11-25

    Our objective was to investigate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine maintenance therapy (CMT) after capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The clinical data of 139 metastatic breast cancer patients treated from March 2008 to May 2012 with capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. When initial disease control was achieved by the combination chemotherapy, we used CMT for 50 patients, while 37 patients were treated with a different (non-CMT) maintenance therapy. We compared time to progression (TTP), objective response rate, disease control rate, clinical benefit rate, and safety of the two groups, and a sub-group analysis was performed according to pathological characteristics. Sixty-four percent of the patients received a median of six cycles of a docetaxel+capecitabine combination chemotherapy regimen (range 1-45); the median TTP (MTTP) for the complete treatment was 9.43 months (95%CI=8.38-10.48 months) for the CMT group and 4.5 months (95%CI=4.22-4.78 months; P=0.004) for the non-CMT group. The MTTPs for the maintenance therapies administered after the initial capecitabine combined chemotherapy were 4.11 months (95%CI=3.34-4.87 months) for the CMT group and 2.0 months (95%CI=1.63-2.38 months) for the non-CMT group. Gastrointestinal side effects, decreased white blood cells and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia were the main adverse reactions experienced with the combination chemotherapies, CMT and non-CMT treatments. No significant differences in the incidence of adverse reactions were detected in the CMT and non-CMT patients. After initial disease control was achieved with the capecitabine-based combination chemotherapy, CMT can significantly prolong TTP rates with a favorable safety profile.

  1. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care, postoper...

  2. Incidence of Postoperative Acid-Base Disturbances in Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghavi Gilani M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Respiratory and blood pressure changes as well as fluid administration alter the acid-base balance during the perioperative period which may cause consciousness disturbance and additional hemodynamic disorders. The aim of this study was to identify frequent postoperative acid-base disturbances in order to control postoperative complications. Materials and Methods:This prospective, observational study design was used on patients who underwent abdominal surgery during a six-month period. Gasometry was performed immediately after the patients’ admittion to ICU and six and 12 hours postoperatively. SPSS v13 software was used, and PResults: 213 patients (123 male and 90 female aged 14-85 years (51.7± 22.4 were evaluated. During admission, PH and PaCO2 were (7.29±0.13 and (38.3±11.9, respectively; however, although PH increased gradually (P=0.001, PaCO2 was reduced (P=0.03. Bicarbonate and base excess had opposite effects; bicarbonate initially decreased but increased after 12 hours (P=0.001, whereas base excess initially increased (-6.3±11.6 and then decreased gradually (P=0.003. The arterial oxygen pressure was reduced for 22.5% of the patients throughout the admission period, and this did not significantly change (P=0.57. Conclusion: According to the results, in admission, 65.7% had metabolic acidosis, but metabolic alkalosis was the least. Gradually, metabolic acidosis was modified, but metabolic alkalosis increased. Intraoperative hypotension and fluid infusion may be the main factors of early metabolic acidosis and control of hypotension, or correction of acidosis may increase metabolic alkalosis.

  3. Clinical efficacy of including capecitabine in neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Capecitabine has proven effective as a chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer. Though several Phase II/III studies of capecitabine as neoadjuvant chemotherapy have been conducted, the results still remain inconsistent. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to obtain more precise understanding of the role of capecitabine in neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer patients. METHODS: The electronic database PubMed and online abstracts from ASCO and SABCS were searched to identify randomized clinical trials comparing neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without capecitabine in early/operable breast cancer patients without distant metastasis. Risk ratios were used to estimate the association between capecitabine in neoadjuvant chemotherapy and various efficacy outcomes. Fixed- or random-effect models were adopted to pool data in RevMan 5.1. RESULTS: Five studies were included in the meta-analysis. Neoadjuvant use of capecitabine with anthracycline and/or taxane based therapy was not associated with significant improvement in clinical outcomes including: pathologic complete response in breast (pCR; RR = 1.10, 95% CI 0.87-1.40, p = 0.43, pCR in breast tumor and nodes (tnpCR RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.83-1.18, p = 0.90, overall response rate (ORR; RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.94-1.07, p = 0.93, or breast-conserving surgery (BCS; RR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.93-1.04, p = 0.49. CONCLUSIONS: Neoadjuvant treatment of breast cancer involving capecitabine did not significantly improve pCR, tnpCR, BCS or ORR. Thus adding capecitabine to neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimes is unlikely to improve outcomes in breast cancer patients without distant metastasis. Further research is required to establish the condition that capecitabine may be useful in breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Capecitabine, Bevacizumab, and Erlotinib for Rectal Cancer: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Prajnan, E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eng, Cathy [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; You, Y. Nancy [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Maru, Dipen M. [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Clemons, Marilyn V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kopetz, Scott E.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Shureiqi, Imad [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The goal of this phase 1 trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib with preoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with clinical stage II to III rectal adenocarcinoma, within 12 cm from the anal verge, were treated in 4 escalating dose levels, using the continual reassessment method. Patients received preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks), erlotinib, and capecitabine. Capecitabine dose was increased from 650 mg/m{sup 2} to 825 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the days of radiation therapy; erlotinib dose was increased from 50 mg orally daily in weeks 1 to 3, to 50 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6, to 100 mg daily in weeks 1 to 6. Patients underwent surgery at least 9 weeks after the last dose of bevacizumab. Results: A total of 19 patients were enrolled, and 18 patients were considered evaluable. No patient had grade 4 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had grade 3 acute toxicity (hypertension). The MTD was not reached. All 18 evaluable patients underwent surgery, with low anterior resection in 7 (39%), proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis in 4 patients (22%), posterior pelvic exenteration in 1 (6%), and abdominoperineal resection in 6 (33%). Of the 18 patients, 8 (44%) had pathologic complete response, and 1 had complete response of the primary tumor with positive nodes. Three patients (17%) had grade 3 postoperative complications (ileus, small bowel obstruction, and infection). With a median follow-up of 34 months, 1 patient developed distant metastasis, and no patient had local recurrence or died. The 3-year disease-free survival was 94%. Conclusions: The combination of preoperative radiation therapy with concurrent capecitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib was well tolerated. The pathologic complete response rate appears promising and may warrant further investigation.

  5. Cardiotoxicity in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polk, Anne; Vaage-Nilsen, Merete Bech; Vistisen, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    To systematically review the incidence, manifestations and predisposing factors for cardiovascular toxicity in cancer patients treated with systemic 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine.......To systematically review the incidence, manifestations and predisposing factors for cardiovascular toxicity in cancer patients treated with systemic 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine....

  6. European Society of Anaesthesiology evidence-based and consensus-based guideline on postoperative delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aldecoa, César; Bettelli, Gabriella; Bilotta, Federico; Sanders, Robert D.; Audisio, Riccardo; Borozdina, Anastasia; Cherubini, Antonio; Jones, Christina; Kehlet, Henrik; Maclullich, Alasdair; Radtke, Finn; Riese, Florian; Slooter, Arjen J C; Veyckemans, Francis; Kramer, Sylvia; Neuner, Bruno; Weiss, Bjoern; Spies, Claudia D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to present evidence-based and consensus-based recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postoperative delirium. The cornerstones of the guideline are the preoperative identification and handling of patients at risk, adequate intraoperative care,

  7. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saelen, Marie Grøn; Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristian, Alexandr; Fleten, Karianne Giller; Furre, Torbjørn; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials

  8. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saelen, Marie Grøn; Ree, Anne Hansen; Kristian, Alexandr; Fleten, Karianne Giller; Furre, Torbjørn; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2012-09-27

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials.

  9. Radiosensitization by the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat under hypoxia and with capecitabine in experimental colorectal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saelen Marie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat is a candidate radiosensitizer in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Radiosensitivity is critically influenced by hypoxia; hence, it is important to evaluate the efficacy of potential radiosensitizers under variable tissue oxygenation. Since fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT is the only clinically validated regimen in LARC, efficacy in combination with this established regimen should be assessed in preclinical models before a candidate drug enters clinical trials. Methods Radiosensitization by vorinostat under hypoxia was studied in four colorectal carcinoma cell lines and in one colorectal carcinoma xenograft model by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Radiosensitizing effects of vorinostat in combination with capecitabine were assessed by evaluation of tumor growth delay in two colorectal carcinoma xenografts models. Results Under hypoxia, radiosensitization by vorinostat was demonstrated in vitro in terms of decreased clonogenicity and in vivo as inhibition of tumor growth. Adding vorinostat to capecitabine-based CRT increased radiosensitivity of xenografts in terms of inhibited tumor growth. Conclusions Vorinostat sensitized colorectal carcinoma cells to radiation under hypoxia in vitro and in vivo and improved therapeutic efficacy in combination with capecitabine-based CRT in vivo. The results encourage implementation of vorinostat into CRT in LARC trials.

  10. Capecitabine treatment of HCT-15 colon cancer cells induces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HCT-15 cells caused condensation of DNA and induced apoptosis in a concentration- ... Conclusion: Capecitabine treatment causes inhibition of colon cancer growth via the mitochondrial ... fluoropyrimidine aimed to selectively transfer 5-.

  11. Use of capecitabine in management of early colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available H Hameed, J CassidyBeatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAbstract: Capecitabine (Xeloda®, Roche, Basel, Switzerland is a pro-drug of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, and it is converted to 5-FU in the cancer cell by enzymatic degradation. The role of capecitabine in colorectal cancer has evolved in the last 15 years. In early trials in the metastatic setting, capecitabine has shown superior response rates compared with those achieved with 5-FU (Mayo Clinic regimen (26% vs 17%, with equivalent progression-free survival and overall survival. In the adjuvant setting, the Xeloda in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Therapy (X-ACT trial demonstrated that capecitabine as a single agent led to improvement in relapse-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.74–0.99, P = 0.04 and was associated with significantly fewer adverse events than 5-FU plus leucovorin (LV, folinic acid. On the basis of the X-ACT trial, capecitabine was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, and the Scottish Medicines Consortium as monotherapy for the adjuvant treatment of stage III colon cancer. The next step was to incorporate capecitabine into combination therapy. The XELOXA trial studied the combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX vs 5-FU/LV and demonstrated 5-year disease-free survival of 66% for XELOX, compared with 60% for 5-FU/LV. The toxicity profile was also quite comparable in the two arms. So both the single agent use of capecitabine as well as in combination with oxaliplatin can be considered as part of the standard of care in management of early colon cancer in appropriately selected patient groups.Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, 5-FU, leucovorin, folinic acid, LV, XELOX, oxaliplatin, FOLFOX

  12. Targeting cancers in the gastrointestinal tract: role of capecitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Wasif SaifYale Cancer Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Capecitabine is currently the only novel, orally home-administered fluorouracil prodrug. It offers patients more freedom from hospital visits and less inconvenience and complications associated with infusion devices. The drug has been extensively studied in large clinical trials in many solid tumors, including breast cancer, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and many others. Furthermore, the drug compares favorably with fluorouracil in patients with such cancers, with a safe toxicity profile, consisting mainly of gastrointestinal and dermatologic adverse effects. Whereas gastrointestinal events and hand-foot syndrome occur often with capecitabine, the tolerability profile is comparatively favorable. Prompt recognition of severe adverse effects is the key to successful management of capecitabine. Ongoing and future clinical trials will continue to examine, and likely expand, the role of capecitabine as a single agent and/or in combination with other anticancer agents for the treatment of gastrointestinal as well as other solid tumors, both in the advanced palliative and adjuvant settings. The author summarizes the current data on the role of capecitabine in the management of gastrointestinal cancers. Keywords: 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine, chemotherapy, adjuvant, advanced, colon cancer, gastric cancer, hepatocellular cancer, pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, rectal cancer, anal cancer

  13. Capecitabine-induced cardiotoxicity: more evidence or clinical approaches to protect the patients' heart?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanella C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Caterina Fontanella,1 Marianna Aita,1 Marika Cinausero,1 Giuseppe Aprile,1 Maria Grazia Baldin,2 Veronica Dusi,3 Chiara Lestuzzi,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Fabio Puglisi1,5 1Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Udine, Udine, Italy; 2Department of Cardiology, Palmanova General Hospital, Palmanova, Italy; 3Department of Cardiology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 4Department of Cardiology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy; 5Department of Medical and Biological Sciences, University of Udine, Udine, Italy Abstract: Fluoropyrimidines, such as capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil, may cause cardiac toxicity. In recent years, the incidence of this side effect has increased and it is expected to further rise due to the population aging and the disproportionate incidence of breast and gastrointestinal cancers in older individuals. The spectrum of cardiac manifestations includes different signs and symptoms and the diagnosis may be difficult. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old woman with advanced breast cancer who was rechallenged with a capecitabine-based regimen after experiencing a cardiac adverse event during the first fluoropyrimidine exposure. This real-practice case serves as a springboard for discussion about the current evidence on differential diagnosis of capecitabine-related cardiac toxicity, its risk factors, and the underpinning mechanisms of early onset. Moreover, we discussed whether a rechallenge with fluoropyrimidines could be safe in patients who had experienced a previous cardiac adverse event. Keywords: risk factors, clinical manifestation, rechallenge

  14. Phase II trial of preoperative radiochemotherapy with concurrent bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellas, Kathrin; Dunst, Jürgen; Höhler, Thomas; Reese, Thomas; Würschmidt, Florian; Engel, Erik; Rödel, Claus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Richter, Michael; Arnold, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-FU or capecitabine is the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Preoperative RCT achieves pathological complete response rates (pCR) of 10-15%. We conducted a single arm phase II study to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of addition of bevacizumab and oxaliplatin to preoperative standard RCT with capecitabine. Eligible patients had LARC (cT3-4; N0/1/2, M0/1) and were treated with preoperative RCT prior to planned surgery. Patients received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions) and simultaneous chemotherapy with capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 bid (d1-14, d22-35) and oxaliplatin 50 mg/m 2 (d1, d8, d22, d29). Bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was added on days 1, 15, and 29. The primary study objective was the pCR rate. 70 patients with LARC (cT3-4; N0/1, M0/1), ECOG < 2, were enrolled at 6 sites from 07/2008 through 02/2010 (median age 61 years [range 39–89], 68% male). At initial diagnosis, 84% of patients had clinical stage T3, 62% of patients had nodal involvement and 83% of patients were M0. Mean tumor distance from anal verge was 5.92 cm (± 3.68). 58 patients received the complete RCT (full dose RT and full dose of all chemotherapy). During preoperative treatment, grade 3 or 4 toxicities were experienced by 6 and 2 patients, respectively: grade 4 diarrhea and nausea in one patient (1.4%), respectively, grade 3 diarrhea in 2 patients (3%), grade 3 obstipation, anal abscess, anaphylactic reaction, leucopenia and neutropenia in one patient (1.4%), respectively. In total, 30 patients (46%) developed postoperative complications of any grade including one gastrointestinal perforation in one patient (2%), wound-healing problems in 7 patients (11%) and bleedings in 2 patients (3%). pCR was observed in 12/69 (17.4%) patients. Pathological downstaging (ypT < cT and ypN ≤ cN) was achieved in 31 of 69 patients (44.9%). All of the 66 operated patients had a R0 resection

  15. Patient Satisfaction With an Early Smartphone-Based Cosmetic Surgery Postoperative Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozza, Edoardo Dalla; D'Souza, Gehaan F; DeLeonibus, Anthony; Fabiani, Brianna; Gharb, Bahar Bassiri; Zins, James E

    2017-12-13

    While prevalent in everyday life, smartphones are also finding increasing use as a medical care adjunct. The use of smartphone technology as a postoperative cosmetic surgery adjunct for care has received little attention in the literature. The purpose of this effort was to assess the potential efficacy of a smartphone-based cosmetic surgery early postoperative follow-up program. Specifically, could smartphone photography provided by the patient to the plastic surgeon in the first few days after surgery allay patient's concerns, improve the postoperative experience and, possibly, detect early complications? From August 2015 to March 2016 a smartphone-based postoperative protocol was established for patients undergoing cosmetic procedures. At the time of discharge, the plastic surgeon sent a text to the patient with instructions for the patient to forward a postoperative photograph of the operated area within 48 to 72 hours. The plastic surgeon then made a return call/text that same day to review the patient's progress. A postoperative questionnaire evaluated the patients' postoperative experience and satisfaction with the program. A total of 57 patients were included in the study. Fifty-two patients responded to the survey. A total of 50 (96.2%) patients reported that the process improved the quality of their postoperative experience. The protocol allowed to detect early complications in 3 cases. The physician was able to address and treat the complications the following day prior to the scheduled clinic follow up. The smartphone can be effectively utilized by the surgeon to both enhance the patient's postoperative experience and alert the surgeon to early postoperative problems. 4. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Perioperative management in order to minimise postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction: Results from a Swedish web-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pether K. Jildenstål

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Swedish anaesthesia personnel are concerned about the risk of postoperative cognitive side-effects but are more concerned about cardiovascular/pulmonary risks, pain, PONV and the rare event of awareness. Most respondents were not convinced about the use of depth-of-anaesthesia monitors. There is a need to improve knowledge around risk factors, prevention and management of postoperative cognitive side effects.

  17. Capecitabine and oxaliplatin as second-line treatment in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anne Kirstine Hundahl; Pedersen, Karen Damgaard; Abildgaard, Julie Rafn

    2010-01-01

    tumours may be overrepresented. These patients could be candidates for GI tract-directed therapy. We here report the results obtained with oxaliplatin and capecitabine as second-line therapy in 25 recurrent/refractory CUP patients following first-line treatment with paclitaxel, cisplatin and gemcitabine.......Treatment of patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP) remains a challenge, and no effective second-line treatment has been identified. In CUP patients who are non-responsive or relapse early after first-line platinum/taxane-based regimens, it is likely that gastrointestinal (GI) tract...

  18. Update on capecitabine alone and in combination regimens in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, N; Maiello, E; De Vita, F; Cinieri, S; Santini, D; Russo, A; Tommasi, S; Azzariti, A; Numico, G; Pisconti, S; Petriella, D; Lorusso, V; Millaku, A; Colucci, G

    2010-11-01

    Capecitabine is an orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate which has been developed as a prodrug of 5-FU with the goal to improve its tolerability and intratumoral drug concentration. The review aims to provide an evidence-based update of clinical trials investigating the clinical efficacy, adverse-event profile, dosage and administration of this drug, alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and/or new target-oriented drugs, in the management of colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [A Case of an Older Patient with Metastatic Breast Cancer Effectively Treated with Capecitabine, with Achievement of cCR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoko; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Sakurai, Kenichi; Amano, Sadao

    2015-11-01

    A case: An 82-year-old woman underwent Bp plus Ax enforcement for carcinoma of the right breast (T2N1M0, StageⅡB) about 5 years previously. Letrozole was administered, but right pleura tuberculum and pleural dissemination was noted in the fifth postoperative year. The hormone therapy was changed, but mediastinal lymph node metastases were observed with tumor marker elevation and bilateral metastases in the lung and right pleural fluid retention. Capecitabine 1,800 mg/day for 3 weeks was started in the sixth postoperative year. The response to treatment was classified as cCR and no side effects were noted. For approximately 1 year and 6 months, no recurrence or metastasis has been observed. Consecutive therapy such as onset of the side effect or an injection method change, dosage weight loss is difficult though chemotherapies is performed for the recurrence metastasis breast cancer case of the older patient. Because capecitabine is isolated, and a continuous administration is had without a side effect, and it was with cCR for this case, in addition, discussion of the literature is reported because it seemed that it may be in effective therapy for an older patient breast cancer case in future.

  20. Voxel Based Analysis of Surgical Revascularization for Moyamoya Disease: Pre- and Postoperative SPECT Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutaka Fushimi

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease (MMD is a chronic, progressive, cerebrovascular occlusive disease that causes abnormal enlargement of collateral pathways (moyamoya vessels in the region of the basal ganglia and thalamus. Cerebral revascularization procedures remain the preferred treatment for patients with MMD, improving the compromised cerebral blood flow (CBF. However, voxel based analysis (VBA of revascularization surgery for MMD based on data from pre- and postoperative data has not been established. The latest algorithm called as Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL has been introduced for VBA as the function of statistical parametric mapping (SPM8, and improved registration has been achieved by SPM8 with DARTEL. In this study, VBA was conducted to evaluate pre- and postoperative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images for MMD by SPM8 with DARTEL algorithm, and the results were compared with those from SPM8 without DARTEL (a conventional method. Thirty-two patients with MMD who underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA bypass surgery as the first surgery were included and all patients underwent pre- and postoperative 3D T1-weighted imaging and SPECT. Pre- and postoperative SPECT images were registered to 3D T1-weighted images, then VBA was conducted. Postoperative SPECT showed more statistically increased CBF areas in the bypassed side cerebral hemisphere by using SPM8 with DARTEL (58,989 voxels; P<0.001, and increased ratio of CBF after operation was less than 15%. Meanwhile, postoperative SPECT showed less CBF increased areas by SPM8 without DARTEL. In conclusion, VBA was conducted for patients with MMD, and SPM8 with DARTEL revealed that postoperative SPECT showed statistically significant CBF increases over a relatively large area and with at most 15% increase ratio.

  1. Combination of capecitabine and ludartin inhibits colon cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of capecitabine and ludartin in the treatment of colon cancer in mice. Methods: Mice model of colon cancer was used in this study. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Qrt-PCR) was used to quantify the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA.

  2. Capecitabine caused cardiogenic shock through induction of global takotsubo syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y-Hassan, Shams, E-mail: shams.younis-hassan@karolinska.se; Tornvall, Per; Törnerud, Mattias; Henareh, Loghman

    2013-01-15

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and its oral pro-drug capecitabine are widely used in oncology for the treatment of various solid tumours, including colorectal cancers. Cardiotoxicity to these drugs is not an uncommon adverse effect and has been reported in 1%–18% of patients. Capecitabine has been reported to trigger mid-apical Takotsubo syndrome (TS). We describe here the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with cardiogenic shock and ECG signs of ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The symptoms began 28 h after the commencement of capecitabine adjuvant therapy, following a radical right-sided hemicolectomy for low-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the caecum. Echocardiography showed severe global left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed no signs of late gadolinium enhancement. These clinical, cardiac image study findings and the course of the disease with full recovery within one week were consistent with global TS triggered by the adjuvant therapy capecitabine and presenting with a life-threatening cardiogenic shock. Moreover, we have demonstrated the speedy dynamic of the left ventricular wall motion abnormality with global TS at presentation and basal (inverted) TS findings 4 days later on.

  3. Quality improvement in documentation of postoperative care nursing using computer-based medical records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Susanne Winther

    2013-01-01

    on the template with quantitative data showed satisfactory documentation of postoperative care nursing in 67% (18% to 92%; mean [min-max]) of the scores. The template for documentation using qualitative descriptions was used by 63% of the nurses, but the keywords were used to a varying degree, that is, from 0......Postanesthesia nursing should be documented with high quality. The purpose of this retrospective case-based study on 49 patients was to analyze the quality of postoperative documentation in the two existing templates and, based on this audit, to suggest a new template for documentation. The audit...

  4. Capecitabine, oxaliplatin and radiotherapy: Results of the phase II study in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.

    2010-01-01

    postoperative). Conclusions: Our results for the TSO are similar to those of the international bibliography but with significant toxicity that we consider unacceptable. Phase III essays completed (ACCORD 12/0405, STAR-01, GCR-3) confirmed that the addition of oxaliplatin to 5-FU or Capecitabine in conjunction with radiation therapy do not increase the complete pathological responses but significantly it increases severe toxicity so emphatically discouraged use of preoperative oxaliplatin in adjuvant. At present it is considered that 5-FU continuous infusion or Capecitabine associated with radiotherapy is the standard treatment minimum in this therapeutic segment

  5. Detection of capecitabine (Xeloda®) on the skin surface after oral administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mao-Dong; Fuss, Harald; Lademann, Jürgen; Florek, Stefan; Patzelt, Alexa; Meinke, Martina C.; Jung, Sora

    2016-04-01

    Palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE), or hand-foot syndrome, is a cutaneous toxicity under various chemotherapeutics contributing to the most frequent side effects in patients treated with capecitabine (Xeloda®). The pathomechanism of PPE has been unclear. Here, the topical detection of capecitabine in the skin after oral application was shown in 10 patients receiving 2500 mg/m2/day capecitabine. Sweat samples were taken prior to and one week after oral administration of capecitabine. Using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry, the changes in concentrations of fluorine, which is an ingredient of capecitabine, were quantified and statistically analyzed. Here, we show an increase in fluorine concentrations from 40±10 ppb (2±0.5 pM) before capecitabine administration to 27.7±11.8 ppm (14.6±6.5 nM) after application, ptoxic effect as a possible pathomechanism of PPE.

  6. Postoperative adverse outcomes in intellectually disabled surgical patients: a nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-An Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intellectually disabled patients have various comorbidities, but their risks of adverse surgical outcomes have not been examined. This study assesses pre-existing comorbidities, adjusted risks of postoperative major morbidities and mortality in intellectually disabled surgical patients. METHODS: A nationwide population-based study was conducted in patients who underwent inpatient major surgery in Taiwan between 2004 and 2007. Four controls for each patient were randomly selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Preoperative major comorbidities, postoperative major complications and 30-day in-hospital mortality were compared between patients with and without intellectual disability. Use of medical services also was analyzed. Adjusted odds ratios using multivariate logistic regression analyses with 95% confidence intervals were applied to verify intellectual disability's impact. RESULTS: Controls were compared with 3983 surgical patients with intellectual disability. Risks for postoperative major complications were increased in patients with intellectual disability, including acute renal failure (odds ratio 3.81, 95% confidence interval 2.28 to 6.37, pneumonia (odds ratio 2.01, 1.61 to 2.49, postoperative bleeding (odds ratio 1.35, 1.09 to 1.68 and septicemia (odds ratio 2.43, 1.85 to 3.21 without significant differences in overall mortality. Disability severity was positively correlated with postoperative septicemia risk. Medical service use was also significantly higher in surgical patients with intellectual disability. CONCLUSION: Intellectual disability significantly increases the risk of overall major complications after major surgery. Our findings show a need for integrated and revised protocols for postoperative management to improve care for intellectually disabled surgical patients.

  7. Preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Sung; Cho, Moon-June; Song, Kyu-Sang; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine (Xeloda) is a new orally administered fluoropyrimidine carbamate that was rationally designed to exert its effect by tumor-selective activation. We attempted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of preoperative chemoradiation using capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between July 1999 and March 2001, 45 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/T4 or N+) were treated with preoperative chemoradiation. Radiation of 45 Gy/25 fractions was delivered to the pelvis, followed by a 5.4 Gy/3 fractions boost to the primary tumor. Chemotherapy was administered concurrent with radiotherapy and consisted of 2 cycles of 14-day oral capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m 2 /day), each of which was followed by a 7-day rest period. Surgery was performed 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: Thirty-eight patients received definitive surgery. Primary tumor and node downstaging occurred in 63% and 90% of patients, respectively. The overall downstaging rate, including both primary tumor and nodes, was 84%. A pathologic complete response was achieved in 31% of patients. Twenty-one patients had tumors located initially 5 cm or less from the anal verge; among the 18 treated with surgery, 72% received sphincter-preserving surgery. No Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities developed. Other Grade 3 toxicities were as follows: hand-foot syndrome (7%), fatigue (4%), diarrhea (4%), and radiation dermatitis (2%). Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective neoadjuvant treatment modality for locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition, this preoperative treatment has a considerable downstaging effect on the tumor and can increase the possibility of sphincter preservation in distal rectal cancer

  8. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  9. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON PREOPERATIVE CONCURRENT CHEMORADIATION WITH CAPECITABINE IN STAGE II/III CARCINOMA OF RECTUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anish Kuttappan Soman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Fluorouracil (5-FU based chemoradiotherapy represents the standard treatment option for the preoperative treatment of advanced rectal cancer. Capecitabine is an oral precursor of 5-FU with the advantage of delivering the chemotherapy in an outpatient setup. NSABP R-04 & a German phase 3 trial by Hofheinz et al showed that Capecitabine was equivalent to 5-FU. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate pathological response (PR, clinical & surgical outcomes of stage II & III patients treated with chemoradiation with Capecitabine. The secondary objective was to evaluate toxicity and compliance to treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS This single arm prospective study included 35 patients with stages II & III adenocarcinoma of rectum who after evaluation were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent Capecitabine. Toxicities were graded using RTOG scoring criteria. Clinical response was assessed after EBRT completion, and patients were referred for surgery after 4-6 weeks. Pathologic response and completeness of resection were assessed from the histopathology report. RESULTS Growth located within 5 cm from anal verge was seen in 24 (68.5% patients and 6 were inoperable upfront. All patients completed the intended preoperative treatment and 88.6% did not have any toxicity related break in RT. Clinical response was seen in 80% of patients after Chemoradiation. Out of 35 treated 80% of them underwent surgery. APR was performed in 64.2% and 35.7% had LAR. Out of 6 upfront inoperable patients, 3 were converted to operable. Out of 23 APR cases, 7 were converted to anterior resection (30.4%, p=0.046. 96% of operated patients had an R0 resection, including all the 3 upfront inoperable patients. Minimal pathologic response was seen in 89.2% of patients and 7.14% had complete pathologic response. There were no Grade 4 or 5 toxicities. Only 2.9% had a Grade 3 event. 45.7% had maximum of Grade 1 events and 48.6% had maximum of Grade 2

  10. Capecitabine versus 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer: where are we now?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Chintala

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluorouracil (5-FU remains the most widely used agent for colorectal cancer. Capecitabine is a rationally designed 5-FU pro-drug developed to mimic the continuous infusion of 5-FU while avoiding complications and inconvenience of intravenous administration. Capecitabine is absorbed intact from the gastrointestinal tract, converted enzymatically to active 5-FU, and released directly into the tumor. Capecitabine’s efficacy and safety are shown in multiple phase III trials across different disease stages and therapy lines. Three randomized phase III trials demonstrated the equivalence of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX versus 5-FU/leucovorin (LV/oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. The safety of capecitabine compared with 5-FU depends on the regimen of 5-FU used. The adverse event rate with oxaliplatin in combination with infusional 5-FU is similar to that of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin but is associated with more neutropenia and venous thrombotic events; capecitabine plus oxaliplatinbased regimens tend to be associated with more grade 3 diarrhea and hand-foot skin reaction. Combination therapy with capecitabine and irinotecan (CapeIRI versus 5-FU/ LV and irinotecan (FOLFIRI had more variable results; some former schedules resulted in excessive treatmentrelated toxicity. More recent data show that lower capecitabine and irinotecan doses, different schedules, and combination with targeted agents (e.g, bevacizumab have resulted in more favorable outcomes.

  11. Higher capecitabine AUC in elderly patients with advanced colorectal cancer (SWOGS0030).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, S G; Ely, B; Lenz, H-J; Albain, K S; Gotay, C; Coleman, D; Raghavan, D; Shields, A F; Gold, P J; Blanke, C D

    2013-10-01

    The aging process is accompanied by physiological changes including reduced glomerular filtration and hepatic function, as well as changes in gastric secretions. To investigate what effect would aging have on the disposition of capecitabine and its metabolites, the pharmacokinetics between patients ≥70 years and AUC) was accompanied by reduction in capecitabine clearance in ≥70 years patients (PAUCs between the two age groups, suggesting that carboxylesterase and cytidine deaminase (CDA) activity was similar between the two age groups. These results suggest that metabolic enzymes involved in converting capecitabine metabolites are not altered by age. An elevation in capecitabine Cmax and reduction in clearance was seen in females, where capecitabine AUC was 40.3% higher in women. Elevation of DFUR Cmax (45%) and AUC (46%) (PAUC was observed in patients ≥70 years when compared with younger patients who were >60 years.

  12. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: hospital based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladha, Karim; Vidal Melo, Marcos F; McLean, Duncan J; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Grabitz, Stephanie D; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2015-07-14

    To evaluate the effects of intraoperative protective ventilation on major postoperative respiratory complications and to define safe intraoperative mechanical ventilator settings that do not translate into an increased risk of postoperative respiratory complications. Hospital based registry study. Academic tertiary care hospital and two affiliated community hospitals in Massachusetts, United States. 69,265 consecutively enrolled patients over the age of 18 who underwent a non-cardiac surgical procedure between January 2007 and August 2014 and required general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Protective ventilation, defined as a median positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cmH2O or more, a median tidal volume of less than 10 mL/kg of predicted body weight, and a median plateau pressure of less than 30 cmH2O. Composite outcome of major respiratory complications, including pulmonary edema, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and re-intubation. Of the 69,265 enrolled patients 34,800 (50.2%) received protective ventilation and 34,465 (49.8%) received non-protective ventilation intraoperatively. Protective ventilation was associated with a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications in multivariable regression (adjusted odds ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 0.98, P=0.013). The results were similar in the propensity score matched cohort (odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 0.97, P=0.004). A PEEP of 5 cmH2O and median plateau pressures of 16 cmH2O or less were associated with the lowest risk of postoperative respiratory complications. Intraoperative protective ventilation was associated with a decreased risk of postoperative respiratory complications. A PEEP of 5 cmH2O and a plateau pressure of 16 cmH2O or less were identified as protective mechanical ventilator settings. These findings suggest that protective thresholds differ for intraoperative ventilation in patients with normal lungs compared with those used for patients

  13. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree......Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...

  14. Postoperative alar base symmetry in complete unilateral cleft lip and palate:A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyloppilli, Suresh; Krishnakumar, K S; Sayd, Shermil; Latheef, Sameer; Narayanan, Saju V; Pati, Ajit

    2017-11-01

    In the evolution of cleft lip repair, there have been continuous attempts to minimize local trauma and to improve lip and nasal appearances. In order to obtain an aesthetically balanced development of midface, the primary surgical correction of the nasolabial area is of paramount importance. In this study, the importance of a back-cut extending cephalically above the inferior turbinate at the mucocutaneous junction which elevates the nostril floor on the cleft side for the purpose of achieving symmetry of the alar bases are analyzed by pre and postoperative photographic anthropometry. This study comprised of fifty cases of the unilateral complete cleft lip. At the time of surgery, the patient age ranged from 3-9 months. The surgeries, performed by a single surgeon, employed the standard Millard technique, incorporating Mohler modifications of lip repair. Anthropometric analysis revealed that the preoperative mean difference between the normal side and the cleft side was 0.2056 with a standard deviation of 0.133. In the postoperative analysis, the mean difference was reduced to 0.0174 with a standard deviation of 0.141. The paired t-test showed that the p-value is cleft lip and palate, the geometrically placed nasal back-cut incision has a definite role in the correction of the alar base symmetry during primary surgery. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Surgical Treatments for Prostate Cancer: A Population-Based Analysis of Postoperative Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T.; Elkin, Elena B.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; Yee, David S.; Jang, Thomas L.; Laudone, Vincent P.; Guillonneau, Bertrand D.; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Enthusiasm for laparoscopic surgical approaches to prostate cancer treatment has grown, despite limited evidence of improved outcomes compared with open radical prostatectomy. We compared laparoscopic (with or without robotic assistance) versus open radical prostatectomy in terms of postoperative outcomes and subsequent cancer-directed therapy. Materials and Methods Using a population-based cancer registry linked with Medicare claims, we identified men age 66 or older with localized prostate cancer who received a radical prostatectomy from 2003-2005. Outcome measures were general medical/surgical complications and mortality within 90 days following surgery; genitourinary/bowel complications within 365 days; receipt of radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy or both within 365 days; length of hospital stay. Results Of the 5,923 men,18% received a laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics, there were no differences in rates of general medical/surgical complications (OR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.77-1.14) or genitourinary/bowel complications (OR 0.96; 95% CI: 0.76-1.22) or in the use of postoperative radiation, androgen deprivation or both (OR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.60-1.08). Laparoscopic prostatectomy was associated with a 35% shorter hospital stay (p<0.0001) and a lower rate of bladder neck/urethral obstruction (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.58-0.94). In laparoscopic patients, surgeon volume was inversely associated with length of hospital stay and the odds of any genitourinary/bowel complication. Conclusions Laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy have similar rates of postoperative morbidity and use of additional treatment. Men considering prostate cancer surgery should understand the expected benefits and risks of each technique to facilitate decision-making and to set realistic expectations. PMID:20188381

  16. Comparative effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical treatments: a population based analysis of postoperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrance, William T; Elkin, Elena B; Jacks, Lindsay M; Yee, David S; Jang, Thomas L; Laudone, Vincent P; Guillonneau, Bertrand D; Scardino, Peter T; Eastham, James A

    2010-04-01

    Enthusiasm for laparoscopic surgical approaches to prostate cancer treatment has grown despite limited evidence of improved outcomes compared with open radical prostatectomy. We compared laparoscopic prostatectomy with or without robotic assistance vs open radical prostatectomy in terms of postoperative outcomes and subsequent cancer directed therapy. Using a population based cancer registry linked with Medicare claims we identified men 66 years old or older with localized prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy from 2003 to 2005. Outcome measures were general medical/surgical complications and mortality within 90 days after surgery, genitourinary/bowel complications within 365 days, radiation therapy and/or androgen deprivation therapy within 365 days and length of hospital stay. Of the 5,923 men 18% underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Adjusting for patient and tumor characteristics, there were no differences in the rate of general medical/surgical complications (OR 0.93 95% CI 0.77-1.14) or genitourinary/bowel complications (OR 0.96 95% CI 0.76-1.22), or in postoperative radiation and/or androgen deprivation (OR 0.80 95% CI 0.60-1.08). Laparoscopic prostatectomy was associated with a 35% shorter hospital stay (p <0.0001) and a lower bladder neck/urethral obstruction rate (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.94). In laparoscopic cases surgeon volume was inversely associated with hospital stay and the odds of any genitourinary/bowel complication. Laparoscopic prostatectomy and open radical prostatectomy have similar rates of postoperative morbidity and additional treatment. Men considering prostate cancer surgery should understand the expected benefits and risks of each technique to facilitate decision making and set realistic expectations. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Metronomic capecitabine as second-line treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma after sorafenib discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisani, Franco; Brandi, Giovanni; Garuti, Francesca; Barbera, Maria Aurelia; Tortora, Raffaella; Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Granito, Alessandro; Tovoli, Francesco; De Lorenzo, Stefania; Inghilesi, Andrea Lorenzo; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Bernardi, Mauro; Marra, Fabio; Sacco, Rodolfo; Di Costanzo, Giovan Giuseppe

    2018-02-01

    Metronomic capecitabine (MC) is a well-tolerated systemic treatment showing promising results in one retrospective study, as second-line therapy after sorafenib failure, in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). 117 patients undergoing MC were compared to 112 patients, eligible for this treatment, but undergoing best supportive care (BSC) after sorafenib discontinuation for toxicity or HCC progression. The two groups were compared for demographic and clinical features. A multivariate regression analysis was conducted to detect independent prognostic factors. To balance confounding factors between the two groups, a propensity score model based on independent prognosticators (performance status, neoplastic thrombosis, causes of sorafenib discontinuation and pre-sorafenib treatment) was performed. Patients undergoing MC showed better performance status, lower tumor burden, lower prevalence of portal vein thrombosis, and better cancer stage. Median (95% CI) post-sorafenib survival (PSS) was longer in MC than in BSC patients [9.5 (7.5-11.6) vs 5.0 (4.2-5.7) months (p < 0.001)]. Neoplastic thrombosis, cause of sorafenib discontinuation, pre-sorafenib treatment and MC were independent prognosticators. The benefit of capecitabine was confirmed in patients after matching with propensity score [PSS: 9.9 (6.8-12.9) vs. 5.8 (4.8-6.8) months, (p = 0.001)]. MC lowered the mortality risk by about 40%. MC achieved better results in patients who stopped sorafenib for adverse events than in those who progressed during it [PSS: 17.3 (10.5-24.1) vs. 7.8 (5.2-10.1) months, (p = 0.035)]. Treatment toxicity was low and easily manageable with dose modulation. MC may be an efficient and safe second-line systemic therapy for HCC patients who discontinued sorafenib for toxicity or tumor progression.

  18. Comparison of Real-Time Intraoperative Ultrasound-Based Dosimetry With Postoperative Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry for Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nag, Subir; Shi Peipei; Liu Bingren; Gupta, Nilendu; Bahnson, Robert R.; Wang, Jian Z.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether real-time intraoperative ultrasound (US)-based dosimetry can replace conventional postoperative computed tomography (CT)-based dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between December 2001 and November 2002, 82 patients underwent 103 Pd prostate brachytherapy. An interplant treatment planning system was used for real-time intraoperative transrectal US-guided treatment planning. The dose distribution was updated according to the estimated seed position to obtain the dose-volume histograms. Postoperative CT-based dosimetry was performed a few hours later using the Theraplan-Plus treatment planning system. The dosimetric parameters obtained from the two imaging modalities were compared. Results: The results of this study revealed correlations between the US- and CT-based dosimetry. However, large variations were found in the implant-quality parameters of the two modalities, including the doses covering 100%, 90%, and 80% of the prostate volume and prostate volumes covered by 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescription dose. The mean relative difference was 38% and 16% for doses covering 100% and 90% of the prostate volume and 10% and 21% for prostate volumes covered by 100% and 150% of the prescription dose, respectively. The CT-based volume covered by 200% of the prescription dose was about 30% greater than the US-based one. Compared with CT-based dosimetry, US-based dosimetry significantly underestimated the dose to normal organs, especially for the rectum. The average US-based maximal dose and volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose for the rectum was 72 Gy and 0.01 cm 3 , respectively, much lower than the 159 Gy and 0.65 cm 3 obtained using CT-based dosimetry. Conclusion: Although dosimetry using intraoperative US-based planning provides preliminary real-time information, it does not accurately reflect the postoperative CT-based dosimetry. Until studies have determined whether US-based dosimetry or

  19. Phase 1 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Ho; Hong, Yong Sang [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yangsoon; Kim, Jihun [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyu-pyo; Kim, Sun Young [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong; Kim, Jong Hoon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon [Department of Colorectal Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Won, E-mail: twkimmd@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with capecitabine is a standard treatment strategy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Temozolomide improves the survival of patients with glioblastoma with hypermethylated O{sup 6}-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT); MGMT hypermethylation is one of the colorectal carcinogenesis pathways. We aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) and recommended dose (RD) of temolozomide in combination with capecitabine-based preoperative CRT for LARC. Methods and Materials: Radiation therapy was delivered with 45 Gy/25 daily fractions with coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy/3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy comprised fixed and escalated doses of capecitabine and temozolomide, respectively. The MGMT hypermethylation was evaluated in pretreatment tumor samples. This trial is registered with (ClinicalTrials.gov) with the number (NCT01781403). Results: Twenty-two patients with LARC of cT3-4N0 or cT{sub any}N1-2 were accrued. Dose level 3 was chosen as the RD because DLT was noticeably absent in 10 patients treated up to dose level 3. An additional 12 patients were recruited in this group. Grade III adverse events were noted, and pathologic complete response (pCR) was observed in 7 patients (31.8%); MGMT hypermethylation was detected in 16. The pCR rate was 37.5% and 16.7% in the hypermethylated and unmethylated MGMT groups, respectively (P=.616). Conclusions: There was a tendency toward higher pCR rates in patients with hypermethylated MGMT. Future randomized studies are therefore warranted.

  20. Adjuvant capecitabine plus bevacizumab versus capecitabine alone in patients with colorectal cancer (QUASAR 2): an open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Rachel S; Love, Sharon; Segelov, Eva; Johnstone, Elaine; Falcon, Beverly; Hewett, Peter; Weaver, Andrew; Church, David; Scudder, Claire; Pearson, Sarah; Julier, Patrick; Pezzella, Francesco; Tomlinson, Ian; Domingo, Enric; Kerr, David J

    2016-11-01

    Antiangiogenic agents have established efficacy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. We investigated whether bevacizumab could improve disease-free survival in the adjuvant setting after resection of the primary tumour. For the open-label, randomised, controlled QUASAR 2 trial, which was done at 170 hospitals in seven countries, we recruited patients aged 18 years or older with WHO performance status scores of 0 or 1 who had undergone potentially curative surgery for histologically proven stage III or high-risk stage II colorectal cancer. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive eight 3-week cycles of oral capecitabine alone (1250 mg/m 2 twice daily for 14 days followed by a break for 7 days) or the same regimen of oral capecitabine plus 16 cycles of 7·5 mg/kg bevacizumab by intravenous infusion over 90 min on day 1 of each cycle. Randomisation was done by a computer-generated schedule with use of minimisation with a random element stratified by age, disease stage, tumour site, and country. The study was open label and no-one was masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was 3-year disease-free survival, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. Toxic effects were assessed in patients who received at least one dose of randomised treatment. This trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN45133151. Between April 25, 2005, and Oct 12, 2010, 1952 eligible patients were enrolled, of whom 1941 had assessable data (968 in the capecitabine alone group and 973 in the capecitabine and bevacizumab group). Median follow-up was 4·92 years (IQR 4·00-5·16). Disease-free survival at 3 years did not differ between the groups (75·4%, 95% CI 72·5-78·0 in the capecitabine and bevacizumab group vs 78·4%, 75·7-80·9 in the capecitabine alone group; hazard ratio 1·06, 95% CI 0·89-1·25, p=0·54). The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were hand-foot syndrome (201 [21%] of 963 in the capecitabine alone group vs 257 [27%] of

  1. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velenik, Vaneja; Omejc, Mirko; Ocvirk, Janja; Music, Maja; Bracko, Matej; Anderluh, Franc; Oblak, Irena; Edhemovic, Ibrahim; Brecelj, Erik; Kropivnik, Mateja

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day), starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG) were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR). 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male). Twelve patients (19.7%) had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1%) T3N1, 2 patients (3.3%) T2N2, 22 patients (36.1%) T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2%) T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11). Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%), proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5%) and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%). Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%), and 42 patients (70%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR) was recorded in 8 patients (13.3%) and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%). T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower

  2. Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Before, During, and After Radiotherapy for High-Risk Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Markussen, Alice; Jensen, Benny V

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before, during, and after radiotherapy for high-risk rectal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with rectum cancer T4 or T3 involving the mesorectal fascia was included in a prospective phase 2 trial. Liver or lung metastases were...... accepted if the surgeons found them resectable. The patients received 6 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before chemoradiotherapy (CRT), continued capecitabine and oxaliplatin during radiotherapy, and received 4 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin after CRT. The patients received radiotherapy...... as intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was planned 8 weeks after CRT. The patients were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before start of treatment, after 6 weeks of chemotherapy, and again just before the operation. The European Organization for Research and Treatment...

  3. Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia associated with capecitabine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of a 62 year-old patient who developed Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia upon receiving four cycles of capacitabine-based chemotherapy. She was on post surgical adjuvant treatment for invasive well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon. The clinical and therapeutic aspects of this ...

  4. Adherence and Patients' Experiences with the Use of Capecitabine in Daily Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Timmers, Lonneke; Boons, Christel C. L. M.; Mangnus, Dirk; Van de Ven, Peter M.; Van den Berg, Pieter H.; Beeker, Aart; Swart, Eleonora L.; Honeywell, Richard J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Boven, Epie; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Capecitabine is a widely prescribed oral anticancer agent. We studied medication adherence and explored its use in daily practice from a patients' perspective. Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 92) starting capecitabine were followed up to five 3-week cycles. Adherence was assessed using a pill count, pharmacy data and dosing information from the patients' medical file. Self-reported adherence was measured using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). At baseline and ...

  5. Adherence and patients’ experiences with the use of capecitabine in daily practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lonneke Timmers; Christel Boons; Dirk Mangnus; Peter van de Ven; Pieter van den Berg; Aart Beeker; Eleonora Swart; Richard Honeywell; Godefridus Peters; Epie Boven; Jacqueline Hugtenburg; Jacqueline Hugtenburg

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capecitabine is a widely prescribed oral anticancer agent. We studied medication adherence and explored its use in daily practice from a patients’ perspective. Methods: Patients (n=92) starting capecitabine were followed up to five 3-week cycles. Adherence was assessed using a pill count, pharmacy data and dosing information from the patients’ medical file. Self-reported adherence was measured using the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS). At baseline and during week 2 of cy...

  6. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy

  7. Evaluation of Nanocarrier Targeted Drug Delivery of Capecitabine-PAMAM Dendrimer Complex in a Mice Colorectal Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Nabavizadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Capecitabine, an effective anticancer drug in colorectal cancer chemotherapy, may create adverse side effects on healthy tissues. In the present study, we first induced colon adenocarcinoma with azoxymethane, a carcinogen agent, and then investigated the potentiality of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer to improve capecitabine therapeutic index and decrease its adverse side effects on healthy tissues like liver and bone marrow. Other variables such as nanoparticle concentrations have also been investigated. Drug loading concentration (DLC and encapsulation efficiency (EE were calculated for capecitabine/dendrimer complex. Experimental results showed an increase in DLC percentage resulted from elevated capecitabine/dendrimer ratio. Capecitabine/dendrimer complex could reduce tumor size and adverse side effects in comparison with free capecitabine form.

  8. Role of capecitabine in treating metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang F

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Feng Wang,* Feng-Hua Wang,* Long Bai, Rui-Hua XuDepartment of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of capecitabine in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC in 2004. This paper reviews the available information of capecitabine in Chinese patients with mCRC, focusing on its effectiveness and safety against mCRC. Identification of all eligible studies was made by searching the PubMed and Wanfang database from 2000 to 2013. Published data examining various aspects of clinical response and tolerability with capecitabine alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic or biological agents for first- and second-line mCRC were examined. Capecitabine and its combination displayed high efficacy in Chinese patients with mCRC. Toxicities are generally manageable, and elderly patients can tolerate capecitabine well.Keywords: capecitabine, metastatic colorectal cancer, Chinese

  9. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Irinotecan and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Jeong, Jun Yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Jae-Gahb; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer has shown benefit over postoperative CRT; however, a standard CRT regimen has yet to be defined. We performed a prospective concurrent CRT Phase II study with irinotecan and capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer to investigate the efficacy and safety of this regimen. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid-to-lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-Gy daily fractions for a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 40 mg/m 2 of irinotecan per week for 5 consecutive weeks and 1,650 mg/m 2 of capecitabine per day for 5 days per week (weekdays only) from the first day of radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were included for the study endpoints. Results: In total, 48 patients were enrolled; 33 (68.7%) were men and 15 (31.3%) were women, and the median age was 59 years (range, 32-72 years). The pathologic complete response rate was 25.0% (11 of 44; 95% confidence interval, 12.2-37.8) and 8 patients (18.2% [8 of 44]) showed near-total tumor regression. The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 75.0% and 93.6%, respectively. Grade 3 toxicities included leukopenia (3 [6.3%]), neutropenia (1 [2.1%]), infection (1 [2.1%]), alanine aminotransferase elevation (1 [2.1%]), and diarrhea (1 [2.1%]). There was no Grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. Conclusions: Preoperative CRT with irinotecan and capecitabine with treatment-free weekends showed very mild toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of survival.

  10. Activity-based costing analysis of the analgesic treatments used in postoperative pain management in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Andrea; Ruggeri, Matteo; Basile, Michele; Cicchetti, Americo; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Della Rocca, Giorgio; Di Marco, Pierangelo; Esposito, Clelia; Fanelli, Guido; Grossi, Paolo; Leykin, Yigal; Lorini, Ferdinando Luca; Paolicchi, Adriana; Scardino, Marco; Corcione, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this analysis is to evaluate the costs of 72-hour postoperative pain treatment in patients undergoing major abdominal, orthopedic and thoracic procedures in nine different Italian hospitals, defined as the cumulative cost of drugs, consumable materials and time required for anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses to administer each analgesic technique. Nine Italian hospitals have been involved in this study through the administration of a questionnaire aimed to acquire information about the Italian clinical practice in terms of analgesia. This study uses activity-based costing (ABC) analysis to identify, measure and give value to the resources required to provide the therapeutic treatment used in Italy to manage the postoperative pain patients face after surgery. A deterministic sensitivity analysis (DSA) has been performed to identify the cost determinants mainly affecting the final cost of each treatment analyzed. Costs have been reclassified according to three surgical macro-areas (abdominal, orthopedic and thoracic) with the aim to recognize the cost associated not only to the analgesic technique adopted but also to the type of surgery the patient faced before undergoing the analgesic pathway. Fifteen different analgesic techniques have been identified for the treatment of moderate to severe pain in patients who underwent a major abdominal, orthopedic or thoracic surgery. The cheapest treatment actually employed is the oral administration "around the clock" (€ 8.23), whilst the most expensive is continuous peripheral nerve block (€ 223.46). The intravenous patient-controlled analgesia costs € 277.63. In terms of resources absorbed, the non-continuous administration via bolus is the gold standard in terms of cost-related to the drugs used (€ 1.28), and when administered pro re nata it also absorbs the lowest amount of consumables (€0.58€) compared to all other therapies requiring a delivery device. The oral analgesic administration pro re

  11. Development of an E-Health App for Lower Limb Postoperative Rehabilitation Based on Plantar Pressure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Cheng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional postoperative rehabilitation training mode of lower limbs is mostly confined to hospitals or nursing sites. With the increase of postoperative patients, the current shortage of medical resources is obviously not satisfactory, and the medical costs are high, thus it is difficult to apply widely. A new mobile phone application (app based on plantar pressure analysis is developed to fulfill the requirements of remote postoperative rehabilitation. It is designed, implemented, tested, and used for pilot experiment in conjunction with the system design methodology of the waterfall model. Preliminary testing and a pilot experiment showed that the app has realized basic functions and can achieve patient rehabilitation out of hospitals. The development of the app can shorten the hospitalization time of patients, reduce medical costs, and make up for the current shortage of medical resources. In the future, more experiments will be done to verify the effectiveness of the app.

  12. Survival benefit of postoperative radiation in papillary meningioma: Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Whitney A; Amini, Arya; Hankinson, Todd C; Foreman, Nicholas K; Gaspar, Laurie E; Kavanagh, Brian D; Karam, Sana D; Rusthoven, Chad G; Liu, Arthur K

    2017-01-01

    Papillary meningioma represents a rare subset of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade III meningioma that portends an overall poor prognosis. There is relatively limited data regarding the benefit of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT). We used the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to compare overall survival (OS) outcomes of surgically resected papillary meningioma cases undergoing PORT compared to post-operative observation. The NCDB was queried for patients with papillary meningioma, diagnosed between 2004 and 2013, who underwent upfront surgery with or without PORT. Overall survival (OS) was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate (MVA) analyses were performed. In total, 190 patients were identified; 89 patients underwent PORT, 101 patients were observed. Eleven patients received chemotherapy (6 with PORT, 5 without). 2-Year OS was significantly improved with PORT vs. no PORT (93.0% vs. 74.4%), as was 5-year OS (78.5% vs. 62.5%) (hazard ratio [HR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27-0.85; p  = 0.01). On MVA, patients receiving PORT had improved OS compared to observation (HR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.22-0.76; p  = 0.005). On subset analysis by age group, the benefit of PORT vs. no PORT was significant in patients ≤18 years ( n  = 13), with 2-year OS of 85.7% vs. 50.0% (HR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.80; p  = 0.032) and for patients >18 years ( n  = 184), with 2-year OS of 94.7% vs. 76.1% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.31-1.00; p  = 0.049), respectively. In this large contemporary analysis, PORT was associated with improved survival for both adult and pediatric patients with papillary meningioma. PORT should be considered in those who present with this rare, aggressive tumor.

  13. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsueh-Ju; Yang, Chao-Chun; Wang, Ling-Wei; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Chen, Ming-Huang; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0) months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%). Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%). No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC. PMID:25793192

  14. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Ju Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC. We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0 months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%. Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%. No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC.

  15. Clinical value of CT-based preoperative software assisted lung lobe volumetry for predicting postoperative pulmonary function after lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormanns, Dag; Beyer, Florian; Hoffknecht, Petra; Dicken, Volker; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Lange, Tobias; Thomas, Michael; Heindel, Walter

    2005-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate a morphology-based approach for prediction of postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) after lung resection from preoperative CT scans. Fifteen Patients with surgically treated (lobectomy or pneumonectomy) bronchogenic carcinoma were enrolled in the study. A preoperative chest CT and pulmonary function tests before and after surgery were performed. CT scans were analyzed by prototype software: automated segmentation and volumetry of lung lobes was performed with minimal user interaction. Determined volumes of different lung lobes were used to predict postoperative FEV1 as percentage of the preoperative values. Predicted FEV1 values were compared to the observed postoperative values as standard of reference. Patients underwent lobectomy in twelve cases (6 upper lobes; 1 middle lobe; 5 lower lobes; 6 right side; 6 left side) and pneumonectomy in three cases. Automated calculation of predicted postoperative lung function was successful in all cases. Predicted FEV1 ranged from 54% to 95% (mean 75% +/- 11%) of the preoperative values. Two cases with obviously erroneous LFT were excluded from analysis. Mean error of predicted FEV1 was 20 +/- 160 ml, indicating absence of systematic error; mean absolute error was 7.4 +/- 3.3% respective 137 +/- 77 ml/s. The 200 ml reproducibility criterion for FEV1 was met in 11 of 13 cases (85%). In conclusion, software-assisted prediction of postoperative lung function yielded a clinically acceptable agreement with the observed postoperative values. This method might add useful information for evaluation of functional operability of patients with lung cancer.

  16. Preoperative treatment with capecitabine, cetuximab and radiotherapy for primary locally advanced rectal cancer : A phase II clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisterer, Wolfgang; de Vries, Alexander; Öfner, Dietmar; Rabl, Hans; Koplmüller, Renate; Greil, Richard; Tschmelitsch, Jöerg; Schmid, Rainer; Kapp, Karin; Lukas, Peter; Sedlmayer, Felix; Höfler, Gerald; Gnant, Michael; Thaler, Josef; Widder, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: To investigate the feasibility and safety of preoperative capecitabine, cetuximab and radiation in patients with MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC, cT3/T4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: 31 patients with LARC were treated with cetuximab and capecitabine concomitantly with 45

  17. Intrahepatic and systemic therapy with oxaliplatin combined with capecitabine in patients with hepatic metastases from breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D L; Nørgaard, H; Weber Vestermark, Lene

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate activity and toxicity of hepatic arterial infusion of oxaliplatin in combination with capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer with liver metastases and limited extrahepatic disease.......The aim was to evaluate activity and toxicity of hepatic arterial infusion of oxaliplatin in combination with capecitabine in patients with metastatic breast cancer with liver metastases and limited extrahepatic disease....

  18. Curcuma longa (Turmeric) for Prevention of Capecitabine-Induced Hand-Foot Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scontre, Vanessa Armenio; Martins, Janine Capobiango; de Melo Sette, Claudia Vaz; Mutti, Haila; Cubero, Daniel; Fonseca, Fernando; Del Giglio, Auro

    2017-11-02

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is common and frequently occurs in the first cycle of treatment in approximately 40% to 50% of patients who receive capecitabine. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a plant used in Ayurvedic medicine with clinical activity in various inflammatory conditions. Our objective was to evaluate whether turmeric was active for the prevention of capecitabine-induced HFS. We included patients older than 18 years of age without previous exposure to capecitabine who were scheduled to receive this medication. Before starting treatment, after three weeks and at the end of six weeks, we evaluated dermatologic toxicity, conducted quality-of-life questionnaires (EORTC-QLQC30 and DLQI) and collected serum inflammatory biomarkers (inerleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a), C-reactive protein (CRP), and albumin). We administered turmeric at a dose of 4 g/day (2 pills 12 hours apart) starting at the beginning of capecitabine treatment and lasting six weeks. We included 40 patients whose mean age was 62 years. Most were female (80%), 52% had breast cancer, and 47.5% had GI tumors. After the first cycle of capecitabine treatment, we observed that 11 of 40 patients developed HFS (27.5%; 95% CI [15, 42]), whereas four patients developed HFS equal or superior to grade 2 (10%; 95% CI [3.3, 23]). We did not find any correlations between the inflammatory markers tested and HFS. We show that turmeric combined with capecitabine seems to produce a lower rate of HFS, especially grade 2 or higher. These findings need to be reproduced in larger controlled studies.

  19. DPD is a molecular determinant of capecitabine efficacy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallböhmer, Daniel; Yang, Dong Yun; Kuramochi, Hidekazu

    2007-01-01

    in this study and treated with single agent capecitabine. The intratumoral mRNA levels of DPD, TP and TS were assessed from paraffin-embedded tissue samples using laser-capture-microdissection methods and quantitative real-time PCR. There were 20 women and 17 men with a median age of 61 years (range 49...... was inevaluable in 7 patients). Higher gene expression levels of DPD were associated with resistance to capecitabine (P=0.032; Kruskal-Wallis test). Patients with a lower mRNA amount of DPD (...

  20. Predictive value of MSH2 gene expression in colorectal cancer treated with capecitabine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars H; Danenberg, Kathleen D; Danenberg, Peter V

    2007-01-01

    was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.5 (95% confidence interval, 0.23-1.11; P = 0.083) in survival analysis. CONCLUSION: The higher gene expression of MSH2 in responders and the trend for predicting overall survival indicates a predictive value of this marker in the treatment of advanced CRC with capecitabine.......PURPOSE: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the gene expression of the DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 as a predictive marker in advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) treated with first-line capecitabine. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Microdissection of paraffin-embedded tumor tissue, RNA...

  1. Evidence-based management of postoperative pain in adults undergoing open inguinal hernia surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, G P; Rawal, N; Kehlet, H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Open inguinal hernia repair is associated with moderate postoperative pain, but optimal analgesia remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available literature on the management of pain after open hernia surgery. METHODS: Randomized studies......, in English, published between January 1966 and March 2009, assessing analgesic and anaesthetic interventions in adult open hernia surgery, and reporting pain scores, were retrieved from the Embase and MEDLINE databases. In addition to published evidence, clinical practice was taken into account to ensure...... and increased time to home-readiness compared with regional anaesthesia. CONCLUSION: Field block with, or without wound infiltration, either as a sole anaesthetic/analgesic technique or as an adjunct to general anaesthesia, is recommended to reduce postoperative pain. Continuous local anaesthetic infusion...

  2. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain...... intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe...... the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold...

  3. Gemcitabine and capecitabine for heavily pre-treated metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the efficacy and safety of capecitabine and gemcitabin (GemCap) in heavily pre-treated, therapy-resistant metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients and the clinical importance of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) measurement. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients' inclusion criteria included...

  4. STUDY ON ADHERENCE TO CAPECITABINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER AND METASTATIC BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adiel Goes de FIGUEIREDO JUNIOR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Capecitabine, an oral drug, is as effective as traditional chemotherapy drugs. Objectives To investigate the adhesion to treatment with oral capecitabine in breast and colorectal cancer, and to determine any correlation with changes in patient’s quality of life. Methods Patients with colorectal cancer or breast cancer using capecitabine were included. The patients were asked to bring any medication left at the time of scheduled visits. The QLQ-C30 questionnaire was applied at the first visit and 8-12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty patients were evaluated. Adherence was 88.3% for metastatic colon cancer, 90.4% for non-metastatic colon cancer, 94.3% for rectal cancer and 96.2% for metastatic breast cancer. No strong correlation between adherence and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 functional or symptom scale rates had been found. There was no statistically significant correlation between compliance and the functional and symptom scales of the questionnaire before and after chemotherapy, with the exception of dyspnea. Conclusions Although no absolute adherence to oral capecitabine treatment had been observed, the level of adherence was good. Health professionals therefore need a greater focus in the monitoring the involvement of patients with oral treatment regimens. Patients with lesser degrees of dyspnea had greater compliance.

  5. Capecitabine and oxaliplatin in the preoperative multimodality treatment of rectal cancer: surgical end points from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael J; Colangelo, Linda H; Beart, Robert W; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Allegra, Carmen J; Sharif, Saima; Pitot, Henry C; Shields, Anthony F; Landry, Jerome C; Ryan, David P; Parda, David S; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini S; Eakle, Janice; Robertson, John M; Moore, Dennis F; Mullane, Michael R; Marchello, Benjamin T; Ward, Patrick J; Wozniak, Timothy F; Roh, Mark S; Yothers, Greg; Wolmark, Norman

    2014-06-20

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen administered concurrently with preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for patients with rectal cancer is unknown. National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project trial R-04 compared four chemotherapy regimens administered concomitantly with RT. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer who were undergoing preoperative RT (45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks plus a boost of 5.4 Gy to 10.8 Gy in three to six daily fractions) were randomly assigned to one of the following chemotherapy regimens: continuous intravenous infusional fluorouracil (CVI FU; 225 mg/m(2), 5 days per week), with or without intravenous oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) once per week for 5 weeks) or oral capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) twice per day, 5 days per week), with or without oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) once per week for 5 weeks). Before random assignment, the surgeon indicated whether the patient was eligible for sphincter-sparing surgery based on clinical staging. The surgical end points were complete pathologic response (pCR), sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging (conversion to sphincter-sparing surgery). From September 2004 to August 2010, 1,608 patients were randomly assigned. No significant differences in the rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, or surgical downstaging were identified between the CVI FU and capecitabine regimens or between the two regimens with or without oxaliplatin. Patients treated with oxaliplatin experienced significantly more grade 3 or 4 diarrhea (P < .001). Administering capecitabine with preoperative RT achieved similar rates of pCR, sphincter-sparing surgery, and surgical downstaging compared with CVI FU. Adding oxaliplatin did not improve surgical outcomes but added significant toxicity. The definitive analysis of local tumor control, disease-free survival, and overall survival will be performed when the protocol-specified number of events has occurred. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin Before, During, and After Radiotherapy for High-Risk Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Finn Ole; Markussen, Alice; Jensen, Benny V; Fromm, Anne L; Vistisen, Kirsten K; Parner, Vibeke K; Linnemann, Dorte; Hansen, Rasmus H; Johannesen, Helle H; Schou, Jakob V

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before, during, and after radiotherapy for high-risk rectal cancer. Patients with rectum cancer T4 or T3 involving the mesorectal fascia was included in a prospective phase 2 trial. Liver or lung metastases were accepted if the surgeons found them resectable. The patients received 6 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin before chemoradiotherapy (CRT), continued capecitabine and oxaliplatin during radiotherapy, and received 4 weeks of capecitabine and oxaliplatin after CRT. The patients received radiotherapy as intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was planned 8 weeks after CRT. The patients were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before start of treatment, after 6 weeks of chemotherapy, and again just before the operation. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-CR29 scoring system was used to evaluate adverse events. Fifty-two patients were enrolled between 2009 and 2012. The treatment was well tolerated, with only one death during treatment. Eighty percent of assessable patients experienced response to chemotherapy alone as evaluated by MRI, which increased to 94% after complete oncologic treatment. Forty-nine patients had a total mesorectal excision performed, all with a R0 resection and with a pathologic complete response of 20% for patients with T3 tumor and 7% for patients with T4 tumor. Five patients had metastases at study entry, while 47 patients had locally advanced rectal cancer without metastases. Of these 47 patients, overall survival and progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% and 62%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 60 months. This aggressive approach with capecitabine and oxaliplatin before, during, and after radiotherapy for high-risk rectal cancer is safe and feasible; it also has an impressive response rate as measured by MRI and a promising 5-year overall survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. CAPIRI-IMRT: a phase II study of concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan with intensity-modulated radiation therapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Gang; Zhu, Ji; Palmer, Joshua D; Xu, Ye; Hu, Weigang; Gu, Weilie; Cai, Sanjun; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-02-28

    This study investigated the local effect and acute toxicity of irinotecan and capecitabine with concurrent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer without prior pelvic irradiation. Seventy-one patients diagnosed with recurrent rectal cancer who did not previously receive pelvic irradiation were treated in our hospital from October 2009 to July 2012. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis, and IMRT of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction), followed by a boost of 10 Gy to 16 Gy (2 Gy per fraction), was delivered to the recurrent sites. The concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m(2) irinotecan weekly and 625 mg/m(2) capecitabine twice daily (Mon-Fri). Radical surgery was recommended for medically fit patients without extra-pelvic metastases. The patients were followed up every 3 months. Tumor response was evaluated using CT/MRIs according to the RECIST criteria or postoperative pathological findings. NCI-CTC 3.0 was used to score the toxicities. Forty-eight patients (67.6%) had confirmed recurrent rectal cancer without extra pelvic metastases, and 23 patients (32.4%) had extra pelvic metastases. Fourteen patients (19.7%) underwent radical resections (R0) post-chemoradiation. A pathologic complete response was observed in 7 of 14 patients. A clinical complete response was observed in 4 patients (5.6%), and a partial response was observed in 22 patients (31.0%). Only 5 patients (7.0%) showed progressive disease during or shortly after treatment. Of 53 symptomatic patients, clinical complete and partial symptom relief with chemoradiation was achieved in 56.6% and 32.1% of patients, respectively. Only 2 patients (2.8%) experienced grade 4 leukopenia. The most common grade 3 toxicity was diarrhea (16 [22.5%] patients). The median follow-up was 31 months. The cumulative local progression-free survival rate was 74.2% and 33.9% at 1 and 3 years after chemoradiation, respectively. The cumulative total survival rate was 80.1% and 36

  8. A PHASE II STUDY OF GEMCITABINE AND CAPECITABINE IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED RENAL CELL CANCER (RCC): SOUTHWEST ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY S0312

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Hussey, Michael; Lara, Primo N.; Mack, Philip C.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Clark, Joseph I.; Lange, Marianne K.; Crawford, E. David

    2010-01-01

    Background Gemcitabine plus capecitabine has modest efficacy in patients with advanced RCC but has considerable toxicity. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a modified dose-schedule of this doublet in patients with advanced unresectable or metastatic RCC. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients were treated with gemcitabine at 900mg/m2 on days 1,8,15 and capecitabine at 625mg/m2 twice daily on days 1 through 21, every 28 days. Eligible patients must have adequate performance status and end-organ function. The primary endpoint was tumor response rate (RR). No further evaluation of this regimen would be pursued if the RR was ≤ 5%. In an exploratory manner using archival specimens, we also evaluated potential markers of prognosis and treatment response including thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms and tumor expression of p53, PTEN, pAKT, pmTOR, and ERCC1. Results Of 43 patients registered, 1 was ineligible and 2 were not analyzable. There was 1 confirmed complete response (CR) and three unconfirmed partial responses (PR), for an overall response rate of 10% (95% CI: 3, 24). Nineteen patients (48%) had stable disease (SD). The six-month freedom-from-treatment-failure and overall survival rates were 20% (95% CI: 8, 32) and 75% (95% CI: 62, 88), respectively. Median survival time was 23 months (95% CI: 10, 37). One patient each experienced Grade 4 neutropenia, fatigue, thrombocytopenia and hemolysis with renal failure. The most common Grade 3 toxicities were neutropenia (12 patients), fatigue (5), and leucopenia (4). Patients with a best response of stable disease or better were more likely to have a decrease in expression of PTEN and an increased expression of pmTOR. Conclusions Gemcitabine plus capecitabine at this reduced dose-schedule benefits a small percentage of patients with RCC with an acceptable toxicity profile. The combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine may serve as a base regimen for combination therapy with targeted agents in select RCC

  9. Post-operative rotator cuff integrity, based on Sugaya's classification, can reflect abduction muscle strength of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahito; Collin, Phillipe; Josseaume, Thierry; Lädermann, Alexandre; Goto, Hideyuki; Sugimoto, Katumasa; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is common in structural and qualitative assessment of the rotator cuff post-operatively. Rotator cuff integrity has been thought to be associated with clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the inter-observer reliability of cuff integrity (Sugaya's classification) and assess the correlation between Sugaya's classification and the clinical outcome. It was hypothesized that Sugaya's classification would show good reliability and good correlation with the clinical outcome. Post-operative MR images were taken two years post-operatively, following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. For assessment of inter-rater reliability, all radiographic evaluations for the supraspinatus muscle were done by two orthopaedic surgeons and one radiologist. Rotator cuff integrity was classified into five categories, according to Sugaya's classification. Fatty infiltration was graded into four categories, based on the Fuchs' classification grading system. Muscle hypotrophy was graded as four grades, according to the scale proposed by Warner. The clinical outcome was assessed according to the constant scoring system pre-operatively and 2 years post-operatively. Of the sixty-two consecutive patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears, fifty-two patients were reviewed in this study. These subjects included twenty-three men and twenty-nine women, with an average age of fifty-seven years. In terms of the inter-rater reliability between orthopaedic surgeons, Sugaya's classification showed the highest agreement [ICC (2.1) = 0.82] for rotator cuff integrity. The grade of fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy demonstrated good agreement, respectively (0.722 and 0.758). With regard to the inter-rater reliability between orthopaedic surgeon and radiologist, Sugaya's classification showed good reliability [ICC (2.1) = 0.70]. On the other hand, fatty infiltration and muscle hypotrophy classifications demonstrated fair and moderate agreement

  10. Metronomic capecitabine in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma unresponsive to or ineligible for sorafenib treatment: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Sara; Granito, Alessandro; Piscaglia, Fabio; Renzulli, Matteo; Stagni, Angela; Bolondi, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Sorafenib, an oral multikinase inhibitor, is the only systemic agent proven to be effective in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). There are no approved second line systemic therapies in patients who have had disease progression on or are not eligible to sorafenib. We describe two cases of unresectable HCC that were treated with low, "metronomic" doses of capecitabine. In the first patient, capecitabine was used after sorafenib failure. In the second case, treatment with capecitabine was attempted since the patient was considered not eligible for sorafenib due to spontaneous hepatic bleeding of a large HCC lesion. Treatment was effective and well tolerated in both patients with long-lasting objective responses. Lacking established second-line therapy, metronomic capecitabine may be a valid alternative in the treatment of HCC patients who are judged not eligible for sorafenib or those having progression disease on sorafenib.

  11. Development and optimization of locust bean gum and sodium alginate interpenetrating polymeric network of capecitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Mansi; Adena, Sandeep Kumar Reddy; Vardhan, Harsh; Pandey, Sureshwar; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the study was to develop interpenetrating polymeric network (IPN) of capecitabine (CAP) using natural polymers locust bean gum (LBG) and sodium alginate (NaAlg). The IPN microbeads were optimized by Box-Behnken Design (BBD) to provide anticipated particle size with good drug entrapment efficiency. The comparative dissolution profile of IPN microbeads of CAP with the marketed preparation proved an excellent sustained drug delivery vehicle. Ionotropic gelation method utilizing metal ion calcium (Ca 2+ ) as a cross-linker was used to prepare IPN microbeads. The optimization study was done by response surface methodology based Box-Behnken Design. The effect of the factors on the responses of optimized batch was exhibited through response surface and contour plots. The optimized batch was analyzed for particle size, % drug entrapment, pharmacokinetic study, in vitro drug release study and further characterized by FTIR, XRD, and SEM. To study the water uptake capacity and hydrodynamic activity of the polymers, swelling studies and viscosity measurement were performed, respectively. The particle size and % drug entrapment of the optimized batch was 494.37 ± 1.4 µm and 81.39 ± 2.9%, respectively, closer to the value predicted by Minitab 17 software. The in vitro drug release study showed sustained release of 92% for 12 h and followed anomalous drug release pattern. The derived pharmacokinetic parameters of optimized batch showed improved results than pure CAP. Thus, the formed IPN microbeads of CAP proved to be an effective extended drug delivery vehicle for the water soluble antineoplastic drug.

  12. Postoperative spinal column; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaefer, W. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Abteilung fuer Wirbelsaeulenchirurgie, Kusel (Germany); Heumueller, I. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Institut fuer Radiologie II, Kusel (Germany); Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    As a rule, postoperative imaging is carried out after spinal interventions to document the exact position of the implant material. Imaging is absolutely necessary when new clinical symptoms occur postoperatively. In this case a rebleeding or an incorrect implant position abutting a root or the spinal cord must be proven. In addition to these immediately occurring postoperative clinical symptoms, there are a number of complications that can occur several days, weeks or even months later. These include the failed back surgery syndrome, implant loosening or breakage of the material and relapse of a disc herniation and spondylodiscitis. In addition to knowledge of the original clinical symptoms, it is also important to know the operation details, such as the access route and the material used. In almost all postoperative cases, imaging with contrast medium administration and corresponding correction of artefacts by the implant material, such as the dual energy technique, correction algorithms and the use of special magnetic resonance (MR) sequences are necessary. In order to correctly assess the postoperative imaging, knowledge of the surgical procedure and the previous clinical symptoms are mandatory besides special computed tomography (CT) techniques and MR sequences. (orig.) [German] In der Regel erfolgt bei spinalen Eingriffen eine postoperative Bildgebung, um die exakte Lage des Implantatmaterials zu dokumentieren. Unbedingt notwendig ist die Bildgebung, wenn postoperativ neue klinische Symptome aufgetreten sind. Hier muessen eine Nachblutung bzw. inkorrekte, eine Wurzel oder das Myelon tangierende Implantatlage nachgewiesen werden. Neben diesen direkt postoperativ auftretenden klinischen Symptomen gibt es eine Reihe von Komplikationen, die erst nach mehreren Tagen, Wochen oder sogar nach Monaten auftreten koennen. Hierzu zaehlen das Failed-back-surgery-Syndrom, die Implantatlockerung oder -bruch, aber auch ein Rezidivvorfall und die Spondylodiszitis. Neben der

  13. Postoperative hypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    It is essential to preserve as many of the parathyroid glands, as possible, during surgery of the thyroid gland. This is achieved by visualizing them and by minimal handling of the glands. Truncal ligation of the inferior thyroid artery is quite safe. Capsular ligation of the branches of the artery is theoretically superior but requires a greater degree of skill and experience in thyroid surgery. It also puts the recurrent laryngeal nerve at a greater risk of injury. Calcitriol or 1.25 dihydroxy vitamin D is a very useful drug in managing patients with severe post-operative hypoparathyroidism

  14. A 2 to 6 year postoperative evaluation of tension-free vaginal tape (tvt: a questionnaire based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Lužnik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this article is to show the long-term subjective cure rate of urinary incontinence in patients after the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT procedure and eventual correlation of some factors with this cure rate.Methods: From December 1999 to July 2004 we performed one hundred and fifty TVT procedures at our Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics. In April 2006, a 2 to 6 year postoperatively, 149 questionnaires were sent to our patients for self-estimation of the cure rate. The subjective evaluation of results of the operation was based on definition of the improvement of continence in percents, with 13 possibilities ranging from –20 % to 100 %. With tests of correlation we wish to establish eventual connection between the cure rate of urinary incontinence and the age of women at the time of operation and the number of postoperative years. Statistical significance of eventual influence of independent variables on cure rate was analyzed using nonparametric tests in Statistical Program Package for Social Sciences (SPSS.Results: Of 119 answers, in 40 cases (33.6 % patients confirmed that they are completely healthy, and 87 women (73.1 % confirmed at least 70 % cure rate. 100 answers confirmed that 87.6 % patients had benefited by TVT procedure even 2 to 6 years postoperatively. Correlation between the long-term cure rate and the patient’s age at time of operation had Pearson’s correlation coefficient r = –0.335 and was statistically significant (p = 0.01. Statistically significantly different success was still in the groups with regard to the previous hysterectomy (p = 0.005 and the previous surgical procedure for urinary incontinence (p = 0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between the cure rate and the number of postoperative years (p = 0.236.Conclusions: 150 TVT procedures were performed very safely as solo intervention or as connected with other repair of pelvic organ prolapse at our

  15. Metronomic capecitabine as second-line treatment in hepatocellular carcinoma after sorafenib failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Marinelli, Sara; Terzi, Eleonora; Piscaglia, Fabio; Renzulli, Matteo; Venerandi, Laura; Benevento, Francesca; Bolondi, Luigi

    2015-06-01

    No standard second-line treatments are available for hepatocellular carcinoma patients who fail sorafenib therapy. We assessed the safety and efficacy of metronomic capecitabine after first-line sorafenib failure. Retrospective analysis of consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma patients receiving metronomic capecitabine between January 2012 and November 2014. The primary end-point was safety, secondary end-point was efficacy, including time-to-progression and overall survival. Twenty-six patients (80% Child-Pugh A, 80% Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage C) received metronomic capecitabine (500 mg/bid). Median treatment duration was 3.2 months (range 0.6-31). Fourteen (53%) patients experienced at least one adverse event. The most frequent drug-related adverse events were bilirubin elevation (23%), fatigue (15%), anaemia (11%), lymphoedema (11%), and hand-foot syndrome (7.6%). Treatment was interrupted in 19 (73%) for disease progression, in 4 (15%) for liver deterioration, and in 1 (3.8%) for adverse event. Disease control was achieved in 6 (23%) patients. Median time-to-progression was 4 months (95% confidence interval 3.2-4.7). Median overall survival was 8 months (95% confidence interval 3.7-12.3). Metronomic capecitabine was well tolerated in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who had been treated with sorafenib. Preliminary data show potential anti-tumour activity with long-lasting disease control in a subgroup of patients that warrants further evaluation in a phase III study. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxaliplatin and capecitabine concomitant with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and extended to the resting period in high risk locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.H.; Zeng, Z.F. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, X. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Guangzhou (China); An, X. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Medical Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Cai, M.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Pathology, Guangzhou (China); Chen, G.; Kong, L.H.; Lin, J.Z.; Wan, D.S.; Pan, Z.Z.; Ding, P.R. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Colorectal Surgery, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    Conventional neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is suboptimal for systemic control in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve systemic control, we developed an alternative approach in which an intensified oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOX) chemotherapy regimen was administered concomitantly with radiation and extended to the resting period (consolidation chemotherapy) for high-risk LARC. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy and toxicity of this strategy. Patients with high-risk LARC were treated with CRT. Two cycles of XELOX were administered concomitantly with radiation. Thereafter, an additional cycle of the same regimen was administered during the resting period after completion of CRT. Tumor response, toxicities and surgical complications were recorded. This study includes 36 patients treated with the above strategy. All patients completed the planned concurrent CRT. Because of grade 3 toxicities, 2 patients were unable to complete the additional chemotherapy. Grade 3 toxicities were leucopenia (2.8 %), diarrhea (2.8 %) and radiodermatitis (2.8 %). All patients underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME) and a sphincter-saving procedure was performed in 27 patients (75 %). There was no perioperative mortality. Postoperative complications developed in 7 patients (19.4 %). Pathologic complete regression (pCR),''nearly pCR'' (major regression), and moderate or minimal regression were achieved in 13 (36.1 %), 16 (44.4 %), and 7 patients (19.5 %), respectively. The preliminary results suggest that a XELOX regimen initially administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and then extended to the resting period in high-risk LARC patients is well tolerated. The strategy is highly effective in terms of pCR and nearly pCR rates, and thus warrants further investigation. (orig.)

  17. A Phase I study of concurrent radiotherapy and capecitabine as adjuvant treatment for operable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Liu Yueping; Wang Weihu; Song Yongwen; Li Tao; Li Ning; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose and the dose-limiting toxicity of capecitabine with standard radiotherapy (RT) as adjuvant treatment in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage II/III rectal cancer after surgery were eligible. Total RT dose was delivered as DT 50 Gy in fractions of 2.0 Gy/day for 5 weeks to the pelvic area. Capecitabine was administered concurrently with RT in escalating doses, twice daily with a 12-h interval, for two cycles of 14 days separated by a 7-day rest. Dose-limiting toxicity included Grade 3 or Grade 4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity. Results: Twenty-four patients were enrolled at the following dose levels: 1,000 (3 patients), 1,200 (3 patients), 1,400 (3 patients), 1,500 (3 patients), 1,600 (6 patients), and 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (6 patients). Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 patient at 1,600 mg/m 2 /day (Grade 3 diarrhea) and in 2 patients at 1,700 mg/m 2 /day (1 patient had Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4 diarrhea). Conclusion: The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of capecitabine given concurrently with RT was 1,600 mg/m 2 , daily from the 1st to the 14th day, with a 7-day rest, for two cycles

  18. Phase I trial of cetuximab in combination with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, and radiotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Horisberger, Karoline; Woernle, Christoph; Wenz, Frederik; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Kaehler, Georg; Dinter, Dietmar; Grobholz, Rainer; Heeger, Steffen; Post, Stefan; Hochhaus, Andreas; Willeke, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and efficacy of chemotherapy with capecitabine, weekly irinotecan, cetuximab, and pelvic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with rectal cancer (clinical Stage uT3-T4 or N+) received a standard dosing regimen of cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and 250 mg/m 2 on Days 8, 15, 22, and 29) and escalating doses of irinotecan and capecitabine according to phase I methods: dose level I, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 on Days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 and capecitabine 800 mg/m 2 on Days 1-38; dose level II, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 ; and dose level III, irinotecan 50 mg/m 2 and capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 . Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 50.4 Gy (45 Gy plus 5.4 Gy). Resection was scheduled 4-5 weeks after termination of chemoradiotherapy. Results: On dose level I, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred; however, Grade 3 diarrhea affected 1 of 6 patients on dose level II. Of 5 patients treated at dose level III, 2 exhibited dose-limiting toxicity (diarrhea in 2 and nausea/vomiting in 1). Therefore, dose level II was determined as the recommended dose for future studies. A total of 10 patients were treated on dose level II and received a mean relative dose intensity of 100% of cetuximab, 94% of irinotecan, and 95% of capecitabine. All patients underwent surgery. Five patients had a pathologically complete remission and six had microfoci of residual tumor only. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with cetuximab, capecitabine, and weekly irinotecan is feasible and well tolerated. The preliminary efficacy is very promising. Larger phase II trials are ongoing

  19. Renal function and urological complications after radical hysterectomy with postoperative radiotherapy and platinum-based chemotherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okadome, Masao; Saito, Toshiaki; Kitade, Shoko; Ariyoshi, Kazuya; Shimamoto, Kumi; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Minami, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Motonobu; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Kubo, Yuichiro; Kunitake, Naonobu

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to clarify renal functional changes long term and serious urological complications in women with cervical cancer who undergo radical hysterectomy followed by pelvic radiotherapy and/or platinum-based chemotherapy to treat the initial disease. Data on 380 women who underwent radical hysterectomy at the National Kyushu Cancer Center from January 1997 to December 2013 were reviewed. Main outcome measures were the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and monitored abnormal urological findings. Postoperative eGFR was significantly lower than preoperative eGFR in 179 women with surgery alone and in 201 women with additional pelvic radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy (both P types of univariate analyses for eGFR reduction in women after treatment showed that older age, advanced stage, pelvic radiotherapy, and platinum-based chemotherapy were significant variables on both analyses. Two types of multivariate analyses showed that platinum-based chemotherapy or pelvic radiotherapy were associated with impaired renal function (odds ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.08-3.54 and odds ratio 2.85, 95% confidence interval 1.12-7.24, for the respective analyses). There was a higher rate of bladder wall thickening in women with pelvic radiotherapy had than those without it (17.4% vs. 2.7%, P chemotherapy and/or postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Serious and life-threatening urological complications are rare, but surgeons should be aware of the possibility during the long follow-up. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. In vivo monitoring of capecitabine metabolism in human liver by 19fluorine magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 and 3 Tesla field strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; Klomp, Dennis W. J.; Kamm, Yvonne J. L.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Heerschap, Arend

    2003-01-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancer the oral 5-fluorouracil (5FU) prodrug capecitabine is used with increasing frequency as an alternative to i.v. 5FU administration. The rate of conversion of capecitabine into 5'deoxy-5-fluorouridine has been related to tumor response, and 5FU catabolites have been

  1. In vivo monitoring of capecitabine metabolism in human liver by 19fluorine magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 and 3 Tesla field strength.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laarhoven, H.W.M. van; Klomp, D.W.J.; Kamm, Y.J.L.; Punt, C.J.A.; Heerschap, A.

    2003-01-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancer the oral 5-fluorouracil (5FU) prodrug capecitabine is used with increasing frequency as an alternative to i.v. 5FU administration. The rate of conversion of capecitabine into 5'deoxy-5-fluorouridine has been related to tumor response, and 5FU catabolites have been

  2. Inflammation-based prognostic score, prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, predicts postoperative outcome in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Teruya, Masanori; Kishiki, Tomokazu; Endo, Daisuke; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Hozumi; Miki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Morita, Koji

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed that Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score, is associated with poor outcome in a variety of tumors. However, few studies have investigated whether GPS measured prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) is useful for postoperative prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). GPS was calculated on the basis of admission data as follows: patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminaemia (L) were allocated a GPS score of 2. Patients in whom only 1 of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a GPS score of 1, and patients with a normal C-reactive protein and albumin were allocated a score of 0. All patients underwent radical en-bloc resection 3-4 weeks after nCRT. A total of 48 patients with clinical TNM stage II/III were enrolled. Univariate analyses revealed that there were significant differences in cancer-specific survival in relation to grade of response to nCRT (P = .004), lymph node status (P = .0065), lymphatic invasion (P = .0002), venous invasion (P = .0001), pathological TNM classification (P = .015), and GPS (P GPS classification showed a close relationship with lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and number of lymph node (P = .0292, .0473, and .0485, respectively). GPS was found to be the only independent predictor of cancer-specific survival (odds ratio, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.52; P = .0019). GPS, measured prior to nCRT, is an independent novel predictor of postoperative outcome in patients with advanced ESCC.

  3. Comparison of Automated Atlas Based Segmentation Software for postoperative prostate cancer radiotherapy

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    Grégory Delpon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Automated atlas-based segmentation algorithms present the potential to reduce the variability in volume delineation. Several vendors offer software that are mainly used for cranial, head and neck and prostate cases. The present study will compare the contours produced by a radiation oncologist to the contours computed by different automated atlas-based segmentation algorithms for prostate bed cases, including femoral heads, bladder and rectum. Contour comparison was evaluated by different metrics such as volume ratio, Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. Results depended on the volume of interest and showed some discrepancies between the different software. Automatic contours could be a good starting point for the delineation of organs since efficient editing tools are provided by different vendors. It should become an important help in the next few years for organ at risk delineation.

  4. Postoperative otorhinolaryngologic complications in transnasal endoscopic surgery to access the skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Landini Lutaif Dolci

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The large increase in the number of transnasal endoscopic skull base surgeries is a consequence of greater knowledge of the anatomic region, the development of specific materials and instruments, and especially the use of the nasoseptal flap as a barrier between the sinus tract (contaminated cavity and the subarachnoid space (sterile area, reducing the high risk of contamination. Objective: To assess the otorhinolaryngologic complications in patients undergoing endoscopic surgery of the skull base, in which a nasoseptal flap was used. Methods: This was a retrospective study that included patients who underwent endoscopic skull base surgery with creation of a nasoseptal flap, assessing for the presence of the following post-surgical complications: cerebrospinal fluid leak, meningitis, mucocele formation, nasal synechia, septal perforation (prior to posterior septectomy, internal nasal valve failure, epistaxis, and olfactory alterations. Results: The study assessed 41 patients undergoing surgery. Of these, 35 had pituitary adenomas (macro- or micro-adenomas; sellar and suprasellar extension, three had meningiomas (two tuberculum sellae and one olfactory groove, two had craniopharyngiomas, and one had an intracranial abscess. The complications were cerebrospinal fluid leak (three patients; 7.3%, meningitis (three patients; 7.3%, nasal fossa synechia (eight patients; 19.5%, internal nasal valve failure (six patients; 14.6%, and complaints of worsening of the sense of smell (16 patients; 39%. The olfactory test showed anosmia or hyposmia in ten patients (24.3%. No patient had mucocele, epistaxis, or septal perforation. Conclusion: The use of the nasoseptal flap has revolutionized endoscopic skull base surgery, making the procedures more effective and with lower morbidity compared to the traditional route. However, although mainly transient nasal morbidities were observed, in some cases, permanent hyposmia and anosmia resulted

  5. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Stuart J.; Moughan, Jennifer; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m 2 /d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m 2 /wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m 2 /d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m 2 /wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m 2 ; leucovorin 400 mg/m 2 ; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m 2 ; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m 2 ) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an unsuitable surrogate for

  6. Efficacy Endpoints of Radiation Therapy Group Protocol 0247: A Randomized, Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Radiation Therapy Plus Concurrent Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stuart J. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Meropol, Neal J., E-mail: Neal.Meropol@case.edu [University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rashid, Asif [Department of Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Watson, James C. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitchell, Edith P. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pollock, Jondavid [The Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah (United States); Haddock, Michael [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Erickson, Beth A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Willett, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). Methods and Materials: A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m{sup 2}/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m{sup 2}; leucovorin 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m{sup 2}; 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m{sup 2}) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local–regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. Results: A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Conclusions: Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an

  7. Postoperative Irradiation of Gynecologic Malignancies: Improving Treatment Delivery Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Sylvain; Bouchard, Myriam; Germain, Isabelle; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Roy, Rene; Gingras, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric and treatment delivery advantages of aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for the treatment of patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy after resection of endometrial cancers were selected. A 45-Gy dose was prescribed to the target volume delineated on a planning CT scan. An in-house inverse planning system, Ballista, was used to develop a treatment plan using aperture-based multileaf collimator segments. This approach was compared with conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and static beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT) techniques in terms of target coverage, dose-volume histogram statistics for surrounding normal tissues, and numbers of segments and monitor units (MU). Results: Three quarters (76.4%) of the planning target volume received the prescription dose with conventional four-field plans. With adequate target coverage, the Ballista plans significantly reduced the volume of bowel and bladder irradiated at the prescribed dose (p < 0.001), whereas the two approaches provided equivalent results for the rectum (p 0.5). On the other hand, AB-IMRT and BB-IMRT plans showed only small differences in dose-volume histogram statistics of unknown clinical impact, whereas Ballista plan delivery required on average 73% and 59% fewer segments and MU, respectively. Conclusion: With respect to conventional techniques, AB-IMRT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies provides dosimetric advantages similar to those with BB-IMRT but with clear treatment delivery improvements

  8. Dutch evidence-based guidelines for amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity : Amputation surgery and postoperative management. Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan; van der Linde, Harmen; Rosenbrand, Kitty; Conradi, Marcel; Deckers, Jos; Koning, Jan; Rietman, Hans S.; van der Schaaf, Dick; van der Ploeg, Rein; Schapendonk, Johannes; Schrier, Ernst; Duijzentkunst, Rob Smit; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Versteegen, Gerbrig; Voesten, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgeons still use a range of criteria to determine whether amputation is indicated. In addition, there is considerable debate regarding immediate postoperative management, especially concerning the use of immediate/delayed fitting' versus conservative elastic bandaging. Objectives: To

  9. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase II Study of Ruxolitinib or Placebo in Combination With Capecitabine in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer for Whom Therapy With Gemcitabine Has Failed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Herbert I; Uppal, Nikhil; Wagner, Stephanie A; Bendell, Johanna C; Beck, J Thaddeus; Wade, Seaborn M; Nemunaitis, John J; Stella, Philip J; Pipas, J Marc; Wainberg, Zev A; Manges, Robert; Garrett, William M; Hunter, Deborah S; Clark, Jason; Leopold, Lance; Sandor, Victor; Levy, Richard S

    2015-12-01

    Patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma have a poor prognosis and limited second-line treatment options. Evidence suggests a role for the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway in the pathogenesis and clinical course of pancreatic cancer. In this double-blind, phase II study, patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer who had experienced treatment failure with gemcitabine were randomly assigned 1:1 to the JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib (15 mg twice daily) plus capecitabine (1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily) or placebo plus capecitabine. The primary end point was overall survival (OS); secondary end points included progression-free survival, clinical benefit response, objective response rate, and safety. Prespecified subgroup analyses evaluated treatment heterogeneity and efficacy in patients with evidence of inflammation. In the intent-to-treat population (ruxolitinib, n = 64; placebo, n = 63), the hazard ratio was 0.79 (95% CI, 0.53 to 1.18; P = .25) for OS and was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.52 to 1.10; P = .14) for progression-free survival. In a prespecified subgroup analysis of patients with inflammation, defined by serum C-reactive protein levels greater than the study population median (ie, 13 mg/L), OS was significantly greater with ruxolitinib than with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.85; P = .011). Prolonged survival in this subgroup was supported by post hoc analyses of OS that categorized patients by the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score, a systemic inflammation-based prognostic system. Grade 3 or greater adverse events were observed with similar frequency in the ruxolitinib (74.6%) and placebo (81.7%) groups. Grade 3 or greater anemia was more frequent with ruxolitinib (15.3%; placebo, 1.7%). Ruxolitinib plus capecitabine was generally well tolerated and may improve survival in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer and evidence of systemic inflammation. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. A phase II study of preoperative capecitabine in women with operable hormone receptor positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolaney, Sara M; Jeong, Joon; Guo, Hao; Brock, Jane; Morganstern, Daniel; Come, Steven E; Golshan, Mehra; Bellon, Jennifer; Winer, Eric P; Krop, Ian E

    2014-01-01

    Conventional preoperative chemotherapy regimens have only limited efficacy in hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer and new approaches are needed. We hypothesized that capecitabine, which is effective in metastatic breast cancer, may be an active preoperative treatment for HR+ breast cancer. Women with HR+, HER2-negative operable breast cancer received capecitabine, 2000 mg/m 2 daily in divided doses for 14 days, followed by a 7-day rest period. Treatment was repeated every 21 days for a total of four cycles. The primary endpoint of the study was to determine the rate of pathological complete response (pCR). Because of slow accrual, the study was closed after 24 patients were enrolled. Three patients had a complete clinical response, and eight patients had a partial clinical response, for an overall clinical response rate of 45.8%. There were no cases of pCR. Of the 22 patients who had pathological response assessment by the Miller–Payne grading system, there were six grade 3 responses, and no grade 4 or 5 responses. Toxicity was manageable: the only grade 3 toxicities observed were one case each of diarrhea, palmar plantar erythrodysesthesia, hypokalemia, and mucositis. There was no association between baseline levels, or change in level from baseline to cycle 1, or from baseline to time of surgery, of thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP), thymidylate synthase (TYMS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD), or Ki67 and pathological, clinical, or radiographic response. Preoperative capecitabine is a well-tolerated regimen, but appears not lead to pCR when used as monotherapy in HR+ breast cancer

  11. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  12. Inflammation-based prognostic score is a useful predictor of postoperative outcome in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Yukio; Sasaki, Ryoko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Tadashi; Oda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Hideto; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score, is useful for predicting outcome in a variety of cancers. This study sought to investigate the significance of GPS for prognostication of patients who underwent surgery with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 62 patients who underwent resection for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We calculated the GPS as follows: patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminemia (L) were allocated a score of 2; patients with one or none of these abnormalities were allocated a s ore of 1 or 0, respectively. Prognostic significance was analyzed by the log-rank test and a Cox proportional hazards model. Overall survival rate was 25.5 % at 5 years for all 62 patients. Venous invasion (p = 0.01), pathological primary tumor category (p = 0.013), lymph node metastasis category (p GPS (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with survival by univariate analysis. A Cox model demonstrated that increased GPS was an independent predictive factor with poor prognosis. The preoperative GPS is a useful predictor of postoperative outcome in patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

  13. [Localization Establishment of an Interdisciplinary Intervention Model to Prevent Post-Operative Delirium in Older Patients Based on 'Hospital Elder Life Program'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Liao, Yu-Lin; Gao, Lang-Li; Hu, Xiu-Ying; Yue, Ji-Rong

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative delirium is a significant complication in elderly patients. The occurrence of delirium may increase the related physical and psychological risks, delay the length of hospital stays, and even lead to death. According to the current evidence-based model, the application of interdisciplinary intervention may effectively prevent delirium, shorten the length of hospital stays, and save costs. To establish a culturally appropriate interdisciplinary intervention model for preventing postoperative delirium in older Chinese patients. The authors adapted the original version of the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP©) from the Hebrew Senior Life Institute for Aging Research of Harvard University by localizing the content using additional medical resources and translating the modified instrument into Chinese. Furthermore, the final version of this interdisciplinary intervention model for postoperative delirium was developed in accordance with the "guideline of delirium: diagnosis, prevention and management produced by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in 2010" and the "clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults" produced by American geriatrics society in 2014. Finally, the translated instrument was revised and improved using discussions, consultations, and pilot study. The abovementioned procedure generated an interdisciplinary intervention model for preventing postoperative delirium that is applicable to the Chinese medical environment. The content addresses personnel structure and assignment of responsibility; details of interdisciplinary intervention protocols and implementation procedures; and required personnel training. The revised model is expected to decrease the occurrence of post-operative delirium and other complications in elderly patients, to help them maintain and improve their function, to shorten the length of their hospital stays, and to facilitate recovery.

  14. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS AFTER RADICAL CYSTECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Mager

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy (RCE is associated with a considerable number of early postoperative complications as before. Based on 10 years’ experience, this paper demonstrates the frequency (33.9 % and types of early complications following RCE, as well as postoperative mortality (5.5 % and its resulting causes. Although postoperative mortality is relatively low today, the frequency of early postoperative complications remains high as before.

  15. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS G12D status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival

  16. Preparation and Characterization of a Gastric Floating Dosage Form of Capecitabine

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    Ehsan Taghizadeh Davoudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal disturbances, such as nausea and vomiting, are considered amongst the main adverse effects associated with oral anticancer drugs due to their fast release in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Sustained release formulations with proper release profiles can overcome some side effects of conventional formulations. The current study was designed to prepare sustained release tablets of Capecitabine, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of advanced breast cancer, using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, carbomer934P, sodium alginate, and sodium bicarbonate. Tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method and characterized such that floating lag time, total floating time, hardness, friability, drug content, weight uniformity, and in vitro drug release were investigated. The sustained release tablets showed good hardness and passed the friability test. The tablets’ floating lag time was determined to be 30–200 seconds, and it floated more than 24 hours and released the drug for 24 hours. Then, the stability test was done and compared with the initial samples. In conclusion, by adjusting the right ratios of the excipients including release-retarding gel-forming polymers like HPMC K4M, Na alginate, carbomer934P, and sodium bicarbonate, sustained release Capecitabine floating tablet was formulated.

  17. Preparation and characterization of a gastric floating dosage form of capecitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh Davoudi, Ehsan; Ibrahim Noordin, Mohamed; Kadivar, Ali; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Farjam, Abdoreza Soleimani; Akbari Javar, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances, such as nausea and vomiting, are considered amongst the main adverse effects associated with oral anticancer drugs due to their fast release in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Sustained release formulations with proper release profiles can overcome some side effects of conventional formulations. The current study was designed to prepare sustained release tablets of Capecitabine, which is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of advanced breast cancer, using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), carbomer934P, sodium alginate, and sodium bicarbonate. Tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method and characterized such that floating lag time, total floating time, hardness, friability, drug content, weight uniformity, and in vitro drug release were investigated. The sustained release tablets showed good hardness and passed the friability test. The tablets' floating lag time was determined to be 30-200 seconds, and it floated more than 24 hours and released the drug for 24 hours. Then, the stability test was done and compared with the initial samples. In conclusion, by adjusting the right ratios of the excipients including release-retarding gel-forming polymers like HPMC K4M, Na alginate, carbomer934P, and sodium bicarbonate, sustained release Capecitabine floating tablet was formulated.

  18. Three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy combined with capecitabine chemotherapy for locally advanced (unresectable) rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yaqun; Tian Ye; Zhang Junning; Wang Bin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the compliance and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced (unresectable) rectal cancer. Methods: Thirty eight patients with locally advanced (T4 or recurred) rectal cancer received three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy (for 46 ∼ 50Gy/5 weeks and was boosted to the tumor 16 ∼ 18Gy/2 weeks, 2Gy/fraction, 5 days/week) in combination with capecitabine 1 650mg · m -2 · d -1 , day 1-14, every 3 weeks. Results: The overall response rate was 57.9%, with CR 5 (13.2%), PR 17(44.7%), SD 10 (26.3%), PD 6 (15.8%), median survival time, the 1-year overall survival rate and the 2-year overall survival rate were 18 months, 64.43%, 18.78%, respectively. The remission rate of pain and improvement rate of performance status were 100% and 52.8%. Treatment-related toxicity mainly showed at diarrhea, neutrocytopenia and hand-foot syndrome, the incidence of grade 3 toxicity were 15.8%, 15.8%, 7.9%, respectively. there were no grade 4 toxicity and treatment-related death. Conclusion: Combination of three dimensional-conformal radiotherapy with capecitabine is active in advanced rectal cancer, It is a well-tolerated regimen. (authors)

  19. Systemic chemotherapy with doxorubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine for metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma

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    Bang Soo-Mee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous chemotherapeutic agents have been tested, the role of systemic chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has not been clarified. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed to improve outcomes, and we designed this study with new effective drug combination. Methods Twenty-nine patients with histologically-confirmed, metastatic HCC received a combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin 60 mg/m2 and cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on day 1, plus capecitabine 2000 mg/m2/day as an intermittent regimen of 2 weeks of treatment followed by a 1-week rest. Results The median age was 49 years (range, 32–64 and 19 patients were hepatitis B virus seropositive. Child-Pugh class was A in all patients and 4 had Zubrod performance status of 2. The objective response rate was 24% (95% CI 9–40 with 6 stable diseases. The chemotherapy was generally well tolerated despite one treatment-related death. Conclusion Combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine produced modest antitumor activity with tolerable adverse effects in patients with metastatic HCC.

  20. Prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation: novel and safe strategy based on the modulation of the antioxidant system

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    Ramón eRodrigo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia following cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation. The pathogenesis of postoperative AF is multifactorial. Oxidative stress, caused by the unavoidable ischemia-reperfusion event occurring in this setting, is a major contributory factor. ROS-derived effects could result in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation or DNA oxidation of cardiac tissue, thus leading to functional and structural myocardial remodeling. The vulnerability of myocardial tissue to the oxidative challenge is also dependent on the activity of the antioxidant system. High ROS levels, overwhelming this system, should result in deleterious cellular effects, such as the induction of necrosis, apoptosis or autophagy. Nevertheless, tissue exposure to low to moderate ROS levels could trigger a survival response with a trend to reinforce the antioxidant defense system. Administration of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, known to involve a moderate ROS production, is consistent with a diminished vulnerability to the development of postoperative AF. Accordingly, supplementation of n-3 PUFA successfully reduced the incidence of postoperative AF after coronary bypass grafting. This response is due to an up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, as shown in experimental models. In turn, non-enzymatic antioxidant reinforcement through vitamin C administration prior to cardiac surgery has also reduced the postoperative AF incidence. Therefore, it should be expected that a mixed therapy result in an improvement of the cardioprotective effect by modulating both components of the antioxidant system. We present available evidence supporting the view of an effective prevention of postoperative AF including a 2-step therapeutic strategy: n-3 PUFA followed by vitamin C supplementation to patients scheduled for cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation. The present study should encourage the design of clinical

  1. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean ± standard deviation of 32 ± 9 vs. 23 ± 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 ± 3 vs. 21 ± 5 min (p = .003), 39 ± 12 vs. 30 ± 5 min (p = .055), and 29 ± 5 vs. 20 ± 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target volume.

  2. A Phase I study of capecitabine, carboplatin, and paclitaxel with external beam radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czito, Brian G.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Willett, Chris G.; Morse, Michael A.; Blobe, Gerard C.; Fernando, Nishan H.; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Harpole, David H.; Honeycutt, Wanda R.N.; Yu Daohai; Bendell, Johanna C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) are used to treat patients with esophageal cancer. The optimal combination of chemotherapeutic agents with RT is undefined. We evaluated a combination of capecitabine, carboplatin, and paclitaxel with RT in a phase I study. Methods and Materials: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the esophagus initially received capecitabine, carboplatin, and paclitaxel with RT (1.8 Gy daily to 50.4 Gy). After completion, patients were restaged and evaluated for surgery. Primary endpoints included determination of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) and a recommended phase II dose, non-DLT, and preliminary radiographic and pathologic response rates. Results: Thirteen patients were enrolled (10 men, 3 women). All were evaluable for toxicity and efficacy. Two of 3 patients at dose level 1 (capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 twice daily on RT days, carboplatin area under the curve (AUC) 2 weekly, paclitaxel 60 mg/m 2 weekly) had DLT (both Grade 4 esophagitis). Of these 3, 2 underwent esophagectomy and had pathologic complete response (pCR). Ten patients were then enrolled at dose level -1 (capecitabine 600 mg/m 2 twice daily, carboplatin AUC 1.5, paclitaxel 45 mg/m 2 ). Overall, 3 of 10 patients at dose level -1 developed DLT (2 Grade 3 esophagitis, 1 Grade 3 hypotension). Esophagectomy was performed in 6 of 10 patients. All patients had pathologic downstaging and 2 of 6 had pCR. Conclusions: The maximally tolerated/recommended phase II doses were capecitabine 600 mg/m 2 twice daily, carboplatin AUC 1.5 weekly, and paclitaxel 45 mg/m 2 weekly with RT to 50.4 Gy. In our small study, this regimen appears active but is accompanied by significant toxicities, primarily esophagitis

  3. PROSPECT: a practical method for formulating evidence-based expert recommendations for the management of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, E A M; Wilkinson, R C; Kehlet, H; Schug, S A

    2007-07-01

    Many patients still suffer severe acute pain in the postoperative period. Although guidelines for treating acute pain are widely published and promoted, most do not consider procedure-specific differences in pain experienced or in techniques that may be most effective and appropriate for different surgical settings. The procedure-specific postoperative pain management (PROSPECT) Working Group provides procedure-specific recommendations for postoperative pain management together with supporting evidence from systematic literature reviews and related procedures at http://www.postoppain.org The methodology for PROSPECT reviews was developed and refined by discussion of the Working Group, and it adapts existing methods for formulation of consensus recommendations to the specific requirements of PROSPECT. To formulate PROSPECT recommendations, we use a methodology that takes into account study quality and source and level of evidence, and we use recognized methods for achieving group consensus, thus reducing potential bias. The new methodology is first applied in full for the 2006 update of the PROSPECT review of postoperative pain management for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Transparency in PROSPECT processes allows the users to be fully aware of any limitations of the evidence and recommendations, thereby allowing for appropriate decisions in their own practice setting.

  4. Postoperative pain assessment based on numeric ratings is not the same for patients and professionals: A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, J.F.; van Wijck, A.J.M.; Kappen, T.H.; Peelen, L.M.; Kalkman, C.J.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    Background: Numeric pain scores have become important in clinical practice to assess postoperative pain and to help develop guidelines for treating pain. Professionals need the patients’ pain scores to administer analgesic medication. However, do professionals interpret the pain scores in line with

  5. Exclusive image guided IMRT vs. radical prostatectomy followed by postoperative IMRT for localized prostate cancer: a matched-pair analysis based on risk-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azelie, Caroline; Créhange, Gilles; Gauthier, Mélanie; Mirjolet, Céline; Cormier, Luc; Martin, Etienne; Peignaux-Casasnovas, Karine; Truc, Gilles; Chamois, Jérôme; Maingon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether patients treated for a localized prostate cancer (PCa) require a radical prostatectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy or exclusive radiotherapy, in the modern era of image guided IMRT. 178 patients with PCa were referred for daily exclusive image guided IMRT (IG-IMRT) using an on-line 3D ultra-sound based system and 69 patients were referred for postoperative IMRT without image guidance after radical prostatectomy (RP + IMRT). Patients were matched in a 1:1 ratio according to their baseline risk group before any treatment. Late toxicity was scored using the CTV v3.0 scale. Biochemical failure was defined as a postoperative PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/mL followed by 1 consecutive rising PSA for the postoperative group of patients and by the Phoenix definition (nadir + 2 ng/mL) for the group of patients treated with exclusive radiotherapy. A total of 98 patients were matched (49:49). From the start of any treatment, the median follow-up was 56.6 months (CI 95% = [49.6-61.2], range [18.2-115.1]). No patient had late gastrointestinal grade ≥ 2 toxicity in the IG-IMRT group vs. 4% in the RP + IMRT group. Forty two percent of the patients in both groups had late grade ≥ 2 genitourinary toxicity. The 5-year FFF rates in the IG-IMRT group and in the RP + IMRT groups were 93.1% [80.0-97.8] and 76.5% [58.3-87.5], respectively (p = 0.031). Patients with a localized PCa treated with IG-IMRT had better oncological outcome than patients treated with RP + IMRT. Further improvements in postoperative IMRT using image guidance and dose escalation are urgently needed

  6. Ernstige toxiciteit na behandeling met capecitabine en fluorouracil ten gevolge van een partiële dihydropyrimidine-dehydrogenasedeficiëntie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooiveld, E. A.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Haanen, J. B.; Westermann, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Two female patients, aged 48 and 52 years, developed severe bone marrow suppression and (gastrointestinal) mucositis following administration of capecitabine. Analysis of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed the presence of DPD deficiency.

  7. Preoperative Capecitabine and Pelvic Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-Is it Equivalent to 5-FU Infusion Plus Leucovorin and Radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Alexander K.; Wong, Alfred O.; Jenken, Daryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective case-matching study was to compare the treatment outcomes and acute toxicity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with capecitabine vs. preoperative RT with intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion, leucovorin, and mitomycin C in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We matched 34 patients who were treated with preoperative concurrent capecitabine and 50 Gy of RT by their clinical T stage (T3 or T4) and the tumor location (≤7 cm or >7 cm from the anal verge) with another 68 patients who were treated with preoperative intermittent 5-FU infusion, leucovorin, mitomycin C, and 50 Gy of RT for a comparison of the pathologic tumor response, local control, distant failure, and survival rates. Results: The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 18% with 5-FU and leucovorin (p = 0.72). The rate of T downstaging after chemoradiation was 59% for both groups. The rate of sphincter-sparing resection was 38% after capecitabine plus RT and 43% after 5-FU plus RT (p = 0.67). At 3 years, there was no significant difference in the local control rate (93% for capecitabine and 92% for 5-FU and leucovorin), relapse-free rate (74% for capecitabine and 73% for 5-FU and leucovorin), or disease-specific survival rate (86% for capecitabine and 77% for 5-FU and leucovorin). The acute toxicity profile was comparable, with little Grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Conclusions: When administered with concurrent preoperative RT, both capecitabine and intermittent 5-FU infusion with leucovorin modulation provided comparable pathologic tumor response, local control, relapse-free survival, and disease-specific survival rates in rectal cancer.

  8. Effect of time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy on local recurrence-free survival in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Jang, Se Jin; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The concentration of capecitabine peaks at 1–2 hours after administration. We therefore assumed that proper timing of capecitabine administration and radiotherapy would maximize radiosensitization and influence survival among patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 223 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent preoperative chemoradiation, followed by surgery from January 2002 to May 2006. All patients underwent pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) and received capecitabine twice daily at 12-hour intervals (1,650 mg/m2/day). Patients were divided into two groups according to the time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy. Patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy were classified as Group A (n = 109); all others were classified as Group B (n = 114). The median follow-up period was 72 months (range, 7 to 149 months). Although Group A had a significantly higher rate of good responses (44% vs. 25%; p = 0.005), the 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of 93% in Group A and 97% in Group B did not differ significantly (p = 0.519). The 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were also comparable between the groups. Despite the better pathological response in Group A, the time interval between capecitabine and radiotherapy administration did not have a significant effect on survivals. Further evaluations are needed to clarify the interaction of these treatment modalities.

  9. Incidence of severe capsular contracture following implant-based immediate breast reconstruction with or without postoperative chest wall radiotherapy using 40 Gray in 15 fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, Gillian A.; Horan, Gail; Irwin, Michael S.; Malata, Charles M.; Wishart, Gordon C.; Wilson, Charles B.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of capsular contracture (CC) requiring revisional surgery in patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy (RT) or no RT following mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction. Material and methods: One hundred and seventy-eight immediate breast reconstructions performed at the Cambridge Breast Unit between 1.1.2001 and 31.12.2005 were identified. RT was delivered using a standard UK scheme of 40 Gray in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. The influence of hormones and chemotherapy as well as postoperative RT on time to development of severe CC after implant-based reconstruction was explored in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: One hundred and ten patients had implant-based reconstructions with a median follow-up of 51 months. In the RT group (41 patients), there were 8 patients with severe CC requiring revisional surgery, a crude rate of 19.5%, with actuarial rates of 0%, 5%, 5%, 21%, 30% and 30% at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 years follow-up. In the unirradiated group, there were no cases of severe CC. This difference is highly significant (p < 0.001). Hormones and chemotherapy were not significantly associated with severe CC. Conclusions: This series showed a significantly higher rate of severe CC with postoperative RT. This finding has important clinical implications, when counselling patients for immediate breast reconstruction

  10. n-3 fatty acid-based parenteral nutrition improves postoperative recovery for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binhao; Wei, Gang; Li, Rui; Wang, Yanjun; Yu, Jie; Wang, Rui; Xiao, Hua; Wu, Chao; Leng, Chao; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-10-01

    A new lipid emulsion enriched in n-3 fatty acid has been reported to prevent hepatic inflammation in patients following major surgery. However, the role of n-3 fatty acid-based parenteral nutrition for postoperative patients with cirrhosis-related liver cancer is unclear. We investigated the safety and efficacy of n-3 fatty acid-based parenteral nutrition for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer followed hepatectomy. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial (Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier no. NCT02321202) was conducted for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer that underwent hepatectomy between March 2010 and September 2013 in our institution. We compared isonitrogenous total parenteral nutrition with 20% Structolipid and 10% n-3 fatty acid (Omegaven, Fresenius-Kabi, Germany) (treatment group) to Structolipid alone (control group) for five days postoperatively, in the absence of enteral nutrition. We enrolled 320 patients, and 312 (97.5%) were included in analysis (155 in the control group and 157 in the treatment group). There was a significant reduction of morbidity and mortality in the treatment group, when compared with the control group (total complications 78 [50.32%] vs. 46 [29.30%]; P parenteral nutrition significantly improved postoperative recovery for cirrhotic patients with liver cancer following hepatectomy, with a significant reduction in overall mortality and length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. [A paclitaxel-resistant case of recurrent breast cancer responded to combination therapy of capecitabine and trastuzumab].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marutaka, Masahito; Suguri, Takayasu; Miyake, Mikio; Yoshimura, Kouichi

    2005-12-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old female. Under the supervision of her former doctor, this patient had an operation and adjuvant chemotherapy for progressive breast cancer. During the following period, local recurrence of breast cancer and pulmonary lymphopathia developed. Although medication with paclitaxel was attempted, the focus was resistant to this treatment, and metastasis to the brain was also observed. Due to the dyscrasia above, the patient had difficulty breathing and became bedridden. Subsequently, combination treatment of capecitabine and trastuzumab was attempted. As a result,metastasis in the brain and pulmonary lymphopathia were improved. The patient recovered enough to be discharged at one time. However, his condition took a turn for the worse after the interruption of the combination treatment by a side effect. In conclusion, the combination treatment of capecitabine and trastuzumab is thought to be effective for non-responders to paclitaxel.

  12. Fructus mume Extracts Alleviate Diarrhea in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving the Combination Therapy of Lapatinib and Capecitabine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xing

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Lapatinib and capecitabine have been widely used in the therapy of breast cancer. However, long-term use of lapatinib and capecitabine often causes the most common side effect diarrhea, which limit the medicine use. Fructus mume (F. mume has been proved to be effective to treat chronic diarrhea with few side effects. The compounds from F. mume were extracted by using an ethanol method. Extracts of F. mume (EFM were analyzed by HPLC. We investigated the protective effects of EFM on the diarrhea caused by lapatinib and capecitabine. From March 1st, 2016 to June 1st, 2017, 208 breast cancer patients with diarrhea caused by lapatinib and capecitabine were recruited. The patients were evenly assigned into two groups: EG group (the patients took 100 mg EFM daily and CG group (the patients took placebo daily. The effects of EFM on diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptoms were measured by a semiquantitative method seven-point Likert scale. Overall quality of life was measured by SF-36 questionnaire and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The HPLC analysis showed that there were three components in EFM, including citric acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, and chlorogenic acid. Breast cancer types were observed by using Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stain. The breast cancer can be divided into leaflet, gland and fibroblast types. Patient age, skin metastases, treatment, and grade 1 diarrhea were significant risk factors associated with for grade 2 diarrhea. EFM reduced diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptoms by reducing the average scores of the diarrhea symptom and seven-point Likert scale, and improved life quality of patients significantly by improving SF-36 scores and reducing HADS scores when compared to that in the CG group after 6-week therapy and further 4-week follow-up (P < 0.05. EFM may be a potential choice for the diarrhea therapy in breast cancer patients.

  13. Simultaneous Estimation of Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Capecitabine Hydrochloride in Combined Tablet Dosage Form by RP-HPLC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC method has been developed for the simultaneous estimation of gemcitabine hydrochloride and capecitabine hydrochloride in combined tablet dosage form. An inertsil ODS-3 C-18 column having dimensions of 250×4.6 mm and particle size of 5 µm, with mobile phase containing a mixture of acetonitrile : water : triethyelamine in the ratio of (70 : 28 : 2v/v was used. The pH of mobile phase was adjusted to 4.0 with ortho-phosphoric acid. The flow rate was 1 mL/min and the column effluents were monitored at 260 nm. The retention time for gemcitabine hydrochloride and capecitabine hydrochloride was found to be 2.76 and 2.3 min respectively. The proposed method was validated in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of detection, limit of quantitation and robustness. The method was found to be linear in the range of 10-50 µg/mL and 4-24 µg/mL for gemcitabine hydrochloride and capecitabine hydrochloride, with regression coefficient r = 0.999 and r = 0.999, respectively.

  14. A phase two randomised trial of neratinib monotherapy versus lapatinib plus capecitabine combination therapy in patients with HER2+ advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Miguel; Bonneterre, Jacques; Geyer, Charles E; Ito, Yoshinori; Ro, Jungsil; Lang, Istvan; Kim, Sung-Bae; Germa, Caroline; Vermette, Jennifer; Wang, Kenneth; Wang, Kongming; Awada, Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    The safety and efficacy of neratinib monotherapy were compared with that of lapatinib plus capecitabine in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (HER2+), locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer and prior trastuzumab treatment. Patients received neratinib 240 mg/d continuously (n=117) or lapatinib 1250 mg/d continuously plus capecitabine 2000 mg/m(2) per day on days 1-14 of each 21-d cycle (n=116). The primary aim was to demonstrate non-inferiority of neratinib for progression-free survival (PFS). The non-inferiority of neratinib was not demonstrated when compared with lapatinib plus capecitabine (hazard ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.60; non-inferiority margin, 1.15). Median PFS for neratinib was 4.5 months versus 6.8 months for lapatinib plus capecitabine and median overall survival was 19.7 months versus 23.6 months. Objective response rate (neratinib, 29% versus lapatinib plus capecitabine, 41%; P=0.067) and clinical benefit rate (44% versus 64%; P=0.003) were lower for the neratinib arm but consistent with previously reported results. In both treatment arms, diarrhoea was the most frequently reported treatment-related adverse event of any grade (neratinib, 85% versus lapatinib plus capecitabine, 68%; P=0.002) and of grade 3/4 (28% versus 10%; P<0.001), but was typically managed with concomitant anti-diarrhoeal medication and/or study treatment modification. Importantly, neratinib had no significant skin toxicity. The results are considered as inconclusive since neither inferiority nor non-inferiority of treatment with neratinib versus lapatinib plus capecitabine could be demonstrated. The study confirmed relevant single-agent clinical activity and acceptable overall tolerability of neratinib in patients with recurrent HER2+ advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  16. Gender-Specific Differences in Low-Dose Haloperidol Response for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Register-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettner, Florian; Janitza, Silke; Prüll, Kathrin; Weninger, Ernst; Mansmann, Ulrich; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Jovanovic, Alexander; Pollwein, Bernhard; Chappell, Daniel; Zwissler, Bernhard; von Dossow, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the most common and distressing complications after general anesthesia and surgery, with young non-smoking females receiving postoperative opioids being high-risk patients. This register-based study aims to evaluate the effect of low-dose haloperidol (0.5 mg intravenously) directly after induction of general anesthesia to reduce the incidence of PONV in the postoperative anesthesiological care unit (PACU). Multivariable regression models were used to investigate the association between low-dose haloperidol and the occurrence of PONV using a patient registry containing 2,617 surgical procedures carried out at an university hospital. Haloperidol 0.5 mg is associated with a reduced risk of PONV in the total collective (adjusted odds ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: [0.56, 0.99], p = 0.05). The results indicate that there is a reduced risk in male patients (adjusted odds ratio = 0.45, 95% confidence interval: [0.28, 0.73], p = 0.001) if a dose of 0.5 mg haloperidol was administered while there seems to be no effect in females (adjusted odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval: [0.71, 1.46], p = 0.93). Currently known risk factors for PONV such as female gender, duration of anesthesia and the use of opioids were confirmed in our analysis. This study suggests that low-dose haloperidol has an antiemetic effect in male patients but has no effect in female patients. A confirmation of the gender-specific effects we have observed in this register-based cohort study might have major implications on clinical daily routine.

  17. The impact of pancreaticoduodenectomy on endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function: A prospective cohort study based on pre- and postoperative function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeyen, Geert; Jansen, Miet; Hartman, Vera; Chapelle, Thiery; Bracke, Bart; Ysebaert, Dirk; De Block, Christophe

    Studies reporting on function after pancreatic surgery are frequently based on diabetes history, fasting glycemia or random glycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the evolution of pancreatic function in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy based on proper pre- and postoperative function tests. It was hypothesised that pancreatic function deteriorates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Between 2013 and 2016, 78 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for oncologic indications had a prospective evaluation of their endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function. Endocrine function was evaluated with the 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the 1 mg intravenous glucagon test. Exocrine function was evaluated with a 13C-labelled mixed-triglyceride breath test. Tests were performed pre- and postoperatively. In 90.5% (19/21) of patients with preoperatively known diabetes, no change in endocrine function was observed. In contrast, endocrine function improved in 68.1% (15/22) of patients with newly diagnosed diabetes. 40% (14/35) of patients with a preoperative normal OGTT or prediabetes experienced deterioration in function. In multivariate analysis, improvement of newly diagnosed diabetes was correlated with preoperative bilirubin levels (p = 0.045), while progression towards diabetes was correlated with preoperative C-peptidogenic index T 30 (p = 0.037). A total of 20.5% (16/78) of patients had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency preoperatively. Another 51.3% (40/78) of patients deteriorated on exocrine level. In total, 64.1% (50/78) of patients required pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy postoperatively. Although deterioration of endocrine function was expected after pancreatic resection, improvement is frequently observed in patients with newly diagnosed diabetes. Exocrine function deteriorates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Does preoperative physiotherapy improve postoperative, patient-based outcomes in older adults who have undergone total knee arthroplasty? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesham, Ross Alexander; Shanmugam, Sivaramkumar

    2017-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability in older adults (≥60) in the UK. If nonsurgical management fails and if OA severity becomes too great, knee arthroplasty is a preferred treatment choice. Preoperative physiotherapy is often offered as part of rehabilitation to improve postoperative patient-based outcomes. Systematically review whether preoperative physiotherapy improves postoperative, patient-based outcomes in older adults who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and compare study interventions to best-practice guidelines. A literature search of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs), published April 2004-April 2014, was performed across six databases. Individual studies were evaluated for quality using the PEDro Scale. Ten RCTs met the full inclusion/exclusion criteria. RCTs compared control groups versus: preoperative exercise (n = 5); combined exercise and education (n = 2); combined exercise and acupuncture (n = 1); neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES; n = 1); and acupuncture versus exercise (n = 1). RCTs recorded many patient-based outcomes including knee strength, ambulation, and pain. Minimal evidence is presented that preoperative physiotherapy is more effective than no physiotherapy or usual care. PEDro Scale and critical appraisal highlighted substantial methodological quality issues within the RCTs. There is insufficient quality evidence to support the efficacy of preoperative physiotherapy in older adults who undergo total knee arthroplasty.

  19. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ferrone, Cristina R. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  20. Postoperative Outcomes of Minimally Invasive Gastrectomy Versus Open Gastrectomy During the Early Introduction of Minimally Invasive Gastrectomy in the Netherlands: A Population-based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenkman, Hylke J F; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Slaman, Annelijn E; Goense, Lucas; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2017-11-01

    To compare postoperative outcomes of minimally invasive gastrectomy (MIG) to open gastrectomy (OG) for cancer during the introduction of MIG in the Netherlands. Between 2011 and 2015, the use of MIG increased from 4% to 53% in the Netherlands. This population-based cohort study included all patients with curable gastric adenocarcinoma that underwent gastrectomy between 2011 and 2015, registered in the Dutch Upper GI Cancer Audit. Patients with missing preoperative data, and patients in whom no lymphadenectomy or reconstruction was performed were excluded. Propensity score matching was applied to create comparable groups between patients receiving MIG or OG, using year of surgery and other potential confounders. Morbidity, mortality, and hospital stay were evaluated. Of the 1697 eligible patients, 813 were discarded after propensity score matching; 442 and 442 patients who underwent MIG and OG, respectively, remained. Conversions occurred in 10% of the patients during MIG. Although the overall postoperative morbidity (37% vs 40%, P = 0.489) and mortality rates (6% vs 4%, P = 0.214) were comparable between the 2 groups, patients who underwent MIG experienced less wound complications (2% vs 5%, P = 0.006). Anastomotic leakage occurred in 8% of the patients after MIG, and in 7% after OG (P = 0.525). The median hospital stay declined over the years for both procedures (11 to 8 days, P Netherlands, with overall morbidity and mortality comparable with OG, less wound complications and shorter hospitalization.

  1. Adjuvant treatment for resected rectal cancer: impact of standard and intensified postoperative chemotherapy on disease-free survival in patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation-a propensity score-matched analysis of an observational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Ptok, Henry; Benedix, Frank; Otto, Ronny; Popp, Felix; Ridwelski, Karsten; Gastinger, Ingo; Benckert, Christoph; Lippert, Hans; Bruns, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected rectal cancer is widely used. However, studies on adjuvant treatment following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal excision (TME) have yielded conflicting results. Recent studies have focused on adding oxaliplatin to both preoperative and postoperative therapy, making it difficult to assess the impact of adjuvant oxaliplatin alone. This study was aimed at determining the impact of (i) any adjuvant treatment and (ii) oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant treatment on disease-free survival in CRT-pretreated, R0-resected rectal cancer patients. Patients undergoing R0 TME following 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-only-based CRT between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, were selected from a nationwide registry. After propensity score matching (PSM), comparison of disease-free survival (DFS) using Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test was performed in (i) patients receiving no vs. any adjuvant treatment and (ii) patients treated with adjuvant 5FU/capecitabine without vs. with oxaliplatin. Out of 1497 patients, 520 matched pairs were generated for analysis of no vs. any adjuvant treatment. Mean DFS was significantly prolonged with adjuvant treatment (81.8 ± 2.06 vs. 70.1 ± 3.02 months, p rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT and TME surgery under routine conditions, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved DFS. No benefit was observed for the addition of oxaliplatin to adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting.

  2. The effect of simulation-based crew resource management training on measurable teamwork and communication among interprofessional teams caring for postoperative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Douglas E; Deleeuw, Lori D; Wolk, Seth; Paige, John T; Neily, Julia; Mills, Peter D

    2013-11-01

    Many adverse events in health care are caused by teamwork and communication breakdown. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of a point-of-care simulation-based team training curriculum on measurable teamwork and communication skills in staff caring for postoperative patients. Twelve facilities involving 334 perioperative surgical staff underwent simulation-based training. Pretest and posttest self-report data included the Self-Efficacy of Teamwork Competencies Scale. Observational data were captured with the Clinical Teamwork Scale. Teamwork scores (measured on a five-point Likert scale) improved for all eight survey questions by an average of 18% (3.7 to 4.4, p communication rating (scale of 1 to 10) increased by 16% (5.6 to 6.4, p teamwork and communication. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  4. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  5. Safety and efficacy of neratinib in combination with capecitabine in patients with metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Cristina; Garcia-Saenz, Jose A; Xu, Binghe; Harb, Wael; Moroose, Rebecca; Pluard, Timothy; Cortés, Javier; Kiger, Corinne; Germa, Caroline; Wang, Kongming; Martin, Miguel; Baselga, José; Kim, Sung-Bae

    2014-11-10

    Neratinib is a potent irreversible pan-tyrosine kinase inhibitor with antitumor activity and acceptable tolerability in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive breast cancer. A multinational, open-label, phase I/II trial was conducted to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of neratinib plus capecitabine in patients with solid tumors (part one) and to evaluate the safety and efficacy of neratinib plus capecitabine in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (part two). Part one was a 3 + 3 dose-escalation study in which patients with advanced solid tumors received oral neratinib once per day continuously plus capecitabine twice per day on days 1 to 14 of a 21-day cycle at predefined dose levels. In part two, patients with trastuzumab-pretreated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer received neratinib plus capecitabine at the MTD. The primary end point in part two was objective response rate (ORR). In part one (n = 33), the combination of neratinib 240 mg per day plus capecitabine 1,500 mg/m(2) per day was defined as the MTD, which was further evaluated in part 2 (n = 72). The most common drug-related adverse events were diarrhea (88%) and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (48%). In part two, the ORR was 64% (n = 39 of 61) in patients with no prior lapatinib exposure and 57% (n = 4 of 7) in patients previously treated with lapatinib. Median progression-free survival was 40.3 and 35.9 weeks, respectively. Neratinib in combination with capecitabine had a manageable toxicity profile and showed promising antitumor activity in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer pretreated with trastuzumab and lapatinib. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Phase II study of radiopeptide {sup 177}Lu-octreotate and capecitabine therapy of progressive disseminated neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claringbold, Phillip G. [Fremantle Hospital, Department of Oncology, Fremantle, WA (Australia); Brayshaw, Paul A.; Turner, J.H. [University of Western Australia, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fremantle Hospital, Fremantle, WA (Australia); Price, Richard A. [Fremantle Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fremantle, WA (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    In this phase II study we investigated the safety and efficacy of combination capecitabine and {sup 177}Lu-octreotate for the treatment of disseminated, progressive, unresectable neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Enrolled in the study were 33 patients with biopsy-proven NETs, positive {sup 111}In-octreotide scintigraphy and progressive disease measurable by CT/MRI who were to receive four cycles of 7.8 GBq {sup 177}Lu-octreotate 8-weekly, with 14 days of 1,650 mg/m{sup 2} capecitabine per day. Of the 33 patients, 25 completed four cycles. Minimal transient myelosuppression at 3-4 weeks caused grade 3 thrombocytopenia in one patient but no neutropenia. Nephrotoxicity was absent. Critical organ radiation dosimetry provided median estimates of the dose per cycle to the kidneys of 2.4 Gy and to the liver of 4.8 Gy, and showed cumulative doses all below toxic thresholds. Objective response rates (ORR) were 24% partial response (PR), 70% stable disease (SD) and 6% progressive disease. Median progression-free survival and median overall survival had not been reached at a median follow-up of 16 months (range 5-33 months). Survival at 1 and 2 years was 91% (95% CI 75-98%) and 88% (95% CI 71-96%), respectively. The addition of capecitabine radiosensitizing chemotherapy does not increase the minimal toxicity of {sup 177}Lu-octreotate radiopeptide therapy and led to an ORR of 24% PR and 70% minor response or SD in patients with progressive metastatic NETs. Tumour control and stabilization of disease was obtained in 94% of these patients. (orig.)

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m 2 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m 2 /week, irinotecan 40 mg/m 2 /week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m 2 /day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 ± 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  8. Phase II study of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ) and concomitant boost radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Das, Prajnan; Delclos, Marc E.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Brown, Thomas D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Feig, Barry W.; Morris, Jeffrey; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Lin, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of capecitabine (Xeloda (registered) ), an oral fluoropyrimidine, as a radiosensitizer in the neoadjuvant treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: We conducted a phase II study of capecitabine (825 mg/m 2 orally, twice daily continuous) with radiotherapy (52.5 Gy/30 fractions to the primary tumor and perirectal nodes) in 54 patients with LARC (node-negative ≥T3 or any node-positive tumor) staged by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). The primary endpoint was pathologic response rate; secondary endpoints included toxicity profiles and survival parameters. Results: Of the 54 patients (median age, 56.7 years; range, 21.3-78.7 years; male:female ratio, 1.7; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1: 100%), 51 patients (94%) had T3N0 or T3N1 disease by EUS. Surgery was not performed in 3 patients; 2 of these patients had metastatic disease, and the third patient refused after a complete clinical response. Of the 51 patients evaluable for pathologic response, 9 patients (18%) achieved complete response, and 12 patients (24%) had microscopic residual disease (<10% viable cells). In addition, 26 patients of all 54 patients (51%) achieved T-downstaging, and 15 patients of 29 patients (52%) achieved N-downstaging. Grade 3/4 toxicities were radiation dermatitis (9%) and diarrhea (2%). Sphincter preservation rate for tumor ≤5 cm from the anal verge was 67% (18/27). Conclusion: This regimen of radiotherapy plus capecitabine is well tolerated and is more convenient than protracted venous infusion of 5-FU. The pathologic response rate is comparable to our previous experience using protracted venous infusion 5-FU for LARC

  9. Phase II study of concurrent capecitabine and external beam radiotherapy for pain control of bone metastases of breast cancer origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Kundel

    Full Text Available Pain from bone metastases of breast cancer origin is treated with localized radiation. Modulating doses and schedules has shown little efficacy in improving results. Given the synergistic therapeutic effect reported for combined systemic chemotherapy with local radiation in anal, rectal, and head and neck malignancies, we sought to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of combined capecitabine and radiation for palliation of pain due to bone metastases from breast cancer.Twenty-nine women with painful bone metastases from breast cancer were treated with external beam radiation in 10 fractions of 3 Gy, 5 fractions a week for 2 consecutive weeks. Oral capecitabine 700 mg/m(2 twice daily was administered throughout radiation therapy. Rates of complete response, defined as a score of 0 on a 10-point pain scale and no increase in analgesic consumption, were 14% at 1 week, 38% at 2 weeks, 52% at 4 weeks, 52% at 8 weeks, and 48% at 12 weeks. Corresponding rates of partial response, defined as a reduction of at least 2 points in pain score without an increase in analgesics consumption, were 31%, 38%, 28%, 34% and 38%. The overall response rate (complete and partial at 12 weeks was 86%. Side effects were of mild intensity (grade I or II and included nausea (38% of patients, weakness (24%, diarrhea (24%, mucositis (10%, and hand and foot syndrome (7%.External beam radiation with concurrent capecitabine is safe and tolerable for the treatment of pain from bone metastases of breast cancer origin. The overall and complete response rates in our study are unusually high compared to those reported for radiation alone. Further evaluation of this approach, in a randomized study, is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01784393NCT01784393.

  10. The postoperative stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfield, Courtney A. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Levine, Marc S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu

    2005-03-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients.

  11. The postoperative stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfield, Courtney A.; Levine, Marc S.

    2005-01-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients

  12. Primary radiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Comparative analysis of inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selzer, Edgar; Grah, Anja; Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar; Kornek, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation-based scoring systems have potential value in evaluating the prognosis of cancer patients; however, detailed comparative analyses in well-characterized head and neck cancer patient collectives are missing. We analyzed overall survival (OS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who were treated with curative intent by primary radiotherapy (RT) alone, by RT in combination with cetuximab (RIT) or with cisplatin (RCHT), and by primary surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). The primary RT collective (N = 170) was analyzed separately from the surgery plus RT group (N = 148). OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meyer method. Cox proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors and the inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the modified GPS (mGPS), the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the prognostic index (PI). A prognostic relevance of the scoring systems for OS was observed in the primarily irradiated, but not in the PORT collective. OS was 35.5, 18.8, and 15.4 months, respectively, according to GPS 0, 1, and 2. OS according to mGPS 0-2 was identical. The PLR scoring system was not of prognostic relevance, while OS was 27.3 months in the NLR 0 group and 17.3 months in the NLR 1 group. OS was 35.5 months in PI 0, 16.1 months in PI 1, and 22.6 months in PI 2. GPS/mGPS scoring systems are able to discriminate between three risk groups in primarily, but not postoperatively irradiated locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. (orig.) [de

  13. Determination and delineation of nodal target volumes for head-and-neck cancer based on patterns of failure in patients receiving definitive and postoperative IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, K.S. Clifford; Wippold, Franz J.; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Tran, Binh N.; Dempsey, James F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We present the guidelines for target volume determination and delineation of head-and-neck lymph nodes based on the analysis of the patterns of nodal failure in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Data pertaining to the natural course of nodal metastasis for each head-and-neck cancer subsite were reviewed. A system was established to provide guidance for nodal target volume determination and delineation. Following these guidelines, 126 patients (52 definitive, 74 postoperative) were treated between February 1997 and December 2000 with IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. The median follow-up was 26 months (range 12-55), and the patterns of nodal failure were analyzed. Results: These guidelines define the nodal target volume based on the location of the primary tumor and the probability of microscopic metastasis to the ipsilateral and contralateral (Level I-V) nodal regions. Following these guidelines, persistent or recurrent nodal disease was found in 6 (12%) of 52 patients receiving definitive IMRT, and 7 (9%) of 74 patients receiving postoperative IMRT had failure in the nodal region. Conclusion: On the basis of our clinical experience in implementing inverse-planning IMRT for head-and-neck cancer, we present guidelines using a simplified, but clinically relevant, method for nodal target volume determination and delineation. The intention was to provide a foundation that enables different institutions to exchange clinical experiences in head-and-neck IMRT. These guidelines will be subject to future refinement when the clinical experience in head-and-neck IMRT advances

  14. The postoperative spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is one of the most perplexing medical and medicoeconomic problems facing our health system today. In many studies reoperation rates tend to be between 10 and 20%, but as many as 20-45% 3 of patients may have persistent back or radicular pain following what was to have been definitive therapy. The causes for the FBSS are very complex. The Workmen's Compensation system and medicolegal trends toward very high settlements of litigation for injury have provided serious incentive for patients to remain symptomatic. It is difficult to analyze any statistical survey of symptomatic back patients without serious bias from this group of patients. Others suggest that patients with severe psychological problems, drug abuse, and alcoholism are inappropriately selected as surgical candidates. They believe that careful psychological evaluation of patients minimizes FBSS. Even if all extrinsic factors could be eliminated, the problem of failed back surgery would still be a major one. This chapter is based on a review of 300 postoperative lumbar spine multiplanar CT scans performed over a 15-month period. All patients had a complete set of axial images, with sagittal and coronal reformations photographed twice: optimized once for bone definition and once for soft-tissue contrast resolution

  15. Combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin is an effective treatment option for advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Ferrarotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of chemotherapy in well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET has been questioned. It was recently demonstrated that everolimus and sunitinib have activity in low and intermediate grade pancreatic NET. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CapOx combination in treating NET in an unselected population. In this regard, we retrospectively evaluated 24 patients diagnosed with metastatic NET treated with CapOx at two Brazilian institutes that are reference centers in cancer care. Tumor response was measured by RECIST criteria. Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, 71% had ECOG 0 or 1, the majority of tumors were primary from pancreas (67% followed by lung (17%, and 29% were functional. According to WHO classification criteria, 25% were grade 1, 37.5% grade 2 and 37.5% grade 3. Most patients received CapOx as second-line therapy, with a median of 6 cycles. Twenty-nine percent of patients had partial response by RECIST criteria. No association was observed between response rate and tumor grade, primary site or line of CapOx. The median time to progression was 9.8 months and median time to treatment failure was 12.1 months. Seventy-five percent of patients are alive at the time of this analysis; therefore, median overall survival was not reached. The CapOx combination was shown to be active in an unselected population with metastatic NET and may be a good platform for the incorporation of the newer molecular targeted agents being investigated for the treatment of this entity.

  16. Blood transfusion strategy and risk of postoperative delirium in nursing homes residents with hip fracture. A post hoc analysis based on the TRIFE randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandfort, Sif; Gregersen, Merete; Borris, Lars Carl; Damsgaard, Else Marie

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether a liberal blood transfusion strategy [Hb levels ≥11.3 g/dL (7 mmol/L)] reduces the risk of postoperative delirium (POD) on day 10, among nursing home residents with hip fracture, compared to a restrictive transfusion strategy [Hb levels ≥9.7 g/dL (6 mmol/L)]. Furthermore, to investigate whether POD influences mortality within 90 days after hip surgery. This is a post hoc analysis based on The TRIFE - a randomized controlled trial. Frail anemic patients from the Orthopedic Surgical Ward at Aarhus University Hospital were enrolled consecutively between January 18, 2010 and June 6, 2013. These patients (aged ≥65 years) had been admitted from nursing homes for unilateral hip fracture surgery. After surgery, 179 patients were included in this study. On the first day of hospitalization, all enrolled patients were examined for cognitive impairment (assessed by MMSE) and delirium (assessed by CAM). Delirium was also assessed on the tenth postoperative day. The prevalence of delirium was 10 % in patients allocated to a liberal blood transfusion strategy (LB) and 21 % in the group with a restrictive blood transfusion strategy (RB). LB prevents development of delirium on day 10, compared to RB, odds ratio 0.41 (95 % CI 0.17-0.96), p = 0.04. Development of POD on day 10 increased the risk of 90-day death, hazard ratio 3.14 (95 % CI 1.72-5.78), p < 0.001. In nursing home residents undergoing surgery for hip fracture, maintaining hemoglobin level above 11.3 g/dL reduces the rate of POD on day 10 compared to a RB. Development of POD is associated with increased mortality.

  17. Development of a novel CsA-PLGA drug delivery system based on a glaucoma drainage device for the prevention of postoperative fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhaoxing; Yu, Xiaobo; Hong, Jiaxu; Liu, Xi [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye & ENT Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Visual Impairment and Restoration, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Jianguo, E-mail: sjgsun@126.com [Research Center, Eye & ENT Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Visual Impairment and Restoration, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Xinghuai, E-mail: xhsun@shmu.edu.cn [Department of Ophthalmology, Eye & ENT Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Visual Impairment and Restoration, Fudan University, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2016-09-01

    The formation of a scar after glaucoma surgery often leads to unsuccessful control of intraocular pressure, and should be prevented by using a variety of methods. We designed and developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) comprising cyclosporine A (CsA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) based on a glaucoma drainage device (GDD) that can continuously release CsA to prevent postoperative fibrosis following glaucoma surgery. The CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and revealed an asymmetric pore structure. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed to measure the weight loss and evaluate the thermal stability of the CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS. The in vitro drug release profile of the DDS was studied using high performance liquid chromatography, which confirmed that the DDS released CsA at a stable rate and maintained adequate CsA concentrations for a relatively long time. The biocompatibility of the DDS and the inhibitory effects on the postoperative fibrosis were investigated in vitro using rabbit Tenon's fibroblasts. The in vivo safety and efficacy of the DDS were examined by implanting the DDS into Tenon's capsules in New Zealand rabbits. Bleb morphology, intraocular pressure, anterior chamber reactions, and anterior chamber angiography were studied at a series of set times. The DDS kept the filtration pathway unblocked for a longer time compared with the control GDD. The results indicate that the CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS represents a safe and effective strategy for preventing scar formation after glaucoma surgery. - Highlights: • CsA@PLGA@GDD drug delivery system (DDS) was designed and prepared successfully. • The DDS released CsA at a stable rate for > 3 months. • The DDS kept filtration pathway unblocked for a longer time than control. • CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS prevented glaucoma scar formation as a safe and effective strategy.

  18. Development of a novel CsA-PLGA drug delivery system based on a glaucoma drainage device for the prevention of postoperative fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Zhaoxing; Yu, Xiaobo; Hong, Jiaxu; Liu, Xi; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a scar after glaucoma surgery often leads to unsuccessful control of intraocular pressure, and should be prevented by using a variety of methods. We designed and developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) comprising cyclosporine A (CsA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) based on a glaucoma drainage device (GDD) that can continuously release CsA to prevent postoperative fibrosis following glaucoma surgery. The CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS was observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and revealed an asymmetric pore structure. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed to measure the weight loss and evaluate the thermal stability of the CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS. The in vitro drug release profile of the DDS was studied using high performance liquid chromatography, which confirmed that the DDS released CsA at a stable rate and maintained adequate CsA concentrations for a relatively long time. The biocompatibility of the DDS and the inhibitory effects on the postoperative fibrosis were investigated in vitro using rabbit Tenon's fibroblasts. The in vivo safety and efficacy of the DDS were examined by implanting the DDS into Tenon's capsules in New Zealand rabbits. Bleb morphology, intraocular pressure, anterior chamber reactions, and anterior chamber angiography were studied at a series of set times. The DDS kept the filtration pathway unblocked for a longer time compared with the control GDD. The results indicate that the CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS represents a safe and effective strategy for preventing scar formation after glaucoma surgery. - Highlights: • CsA@PLGA@GDD drug delivery system (DDS) was designed and prepared successfully. • The DDS released CsA at a stable rate for > 3 months. • The DDS kept filtration pathway unblocked for a longer time than control. • CsA@PLGA@GDD DDS prevented glaucoma scar formation as a safe and effective strategy.

  19. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garofalo, Michael C. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bendell, Johanna [Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Berger, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E. [North Main Radiation Oncology, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Program/Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Nowlan, Adam [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); DeNittis, Albert [Main Line Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  20. Defining the target volume for post-operative radiotherapy after D2 dissection in gastric cancer by CT-based vessel-guided delineation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hong In; Chang, Jee Suk; Lim, Joon Seok; Noh, Sung Hoon; Hyung, Woo Jin; An, Ji Yeong; Lee, Yong Chan; Rha, Sun Young; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Koom, Woong Sub

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the recurrent nodal gross tumor volume (rnGTV) based on CT-guided vascular structure to refine the clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in postoperative radiotherapy for advanced gastric cancer following radical gastrectomy with D2 dissection. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed follow-up images from 91 patients with their first regional recurrence after D2 dissection in stage III gastric cancer with N3 disease. We defined rnGTV as recurrent nodes shown in follow-up CT images, in which one diagnostic radiologist with specialty of gastrointestinal tract investigated. We drew rnGTVs at the equivalent location based on the same vessels of reference comparing CT images to recurrence CT images. Results: We propose vessel-based locations of rnGTVs on CT images with axial and coronal views. We show different patterns of regional recurrence according to the location of primary gastric cancer using CT and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) images. Frequently recurred sites, overlapped by more than five rnGTVs, are depicted in a DRR image. Conclusions: This study suggests vessel-based delineations of rnGTVs on CT images depending on nodal recurrence sites from follow-up images after D2 lymphadenectomy. Our results could help reduce the inter-observer variation of CTV delineation after D2 dissection in gastric cancer

  1. Postoperative spine infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of post-operative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication.

  2. The Application of an Evidence-Based Clinical Nursing Path for Improving the Preoperative and Postoperative Quality of Care of Pediatric Retroperitoneal Neuroblastoma Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial at a Tertiary Medical Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Mo, Lin; Tang, Yan; Wang, Qiuhong; Huang, Xiaoyan

    A clinical nursing path (CNP) that encourages patients and their families to become actively involved in healthcare decision-making processes may improve outcomes of pediatric retroperitoneal neuroblastoma (NB) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility and value of an evidence-based CNP provided to pediatric retroperitoneal NB patients undergoing resection surgery. One hundred twenty NB cases were assigned to a control group or a CNP group. The control group was provided with standard nursing care. The CNP group was provided with nursing care in accordance with an evidence-based CNP. The utility and value of the CNP were compared with standard nursing care. Outcome measures included rates of postoperative complications, lengths of hospital stay, and cost of hospitalization, as well as preoperative and postoperative quality of care and patient satisfaction with care. The rates of postoperative complications, length of preoperative hospitalization, total length of hospital stay, and costs of hospitalization were significantly lower for patients receiving the CNP compared with the control group. Preoperative and postoperative quality of care and patient satisfaction with care were significantly higher in patients receiving the CNP compared with the control group. Adoption of a CNP for preoperative and postoperative care of pediatric retroperitoneal NB patients undergoing resection surgery improves clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction with care. A CNP can increase families' participation in a patient's recovery process, enhance nurses' understanding of the services they are providing, and improve the quality of healthcare received by patients.

  3. Phase I study of neoadjuvant accelerated short course radiation therapy with photons and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Tseng, Yolanda D.; Napolitano, Brian N.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Swanson, Richard S.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Hong, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this phase I study, we sought to determine the feasibility and tolerability of neoadjuvant short course radiotherapy (SC-CRT) delivered with photon RT with concurrent capecitabine for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Ten patients with localized, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled from December 2009 to August 2011. In dose level I, patients received 3 Gy × 10. In dose level 2, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (every other day). In dose level 3, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (consecutive days). Capecitabine was given during weeks 1 and 2. Surgery was performed 1–3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. Results: With an intended accrual of 12 patients, the study was closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Compared to the companion phase I proton study, patients treated with photons had increased intraoperative RT fibrosis reported by surgeons (27% vs. 63%). Among those undergoing a Whipple resection, increased RT fibrosis translated to an increased mean OR time of 69 min. Dosimetric comparison revealed significantly increased low dose exposure to organs at risk for patients treated with photon RT. Conclusions: This phase I experience evaluating the tolerability of neoadjuvant SC-CRT with photon RT closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications

  4. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuan-Hong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Jun-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); An, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Luo, Jie-Lin [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Mu-Yan [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Pei-Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ding, Pei-Rong, E-mail: dingpr@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Department of Colorectal Surgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  5. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  6. The predictive value of microRNA-126 in relation to first line treatment with capecitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA-126 is the only microRNA (miRNA) known to be endothelial cell-specific influencing angiogenesis in several ways. The aim of the present study was to analyse the possible predictive value of miRNA-126 in relation to first line capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) in patients with metastatic...

  7. [Postoperative cognitive deficits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalezić, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Ivan; Leposavić, Ljubica; Kocica, Mladen; Bumbasirević, Vesna; Vucetić, Cedomir; Paunović, Ivan; Slavković, Nemanja; Filimonović, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunctions are relatively common in postoperative and critically ill patients. This complication not only compromises recovery after surgery, but, if persistent, it minimizes and compromises surgery itself. Risk factors of postoperative cognitive disorders can be divided into age and comorbidity dependent, and those related to anesthesia and surgery. Cardiovascular, orthopedic and urologic surgery carries high risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. It can also occur in other types of surgical treatment, especially in elderly. Among risk factors of cognitive disorders, associated with comorbidity, underlying psychiatric and neurological disorders, substance abuse and conditions with elevation of intracranial pressure are in the first place in postoperative patients. Preoperative and perioperative predisposing conditions for cognitive dysfunction and their incidence were described in our paper. These are: geriatric patients, patients with substance abuse, preexisting psychiatric or cognitive disorders, neurologic disease with high intracranial pressure, cerebrovascular insufficiency, epilepsia, preeclampsia, acute intermittent porphyria, operation type, brain hypoxia, changes in blood glucose level, electrolyte imbalance, anesthetic agents, adjuvant medication and intraoperative awareness. For each of these factors, evaluation, prevention and treatment strategies were suggested, with special regard on anesthetic technique.

  8. Postoperative Chemotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate and cognitive function of 43 children, age <3 years, with medulloblastoma treated with intensive postoperative chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy, were determined at the University of Wurzburg and other centers in Germany Chemotherapy consisted of three two-month cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, carboplatin, and etoposide.

  9. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan-Zhang; Gao, Peng; Song, Yong-Xi; Sun, Jing-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wan; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2016-04-12

    Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992-2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I-III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN- patients.

  10. Role of WhatsApp-based discussions in improving residents' knowledge of post-operative pain management: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Sumitra G; Bhawalkar, Pranay

    2017-10-01

    To provide a platform for the dissemination of basic knowledge of pain management, a WhatsApp group was created by residents and consultants. Common clinical scenarios, resident queries, and important instructions to be followed by residents with respect to running the Acute Pain Service were discussed in the group. This study evaluates the benefits of this interaction. This study was approved by the hospital ethics board and was registered with the Clinical Trial Registry of India. Second- and third-year anesthesia residents were included in a WhatsApp group, along with consultants (board certified anesthesiologists with a special interest in pain). Pain knowledge assessment was performed pre- and post-discussion using a standard 22-point questionnaire. A feedback form, which included self-rated confidence scores (1-10, 10-most confident) and opinions about the 3-month WhatsApp discussion, was collected. Improvements in the documentation in clinical sheets post-discussion were also analyzed. A total of 38 residents were included in the WhatsApp group. An improvement in the percentage of correct answers from 69.1% (pre-discussion) to 73.6% (post-discussion) was observed (P = 0.031). Improvements in the self-rated residents' confidence levels were also noted (P WhatsApp-based discussion was useful. Documentation of the details of epidural blockade in clinical sheets improved from 30% to 100%. The WhatsApp discussion improved residents' knowledge and confidence levels, and also resulted in improved documentation of essential details in the clinical notes. This form of education is promising and should be explored in future studies.

  11. Preoperative Alcohol Consumption and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Grønkjær, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To systematically review and summarize the evidence of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type. BACKGROUND:: Conclusions in studies on preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications have...... been inconsistent. METHODS:: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO citations. Included were original studies of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications occurring within 30 days of the operation.......30-2.49), prolonged stay at the hospital (RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.18-1.31), and admission to intensive care unit (RR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Clearly defined high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of postoperative mortality (RR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.50-4.78). Low to moderate preoperative alcohol...

  12. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multimodal approach to postoperative recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide updated information on recent developments within individual components of multimodal interventions to improve postoperative outcome (fast-track methodology). RECENT FINDINGS: The value of the fast-track methodology to improve recovery and decrease hospital stay...... and morbidity has been firmly consolidated, especially in colorectal procedures. An increasing amount of data from other procedures supports the value of the fast-track concept across procedures. Fast-track programs should be based on the analysis of procedure-specific factors that may influence outcome...

  14. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0247: A Randomized Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Capecitabine and Irinotecan or Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Concurrent Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Stuart J.; Winter, Kathryn; Meropol, Neal J.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Kachnic, Lisa; Rashid, Asif; Watson, James C.; Mitchell, Edith; Pollock, Jondavid; Lee, Robert Jeffrey; Haddock, Michael; Erickson, Beth A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of 2 /d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m 2 weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m 2 /d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m 2 weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4–8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4–6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. Results: A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint—the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).

  15. Non-toxic approach for treatment of breast cancer and its cutaneous metastasis: Capecitabine (Xeloda) enhanced photodynamic therapy in a murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Denisyuk, Anton; Bullock, Taylor; Govande, Mukul; Maytin, Edward V.

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer (BCA) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, with distant metastases to lung, liver, bone and skin occurring in approximately 40% of cases. Radiation therapy (RT) has been successfully employed for the treatment of BCA; however, multiple rounds of RT are associated with undesirable cutaneous side effects. This study explores PDT as a therapeutic alternative, to be given alone or in combination with RT and chemotherapy. Earlier, we had developed differentiation-enhanced combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) using a neoadjuvant (5-fluorouracil; 5FU) prior to PDT. The neoadjuvant increases the levels of PpIX, leading to better efficacy following aminolevulinate (ALA)- based PDT. Here, to avoid the toxicity of systemic 5FU, we used a nontoxic 5FU precursor (Capecitabine; CPBN) in a new cPDT regimen. CBPN, a standard chemotherapeutic for BCA, is metabolized to 5FU specifically within tumor tissue. Murine (4T1) BCA cells were injected into breast fat pads of nude mice. CPBN was administered by oral gavage followed by intraperitoneal ALA and red light for PDT. CPBN pretreatment of 4T1 tumors led to increased tumor cell differentiation (3.5 fold), homogenous elevation of intratumoral PpIX levels (4.5 fold), and enhanced tumor cell death post-PDT (5 fold), relative to vehicle control. Using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), a decline in tumor growth following CPBN-PDT was observed. Results showing the effect of CPBN-PDT on distant metastases of BCA to lung, lymph nodes and skin will be presented. In summary, CPBN-PDT, a novel combination approach, has a significant potential for translation into the clinic.

  16. Quality-of-life assessment following surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisi, K.W.; Earle, J.M.; Foote, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate the quality-of-life after surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the tongue base. Materials and Methods: At the 1995 ASTRO meeting, the University of Florida and MSKCC reported the quality-of-life (QOL) functional outcome of patients treated with primary radiation therapy (RT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue base (BOT). Relatively little data evaluating the QOL following primary surgery has been published. Between January 1974 and December 1993, 89 patients (pts) underwent surgery alone (65 pts) or surgery combined with postoperative radiation therapy (24 pts) for tongue base cancer. Twenty-seven pts were alive at last contact. Three pts have been lost to follow-up and three pts declined to participate in the QOL assessment. Twenty-one pts consented to QOL assessment. Their median follow-up is 5.4 years (range 2.0-20.8 years). These patients completed: 1) the Performance Status Scale for Head and Neck Cancer Patients (PSS), a measure of ability to eat in public, understandability of speech, and normalcy of diet (scale 0-100, best score = 100); and 2) Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) (scale 0-28 for physical and social well-being, and 0-20 for emotional well-being, higher number=best score). Pathologic T stage was T1-7, T2-10, T3-3, T4-1. Twenty patients had ipsilateral neck dissection and 6 had bilateral neck dissection. The 8 patients who were treated with adjuvant RT received a median dose of 60 Gy. Prior to treatment, 62% had either full or part-time employment with a median annual income of $10,000-$40,000. Results: Mean PSS scores for all patients were 82 for eating in public, 92 for understandability of speech, and 78 for normalcy of diet. Normalcy of diet was significantly better in the surgery alone group than in the adjuvant RT group (91 vs. 56, p=0.0005). The ability to eat in public (88 vs. 72, p=NS) and understandability of speech (96 vs. 84, p=NS) did not differ

  17. Primary radiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Comparative analysis of inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selzer, Edgar; Grah, Anja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Heiduschka, Gregor; Thurnher, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna, Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Kornek, Gabriela [Medical University of Vienna, Medicine I - Division of Clinical Oncology, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-13

    Inflammation-based scoring systems have potential value in evaluating the prognosis of cancer patients; however, detailed comparative analyses in well-characterized head and neck cancer patient collectives are missing. We analyzed overall survival (OS) in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who were treated with curative intent by primary radiotherapy (RT) alone, by RT in combination with cetuximab (RIT) or with cisplatin (RCHT), and by primary surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). The primary RT collective (N = 170) was analyzed separately from the surgery plus RT group (N = 148). OS was estimated using the Kaplan-Meyer method. Cox proportional-hazard regression models were applied to compare the risk of death among patients stratified according to risk factors and the inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), the modified GPS (mGPS), the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and the prognostic index (PI). A prognostic relevance of the scoring systems for OS was observed in the primarily irradiated, but not in the PORT collective. OS was 35.5, 18.8, and 15.4 months, respectively, according to GPS 0, 1, and 2. OS according to mGPS 0-2 was identical. The PLR scoring system was not of prognostic relevance, while OS was 27.3 months in the NLR 0 group and 17.3 months in the NLR 1 group. OS was 35.5 months in PI 0, 16.1 months in PI 1, and 22.6 months in PI 2. GPS/mGPS scoring systems are able to discriminate between three risk groups in primarily, but not postoperatively irradiated locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. (orig.) [German] Entzuendungsbasierte Bewertungssysteme haben eine potenzielle Bedeutung fuer die Beurteilung der Prognose von Krebspatienten. Derzeit fehlen jedoch ausreichend detailliert durchgefuehrte Analysen in Kollektiven von Patienten mit Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Untersucht wurde das Gesamtueberleben (''overall survival'', OS) von Patienten mit lokal

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of postoperative external radiotherapy for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The records of thirty three patients with intracranial meningiomas who were treated with postoperative external irradiation at our institution between Feb, 1988 and Nov, 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Median age of patients at diagnosis was 53 years with range of 17 to 68 years. Sites of involvement were parasagital, cerebral convexity, sphenoid ridge, parasellar and tentorium cerebella. Of 33 evaluated patients, 15 transitional, 10 meningotheliomatous, 4 hemangiopericytic, 3 atypical and 1 malignant meningioma were identified. Four patients underwent biopsy alone and remaining 29 patients underwent total tumor resection. A dose of 50 to 60 Gy was delivered in 28-35 daily fractions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks. Follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 8 years. The actuarial survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 78% and 67%, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival rates were 73% and 61 %, respectively. The overall local control rate at 5 years was 83%. One out of 25 patients in benign group developed local failure, while 4 out of 8 patients in malignant group did local failure (p <0.05), Of 4 patients who underwent biopsy alone, 2 developed local failure. There was no significant difference in 5 year actuarial survival between patients who underwent total tumor resection and those who did biopsy alone. Patients whose age is under 60 showed slightly better survival than those whose age is 60 or older, although this was not statistically significant. There was no documented late complications in any patients. Based on our study, we might conclude that postoperative external beam radiotherapy tends to improve survival of patients with intracranial meningiomas comparing with surgery alone

  19. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Pathologic N2 Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Review of the National Cancer Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cliff G.; Patel, Aalok P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; DeWees, Todd; Waqar, Saiama N.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Baggstrom, Maria Q.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bell, Jennifer M.; Guthrie, Tracey J.; Colditz, Graham A.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of modern postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on overall survival (OS) for patients with N2 non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated nationally with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with pathologic N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from 2006 to 2010 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base and stratified by use of PORT (≥ 45 Gy). A total of 4,483 patients were identified (PORT, n = 1,850; no PORT, n = 2,633). The impact of patient and treatment variables on OS was explored using Cox regression. Results Median follow-up time was 22 months. On univariable analysis, improved OS correlated with younger age, treatment at an academic facility, female sex, urban population, higher income, lower Charlson comorbidity score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT. On multivariable analysis, improved OS remained independently predicted by younger age, female sex, urban population, lower Charlson score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT (hazard ratio, 0.886; 95% CI, 0.798 to 0.988). Use of PORT was associated with an increase in median and 5-year OS compared with no PORT (median OS, 45.2 v 40.7 months, respectively; 5-year OS, 39.3% [95% CI, 35.4% to 43.5%] v 34.8% [95% CI, 31.6% to 38.3%], respectively; P = .014). Conclusion For patients with N2 NSCLC after complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, modern PORT seems to confer an additional OS advantage beyond that achieved with adjuvant chemotherapy alone. PMID:25667283

  20. A comparison of volume clamp method-based continuous noninvasive cardiac output (CNCO) measurement versus intermittent pulmonary artery thermodilution in postoperative cardiothoracic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julia Y; Körner, Annmarie; Schulte-Uentrop, Leonie; Kubik, Mathias; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Kluge, Stefan; Reuter, Daniel A; Saugel, Bernd

    2018-04-01

    The CNAP technology (CNSystems Medizintechnik AG, Graz, Austria) allows continuous noninvasive arterial pressure waveform recording based on the volume clamp method and estimation of cardiac output (CO) by pulse contour analysis. We compared CNAP-derived CO measurements (CNCO) with intermittent invasive CO measurements (pulmonary artery catheter; PAC-CO) in postoperative cardiothoracic surgery patients. In 51 intensive care unit patients after cardiothoracic surgery, we measured PAC-CO (criterion standard) and CNCO at three different time points. We conducted two separate comparative analyses: (1) CNCO auto-calibrated to biometric patient data (CNCO bio ) versus PAC-CO and (2) CNCO calibrated to the first simultaneously measured PAC-CO value (CNCO cal ) versus PAC-CO. The agreement between the two methods was statistically assessed by Bland-Altman analysis and the percentage error. In a subgroup of patients, a passive leg raising maneuver was performed for clinical indications and we present the changes in PAC-CO and CNCO in four-quadrant plots (exclusion zone 0.5 L/min) in order to evaluate the trending ability of CNCO. The mean difference between CNCO bio and PAC-CO was +0.5 L/min (standard deviation ± 1.3 L/min; 95% limits of agreement -1.9 to +3.0 L/min). The percentage error was 49%. The concordance rate was 100%. For CNCOcal, the mean difference was -0.3 L/min (±0.5 L/min; -1.2 to +0.7 L/min) with a percentage error of 19%. In this clinical study in cardiothoracic surgery patients, CNCO cal showed good agreement when compared with PAC-CO. For CNCO bio , we observed a higher percentage error and good trending ability (concordance rate 100%).

  1. Postoperative care in geriatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Ulenberg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the elderly is becoming increasingly common problem and is of interest, because in the future this phenomenon will affect most of us. For many years, he observed in different countries increasingly rapid aging of the population, including in Poland. The operation in such a patient poses a high risk of complications and life-threatening conditions. Their age makes in the postoperative period there are many medical problems. Many factors can affect the scope of a different self-care nursing with such a patient.

  2. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase II study of short-time oxaliplatin, capecitabine and epirubicin (EXE) as first-line therapy in patients with non-resectable gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonnemann, K.R.; Jensen, H.A.; Yilmaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    Epirubicin, cisplatin and continuous infusion of 5-FU is a widely used palliative regimen in patients with gastric cancer. If cisplatin is substituted by oxaliplatin and 5-FU by capecitabine this regimen can be administered in the outpatient setting. Dose-limiting toxicity of oxaliplatin...... is peripheral sensory neuropathy and it is recommended to give oxaliplatin as a 120 min infusion. However, in patients with colorectal cancer a 30 min infusion of oxaliplatin can safely be administered without increasing neurotoxicity, standard infusion time is 30 min at our departments. In our phase I study...... the recommended doses of EXE was established (Dupont et al, 2006). Patients with non-resectable gastric adenocarcinoma were eligible. Patients received EXE (epirubicin 50 mg m(-2) day 1; capecitabine 1000 mg m(-2) day(-1) continuously and oxaliplatin 130 mg m(-2) day 1) as outpatient therapy every third week...

  4. Phase I study of short-time oxaliplatin, capecitabine and epirubicin (EXE) as first line therapy in patients with non-resectable gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Jeanette; Jensen, Helle A; Jensen, Benny V

    2007-01-01

    A phase I trial of short-time oxaliplatin (E), capecitabine (X) and epirubicin (E) for patients with metastatic gastric cancer was initiated to establish the recommended dose for further therapy with short-time EXE. Patients received out-patient therapy with a fixed dose of epirubicin 50 mg/m2 day......-8), median survival was 9.2 months and median TTP was 7.5 months. A combination of epirubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 continuously and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 day 1 each 3 weeks is an easily administered and well tolerated out-patient regimen for patients with non-resectable gastric cancer....

  5. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy - A singlearm phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawky, H.; Galal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and toxicity of 1 year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Methods: Between June 2010 and February 2012, 19 women with pathologically proven operable TNBC, who had received standard adjuvant chemotherapy before were enrolled. Patients received 1 year of oral capecitabine metronomic therapy (650 mg/m2, twice every day), after standard adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy if indicated. The primary endpoints of this study were disease-free survival rates (DFS) and safety profile. Secondary end point was overall survival (OS). Results: The maximal follow-up was 46.6 months with a median of 30.1 months ±11.525 (95% CI; 28.5-33.5 months). The median DFS was 41.7 months ±2.7 (95% CI; 36.5-46.9). No one developed locoregional recurrence. The actuarial rate of DFS was 88.8% and 82.05% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. At the time of the analyses, no patients had died and the median OS was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were manageable with only 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3/4 hand-foot syndrome and another 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3 diarrhea. No Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity was recorded. All patients received full doses of capecitabine throughout the study and dose reduction was not required in any of our patients. Conclusion: One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy.

  6. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitors and Metronomic Capecitabine as Salvage Treatment for Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Tumors: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Paolo; Milano, Annalisa; D'Antonio, Chiara; Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Fais, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The acidification of extracellular compartment represents a conceivable mechanism of drug resistance in malignant cells. In addition, it has been reported to drive proliferation and promote invasion and metastasis. Experimental evidence has shown that proton pump inhibitors can counteract tumor acidification and restore sensitivity to anticancer drugs. Moreover, early clinical data have supported the role of proton pump inhibitors in anticancer treatments. Metronomic capecitabine has demonstrated beneficial effects as salvage chemotherapy for heavily pretreated or frail patients with gastrointestinal cancer. The present study (EudraCT Number: 2013-001096-20) was aimed at investigating the activity and safety of high-dose rabeprazole in combination with metronomic capecitabine in patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer refractory to standard treatment. A total of 66 patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive capecitabine 1500 mg/daily, continuously with or without rabeprazole 1.5 mg/kg twice a day, 3 days a week until disease progression, undue toxicity, or withdrawal of informed consent. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival. The secondary endpoints are clinical benefit, which reflects the proportion of patients with complete response, partial response, and stable disease, and overall survival. Progression-free and overall survival will be evaluated using a log-rank test to determine the effect of rabeprazole independently at the 2-sided α-level of 0.05. Other assessments will include the frequency and severity of adverse events and changes in laboratory parameters to measure the safety, and the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine. The results are expected in 2016. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Preliminary results of capecitabine metronomic chemotherapy in operable triple-negative breast cancer after standard adjuvant therapy--a single-arm phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawky, Hanan; Galal, Samar

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate efficacy and toxicity of 1 year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Between June 2010 and February 2012, 19 women with pathologically proven operable TNBC, who had received standard adjuvant chemotherapy before were enrolled. Patients received 1 year of oral capecitabine metronomic therapy (650 mg/m2, twice every day), after standard adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy if indicated. The primary endpoints of this study were disease-free survival rates (DFS) and safety profile. Secondary end point was overall survival (OS). The maximal follow-up was 46.6 months with a median of 30.1 months±11.525 (95% CI; 28.5-33.5 months). The median DFS was 41.7 months±2.7 (95% CI; 36.5-46.9). No one developed locoregional recurrence. The actuarial rate of DFS was 88.8% and 82.05% at 2 and 3 years, respectively. At the time of the analyses, no patients had died and the median OS was not reached. Treatment-related adverse events were manageable with only 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3/4 hand-foot syndrome and another 1 patient (5.3%) suffering from Grade 3 diarrhea. No Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity was recorded. All patients received full doses of capecitabine throughout the study and dose reduction was not required in any of our patients. One year of capecitabine metronomic therapy preceded by standard adjuvant chemotherapy, is active and well-tolerated in TNBC patients previously treated with standard adjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  8. CNS tumors: postoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayanir, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Imaging assessment of brain tumors following surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including the location of the tumor, the surgical procedure and the disease process for which it was performed. Depending upon these factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities may be required to demonstrate any clinically relevant situation, to assist the surgeon in deciding if repeat surgery is necessary. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show the shape, size, signal intensity, and enhancement of a brain tumor. It has been widely used to diagnose and differentiate brain tumors and to assess the surgery outcomes. Longitudinal MRI scans have also been applied for the assessment of treatment and response to surgery. The newly developed MRI techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have the potential to provide the molecular, functional and metabolic information of preoperative and postoperative brain tumors. Postoperative diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging are especially useful in predicting early functional recovery from new deficits after brain tumor surgery.This lecture will stress the principles, applications, and pitfalls of conventional as well as newly developing functional imaging techniques following operation of brain tumors

  9. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Gary M.; Meropol, Neal J.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Hoffman, John; Callahan, Elaine; Price, Robert; Cheng, Jonathan; Cohen, Steve; Lewis, Nancy; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Rogatko, Andre; Konski, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age ≥18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m 2 twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation

  10. Re-irradiation combined with capecitabine in locally recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. A prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormittag, L.; Kornek, G. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Div. of Clinical Oncology; Lemaire, C.; Radonjic, D.; Selzer, E. [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. for Radiotherapy and Radiobiology

    2012-03-15

    We performed a prospective phase II trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of radiotherapy combined with capecitabine in patients suffering from a recurrence of a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) within a previously irradiated field. A total of 31 evaluable patients with recurrent SCCHN received re-irradiation with a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions over 5 weeks) up to a maximum of 60 Gy combined with 900 mg/m{sup 2}/day capecitabine given on the days of radiotherapy. The median time to relapse after the first course of radiotherapy was 15 months. The overall response rate in our study was 68% including 6 patients with a complete response. The median overall survival was 8.4 months. Grade 3 or 4 mucositis occurred in 4 patients and 1 patient, respectively. No grade 4 hematological toxicities were observed; 1 patient had grade 3 anemia. The cumulative median lifetime dose was 116 Gy. Capecitabine combined with re-irradiation is a well-tolerated treatment in patients with recurrent SCCHN. In light of its good tolerability, it appears to be a potential option for patients with a reduced performance status and may also serve as a basis for novel treatment concepts, such as in combination with targeted therapies.

  11. Comparison of the effectiveness and toxicity of neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens, capecitabine/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide vs 5-fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide, followed by adjuvant, capecitabine/docetaxel vs docetaxel, in patients with operable breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang MM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Minmin Zhang,* Wei Wei,* Jianlun Liu, Huawei Yang, Yi Jiang, Wei Tang, Qiuyun Li, Xiaoming Liao Department of Breast Surgery, Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and toxicity of neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens, xeloda/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (XEC vs 5-fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (FEC, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, capecitabine/taxotere (XT vs taxotere (T, in axillary lymph node (LN-positive early-stage breast cancer. In this randomized, Phase III trial, 137 patients with operable primary breast cancer (T2-0, N0-1 who were tested axillary LN positive through aspiration biopsy of axillary LNs were randomized (1:1 to four 3-weekly cycles of XEC or FEC. Patients underwent surgery within 4–6 weeks after the fourth cycle, followed by four adjuvant cycles of 3-weekly XT or T. The primary end point was tumor pathological complete response. Toxicity profiles were secondary objectives. In total, 131 patients had clinical and radiological evaluation of response and underwent surgery. Treatment with XEC led to an increased rate of pathological complete response in primary tumor (18% vs 6%, respectively, P=0.027 and objective remission rate (87% vs 73%, P=0.048 compared to FEC. Clinical complete response occurred in 20% and 7% for XEC and FEC, respectively. Compared to FEC, XEC was associated with more hand-foot syndrome (57% vs 11%, P<0.001 and 3/4 grade nausea/vomiting/diarrhea (30% vs 14%, P=0.034 but less phlebitis (3% vs 14%, P=0.035. XT and T adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were well tolerated: treatment-related 3/4 grade adverse events occurred in 28% and 17% of patients receiving XT and T, respectively. Keywords: breast cancer, capecitabine, docetaxel, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, curative effect, toxic side effects

  12. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Simultaneous Integrated Boost–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Capecitabine and Mitomycin C for Locally Advanced Anal Carcinoma: A Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deenen, Maarten J. [Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dewit, Luc [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boot, Henk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beijnen, Jos H. [Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schellens, Jan H.M. [Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Science, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaco-epidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke, E-mail: a.cats@nki.nl [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Newer radiation techniques, and the application of continuous 5-FU exposure during radiation therapy using oral capecitabine may improve the treatment of anal cancer. This phase 1, dose-finding study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost–intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with concomitant capecitabine and mitomycin C in locally advanced anal cancer, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced anal carcinoma were treated with SIB-IMRT in 33 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 33 fractions of 1.5 Gy electively to the bilateral iliac and inguinal lymph node areas. Patients received a sequential radiation boost dose of 3 × 1.8 Gy on macroscopic residual tumor if this was still present in week 5 of treatment. Mitomycin C 10 mg/m{sup 2} (maximum 15 mg) was administered intravenously on day 1, and capecitabine was given orally in a dose-escalated fashion (500-825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d.) on irradiation days, until dose-limiting toxicity emerged in ≥2 of maximally 6 patients. An additional 8 patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: A total of 18 patients were included. The MTD of capecitabine was determined to be 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. The predominant acute grade ≥3 toxicities included radiation dermatitis (50%), fatigue (22%), and pain (6%). Fifteen patients (83% [95%-CI: 66%-101%]) achieved a complete response, and 3 (17%) patients a partial response. With a median follow-up of 28 months, none of the complete responders, and 2 partial responders had relapsed. Conclusions: SIB-IMRT with concomitant single dose mitomycin C and capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. on irradiation days resulted in an acceptable safety profile, and proved to be a tolerable and effective treatment regimen for locally advanced anal cancer.

  14. Neoadjuvant 5-FU or Capecitabine Plus Radiation With or Without Oxaliplatin in Rectal Cancer Patients: A Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yothers, Greg; O’Connell, Michael J.; Beart, Robert W.; Wozniak, Timothy F.; Pitot, Henry C.; Shields, Anthony F.; Landry, Jerome C.; Ryan, David P.; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S.; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini; Eakle, Janice F.; Robertson, John M.; Moore, Dennis F.; Mullane, Michael R.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Ward, Patrick J.; Sharif, Saima; Roh, Mark S.; Wolmark, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background: National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R-04 was designed to determine whether the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine could be substituted for continuous infusion 5-FU in the curative setting of stage II/III rectal cancer during neoadjuvant radiation therapy and whether the addition of oxaliplatin could further enhance the activity of fluoropyrimidine-sensitized radiation. Methods: Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer undergoing preoperative radiation were randomly assigned to one of four chemotherapy regimens in a 2x2 design: CVI 5-FU or oral capecitabine with or without oxaliplatin. The primary endpoint was local-regional tumor control. Time-to-event endpoint distributions were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Hazard ratios were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Among 1608 randomized patients there were no statistically significant differences between regimens using 5-FU vs capecitabine in three-year local-regional tumor event rates (11.2% vs 11.8%), 5-year DFS (66.4% vs 67.7%), or 5-year OS (79.9% vs 80.8%); or for oxaliplatin vs no oxaliplatin for the three endpoints of local-regional events, DFS, and OS (11.2% vs 12.1%, 69.2% vs 64.2%, and 81.3% vs 79.0%). The addition of oxaliplatin was associated with statistically significantly more overall and grade 3–4 diarrhea (P < .0001). Three-year rates of local-regional recurrence among patients who underwent R0 resection ranged from 3.1 to 5.1% depending on the study arm. Conclusions: Continuous infusion 5-FU produced outcomes for local-regional control, DFS, and OS similar to those obtained with oral capecitabine combined with radiation. This study establishes capecitabine as a standard of care in the pre-operative rectal setting. Oxaliplatin did not improve the local-regional failure rate, DFS, or OS for any patient risk group but did add considerable toxicity. PMID:26374429

  15. Simultaneous Integrated Boost–Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Capecitabine and Mitomycin C for Locally Advanced Anal Carcinoma: A Phase 1 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deenen, Maarten J.; Dewit, Luc; Boot, Henk; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Cats, Annemieke

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Newer radiation techniques, and the application of continuous 5-FU exposure during radiation therapy using oral capecitabine may improve the treatment of anal cancer. This phase 1, dose-finding study assessed the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost–intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with concomitant capecitabine and mitomycin C in locally advanced anal cancer, including pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic analyses. Methods and Materials: Patients with locally advanced anal carcinoma were treated with SIB-IMRT in 33 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 33 fractions of 1.5 Gy electively to the bilateral iliac and inguinal lymph node areas. Patients received a sequential radiation boost dose of 3 × 1.8 Gy on macroscopic residual tumor if this was still present in week 5 of treatment. Mitomycin C 10 mg/m 2 (maximum 15 mg) was administered intravenously on day 1, and capecitabine was given orally in a dose-escalated fashion (500-825 mg/m 2 b.i.d.) on irradiation days, until dose-limiting toxicity emerged in ≥2 of maximally 6 patients. An additional 8 patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: A total of 18 patients were included. The MTD of capecitabine was determined to be 825 mg/m 2 b.i.d. The predominant acute grade ≥3 toxicities included radiation dermatitis (50%), fatigue (22%), and pain (6%). Fifteen patients (83% [95%-CI: 66%-101%]) achieved a complete response, and 3 (17%) patients a partial response. With a median follow-up of 28 months, none of the complete responders, and 2 partial responders had relapsed. Conclusions: SIB-IMRT with concomitant single dose mitomycin C and capecitabine 825 mg/m 2 b.i.d. on irradiation days resulted in an acceptable safety profile, and proved to be a tolerable and effective treatment regimen for locally advanced anal cancer

  16. Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Pain Management: Clinicians' Knowledge and Practices on Assessment and Measurement at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. ... A standardized questionnaire was administered to 236 hospital – based clinicians including medical doctors, nurses and clinical officers. The questionnaire consisted of ...

  17. Phase II trial of utidelone as monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in heavily pretreated metastatic breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC remains a great clinical challenge as drug resistance frequently develops. Alternative agents that can overcome drug resistance would offer new therapeutic options. The primary aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of utidelone as a monotherapy or in combination with capecitabine in metastatic breast cancer patients previously treated with and resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes. Methods In two open-label, noncomparative clinical studies, patients with metastatic breast cancer who previously received anthracycline- and/or taxane-containing regimens were given (1 25 to 35 mg/m2/day intravenously infused utidelone, once daily for 5 days, in combination with 14 days of 2000 mg/m2 capecitabine, divided in two equal daily oral doses or (2 40 mg/m2/day intravenously infused utidelone, once daily for 5 days. These regimens were administered per each 21-day treatment cycle, and the maximum of treatment cycles allowed per protocol is 6. Objective response rate (ORR, progression-free survival (PFS, and tolerability were evaluated. Results In the combination study, 33 patients completed a median of 6 cycles of therapy, which was the highest cycles a trial patient could receive under the criteria of the study protocol. Efficacy was evaluated (n = 32 with an ORR of 42.4 % (FAS, 95 % CI, 26.6, 60.9 and a median PFS of 7.9 (FAS, 95 % CI, 6.1, 9.8 months. The monotherapy study (n = 63 resulted in an ORR of 28.57 % (FAS, 95 % CI, 18.4, 40.6 and a median PFS of 5.4 (FAS, 95 % CI, 2.9, 9.8 months. In both studies, common toxicities associated with utidelone administration included peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, myalgia, and arthralgia, but the toxicities were limited and manageable. Notably, very mild myelosuppression, low liver and renal toxicities, and very limited gastrointestinal toxic effect were observed, in contrast to other agents in

  18. Is a nurse-led telephone intervention a viable alternative to nurse-led home care and standard care for patients receiving oral capecitabine? Results from a large prospective audit in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Olive; Hughes, Carol Anne; Burton, Amy; Saunders, Mark P; Molassiotis, Alex

    2013-05-01

    Home care nursing has been shown to be a valuable service for patients receiving oral chemotherapy; however, associated costs can be high and telephone-based services may be more cost-effective options. This prospective audit explored the usefulness of a nurse-led telephone intervention for supporting cancer patients treated with Capecitabine, comparing historical findings from a randomised trial evaluating a home-based intervention over standard care with a modified nurse-led telephone follow-up intervention. Self-reported toxicity and service use were assessed in 298 patients who received nurse-led telephone follow-up, compared with historical data from 164 patients (81 receiving standard care and 83 home care intervention). Findings suggested that nurse-led telephone follow-up can potentially lead to reduced toxicity (chest pain, vomiting, oral mucositis, nausea, insomnia) when compared with standard care, and that it has a similar impact on the management of some symptoms when compared with home care (i.e. vomiting, oral mucositis), although it was not as effective as the home care intervention for other toxicities (diarrhoea and insomnia). These encouraging findings need to be explored further using a randomised trial design before we reach any conclusions. Further research should also include a health economics study to assess the cost-effectiveness of the telephone-based services for patients receiving oral chemotherapy. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  20. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, and Irinotecan versus Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine in Patients with Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Zheng, Hanrui; Wu, Yifan; Wheeler, John; Zeng, Xiaoxi; Fu, Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    No standard treatment has been accepted widely for the first-/second-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The current study aimed to determine a preferred strategy between FOLFIRI (fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan) and ECX (epirubicin, cisplatin,and capecitabine) for AGC from the cost-effectiveness perspective. According to a French intergroup study, two groups (ECX arm and FOLFIRI arm) and three health states (progression-free survival (PFS), progressive disease (PD) and death) were analyzed in the current Markov model. All the medical costs were calculated from a Chinese societal perspective. Although FOLFIRI was an acceptable first-line therapy in the treatment of AGC with a better time-to treatment failure (TTF) compared to ECX, ECX arm (ECX followed by FOLFIRI) gained 0.08 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs) more effectiveness benefit compared with FOLFIRI arm (FOLFIRI followed by ECX). Additionally, a lower cost was found in ECX arm ($23,813.13 versus $24,983.70). Hence, the strategy of FOLFIRI arm is dominated by ECX arm ($4,125.8 per QALM in FOLIRI arm; $3,879.724 per QALM in ECX arm). ECX followed by FOLFIRI was a preferred strategy with more effectiveness and lower cost compared with FOLFIRI followed by ECX for the treatment of AGC. PMID:27824060

  1. Phase I study of imatinib, cisplatin and 5-fluoruracil or capecitabine in advanced esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Martina; Becker, Karen; Schulte, Nadine; Belle, Sebastian; Hofheinz, Ralf; Krause, Annekatrin; Schmid, Roland M; Röcken, Christoph; Ebert, Matthias P

    2012-01-01

    Despite all benefit provided by established therapies prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. Targeted inhibition of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) by imatinib may influence tumor growth and amplify chemotherapeutic effects. This phase I study evaluated dose limiting toxicity (DLT) of imatinib combinated with chemotherapy according to a 3-patient cohort dose-escalating design. Thirty-five patients received cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 d1 q 3w)/ capecitabine (1250 mg/m 2 bid d1-14 q 21) or cisplatin (50 mg/m 2 d1 q 2w)/ 5-fluoruracil (2 g/m 2 d1, q 1w). Imatinib was started d - 4 with dose escalation from 300 to 700 mg QD in 100 mg steps. At imatinib dose level 1 (300mg) one DLT was observed, three more patients were enrolled without further DLT. At dose level 5 (700 mg) two gastric perforations occurred, so 600 mg imatinib emerged as the maximum tolerated dose. Major grade 3/4 toxicities were nausea (6%), anemia (6%) and fatigue (3%). Response evaluation revealed partial response in 27% and stable disease in 43% of the assessable patients. Combination of imatinib and chemotherapy is well tolerated. Response rates were not superior to those of standard therapy. Further investigations of a larger group of patients are required to confirm the amplification of chemotherapy effects by imatinib. European Clinical Trials Database: Eudra-CT2006-005792-17 and Clinical Trials Database: NCT00601510

  2. POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING | Yusufu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiemetics, acupuncture and other drugs are used to prevent and treat postoperative nausea and vomiting. Those that manage patients in the postoperative period should endeavour to make postoperative nausea and vomiting as unacceptable as postoperative pain. Key words: Postoperative, Nausea, Vomiting, Narcotics, ...

  3. A procedure-specific systematic review and consensus recommendations for postoperative analgesia following total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, H.B.; Simanski, C.J.; Sharp, C.

    2008-01-01

    The PROSPECT Working Group, a collaboration of anaesthetists and surgeons, conducts systematic reviews of postoperative pain management for different surgical procedures (http://www.postoppain.org). Evidence-based consensus recommendations for the effective management of postoperative pain are th...

  4. Postoperative Ileus in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Tu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative ileus is among the most common complications after surgery. Aging is associated with an increased colonic transit time, and anesthetic disturbance to colonic motility is often aggravated in the elderly. Postoperative ileus increases morbidity, prolongs the length of hospital stay, and constitutes a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. Multimodal enhanced recovery protocols, or fast-track surgeries, have been developed to improve postoperative recovery. Patient education, avoidance of perioperative fluid overload, selective use of nasogastric decompression, early ambulation, adopting a minimally invasive approach, early initiation of clear fluids, and gum chewing are all possible measures to reduce postoperative ileus. Thoracic epidural anesthesia is a well-established technique to hasten recovery, whereas insufficient data are available to ascertain the safety and efficacy of opioid-sparing analgesia in the elderly. The evidence is clear that traditional prokinetic medications are not helpful in the treatment or prevention of postoperative ileus. Early results suggest that alvimopan is a promising agent to reverse opioid-induced ileus. Since postoperative ileus is a multifactorial condition, a concerted effort is therefore necessary to prevent or decrease the duration of postoperative ileus using multimodal strategies.

  5. Patient-reported outcomes from EMILIA, a randomized phase 3 study of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) versus capecitabine and lapatinib in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welslau, Manfred; Diéras, Veronique; Sohn, Joo-Hyuk; Hurvitz, Sara A; Lalla, Deepa; Fang, Liang; Althaus, Betsy; Guardino, Ellie; Miles, David

    2014-03-01

    This report describes the results of an analysis of patient-reported outcomes from EMILIA (TDM4370g/BO21977), a randomized phase 3 study of the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) versus capecitabine and lapatinib in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. A secondary endpoint of the EMILIA study was time to symptom worsening (time from randomization to the first documentation of a ≥ 5-point decrease from baseline) as measured by the Trial Outcome Index Physical/Functional/Breast (TOI-PFB) subset of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Breast questionnaire. Predefined exploratory patient-reported outcome endpoints included proportion of patients with a clinically significant improvement in symptoms (per TOI-PFB) and proportion of patients with diarrhea symptoms (per Diarrhea Assessment Scale). In the T-DM1 arm, 450 of 495 patients had a baseline and ≥ 1 postbaseline TOI-PFB score versus 445 of 496 patients in the capecitabine-plus-lapatinib arm. Time to symptom worsening was delayed in the T-DM1 arm versus the capecitabine-plus-lapatinib arm (7.1 months versus 4.6 months, respectively; hazard ratio = 0.796; P = .0121). In the T-DM1 arm, 55.3% of patients developed clinically significant improvement in symptoms from baseline versus 49.4% in the capecitabine-plus-lapatinib arm (P = .0842). Although similar at baseline, the number of patients reporting diarrhea symptoms increased 1.5- to 2-fold during treatment with capecitabine and lapatinib but remained near baseline levels in the T-DM1 arm. Together with the EMILIA primary data, these results support the concept that T-DM1 has greater efficacy and tolerability than capecitabine plus lapatinib, which may translate into improvements in health-related quality of life. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  6. Postoperative imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primery impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications. (orig.) [de

  7. Postoperative MRI of the ankle; Postoperative Magnetresonanztomographie des Sprunggelenks

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    Sharabianlou Korth, M.; Fritz, L.B. [Rheinlandaerzte, Willich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Postoperative imaging of the ankle can be challenging, even for the experienced radiologist. Pathological and postoperative changes to the primarily complex anatomy of the ankle with its great variety of bone structures, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissue in a very limited space may cause great difficulty in differentiating underlying pathology from expected postoperative changes and artifacts, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Selecting the appropriate radiological modality is key to making the correct diagnosis. Therefore, knowledge of the initial and current symptoms is just as important as familiarity with the most frequently performed operations in the ankle. This article aims to give its reader a summary of the most important and frequently performed operation techniques of the ankle and discusses the expected appearance and possible complications in postoperative imaging. (orig.) [German] Die postoperative radiologische Bildgebung des Sprunggelenks kann auch fuer den erfahrenen Radiologen eine besondere Herausforderung darstellen. Die komplex aufgebaute Anatomie des Sprunggelenks, mit seinen multiplen Gelenkflaechen, Sehnen, Baendern und neurovaskulaeren Strukturen auf engstem Raum, kann durch Operationen signifikant veraendert und insbesondere in der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) verfaelscht dargestellt werden. Fuer eine fundierte Befundung und Beurteilung der Operationsergebnisse ist die Kenntnis der praeoperativen Diagnose, Zeitpunkt und Technik der durchgefuehrten Operation(en) sowie der aktuellen klinischen Symptomatik von grosser Bedeutung. Dieser Artikel konzentriert sich auf zu erwartende radiologische Veraenderungen und gibt Tipps zur Befundung der postoperativen MRT des Sprunggelenks bei einer Auswahl relevanter operativer Eingriffe. Zudem wird auf moegliche postoperative Komplikationen und ihre radiologische Darstellung hingewiesen. (orig.)

  8. Combined electron/photon (E/P) postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for early breast cancer based on central lung distance (CLD) values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Michiko

    2008-01-01

    Combined electron/photon (E/P) method has been introduced since 1999 in the postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for 27 early breast cancer patients out of 491, whose central lung disease (CLD) exceeded over 2.5 cm. Several parameters were analyzed between the conventional method and E/P method. Remarkable improvement was established as follows, CLD 2.64 vs. 1.26 cm, maximum lung distance (MLD) 2.75 vs. 1.40 cm and maximum heart distance (MHD) 1.81 vs. 0.58 cm, respectively (p<0.0001). Combined E/P method would be valid to avoid lung complications and long-term cardiac mortality. (author)

  9. Phase I/II trial of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan in combination with bevacizumab in first line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazarbashi, Shouki; Aljubran, Ali; Alzahrani, Ahmad; Mohieldin, Ahmed; Soudy, Hussein; Shoukri, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Phase III studies have demonstrated the efficacy of FOLFOXIRI regimens (5-fluorouracil/leucovorin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan) with/without bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Capecitabine is an orally administered fluoropyrimidine that may be used instead of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin. We evaluated a triple-chemotherapy regimen of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, plus bevacizumab in 53 patients with mCRC. A Phase I study identified the maximum tolerated dose of irinotecan as 150 mg/m 2 . Median follow-up in a subsequent Phase II study using this dose was 28 months (74% progressed). For all patients, a complete response was achieved in 4% and a partial response in 60%; median progression-free survival (PFS) was 16 months and median overall survival (OS) was 28 months. Median PFS was longer for patients with an early treatment response (28 vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.024), or early tumor shrinkage (25 vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.006), or for patients suitable for surgical removal of metastases with curative intent (median not reached vs. 9 months for others; P = 0.001). Median OS was longer for patients with early tumor shrinkage (median not reached vs. 22 months for others; P = 0.006) or surgery (median not reached vs. 22 months for others, P = 0.002). K-ras mutations status did not influence PFS (P = 0.88) or OS (P = 0.82). Considerable Grade 3/4 toxicity was encountered (36% for diarrhea, 21% for vomiting and 17% for fatigue). In conclusion, the 3-weekly triple-chemotherapy regimen of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, plus bevacizumab, was active in the first-line treatment of mCRC, although at the expense of a high level of toxicity

  10. A prospective, non-randomized phase II trial of Trastuzumab and Capecitabine in patients with HER2 expressing metastasized pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endlicher Esther

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer related death in Western countries. Advantages in surgical techniques, radiation and chemotherapy had almost no impact on the long term survival of affected patients. Therefore, the need for better treatment strategies is urgent. HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase of the EGFR family, involved in signal transduction pathways leading to cell growth and differentiation is overexpressed in a number of cancers, including breast and pancreatic cancer. While in breast cancer HER2 has already been successfully used as a treatment target, there are only limited data evaluating the effects of inhibiting HER2 tyrosine kinases in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods Here we report the design of a prospective, non-randomized multi-centered Phase II clinical study evaluating the effects of the Fluoropyrimidine-carbamate Capecitabine (Xeloda ® and the monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody Trastuzumab (Herceptin® in patients with non-resectable, HER2 overexpressing pancreatic cancer. Patients eligible for the study will receive Trastuzumab infusions on day 1, 8 and 15 concomitant to the oral intake of Capecitabine from day 1 to day 14 of each three week cylce. Cycles will be repeated until tumor progression. A total of 37 patients will be enrolled with an interim analysis after 23 patients. Discussion Primary end point of the study is to determine the progression free survival after 12 weeks of bimodal treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent Capecitabine and the anti-HER2 antibody Trastuzumab. Secondary end points include patient's survival, toxicity analysis, quality of life, the correlation of HER2 overexpression and clinical response to Trastuzumab treatment and, finally, the correlation of CA19-9 plasma levels and progression free intervals.

  11. Phase I and pharmacodynamic study of vorinostat combined with capecitabine and cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Changhoon; Ryu, Min-Hee; Na, Young-Soon; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Lee, Chae-Won; Maeng, Jeheon; Kim, Se-Yeon; Koo, Dong Hoe; Park, Inkeun; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2014-04-01

    A phase I trial of first-line vorinostat, an orally bio-available histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) was performed to assess recommend phase II trial dose in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Five dose levels of three-weekly vorinostat-XP were tested; vorinostat was dosed at 300-400 mg once daily on Days 1-14, capecitabine at 800-1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily on Days 1-14, and cisplatin at 60-80 mg/m(2) on Day 1. To assess the pharmacodynamics of vorinostat, histone H3 acetylation was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before the study treatment and at Day 8 of cycle 1. In total, 30 patients with unresectable or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma were included. Dose-limiting toxicities were thrombocytopenia, fatigue, stomatitis, and anorexia. The following doses were recommended for phase II trial: 400 mg of vorinostat once daily, 1,000 mg/m(2) of capecitabine twice daily, and 60 mg/m(2) of cisplatin. The most common grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (47 %), anorexia (20 %), thrombocytopenia (17 %), and fatigue (13 %). In overall, response rate was 56 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 32-81). With a median follow-up of 14.1 months, the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 7.1 months (95 % CI: 3.8-10.3) and 18.0 months (95 % CI: 4.8-31.1), respectively. The change in H3 acetylation after treatment with vorinostat correlated significantly with the vorinostat dose (300 vs. 400 mg/day) and the baseline level of H3 acetylation before treatment. Three-weekly vorinostat-XP regimen is feasible and recommended for further development in advanced gastric cancer.

  12. Postoperative MRI of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharabianlou Korth, M.; Fritz, L.B.

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative imaging of the ankle can be challenging, even for the experienced radiologist. Pathological and postoperative changes to the primarily complex anatomy of the ankle with its great variety of bone structures, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissue in a very limited space may cause great difficulty in differentiating underlying pathology from expected postoperative changes and artifacts, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Selecting the appropriate radiological modality is key to making the correct diagnosis. Therefore, knowledge of the initial and current symptoms is just as important as familiarity with the most frequently performed operations in the ankle. This article aims to give its reader a summary of the most important and frequently performed operation techniques of the ankle and discusses the expected appearance and possible complications in postoperative imaging. (orig.) [de

  13. Capecitabine in combination with either cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel as a first-line treatment for metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a randomized phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Sungmin; Kim, Moonjin; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Se Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of a combination regimen of capecitabine plus cisplatin (CC) or capecitabine plus paclitaxel (CP) as a first-line treatment in patients with metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were enrolled in this open-label, phase II, randomized trial. Patients were assigned to either the CC arm (days [D]1–14 capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 twice daily + D1 cisplatin 75 mg/m 2 , every 3 weeks) or the CP arm (D1–14 capecitabine 1000 mg/m 2 twice daily + D1, 8 paclitaxel 80 mg/m 2 , every 3 weeks). The primary endpoint of the study was response rate and secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), toxicity and quality of life. A total of 94 patients were entered into this study between October 2008 and October 2012, 46 patients in the CC arm and 48 in the CP arm. Patients in both arms received a median of six cycles of treatment (range, 1–14) and the response rates were 57 and 58 % in the cisplatin and paclitaxel arm, respectively. With a median follow-up of 23 months, the median PFS was 5.1 months (95 % CI 4.0–6.2 months) in the cisplatin arm and 6.7 months (95 % CI 4.9–8.5 months) in the paclitaxel arm, whereas the median OS was 10.5 months (95 % CI 9.2–11.9 months) in the cisplatin arm and 13.2 months (95 % CI 9.4–17.0 months) in the paclitaxel arm. Patients in the cisplatin arm were more likely to experience neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, whereas patients in the paclitaxel arm had a higher frequency of neuropathy and alopecia. Quality of life was similar between treatment arms. Both CC and CP regimens were effective and well tolerated as a first-line treatment in patients with metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

  14. Identification of colorectal cancer patients with tumors carrying the TP53 mutation on the codon 72 proline allele that benefited most from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based postoperative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godai, Ten-i; Sakuma, Yuji; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Kameda, Yoichi; Akaike, Makoto; Miyagi, Yohei; Suda, Tetsuji; Sugano, Nobuhiro; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Shiozawa, Manabu; Sekiguchi, Hironobu; Sekiyama, Akiko; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi

    2009-01-01

    Although postoperative chemotherapy is widely accepted as the standard modality for Dukes' stage C or earlier stage colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, biomarkers to predict those who may benefit from the therapy have not been identified. Previous in vitro and clinical investigations reported that CRC patients with wild-type p53 gene (TP53)-tumors benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy, while those with mutated TP53-tumors do not. However, these studies evaluated the mutation-status of TP53 by immunohistochemistry with or without single-strand conformation polymorphism, and the mutation frequency was different from study to study. In addition, the polymorphic status at p53 codon 72, which results in arginine or proline residues (R72P) and is thought to influence the function of the protein significantly, was not examined. To evaluate the significance of the TP53 mutation as a molecular marker to predict the prognosis of CRC patients, especially those who received postoperative chemotherapy, we examined the mutation by direct sequencing from fresh CRC tumors and evaluated the R72P polymorphism of the mutated TP53 by a combined mutant allele- and polymorphic allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The TP53 mutation occurred in 147 (70%) of 211 Japanese CRC tumors. The mutation was observed in 93 (63%) tumors on the R72 allele and in 54 (37%) tumors on the P72 allele. Although the alterations to TP53 have no prognostic significance for CRC patients overall, we found that Dukes' stage C CRC patients who did not receive postoperative chemotherapy and carried the mutated TP53-R72 showed significantly longer survival times than those with the mutated TP53-P72 when evaluated by overall survival (p = 0.012). Using a combined mutant allele- and polymorphic allele-specific PCR, we defined the codon 72 polymorphic status of the TP53 mutated allele in Japanese CRC patients. We raised a possibility that Dukes' stage C colorectal cancer

  15. Phase II study of neoadjuvant treatment with doxorubicin, docetaxel, and capecitabine (ATX) in locally advanced or inflammatory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Gumersindo Pérez; Shahi, Parham Khosravi; Ureña, Miguel Méndez; Pereira, Rosa Quiben; Plaza, María Isabel Palomero; Peron, Yann Izarzugaza; Val, Ricardo González Del; Carrión, Joaquín Belón; Cañón, Esperanza Pérez; Alfonso, Pilar García

    2010-07-01

    Pathologic complete response (pCR) after preoperative systemic chemotherapy (PSCh) is associated with better outcome in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). PSCh included: doxorubicin (A) 50 mg/m(2) i.v. on day 1; docetaxel (T) 30 mg/m(2) i.v. on days 1, 8 and 15; and capecitabine (X) 1,500 mg/m(2)/day p.o. on days 1-14, in a 4-week course repeated for up to four cycles (ATX), followed by surgery. The primary end point of this study was to evaluate the pCR rate. Secondary endpoints included clinical response rate, disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and the toxicity profile. A total of 60 patients were included in the analysis. Median age was 49 years, and 63.3% of patients were hormone receptor positive. The median number of cycles of PSCh was four (95% CI: 3-4). Five patients (8.3%) achieved pCR in both breast and nodes, and 16.7% reached pCR only in nodes. The clinical response rate was 77% (27% complete response), but only 18% of the patients underwent conservative surgery. With a median follow-up of 20 months, 3-year DFS and OS were 76 and 90%, respectively. Grade III/IV toxicity included neutropenia (74%), febrile neutropenia (9%), mucositis (12%), and diarrhea (12%). ATX every 28 days for four cycles is associated with a modest activity (low pCR rate) in the neoadjuvant setting of LABC.

  16. Bevacizumab plus octreotide and metronomic capecitabine in patients with metastatic well-to-moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: the xelbevoct study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berruti, Alfredo; D’Avolio, Antonio; Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Birocco, Nadia; Amoroso, Vito; Biasco, Guido; Papotti, Mauro; Dogliotti, Luigi; Fazio, Nicola; Ferrero, Anna; Brizzi, Maria Pia; Volante, Marco; Nobili, Elisabetta; Tozzi, Lucia; Bodei, Lisa; Torta, Mirella

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the activity and toxicity of the XELBEVOCT regimen in patients with metastatic well-to-moderately differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (WMD-NEN). Ancillary studies evaluated hypertension, proteinuria, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) polymorphisms in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and the predictive role of serum vitamin D in progression-free survival and proteinuria onset. This prospective phase 2 study included 45 patients with WMD-NEN arising from various primary sites. The treatment regimen was octreotide long-acting release (LAR), 20 mg monthly, metronomic capecitabine, 2000 mg/daily, and intravenous bevacizumab, 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks, without interruption for 9 months. Bevacizumab was continued until disease progression. Partial response was obtained in 8 patients (17.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.4%-28.2%); tumor response was more frequent in pancreatic than in non-pancreatic malignancies. The median PFS was 14.9 months; median overall survival was not attained. Biochemical and symptomatic responses were observed in 52.9% and 82.3% of cases, respectively. The treatment was well tolerated. Grade 3 toxicities included hand and foot syndrome (11.1%), proteinuria (4.4%), and renal toxicity (2.2%). Proteinuria (all grades) was correlated with longer PFS (p = 0.017). There was an inverse relationship between proteinuria and vitamin D levels. VEGF polymorphisms were not associated with patient outcome. The XELBEVOCT regimen is active and well tolerated in patients with metastatic WMD-NEN. Proteinuria correlated with hypovitaminosis D status and was the best predictive factor of treatment efficacy. Trial registration number http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01203306?term

  17. Proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine for pancreatic and ampullary cancers is associated with a low incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R. Charles Jr.; Huh, Soon; Ho, Meng Wei; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; George, Thomas J.; Zaiden, Robert A. Jr.; Awad, Ziad T.; Asbun, Horacio J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To review treatment toxicity for patients with pancreatic and ampullary cancer treated with proton therapy at our institution. Material and methods: From March 2009 through April 2012, 22 patients were treated with proton therapy and concomitant capecitabine (1000 mg PO twice daily) for resected (n = 5); marginally resectable (n = 5); and unresectable/inoperable (n = 12) biopsy-proven pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinoma. Two patients with unresectable disease were excluded from the analysis for reasons unrelated to treatment. Proton doses ranged from 50.40 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to 59.40 CGE. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 11 (range 5-36) months. No patient demonstrated any grade 3 toxicity during treatment or during the follow-up period. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities occurred in three patients, consisting of vomiting (n = 3); and diarrhea (n = 2). Median weight loss during treatment was 1.3 kg (1.75% of body weight). Chemotherapy was well-tolerated with a median 99% of the prescribed doses delivered. Percentage weight loss was reduced (p = 0.0390) and grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was eliminated (p = 0.0009) in patients treated with plans that avoided anterior and left lateral fields which were associated with reduced small bowel and gastric exposure. Discussion: Proton therapy may allow for significant sparing of the small bowel and stomach and is associated with a low rate of gastrointestinal toxicity. Although long-term follow-up will be needed to assess efficacy, we believe that the favorable toxicity profile associated with proton therapy may allow for radiotherapy dose escalation, chemotherapy intensification, and possibly increased acceptance of preoperative radiotherapy for patients with resectable or marginally resectable disease

  18. Proton therapy with concomitant capecitabine for pancreatic and ampullary cancers is associated with a low incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R. Charles Jr.; Huh, Soon; Ho, Meng Wei; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; George, Thomas J.; Zaiden, Robert A. Jr. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville and Jacksonville (United States); Awad, Ziad T. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. of Florida, Jacksonville (United States); Asbun, Horacio J. [Dept. of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: To review treatment toxicity for patients with pancreatic and ampullary cancer treated with proton therapy at our institution. Material and methods: From March 2009 through April 2012, 22 patients were treated with proton therapy and concomitant capecitabine (1000 mg PO twice daily) for resected (n = 5); marginally resectable (n = 5); and unresectable/inoperable (n = 12) biopsy-proven pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinoma. Two patients with unresectable disease were excluded from the analysis for reasons unrelated to treatment. Proton doses ranged from 50.40 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to 59.40 CGE. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 11 (range 5-36) months. No patient demonstrated any grade 3 toxicity during treatment or during the follow-up period. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities occurred in three patients, consisting of vomiting (n = 3); and diarrhea (n = 2). Median weight loss during treatment was 1.3 kg (1.75% of body weight). Chemotherapy was well-tolerated with a median 99% of the prescribed doses delivered. Percentage weight loss was reduced (p = 0.0390) and grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity was eliminated (p = 0.0009) in patients treated with plans that avoided anterior and left lateral fields which were associated with reduced small bowel and gastric exposure. Discussion: Proton therapy may allow for significant sparing of the small bowel and stomach and is associated with a low rate of gastrointestinal toxicity. Although long-term follow-up will be needed to assess efficacy, we believe that the favorable toxicity profile associated with proton therapy may allow for radiotherapy dose escalation, chemotherapy intensification, and possibly increased acceptance of preoperative radiotherapy for patients with resectable or marginally resectable disease.

  19. Cetuximab Combined With Induction Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine, Followed by Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: SWOG 0713.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichman, Cynthia Gail; McDonough, Shannon L; Smalley, Stephen R; Billingsley, Kevin G; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Beldner, Matthew A; Hezel, Aram F; Velasco, Mario R; Guthrie, Katherine A; Blanke, Charles D; Hochster, Howard S

    2018-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (NCRT) is standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologic complete response (pCR) has associated with improved survival. In modern phase III trials of NCRT, pCR ranges from 10% to 20%. Cetuximab improves response in KRAS (KRAS proto-oncogene) wild type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer. S0713 was designed to assess improvement in pCR with additional use of cetuximab with induction chemotherapy and NCRT for locally advanced, KRAS-wt rectal cancer. Patient eligibility: stage II to III biopsy-proven, KRAS-wt rectal adenocarcinoma; no bowel obstruction; adequate hematologic, hepatic and renal function; performance status of 0 to 2. Target enrollment: 80 patients. induction chemotherapy with wCAPOX (weekly capecitabine and oxaliplatin) and cetuximab followed by the same regimen concurrent with radiation (omitting day 15 oxaliplatin). If fewer than 7 pCRs were observed at planned interim analysis after 40 patients received all therapy, the study would close. Eighty eligible patients would provide 90% power given a true pCR rate > 35% at a significance of 0.04. The regimen would lack future interest if pCR probability was ≤ 20%. Between February 2009 and April 2013, 83 patients registered. Four were ineligible and 4 not treated, leaving 75 evaluable for clinical outcomes and toxicity, of whom 65 had surgery. Of 75 patients, 20 had pCR (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17%-38%); 19 (25%) had microscopic cancer; 36 (48%) had minor/no response (including 10 without surgery). Three-year disease-free survival was 73% (95% CI, 63%-83%). Our trial did not meet the pCR target of 35%. Toxicity was generally acceptable. This regimen cannot be recommended outside the clinical trial setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase I study of imatinib, cisplatin and 5-fluoruracil or capecitabine in advanced esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayr Martina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite all benefit provided by established therapies prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor. Targeted inhibition of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR by imatinib may influence tumor growth and amplify chemotherapeutic effects. Methods This phase I study evaluated dose limiting toxicity (DLT of imatinib combinated with chemotherapy according to a 3-patient cohort dose-escalating design. Thirty-five patients received cisplatin (60 mg/m2 d1 q 3w/ capecitabine (1250 mg/m2 bid d1-14 q 21 or cisplatin (50 mg/m2 d1 q 2w/ 5-fluoruracil (2 g/m2 d1, q 1w. Imatinib was started d - 4 with dose escalation from 300 to 700 mg QD in 100 mg steps. Results At imatinib dose level 1 (300mg one DLT was observed, three more patients were enrolled without further DLT. At dose level 5 (700 mg two gastric perforations occurred, so 600 mg imatinib emerged as the maximum tolerated dose. Major grade 3/4 toxicities were nausea (6%, anemia (6% and fatigue (3%. Response evaluation revealed partial response in 27% and stable disease in 43% of the assessable patients. Conclusions Combination of imatinib and chemotherapy is well tolerated. Response rates were not superior to those of standard therapy. Further investigations of a larger group of patients are required to confirm the amplification of chemotherapy effects by imatinib. Trial registration European Clinical Trials Database: Eudra-CT2006-005792-17 and Clinical Trials Database: NCT00601510

  1. Cytotoxic effects of the newly-developed chemotherapeutic agents 17-AAG in combination with oxaliplatin and capecitabine in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Mahshid; Zeynali, Shima; Azarbaijani, Anahita Fathi; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2017-12-01

    The use of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors like 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-AAG) has been recently introduced as an attractive anticancer therapy. It has been shown that 17-AAG may potentiate the inhibitory effects of some classical anticolorectal cancer (CRC) agents. In this study, two panels of colorectal carcinoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effects of 17-AAG in combination with capecitabine and oxaliplatin as double and triple combination therapies on the proliferation of CRC cell lines. HT-29 and all HCT-116 cell lines were seeded in culture media in the presence of different doses of the mentioned drugs in single, double, and triple combinations. Water-soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1) assay was used to investigate cell proliferation 24 h after treatments. Then, dose-response curves were plotted using WST-1outputs, and IC 50 values were determined. For double and triple combinations respectively 0.5 × IC 50 and 0.25 × IC 50 were used. Data was analyzed with the software CompuSyn. Drug interactions were analyzed using Chou-Talalay method to calculate the combination index (CI).The data revealed that 17-AAG shows a potent synergistic interaction (CI 1) in HT-29 and a synergistic effect (CI AAG with oxaliplatin or capecitabine might be effective against HCT-116 and HT-29 cell lines. However, in triple combinations, positive results were seen only against HCT-116. Further investigation is suggested to confirm the effectiveness of these combinations in clinical trials.

  2. Postoperative ileus: a preventable event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus has traditionally been accepted as a normal response to tissue injury. No data support any beneficial effect of ileus and indeed it may contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. Efforts should, therefore, be made to reduce such ileus. METHODS......: Material was identified from a Medline search of the literature, previous review articles and references cited in original papers. This paper updates knowledge on the pathophysiology and treatment of postoperative ileus. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Pathogenesis mainly involves inhibitory neural reflexes...... only cisapride is proven beneficial; the effect of early enteral feeding remains unclear. However, postoperative ileus may be greatly reduced when all of the above are combined in a multimodal rehabilitation strategy....

  3. Alcohol abuse and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Patients who drink too much have more complications after surgery. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the evidence, possible mechanisms, and prevention of the increased postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, defined by a consumption of at least five drinks per day. The literature could...... be criticised for several methodological flaws. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement showing moderate to strong evidence of increased postoperative morbidity after surgical procedures on alcohol abusers. There is weak to moderate evidence of increased postoperative mortality, hospital stay, and re......-operation. The personal and economic consequences are tremendous. The incidence of alcohol abusers undergoing surgery was 7% to 49%, according to gender and diagnosis. They have been identified by a self-reported alcohol intake, which implies the possibility of underestimation. Alcohol markers could be used for a more...

  4. Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in High-Risk Cervical Cancer: Re-evaluating the Findings of Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 109 in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Swisher-McClure, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hegarty, Sarah E. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grover, Surbhi, E-mail: Surbhi.grover@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To review the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to evaluate postoperative high-risk cervical cancer patients for factors associated with a benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT) over external beam radiation therapy alone (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried for women with cervical cancer treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant EBRT from 2002 to 2012. Only patients with pathologic lymph node involvement (LN+), positive surgical margins, and/or parametrial invasion were included in our analysis (on the basis of Peter's criteria). Univariable and multivariable analyses (MVA) were performed, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigate for factors associated with of CRT utilization and overall survival (OS). Results: A total of 3053 patients met inclusion criteria, and 2479 received adjuvant CRT (81%), whereas 574 (19%) received EBRT alone. Factors associated with increased CRT utilization on MVA included age <69 years, year of diagnosis ≥2008, non-adenocarcinoma histology, and LN+. Use of CRT improved OS among the entire cohort on MVA (HR 0.76, CI 0.601-0.962; P=.022). On MVA, CRT improved OS in patients with LN+ as their sole Peter's criteria (HR 0.58, CI 0.413-0.814; P=.002). Chemoradiation therapy did not improve OS in patients with only positive margins (P=.73), only parametrial invasion (P=.95), or any combination of these 2 factors without LN+ (P=.63). Conclusions: The use of adjuvant CRT after hysterectomy improves OS in patients with high-risk cervical cancer compared with EBRT alone, but this benefit seems to be restricted to patients with LN+. The benefits of adjuvant CRT over EBRT alone in patients with parametrial invasion and/or positive margins (without nodal involvement) are unknown.

  5. Oxygen therapy reduces postoperative tachycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausholm, K; Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Concomitant hypoxaemia and tachycardia in the postoperative period is unfavourable for the myocardium. Since hypoxaemia per se may be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperative tachycardia, we have studied the effect of oxygen therapy on tachycardia in 12 patients randomly allocated to blinded...... air or oxygen by facemask on the second or third day after major surgery. Inclusion criteria were arterial hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation 90 beat.min-1). Each patient responded similarly to oxygen therapy: an increase in arterial oxygen saturation and a decrease...... in heart rate (p oxygen has a positive effect on the cardiac oxygen delivery and demand balance....

  6. [Management of postoperative pain in surgical units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbos, A

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve the management of postoperative pain many publications insist on progressive changes in care organization. The following list outlines steps to be taken for implementation of these changes: 1) an initial analysis of management of post-operative pain allows awareness of reforms to be proposed; 2) participation of health teams in special training in order to use evaluation tools and collect data (use of analgesics, adverse effects); 3) establishing policies and procedures: recovery room, guidelines for analgesic use and adverse effects; 4) notifying patient about the various procedures to be used in postoperative period--discussion with the patient during the preoperative interview; 5) current use of standard patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and locoregional analgesia; 6) use of combined techniques in order to achieve a balanced analgesia; 7) implementing a quality assurance programme which should include analgesic effectiveness, patient satisfaction and prevention of complications; and 8) planning of an Acute Pain Service based on a clinical nurse co-ordinator which offers highly effective forms of postsurgical analgesia.

  7. Perspectives on the importance of postoperative ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Spoletini, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Post-operative ileus (POI) is a common condition after surgery. Failure to restore adequate bowel function after surgery generates a series of complications and it is associated to patients frustration and discomfort, worsening their perioperative experience. Even mild POI can be source of anxiety and could be perceived as a drop out from the "straight-forward" pathway. Enhanced recovery programmes have emphasized the importance of early commencement of oral diet, avoiding the ancient dogmata of prolonged gastric decompression and fasting. These protocols with early oral feeding and mobilization have led to improved perioperative management and have decreased hospital length of stay, ameliorating patient's postoperative experience as well. Nonetheless, the incidence of POI is still high especially after major open abdominal surgery. In order to decrease the incidence of POI, minimally-invasive surgical approaches and minimization of surgical manipulation have been suggested. From a pharmacological perspective, a meta-analysis of pro-kinetics showed beneficial results with alvimopan, although its use has been limited by the augmented risk of myocardial infarction and the high costs. A more simple approach based on the postoperative use of chewing-gum has provided some benefits in restoring bowel function. From an anaesthesiological perspective, epidural anaesthesia/analgesia does not only reduce the postoperative consumption of systemic opioids but directly improve gastrointestinal function and should be considered where possible, at least for open surgical procedures. POI represents a common and debilitating complication that should be challenged with multi-disciplinary approach. Prospective research is warranted on this field and should focus also on patient s reported outcomes.

  8. Postoperative Complications of Beger Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Samejima Peternelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic pancreatitis (CP is considered an inflammatory disease that may cause varying degrees of pancreatic dysfunction. Conservative and surgical treatment options are available depending on dysfunction severity. Presentation of Case. A 36-year-old male with history of heavy alcohol consumption and diagnosed CP underwent a duodenal-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR or Beger procedure after conservative treatment failure. Refractory pain was reported on follow-up three months after surgery and postoperative imaging uncovered stones within the main pancreatic duct and intestinal dilation. The patient was subsequently subjected to another surgical procedure and intraoperative findings included protein plugs within the main pancreatic duct and pancreaticojejunal anastomosis stricture. A V-shaped enlargement and main pancreatic duct dilation in addition to the reconstruction of the previous pancreaticojejunal anastomosis were performed. The patient recovered with no further postoperative complications in the follow-up at an outpatient clinic. Discussion. Main duct and pancreaticojejunal strictures are an unusual complication of the Beger procedure but were identified intraoperatively as the cause of patient’s refractory pain and explained intraductal protein plugs accumulation. Conclusion. Patients that undergo Beger procedures should receive close outpatient clinical follow-up in order to guarantee postoperative conservative treatment success and therefore guarantee an early detection of postoperative complications.

  9. Postoperative ileus: a preventable event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus has traditionally been accepted as a normal response to tissue injury. No data support any beneficial effect of ileus and indeed it may contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. Efforts should, therefore, be made to reduce such ileus. METHODS...

  10. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  11. Postoperative mental confusion--association with postoperative hypoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    under general anesthesia, were monitored for oxygen saturation (SpO2) with a pulse oximeter on a preoperative night and on the second night after operation (11:00 PM to 7:00 AM). All patients were tested with a mental test questionnaire (the Hodkinson modification of the original Roth-Hopkins test...... major surgery had decreased mental function on the third day (p operation, whereas minor surgery did not impair mental function. There was a significant correlation between mental function on the third day after operation and mean SpO2 on the second postoperative.......04). During stepwise multiple regression analysis in patients undergoing major surgery, a significant relationship was found between postoperative mental test score and SpO2 (p mental function and other perioperative variables (age, premedication dose, duration of operation...

  12. [Postoperative Chylotholax;Intraoperative Prevention and Postoperative Management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tomohito; Kariya, Shuji; Murakawa, Tomohiro

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative chylothorax is a relatively rare but potentially fatal complication caused by iatrogenic injury to thoracic duct system, with an incidence ranging from 2 to 4% after major lung surgery or esophagectomy. The pathophysiologic features of chylothorax include dehydration, loss of nutrients and immunological components. Intraopreative prevention is the first step for the management, and treatment options include conservative therapy, percutaneous intervention, and redo-operation. Although the treatment algorithm has not been standardized, chylothorax which is refractory to conservative treatment, or that with high output greater than 1,000 ml/day should be treated aggressively with thoracic duct embolization or redo-operation in a timely fashion. We herein review the anatomy and physiology of thoracic duct system and describe the overview of prevention and each theapeutic options of postoperative chylothorax.

  13. Postoperative diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint; Postoperative Kiefergelenkdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Undt, G. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-09-01

    Postoperative management of patients suffering from symptoms of the temporomandibular joint does not differ considerably from the one of preoperative examination protocols. Knowledge of previous surgery helps to plan patient work-up and to interpret normal postoperative findings (eminectomy, discectomy, susceptibility artefacts from metallic residues..) and typical complications (intraarticular loose bodies, dislocations, avascular necrosis, foreign body granulomatous reactions) appropriately. (orig.) [German] Wie auch in anderen Koerperregionen differiert das Diagnoseprotokoll von prae- und postoperativen Patienten mit Beschwerden des Kiefergelenks nicht wesentlich voneinander. Die Kenntnis des vorangegangenen Eingriffs hilft allerdings, die Untersuchung entsprechend zu planen und den Befund im Kontext richtig zu bewerten, um moegliche Komplikationen (intraartikulaere Fragmente, Dislokationen, avaskulaere Nekrose, Fremdkoerperreaktionen) und zu erwartende Befunde (Eminektomie, Diskektomie, Metallartefakte usw.) richtig zu interpretieren. (orig.)

  14. Hypofractionated Image-Guided IMRT in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Infiltrated Vessels Concomitant With Capecitabine: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passoni, Paolo, E-mail: passoni.paolo@hsr.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Reni, Michele [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, Giovanni M. [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Slim, Najla [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cereda, Stefano [Department of Medical Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Balzano, Gianpaolo; Castoldi, Renato [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Longobardi, Barbara [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Bettinardi, Valentino; Gianolli, Luigi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Gusmini, Simone [Department of Radiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Staudacher, Carlo [Department of Surgery, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Di Muzio, Nadia [Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated radiation dose (MTD) of an integrated boost to the tumor subvolume infiltrating vessels, delivered simultaneously with radical dose to the whole tumor and concomitant capecitabine in patients with pretreated advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma without progressive disease after induction chemotherapy were eligible. Patients underwent simulated contrast-enhanced four-dimensional computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography. Gross tumor volume 1 (GTV1), the tumor, and GTV2, the tumor subvolume 1 cm around the infiltrated vessels, were contoured. GTVs were fused to generate Internal Target Volume (ITV)1 and ITV2. Biological tumor volume (BTV) was fused with ITV1 to create the BTV+Internal Target Volume (ITV) 1. A margin of 5/5/7 mm (7 mm in cranium-caudal) was added to BTV+ITV1 and to ITV2 to create Planning Target Volume (PTV) 1 and PTV2, respectively. Radiation therapy was delivered with tomotherapy. PTV1 received a fixed dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and PTV2 received a dose escalation from 48 to 58 Gy as simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in consecutive groups of at least 3 patients. Concomitant chemotherapy was capecitabine, 1250 mg/m{sup 2} daily. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any treatment-related G3 nonhematological or G4 hematological toxicity occurring during the treatment or within 90 days from its completion. Results: From June 2005 to February 2010, 25 patients were enrolled. The dose escalation on the SIB was stopped at 58 Gy without reaching the MTD. One patient in the 2{sup nd} dose level (50 Gy) had a DLT: G3 acute gastric ulcer. Three patients had G3 late adverse effects associated with gastric and/or duodenal mucosal damage. All patients received the planned dose of radiation. Conclusions: A dose of 44.25 Gy in 15 fractions to the whole tumor with an SIB of 58 Gy to small

  15. Postoperative imaging of paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.; Czerny, C.; Formanek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The radiological interpretation of postoperative changes of the paranasal sinuses requires knowledge of why and how the surgical intervention was performed and what the basic clinical findings were. It is important to know whether there was an inflammation, a reconstructive procedure, or a tumorous process. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluated in a high-resolution bone window level setting represents the method of choice for imaging after nonfunctional and functional procedures after inflammatory changes as well as for imaging after reconstructive surgery because of facial trauma or before dental implantation. In the postoperative follow-up of tumor patients contrast-enhanced MDCT evaluated in a soft tissue window and bone window and especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent the standard. In many cases it is possible to differentiate tumor recurrence from inflammation with the help of contrast-enhanced multiplanar MRI and to detect bone marrow changes prior to CT. (orig.)

  16. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus. © 2015 The American Osteopathic Association.

  17. Postoperative ileus: progress towards effective management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of postoperative ileus (PI) is multifactorial, and includes activation of inhibitory reflexes, inflammatory mediators and opioids (endogenous and exogenous). Accordingly, various strategies have been employed to prevent PI. As single-modality treatment, continuous postoperative e...

  18. Need for postoperative experience in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcione, S; Api, P; Magnoni, G

    1984-01-01

    A clinical evaluation regarding the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in 294 patients with breast cancer is presented. In the Author's opinion post-operative radiotherapy is fundamental in the treatment of this tumor. 21 refs.

  19. Management of pediatric postoperative chylothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, S J; Guzzetta, P C; Snyder, M L; Randolph, J G

    1993-09-01

    Questions persist about the management of postoperative chylothorax in infants and children. Our experience with postoperative chylothorax over the most recent decade (1980 to 1990) has been reviewed. The type and amount of drainage, data from cardiac catheterization and echocardiography, operative decisions and details, and eventual outcomes have been cataloged. All patients were initially treated with total gut rest, with operation reserved for unabated drainage. Chylothorax developed postoperatively in 15 infants and 11 children (18 with a cardiac procedure and 8 with a noncardiac procedure). The average age was 3.1 years. Spontaneous cessation and cure occurred in 19 (73.1%) of these 26 patients, with an average drainage duration of 11.9 days (range, 4 to 30 days). Those for whom operation was chosen drained preoperatively for an average of 29.2 days (range, 25 to 40 days). There were no deaths in either group. Complications were lymphopenia (2 patients) and fungal sepsis (1 patient). The amount of drainage per day was not significantly different between patients treated operatively and those treated nonoperatively. Failure of nonoperative management was associated with venous hypertension from increased right-sided cardiac pressures or central venous thrombosis (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Presumably this increased pressure is transmitted to the lymphatic system. These patients should be identified early and considered for thoracic duct suture or pleuroperitoneal shunting.

  20. The ABC7 regimen: a new approach to metastatic breast cancer using seven common drugs to inhibit epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and augment capecitabine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kast RE

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Richard E Kast,1 Nicolas Skuli,2 Samuel Cos,3 Georg Karpel-Massler,4 Yusuke Shiozawa,5 Ran Goshen,6 Marc-Eric Halatsch4 1IIAIGC Study Center, Burlington, VT, USA; 2INSERM, Centre de Recherches en Cancérologie de Toulouse – CRCT, UMR1037 Inserm/Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France; 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria and Valdecilla Research Institute (IDIVAL, Santander, Spain; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Ulm University Hospital, Ulm, Germany; 5Department of Cancer Biology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 6Eliaso Consulting Ltd., Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel Abstract: Breast cancer metastatic to bone has a poor prognosis despite recent advances in our understanding of the biology of both bone and breast cancer. This article presents a new approach, the ABC7 regimen (Adjuvant for Breast Cancer treatment using seven repurposed drugs, to metastatic breast cancer. ABC7 aims to defeat aspects of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT that lead to dissemination of breast cancer to bone. As add-on to current standard treatment with capecitabine, ABC7 uses ancillary attributes of seven already-marketed noncancer treatment drugs to stop both the natural EMT process inherent to breast cancer and the added EMT occurring as a response to current treatment modalities. Chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery provoke EMT in cancer generally and in breast cancer specifically. ABC7 uses standard doses of capecitabine as used in treating breast cancer today. In addition, ABC7 uses 1 an older psychiatric drug, quetiapine, to block RANK signaling; 2 pirfenidone, an anti-fibrosis drug to block TGF-beta signaling; 3 rifabutin, an antibiotic to block beta-catenin signaling; 4 metformin, a first-line antidiabetic drug to stimulate AMPK and inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin, (mTOR; 5 propranolol, a beta-blocker to block beta

  1. A triplet combination with capecitabine/oxaliplatin/irinotecan (XELOXIRI) plus cetuximab as first-line therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: a dose escalation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Minoru; Okamoto, Tetsuro; Okamoto, Koichi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Takemasa, Ichiro; Kato, Junji; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2017-12-01

    The addition of cetuximab to triplet chemotherapy can increase treatment efficacy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). We explored the dose-limiting toxicity and feasibility of a triweekly capecitabine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, plus cetuximab (XELOXIRI plus cetuximab) regimen in patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC. Patients received oxaliplatin (100 mg/m 2 , day 1), capecitabine (1700 mg/m 2 per day from day 2 to 15), irinotecan (100, 120, and 150 mg/m 2 for dose levels 1, 2, 3, respectively, on day 1), and cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 , day 1 and, thereafter, 250 mg/m 2 every week), repeated every 3 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were assessed in the first 2 treatment cycles to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and the recommended dose (RD). Twelve patients received a median of 7 cycles of therapy (range 2-10). The DLT was grade 4 neutropenia, observed in 1 of 6 patients at dose level 2. The MTD was not reached at dose level 3. Therefore, the RD of irinotecan was defined as 150 mg/m 2 . Most common grade ≥ 3 toxicities were neutropenia (50%), diarrhea (17%), and febrile neutropenia (8%). The response rate was 83% (complete and partial response: 1 and 9 patient(s), respectively), including 4 conversion cases. The combination of XELOXIRI and cetuximab is feasible and has an acceptable toxicity profile; neutropenia was the DLT. The RD of irinotecan is 150 mg/m 2 . The observed response rate was promising and warrants further investigation.

  2. Combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems in TKA reduces postoperative outliers of rotational alignment of the tibial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Shota; Akamatsu, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Kusayama, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Ken; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2018-02-01

    Rotational malpositioning of the tibial component can lead to poor functional outcome in TKA. Although various surgical techniques have been proposed, precise rotational placement of the tibial component was difficult to accomplish even with the use of a navigation system. The purpose of this study is to assess whether combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems replicate accurately the rotational alignment of tibial component that was preoperatively planned on CT, compared with the conventional method. We compared the number of outliers for rotational alignment of the tibial component using combined CT-based and image-free navigation systems (navigated group) with those of conventional method (conventional group). Seventy-two TKAs were performed between May 2012 and December 2014. In the navigated group, the anteroposterior axis was prepared using CT-based navigation system and the tibial component was positioned under control of the navigation. In the conventional group, the tibial component was placed with reference to the Akagi line that was determined visually. Fisher's exact probability test was performed to evaluate the results. There was a significant difference between the two groups with regard to the number of outliers: 3 outliers in the navigated group compared with 12 outliers in the conventional group (P image-free navigation systems decreased the number of rotational outliers of tibial component, and was helpful for the replication of the accurate rotational alignment of the tibial component that was preoperatively planned.

  3. Tramadol for postoperative pain treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Alexander; Reichl, Sylvia U; Meyer-Frießem, Christine; Zahn, Peter K; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther

    2015-03-18

    nausea and vomiting (PONV) in the postoperative care unit and 24 h postoperation. Children treated with tramadol, compared to placebo, did not show clear evidence of benefit for PONV in the postoperative care unit (RR 0.84; 95% CI 0.28 to 2.52; moderate quality evidence) and 24 h postoperation (RR 0.78; 95% CI 0.54 to 1.12; moderate quality evidence). The overall evidence regarding tramadol for postoperative pain in children is currently low or very low and should be interpreted with caution due to small studies and methodological problems (different validated and non-validated pain scales with different pain triggers, missing sample size calculations and missing intention-to-treat analysis). Nevertheless, we demonstrated that tramadol administration might provide appropriate analgesia when compared to placebo; this is based on results showing reduced rescue analgesia in children treated with tramadol compared to placebo. In contrast, the evidence regarding the comparison with other opioids (for example morphine) was uncertain. Adverse events were only poorly reported, so an accurate risk-benefit analysis was not possible.

  4. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    effect on postoperative pulmonary function in the sitting or standing position compared with the supine. Thus, avoidance of the supine position may improve postoperative pulmonary function. Three of six studies showed a positive effect on postoperative pulmonary function of the lateral side compared......BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed...... with the supine. Thus, the lateral position has limited effects on pulmonary function. CONCLUSION: Changes of postoperative position from supine to sitting or standing are of major importance in the interpretation of postoperative pulmonary outcome studies and in future strategies to improve pulmonary outcome....

  5. Yoga-based postoperative cardiac rehabilitation program for improving quality of life and stress levels: Fifth-year follow-up through a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraballi Amaravathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the efficacy of yoga-based lifestyle program (YLSP in improving quality of life (QOL and stress levels in patients after 5 years of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Methodology: Three hundred patients posted for elective CABG in Narayana Hrudayalaya Super Speciality Hospital, Bengaluru, were randomized into two groups: YLSP and conventional lifestyle program (CLSP, and follow-up was done for 5 years. Intervention: In YLSP group, all practices of integrative approach of yoga therapy such as yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, and meditation were used as an add-on to conventional cardiac rehabilitation. The control group (CLSP continued conventional cardiac rehabilitation only. Outcome Measures: World Health Organization (WHO-QOL BREF Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed before surgery and at the end of the 5th year after CABG. As data were not normally distributed, Mann–Whitney U-test was used for between-group comparisons and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was used for within-group comparisons. Results: At the end of 5 years, mental health (P = 0.05, perceived stress (P = 0.01, and negative affect (NA (P = 0.05 have shown significant improvements. WHO-QOL BREF score has shown improvements in physical health (P = 0.046, environmental health (P = 0.04, perceived stress (P = 0.001, and NA (P = 0.02 in YLSP than CLSP. Positive affect has significantly improved in CLSP than YLSP. Other domains of WHO-QOL-BREF, PANAS, and HADS did not reveal any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: Addition of long-term YLSP to conventional cardiac rehabilitation brings better improvements in QOL and reduction in stress levels at the end of 5 years after CABG.

  6. Stereotactic Irradiation of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastasis: A Frameless Linear Accelerator-Based Case Series and Review of the Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Paul J.; Lin Yijie Brittany; Yu, Alvin Y.; Alexander, Brian M.; Hacker, Fred; Marcus, Karen J.; Weiss, Stephanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the standard of care after resection of a brain metastasis. However, concern regarding possible neurocognitive effects and the lack of survival benefit with this approach has led to the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity in place of WBRT. We report our initial experience using an image-guided linear accelerator-based frameless stereotactic system and review the technical issues in applying this technique. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the setup accuracy, treatment outcome, and patterns of failure of the first 18 consecutive cases treated at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The target volume was the resection cavity without a margin excluding the surgical track. Results: The median number of brain metastases per patient was 1 (range, 1–3). The median planning target volume was 3.49 mL. The median prescribed dose was 18 Gy (range, 15–18 Gy) with normalization ranging from 68% to 85%. In all cases, 99% of the planning target volume was covered by the prescribed dose. The median conformity index was 1.6 (range, 1.41–1.92). The SRS was delivered with submillimeter accuracy. At a median follow-up of 12.7 months, local control was achieved in 16/18 cavities treated. True local recurrence occurred in 2 patients. No marginal failures occurred. Distant recurrence occurred in 6/17 patients. Median time to any failure was 7.4 months. No Grade 3 or higher toxicity was recorded. A long interval between initial cancer diagnosis and the development of brain metastasis was the only factor that trended toward a significant association with the absence of recurrence (local or distant) (log-rank p = 0.097). Conclusions: Frameless stereotactic irradiation of the resection cavity after surgery for a brain metastasis is a safe and accurate technique that offers durable local control and defers the use of WBRT in select patients. This technique should be tested in larger prospective

  7. Stereotactic Irradiation of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastasis: A Frameless Linear Accelerator-Based Case Series and Review of the Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Paul J., E-mail: pkelly@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States); Lin Yijie Brittany; Yu, Alvin Y. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Alexander, Brian M.; Hacker, Fred; Marcus, Karen J.; Weiss, Stephanie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is the standard of care after resection of a brain metastasis. However, concern regarding possible neurocognitive effects and the lack of survival benefit with this approach has led to the use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity in place of WBRT. We report our initial experience using an image-guided linear accelerator-based frameless stereotactic system and review the technical issues in applying this technique. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the setup accuracy, treatment outcome, and patterns of failure of the first 18 consecutive cases treated at Brigham and Women's Hospital. The target volume was the resection cavity without a margin excluding the surgical track. Results: The median number of brain metastases per patient was 1 (range, 1-3). The median planning target volume was 3.49 mL. The median prescribed dose was 18 Gy (range, 15-18 Gy) with normalization ranging from 68% to 85%. In all cases, 99% of the planning target volume was covered by the prescribed dose. The median conformity index was 1.6 (range, 1.41-1.92). The SRS was delivered with submillimeter accuracy. At a median follow-up of 12.7 months, local control was achieved in 16/18 cavities treated. True local recurrence occurred in 2 patients. No marginal failures occurred. Distant recurrence occurred in 6/17 patients. Median time to any failure was 7.4 months. No Grade 3 or higher toxicity was recorded. A long interval between initial cancer diagnosis and the development of brain metastasis was the only factor that trended toward a significant association with the absence of recurrence (local or distant) (log-rank p = 0.097). Conclusions: Frameless stereotactic irradiation of the resection cavity after surgery for a brain metastasis is a safe and accurate technique that offers durable local control and defers the use of WBRT in select patients. This technique should be tested in larger prospective studies.

  8. Postoperative Radiation Therapy of Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Cho, Byung Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Hyong Geln [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-06-15

    Between December 1979 and September 1989, 23 patients with craniopharyngioma who underwent surgery and postoperative radiation therapy were retrospectively evaluated to assess the efficacy of this management at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Total removal of tumor was attempted in all patients. Of these, surgeons tried total removal in eight patients, but revealed residual mass by postoperative CT, and partial removal was done in 15 patients. The morphology of tumor on the operative finding was grouped into three types : cystic 13 (57%), solid 4 (17%), and mixed 6 (26%). Cystic type was predominant in {<=}20 years old group. Actuarial overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 95% and 81% respectively and actuarial tumor control rates were 74% and 50%. Surgical extent was not related to the survival rates(p=0.41). Pediatric and adolescent Patients(age of {<=}20 year) had a trend of better survival than that of adult patients(p=0.10). The results indicated that limited surgical excision followed by radiation therapy is recommended when total excision is not possible.

  9. Postoperative Radiation Therapy of Craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Cho, Byung Kyu; Yun, Hyong Geln

    1993-01-01

    Between December 1979 and September 1989, 23 patients with craniopharyngioma who underwent surgery and postoperative radiation therapy were retrospectively evaluated to assess the efficacy of this management at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Total removal of tumor was attempted in all patients. Of these, surgeons tried total removal in eight patients, but revealed residual mass by postoperative CT, and partial removal was done in 15 patients. The morphology of tumor on the operative finding was grouped into three types : cystic 13 (57%), solid 4 (17%), and mixed 6 (26%). Cystic type was predominant in ≤20 years old group. Actuarial overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 95% and 81% respectively and actuarial tumor control rates were 74% and 50%. Surgical extent was not related to the survival rates(p=0.41). Pediatric and adolescent Patients(age of ≤20 year) had a trend of better survival than that of adult patients(p=0.10). The results indicated that limited surgical excision followed by radiation therapy is recommended when total excision is not possible

  10. Postoperative B-Type Natriuretic Peptide as Predictor for Postoperative Outcomes in Patients Implanted With Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Gardner; Bhat, Geetha; Pappas, Patroklos; Tatooles, Antone

    2018-04-18

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a cardiac neurohormone known to correlate with left ventricular (LV) dilation, decreased contractility, and increased stiffness. Consequently, BNP has been used as a prognostic tool to assess the degree of LV unloading for patients supported by continuous-flow LV assist devices (LVADs). We assessed the prognostic value of changes in BNP in the 2 weeks after LVAD implantation. This retrospective study analyzed laboratory findings and outcomes of 189 LVAD patients. Patients were separated into two groups based on whether serum BNP levels had improved from preoperative levels by postoperative day 14. Group 1 had improvement in BNP levels, whereas group 2 had no improvement or worsening in BNP. There were no significant differences between the groups in age, gender, race, body mass index, or comorbidities. Group 1 had preoperative BNP 1,125 ± 1,078.3 pg/dl and postoperative BNP 440.2 ± 267.7 pg/dl (ΔBNP = -693.09 ± 942.4 pg/dl), whereas group 2 had preoperative BNP 346.0 ± 309.1 pg/dl and postoperative BNP 631.57 ± 483.4 pg/dl (ΔBNP = 289.32 ± 329.7 pg/dl). Postoperative survival in group 2 was significantly worse than in group 1. Rates of right ventricular failure (RVF) were significantly higher in group 2 (group 1: 39%, group 2: 52.7%; p = 0.01). In most patients implanted with a LVAD, BNP improves significantly in the postoperative period as the LV is unloaded. Our results indicate that lack of improvement in postoperative BNP is associated with longer length of stay, increased rates of RVF, and is an independent risk factor for reduced postoperative survival.

  11. Prospective trial of aggressive postoperative bowel stimulation following radical hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, J; Yu-Brekke, S

    1999-06-01

    Postoperative traditional feeding protocols are not based on scientific studies, but rather on anecdotal evidence. We present the first prospective trial of aggressive postoperative bowel stimulation following radical hysterectomy in an attempt to determine its effect on the length of hospital stay. Twenty consecutive patients undergoing radical hysterectomy were entered onto a prospective trial of aggressive postoperative bowel stimulation, which consisted of 30 cc milk of magnesia p.o. b.i.d. starting on postoperative day 1 and biscolic suppositories q.d. starting on day 2. A clear liquid diet was begun following flatus or bowel movement and patients were discharged 12 h after tolerating a clear liquid diet. Diet was slowly advanced at home. Median time to flatus was 3 days, bowel movement 3 days, and clear liquid diet 3 days. Median time to discharge was 4 days. No patients developed ileus or bowel obstructions and there were no readmissions for bowel complications. Our median time to discharge of 4 days represents a 50% reduction in hospital stay compared to our previous prospective study using traditional postoperative bowel management (8 days), which was statistically significant at P = 0.001. Aggressive bowel stimulation with milk of magnesia and biscolic suppositories resulted in early return of bowel function and early discharge with no noticeable complications. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Postoperative interstitial radiotherapy of keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavere, P.; Bonnafoux-Clavere, A.; Roullet, B.; Morzel, A.; Rhein, B.; Bonnetblanc, J.M.; Olivier, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    During an 8-year period, 21 patients with keloids (27 keloids) were treated with keloidectomy and post-operative interstitial radiotherapy by an iridium 192 wire. Only one patient had been previously treated by corticoids, without results. A dose of 12 Gy (three patients) to 15 Gy (18 patients) was delivered at a point 2.5 mm from the axis of the wire. The follow-up time was from 2 - 104 months. The success rate, at 7 months, was close to 88%. Ao recurrence occurred in three patients without relation to the method used, the lesion-age or the localization of the lesions. There were no side-effects. This method represents an effective, non-constraining and safe treatment for keloids if the contra-indications are respected

  13. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathsen, Curtis

    2001-01-01

    .... This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period...

  14. Postoperative pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer Karlsen, Anders Peder; Geisler, Anja; Petersen, Pernille Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of postoperative pain should rely on results from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of high scientific quality. The efficacy of a particular intervention may depend on the type of surgical procedure, which supports the reporting of "procedure-specific" interventions. The aim...... of this systematic review was to document the procedure-specific evidence for analgesic interventions after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of medication-based analgesic interventions after THA. Endpoints were......, and lumbar plexus block reduced nausea and pruritus. The GRADE-rated quality of evidence ranged from low to very low throughout the analyses. This review demonstrated, that some analgesic interventions may have the capacity to reduce mean opioid requirements and/or mean pain intensity compared with controls...

  15. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment in Du...

  16. Trauma and postoperative follow-up; Traumata und postoperative Folgezustaende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, E. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-10-01

    Indications for the use of nuclear medicine techniques, mostly bone scintigraphy, occur in case of diagnostic problems, especially if there are discrepancies between the clinical symptoms and X-ray findings. This may happen in case of stress fractures, fractures in bones difficult to judge by X-ray imaging, and in the differentation of recent versus old fracture. A further indication for bone scanning is to assess the extent of skeletal lesions in polytrauma and in the battered child syndrome. In postoperative patients bone scanning is most frequently performed in order to assess loosening or infection of endoprosthesis. Due to bone remodelling uptake of Tc-diphosphonates varies between cemented and cementfree implants. This fact should be taken into consideration when interpreting bone scans in areas with endoprostheses. In both trauma and postoperative patients, indications for nuclear medicine imaging exist if healing is complicated. Bone scanning can be used to assess pseudoartrosis or non-union, infection, viability of grafts and bone fragments and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. In suspicious infection with positive bone scan, white blood cell or microcollid scintigraphy can be used for further differentiation. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Indikationen zum Einsatz nuklearmedizinischer Verfahren, in der Regel der Skelettszintigraphie, ergeben sich bei diagnostischen Problemen, speziell bei Diskrepanzen zwischen der klinischen Symptomatik und dem roentgenologischen Befund. In der Traumatologie kann dies Stressfrakturen, Frakturen in roentgenologisch schwer beurteilbaren Skelettabschnitten, das Ausmass der knoechernen Verletzungen bei Polytraumata oder Kindermisshandlungen sowie die Differenzierung alte versus frische Fraktur betreffen. In der postoperativen Verlaufs- bzw. Therapiekontrolle ist die haeufigste Indikation zur Skelettszintigraphie die Frage nach Lockerung einer Endoprothese. Wegen des aus pathophysiologischen Gruenden unterschiedlichen Anreicherungsmusters

  17. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokas, Emmanouil, E-mail: emmanouil.fokas@kgu.de [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Conradi, Lena [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Weiss, Christian [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sprenger, Thilo [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Middel, Peter [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rau, Tillman [Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Dellas, Kathrin [Department of Radiotherapy, Lübeck University (Germany); Kitz, Julia [Institute for Pathology, University Medical Center, Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Franz [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Erlangen (Germany); Rüschoff, Josef [Targos Molecular Pathology, Kassel (Germany); Beissbarth, Tim [Department of Medical Statistics, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Arnold, Dirk [Tumor Biology Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg (Germany); Ghadimi, B. Michael [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany); Rödel, Claus [Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt (Germany); Liersch, Torsten [Department of General Surgery, University Medical Center of Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  18. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  19. Pre- and postoperative MR imaging of craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, J.K. [Rijkshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiology; Eldevik, O.P. [Rijkshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Quint, D.J. [Rijkshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chandler, W.F. [Univ. of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kollevold, T. [Univ. of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the pre- and postoperative MR appearance of craniopharyngiomas with respect to lesion size, tumour morphology and identification of surrounding normal structures. Material and Methods: MR images obtained prior to and following craniopharyngioma resection were evaluated retrospectively in 10 patients. Tumour signal charcteristics, size and extension with particular reference to the optic chiasm, the pituitary gland, the pituitary stalk and the third ventricle were evaluated. Results: Following surgery, tumour volume was reduced in all patients. In 6 patients there was further tumour volume reduction between the first and second postoperative images. Two of these patients received radiation therapy between the 2 postoperative studies, while 4 had no adjuvant treatment to the surgical intervention. There was improved visualization of the optic chiasm, in 3, the pituitary stalk in one, and the third ventricle in 9 of the 10 patients. The pituitary gland was identified preoperatively only in one patient, postoperatively only in another, pre- and postoperatively in 5, and neither pre- nor postoperatively in 3 patients. In 3 patients MR imaging 0-7 days postoperatively identified tumour remnants not seen at the end of the surgical procedure. The signal intensities of solid and cystic tumour components were stable from pre- to the first postoperative MR images. Optic tract increased signal prior to surgery was gone 28 days postoperatively in one patient, but persisted on the left side for 197 days after surgery in another. Conclusion: Postoperative MR imaging of craniopharyngiomas demonstrated tumour volume reduction and tumour remnants not seen at surgery. Early postoperative MR imaging of craniopharyngiomas may overestimate the size of residual tumour. Improved visualization of peritumoral structures may be achieved. (orig.).

  20. Oxaliplatin added to fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer (the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 study): final results of the multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Graeven, Ullrich; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hothorn, Torsten; Arnold, Dirk; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Ghadimi, Michael; Wolff, Hendrik A; Lang-Welzenbach, Marga; Raab, Hans-Rudolf; Wittekind, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Staib, Ludger; Wilhelm, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Hoffmanns, Hans; Lindemann, Fritz; Schlenska-Lange, Anke; Folprecht, Gunnar; Sauer, Rolf; Liersch, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with infusional fluorouracil, total mesorectal excision surgery, and postoperative chemotherapy with fluorouracil was established by the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 trial as a standard combined modality treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Here we compare the previously established regimen with an investigational regimen in which oxaliplatin was added to both preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. In this multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 study we randomly assigned patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, clinically staged as cT3-4 or any node-positive disease, to two groups: a control group receiving standard fluorouracil-based combined modality treatment, consisting of preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgery and four cycles of bolus fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29); or to an investigational group receiving preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (250 mg/m(2) on days 1-14 and 22-35) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, 22, and 29), followed by surgery and eight cycles of oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), leucovorin (400 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), and infusional fluorouracil (2400 mg/m(2) on days 1-2 and 15-16). Randomisation was done with computer-generated block-randomisation codes stratified by centre, clinical T category (cT1-3 vs cT4), and clinical N category (cN0 vs cN1-2) without masking. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival, defined as the time between randomisation and non-radical surgery of the primary tumour (R2 resection), locoregional recurrence after R0/1 resection, metastatic disease or progression, or death from any cause, whichever occurred first. Survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle; toxicity analyses included all patients treated. Enrolment of

  1. Intra-operative colloid administration increases the clearance of a post-operative fluid load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Tine; Hahn, Robert; Holte, K

    2009-01-01

    using volume kinetics based on the plasma dilution alone. The pre-operative plasma clearance was compared with the post-operative plasma clearance and patients served as their own control. RESULTS: The urinary excretion averaged 350 ml for the pre-operative infusion and 612 ml post-operatively, which...

  2. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pain after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... systemic diseases (hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus),. Original Article. INTRODUCTION. Postoperative ... vertigo, etc.) have been shown.[3-15]. In this study, we aimed to investigate possible relationship between preoperative NLR and postoperative pain (which was evaluated by analgesic demand at.

  3. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Grønkjær; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  4. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed...

  5. Routine versus Selective Postoperative Nasogastric Suction In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2005-12-02

    Dec 2, 2005 ... Mobilization of the patient in the postoperative period is dependent on the presence of a NGT. The longer it is kept in place the longer will be the duration of patients' restriction in bed. Prolonged immobilization after surgery infact enhances the risk of postoperative complication like DVT and delays recovery ...

  6. Predicting postoperative haemoglobin changes after burn surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Burn surgery is associated with significant blood loss and fluid shifts that cause rapid haemoglobin (Hb) changes during and after surgery. Understanding the relationship between intraoperative and postoperative (day 1) Hb changes may assist in avoiding postoperative anaemia and unnecessary ...

  7. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pain after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Postoperative pain is well known and usually disturbing complication of surgery. Inflammation plays an important role in the development and progression of postoperative pain. We aimed to investigate possible relationship between preoperatively measured neutrophil‑lymphocyte ratio (NLR) – as an ...

  8. Postoperative CT in pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, F.E.; Harper, S.J.F.; Callaghan, C.J.; Shaw, A.; Godfrey, E.M.; Bradley, J.A.; Watson, C.J.E.; Pettigrew, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the usage and value of computed tomography (CT) following simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Materials and methods: Indications for postoperative CT, key findings, and their influence on management were determined by retrospective analysis. Results: Ninety-eight patients underwent 313 CT examinations. Common indications for the examinations included suspected intra-abdominal collection (31.1%) and elevated serum amylase/lipase (24.1%). CT findings most frequently showed non-specific mild inflammation (27.6%), a normal scan (17.1%) and fluid collections (16.3%). High capillary blood glucose (CBG) was associated with resultant CT demonstration of graft vascular abnormalities, but otherwise, particular clinical indications were not associated with specific CT findings. Conclusion: Clinical findings in patients with SPK transplants are non-specific. The pattern of abnormalities encountered is significantly different to those seen in native pancreatic disease and demands a tailored protocol. CT enables accurate depiction of vascular abnormalities and fluid collections, thus reducing the number of surgical interventions that might otherwise be required. Elevated CBG should prompt urgent CT to exclude potentially reversible vascular complications. - Highlights: • The value of CT following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation was assessed. • 313 CT scans were performed on 98 patients between January 2005 and August 2010. • Elevated blood glucose was associated with CT findings of graft vascular anomalities. • CT was particularly useful in directing operative versus non-operative intervention.

  9. Surgical correction of postoperative astigmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstrom Richard

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The photokeratoscope has increased the understanding of the aspheric nature of the cornea as well as a better understanding of normal corneal topography. This has significantly affected the development of newer and more predictable models of surgical astigmatic correction. Relaxing incisions effectively flatten the steeper meridian an equivalent amount as they steepen the flatter meridian. The net change in spherical equivalent is, therefore, negligible. Poor predictability is the major limitation of relaxing incisions. Wedge resection can correct large degrees of postkeratoplasty astigmatism, Resection of 0.10 mm of tissue results in approximately 2 diopters of astigmatic correction. Prolonged postoperative rehabilitation and induced irregular astigmatism are limitations of the procedure. Transverse incisions flatten the steeper meridian an equivalent amount as they steepen the flatter meridian. Semiradial incisions result in two times the amount of flattening in the meridian of the incision compared to the meridian 90 degrees away. Combination of transverse incisions with semiradial incisions describes the trapezoidal astigmatic keratotomy. This procedure may correct from 5.5 to 11.0 diopters dependent upon the age of the patient. The use of the surgical keratometer is helpful in assessing a proper endpoint during surgical correction of astigmatism.

  10. Prediction of postoperative pain after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain remains a significant problem and the individual variance in postoperative pain is not fully understood. In recent years, there has been focus on identifying risk factors predicting patients with high postoperative pain intensity or consumption of analgesics, which may facilitate...... thresholds were measured using electrical (single and 5 repeated) and pressure pain stimulation over the flank bilaterally (stone-side = operation side and control-side = non-operation side). Postoperative pain scores were recorded on a numerical rating scale and analgesic consumption was registered....... The responses to repeated electrical stimuli (temporal summation) were preoperatively increased on the stone-side compared to the control-side (P = 0.016). Preoperative electrical pain thresholds from the control-side correlated inversely with postoperative opioid consumption (single stimuli: ρ = -0.43, P

  11. Daily low-dose/continuous capecitabine combined with neo-adjuvant irradiation reduces VEGF and PDGF-BB levels in rectal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, David; B e'Ery, Einat; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Koren, Claude; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal; Lavi, Idit; Shaked, Yuval

    2008-01-01

    Metronomic low-dose chemotherapy regimen was found to have an antiangiogenic effect in tumors. However, its effect on levels of circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is not fully explored. Materials and methods. The levels of both VEGF and PDGF-BB were measured in three time points, in the serum of 32 rectal carcinoma patients receiving daily reduced-dose/continuous capecitabine in combination with preoperative pelvic irradiation. Results. We found a significant decrease in VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels during the combination treatment (p<0.0001), followed by an increase in the successive rest-period (p<0.0001). In addition, substantial changes in platelets counts were observed during treatment in correlation with the changes of VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels. Discussion. These results suggest that combined chemo-irradiation affect levels of pro-angiogenic factors during treatment, and may reflect an anti-angiogenic window induced during this treatment. The potential implications of this inducible phenomenon, including a possible clinical benefit from the administration of long lasting metronomic chemotherapy immediately following combined chemo-irradiation, would warrant further investigation

  12. A Phase I-II dose escalation study of fixed-dose rate gemcitabine, oxaliplatin and capecitabine every two weeks in advanced cholangiocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Ulrik V; Jensen, Lars Henrik; Sorensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    (O) and capecitabine (C), and evaluate the safety and efficacy of this regimen in patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Methods. In the Phase I part of the study a dose-escalation schedule of FDR G, O and C, administered every two weeks, was performed in patients with solid tumours...... and no other treatments or advanced CC. In the Phase II part response rate, toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival was evaluated in patients with newly diagnosed advanced CC. Results. Thirty-six patients entered the Phase I part and G 1 000 mg/m(2) day 1 and 15, O 60 mg/m(2) day 1...... and 15, and C 1 000 mg/m(2) BID day 1-7 and day 15-21 were established as MTD. In the Phase II part, 41 patients with advanced CC were included. Overall response rate was 34% and 51% had stable disease, resulting in a clinical benefit rate of 85%. Grade III and IV adverse events were rare. Median...

  13. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed....... METHODS: Review of controlled, clinical trials evaluating postoperative pulmonary function in patients positioned in the supine vs. the sitting or standing position and patients positioned in the supine vs. the lateral position. Data were obtained from a search in the Medline and Cochrane databases (1966...

  14. Imaging of the postoperative middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Marc T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, 25 rue Manin, 75940, Paris (France); Ayache, Denis [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Paris (France)

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this article is twofold: (a) to present the principles and the indications of surgical treatment of middle ear pathologies; and (b) to review the imaging findings after middle ear surgery, including the normal postoperative aspects and imaging findings in patients presenting with unsatisfactory surgical results or with suspicion of postoperative complications. This review is intentionally restricted to the most common diseases involving the middle ear: chronic otitis media and otosclerosis. In these specific fields of interest, CT and MR imaging play a very important role in the postoperative follow-up and in the work-up of surgical failures and complications. (orig.)

  15. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  16. Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: incidence, imaging, and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harreld, J H; Mohammed, N; Goldsberry, G; Li, X; Li, Y; Boop, F; Patay, Z

    2015-05-01

    Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MR imaging or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated the incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors, and time course of these collections after posterior fossa tumor resection. Retrospective review of postoperative spine MRI in 243 children (5.5 ± 4.6 years of age) from our clinical data base postresection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994 to August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0 ± 4.8 years of age) subjects positive for postoperative intraspinal subdural collections. Their extent and signal properties were recorded for postoperative (37/37), preoperative (15/37), and follow-up spine (35/37) MRI. Risk factors were compared with age-matched internal controls (n = 37, 5.9 ± 4.5 years of age). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation, and postoperative intracranial subdural collections with postoperative intraspinal subdural collections were assessed by the Fisher exact test or χ(2) test. The association between preoperative tumor volume and postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was assessed by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The overall incidence of postoperative intraspinal subdural collections was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days postoperatively (36%); 97% were seen 0-41 days postoperatively (12.9 ± 11.0 days). They were T2 hyperintense and isointense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced, and resolved on follow-up MR imaging (35/35). None were symptomatic. They were associated with intracranial subdural collections (P = .0011) and preoperative tonsillar herniation (P = .0228). Postoperative intraspinal subdural collections are infrequent and clinically silent, resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Preoperative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MR imaging by 4 weeks

  17. New insights into frequency and contents of fear of cancer progression/recurrence (FOP/FCR) in outpatients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC) receiving oral capecitabine: a pilot study at a comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jochen; Berberich, Sara; Lanvers, Elena; Sanning, Maria; Steimer, Ann-Kathrin; Kunzmann, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Fear of cancer progression/recurrence (FOP/FCR) is considered one of the most prevalent sources of distress in cancer survivors and associated with lower quality of life and functional impairment. Detailed measures of FOP/FCR are needed because little is known about the knowledge of FOP/FCR, its associations with the patient-doctor relationship, and the rate of adequate therapy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancer entities, and oral capecitabine is widely prescribed as treatment. Therefore, we initiated a pilot study to expand the literature on FOP/FCR in CRC outpatients receiving capecitabine and to generate hypotheses for future investigations. This study included 58 patients treated at a comprehensive cancer center. FOP/FCR was assessed with the Fear of Progression Questionnaire (FOP-Q-SF). Satisfaction with the relationships with doctors was assessed with the Patient-Doctor Relationship Questionnaire-9 (PRDQ-9). Levels of side effects were rated by the patients on a visual analog scale. Clinical data were extracted from the charts. A total of 19 out of 58 patients (36%) suffered from FOP/FCR according to our assessment. Levels of FOP/FCR seemed to be mostly moderate to high. Only four out of the 19 distressed patients (21%) were treated accordingly. Typical side effects of oncological treatment were associated with higher FOP/FCR. Satisfaction with doctor-patient relationships was not associated with FOP/FCR. Regarding single items of FOP/FCR, three out of the five most prevalent fears were associated with close relatives. FOP/FCR occurred frequently in more than one in three patients, but was mostly untreated in this sample of consecutive outpatients with CRC receiving oral capecitabine. In detail, most fears were related to family and friends. In addition to an unmet need of patients, our data indicate sources of distress not considered thus far. If replicated in larger studies, results may help to inform intervention development and

  18. Safety results from a phase III study (TURANDOT trial by CECOG) of first-line bevacizumab in combination with capecitabine or paclitaxel for HER-2-negative locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, I; Inbar, M J; Kahán, Z; Greil, R; Beslija, S; Stemmer, S M; Kaufman, B; Zvirbule, Z; Steger, G G; Messinger, D; Brodowicz, T; Zielinski, C

    2012-11-01

    We report safety data from a randomised, phase III study (CECOG/BC.1.3.005) evaluating first-line bevacizumab plus paclitaxel or capecitabine for locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Patients aged ≥18 years with human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative breast adenocarcinoma were randomised to Arm A: bevacizumab 10 mg/kg days 1 and 15; paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks; or Arm B: bevacizumab 15 mg/kg day 1; capecitabine 1000 mg/m(2) b.i.d., days 1-14, every 3 weeks, until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or consent withdrawal. A post hoc interim safety analysis included 561 patients (Arm A: 284, Arm B: 277). The regimens demonstrated similar frequencies of all-grade and serious adverse events (SAEs), but different safety profiles. Treatment-related events occurred in 85.2% (Arm A) and 78.0% (Arm B) of patients. Fatigue was most common in Arm A (30.6% versus 23.5% Arm B), and hand-foot syndrome (HFS) most common in Arm B (49.5% versus 2.5% Arm A). Diarrhoea (Arm A: 0.4%, Arm B: 1.4%) and pulmonary embolism (Arm A: 0.7%, Arm B: 1.1%) were the most frequently reported SAEs. These findings are in-line with safety data for bevacizumab plus paclitaxel or capecitabine, reported in previous phase III trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bevacizumab plus capecitabine in patients with progressive advanced well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the gastro-intestinal (GI-NETs) tract (BETTER trial)--a phase II non-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitry, Emmanuel; Walter, Thomas; Baudin, Eric; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Dominguez-Tinajero, Sophie; Bengrine-Lefevre, Leïla; Cadiot, Guillaume; Dromain, Clarisse; Farace, Françoise; Rougier, Philippe; Ducreux, Michel

    2014-12-01

    Gastro-intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (GI-NETs) are chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Bevacizumab, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has shown promising results in several phase II trials of gastro-entero-pancreatic-NETs. We assessed bevacizumab combined with capecitabine, specifically in GI-NET patients. BEvacizumab in The Treament of neuroEndocrine tumoRs (BETTER) was a multicentre, open-label, non-randomised, two-group phase II trial. Here we present the group of patients with progressive, metastatic, well-differentiated GI-NETs. Patients Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-performance status (ECOG-PS)⩽2, Ki-67 proliferation rate <15% and no prior systemic chemotherapy were treated with bevacizumab (7.5 mg/kg/q3w) and capecitabine (1000 mg/m2 twice daily, orally d1-14, resumed on d22) for 6-24 months. The primary end-point was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end-points included overall survival (OS), response rate, safety and quality of life. Of the 49 patients included, 53% were men, median age was 60 years (41-82), primary tumour site was ileal in 82% patients and Ki-67 was <15% in 48 patients and not available for one patient. After a maximum of 24 month follow-up per patient, the median PFS by investigator assessment was 23.4 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 13.2; not reached] and the overall disease control rate was 88% (18% partial response, 70% stable disease). The 2-year survival rate was 85%. Median OS was not reached. The most frequent grade 3-4 adverse events were hypertension (31%), diarrhoea (14%) and hand-foot syndrome (10%). The combination of bevacizumab and capecitabine showed clinical activity and a manageable safety profile in the treatment of GI-NETs that warrant confirmation in a randomised phase III trial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Methodological issues of postoperative cognitive dysfunction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    to reveal postoperative cognitive decline, and questionnaires are not useful for this purpose. There is a profound lack of consensus regarding the research methodology for detection of cognitive deterioration, especially the diagnostic criteria. Issues, such as baseline performance, learning effects...

  1. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Postoperative Complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications were determined during the thirty day post operative period. ... An ideal model to predict postoperative complications ... their SAS for purposes of risk stratification; high risk. (0-4), medium .... surgical audit (9,14). Serial monitoring ...

  2. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and document the pain managementoutcomes. The nurses’ holistic approach to pain managementminimizes the patients’ discomfort caused by pain inthe postoperative period after the surgery. In this article,nurses’ approaches to postoperative pain managementare discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 474-478

  3. Postoperative neuromuscular function following non-depolarising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... method of neurostimulation in the 1970s.9 A TOF refers to four supramaximal impulses delivered at ..... of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study. BMJ. 2012;345:e6329. 21.

  4. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... during postoperative 3DCRT treatment of parotid gland cancer patients. ... contralateral parotid, oral cavity, cochlea, spinal cord, brain stem, eyes, lenses and ... xerostomia, dry ear, ear infections, hearing deficits and ipsilat-.

  5. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  6. Postoperative opioid analgesia: time for a reconsideration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Rung, G W; Callesen, T

    1996-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief has improved in recent years with the development of new analgesics, additional routes of administration and the appearance of the hypothesis of preemptive as well as balanced analgesia (Kehlet H; Postoperative pain relief-what is the issue? Br J Anaesth 1994;72:375-8). ......Postoperative pain relief has improved in recent years with the development of new analgesics, additional routes of administration and the appearance of the hypothesis of preemptive as well as balanced analgesia (Kehlet H; Postoperative pain relief-what is the issue? Br J Anaesth 1994......;72:375-8). Many initial improvements simply involved the administration of opioid analgesics in new ways, such as continuous or on demand intravenous (i.v.) or epidural infusion. These methods allow lower total opioid dosages, provide a more stable concentration of opioid at the receptor and correspondingly...

  7. MR imaging of the postoperative spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.S.; Modic, M.T.; Masaryk, T.T.; Bohlman, H.

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative, immediate postoperative, and delayed (2-6 months) postoperative MR studies were obtained in 20 patients who had undergone a variety of spinal surgical procedures. In addition, 50 postoperative patients without preoperative studies were also reviewed. MR studies included sagittal T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and axial T1-weighted and multiecho T2-weighted images. The evolution of signal intensity changes with time is demonstrated. Diskectomy produced no significant vertebral body changes and reduced but did not completely remove the extradural mass of herniation. Anterior fusion resulted in decreased signal on T1-weighted and increased signal on T2-weighted images in adjacent vertebral bodies, which were changes that were similar to those seen around bone grafts but distinct from the graft itself. Scar formation was better defined 2-3 months postoperatively

  8. [Postoperative inconveniences after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gartner, R.; Callesen, T.; Kroman, N.

    2008-01-01

    The most common postoperative inconveniences after breast cancer surgery are pain, nausea and vomiting, which contribute to reduced patient satisfaction, prolonged hospital stays and delayed courses of rehabilitation. This article summarizes the literature regarding available procedure...

  9. Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern of Bacteria Isolates among Patients Admitted at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahirdar, ... Wound swab and venous blood samples were collected and processed for bacterial isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility testing following standard ...

  10. Abdominal CT findings of delayed postoperative complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A. [Sapir Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Kfar Saba (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Zrifin (Israel)

    2007-10-15

    Despite progress in surgical techniques and modern medical treatment, postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to type of surgery, clinical setting, and time elapsed since surgery. In general, they can be divided into early and delayed complications. Delayed postoperative complications can be classified as specific and nonspecific. The common nonspecific delayed complications are incisional hernia and postoperative bowel obstruction. Bowel obstruction can be further categorized as obstruction related to benign or neoplastic etiology, the latter occurring in oncology patients in whom the primary surgery was related to an underlying abdominal neoplasm. Gossypiboma is another, fortunately rare, postoperative complication. Specific complications appear after specific operations and include the following: Splenosis - following splenectomy. Retained gallstones and spilled gallstones - following cholecystectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Dropped appendicolith and stump appendicitis - following appendectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Obturation obstruction by a bezoar - following gastric surgery. Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) - following Bilroth II gastrectomy. (author)

  11. Body position and late postoperative nocturnal hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Stausholm, K; Edvardsen, L

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients were monitored for nocturnal body position (supine vs. side) and arterial oxygen saturation pre-operatively and on the second postoperative night after major abdominal surgery. The number of positional changes were significantly decreased after operation (p ... position than on the side (p movements....... towards more time spent in the supine position (p = 0.1). Individual mean arterial oxygen saturation decreased postoperatively (p positions (p = 0.9). Pre-operatively, episodic desaturations were significantly more frequent in the supine...

  12. Methodological issues of postoperative cognitive dysfunction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a subtle impairment of memory, concentration, and speed of information processing. It is a frequent complication following surgery and can have a debilitating effect on patients' recovery and future prognosis. Neuropsychological testing is needed...... to reveal postoperative cognitive decline, and questionnaires are not useful for this purpose. There is a profound lack of consensus regarding the research methodology for detection of cognitive deterioration, especially the diagnostic criteria. Issues, such as baseline performance, learning effects...

  13. [Post-operative infections after cosmetic tourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Albrechtsen, Sine; Sørensen, Lene Birk; Juel, Jacob

    2018-06-11

    Cosmetic tourism is defined as patient mobility across borders, typically constituted by patients seeking cosmetic surgery at lower costs abroad. The most common procedures are abdominoplasty, fat grafting and breast augmentation. Very little is known about the complication rates after cosmetic tourism, and there is a paucity of evidence in all aspects of cosmetic tourism. In this review, we focus on post-operative complications i.e. post-operative infections, in particular with rare microorganisms such as mycobacteria.

  14. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-01-01

    Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and doc...

  15. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night...... deaths occurred at night-time. These results suggest a need for further studies of sleep- and respiration-related effects on postoperative nocturnal cardiac function. The efficacy of monitoring during this apparent high-risk period should be evaluated....

  16. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suenaga M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitsukuni Suenaga,1 Nobuyuki Mizunuma,1 Satoshi Matsusaka,1 Eiji Shinozaki,1 Masato Ozaka,1 Mariko Ogura,1 Keisho Chin,1 Toshiharu Yamaguchi2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo, Japan Background: Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC.Methods: Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2, and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS.  Results: The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44: median age, 60 years (range 32–80; male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months, and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six

  17. The scientific basis for postoperative respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common and expensive. Costs, morbidity, and mortality are higher with PPCs than with cardiac or thromboembolic complications. Preventing and treating PPCs is a major focus of respiratory therapists, using a wide variety of techniques and devices, including incentive spirometry, CPAP, positive expiratory pressure, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and chest physical therapy. The scientific evidence for these techniques is lacking. CPAP has some evidence of benefit in high risk patients with hypoxemia. Incentive spirometry is used frequently, but the evidence suggests that incentive spirometry alone has no impact on PPC. Chest physical therapy, which includes mechanical clapping and postural drainage, appears to worsen atelectasis secondary to pain and splinting. As with many past respiratory therapy techniques, the profession needs to take a hard look at these techniques and work to provide only practices based on good evidence. The idea of a PPC bundle has merit and should be studied in larger, multicenter trials. Additionally, intraoperative ventilation may play a key role in the development of PPCs and should receive greater attention.

  18. Preoperative Radiotherapy of Advanced Rectal Cancer With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With or Without Cetuximab: A Pooled Analysis of Three Prospective Phase I-II Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Christian; Arnold, Dirk; Dellas, Kathrin; Liersch, Torsten; Hipp, Matthias; Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf; Hinke, Axel; Roedel, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A pooled analysis of three prospective trials of preoperative radiochemotherapy (RCT) for rectal cancer by using oxaliplatin and capecitabine with or without cetuximab was performed to evaluate the impact of additional cetuximab on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and tumor regression (TRG) grades. Methods and Materials: Of 202 patients, 172 patients met the inclusion criteria (primary tumor stage II/III, M0). All patients received concurrent RCT, and 46 patients received additional cetuximab therapy. A correlation of pretreatment clinicopathologic factors and cetuximab treatment with early pCR rates (TRG > 50%) was performed with univariate and multivariate analyses. Toxicity data were recorded for all patients. Results: Of 172 patients, 24 (14%) patients achieved a pCR, and 84 of 172 (71%) patients showed a TRG of >50% in the surgical specimen assessment after preoperative treatment. Age, gender, and T/N stages, as well as localization of the tumor, were not associated with pCR or good TRG. The pCR rate was 16% after preoperative RCT alone and 9% with concurrent cetuximab therapy (p = 0.32). A significantly reduced TRG of >50% was found after RCT with cetuximab compared to RCT alone (p = 0.0035). This was validated by a multivariate analysis with all available clinical factors (p = 0.0037). Acute toxicity and surgical complications were not increased with additional cetuximab. Conclusions: Triple therapy with RCT and cetuximab seems to be feasible, with no unexpected toxicity. Early response assessment (TRG), however, suggests subadditive interaction. A longer follow-up (and finally randomized trials) is needed to draw any firm conclusions with respect to local and distant failure rates.

  19. Preoperative chemoradiation with capecitabine, irinotecan and cetuximab in rectal cancer: significance of pre-treatment and post-resection RAS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollins, Simon; West, Nick; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Myint, Arthur Sun; Saunders, Mark; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Quirke, Phil; Essapen, Sharadah; Samuel, Leslie; Sizer, Bruce; Worlding, Jane; Southward, Katie; Hemmings, Gemma; Tinkler-Hundal, Emma; Taylor, Morag; Bottomley, Daniel; Chambers, Philip; Lawrie, Emma; Lopes, Andre; Beare, Sandy

    2017-10-24

    The influence of EGFR pathway mutations on cetuximab-containing rectal cancer preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) is uncertain. In a prospective phase II trial (EXCITE), patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined non-metastatic rectal adenocarinoma threatening/involving the surgical resection plane received pelvic radiotherapy with concurrent capecitabine, irinotecan and cetuximab. Resection was recommended 8 weeks later. The primary endpoint was histopathologically clear (R0) resection margin. Pre-planned retrospective DNA pyrosequencing (PS) and next generation sequencing (NGS) of KRAS, NRAS, PIK3CA and BRAF was performed on the pre-treatment biopsy and resected specimen. Eighty-two patients were recruited and 76 underwent surgery, with R0 resection in 67 (82%, 90%CI: 73-88%) (four patients with clinical complete response declined surgery). Twenty-four patients (30%) had an excellent clinical or pathological response (ECPR). Using NGS 24 (46%) of 52 matched biopsies/resections were discrepant: ten patients (19%) gained 13 new resection mutations compared to biopsy (12 KRAS, one PIK3CA) and 18 (35%) lost 22 mutations (15 KRAS, 7 PIK3CA). Tumours only ever testing RAS wild-type had significantly greater ECPR than tumours with either biopsy or resection RAS mutations (14/29 [48%] vs 10/51 [20%], P=0.008), with a trend towards increased overall survival (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.05-1.03, P=0.055). This regimen was feasible and the primary study endpoint was met. For the first time using pre-operative rectal CRT, emergence of clinically important new resection mutations is described, likely reflecting intratumoural heterogeneity manifesting either as treatment-driven selective clonal expansion or a geographical biopsy sampling miss.

  20. Postoperative radiation therapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Shikama, Naoto; Gomi, Koutarou; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Arakawa, Kazukiyo; Sasaki, Shigeru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Sone, Syusuke

    2000-01-01

    The authors retrospectively assessed the usefulness of postoperative radiation therapy after local resection of adenoid cystic carcinoma, with emphasis on organ-conserving treatment and the cosmetic results. Between 1985 and 1995, 32 patients underwent local resection followed by postoperative radiation therapy with curative and organ-conserving intent. None of patients received any form of chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. Radiation therapy was carried out by techniques that were appropriate for the site and extension of each tumor. The 5-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates of all patients were 76%, 68%, and 86%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate and disease-free survival rate of patients with microscopically positive margins were 89% and 75%, respectively, and higher than in patients with macroscopically residual disease, but no significant difference in 5-year overall survival rate was observed. The postoperative cosmetic results in 29 patients with head and neck lesions were evaluated. No difference was documented between the cosmetic results postoperatively setting and after postoperative radiotherapy, and no significant differences in cosmetic results were observed according to radiation dose. The combination of local resection with organ-conserving intent and postoperative radiation therapy provided good cosmetic results in patients with T1 or T2 lesions. Postoperative radiation therapy with smaller fractions is useful, because good local control can be achieved in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma having microscopically positive margins without inducing any late adverse reactions. However, the number of patients was too small and the follow-up period was too short to draw any definite conclusion in regard to fraction size. A much longer follow-up study with a larger number patients will be required to accurately determine the optimal treatment intensity and duration of treatment. (K.H.)

  1. Postoperative pain management in children: A survey of practices of pediatric surgeons in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed A Nasir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain has a negative effect on the process of recovery. There is paucity of literature on the postoperative pain management practice in children in developing countries. We sought to determine the current practice of postoperative pain management in children among pediatric surgeons in Nigeria. Methods: A cohort of 43 pediatric surgeons/trainees attending two annual meetings of Association of Paediatric Surgeons of Nigeria (2011 and 2013 were surveyed with a questionnaire enquiring about the practice of postoperative pain management in children and their perceptions. Results: Thirty-seven respondents had completed the survey (86% response rate. Of these respondents, 27 (73.0% were consultants and 10 (27.0% were trainees. Only 2 (5.4% respondents used any guidelines, and 8 (21.6% respondents had an established institutional protocol for the pediatric postoperative pain management. Almost half of the respondents (18, 48.6% used clinical judgments for assessing postoperative pain, followed by crying, requires oxygen to maintain saturation > 95%, increased vital signs, expressions, and sleeplessness scale (13, 35.1%; alertness, calmness, respiratory response/crying, physical movement, muscle tone, and facial tension behavioral scale (11, 29.7%; and verbal rating (10, 27.0%. In neonates, 89% of the respondents used paracetamol and 32% used pentazocine for routine postoperative analgesia. None of the respondents used morphine for neonatal postoperative analgesia. In older children, commonly used analgesics include paracetamol (35, 94.6%, pentazocine (30, 81.1%, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (28, 75.7%. More than half of the respondents (20, 54.1% were not satisfied with their current practice of postoperative pain management. Conclusion: Pain was infrequently assessed, and analgesic therapy though multimodal was largely not protocol based and therefore subject to inadequate pain relief. Postoperative pain should be

  2. Neural activation-based sexual orientation and its correlation with free testosterone level in postoperative female-to-male transsexuals: preliminary study with 3.0-T fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the brain activation pattern associated with sexual orientation and its correlation with the level of the free testosterone (free T) in postoperative female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals using a 3.0-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Eleven postoperative FtM transsexuals with sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0-T MR scanner. Brain activity was measured while viewing erotic male and female nude pictures. The average level of free T in the FtM transsexuals was in the normal range of heterosexual men. The brain areas with predominant activities during viewing female nude pictures in contrast to male pictures included the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus, putamen, amygdala, hypothalamus, and insula (p < 0.005). The free T levels were positively correlated with the BOLD signal changes in the parahippocampal gyrus (Spearman's rho = 0.91, p < 0.001), hippocampus (rho = 0.90, p < 0.001), insula (rho = 0.68, p < 0.05), putamen (rho = 0.66, p < 0.05), and amygdala (rho = 0.64, p < 0.05). Compared to FtM transsexuals with deficient level of free T, the FtM transsexuals with normal range of free T showed significantly higher activities in the parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, insula, putamen, and amygdala during viewing female nude pictures (p < 0.005). This study revealed the specific brain activation pattern associated with sexual orientation and its correlation with free T in the postoperative FtM transsexuals. These findings are applicable in understanding the neural mechanism on sexual arousal in FtM transsexuals and their sexual orientation in connection with the free T levels.

  3. Postoperative X-ray morphology: Thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.

    1987-01-01

    The publication focuses on the X-ray morphology of lungs. While one chapter is dedicated to the diagnoses obtained during the postoperative case of patients operated for the lungs a second chapter deals with the X-ray diagnosis of patients during the first days after lung surgery. Chapter 3 discusses the postoperative medical care of patients in medical intensive case units after operations other than lung surgery. The parallels between the critical care of patients after heart surgery and the critical care after operations other than heart surgery explain their simultaneous discussion in one chapter. Some diagnoses refer to patients subjected to long-term oxygen breathing and patients after abdomen and bone joint surgery. These are parallels between the volume 'Postoperative X-ray morphology: Blood vessels' and the chapter 'Heart' dealing with the coronary vessels; postoperative changes due to cogenital vitiae belong to pediatric radiology. The oesophagus dealt with in 'mediastinum und mediastinal organs' is also discussed in the volume on 'Postoperative X-ray morphology: Abdomen.' In order to avoid repetitions both chapters represent but a selection of facts. The publication focuses on the medical care of adult heat patients after cardiac valve surgery and coronary bypass surgery on the basis of native diagnostics. Methods of a more radical nature (for example those preceding re-operations) are only mentioned briefly. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Postoperative infections in craniofacial reconstructive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; Holy, C; Forrest, C R; Phillips, J H; Antonyshyn, O M

    2001-07-01

    The rate of, and possible risk factors for, postoperative craniofacial infection is unclear. To investigate this problem, we reviewed 349 cases of craniofacial skeletal procedures performed from 1996 to 1999 at our institution. Infection rate was determined and correlated with the use of implants, operative site, and cause of deformity. The inclusion criteria consisted of all procedures requiring autologous or prosthetic implantation in craniofacial skeletal sites, as well as all procedures involving bone or cartilage resection, osteotomies, debridement, reduction and/or fixation. Procedures that did not involve bone or cartilage surgery were excluded. The criteria for diagnosis of infection included clinical confirmation and one or more of 1) intravenous or oral antibiotic treatment outside of the prophylactic surgical regimen; 2) surgical intervention for drainage, irrigation, and or debridement; and 3) microbiological confirmation. Among the 280 surgical cases that fit the inclusion criteria and had complete records, there were 23 cases of postoperative infection (8.2%). The most common site for postoperative infection was the mandible (infection rate = 16.7%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed gunshot wound to be the most significant predictor of postoperative infection. Additionally, porous polyethylene implantation through a transoral route was correlated with a significant risk of postoperative infection.

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Risk of Postoperative Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick J; Attix, Deborah K; Weldon, B Craig; Monk, Terri G

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that elevated depressive symptoms are associated with increased risk of postoperative delirium. However, to our knowledge no previous studies have examined whether different components of depression are differentially predictive of postoperative delirium. One thousand twenty patients were screened for postoperative delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method and through retrospective chart review. Patients underwent cognitive, psychosocial, and medical assessments preoperatively. Depression was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form. Thirty-eight patients developed delirium (3.7%). Using a factor structure previously validated among geriatric medical patients, the authors examined three components of depression as predictors of postoperative delirium: negative affect, cognitive distress, and behavioral inactivity. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, education, comorbidities, and cognitive function, the authors found that greater behavioral inactivity was associated with increased risk of delirium (OR: 1.95 [1.11, 3.42]), whereas negative affect (OR: 0.65 [0.31, 1.36]) and cognitive distress (OR: 0.95 [0.63, 1.43]) were not. Different components of depression are differentially predictive of postoperative delirium among adults undergoing noncardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of persistent postoperative pain by quantitative sensory testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U.; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative pain remains inadequately treated, and it has been estimated that 5-10% undergoing surgery will develop moderate to severe persistent pain leading to chronic physical disability and psychosocial distress. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is a graded, standardized activation...... research tool in studies investigating the correlation between responses to preoperatively applied experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain. Second, the use of QST as a valuable prognostic, sequential assessment tool in surgical procedure specific research is presented. Third......, the implications of these findings for use of QST in future research are discussed. More rational design of predictive studies in PPP, based on surgical procedure specific approaches, is needed in order to improve our understanding of prevention and management of this debilitating postsurgical condition....

  7. Characterization of persistent postoperative pain by quantitative sensory testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U.; Kehlet, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    , the implications of these findings for use of QST in future research are discussed. More rational design of predictive studies in PPP, based on surgical procedure specific approaches, is needed in order to improve our understanding of prevention and management of this debilitating postsurgical condition.......Postoperative pain remains inadequately treated, and it has been estimated that 5-10% undergoing surgery will develop moderate to severe persistent pain leading to chronic physical disability and psychosocial distress. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is a graded, standardized activation...... research tool in studies investigating the correlation between responses to preoperatively applied experimental pain stimuli and clinical postoperative pain. Second, the use of QST as a valuable prognostic, sequential assessment tool in surgical procedure specific research is presented. Third...

  8. Computer tomographic assessment of postoperative peripancreatic collections after distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yuichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Sato, Asahi; Nagai, Kazuyuki; Anazawa, Takayuki; Takaori, Kyoichi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2018-03-27

    Peripancreatic collections occur frequently after distal pancreatectomy. However, the sequelae of peripancreatic collections vary from case to case, and their clinical impact is uncertain. In this study, the correlations between CT findings of peripancreatic collections and complications after distal pancreatectomy were investigated. Ninety-six consecutive patients who had undergone distal pancreatectomy between 2010 and 2015 were retrospectively investigated. The extent and heterogeneity of peripancreatic collections and background clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed. The extent of peripancreatic collections was calculated based on three-dimensional computed tomography images, and the degree of heterogeneity of peripancreatic collections was assessed based on the standard deviation of their density on computed tomography. Of 85 patients who underwent postoperative computed tomography imaging, a peripancreatic collection was detected in 77 (91%). Patients with either a large extent or a high degree of heterogeneity of peripancreatic collection had a significantly higher rate of clinically relevant pancreatic fistula than those without (odds ratio 5.95, 95% confidence interval 2.12-19.72, p = 0.001; odds ratio 8.0, 95% confidence interval 2.87-24.19, p = 0.0001, respectively). A large and heterogeneous peripancreatic collection was significantly associated with postoperative complications, especially clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula. A small and homogenous peripancreatic collection could be safely observed.

  9. Experience with early postoperative feeding after abdominal aortic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Po-Jen; Hsieh, Hung-Chang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping

    2004-03-01

    Abdominal aortic surgery is a form of major vascular surgery, which traditionally involves long hospital stays and significant postoperative morbidity. Experiences with transit ileus are often encountered after the aortic surgery. Thus traditional postoperative care involves delayed oral feeding until the patients regain their normal bowel activities. This report examines the feasibility of early postoperative feeding after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) open-repair. From May 2002 through May 2003, 10 consecutive patients with infrarenal AAA who underwent elective surgical open-repair by the same surgeon in our department were reviewed. All of them had been operated upon and cared for according to the early feeding postoperative care protocol, which comprised of adjuvant epidural anesthesia, postoperative patient controlled analgesia, early postoperative feeding and early rehabilitation. The postoperative recovery and length of hospital stay were reviewed and analyzed. All patients were able to sip water within 1 day postoperatively without trouble (Average; 12.4 hours postoperatively). All but one patient was put on regular diet within 3 days postoperatively (Average; 2.2 days postoperatively). The average postoperative length of stay in hospital was 5.8 days. No patient died or had major morbidity. Early postoperative feeding after open repair of abdominal aorta is safe and feasible. The postoperative recovery could be improved and the length of stay reduced by simply using adjuvant epidural anesthesia during surgery, postoperative epidural patient-controlled analgesia, early feeding, early ambulation, and early rehabilitation. The initial success of our postoperative recovery program of aortic repair was demonstrated.

  10. Delirium is associated with early postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, J.L.; Marcantonio, E.R.; Culley, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to determine if postoperative delirium was associated with early postoperative cognitive dysfunction (at 7 days) and long-term postoperative cognitive dysfunction (at 3 months). The International Study of Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction recruited 1218 subjects...

  11. Postoperative course of chronic subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tsubone, Kyoji; Kyuma, Yoshikazu; Kuwabara, Takeo

    1983-01-01

    1) Fourty cases of chronic subdural hematoma were operated on by trephination, irrigation and external drainage. Postoperative neurological recovery and decrease of hematoma cavity on CT scan were followed. 2) Operation were effective for recovery of neurological grade in 28 cases, moderately effective in 7 cases and not effective in 5 cases. 3) Withinthe tenth postoperative day, more than half residual hematoma cavity existed in 53% of examined cases. After that, more than half residual cavity existed in only 17%. 4) Preoperative feature of neurologically unimproved cases were no definite history of head trauma and water like low density of hematoma cavity. Postoperative feature was persistence of more than three fourth of residual hematoma cavity on CT scan. 5) A group of unimproved cases described above are thought to have a feature of subdural hygroma rather than subdural hematoma. When possibility of subdural hygroma is high in preoperative differential diagnosis, indication of operation should be different from chronic subdural hematoma. (author)

  12. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids applied peripherally at the site of surgery may produce postoperative analgesia with few side effects. We performed this systematic review to evaluate the analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids for acute postoperative pain. METHODS: We searched PubMed (1966 to June...... 2013), Embase (1980 to June 2013), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6). Randomized controlled trials investigating the postoperative analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids vs. systemic opioids or placebo, measured by pain intensity...... difference -5 mm, 95% CI: -7 to -3) for peripherally applied opioids vs. placebo and statistically significant increased time to first analgesic (mean difference 153 min, 95% CI: 41-265). When preoperative inflammation was reported (five studies), peripherally applied opioids significantly improved...

  13. Biomarkers of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna eAndrosova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elderly surgical patients frequently experience postoperative delirium (POD and the subsequent development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD. Clinical features include deterioration in cognition, disturbance in attention and reduced awareness of the environment and result in higher morbidity, mortality and greater utilization of social financial assistance. The aging Western societies can expect an increase in the incidence of POD and POCD. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been studied on the molecular level albeit with unsatisfying small research efforts given their societal burden. Here, we review the known physiological and immunological changes and genetic risk factors, identify candidates for further studies and integrate the information into a draft network for exploration on a systems level. The pathogenesis of these postoperative cognitive impairments is multifactorial; application of integrated systems biology has the potential to reconstruct the underlying network of molecular mechanisms and help in the identification of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers.

  14. Postoperative hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Catherine E; Shiue, Zita; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Umbricht, Christopher B; Tufano, Ralph P; Dackiw, Alan P B; Kowalski, Jeanne; Zeiger, Martha A

    2010-11-01

    It is believed that patients who undergo thyroidectomy for Graves' disease are more likely to experience postoperative hypocalcemia than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. However, no study has directly compared these two groups of patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased incidence or severity of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. An institutional review board-approved database was created of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 1998 to 2009 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were a total of 68 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgery. Fifty-five patients who underwent total thyroidectomy were randomly selected and served as control subjects. An analysis was conducted that examined potential covariates for postoperative hypocalcemia, including age, gender, ethnicity, preoperative alkaline phosphatase level, size of goiter, whether parathyroid tissue or glands were present in the specimen, and the reason the patient underwent surgery. Specific outcomes examined were calcium levels on postoperative day 1, whether or not patients experienced symptoms of hypocalcemia, whether or not Rocaltrol was required, the number of calcium tablets prescribed upon discharge, whether or not postoperative tetany occurred, and calcium levels 1 month after discharge. Each outcome was analyzed using a logistic regression. Graves' disease patients had a significantly (p-value Graves' disease and no patient in the control group were readmitted with tetany (p = 0.033). There was a trend, though not significant, toward patients with Graves' disease having a higher prevalence of hypocalcemia the day after thyroidectomy and 1 month later. Patients with Graves' disease are more likely to require increased dosages of calcium as well as experience tetany postoperatively than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. This suggests that

  15. Postoperative dental morbidity in children following dental treatment under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Aileen; Ou-Yang, Li-Wei; Chuang, Li-Chuan; Chang, Pei-Ching

    2018-05-10

    General anesthesia has been widely used in pediatric dentistry in recent years. However, there remain concerns about potential postoperative dental morbidity. The goal of this study was to identify the frequency of postoperative dental morbidity and factors associated with such morbidity in children. From March 2012 to February 2013, physically and mentally healthy children receiving dental treatment under general anesthesia at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry of the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan were recruited. This was a prospective and observational study with different time evaluations based on structured questionnaires and interviews. Information on the patient demographics, anesthesia and dental treatment performed, and postoperative dental morbidity was collected and analyzed. Correlations between the study variables and postoperative morbidity were analyzed based on the Pearson's chi-square test. Correlations between the study variables and the scale of postoperative dental pain were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Fifty-six pediatric patients participated in this study, with an average age of 3.34 ± 1.66 years (ranging from 1 to 8 years). Eighty-two percent of study participants reported postoperative dental pain, and 23% experienced postoperative dental bleeding. Both dental pain and bleeding subsided 3 days after the surgery. Dental pain was significantly associated with the total number of teeth treated, while dental bleeding, with the presence of teeth extracted. Patients' gender, age, preoperative dental pain, ASA classification, anesthesia time, and duration of the operation were not associated with postoperative dental morbidity. Dental pain was a more common postoperative dental morbidity than bleeding. The periods when parents reported more pain in their children were the day of the operation (immediately after the procedure) followed by 1 day and 3 days after the treatment.

  16. Postoperative ileus - an update on preventive techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews techniques currently used to prevent or reduce the duration of postoperative ileus (POI), which is considered an undesirable stress response to major abdominal surgery that leads to discomfort, morbidity and prolonged hospital stay. In several randomized studies, a number...... institution of oral feeding and laparoscopic surgery might also be effective, but there is less clear evidence available to support their use. When some of these techniques are combined as part of the concept of multimodal postoperative rehabilitation (fast-track surgery), the duration of POI after open...

  17. Preoperative patient education: evaluating postoperative patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, B J

    1994-04-01

    Preoperative teaching is an important part of patient care and can prevent complications, as well as promote patient fulfillment during hospitalization. A study was conducted at Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation in New Orleans, LA, in 1989, to determine the impact of a preoperative teaching program on the incidence of postoperative atelectasis and patient satisfaction. Results showed no significant difference of postoperative complications and patient gratification after participating in a structured preoperative teaching program. As part of this study, it was identified that a patient evaluation tool for a preoperative teaching class needed to be developed. The phases of this process are explained in the following article.

  18. Imaging of postoperative knee extensor mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Seeger, Leanne L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-57, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hame, Sharon L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Box 956902, 76-143 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Disorders of the anterior knee are common and include patellofemoral syndrome, patella instability, patella fracture, and patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures. Depending on the operative procedure performed, the post-operative imaging appearance of these knees may be confusing. It is crucial for the radiologist to be familiar with the procedures performed in order to recognize the postoperative findings. Radiologists must be able to interpret hardware (anchors, screw and wires) and disruptions in soft tissue planes that may persist with these types of procedures.

  19. Multimodality postoperative imaging of liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamboni, Giulia A.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Kruskal, Jonathan B.; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the only effective and definitive treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease. The shortage of cadaveric livers has lead to the increasing use of split-liver transplantation and living-donor liver transplantation, but the expansion of the donor pool has increased the risk for postoperative vascular and biliary complications. Early recognition of the imaging appearances of the various postoperative complications of liver transplantation is crucial for both graft and patient survival. This review describes the imaging findings of normal and abnormal transplanted liver parenchyma and of vascular and biliary post-transplantation complications. (orig.)

  20. Intervention radiology in postoperative recurrent goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, E.V.

    1995-01-01

    Roentgenoendovascular functional thyroidectomy was used to suppress the pathological activity of the thyroid in postoperative recurrent goiter. The method consists in vascular isolation of hyperplastic stump of the thyroid by catheterization of the left and right thyroid arteries, followed by their material occlusion. For embolization, a wide spectrum of nonlyzed synthetic, organic, and inorganic materials were used. The results of roentgenoendovascular functional thyroidectomy in 14 patients with postoperative recurrent goiter are analyzed. The advantages of roentgenoendovascular occlusion of the thyroid arteries before subtotal thyroidectomy are emphasized. A stabile clinical and hormonal remission and reduction of the thyroid in size to stage 1 were observed during three years following roentgenoendovascular intervention [ru

  1. Postoperative radiotherapy for merkel cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuya; Asakawa, Isao; Katayama, Emiko; Kajitani, Chikae; Tamamoto, Tetsuro; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Fukumoto, Takaya; Asada, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Seven patients with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) who visited our department of radiation oncology from February 2005 to July 2011 received postoperative radiotherapy (50-60 Gy). All patients were alive without recurrence (median follow-up period: 47.6 (14.7-88.4) months). All of them had grade 2 dermatitis, and one grade 2 oral mucositis and three grade 2 lymphedema were observed. No adverse event grade 3 (CTCAE v4.0) or over was observed. In our hospital, clinical results of postoperative radiotherapy for MCC were fairly good, and adverse events were acceptable during the follow-up period. (author)

  2. Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Bajwa, SJ Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema...

  3. Risk factors for postoperative liver failure after hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Minekatsu; Takao, Takashi; Mori, Naohide; Tamesa, Takao; Tangoku, Akira; Oka, Masaaki

    2004-01-01

    Selection of patients for hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma conventionally has been based upon Child-Pugh grading. However, postoperative liver failure after hepatectomy is a major cause of hospital mortality. A new predictor of postoperative liver failure is required. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for postoperative liver failure after hepatectomy. Perioperative risk factors for liver failure after hepatectomy were analyzed in 112 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma Eight of these patients died of liver failure. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was performed to investigate significant independent factors among 17 variables, including the serum alkaline phosphatase ratio (ALPR) on the first day after hepatectomy. ALPR was calculated as the postoperative ALP level divided by the ALP level before surgery. Significant risk factors of postoperative liver failure were ALPR on postoperative day 1 (ALPR1), sex, operative blood loss, and operative procedure. As an indicator of liver failure, the diagnostic accuracy of the ALPR1 was 93.7% when the ALPR was less than 0.4 on the first postoperative day. The ALPR and the serum total bilirubin concentration after hepatectomy were uncorrelated. ALPR1 is a useful predictor of liver failure after hepatectomy.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors for postoperative delirium in total joint arthroplasty patients: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenliang; Ke, Xiurong; Wang, Xiaoqing; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Juncheng; Yang, Guojing; Xia, Haijie; Zhang, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the incidence and clinical features of delirium after total joint arthroplasty, and to establish the potential risk factors for postoperative delirium. A total of 212 consecutive patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty, who met the inclusion and exclusive criteria were enrolled. The general characteristics, preoperative and postoperative hematological variables were documented respectively. According to the presence of delirium, all patients were divided into the delirium group and non-delirium group. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed to identify the possible predictors for postoperative delirium. At a minimum of 6months of follow-up, 35 patients were observed with postoperative delirium at an estimated total incidence of 16.5%. The incidence of delirium was statistically higher in hip arthroplasty (22.8%) than that in knee arthroplasty (7.1%). The multivariate regression analysis identified older age (OR=1.590, P=0.023), a history of stroke (OR=190.23, P=0.036), preoperative PaO 2 (OR=1.277, P=0.018) and equivalent fentanyl dose (OR=1.010, P=0.012) as the predictive factors for postoperative delirium after total joint arthroplasty. The incidence of postoperative delirium after total joint arthroplasty is higher than expected. Based on our findings, we suggest that the surgeons should focus on those patients who have these risk factors and ensure the appropriate management to avoid postoperative delirium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Postoperative management of dogs with gastric dilatation and volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Kelmer, Efrat

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to review the veterinary literature for evidence-based and common clinical practice supporting the postoperative management of dogs with gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV). GDV involves rapid accumulation of gas in the stomach, gastric volvulus, increased intragastric pressure, and decreased venous return. GDV is characterized by relative hypovolemic-distributive and cardiogenic shock, during which the whole body may be subjected to inadequate tissue perfusion and ischemia. Intensive postoperative management of the patients with GDV is essential for survival. Therapy in the postoperative period is focused on maintaining tissue perfusion along with intensive monitoring for prevention and early identification of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and consequent potential complications such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, acute kidney injury (AKI), gastric ulceration, electrolyte imbalances, and pain. In addition, early identification of patients in need for re-exploration owing to gastric necrosis, abdominal sepsis, or splenic thrombosis is crucial. Therapy with intravenous lidocaine may play a central role in combating IRI and cardiac arrhythmias. The most serious complications of GDV are associated with IRI and consequent systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Other reported complications include hypotension, AKI, disseminated intravascular coagulation, gastric ulceration, and cardiac arrhythmias. Despite appropriate medical and surgical treatment, the reported mortality rate in dogs with GDV is high (10%-28%). Dogs with GDV that are affected with gastric necrosis or develop AKI have higher mortality rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of diclofenac mouthwash on periodontal postoperative pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaber Yaghini

    2011-01-01

    After the operation in addition to ibuprofen 400 mg, one quadrant randomly received Diclofenac mouthwash (0/01% for 30 seconds, 4 times a day (for a week and for the contrary quadrant, ibuprofen and placebo mouthwash was given to be used in the same manner. The patients scored the number of ibuprofen consumption and their pain intensity based on VAS index in a questionnaire in days 1, 2, 3 and the first week after operation. The findings were analysed using two-way ANOVA, t-test and Wilcoxon. P-value less than 0.05 considered to be significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the mean values of pain intensity of two quadrants in four periods (P = 0.031. But, there was no significant difference between the average ibuprofen consumption in two groups (P = 0.51. Postoperative satisfaction was not significantly different in two quadrants (P = 0.059. 60% of patients preferred Diclofenac mouthwash. Conclusion: Diclofenac mouthwash was effective in reducing postoperative periodontal pain but it seems that it isn′t enough to control postoperative pain on its own.

  7. Postoperative pneumonia-prevention program for the inpatient surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Sherry M; Martin, Molinda; Yoon, Jung K; Bech, Fritz

    2010-04-01

    Postoperative pneumonia can lead to increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and costs. Pneumonia-prevention programs have been successfully implemented in ICU settings, but no program exists for surgical ward patients. A pilot prevention program was designed and implemented based on literature review. The program consisted of education of physicians and ward staff and a standardized postoperative electronic order set consisting of incentive spirometer, chlorhexidine oral hygiene, ambulation, and head-of-bed elevation. Quarterly staff meetings discussed the results of and compliance with the program. The intervention commenced in April 2007. Baseline incidence of inpatient ward pneumonia was calculated from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY 2007. Postintervention incidence was calculated in the same manner from FY 2007 through FY 2008. Any patient who contracted pneumonia in the ICU was excluded from analysis. There was a significant decrease in ward pneumonia incidence from 0.78% in the preintervention group compared with 0.18% in the postintervention group (p = 0.006), representing an 81% decrease in incidence from 2006 to 2008. The pneumonia-prevention program was very successful in diminishing postoperative pneumonia on the surgical ward. There was a highly statistically significant 4-fold decrease in pneumonia incidence after program implementation. The interventions were not costly but did require ongoing communication and cooperation between physician and nursing leadership to achieve compliance with the measures. This program has great potential for dissemination to hospital surgical wards and could decrease inpatient postoperative pneumonias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Postoperative 3D spine reconstruction by navigating partitioning manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoury, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.kadoury@polymtl.ca [Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Montreal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Labelle, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.labelle@recherche-ste-justine.qc.ca; Parent, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.parent@umontreal.ca [CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center, Montréal, Québec H3T 1C5 (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The postoperative evaluation of scoliosis patients undergoing corrective treatment is an important task to assess the strategy of the spinal surgery. Using accurate 3D geometric models of the patient’s spine is essential to measure longitudinal changes in the patient’s anatomy. On the other hand, reconstructing the spine in 3D from postoperative radiographs is a challenging problem due to the presence of instrumentation (metallic rods and screws) occluding vertebrae on the spine. Methods: This paper describes the reconstruction problem by searching for the optimal model within a manifold space of articulated spines learned from a training dataset of pathological cases who underwent surgery. The manifold structure is implemented based on a multilevel manifold ensemble to structure the data, incorporating connections between nodes within a single manifold, in addition to connections between different multilevel manifolds, representing subregions with similar characteristics. Results: The reconstruction pipeline was evaluated on x-ray datasets from both preoperative patients and patients with spinal surgery. By comparing the method to ground-truth models, a 3D reconstruction accuracy of 2.24 ± 0.90 mm was obtained from 30 postoperative scoliotic patients, while handling patients with highly deformed spines. Conclusions: This paper illustrates how this manifold model can accurately identify similar spine models by navigating in the low-dimensional space, as well as computing nonlinear charts within local neighborhoods of the embedded space during the testing phase. This technique allows postoperative follow-ups of spinal surgery using personalized 3D spine models and assess surgical strategies for spinal deformities.

  9. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  10. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  11. Postoperative 3D spine reconstruction by navigating partitioning manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The postoperative evaluation of scoliosis patients undergoing corrective treatment is an important task to assess the strategy of the spinal surgery. Using accurate 3D geometric models of the patient’s spine is essential to measure longitudinal changes in the patient’s anatomy. On the other hand, reconstructing the spine in 3D from postoperative radiographs is a challenging problem due to the presence of instrumentation (metallic rods and screws) occluding vertebrae on the spine. Methods: This paper describes the reconstruction problem by searching for the optimal model within a manifold space of articulated spines learned from a training dataset of pathological cases who underwent surgery. The manifold structure is implemented based on a multilevel manifold ensemble to structure the data, incorporating connections between nodes within a single manifold, in addition to connections between different multilevel manifolds, representing subregions with similar characteristics. Results: The reconstruction pipeline was evaluated on x-ray datasets from both preoperative patients and patients with spinal surgery. By comparing the method to ground-truth models, a 3D reconstruction accuracy of 2.24 ± 0.90 mm was obtained from 30 postoperative scoliotic patients, while handling patients with highly deformed spines. Conclusions: This paper illustrates how this manifold model can accurately identify similar spine models by navigating in the low-dimensional space, as well as computing nonlinear charts within local neighborhoods of the embedded space during the testing phase. This technique allows postoperative follow-ups of spinal surgery using personalized 3D spine models and assess surgical strategies for spinal deformities

  12. Postoperative radiotherapy in salivary ductal carcinoma: a single institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Mi Sun; Choi, Seo Hee; Suh, Yang Gun; Koh, Yoon Woo; Kim, Se Hun; Choi, Eun Chang; Keum, Ki Chang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We reviewed treatment outcomes and prognostic factors for patients with salivary ductal carcinoma (SDC) treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy from 2005 to 2012. A total of 16 patients were identified and 15 eligible patients were included in analysis. Median age was 61 years (range, 40 to 71 years) and 12 patients (80%) were men. Twelve patients (80%) had a tumor in the parotid gland, 9 (60%) had T3 or T4 disease, and 9 (60%) had positive nodal disease. All patients underwent surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy was delivered using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant failure-free survival (DFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Differences in survival based on risk factors were tested using a log-rank test. Median total radiotherapy dose was 60 Gy (range, 52.5 to 63.6 Gy). Four patients received concurrent weekly chemotherapy with cisplatin. Among 10 patients who underwent surgery with neck dissection, 7 received modified radical neck dissection. With a median follow-up time of 38 months (range, 24 to 105 months), 4-year rates were 86% for LRFFS, 51% for DFFS, 46% for PFS, and 93% for OS. Local failure was observed in 2 patients (13%), and distant failure was observed in 7 (47%). The lung was the most common involved site of distant metastasis. Surgery and postoperative radiotherapy in SDC patients resulted in good local control, but high distant metastasis remained a major challenge.

  13. Postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the elderly - what are the differences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, L; Rasmussen, L S

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive impairment is an increasingly common problem as more elderly patients undergo major surgery. Cognitive deficits in the postoperative period cause severe problems and are associated with a marked increase in morbidity and mortality. There are two main entities of postoperat......Postoperative cognitive impairment is an increasingly common problem as more elderly patients undergo major surgery. Cognitive deficits in the postoperative period cause severe problems and are associated with a marked increase in morbidity and mortality. There are two main entities...... of postoperative cognitive decline, delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, which are often reported as being part of the same continuum. Although there are similarities in the predisposing factors, it seems unlikely that they share the same pathophysiology. Both have multifactorial pathogenesis...... but differ in numerous other ways, with delirium being well-defined and acute in onset and postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) being subtler and with longer duration. This review aims to provide an overview of the differences in the diagnosis of the two entities and to illustrate the methodological...

  14. Concurrent chemoradiation of metastases with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and 3D-CRT in patients with oligometastatic colorectal cancer: results of a phase I study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dellas Kathrin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local control appears to be an important treatment aim in patients with limited metastases (oligometastases of colorectal cancer (CRC. Those patients show a favourable prognosis, if - in addition to the local effective treatment - an occurrence of new metastases may also be postponed by effective systemic therapy. The purpose of this dose escalation phase I study was to establish the efficacy of local radiotherapy (RT of oligometastatic CRC with a concurrent standard chemotherapy regimen. Methods Patients with first-, second- or third-line therapy of oligometastatic CRC (1–3 metastases or local recurrence plus max. 2 metastases received capecitabine (825 mg/m2/d BID d 1–14; 22–35 and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m2 d 1, 8, 22, 29. 3D-conformal RT of all metastatic lesions was delivered in 2.0 Gy up to 36 Gy to 50 Gy (3 dose levels. Primary endpoint was the maximal tolerable dose (MTD of RT defined as the level at which two or more of six patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT. Results Between 09/2004 and 08/2007, 9 patients (7 male, 2 female, 50–74 years were enrolled, 6 patients treated at dose level 1 (36 Gy, 3 patients at dose level 2 (44 Gy. 1 patient from the first cohort experienced DLT (oxaliplatin-related hypersensitivity reaction. No radiation-induced DLT occurred. 6/9 patients achieved objective response (partial remission. One year after initiation, all patients were alive, 6 patients survived (16 to 54 months patients died of tumor progression (14 to 23 months. The phase II part of the trial had to be closed due to recruitment failure. Conclusions Local 3D-CRT to metastatic lesions in addition to standard chemotherapy was feasible, DLT was not documented. 3/9 patients survived for a period of 3.5 to 4.4 years (time at the last evaluation. Radiotherapy of metastatic lesions should be incorporated into subsequent trials.

  15. Postoperative pain management experiences among school-aged children: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Qian Wen; Taylor, Beverley; Liam, Joanne Lw; Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; Wang, Wenru; He, Hong-Gu

    2013-04-01

    To explore postoperative pain management experiences among school-aged children. Ineffective postoperative pain management among children has been commonly reported. School-aged children are able to evaluate how their pain is managed and what their preferred strategies are. Most studies in pain management have adopted quantitative methods and have overlooked children's pain management experiences. This is a qualitative study using face-to-face interviews. Data were collected from 15 school-aged children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Singapore by in-depth interviews conducted between November 2010 and January 2011. Data were analysed by thematic analysis. Five themes were identified: children's self-directed actions to relieve their postoperative pain (e.g. using cognitive-behavioural methods of distraction and imagery, physical method of positioning, sleeping and drinking, seeking other people's help by informing parents and crying and using pain medications); children's perceptions of actions parents take for their postoperative pain relief (assessing pain, administering pain medications, using various cognitive-behavioural, physical methods and emotional support strategies, assisting in activities and alerting health professionals); children's perception of actions nurses take for their postoperative pain relief (administering medication, using cognitive-behavioural methods, emotional support strategies and helping with activities of daily living) and suggestions for parents (using distraction and presence) and nurses (administering medications, distraction and positioning) for their postoperative pain relief improvement. This study contributed to the existing knowledge about children's postoperative pain management based on their own experiences. Children, their parents and nurses used various strategies, including pain medication and non-pharmacological methods, especially distraction, for children's postoperative pain relief. This study provides evidence

  16. Postoperative nausea and vomiting following orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C.; Brookes, C. D.; Rich, J.; Arbon, J.; Turvey, T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with postoperative nausea (PON) and vomiting (POV) after orthognathic surgery. A review of the clinical records of consecutively enrolled subjects (2008–2012) at a single academic institution was conducted between 9/2013 and 3/2014. Data on the occurrence of PON and POV and potential patient-related, intraoperative, and postoperative explanatory factors were extracted from the medical records. Logistic models were used for the presence/absence of postoperative nausea and vomiting separately. Data from 204 subjects were analyzed: 63% were female, 72% Caucasian, and the median age was 19 years. Thirty-three percent had a mandibular osteotomy alone, 27% a maxillary osteotomy alone, and 40% had bimaxillary osteotomies. Sixty-seven percent experienced PON and 27% experienced POV. The most important risk factors for PON in this series were female gender, increased intravenous fluids, and the use of nitrous oxide, and for POV were race, additional procedures, and morphine administration. The incidence of PON and POV following orthognathic surgery in the current cohort of patients, after the introduction of the updated 2007 consensus guidelines for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting, has not decreased substantially from that reported in 2003–2004. PMID:25655765

  17. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Postoperative radiotherapy of the parotid gland could be achieved with various radiotherapy techniques. However they irradiate differently the surrounding organs at risk (OARs) in particular the cochlea, oral cavity & contralateral parotid causing significant increase in the risk of oral mucositis, xerostomia, and ...

  18. Preoperative exercise training to improve postoperative outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenet, K.

    2017-01-01

    It is common knowledge that better preoperative physical fitness is associated with better postoperative outcomes. However, as a result of aging of the population and improved surgical and anaesthesia techniques, the proportion of frail patients with decreased physical fitness levels undergoing

  19. Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative Pulmonary Edema. ... period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post.extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure.

  20. Research Article (Human Resources for Health) Postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-06-14

    Jun 14, 2007 ... ... of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. 4. ... six year Emergency Human Resource Programme aimed ... therefore to elucidate the extent of major surgical work ... back for review seven days after discharge. ... and 24 hour maternal condition, post-operative fever, wound.

  1. Prevention of postoperative pain by balanced analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Rosenberg, J; Dirkes, W E

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen patients undergoing colorectal surgery received an intraoperative afferent neural block with combined intrathecal and extradural local anaesthetics plus a balanced postoperative low-dose regimen of extradural bupivacaine 10 mg h-1-morphine 0.2 mg h-1 and systemic piroxicam 20 mg/24 h...

  2. Neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, K; McIlroy, D; Kasza, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed associations between intraoperative neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia, and a composite primary outcome of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, at 30 days post-randomization in POISE-2 Trial subjects. METHODS: 10 010 high-risk noncardiac surgical pat...

  3. The Postoperative Complications Prediction in Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... management in surgery. Knowing which patient to operate and those at high risk of developing complications contributes significantly to the quality of surgical care and cost reduction. The postoperative complications of patients who underwent Laparotomy in Mulago Hospital were studied using POSSUM scoring system.

  4. Diagnosis, Prevention and Management of Postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for ... leading to leakage of fluid into the interstitium. Any undue ... of the total body water has been termed as fluid overload[9] and it has been ...

  5. Postoperative MR arthography of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Trattnig, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Freilinger, W.; Cochole, M.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Indications of MR arthrography were analyzed in this prospective study. The aim was to evaluate possible advantages over conventional MRI, establish diagnostic criteria and to analyze its meaning further for the therapeutic management of postoperative patients. MR arthrography was performed in eight patients who had undergone surgical repair of rotator cuff lesions (modified Neer acromioplasty) and in six patients who had undergone arthroscopic therapy of recurrent unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder by combined arthroscopic intra- and extracapsular repair. MR investigations were performed before and after application of a contrast solution (2 mmol Gd-DTPA). All patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, a partial tear could be verified in one patient and excluded in all others. In patients after arthroscopic therapy by combined intra- and extracapsular repair, a radiologically patulous-appearing capsule correlated with clinically recurrent dislocations. In all other patients diagnostic criteria, such as distribution of the intra-articular contrast solution, proliferation of scar tissue, nodular appearance of the glenohumeral ligaments and capsule thickness, correlated with a regular postoperative status. MR arthrography of the shoulder represents a promising method in the evaluation of the postoperative shoulder. It might further improve the evaluation of reactive capsule alterations, scar tissue proliferation, and the labroligamentous complex, as well as the ability to differentiate partial and complete rerupture from degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  6. [Postoperative intraperitoneal complications in colon cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, E A; Topuzov, É G; Topuzov, É É

    2014-01-01

    The authors studied the clinical characteristics and terms of the development of postoperative intraperitoneal complications in patients undergoing colon cancer surgery. It was stated, that the diversity of clinical data depended on complication characteristics. Results of investigation allowed defining of the most dangerous terms of intraperitoneal complications and risk factors.

  7. Characterizing postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Iris Bertha

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands, yearly more than 400.000 elderly patients undergo surgery. An estimated ten percent of these patients develops long-lasting postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), associated with a reduced quality of life, increased dependency and worse prognosis. Currently, there is no

  8. Cryotherapy on postoperative rehabilitation of joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Sheng-Hui; Jiang, Wen-Tong; Guo, Lei; Jin, Yu-Heng; Jiang, Tian-Long; Zhao, Yuyan; Zhao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cryotherapy on joint arthroplasty recovery remains controversial. This systematic review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of cryotherapy in patients after joint arthroplasty. Comprehensive literature searches of several databases including Cochrane Library (2013), MEDLINE (1950-2013), and Embase (1980-2013) were performed. We sought randomised controlled trials that compared the experimental group received any form of cryotherapy with any control group after joint arthroplasty. The main outcomes were postoperative blood loss, adverse events, and pain. Analyses were performed with Revman 5.0. Results were shown as mean differences (MD) and standard deviations or as risk difference and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Ten trials comprised 660 total knee arthroplastys and three trials comprised 122 total hip arthroplastys (THAs) met the inclusion criteria. Blood loss was significantly decreased by cryotherapy (MD = -109.68; 95 % CI -210.92 to -8.44; P = 0.03). Cryotherapy did not increase the risk of adverse effect (n.s.). Cryotherapy decreased pain at the second day of postoperative (MD = -1.32; 95 % CI -2.37 to -0.27; P = 0.0003), but did not decreased pain at the first and third day of postoperative (n.s.). Cryotherapy appears effective in these selected patients after joint arthroplasty. The benefits of cryotherapy on blood loss after joint arthroplasty were obvious. However, the subgroup analysis indicated that cryotherapy did not decreased blood loss after THA. Cryotherapy did not increase the risk of adverse effect. Cryotherapy decreased pain at the second day of postoperative, but did not decreased pain at the first and third day of postoperative. II.

  9. Adult tonsillectomy: postoperative pain depends on indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Zagólski

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Intense pain is one of the most important postoperative complaints after tonsillectomy. It is often described by patients as comparable to the pain that accompanies an acute tonsillitis. Although recurrent tonsillitis is the most frequent indication for surgery, many tonsillectomies are performed due to other indications and these patients may be unfamiliar with such pain. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether individuals with recurrent tonsillitis experience different post-tonsillectomy pain intensity than those with other indications for surgery, with no history of episodes of acute tonsillitis. METHODS: A total of 61 tonsillectomies were performed under general anesthesia, using a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP laser (to eliminate the potential influence on the study results of forceful dissection of fibrotic tonsils in patients with history of recurrent tonsillitis and multiple ligations of blood vessels within the tonsillar beds. The patients received 37.5 mg Tramadoli hydrochloridum + 325 mg Paracetamol tablets for 10 days. Postoperative variables included the duration of hospital stay, postoperative hemorrhage and readmission rate. The patients reported pain intensity on consecutive days, pain duration, weight loss on postoperative day 10, character, intensity and duration of swallowing difficulties, and the need for additional doses of painkillers. Healing was also assessed. Capsular nerve fibers were histologically examined in the resected tonsils by immunostainings for general and sensory markers. RESULTS: Indications for the surgery were: recurrent acute tonsillitis (34 patients, no history of recurrent tonsillitis: focus tonsil (20 and intense malodour (7. Pain intensity on postoperative days 3-4 and incidence of readmissions due to dehydration were significantly higher in the group with no history of recurrent tonsillitis. No significant differences in relative densities of protein gene product (PGP 9.5- and

  10. Intelligent postoperative morbidity prediction of heart disease using artificial intelligence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Nan-Chen; Hung, Lun-Ping; Shih, Chun-Che; Keh, Huan-Chao; Chan, Chien-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an advanced minimally invasive surgical technology that is helpful for reducing patients' recovery time, postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study proposes an ensemble model to predict postoperative morbidity after EVAR. The ensemble model was developed using a training set of consecutive patients who underwent EVAR between 2000 and 2009. All data required for prediction modeling, including patient demographics, preoperative, co-morbidities, and complication as outcome variables, was collected prospectively and entered into a clinical database. A discretization approach was used to categorize numerical values into informative feature space. Then, the Bayesian network (BN), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM) were adopted as base models, and stacking combined multiple models. The research outcomes consisted of an ensemble model to predict postoperative morbidity after EVAR, the occurrence of postoperative complications prospectively recorded, and the causal effect knowledge by BNs with Markov blanket concept.

  11. Effect of postoperative experiences on willingness to pay to avoid postoperative pain, nausea, and vomiting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, Jolanda E.; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Moons, Karel G.; Kalkman, Cor J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors assessed the willingness to pay (WTP) for "perfect" prophylactic antiemetics and analgesics in patients who were scheduled to undergo surgery during general anesthesia. Furthermore, they determined whether postoperative experiences of pain and nausea and vomiting (PONV)

  12. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy

  13. Using the Mouse Grimace Scale to Reevaluate the Efficacy of Postoperative Analgesics in Laboratory Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Lynn C; Sorge, Robert E; Sotocinal, Susana G; Tabaka, John M; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Zaloum, Austin; King, Oliver D; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pain management in animals is complicated greatly by the inability to recognize pain. As a result, the choice of analgesics and their doses has been based on extrapolation from greatly differing pain models or the use of measures with unclear relevance to pain. We recently developed the Mouse Grimace Scale (MGS), a facial-expression–based pain coding system adapted directly from scales used in nonverbal human populations. The MGS has shown to be a reliable, highly accurate measure of spontaneous pain of moderate duration, and therefore is particularly useful in the quantification of postoperative pain. In the present study, we quantified the relative intensity and duration of postoperative pain after a sham ventral ovariectomy (laparotomy) in outbred mice. In addition, we compiled dose–response data for 4 commonly used analgesics: buprenorphine, carprofen, ketoprofen, and acetaminophen. We found that postoperative pain in mice, as defined by facial grimacing, lasts for 36 to 48 h, and appears to show relative exacerbation during the early dark (active) photophase. We find that buprenorphine was highly effective in inhibiting postoperative pain-induced facial grimacing in mice at doses equal to or lower than current recommendations, that carprofen and ketoprofen are effective only at doses markedly higher than those currently recommended, and that acetaminophen was ineffective at any dose used. We suggest the revision of practices for postoperative pain management in mice in light of these findings. PMID:22330867

  14. Incidence of postoperative delirium in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty-an Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juncheng; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Yeo, Seng Jin

    2017-08-01

    Very little is known in the literature with regards to the incidence of postoperative delirium following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Asians and the associated surgical factors. We conducted a retrospective study on incidence of postoperative delirium following TKA in Asians. One thousand sixteen knees of 954 consecutive patients who underwent TKA by the senior author of this study in the year 2006 were included in this review. All written and electronic medical records for patients were screened. Delirium was recorded to be present based on clinical entry onto the patients' inpatient hospital notes and a diagnosis made by psychiatrist based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV). All statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v.18.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). The incidence of postoperative delirium in our patients undergoing TKA was 0.59%. Six patients had a confirmed diagnosis of delirium postoperatively. We noted an association between a higher mean age (P<0.0001), a lower body mass index (P<0.0001), Chinese ethnicity (P=0.002), male gender (P=0.002) and chronic opioid use (P<0.0001) with incidence of post-operative delirium. We also noted a higher proportion of post-operative DVT (P<0.0001) and wound infection (P<0.0001) in the delirium group. The incidence of postoperative delirium in Asians undergoing TKA in our institution is very low at 0.59%. Advanced age, lower body mass index, Chinese ethnicity, male gender and preoperative chronic opioid use may be associated with developing postoperative delirium.

  15. [Effect of postoperative precision nutrition therapy on postoperative recovery for advanced gastric cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q; Li, Y; Yu, B; Yang, P G; Fan, L Q; Tan, B B; Tian, Y; Yang, A B

    2018-02-23

    Objective: To investigate the effect of postoperative precision nutrition therapy on postoperative recovery (PR) of patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC). Methods: 71 subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups. The 34 patients of research group were treated with postoperative precision nutrition treatment according to the indirect energy measurement method. The 31 patients of control group were treated with traditional postoperative nutrition treatment. All participants were measured for body mass index (BMI), NRS2002, PG-SGA and relevant laboratory test within the 1st day before surgery and 7th day after surgery. Moreover, the difference between two groups in short-term effects were evaluated. Results: The daily energy supply of control group was 30.1%-43.74% higher than that of the experimental group ( P nutritional risk became lower in the research group ( P recovery of patients in the research group was comparable to that of the control group ( P >0.05). Moreover, the complication rate and hospitalization costs of in research group were significantly lower than that of in control group ( P nutritional risks before surgery, the nutritional index and inflammatory index in the research group were better than those in the control group. Conclusion: Postoperative precision nutrition therapy may improve the postoperative nutritional status and short-term effects of patients with AGC after NC.

  16. Orthotopic neobladder reconstrution: postoperative CT appearance, complications and potential pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Lim; Jung, Seung Eun; Im, Yeon Soo; Lee, Jae Mun; Lee, Ji Youl; Yoon, Moon Soo; Hahn, Seong Tai [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-08-01

    To evaluate the postoperative CT appearance, complications and potential pitfalls of radical cystectomy with orthotopic neobladder reconstruction. We examined 46 patients [43 men and 3 women aged 34-72 (mean, 56.7) years] who had undergone neobladder reconstruction (ileocolic neobladder in 25 patients and ileal-W neobladder in 21). The CT scans were assessed in terms of their depiction of normal anatomy, namely the shape, location and internal architecture of the neobladder, the location of bladder bases, and the ureteral course. Early and late complications were also assessed. The characteristics of ileocolic neobadder were a right-side location, a lobulated outer margin, interal projections due to haustra or plication, a base in the retropubis, and right-side insertion of both ureters. In contrast, the characteristics of an ileal-W neobladder were a central location, an ovoid shape, nodular thickening at the ureteral insertion site, internal projections due to plication, and a retropubic bladder base. Early complications included hematoma with abscess formation (n=2), and postoperative peritonitis (n=1), while late complications were hydronephrosis due to stricture ar the ureteral anastomotic site (n=16), tumor recurrence at this site (n=1), distal ureteral stone (n=1), mucus urinary retention (n=1), incisional hernia (n=2), tumor recurrence in the pelvic side wall (n=1), carcinomatosis peritonei (n=1), and liver metastasis (n=2). A knowledge of normal anatomic changes is essential for the accurate interpretation of CT scans. CT is a useful modality of the evaluation of postoperative change and the complications occurring in patients who have undergone radial cystectomy with othotopic neobladder reconstruction.

  17. Assessment of Postoperative Analgesic Drug Efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Kloster; Gögenur, Ismail; Torup, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain intensity ratings and opioid consumption (OC) are ubiquitous indicators of pain in postoperative trials of the efficacy of interventional procedures. Unfortunately, consensus on the appropriate statistical handling of these outcomes has not been reached. The aim of this article was......, therefore, to reexamine original data obtained from a postoperative analgesic drug trial, applying a collection of standard statistical methods in analgesic outcome assessments. Furthermore, a modified integrated assessment method of these outcomes was evaluated. METHODS: Data from a randomized, double...... also included an integrated assessment of longitudinally measured pain intensity and opioid consumption (PIOC0-6/0-24 h). Also, estimation of effect size, generalized odds ratio of the individual analgesic outcome variables was performed. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were included in the final data...

  18. Postoperative recurrence after VATS for spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuno, Gotaro; Tsumura, Makoto; Kokudo, Yasutaka; Muraoka, Atsushi; Tsuruno, Masaki

    2003-01-01

    A total of 88 cases of 81 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax treated at the hospital from March 1992 to August 2001 were subjected to a study of examining preoperative chest CT and thoracographic findings from the standpoint of postoperative recurrence. Preoperative chest CT and thoracography were conducted in 82 cases and 41 cases (including 25 cases with continuous air leakage), respectively. Eight (9.1%) patients developed recurrence of pneumothorax, and three patients of them underwent reoperation. Considering the intraoperative findings, newly formed bullae appeared to be a cause of recurrence. Resulting from these examinations, we conclude that it is difficult to predict the risk factor for postoperative recurrence at this time, in addition, it is important that the area of air leakage can be confirmed by thoracoscopic findings. (author)

  19. Multidetector CT evaluation of the postoperative pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Fernando I; Ortega, Cinthia D; Blasbalg, Roberto; Rocha, Manoel S; Jukemura, José; Cerri, Giovanni G

    2012-01-01

    Several pancreatic diseases may require surgical treatment, with most of these procedures classified as resection or drainage. Resection procedures, which are usually performed to remove pancreatic tumors, include pancreatoduodenectomy, central pancreatectomy, distal pancreatectomy, and total pancreatectomy. Drainage procedures are usually performed to treat chronic pancreatitis after the failure of medical therapy and include the Puestow and Frey procedures. The type of surgery depends not only on the patient's symptoms and the location of the disease, but also on the expertise of the surgeon. Radiologists should become familiar with these surgical procedures to better understand postoperative changes in anatomic findings. Multidetector computed tomography is the modality of choice for identifying normal findings after surgery, postoperative complications, and tumor recurrence in patients who have undergone pancreatic surgery. RSNA, 2012

  20. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer operated for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sune Høirup; Harling, Henrik; Kirkeby, Lene Tschemerinsky; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Mocellin, Simone

    2012-03-14

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the Western world. Apart from surgery - which remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary tumours - postoperative (i.e., adjuvant) chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based regimens is now the standard treatment in Dukes' C (TNM stage III) colon tumours i.e. tumours with metastases in the regional lymph nodes but no distant metastases. In contrast, the evidence for recommendations of adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer is sparse. In Europe it is generally acknowledged that locally advanced rectal tumours receive preoperative (i.e., neoadjuvant) downstaging by radiotherapy (or chemoradiotion), whereas in the US postoperative chemoradiotion is considered the treatment of choice in all Dukes' C rectal cancers. Overall, no universal consensus exists on the adjuvant treatment of surgically resectable rectal carcinoma; moreover, no formal systematic review and meta-analysis has been so far performed on this subject. We undertook a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1975 until March 2011 in order to quantitatively summarize the available evidence regarding the impact of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with surgically resectable rectal cancer. The outcomes of interest were overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). CCCG standard search strategy in defined databases with the following supplementary search. 1. Rect* or colorect* - 2. Cancer or carcinom* or adenocarc* or neoplasm* or tumour - 3. Adjuv* - 4. Chemother* - 5. Postoper* Randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer who received no adjuvant chemotherapy with those receiving any postoperative chemotherapy regimen. Two authors extracted data and a third author performed an independent search for verification. The main outcome measure was the hazard ratio (HR) between the risk of event between the treatment arm (adjuvant chemotherapy

  1. Postoperative CT appearance in chronic subdural hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Takaaki; Nishikawa, Michio; Handa, Hajime; Iwaki, Kazuo; Sawai, Teruaki; Munaka, Masahiro

    1988-05-01

    Postoperative CT appearances in 65 cases of chronic subdural hematomas were evaluated in terms of patient's age, preoperative neurological symptoms and CT findings, final outcomes, and so on. All of the cases were treated with trepanation and irrigation. CT appearances were divided into four different types as follows; Type Ia: No abnormal findings in the subdural sapce, Type Ib: The same as above except for a linear high density suggestive of thickened outer membrane, Type II: Persistence subdural fluid collection and widened cortical sulci which indicate underlining brain atrophy, Type III: Remaining hematoma and/or density changes during follow-up period. Although the mean age of the patients in type Ib was higher than those in type Ia and reexpansion of the brain appear to delay in type Ib and preoperative CT in type Ib tended to show mixed density, final outcome in both groups were excellent. Characteristics in type II were that most of cases were in the eighth decade, preceding head injury was unclear, preoperative psychiatric symptoms and disturbance of consciousness were common and postoperative improvement of the symptoms was not satisfactory compared to other types. Aged patients as in type Ib and type II and thick hematomas of over 2 cm depth with mixed or high density tended to show type III postoperatively. All of the nine patients who required reoperation were included in this type. The present study indicates that thick hematomas with sizable mass effect and mixed or high density in the aged must be carefully treated, such as with placement of the subdural drainage or keeping the patient in the Trendelenburg position, to facilitate postoperative reexpansion of the brain.

  2. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  3. Nursing Music Protocol and Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Michael J; Coto, Jeffrey

    2018-04-01

    Pain has always been a major concern for patients and nurses during the postoperative period. Therapies, medicines, and protocols have been developed to improve pain and anxiety but have undesirable risks to the patient. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies have been studied but have not been applied as regular protocols in the hospital setting. Music is one type of complementary and alternative medicine therapy that has been reported to have favorable results on reducing postoperative pain, anxiety, and opioid usage. However, music lacks a protocol that nurses can implement during the perioperative process. This paper is an in-depth literature review assessing a best practice recommendation and protocol that establishes a consensus in the use of music therapy. The results suggest that music therapy may consist of calming, soft tones of 60-80 beats per minute for at least 15-30 minutes at least twice daily during the pre- and postoperative periods. It is suggested that music only be used in conjunction with standards of care and not as the primary intervention of pain or anxiety. This evidence suggests that proper use of music therapy can significantly reduce surgical pain. Implementing these protocols and allowing the freedom of nursing staff to use them may lead to greater reductions in surgical pain and anxiety and a reduction in opioid use. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Postoperative nausea and vomiting in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) has a high incidence in children and requires prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. PONV can be reduced by the avoidance of nitrous oxide, volatile anesthetics, and the reduction of postoperative opioids. The use of dexamethasone, 5-HT3 antagonists, or droperidol alone is potent, but combinations are even more effective to reduce PONV. Droperidol has a Food and Drug Administration warning. Hence, dexamethasone and 5-HT3 antagonists should be preferred as prophylactic drugs. It is further reasonable to adapt PONV prophylaxis to different risk levels. Prolonged surgery time, inpatients, types of surgery (e.g. strabismus and ear-nose-throat surgery), and patients with PONV in history should be treated as high risk, whereas short procedures and outpatients are to be treated as low risk. Concluding from the existing guidelines and data on the handling of PONV in children at least 3 years, the following recommendations are given: outpatients undergoing small procedures should receive a single prophylaxis, outpatients at high risk a double prophylaxis, inpatients with surgery time of more than 30 min and use of postoperative opioids should get double prophylaxis, and inpatients receiving a high-risk surgical procedure or with other risk factors a triple prophylaxis (two drugs and total intravenous anesthesia). Dimenhydrinate can be used as a second choice, whereas droperidol and metoclopramide can only be recommended as rescue therapy.

  5. Postoperative irradiation in carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilepich, M.V.; Walz, B.J.; Baglan, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients received postoperative radiotherapy with curative intent following either radical prostatectomy (18 patients) or enucleative prostatectomy (10 patients). In patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, the indications for postoperative radiotherapy included positive margins in 13, close margins in 2, and seminal vesicle involvement in 3 patients. The majority of patients (82%) received total dose to the prostatic bed in excess of 6500 rad. In over 80% of the patients, the pelvic lymphatics are also treated (to a total dose of 4000-5000 rad). All of the patients irradiated after radical prostatectomy clinically remained disease-free locally. Approximately one-half of the patients in both the enucleation and radial prostatectomy groups developed evidence of distant metastases. The complications of treatment have been comparable to those in patients treated with radiotherapy only. The continence status has not been affected significantly. All patients with incontinence following completion of radiotherapy had documented impairment of continence prior to radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy administered following either radical or enucleative prostatectomy was tolerated well and resulted in excellent local control

  6. Causes and management of postoperative enterocutaneous fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, A.S.; Siddiqui, F.G

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify the causes of postoperative enterocutaneous fistulas and to evaluate the results of conservative and operative treatment including the effectiveness of octreotide in the management of these fistulas. Subjects and Methods: Forty patients with postoperative fistula were studied. Demographic variables, causes and management outcome was observed and recorded. Results: There were 25 males and 15 females with 50% of the patients being in age group of 21-30 years. Emergency surgery for typhoid perforation(45%) and intestinal tuberculosis (30%) were the commonest causes. Ileum and jejunum were the commonest sites of fistulation found in 85% cases. Twenty-one patients were started on conservative treatment with spontaneous closure occurring in 15 (71.4%) patients. Nineteen patients were operated within three days of admission due to generalized peritonitis (73.7%) and local intra-abdominal collections (26.3%). Wound infection was the commonest complication in the operative group. The mortality rate in this series was 7.5%. All the deaths occurred following surgery. Conclusion: Postoperative enterocutaneous fistula has a high morbidity and a significant mortality. Sepsis in the peritoneal cavity is the major cause of mortality. Conservative treatment has a good outcome for these fistulas. The use of octreotide is highly recommended as it definitely converts high output fistulas to low output fistulas. (author)

  7. Radical cystectomy: Analysis of postoperative course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremić Dimitrije

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Radical cystectomy is a method of choice in the therapy of infiltrative bladder cancer. The aim of this research was to analyze postoperative course after radical cystectomy (length of hospitalization, most frequent complications and utilization of antibiotics and transfusions. Methods. We analyzed the records of 82 patients operated on in the Department of Urology, Clinical Center of Vojvodina, in a three-year period. In order to aquire data World Health Organization (WHO has developed Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical/Defined Daily Dose (ATC/DDD methodology. Defined daily dose (DDD is the assumed average maintenance dose per day for a drug use for its main indication. Results. Continent urinary derivation was preformed in 23.15% cases. Postoperative complications occurred in 18.29% of patients. Average blood utilization was 2.19 units. Blood utilization for continent derivations (n = 48 was 4.6 units, and incontinent ones 3.36 units. Totally 159.33 DDD/100 bed days were used. Conclusion. When preforming continent derivation there is a significant increase in blood utilization. Frequency of postoperative complications correlates to those reported in the literature.

  8. [QUIPS: quality improvement in postoperative pain management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of high-quality guidelines and advanced pain management techniques acute postoperative pain management is still far from being satisfactory. The QUIPS (Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management) project aims to improve treatment quality by means of standardised data acquisition, analysis of quality and process indicators, and feedback and benchmarking. During a pilot phase funded by the German Ministry of Health (BMG), a total of 12,389 data sets were collected from six participating hospitals. Outcome improved in four of the six hospitals. Process indicators, such as routine pain documentation, were only poorly correlated with outcomes. To date, more than 130 German hospitals use QUIPS as a routine quality management tool. An EC-funded parallel project disseminates the concept internationally. QUIPS demonstrates that patient-reported outcomes in postoperative pain management can be benchmarked in routine clinical practice. Quality improvement initiatives should use outcome instead of structural and process parameters. The concept is transferable to other fields of medicine. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. [Postoperative unilateral acute glaucoma after abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo Grau, L A; Opisso Juliá, L L; Roqué Meseguer, A; Yuste Graupera, M; Suñol Sala, X

    2012-11-01

    An early and correct diagnosis substantially improves the post-operative prognosis of acute angle closure glaucoma (AACG). A 90 year-old woman was operated on for a right colon tumour by laparotomy, under combined anaesthesia without any adverse events. Twelve hours after the operation, the patient described recurrent periorbital pain in her right eye, with ocular hyperaemia, blurred vision, and unresponsive mydriasis. A diagnosis of AACG was made, but although conservative treatment was started YAG laser iridotomies were required to reduce the intraocular pressure. In the AACG postoperative period, as well as with an eye with several predisposed local factors including genetic predisposition, female gender, hypermetropia, increased lens thickness and small corneal diameter, can be added a pupillary block induced by adrenergic and anticholinergic drugs used in anaesthetic procedures. An acute and intensive periorbital or ocular pain, with or without visual disturbance, must aware the doctor. A differential diagnosis with other postoperative ocular diseases and cranial pain causes must be done. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Ambulatory anesthesia and postoperative nausea and vomiting: predicting the probability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegarty AT

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aoife T Hegarty,1 Muiris A Buckley,1 Conan L McCaul1–3 1Department of Anaesthesia, The Rotunda Hospital, 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, 3School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Abstract: Nausea and vomiting are distinctly unpleasant symptoms that may occur after surgery and anesthesia, and high priority is given to their prevention by patients. Research in this area is plentiful and has focused on event prediction and pharmacological prophylaxis but despite this, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV typically occurs in 20%–30% of patients in contemporary practice. Prediction of postoperative and postdischarge nausea and vomiting is particularly important in the ambulatory surgical population as these symptoms may occur following discharge from hospital and continue for up to one week when access to antiemetic therapies is limited. Many of the existing predictive scoring systems are based on data from inpatient populations and limited to the first 24 hours after surgery. Scoring systems based on data from ambulatory surgical populations to predict PONV are only moderately good. The best-performing systems in ambulatory patients are those of Sinclair and Sarin with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78 and 0.74, respectively, but are limited by the short duration of follow-up and a greater emphasis on nausea than vomiting. Given that the ability to predict both PONV and postdischarge nausea and vomiting is clearly limited, emphasis has been placed on prophylactic strategies that incorporate antiemetic medication, intravenous hydration, and nonnarcotic analgesia. PONV has been reduced to <10% in institutions using multimodal approaches. Scoring systems may facilitate “risk tailoring” in which patient risk profile is used as a stratification method for pharmacointervention. Keywords: postoperative nausea and vomiting, prediction, antiemetics, anesthesia

  11. [Postoperative rehabilitation in patients with peripheral nerve lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronić, I; Marsavelski, A; Nikolić, G; Cirović, D

    2003-01-01

    Injuries of extremities can be followed by various neuromuscular complications. Injury of peripheral nerves directly depended on the topographic localization of injury (fractures, cuts, contusions). The neuromuscular complications were diagnosed and under follow-up, based on clinical, x-ray, neurologic and neurophysiological findings. The timing of physical treatment and assessment of the necessary neurosurgical intervention depended on the obtained findings. After surgeries, we continued to apply physical treatment and rehabilitation. The aim of the paper was to assess the significance of proper timing for surgery and adequate postoperative rehabilitation, as well as treatment results, depending on the extent of peripheral nerve injury. Based on the study condocted in the period from 2000-2002, most surgeries were done on the ulnar nerve (4 pts), median nerve (4 pts), radial nerve (3 pts), peroneal nerve (2 pts) and plexus brachialis (3 pts). Paresis and peripheral nerve paralysis, associated with sensibility disorders, predominated in clinical features. In most patients surgery was done during the first 3-6 months after injury. In early postoperative Postoperative rehabilitation in patients with peripherial treatment positioning of extremities with electrotherapy were most often used in early postoperative treatment, Bioptron and dosed kinesitherapy. Depending on the neurophysiological findings, in later treatment stage we included electrostimulation, thermotherapy, kinesitherapy and working therapy, with the necessary application of static and dynamic orthroses. Study results showed that the success of treatment depended on the extent of injury, i.e. whether suture of liberalization of the nerve had been done, on the adequate timing of surgery, as well as on the adequate timing and application of physical therapy and rehabilitation. More rapid and complete functional recovery was achieved if the interval between injury and surgery was shorter, as well as

  12. Risk Prediction Model for Severe Postoperative Complication in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Erik; Cao, Yang; Szabo, Eva; Näslund, Erik; Näslund, Ingmar; Ottosson, Johan

    2018-01-12

    Factors associated with risk for adverse outcome are important considerations in the preoperative assessment of patients for bariatric surgery. As yet, prediction models based on preoperative risk factors have not been able to predict adverse outcome sufficiently. This study aimed to identify preoperative risk factors and to construct a risk prediction model based on these. Patients who underwent a bariatric surgical procedure in Sweden between 2010 and 2014 were identified from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg). Associations between preoperative potential risk factors and severe postoperative complications were analysed using a logistic regression model. A multivariate model for risk prediction was created and validated in the SOReg for patients who underwent bariatric surgery in Sweden, 2015. Revision surgery (standardized OR 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-0.24, p prediction model. Despite high specificity, the sensitivity of the model was low. Revision surgery, high age, low BMI, large waist circumference, and dyspepsia/GERD were associated with an increased risk for severe postoperative complication. The prediction model based on these factors, however, had a sensitivity that was too low to predict risk in the individual patient case.

  13. Predictors, prevention, and management of postoperative pain associated with nonsurgical root canal treatment: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna K. AlRahabi, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative pain after root canal treatment can be reduced by applying recent advances in endodontic techniques and equipment. This systematic review includes current knowledge about pain after nonsurgical root canal treatment, including predictors, related factors, effects of recent advances, and management. A literature search was performed using the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published between 1990 and 2016. Search keywords included postoperative pain, nonsurgical treatment, single visit, recent advances in endodontics, and management of postoperative pain with endodontic treatment. Only original research studies were included; editorials, reviews, brief notes, conference proceedings, and letters to the editor were excluded. The initial search yielded 4941 articles, which were assessed and filtered using the selection criteria. Sixty-five studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The findings showed that pain after nonsurgical root canal treatment occurred in 3–69.3% of patients. Microorganisms were identified as the primary contributors to postoperative pain, and there was no significant difference in postoperative pain between single- and multiple-visit treatments. Postoperative pain after root canal treatment ranges from mild to moderate and occurs even after optimally performed procedures. Furthermore, adequate management of postoperative pain is often considered an indicator of clinical excellence. Application of recently developed endodontic techniques and devices will reduce postoperative pain. Furthermore, a flexible, severity-based drug administration plan can be used to control and manage pain after root canal treatment. Application of the current research findings will reduce pain following root canal treatment and improve patient outcomes.

  14. Postoperative Urinary Retention and Urinary Tract Infections Predict Midurethral Sling Mesh Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjani, Nahid; Winick-Ng, Jennifer; Welk, Blayne

    2017-01-01

    To determine if postoperative urinary retention and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were predictors of future mesh complications requiring surgical intervention after midurethral sling (MUS). Administrative data in Ontario, Canada, between 2002 and 2013 were used to identify all women who underwent a mesh-based MUS. The primary outcome was revision of the transvaginal mesh sling (including mesh removal/erosion/fistula, or urethrolysis). Two potential risk factors were analyzed: postoperative retention (within 30 days of procedure) and number of postoperative emergency room visits or hospital admissions for UTI symptoms. A total of 59,556 women had a MUS, of which 1598 (2.7%) required revision surgery. Of the 2025 women who presented to the emergency room or were admitted to hospital for postoperative retention, 212 (10.5%) required operative mesh revision. Of the 11,747 patients who had at least one postoperative UTI, 366 (3.1%) patients required operative mesh revision. In adjusted analysis, postoperative retention was significantly predictive of future reoperation (hazard ratio [HR] 3.46, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.97-4.02), and this difference persisted when urethrolysis was excluded as a reason for sling revision (HR 3.08, 95% CI 2.62-3.63). Similarly, in adjusted analysis, each additional postoperative hospital visit for UTI symptoms increased the risk for surgical intervention for mesh complications (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.61-1.87). Postoperative urinary retention and hospital presentation for UTI symptoms are associated with an increased risk of reoperation for MUS complications. These patients should be followed and investigated for mesh complications when appropriate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Postoperative Course and Complications after Pull-through Vaginoplasty for Distal Vaginal Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Roshanak; Dietrich, Jennifer E

    2015-12-01

    To report the usual postoperative course and complications after pull-through vaginoplasty for isolated distal vaginal atresia. Retrospective chart review at Texas Children's Hospital of all patients who were diagnosed with isolated distal vaginal atresia and underwent pull-through vaginoplasty during the study time frame. None. Postoperative complications such as vaginal stenosis or infection and postoperative vaginal diameter. Sixteen patients were identified and charts were reviewed. Patients were initially evaluated by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging and found to have distended hematometrocolpos with distal vaginal atresia. All patients underwent pull-through vaginoplasty with similar operative techniques. The average distance from the perineum to the level of the obstruction was 1.84 ± 1.2 cm. Two patients, both with obstructions at greater than 3 cm, experienced stricture formation postoperatively. Four patients (25%) experienced postoperative vaginitis. One patient (6.25%) experienced a postoperative urinary tract infection. Two groups (3 cm or less versus greater than 3 cm) were compared, and the presence of stricture was statistically different based on mean centimeters from perineum prior to pull-through vaginoplasty (P = .038). Distal vaginal atresia is managed with pull-through vaginoplasty. Atresias that extend greater than 3 cm from the perineum are at increased risk for vaginal stricture formation and should be followed to monitor for their formation. Other complications are infrequent and minor. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional computed tomographic volumetry precisely predicts the postoperative pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keisuke; Saeki, Yusuke; Kitazawa, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Kikuchi, Shinji; Goto, Yukinobu; Sakai, Mitsuaki; Sato, Yukio

    2017-11-01

    It is important to accurately predict the patient's postoperative pulmonary function. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of predictions of the postoperative residual pulmonary function obtained with three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D-CT) volumetry with that of predictions obtained with the conventional segment-counting method. Fifty-three patients scheduled to undergo lung cancer resection, pulmonary function tests, and computed tomography were enrolled in this study. The postoperative residual pulmonary function was predicted based on the segment-counting and 3D-CT volumetry methods. The predicted postoperative values were compared with the results of postoperative pulmonary function tests. Regarding the linear correlation coefficients between the predicted postoperative values and the measured values, those obtained using the 3D-CT volumetry method tended to be higher than those acquired using the segment-counting method. In addition, the variations between the predicted and measured values were smaller with the 3D-CT volumetry method than with the segment-counting method. These results were more obvious in COPD patients than in non-COPD patients. Our findings suggested that the 3D-CT volumetry was able to predict the residual pulmonary function more accurately than the segment-counting method, especially in patients with COPD. This method might lead to the selection of appropriate candidates for surgery among patients with a marginal pulmonary function.

  17. Impact of the viral respiratory season on postoperative outcomes in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeder, Michael C; Carson, Kathryn A; Vricella, Luca A; Alejo, Diane E; Holmes, Kathryn W

    2011-08-01

    To compare postoperative outcomes in children undergoing cardiac surgery during the viral respiratory season and nonviral season at our institution. This was a retrospective cohort study and secondary matched case-control analysis. The setting was an urban academic tertiary-care children's hospital. The study was comprised of all patients <18 years of age who underwent cardiac surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital from October 2002 through September 2007. Patients were stratified by season of surgery, complexity of cardiac disease, and presence or absence of viral respiratory infection. Measurements included patient characteristics and postoperative outcomes. The primary outcome was postoperative length of stay (LOS). A total of 744 patients were included in the analysis. There was no difference in baseline characteristics or outcomes, specifically, no difference in postoperative LOS, intensive care unit (ICU) LOS, and mortality, among patients by seasons of surgery. Patients with viral respiratory illness were more likely to have longer postoperative LOS (p < 0.01) and ICU LOS (p < 0.01) compared with matched controls. We identified no difference in postoperative outcomes based on season in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Children with viral respiratory infection have significantly worse outcomes than matched controls, strengthening the call for universal administration of influenza vaccination and palivizumab to appropriate groups. Preoperative testing for respiratory viruses should be considered during the winter months for children undergoing elective cardiac surgery.

  18. Orthopedic radiology in the postoperative patient (practical orthopedic radiology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Gelman, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    This course examines various aspects of the radiologic examination of postoperative orthopedic patients. The operative indications, pertinent aspects of surgical technique, expected postoperative radiographic appearances, and radiographic findings indicating postoperative complications are discussed. The evaluation of total joint replacement surgery, spinal surgery, lower extremity procedures, and failed orthopedic devices and appliances are covered

  19. Ranitidine prevents postoperative transfusion-induced depression of delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1989-01-01

    The influence of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative depression of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and the effect of ranitidine on transfusion-induced changes in postoperative CMI were investigated. CMI was assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by skin testing with seven common...

  20. Prognostic impact of hemoglobin level and other factors in patients with high-grade gliomas treated with postoperative radiochemotherapy and sequential chemotherapy based on temozolomide. A 10-year experience at a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausili Cefaro, Giampiero; Genovesi, Domenico; Vinciguerra, Annamaria; Trignani, Marianna; Taraborrelli, Maria; Augurio, Antonietta; Buonaguidi, Roberto; Galzio, Renato J.; Di Nicola, Marta

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of serum hemoglobin level prior to radiotherapy and other prognostic factors on survival in patients with high-grade gliomas. From 2001-2010, we retrospectively evaluated a total of 48 patients with malignant glioma treated with surgery and postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide. A total of 37 of 48 patients received sequential temozolomide. Hemoglobin levels were assayed before radiotherapy in all patients. The Kaplan-Meier method was applied to estimate the overall survival, while the log-rank test was applied to evaluate the differences on survival probability between prognostic subgroups. Results were assessed in 43 patients. The median overall survival time was 18 months (95% confidence interval: 12-40 months). The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 62.2% and 36.3%, respectively. The prognostic factors analyzed were gender, age, extent of surgery, performance status before and after radiotherapy, sequential chemotherapy, hemoglobin level, and methylation of the O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT). In univariate analysis, the variables significantly related to survival were performance status before and after radiotherapy, sequential chemotherapy, and hemoglobin level. The median overall survival in patients with a hemoglobin level ≤ 12 g/dl was 12 months and 23 months in patients with a hemoglobin level > 12 g/dl. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 46.7% and 20.0%, respectively, for patients with a hemoglobin level ≤ 12 mg/dl and 69.6% and 45.7%, respectively, for patients with a hemoglobin level > 12 g/dl. Our results confirm the impact of well-known prognostic factors on survival. In this research, it was found that a low hemoglobin level before radiotherapy can adversely influence the prognosis of patients with malignant gliomas.

  1. Fundamentals of management of acute postoperative pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary B; Laussen, Peter C

    2010-03-01

    In the last several years, there have been numerous advancements in the field of pulmonary hypertension as a whole, but there have been few changes in the management of children with pulmonary hypertension after cardiac surgery. Patients at particular risk for postoperative pulmonary hypertension can be identified preoperatively based on their cardiac disease and can be grouped into four broad categories based on the mechanisms responsible for pulmonary hypertension: 1) increased pulmonary vascular resistance; 2) increased pulmonary blood flow with normal pulmonary vascular resistance; 3) a combination of increased pulmonary vascular resistance and increased blood flow; and 4) increased pulmonary venous pressure. In this review of the immediate postoperative management of pulmonary hypertension, various strategies are discussed including medical therapies, monitoring, ventilatory strategies, and weaning from these supports. With early recognition of patients at particular risk for severe pulmonary hypertension, management strategies can be directed at preventing or minimizing hemodynamic instability and thereby prevent the development of ventricular dysfunction and a low output state.

  2. Minimum alveolar concentration threshold of sevoflurane for postoperative dream recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, P; Perilli, V; Lai, C; Sacco, T; Modesti, C; Luca, E; De Santis, P; Sollazzi, L; Antonelli, M

    2015-11-01

    Many factors affect postoperative dream recall, including patient characteristics, type of anesthesia, timing of postoperative interview and stress hormone secretion. Aims of the study were to determine whether Bispectral Index (BIS)-guided anesthesia might decrease sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) when compared with hemodynamically-guided anesthesia, and to search for a MAC threshold useful for preventing arousal, dream recall and implicit memory. One hundred thirty patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were enrolled. Anesthesia was induced with propofol 2 mg kg(-1), fentanyl 3 mcg kg(-1) and cis-atracurium 0.15 mg kg(-1). For anesthesia maintenance, patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: a BIS-guided group in which sevoflurane MAC was adjusted on the basis of BIS values, and a hemodynamic parameters (HP)-guided group in which MAC was adjusted based on HP. An auditory recording was presented to patients during anesthesia maintenance. Dream recall and explicit/implicit memory were investigated upon awakening and approximately after 24 h. Mean sevoflurane MAC during auditory presentation was similar in the two groups (0.85 ± 0.16 and 0.87 ± 0.17 [P = 0.53] in BIS-guided and HP-guided groups, respectively). Frequency of dream recall was similar in the two groups: 27% (N. = 17) in BIS-guided group, 18% (N. = 12) in HP-guided group, P = 0.37. In both groups, dream recall was less probable in patients anesthetized with MAC values ≥ 0.9 (area under ROC curve = 0.83, sensitivity = 90%, and specificity = 49%). BIS-guided anesthesia was not able to generate different MAC values compared to HP-guided anesthesia. Independent of the guide used for anesthesia, a sevoflurane MAC over 0.9 was required to prevent postoperative dream recall.

  3. Recognition of Delirium in Postoperative Elderly Patients: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numan, Tianne; van den Boogaard, Mark; Kamper, Adriaan M; Rood, Paul J T; Peelen, Linda M; Slooter, Arjen J C

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate to what extent delirium experts agree on the diagnosis of delirium when independently assessing exactly the same information and to evaluate the sensitivity of delirium screening tools in routine daily practice of clinical nurses. Prospective observational longitudinal study. Three medical centers in the Netherlands. Elderly postoperative adults (n = 167). A researcher examined participants daily (Postoperative Day 1-3) for delirium using a standardized cognitive assessment and interview including the Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98 as global impression without any cut-off values that was recorded on video. Two delirium experts independently evaluated the videos and clinical information from the last 24 hours in the participants' record and classified each assessment as delirious, possibly delirious, or not delirious. Interrater agreement between the delirium experts was determined using weighted Cohen's kappa. When there was no consensus, a third expert was consulted. Final classification was based on median score and compared with the results of the Confusion Assessment Method for Intensive Care Unit and Delirium Observation Scale that clinical nurses administered. Four hundred twenty-four postoperative assessments of 167 participants were included. The overall kappa was 0.61 (95% confidence interval = 0.53-0.68). There was no agreement between the experts for 89 (21.0%) assessments and a third delirium expert was needed for the final classification. Delirium screening that nurses performed detected 32% of the assessments that the experts diagnosed as (possibly) delirious. There was considerable disagreement in classification of delirium by experts who independently assessed exactly the same information, showing the difficulty of delirium diagnosis. Furthermore, the sensitivity of daily delirium screening by clinical nurses was poor. Future research should focus on development of objective instruments to diagnose delirium. © 2017, Copyright the

  4. Microsurgical principles and postoperative adhesions: lessons from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomel, Victor; Koninckx, Philippe R

    2016-10-01

    "Microsurgery" is a set of principles developed to improve fertility surgery outcomes. These principles were developed progressively based on common sense and available evidence, under control of clinical feedback obtained with the use of second-look laparoscopy. Fertility outcome was the end point; significant improvement in fertility rates validated the concept clinically. Postoperative adhesion formation being a major cause of failure in fertility surgery, the concept of microsurgery predominantly addresses prevention of postoperative adhesions. In this concept, magnification with a microscope or laparoscope plays a minor role as technical facilitator. Not surprisingly, the principles to prevent adhesion formation are strikingly similar to our actual understanding: gentle tissue handling, avoiding desiccation, irrigation at room temperature, shielding abdominal contents from ambient air, meticulous hemostasis and lavage, avoiding foreign body contamination and infection, administration of dexamethasone postoperatively, and even the concept of keeping denuded areas separated by temporary adnexal or ovarian suspension. The actual concepts of peritoneal conditioning during surgery and use of dexamethasone and a barrier at the end of surgery thus confirm without exception the tenets of microsurgery. Although recent research helped to clarify the pathophysiology of adhesion formation, refined its prevention and the relative importance of each factor, the clinical end point of improvement of fertility rates remains demonstrated for only the microsurgical tenets as a whole. In conclusion, the principles of microsurgery remain fully valid as the cornerstones of reproductive microsurgery, whether performed by means of open access or laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Postoperative drainage in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ida; Morar, Pradeep; Belloso, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    A major factor affecting patients' length of hospitalisation following head and neck surgery remains the use of surgical drains. The optimal time to remove these drains has not been well defined. A routine practice is to measure the drainage every 24 h and remove the drain when daily drainage falls below 25 ml. This study aims to determine whether drainage measurement at shorter intervals decreases the time to drain removal and hence the length of in-patient stays. A 6-month prospective observational study was performed. The inclusion criteria were patients who underwent head and neck surgery without neck dissection and had a closed suction drain inserted. Drainage rates were measured at 8-hourly intervals. Drains were removed when drainage-rate was ≤ 1 ml/h over an 8-h period. A total of 43 patients were evaluated. The highest drainage rate occurred in the first 8 postoperative hours and decreased significantly in the subsequent hours. The median drainage rates at 8, 16, 24, 32 and 40 postoperative hours were 3.375, 1, 0, 0 and 0 ml/h, respectively. Applying our new removal criteria of ≤ 1 ml/h drainage rate, the drains were removed in 22 (51%) patients at the 16th postoperative hour; 37 (86%) were removed by 24 h after operation. In comparison, only nine (20.9%) patients could potentially be discharged the day after surgery if previous criteria of ≤ 25 ml/24-h were used to decide on drain removal. Our 8-hourly drainage-rate monitoring has facilitated safe earlier discharge of an additional 28 (65%) patients on the day after surgery. This has led to improvement in patient care, better optimisation of hospital resources and resulted in positive economic implications to the department.

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy for parotid gland malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Keun Yong; Wu, Hong Gyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Park, Charn Il; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Lee, Chae Seo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Ah [Bundang Seoul National University Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of postoperative radiotherapy for parotid gland malignancy, and determine prognostic factors for locoregional control and survival. Between 1980 and 2002, 130 patients with parotid malignancy were registered in the database of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital. The subjects of this analysis were the 72 of these 130 patients who underwent postoperative irradiation. There were 42 males and 30 females, with a median age of 46.5 years. The most common histological type was a mucoepidermoid carcinoma. There were 6, 23, 23 and 20 patients in Stages I, II, III and IV, respectively. The median dose to the tumor bed was 60 Gy, with a median fraction size of 1.8 Gy. The overall 5 and 10 year survival rates were 85 and 76%, respectively. The five-year locoregional control rate was 85%, which reached a plateau phase after 6 years. Sex and histological type were found to be statistically significant for overall survival from a multivariate analysis. No other factors, including age, facial nerve palsy and stage, were related to overall survival. For locoregional control, nodal involvement and positive resection margin were associated with poor local control. Histological type, tumor size, perineural invasion and type of surgery were not significant for locoregional control. A high survival rate of parotid gland malignancies, with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, was confirmed. Sex and histological type were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Nodal involvement and a positive resection margin were associated with poor locoregional control.

  7. Postoperative localization of porta hepatis and abdominal vasculature in pancreatic malignancies: Implications for postoperative radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kresl, John J.; Bonner, James A.; Bender, Claire E.; Grill, Joseph P.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in preoperative and postoperative positions of structures used to define target volumes (i.e., pancreatic bed, porta hepatis, local-regional lymph nodes) for postoperative irradiation of pancreatic malignancies as defined by abdominal computed tomographs. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients who had Whipple resection and postoperative irradiation for pancreatic cancer were evaluated. Preoperative and postoperative computed tomographs of each patient were evaluated for the position of the portal vein bifurcation and the origin of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. The length along the x (medial-lateral position) and y (anterior-posterior position) axes was determined with calipers to the closest millimeter. Length along the z axis (cephalad-caudad position) was determined with the computed tomographic sectional interval between images. Statistical significance of the change in the structure's position along the x, y, or z axis between preoperative and postoperative computed tomographs was assessed with the paired t-test. Results: Evaluation of the preoperative and postoperative positions of the portal vein, celiac axis, and superior mesenteric artery along the x, y, and z axes revealed a statistically significant change in the location of the portal vein and celiac axis postoperatively. The median change of the celiac axis in the anterior-posterior position was significant (p = 0.0047), but the mean change was only 2 mm and not considered clinically significant. The median change for the portal vein was 0.97 cm and 1.07 cm along the y and x axes, respectively, and was significant (p = 0.008 and p = 0.0001). The range in position change for the portal vein was 0.0 to 2.0 cm along the y axis and 0.4 to 1.9 along the x axis. The remaining mean changes in position along all axes for all the structures were less than 3 mm (not statistically significant). Conclusions: The mean position of the portal vein

  8. Bladder exstrophy: current management and postoperative imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, Ketsia; Borer, Joseph; Phelps, Andrew; Chow, Jeanne S.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare malformation characterized by an infra-umbilical abdominal wall defect, incomplete closure of the bladder with mucosa continuous with the abdominal wall, epispadias, and alterations in the pelvic bones and muscles. It is part of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, with cloacal exstrophy on the severe and epispadias on the mild ends of the spectrum. Bladder exstrophy is the most common of these entities and is more common in boys. The goal of this paper is to describe common methods of repair and to provide an imaging review of the postoperative appearances. (orig.)

  9. Postoperative radiological survey of colorectal anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzi, G.; Danesini, G.; Frigerio, L.F.; Pestalozza, M.A.; Severini, A.; Bellomi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The early postoperative study of colo-rectal anastomoses is a common diagnostic procedure with symptomatic patients which is extended to asymptomatic patients by some authors. Eighty-eight anastomotic fistulas were early diagnosed after intervention in 316 patients who underwent a water-soluble contrast enema. Four out of these fistulas (4.5%) could not be demonstrated at complete filling on X-ray, but were only opacified on radiographs taken after the spontaneous evacuation of contrast medium. The increase in endoluminal pressure due to the evacuation and the lack of ballooon catheter probably play a role in allowing these fistulas to be visualized

  10. Nasopharyngeal glial heterotopia with delayed postoperative meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenichi; Furuno, Kenji; Chong, Pin Fee; Morioka, Takato

    2017-06-22

    A male infant, who underwent radical resection of a large glial heterotopia at the nasopharynx at 8 days, developed delayed postoperative bacterial meningitis at 9 months. Neuroradiological examination clearly demonstrated that meningitis had occurred because of the intracranial and extracranial connections, which were scarcely seen in the perioperative period. A transsphenoidal extension of hypothalamic hamartoma is possible because the connection started from the right optic nerve, running through the transsphenoidal canal in the sphenoid bone and terminating at the recurrent mass in the nasopharyngeal region. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Bladder exstrophy: current management and postoperative imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre, Ketsia [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Borer, Joseph [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Phelps, Andrew [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Pediatric Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Chow, Jeanne S. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare malformation characterized by an infra-umbilical abdominal wall defect, incomplete closure of the bladder with mucosa continuous with the abdominal wall, epispadias, and alterations in the pelvic bones and muscles. It is part of the exstrophy-epispadias complex, with cloacal exstrophy on the severe and epispadias on the mild ends of the spectrum. Bladder exstrophy is the most common of these entities and is more common in boys. The goal of this paper is to describe common methods of repair and to provide an imaging review of the postoperative appearances. (orig.)

  12. Postoperative telegammatherapy of breast cancer (Dosimetric studies)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, J; Mitrov, G [Nauchno-Izsledovatelski Onkologichen Inst., Sofia (Bulgaria); Konstantinov, B; Dobrev, D [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1977-01-01

    The method employed for postoperative radiation therapy of breast cancer at the Radiologic Clinic of the Medical Academy in Sofia is described. Results are reported and discussed of dosimetric studies carried out with the T-100 on heterogeneous tissue-equivalent Rando phantom for dose distributions in the regional lymph basin and the underlying tissues and organs. The results show coincidence between calculated and measured doses in the regional lymph basin and the thoracic wall. It was demonstrated that maximal radiation loading (3600 to 5500 rad) occurs in the apical and the hilar lung area.

  13. Substantial variability in postoperative treatment, and convalescence recommendations following vaginal repair. A nationwide questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Marianne; Møller, Charlotte; Kehlet, H

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative care and convalescence recommendations following vaginal surgery are generally not evidence based. The aim of this study was to describe pre and postoperative treatment, and advice and restrictions for the convalescence period, given by Danish hospital-employed gynecolog......BACKGROUND: Postoperative care and convalescence recommendations following vaginal surgery are generally not evidence based. The aim of this study was to describe pre and postoperative treatment, and advice and restrictions for the convalescence period, given by Danish hospital......-employed gynecologists, and gynecologists in private practice, to patients undergoing vaginal repair. METHOD: In 1999 all Danish gynecologists (n=433) received a tested questionnaire about postoperative treatment and convalescence recommendations following vaginal repair. Non-responders received one reminder. OUTCOME...... anterior repair, and 2 days (range, 1-7) following posterior repair. The recommended sick leave was median 6 weeks (range, 2-12) for patients with work with heavy lifts. There were substantial differences in recommendations. Recommended lifting restrictions were median 3 kg (range, 0-20) for median 4 weeks...

  14. Preventive effect of dexketoprofen on postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelir, İsmail Kerem; Güleç, Sacit; Ceyhan, Dilek

    2016-04-01

    Preventive analgesia has been defined as reduction in noxious stimuli during preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. The aim of the present study was to prevent central sensitization by administering ketamine infusion throughout the surgical procedure. In addition, possible preventive effects of dexketoprofen when administered before and after incision were evaluated. Fifty patients were included. Group I was administered 50 mg intravenous dexketoprofen prior to surgical incision, and Group II received the same amount 10 minutes after the incision had been made. Following induction of general anesthesia, all patients received a bolus of 0.50 mg/kg ketamine in 0.07 mg/kg/h intravenous infusion. When postoperative visual analog scale values were compared, values for Group I after 1 and 4 hours were significantly lower than those of Group II. In addition, morphine consumption at 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours was significantly lower in Group I. Combined with the prevention of central sensitization with ketamine, administration of dexketoprofen prior to incision led to a lower rate of morphine consumption and more effective analgesia than post-incision administration.

  15. Trauma and postoperative follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, E.

    1997-01-01

    Indications for the use of nuclear medicine techniques, mostly bone scintigraphy, occur in case of diagnostic problems, especially if there are discrepancies between the clinical symptoms and X-ray findings. This may happen in case of stress fractures, fractures in bones difficult to judge by X-ray imaging, and in the differentation of recent versus old fracture. A further indication for bone scanning is to assess the extent of skeletal lesions in polytrauma and in the battered child syndrome. In postoperative patients bone scanning is most frequently performed in order to assess loosening or infection of endoprosthesis. Due to bone remodelling uptake of Tc-diphosphonates varies between cemented and cementfree implants. This fact should be taken into consideration when interpreting bone scans in areas with endoprostheses. In both trauma and postoperative patients, indications for nuclear medicine imaging exist if healing is complicated. Bone scanning can be used to assess pseudoartrosis or non-union, infection, viability of grafts and bone fragments and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. In suspicious infection with positive bone scan, white blood cell or microcollid scintigraphy can be used for further differentiation. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Postoperative maintaining patients after a phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Akulov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying of efficiency and safety of application of «Sistаnе-gel» after a cataract phaсoemulsification for postoperative therapy of a syndrome of a dry eye was.Methods: 56 patients (56 eyes are surveyed. 26 of them (26 eyes have primary open-angle glaucoma and receive antiglaukomе preparations in instillations. Other 30 patients didn’t use any drops. To all patients the cataract phacoemulsification is executed. After operation applied standard antibacterial and anti-inflammatory therapy and conducted complex examination, including biomicroscopy,Shirmer’s test, Norn’s test, staining the anterior surface of the eye with Fluoresceine. Besides, patients answered the questions containingin a simple questionnaire.Results: Application of the preparation «Sistane-gel» showed its high efficiency and safety in treatment of a postoperative syndrome of a dry eye after a cataract phacoemulsification.Conclusion: Taking into account specifics of patients with a cataract (advanced age, existence of the somatic diseases, the changed hormonal background, reception of medicines, all of them can recommend application of sistant-gel for prevention and dry eye treatment after phacoemulsification. Especially it is necessary to pay attention to dry eye prevention at the patients who have glaucoma and constantly using hypotensive drops.

  17. Postoperative maintaining patients after a phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Akulov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Studying of efficiency and safety of application of «Sistаnе-gel» after a cataract phaсoemulsification for postoperative therapy of a syndrome of a dry eye was.Methods: 56 patients (56 eyes are surveyed. 26 of them (26 eyes have primary open-angle glaucoma and receive antiglaukomе preparations in instillations. Other 30 patients didn’t use any drops. To all patients the cataract phacoemulsification is executed. After operation applied standard antibacterial and anti-inflammatory therapy and conducted complex examination, including biomicroscopy,Shirmer’s test, Norn’s test, staining the anterior surface of the eye with Fluoresceine. Besides, patients answered the questions containingin a simple questionnaire.Results: Application of the preparation «Sistane-gel» showed its high efficiency and safety in treatment of a postoperative syndrome of a dry eye after a cataract phacoemulsification.Conclusion: Taking into account specifics of patients with a cataract (advanced age, existence of the somatic diseases, the changed hormonal background, reception of medicines, all of them can recommend application of sistant-gel for prevention and dry eye treatment after phacoemulsification. Especially it is necessary to pay attention to dry eye prevention at the patients who have glaucoma and constantly using hypotensive drops.

  18. Significance of postoperative irradiation for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Nobuko; Ogami, Koji; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Koga, Kenji; Waki, Norio; Higashi, Hidefumi; Hayashi, Asami; Shibata, Koichiro; Watanabe, Katsuji

    1986-01-01

    From 1978 through 1983, 27 patients were treated with surgery followed by irradiation (irradiated group) and 29 with surery alone (non-irradiated group). In the irradiated group, 10 had stage II and 17 stage III; in the non-irradiated group, 25 had stage II and 4 stage III. The most common histology was medullary tubular carcinoma (MTC). There was no significant difference in survivals at 3 years and 5 years between the groups. Similarly, no significant difference was seen among stage II patients. Patients with MTC tended to have worse survivals in the irradiated group than in the non-irradiated group, with no statistically significant difference. Among stage II patients, no major differences in local recurrence were seen between the groups; the incidence of distant metastases tended to be high in the irradiated group. The incidence of both local recurrence and distant metastases for stage III patients showed a tendency to be higher in the irradiated group than in the non-irradiated group. The results indicated no apparent benifit of postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. A randomized clinical trial is needed for the evaluation of postoperative irradiation for breast cancer. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. [Postoperative peritonitis. The criteria for a reintervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorotti, C; Mosca, D; Palladino, L; Spallanzani, A; Rossi, A

    1999-09-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is a pathologic condition with a sometime nuclear clinical occurrence and therefore with an uncertain timing for reoperation. Aim of this paper is to identify the type and frequency of the digestive and systemic symptoms in relation to the anatomo-pathologic peroperative picture. Between 1980 and 1996, 119 patients were reoperated for a postoperative peritonitis (PPO) in the Surgical Department of Modena University. PPO was due to a lesion situated above the mesocolon in 33 patients, from the small bowel in 18, postappendicectomy in 25 and from the colon in 40. The first operation (for benign disease in 66.4%, for malignancy in 33.6%) was performed in emergency in 47 cases (39.5%) and as elective surgery in 72 (60.5%). The global mortality was of 33.6% (40 patients). An attempt is made to identify, the earlier and the most important bioclinical parameters for a correct indication to surgery. Twenty symptoms have been identified that, with different frequency, are strictly related with the onset of a PPO (in average 5 symptoms were positive). A research of these parameters, each 4-6 hours, allow to identify a subclinical PPO. During the decisional timing, it is important to check these general and digestive symptoms, apparently not serious, in order to avoid the onset appearance of an abdominal tenderness or a multiorgan failure that make the prognosis more severe.

  20. Postoperative US of leg tendon reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draghi, F.; Calliada, F.; Fulle, I.; Madonia, L.; Bottinelli, O.; Campani, R.

    1999-01-01

    The role of ultrasound (US) in the postoperative assessment of tendon reconstruction is not clearly defined and there is non systematic arrangement of US patterns. The authors examined 34 patients submitted to surgery or conservative treatment for total/partial tear or musculotendinous detachment of patellar or Achilles tendon in the last 5 years. All patients underwent physical and US examinations. The surgical tendon exhibited the same US patterns in 23/28 patients: it was markedly enlarged (three-/fourfold the normal diameter) and more rounded, with inhomogeneous and hypoechoic appearance not only at the tear/surgical site but also above and below it, for some cm. Small hyperechoic images, mainly dots, were seen in 19 cases, which were referable to small calcifications and stitches. More and larger calcifications were found in 8 patients, where they were associated with anechoic degeneration areas. Color Doppler US showed moderate or strong hypervascularization around the tear in the first months post injury. US patterns did not correlate with physical findings, but color Doppler patterns did. In 6 cases of musculotendinous detachment submitted to conservative treatment, US showed enlargement and hypoechogenicity in the injury site only, with no involvement of the remaining tendon. US was also used to time and guide drainage of perilesional hematomas, which were often quite large. US is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of tendon tears and musculotendinous detachments because it shows abnormal signs which are missed at clinics and provides additional information needed for treatment planning [it

  1. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, W.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluating the results of controlled clinical trials, an attempt has been made to summarize the current status of adjuvant therapy in colorectal cancer. Several different adjuvant treatment approaches including immunotherapy, postoperative fibrinolysis, anticoagulation, pre- and postoperative radiotherapy when used as a single modality, have not resulted in any long-term survival benefit. Rather in contrast to previous experiences, recent prospective randomized trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of chemotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of colon and rectal cancer. Whereas its definitive role in the former disease remains somewhat controversial, for rectal cancer, it seems clear that combined modality therapy including polychemotherapy with or without radiation prolongs the disease-free interval, lowers the local recurrence rate, and may improve survival compared to surgery alone. Questions which remain to be answered by future clinical trials are related to the optimal duration and sequence of combined modality, to the role of different radiation sensitizers, and in both colon and rectal cancer, to the choice of the most effective systemtic chemotherapeutic drugs. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Postoperative ileus-related morbidity profile in patients treated with alvimopan after bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Bruce G; Weese, James L; Ludwig, Kirk A; Delaney, Conor P; Stamos, Michael J; Michelassi, Fabrizio; Du, Wei; Techner, Lee

    2007-04-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI), an interruption of coordinated bowel motility after operation, is exacerbated by opioids used to manage pain. Alvimopan, a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist, accelerated gastrointestinal (GI) recovery after bowel resection in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter phase III POI trials. The effect of alvimopan on POI-related morbidity for patients who underwent bowel resection was evaluated in a post-hoc analysis. Incidence of POI-related postoperative morbidity (postoperative nasogastric tube insertion or POI-related prolonged hospital stay or readmission) was analyzed in four North American trials for placebo or alvimopan 12 mg administered 30 minutes or more preoperatively and twice daily postoperatively until hospital discharge (7 or fewer postoperative days). GI-related adverse events and opioid consumption were summarized for each treatment. Estimations of odds ratios of alvimopan to placebo and number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one patient from experiencing an event of POI-related morbidity were derived from the analysis. Patients receiving alvimopan 12 mg were less likely to experience POI-related morbidity than patients receiving placebo (odds ratio = 0.44, p POI-related morbidity. There was a lower incidence of postoperative nasogastric tube insertion, and other GI-related adverse events on postoperative days 3 to 6 in the alvimopan group than the placebo group. Opioid consumption was comparable between groups. Alvimopan 12 mg was associated with reduced POI-related morbidity compared with placebo, without compromising opioid-based analgesia in patients undergoing bowel resection. Relatively low NNTs are clinically meaningful and reinforce the potential benefits of alvimopan for the patient and health care system.

  3. Utility of Postoperative Antibiotics After Percutaneous Pinning of Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Nicholas O; Seeley, Mark A; Hariharan, Arun; Farley, Frances A; Caird, Michelle S; Li, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures are common injuries that are often treated surgically with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. Although surgical-site infections are rare, postoperative antibiotics are frequently administered without evidence or guidelines for their use. With the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant organisms and heightened focus on health care costs, appropriate and evidence-based use of antibiotics is needed. We hypothesized that postoperative antibiotic administration would not decrease the rate of surgical-site infection. A billing query identified 951 patients with operatively treated supracondylar humerus fractures at our institution over a 15-year period. Records were reviewed for demographic data, perioperative antibiotic use, and the presence of surgical-site infection. Exclusion criteria were open fractures, open reduction, pathologic fractures, metabolic bone disease, the presence of other injuries that required operative treatment, and follow-up <2 weeks after pin removal. χ and Fisher exact test were used to compare antibiotic use to the incidence of surgical-site infection. Six hundred eighteen patients met our inclusion criteria. Two hundred thirty-eight patients (38.5%) received postoperative antibiotics. Eleven surgical-site infections were identified for an overall rate of 1.8%. The use of postoperative antibiotics was not associated with a lower rate of surgical-site infection (P=0.883). Patients with a type III fracture (P<0.001), diminished preoperative vascular (P=0.001) and neurological status (P=0.019), and postoperative hospital admission (P<0.001) were significantly more likely to receive postoperative antibiotics. Administration of postoperative antibiotics after closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures does not decrease the rate of surgical-site infection. Level III-therapeutic.

  4. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C T; Van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K

    2017-03-01

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery are not known. The purpose of this explorative study was to determine the incidence of postoperative frozen shoulder after various operative shoulder procedures. A second aim was to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery. 505 consecutive patients undergoing elective shoulder surgery were included in this prospective cohort study. Follow-up was 6 months after surgery. A prediction model was developed to identify prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery using the TRIPOD guidelines. We nominated five potential predictors: gender, diabetes mellitus, type of physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score. Frozen shoulder was identified in 11% of the patients after shoulder surgery and was more common in females (15%) than in males (8%). Frozen shoulder was encountered after all types of operative procedures. A prediction model based on four variables (diabetes mellitus, specialized shoulder physiotherapy, arthroscopic surgery and DASH score) discriminated reasonably well with an AUC of 0.712. Postoperative frozen shoulder is a serious complication after shoulder surgery, with an incidence of 11%. Four prognostic factors were identified for postoperative frozen shoulder: diabetes mellitus, arthroscopic surgery, specialized shoulder physiotherapy and DASH score. The combination of these four variables provided a prediction rule for postoperative frozen shoulder with reasonable fit. Level II, prospective cohort study.

  5. The Relationship Between Intraoperative Tear Dimensions and Postoperative Pain in 1624 Consecutive Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Daniel Y T; Walton, Judie R; Lam, Patrick; Murrell, George A C

    2017-03-01

    Rotator cuff repair often results in significant pain postoperatively, the cause of which is undetermined. Purpose/Hypothesis: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between rotator cuff tear area and postoperative pain in patients who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We hypothesized that larger tears would be more painful because of elevated repair tension at 1 week postoperatively but that smaller tears would be more painful because of a greater healing response, especially from 6 weeks postoperatively. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 1624 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Exclusion criteria were moderate to severe osteoarthritis, isolated subscapularis repair, calcific tendinitis, synthetic patch repair, revision surgery, and retears on ultrasound at 6 months after surgery. Rotator cuff tears were subdivided into groups based on the tear size and retear rate found for each group. A modified L'Insalata questionnaire was given before surgery and at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficient tests were performed between rotator cuff tear areas and pain scores. Intraoperative rotator cuff tear areas did not correlate with pain scores preoperatively or at 1 week after surgery. A smaller tear area was associated with more frequent and severe pain with overhead activities, at rest, and during sleep as well as a poorer perceived overall shoulder condition at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after repair ( r = 0.11-0.23, P 8 cm 2 . There were fewer retears with smaller tears, but they were more painful than large tears postoperatively from 6 weeks to 6 months after surgery. Smaller tears may heal more vigorously, causing more pain. Patients with smaller tears experienced more pain after rotator cuff repair compared with patients with larger tears. These findings are contrary to previous ideas about tear size and

  6. Cognitive function is linked to adherence to bariatric postoperative guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Galioto, Rachel; Limbach, Kristen; Gunstad, John; Heinberg, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Impairment in cognitive function is found in a significant subset of individuals undergoing bariatric surgery, and recent work shows this impairment is associated with smaller postoperative weight loss. Reduced cognitive function could contribute to poorer adherence to postoperative guidelines, although this has not been previously examined. The present study examined the relationship between cognitive function and adherence to bariatric postoperative guidelines. We expected that higher cognitive function would be associated with better adherence to postoperative guidelines. Thirty-seven bariatric surgery patients completed cognitive testing and a self-report measure of adherence to postoperative bariatric guidelines during their 4- to 6-week postoperative appointment. Strong correlations were observed between adherence to postoperative guidelines and cognitive indices of attention, executive function, and memory. Results show that cognitive performance is strongly associated with adherence to postoperative guidelines shortly after bariatric surgery. Further work is needed to clarify whether this relationship is present at later postoperative stages and the degree to which this relationship mediates postoperative weight loss outcomes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Incidence of Postoperative Pneumonia in Various Surgical Subspecialties: A Dual Database Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Morad; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Khlopas, Anton; Newman, Jared M; Curtis, Gannon L; Torres, Pedro A; Khan, Rafay; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    underwent general surgery, neurosurgery, spine surgery, orthopaedic surgery, and ENT surgery had a postoperative pneumonia incidence of 1.1%, 0.6%, 0.5%, 0.5%, and 0.4%, respectively. Overall trend analysis demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in postoperative pneumonia incidence (p surgeries that occurred between 2009 and 2013 was 1.3%. The incidences of postoperative pneumonia were highest among patients who underwent cardiothoracic surgery (5.3%), general surgery (1.4%), and neurosurgery (1.4%). The incidences of postoperative pneumonia in patients who underwent ENT surgery, orthopedic surgery, and urologic surgery were 0.7%, respectively. Overall trend analysis demonstrated a statistically significant increase in postoperative pneumonia incidence for patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery (p surgery had the highest incidence in both databases. Furthermore, cardiothoracic surgery appeared to have an increasing trend in incidence. Standardizing and implementing accurate coding methodologies for this complication are needed for a more accurate assessment of this burdensome complication. Future studies should assess interventions, such as oral cleansing and suctioning, incentive spirometry, as well as designated institution-based pneumonia prevention programs and protocols to help prevent and mitigate the occurrence of this complication.

  8. Postoperative management of pulmonary endarterectomy and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayana Iyengar Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery thromboendarterectomy (PTE has been regarded as a promising, potentially curative surgical procedure. However, PTE is associated with specific postoperative complications, such as reperfusion pulmonary edema and right heart failure leading to a considerable mortality of 7-24%. Despite its limitations PTE is a better surgical alternative to lung transplantation which carries high morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study is to analyze the efficacy, safety, morbidity and survival associated in the postoperative period and quality of life after six months of PTE in Indian patients. Forty-one patients with surgically correctable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension underwent pulmonary endarterectomy. All patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II, III or IV. Preoperative mean pulmonary artery pressure was 40.98 ± 9.29 mmHg and mean pulmonary vascular resistance was 418.39 ± 95.88 dynes/sec/cm -5 . All patients were followed up to six months and a telephonic survey was conducted using a standard questionnaire. They were assessed and classified as per NYHA grading. There was a significant reduction in the mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 40.98 ± 9.29 mmHg to 24.13 ± 7.36 mmHg, P < 0.001 and pulmonary vascular resistance (from 418.39 ± 95.88 dynes/sec/cm -5 to 142.45 ± 36.27 dynes/sec/cm -5 , P < 0.001 with a concomitant increase in the cardiac index (from 1.99 ± 0.20 L/min/m 2 to 3.28 ± 0.56 L/min/m 2 , P < 0.001 during the postoperative period. The mortality rate in our study was 12.19% (five patients. Ninety per cent of the patients reported a significant improvement in the quality of life and exercise tolerance after surgery compared to the preoperative state. Pulmonary endarterectomy is an effective and potentially curative surgical treatment for patients with severe chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. The current techniques of operation make the procedure relatively safe and

  9. Determinants of postoperative acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando José; Botelho, Miguela; Fernandes, Vera; Barros, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Development of acute kidney injury (AKI) during the perioperative period is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of postoperative AKI after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previously normal renal function. This retrospective cohort study was carried out in the multidisciplinary Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with five intensive care beds. The study population consisted of 1166 patients with no previous renal insufficiency who were admitted to these intensive care unit (ICU) beds over 2 years. After admission patients were followed for the development of AKI, defined as proposed by The Acute Kidney Injury Network (increment of serum creatinine [greater than or equal to] 0.3 mg/dL or 50% from baseline within 48 hours or urine output 6 hours despite fluid resuscitation when applicable). Patient preoperative characteristics, intraoperative management and outcome were evaluated for associations with acute kidney injury using an univariate and multiple logistic regression model. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the PACU and of these, 1166 met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-seven patients (7.5%) met AKI criteria. Univariate analysis identified age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, emergency surgery, high risk surgery, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart disease and Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) score as independent preoperative determinants for AKI in the postoperative period. Multivariate analysis identified ASA physical status, RCRI score, high risk surgery and congestive heart disease as preoperative determinants for AKI in the postoperative period. Patients that developed AKI had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, higher PACU length of stay (LOS), higher PACU mortality, higher hospital mortality and higher mortality at 6 months follow-up. AKI was an independent

  10. Risk Factors in Development of Postoperative Empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Ozkan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Many etiological factors play a role in the occurrence of postoperative empyema. We aimed to define the effects of these factors on the development of empyema. Material and Method: Two hundred and eighty-eight cases from our clinic who underwent tube thoracostomy and/or were operated due to any cause out of the primary empyema  between August 2009 and May 2010 were prospectively studied in terms of empyema development. Data comprised gender, age, chemoradiotherapy, surgical procedure, intraoperative thoracic lavage with povidone-iodine, emergency surgery status, sharing the same room with other cases with empyema, primary disease, additional comorbidity, operation duration, drain number, complication, number of patients in the room, and drain discontinuation and hospitalization duration. Blood leukocyte-neutrophil count was ordered in all cases at 3-day intervals, and fluid culture specimens were simultaneously collected from cases with drains. Drainage fluid culture specimens were evaluated with “Automated Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing” using standard procedures. Empyema cases who developed clinical manifestation and/or with bacterial growth in culture specimens were studied in terms of risk factors. The findings were analyzed using SPSS (version 16. Results: The results showed that gender, age, chemoradiotherapy, surgical procedure, intraoperative thoracic lavage with povidone-iodine, emergency surgery status, and sharing a same room with other empyema cases were not significantly correlated with the risk of empyema development. Contribution of the primary disease (p<0.05, additional comorbidity (p<0.05, operation duration (p<0.05, drain number (p<0.05, complication (p<0.05, number of people in the room (p<0.05, drain discontinuation time (p<0.05 and hospitalization duration (p<0.05 were found to be significant in the development of postoperative empyema. Discussion: Postoperative development of empyema is one

  11. Hypoalbuminaemia-a marker of malnutrition and predictor of postoperative complications and mortality after hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldebeyan, Sultan; Nooh, Anas; Aoude, Ahmed; Weber, Michael H; Harvey, Edward J

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to determine the effect of hypoalbuminaemia as a marker of malnutrition on the 30-day postoperative complication rate and mortality in patients receiving surgical treatment for hip fractures using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. We analyzed all patients admitted with hip fractures receiving surgical treatment from 2011 to 2013. Patients were dichotomized based on their albumin levels; hypoalbuminaemia (albumin 3.5g/dL). Patient demographics, postoperative complications, and length of stay were analysed. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the ability of albumin level for predicting postoperative complications, length of stay, and mortality. A total of 10,117 patients with hip fractures were identified with 5414 patients with normal albumin levels, and 4703 with low albumin. Multivariate analysis showed that when controlling for comorbidities; hypoalbuminaemia alone was a predictor of postoperative complications (death, unplanned intubation, being on a ventilator >48h, sepsis, and blood transfusion), and increased length of stay (6.90±7.23 versus 8.44±8.70, CI 0.64-1.20, Ppatients with hip fractures. Furthermore, patients with hypoalbuminaemia had a longer hospital length of stay. Further studies are needed to assess whether nutritional support can improve postoperative complications in patients with hypoalbuminaemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predisposing factors for postoperative nausea and vomiting in gynecologic tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Daiane Spitz; Costa, Amine Farias; Chaves, Gabriela Villaça

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the predictors of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in women with gynecologic tumor. The analysis was based on prospectively collected data of 82 adult patients with gynecologic tumor, who were submitted to open surgical treatment and undergoing general anesthesia. The predictors included were age ≥50 years, non-smoker, use of postoperative opioids, mechanical bowel preparation, intraoperative intravenous hydration (IH) ≥10 mL/kg/h, and IH in the immediate postoperative, first and second postoperative days (PO1 and PO2) ≥30 mL/kg. A score with predictor variables was built. A multiple logistic regression was fitted. To estimate the discriminating power of the chosen model, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated. Statistical significance was set at p value 30 mL/kg of IH in the PO2. The results of the adjusted model showed an increased risk of PONV for each 1-point increase in the score punctuation. The relative risk was higher than 2.0 for vomiting in all period and in the PO1. The ROC curve showed great discrimination of postoperative nausea and vomiting from the proposed score (AUC >0.75). The study population was at high risk of PONV. Therefore, institutional guidelines abolishing modificable variables following temporal evaluation of the effectiveness should be undertaken.

  13. Risk of post-operative complications associated with anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tauseef Ali; Laura Yun; David T Rubin

    2012-01-01

    There have been increasing concerns regarding the safety of perioperative antitumour necrosis factor (antiTNF) α agents. We performed a literature review to evaluate the postoperative complications associated with perioperative antiTNF use in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive review was performed with a literature search utilizing Pub Med, Cochrane, OVID and EMBASE databases according to published guidelines. To date, there are only data for infliximab. There are three published studies which have assessed postoperative complications with perioperative infliximab use in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), four studies in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients, and one study on both CD and UC patients. Two out of the three studies in CD patients showed no increased postoperative complications associated with perioperative infliximab. Two out of four studies in UC patients also did not show an increase in postoperative complications, and the combined study with CD and UC patients did not show an increased risk as well. Study differences in study designs, patient population and definition of their endpoints. There appears to be a risk of postoperative complications associated with TNF therapy in some patients. Based on these data, careful patient selection and prospective data collection should be performed.

  14. Study on effectiveness and tolerance of pre-and postoperative radiochemotherapy for patients with stomach cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wydmanski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Postoperative radiochemotherapy was included to the therapeutic scheme of stomach cancer. The effectiveness and tolerance of pre- and postoperative radiochemotherapy were studied. A Range Scale Risk reflecting the risk of treatment failure , selecting patients with bad prognosis to intensive therapy was established on the base of identified predictive and prognostic factors. 426 patients with stomach cancer were undergone radiochemotherapy between 1999 and 2005. The therapeutic schemes with operation followed by adjuvant radiochemotherapy or pre-and postoperative radiochemotherapy were arranged.The overall survival was better in the second group. Body weight loss, age and performance status of patients, location of tumor, cancer stage evaluation, resected lymph nodes, operation radicality were identified as the independent prognostic factors. In conclusions, combined modality approaches in treatment of stomach cancer were shown as more effective than surgery alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may be more effective than postoperative one. Postoperative radiochemotherapy started and completed within 5 weeks positively influenced all prognostic factors. 5-year overall survival rate was 66% and risk of local recurrence less than 15%. 4 prognostics groups of patients selected in 10 points scale of range scale risk by careful evaluation using hazard model were established and detailed results have been presented. (author)

  15. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumul Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe.

  16. Postoperative radiotherapy for rectal and rectosigmoid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B.M.P.; Lebesque, J.V.; Hart, A.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 1984 and 1988, 206 patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy after macroscopically complete surgery for rectal or (recto)sigmoid cancer. Depending on an estimation of the amount of small bowel in the intended treatment volume a total dose was, in general, 45 or 50 Gy. An additional boost of 10 Gy was given to 6 patients because of microscopically involved surgical margins. For tumor stage B a statistically significant trend (p=0.017) for higher local control with higher total dose was observed comparing patients treated with a total dose of 45 Gy or less, with more than 45 Gy but less than 50 Gy or with a total dose of 50 Gy or more. This finding illustrates the impact of total dose on local control for postoperative radiotherapy for rectal carcinoma. (author). 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Postoperative conversion disorder in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Amy; Spielman, Fred

    2010-11-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM IV), conversion disorder is classified as a somatoform illness and defined as an alteration or loss of physical function because of the expression of an underlying psychological ailment. This condition, previously known as hysteria, hysterical neurosis, or conversion hysteria occurs rarely, with an incidence of 11-300 cases per 100,000 people (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 4th edn. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Presentation after an anesthetic is exceptional. After thorough review of the literature, fewer than 20 cases have been documented, with only two instances in patients younger than 18 years of age after general anesthesia; both were mild in nature. We present a severe case of postoperative conversion disorder that developed upon emergence from anesthesia in a previously healthy 16-year-old girl following direct laryngoscopy with vocal fold injection. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Radical pancreatectomy: postoperative evaluation by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, J.P.; Balfe, D.M.; Picus, D.; Scharp, D.W.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-four patients who had undergone radical pancreatic resection were evaluated by CT one week to 11 years after surgery. Eighteen patients had had the Whipple procedure; six had had total pancreatectomy. The region between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery, previously occupied by the uncinate process of the pancreas, is an important area to evaluate for tumor recurrence because periampullary tumors tend to metastasize to the lymph nodes in this region. Tumor recurrence here is readily detectable by CT since radical pancreatectomy leaves this area area free of soft tissue attenuation material. CT demonstrated postoperative complications or tumor recurrence in 16 of the 24 patients and was 100% accurate in patients who had follow-up.

  19. Carotid endarterectomy significantly improves postoperative laryngeal sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Georg Philipp; Tomazic, Peter Valentin; Vasicek, Sarah; Graupp, Matthias; Gugatschka, Markus; Baumann, Anneliese; Konstantiniuk, Peter; Koter, Stephan Herwig

    2016-11-01

    Iatrogenic injury of the vagus nerve or its branches during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) can result in globus sensation, dysphagia, and even vocal fold immobility. Knowledge of morphologic and functional laryngopharyngeal outcomes after CEA is poor. The present study was performed to determine potential iatrogenic damage to the laryngeal innervation after CEA. An area of particular interest was the supraglottic sensory threshold, which was examined by Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing With Sensory Testing (FEESST; Pentax Medical Company, Montvale, NJ), a validated and safe method for the determination of the motor and sensory components of swallowing. FEESST was used preoperatively in 32 patients scheduled to undergo CEA and twice postoperatively to examine the motor and sensory components of swallowing. In this endolaryngeal examination, laryngopharyngeal sensory thresholds (in mm Hg) were defined as normal at 6.0 mm Hg APP, with a value >10.0 mm Hg APP indicating abolished laryngeal adductor reflex. Acoustic voice parameters were also analyzed for further functional changes of the larynx. The mean ± standard deviation preoperative FEESST measures showed no significant differences (P = .065) between the operated-on side (6.73 ± 1.73 mm Hg) and the opposite side (5.83 ± 1.68 mm Hg). At 2 days postoperatively, the threshold increased (P = .001) to 7.62 ± 1.98 mm Hg on the operated-on side. A laryngopharyngeal mucosal hematoma on the operated side was endoscopically detectable in eight patients (30.8%); in these patients, we found a markedly elevated (P = .021) measure of 9.50 ± 0.93 mm Hg. On the opposite (nonoperated-on) side of the laryngopharynx, the thresholds remained at the same level as preoperatively over all assessments (P >.05), whereas the differences between the operated and nonoperated-on sides and the hematoma and nonhematoma groups were highly significant (P = .004 and P = .001, respectively). Surprisingly, the

  20. Postoperative ascitic leaks: the ongoing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemurgy, A S; Statman, R C; Murphy, C G; Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W

    1992-06-01

    The leak of ascitic fluid from surgical incisions is thought to be associated with a very high mortality rate. There have been few reports, however, focusing on the clinical characteristics, management, or mortality rates of this condition. During a 10-year period, 18 patients with postoperative ascitic fluid leaks were treated. All patients had ascites before surgery and all had liver disease; in 13 of the 18 patients alcoholic liver disease was the cause of ascites. Ten of the 18 patients died (56%). Midline incisions were more often associated with recalcitrant leaks and fatal complications than were transverse incisions. Early consideration of fascial dehiscence and prompt repair is emphasized. The most effective predictor of survival was cessation of the leak.

  1. Postoperative irradiation of glaucoma filtering surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mano, Tomiya; Manabe, Reizo; Masaki, Norie; Ohashi, Yuichi; Umemoto, Masayo; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Ryo; Hirose, Naomi.

    1986-01-01

    To inhibit the subcojunctival scarring after glaucoma filtering surgery, Sr-90 beta-irradiation of 10 Gy in 1 fraction or 20 Gy in 2 fractions has been tried in 12 eyes. Usual trabeculectomy followed by beta-irradiation was performed on 6 eyes. Of these, 3/6 eyes were meintained in normal range of IOP after irradiation. Furthermore, combined surgery of trabeculectomy, tenectomy and episcleral resection followed by beta-irradiation were performed on 6 eyes. Of these, 5/6 eyes were maintained in normal range of IOP. No complications was observed during 3 to 8 months of followup periods after treatment. Filtering surgery combined with postoperative beta-irradiation seems to inhibit the proliferation of subcon-junctival fibroblast and to control IOP. (1 Gy = 100 rad). (author)

  2. Postoperative radiographic evaluation of vascularized fibular grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaster, B.J.; Coleman, D.A.; Bell, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on thirty-five patients with free vascularized fibular grafts examined postoperatively with plain radiography. Early graft incorporation is seen as a fuzziness of the cortex at the site of its insertion into the host bone. Causes of failure in grafting for bone defects include graft fracture, hardware failure, and infection. A high percentage of complications or at least delayed unions occurred when vascularized fibular grafts were used to fill defects in the lower extremity. Conversely, upper extremity defects bridged by vascularized grafts heal quickly and hypertrophy. Vascularized grafts placed in the femoral head and neck for a vascular necrosis incorporate early on their superior aspect. The osseous tunnel in which they are placed is normally wider than the graft and often becomes sclerotic; this appearance does not represent nonunion

  3. Radical pancreatectomy: postoperative evaluation by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiken, J.P.; Balfe, D.M.; Picus, D.; Scharp, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-four patients who had undergone radical pancreatic resection were evaluated by CT one week to 11 years after surgery. Eighteen patients had had the Whipple procedure; six had had total pancreatectomy. The region between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery, previously occupied by the uncinate process of the pancreas, is an important area to evaluate for tumor recurrence because periampullary tumors tend to metastasize to the lymph nodes in this region. Tumor recurrence here is readily detectable by CT since radical pancreatectomy leaves this area area free of soft tissue attenuation material. CT demonstrated postoperative complications or tumor recurrence in 16 of the 24 patients and was 100% accurate in patients who had follow-up

  4. Postoperative MR study of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Sander, B.; Schubeus, P.; Tepe, H.; Goudarzi, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    20 patients with acute traumatic rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and ligamental suture were studied postoperatively by MRI. MR results were correlated with stress X-ray studies. We found a normal anterior talofibular ligament in eight cases. However, stress X-ray images showed normal stability of the ankle joint in eighteen cases. In six patients the anterior talofibular ligament was thickened, in another six cases it could not be separated from scar tissue. Therefore MR imaging of ankle ligaments did not allow a diagnosis of their function. Nevertheless, sequelae of the ankle trauma such as osteochondrosis, exsudation into the ankle joint and tendovaginitis of the flexor muscles were sensitively visualised by MR. (orig.) [de

  5. Postoperative Maxillary Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiye Şafak Bulut

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative maxillary cyst is a quite rare delayed complication of surgical intervention associated with maxillary sinuses. It occurs many years after surgery. This paper describes a 54-year-old woman presenting with swelling of left cheek for seven-years duration. The orthopantomograph revealed a unilocular cystic radiolucency with well-defined margins in left maxillary sinus. In the computerized tomography, the cyst had a sclerotic wall with bony condensations. Aspiration cytology revealed many neutrophil leukocytes. Cyst was drained and enucleated. Histopathologically, it had a fibrous wall with inflammation and focal reactive bone formation and lined by a respiratory-type epithelium. In the clinical history, it is learned that she had a maxillary sinus surgery 8 years ago and the diagnosis was made considering the clinical and histopathological findings.

  6. Postoperative craniospinal radiotherapy of medulloblastoma in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubičić Ivana V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE The aim of this study was: 1. to evaluate treatment results of combined therapy (surgery, postoperative craniospinal radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and 2. to assess factors affecting prognosis (extend of tumor removal, involvement of the brain stem, extent of disease postoperative meningitis, shunt placement, age, sex and time interval from surgery to start of postoperative radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS During the period 1986-1996, 78 patients with medulloblastoma, aged 1-22 years (median 8.6 years, were treated with combined modality therapy and 72 of them were evaluable for the study end-points. Entry criteria were histologically proven diagnosis, age under 22 years, and no history of previous malignant disease. The main characteristics of the group are shown in Table 1. Twenty-nine patients (37.2% have total, 8 (10.3% near total and 41 (52.5% partial removal. Seventy-two of 78 patients were treated with curative intent and received postoperative craniospinal irradiation. Radiotherapy started 13-285 days after surgery (median 36 days. Only 13 patients started radiotherapy after 60 days following surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy was applied in 63 (80.7% patients. The majority of them (46 73% received chemotherapy with CCNU and Vincristine. The survival rates were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method and the differences in survival were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test and log-rank test. RESULTS The follow-up period ranged from 1-12 years (median 3 years. Five-year overall survival (OS was 51% and disease-free survival (DFS 47% (Graph 1. During follow-up 32 relapses occurred. Patients having no brain stem infiltration had significantly better survival (p=0.0023 (Graph 2. Patients with positive myelographic findings had significantly poorer survival compared to dose with negative myelographic findings (p=0.0116. Significantly poorer survival was found in patients with meningitis developing in the postoperative period

  7. Minimal Invasive Urologic Surgery and Postoperative Ileus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Aoun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative ileus (POI is the most common cause of prolonged length of hospital stays (LOS and associated healthcare costs. The advent of minimal invasive technique was a major breakthrough in the urologic landscape with great potential to progress in the future. In the field of gastrointestinal surgery, several studies had reported lower incidence rates for POI following minimal invasive surgery compared to conventional open procedures. In contrast, little is known about the effect of minimal invasive approach on the recovery of bowel motility after urologic surgery. We performed an overview of the potential benefit of minimal invasive approach on POI for urologic procedures. The mechanisms and risk factors responsible for the onset of POI are discussed with emphasis on the advantages of minimal invasive approach. In the urologic field, POI is the main complication following radical cystectomy but it is rarely of clinical significance for other minimal invasive interventions. Laparoscopy or robotic assisted laparoscopic techniques when studied individually may reduce to their own the duration and prevent the onset of POI in a subset of procedures. The potential influence of age and urinary diversion type on postoperative ileus is contradictory in the literature. There is some evidence suggesting that BMI, blood loss, urinary extravasation, existence of a major complication, bowel resection, operative time and transperitoneal approach are independent risk factors for POI. Treatment of POI remains elusive. One of the most important and effective management strategies for patients undergoing radical cystectomy has been the development and use of enhanced recovery programs. An optimal rational strategy to shorten the duration of POI should incorporate minimal invasive approach when appropriate into multimodal fast track programs designed to reduce POI and shorten LOS.

  8. Postoperative radiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. Z.; Chun, H. C.; Kim, I. S.; Chung, T. J. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Radical gastrectomy is main treatment of gastric cancer. We analyzed patients with stage III and IV stomach cancer who had radical operation and received postoperative radiation therapy combined with or without chemotherapy retrospectively. From March 1985 to June 1993, 68 patients treated with curative resection and received postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy with 36Gy or more were evaluated. Median age was 60years(range 28-66 yrs). Thirty seven patients had non signet ring adenocarcinoma, 29 signet ring cell, 2 other cell. Patients with stage IIIA, IIIB, IV disease were 19, 25 and 24 respectively. Chemotherapy was given to all patients except two. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate were 36.6% and 33.6T, respectively. Recurrence was documented in 34 patients. High recurrence was seen in omentum and peritoneum with 23.5%, and remnant stomach, anastomosis site, A-loop and E-loop had also high recurrence with 13.2%. In field locoregional recurrence was 20.7% and total distant metastases were 39.7%. Total intraabdominal failure was 47.1% and extraabdominal failure was 13.2%. Treatment toxicity was considered to be acceptable. 22.1% of patients had grade 3 and only 1 patient had grade 4 leukopenia. Six patients(8.8%) had weigh loss more than 10%. Treatment toxicity was acceptable with combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Locoregional recurrence was relatively low compared to distant failure with addition of irradiation. Peritoneal and omental seeding was high. Five-year survival was increased with combined modality. Radiation may eradicate minimal residual disease and improve survival. Furthermore to reduce intraabdominal failure, role of intraabdominal chemotherapy in addition to combined chemotherapy plus radiation has to be explored. (author).

  9. Management of Postoperative Complications Following Splenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yikun; Ren, Shiyan; Li, Chunmin; Qian, Songyi; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Complications of post-splenectomy, especially intra-abdominal hemorrhage can be fatal, with delayed or inadequate treatment having a high mortality rate. The objective of this study was to investigate the cause, prompt diagnosis, and outcome of the fatal complications after splenectomy with a focus on early diagnosis and management of hemorrhage after splenectomy. The medical files of patients who underwent splenectomy between January 1990 and March 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. The cause, characteristics, management, and outcome in patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were analyzed. Fourteen of 604 patients (1.19%) undergoing splenectomy had intraperitoneal hemorrhage: reoperation was performed in 13 patients, and 3 patients died after reoperation, giving the hospital a mortality rate of 21.43%; whereas, 590 of 604 patients (98%) had no hemorrhage following splenectomy, and the mortality rate (0.34%) in this group was significantly lower (P splenectomy, including pneumonia pancreatitis, gastric fistula, gastric flatulence, and thrombocytosis, in patients with postoperative hemorrhage were significantly higher than those without hemorrhage (P splenectomy, 14 patients with post-splenectomy hemorrhage were grouped into two groups: splenic trauma (n = 9, group I) and portal hypertension (n = 5, group II). The median interval between splenectomy and diagnosis of hemorrhage was 15.5 hours (range, 7.25–19.5 hours). No differences were found between groups I and II in terms of incidence of postoperative hemorrhage, time of hemorrhage after splenectomy, volume of hemorrhage, and mortality of hemorrhage, except transfusion. Intra-abdominal hemorrhage after splenectomy is associated with higher hospital mortality rate and complications. Early massive intraperitoneal hemorrhage is often preceded by earlier sentinel bleeding; careful clinical inquiry and ultrasonography are the mainstays of early diagnosis. PMID:23438277

  10. Acute Postoperative Pain Therapy: Current State . Patient Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lončarić-Katušin, Mirjana; Persoli-Gudelj, Marijana; Šimić-Korać, Nataša; Blažanin, Božidar; Žunić, Josip; Korać, Želimir

    2006-01-01

    In effective control of acute postoperative pain, it is essential to respect the principles of multimodal balanced analgesia, and to apply them within organized units for the management of acute postoperative pain (acute pain service). The aim of the study was to find out patient expectations and experience in the intensity of acute postoperative pain, and the efficiency of therapy they received. Between October 11, 2002 and December 14, 2002, 103 patients having undergone elective operative ...

  11. Pyothorax in a cat managed by intrathoracic debridement and postoperative ventilatory support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doyle Ronan S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A domestic-longhair cat presented due to lethargy, dyspnoea and hypersalivation. Radiographic examination revealed a bilateral pleural effusion, which was diagnosed as pyothorax based on cytological examination. Ultrasonographic examination revealed extensive loculations within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory sternotomy, under general anaesthesia, allowed the removal of approximately 100 ml of purulent fluid and debridement of a partially walled-off abscess and necrotic material from the pleural cavity. Postoperative positive-pressure ventilation was required due to severe respiratory depression. Intensive postoperative care, including intensive continuous monitoring, thoracostomy tube drainage and lavage of the pleural cavity and oesophagostomy tube feeding, was performed. Complete resolution of clinical signs had occurred by 15 days postoperatively. Clinical or radiographic abnormalities were not detected at a follow-up examination one year after surgery.

  12. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum: A rare complication after appendectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Faghihi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is an uncommon inflammatory ulcerative skin disease. It is characterized by painful progressive necrosis of the wound margins. Rarely, postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG manifests as a severe disturbance of wound healing following surgical interventions. Only rare cases of this complication have been reported after appendectomy. We report a case of PPG in a 29-year-old female after appendectomy. She was successfully treated with oral prednisolone. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative delayed wound healing, because this disease is simply distinguished from a postoperative wound.

  13. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum: A rare complication after appendectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, G; Abtahi-Naeini, B; Nikyar, Z; Jamshidi, K; Bahrami, A

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon inflammatory ulcerative skin disease. It is characterized by painful progressive necrosis of the wound margins. Rarely, postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) manifests as a severe disturbance of wound healing following surgical interventions. Only rare cases of this complication have been reported after appendectomy. We report a case of PPG in a 29-year-old female after appendectomy. She was successfully treated with oral prednisolone. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative delayed wound healing, because this disease is simply distinguished from a postoperative wound. PMID:25511218

  14. Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of intravenous diclofenac on postoperative sore throat in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery at Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: A prospective, randomized, double blind controlled trial.

  15. Predicting postoperative pain by preoperative pressure pain assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Wei; Somma, Jacques; Hung, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Pei-Shan; Yang, Chen-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chuan

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate whether preoperative pressure pain sensitivity testing is predictive of postoperative surgical pain. Female subjects undergoing lower abdominal gynecologic surgery were studied. A pressure algometer was used preoperatively to determine the pressure pain threshold and tolerance. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess postoperative pain. A State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to assess patients' anxiety. Subjects received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative pain control. The preoperative pain threshold and tolerance were compared with the postoperative VAS pain score and morphine consumption. Forty women were enrolled. Their preoperative pressure pain threshold and tolerance were 141 +/- 65 kPa and 223 +/- 62 kPa, respectively. The VAS pain score in the postanesthesia care unit and at 24 h postoperatively were 81 +/- 24 and 31 +/- 10, respectively. Highly anxious patients had higher VAS pain scores in the postanesthesia care unit (P pain tolerance was significantly correlated with the VAS at 24 h postoperatively (P pain tolerance after fentanyl administration (mean, 272 +/- 68 kPa) correlated significantly with morphine consumption in the first 24 h postoperatively (P pain tolerance is significantly correlated with the level of postoperative pain. Pain tolerance assessment after fentanyl was administered and fentanyl sensitivity predicted the dose of analgesics used in the first 24 h after surgery. The algometer is thus a simple, useful tool for predicting postoperative pain and analgesic consumption.

  16. Intrathecal morphine for postoperative analgesia in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripi, Paul A; Poe-Kochert, Connie; Potzman, Jennifer; Son-Hing, Jochen P; Thompson, George H

    2008-09-15

    A retrospective study of postoperative pain management with intrathecal morphine. Identify the dosing regimen of intrathecal morphine that safely and effectively provides postoperative analgesia with minimal complications in patients with idiopathic scoliosis undergoing posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and segmental spinal instrumentation (SSI). Postoperative pain after surgery for idiopathic scoliosis is a concern. Intrathecal morphine has been used to decrease pain. However, the most appropriate dose has not been determined. We retrospectively analyzed 407 consecutive patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent PSF and SSI at our institution from 1992 through 2006. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on the intrathecal morphine dose: no dose (n = 68); moderate dose of 9 to 19 microg/kg, mean 14 microg/kg (n = 293); and high dose of 20 microg/kg or greater, mean 24 microg/kg (n = 46). Data included demographics, Wong-Baker visual analog scale postoperative pain scores, postoperative intravenous morphine requirements, time to first rescue dose of intravenous morphine, and postoperative complications of pruritus, nausea/vomiting, respiratory depression, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission. The demographics of the 3 study groups showed no statistical differences. The mean Wong-Baker visual analog scale pain score in the post anesthesia care unit was 5.2, 0.5, and 0.2, and the mean time to first morphine rescue was 6.6, 16.7, and 22.9 hours, respectively. In the first 48 postoperative hours, respiratory depression occurred in 1 (1.5%), 8 (2.7%), and 7 (15.2%) patients, whereas PICU admission occurred in 0 (0%), 6 (2%), and 8 (17.4%) patients, respectively. The majority of PICU admissions were the result of respiratory depression. Frequency of pruritus and nausea/vomiting was similar in all 3 groups. Intrathecal morphine in the moderate dose range of 9 to 19 microg/kg (mean 14 microg/kg), provides safe and effective postoperative analgesia in the

  17. Recurrent postoperative sciatica: Evaluation with MR imaging and enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauferrier, R.; Frocain, L.; Husson, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The authors prospectively compared MR imaging performed with a surface coil and CT performed with iodinated contrast agent enhancement in 50 patients with recurrent postoperative sciatica. Surgical decision was an objective measure of accuracy. Surgical treatment was selected for 27 patients. All 27 underwent MR imaging. The 15 patients who underwent CT/surgical treatment were included in the 27 indications of SCMR. All predictions based on MR imaging findings were confirmed at surgery. There were 25 recurrent disk herniations, including five with scar tissue, and two disk herniations above or below the level of the diskectomy. In the 12 patients with scar tissue detected on CT there were seven recurrent disk hernitions, four recurrent disk herniations with scar tissue, and one disk herniation below the level of the diskectomy

  18. Postoperative Submandibular Gland Swelling following Craniotomy under General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Nakanishi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Reporting of a rare case of postoperative submandibular gland swelling following craniotomy. Case Report. A 33-year-old male underwent resection for a brain tumor under general anesthesia. The tumor was resected via a retrosigmoid suboccipital approach and the patient was placed in a lateral position with his face down and turned to the right. Slight swelling of the right submandibular gland was observed just after the surgery. Seven hours after surgery, edematous change around the submandibular gland worsened and he required emergent reintubation due to airway compromise. The cause of submandibular gland swelling seemed to be an obstruction of the salivary duct due to surgical positioning. Conclusion. Once submandibular swelling and edematous change around the submandibular gland occur, they can worsen and compromise the air way within several hours after operation. Adequate precaution must be taken for any predisposing skull-base surgery that requires strong cervical rotation and flexion.

  19. Cochlear implant electrode localization in post-operative CT using a spherical measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braithwaite, Benjamin Michael; Kjer, Hans Martin; Fagertun, Jens

    2016-01-01

    the ordering of electrode contacts on implanted electrode arrays from post-operative CT images. Our method applies a specialized filter chain to the images based on a threshold and spherical measure, and selects contact positions at local maxima in the filtered image. Two datasets of 13 temporal bone specimens...

  20. Long-term adherence to a local guideline on postoperative body temperature measurement: mixed methods analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Knops, Anouk M.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Goossens, Astrid; Legemate, Dink A.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2012-01-01

    Aim To find out whether a successful multifaceted implementation approach of a local evidence-based guideline on postoperative body temperature measurements (BTM) was persistent over time, and which factors influenced long-term adherence. Methods Mixed methods analysis. Patient records were

  1. Care of pediatric tracheostomy in the immediate postoperative period and timing of first tube change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Dylan; Hoffman, Matthew R; Dang, Phat; McMurray, J Scott; Heatley, Diane; Kille, Tony

    2014-12-01

    To analyze the safety of a standardized pediatric tracheostomy care protocol in the immediate postoperative period and its impact on tracheostomy related complications. Retrospective case series. Pediatric patients undergoing tracheotomy from February 2010-February 2014. In 2012, a standardized protocol was established regarding postoperative pediatric tracheostomy care. This protocol included securing newly placed tracheostomy tubes using a foam strap with hook and loop fastener rather than twill ties, placing a fresh drain sponge around the tracheostomy tube daily, and performing the first tracheostomy tube change on postoperative day 3 or 4. Outcome measures included rate of skin breakdown and presence of a mature stoma allowing for a safe first tracheostomy tube change. Two types of tracheotomy were performed based on patient age: standard pediatric tracheotomy and adult-style tracheotomy with a Bjork flap. Patients were analyzed separately based on age and the type of tracheotomy performed. Thirty-seven patients in the pre-protocol group and 35 in the post-protocol group were analyzed. The rate of skin breakdown was significantly lower in the post-protocol group (standard: p=0.0048; Bjork flap: p=0.0003). In the post-protocol group, all tube changes were safely accomplished on postoperative day three or four, and the stomas were deemed to be adequately matured to do so in all cases. A standardized postoperative pediatric tracheostomy care protocol resulted in decreased rates of skin breakdown and demonstrated that pediatric tracheostomy tubes can be safely changed as early as 3 days postoperatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute postoperative neurological deterioration associated with surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm: incidence, predictors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, Kelly B; Todd, Michael M; Bayman, Emine O; Torner, James C

    2012-06-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant morbidity and mortality, even among patients who reach medical attention in good neurological condition. Many patients have neurological decline in the perioperative period, which contributes to long-term outcomes. The focus of this study is to characterize the incidence of, characteristics predictive of, and outcomes associated with acute postoperative neurological deterioration in patients undergoing surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial (IHAST) was a multicenter randomized clinical trial that enrolled 1001 patients and assesssed the efficacy of hypothermia as neuroprotection during surgery to secure a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. All patients had a radiographically confirmed SAH, were classified as World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) Grade I-III immediately prior to surgery, and underwent surgery to secure the ruptured aneurysm within 14 days of SAH. Neurological assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was performed preoperatively, at 24 and 72 hours postoperatively, and at time of discharge. The primary outcome variable was a dichotomized scoring based on an IHAST version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) in which a score of 1 represents a good outcome and a score > 1 a poor outcome, as assessed at 90-days' follow-up. Data from IHAST were analyzed for occurrence of a postoperative neurological deterioration. Preoperative and intraoperative variables were assessed for associations with occurrence of postoperative neurological deterioration. Differences in baseline, intraoperative, and postoperative variables and in outcomes between patients with and without postoperative neurological deterioration were compared with Fisher exact tests. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare variables reported as means. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for covariates associated with occurrence

  3. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF POSTOPERATIVE STRESS REACTION AND MODERN APPROACHES TO NUTRITIVE SUPPORT FOR CHILDREN IN POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Shumilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteral nutrition is a method best adjusted to human physiology for correcting disorders of homeostasis in the postoperative period. Untimely and inadequate correction of these disorders may fatally affect a child’s health and rates of the child’s further development. Understanding the laws of stress response generation is important in selecting an optimal nutritive support in the postoperative period. It is necessary to take account of neuro-endocrine-immune response, changing metabolism and an impaired function of the gastrointestinal tract. Modern methods of diagnostics and treatment make it possible to resolve most of the arising issues, but it requires physicians to take a comprehensive approach and have knowledge in many areas of theoretical and practical medicine. Key words: stress, metabolism, children, enteral nutrition. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:36-45

  4. Interventions for treating inadvertent postoperative hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warttig, Sheryl; Alderson, Phil; Campbell, Gillian; Smith, Andrew F

    2014-11-20

    Inadvertent postoperative hypothermia (a drop in core body temperature to below 36°C) occurs as an effect of surgery when anaesthetic drugs and exposure of the skin for long periods of time during surgery result in interference with normal temperature regulation. Once hypothermia has occurred, it is important that patients are rewarmed promptly to minimise potential complications. Several different interventions are available for rewarming patients. To estimate the effectiveness of treating inadvertent perioperative hypothermia through postoperative interventions to decrease heat loss and apply passive and active warming systems in adult patients who have undergone surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1956 to 21 February 2014), EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1982 to 21 February 2014), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (1950 to 21 February 2014) and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EBSCO host (1980 to 21 February 2014), as well as reference lists of articles. We also searched www.controlled-trials.com and www.clincialtrials.gov. Randomized controlled trials of postoperative warming interventions aiming to reverse hypothermia compared with control or with each other. Three review authors identified studies for inclusion in this review. One review author extracted data and completed risk of bias assessments; two review authors checked the details. Meta-analysis was conducted when appropriate by using standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 11 trials with 699 participants. Ten trials provided data for analysis. Trials varied in the numbers and types of participants included and in the types of surgery performed. Most trials were at high or unclear risk of bias because of inappropriate or unclear randomization procedures, and because blinding of assessors and participants generally was

  5. Prediction of Late Postoperative Hemorrhage after Whipple Procedure Using Computed Tomography Performed During Early Postoperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ga Jin; Kim, Suk; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Seo, Hyeong Il; Kim, Hyun Sung; Kim, Tae Un

    2018-01-01

    Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH) is an uncommon but serious complication of Whipple surgery. To evaluate the radiologic features associated with late PPH at the first postoperative follow up CT, before bleeding. To evaluate the radiological features associated with late PPH at the first follow-up CT, two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the initial postoperative follow-up CT images of 151 patients, who had undergone Whipple surgery. Twenty patients showed PPH due to vascular problem or anastomotic ulcer. The research compared CT and clinical findings of 20 patients with late PPH and 131 patients without late PPH, including presence of suggestive feature of pancreatic fistula (presence of air at fluid along pancreaticojejunostomy [PJ]), abscess (fluid collection with an enhancing rim or gas), fluid along hepaticojejunostomy or PJ, the density of ascites, and the size of visible gastroduodenal artery (GDA) stump. CT findings including pancreatic fistula, abscess, and large GDA stump were associated with PPH on univariate analysis ( p ≤ 0.009). On multivariate analysis, radiological features suggestive of a pancreatic fistula, abscess, and a GDA stump > 4.45 mm were associated with PPH ( p ≤ 0.031). Early postoperative CT findings including GDA stump size larger than 4.45 mm, fluid collection with an enhancing rim or gas, and air at fluid along PJ, could predict late PPH.

  6. Residual urine output and postoperative mortality in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Feng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Ko, Wen-Je; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chen, Yung-Ming; Li, Wen-Yi; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chao, Anne; Huang, Tao-Min; Chang, Fan-Chi; Chen, Shih-I; Shiao, Chih-Chung; Wang, Wei-Jie; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Hu, Fu-Chang; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2009-09-01

    The relationship between residual urine output and postoperative survival in maintenance hemodialysis patients is unknown. To explore the relationship between amount of urine before surgery and postoperative mortality and differences between postoperative nonanuria and anuria in maintenance hemodialysis patients. A total of 109 maintenance hemodialysis patients underwent major operations. Anuria was defined as urine output <30 mL in the 8 hours before the first session of postoperative dialysis. Propensity scores for postoperative anuria were developed. Postoperative residual urine output was 159.2 mL/8 h (SD, 115.1) in 33 patients; 76 patients were anuric. Preoperative residual urine output and adequate perioperative blood transfusion were positively related to postoperative urine output. Propensity-adjusted 30-day mortality was associated with postoperative anuria (odds ratio [OR], 4.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-17.96; P = .03), prior stroke (OR, 4.46; 95% CI, 1.43-13.89; P = .01) and higher disease severity (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.21; P = .049) at the first postoperative dialysis. OR of 30-day mortality was 5.38 for nonanuria to anuria vs nonanuria to nonanuria (P = .03) and 5.13 for preoperative anuria vs nonanuria to nonanuria (P = .01). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, 30-day mortality differed significantly among patients for nonanuria to nonanuria, anuria, and nonanuria to anuria (log rank, P = .045). Patients with preoperative nonanuria and postoperative anuria had higher mortality than did patients with no anuria before and after surgery and patients with anuria before surgery. Postoperative residual urine output is an important surrogate marker for disease severity.

  7. Adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ja; Moon, Hye Seong; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Chong Il; Ahn, Jung Ja

    2003-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy, and to investigate the prognostic factors for FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer patients who were treated with simple hysterectomy, or who had high-risk factors following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Between March 1986 and December 1998, 58 patients, with FIGO stages IB-IIB cervical cancer were included in this study, The indications for postoperative radiation therapy were based on the pathological findings, including lymph node metastasis, positive surgical margin, parametrial extension, Iymphovascular invasion, invasion of more than half the cervical stroma, uterine extension and the incidental finding of cervix cancer following simple hysterectomy. All patients received external pelvic radiotherapy, and 5 patients, received an additional intracavitary radiation therapy. The radiation dose from the external beam to the whole pelvis was 45 - 50 Gy. Vagina cuff irradiation was performed, after completion of the external beam irradiation, al a low-dose rate of CS-137, with the total dose of 4488-4932 chy (median: 4500 chy) at 5 mm depth from the vagina surface. The median follow-up period was 44 months (15-108 months), The 5-yr actuarial local control rate, distant free survival and disease-free survival rate were 98%, 95% and 94%, respectively. A univariate analysis of the clinical and pathological parameters revealed that the clinical stage (p=0.0145), status of vaginal resection margin (p=0.0002) and parametrial extension (p=0.0001) affected the disease-free survival. From a multivariate analysis, only a parametrial extension independently influenced the disease-free survival. Five patients (9%) experienced Grade 2 late treatment-related complications, such as radiation proctitis (1 patient), cystitis (3 patients) and lymphedema of the leg (1 patient). No patient had grade 3 or 4 complications. Our results indicate that postoperative radiation therapy can

  8. Postoperative Compensatory Ammonium Excretion Subsequent to Systemic Acidosis in Cardiac Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrborn, Friederike; Dohle, Daniel-Sebastian; Waack, Indra N; Tsagakis, Konstantinos; Jakob, Heinz; Teloh, Johanna K

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative acid-base imbalances, usually acidosis, frequently occur after cardiac surgery. In most cases, the human body, not suffering from any severe preexisting illnesses regarding lung, liver, and kidney, is capable of transient compensation and final correction. The aim of this study was to correlate the appearance of postoperatively occurring acidosis with renal ammonium excretion. Between 07/2014 and 10/2014, a total of 25 consecutive patients scheduled for elective isolated coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass were enrolled in this prospective observational study. During the operative procedure and the first two postoperative days, blood gas analyses were carried out and urine samples collected. Urine samples were analyzed for the absolute amount of ammonium. Of all patients, thirteen patients developed acidosis as an initial disturbance in the postoperative period: five of respiratory and eight of metabolic origin. Four patients with respiratory acidosis but none of those with metabolic acidosis subsequently developed a base excess > +2 mEq/L. Ammonium excretion correlated with the increase in base excess. The acidosis origin seems to have a large influence on renal compensation in terms of ammonium excretion and the possibility of an overcorrection.

  9. Association Between State Medical Malpractice Environment and Postoperative Outcomes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Christina A; Sheils, Catherine R; Pavey, Emily; Chung, Jeanette W; Stulberg, Jonah J; Odell, David D; Yang, Anthony D; Bentrem, David J; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-03-01

    The US medical malpractice system assumes that the threat of liability should deter negligence, but it is unclear whether malpractice environment affects health care quality. We sought to explore the association between state malpractice environment and postoperative complication rates. This observational study included Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries undergoing one of the following operations in 2010: colorectal, lung, esophageal, or pancreatic resection, total knee arthroplasty, craniotomy, gastric bypass, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, coronary artery bypass grafting, or cystectomy. The state-specific malpractice environment was measured by 2010 medical malpractice insurance premiums, state average award size, paid malpractice claims/100 physicians, and a composite malpractice measure. Outcomes of interest included 30-day readmission, mortality, and postoperative complications (eg sepsis, myocardial infarction [MI], pneumonia). Using Medicare administrative claims data, associations between malpractice environment and postoperative outcomes were estimated using hierarchical logistic regression models with hospital random-intercepts. Measures of malpractice environment did not have significant, consistent associations with postoperative outcomes. No individual tort reform law was consistently associated with improved postoperative outcomes. Higher-risk state malpractice environment, based on the composite measure, was associated with higher likelihood of sepsis (odds ratio [OR] 1.22; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.39), MI (OR 1.14; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.23), pneumonia (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.16), acute renal failure (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.22), deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolism (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.13 to 1.32), and gastrointestinal bleed (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.30). Higher risk malpractice environments were not consistently associated with a lower likelihood of surgical postoperative complications, bringing into question the ability of malpractice lawsuits to

  10. Opioid exit plan: A pharmacist's role in managing acute postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genord, Cheryl; Frost, Timothy; Eid, Deeb

    The benefits of a pharmacist's involvement in medication reconciliation and discharge counseling are well documented in the literature as improving patient outcomes. In contrast, no studies have focused on the initiation of a pharmacist-led opioid exit plan (OEP) for acute postoperative pain management. This paper summarizes a pharmacist-led OEP practice model and the potential role that pharmacists and student pharmacists can have at the point of admission, during postoperative recovery, and on discharge in acute pain management patients. The pain management team at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, MI, has developed and implemented a pharmacist-led OEP to better manage acute postoperative pain in neurosurgery and orthopedic and colorectal surgery in an effort to ensure appropriate patient and provider education and understanding of pain management. OEP is a tool with the potential to expand the role of pharmacists in managing acute pain in postoperative patients at the point of admission, during the postoperative inpatient stay, and on discharge. Its benefits include medication reconciliation review and prescription drug-monitoring program search before admission, interdisciplinary rounds with the medical team to provide optimal inpatient postoperative pain management, clinical assessment of outpatient prescriptions with opioid discharge counseling, and medication evaluation of prescribed pain regimen and opioid discontinuation status at the post-discharge follow-up appointment. A hospital pain management team operating a pharmacist-led OEP can be key to guiding the appropriate prescribing practice of opioids and assisting with transitions of care on discharge. Further outcomes-based evaluations of the practice model are planned and encouraged to validate and improve the pharmacist-led OEP practice. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients on statins undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The efficacy of perioperative statin therapy in decreasing postoperative morbidity in patients undergoing valve replacements and repairs is unknown. The aim of our study was to determine whether or not the literature supports the hypothesis that statins decrease postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), and hence ...

  12. Effect of Body Mass Index on Postoperative Complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative stroke, postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) and intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) use were not associated with BMI. In linear regression analysis, significant correlations between low BMI, reintubation, ICU stay time and intubation time were found. Re-exploration for bleeding was significantly correlated with ...

  13. Factors associated with acute postoperative pain following breast reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita R. Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: This study identifies patients at risk for severe acute postoperative pain following breast reconstruction. These findings will allow plastic surgeons to better tailor postoperative care to improve patient comfort, reduce clinical morbidity, and enhance patient satisfaction with their surgical outcome.

  14. Diagnosis, prevention and management of postoperative pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Sj Singh; Kulshrestha, A

    2012-07-01

    Postoperative pulmonary edema is a well-known postoperative complication caused as a result of numerous etiological factors which can be easily detected by a careful surveillance during postoperative period. However, there are no preoperative and intraoperative criteria which can successfully establish the possibilities for development of postoperative pulmonary edema. The aims were to review the possible etiologic and diagnostic challenges in timely detection of postoperative pulmonary edema and to discuss the various management strategies for prevention of this postoperative complication so as to decrease morbidity and mortality. The various search engines for preparation of this manuscript were used which included Entrez (including Pubmed and Pubmed Central), NIH.gov, Medknow.com, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, Scopus, Science Direct, MedHelp.org, yahoo.com and google.com. Manual search was carried out and various text books and journals of anesthesia and critical care medicine were also searched. From the information gathered, it was observed that postoperative cardiogenic pulmonary edema in patients with serious cardiovascular diseases is most common followed by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema which can be due to fluid overload in the postoperative period or it can be negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE is an important clinical entity in immediate post-extubation period and occurs due to acute upper airway obstruction and creation of acute negative intrathoracic pressure. NPPE carries a good prognosis if promptly diagnosed and appropriately treated with or without mechanical ventilation.

  15. Postoperative complications and mortality after major gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobson, Triin; Karjagin, Juri; Vipp, Liisa

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The incidence of postoperative complications and death is low in the general population, but a subgroup of high-risk patients can be identified amongst whom adverse postoperative outcomes occur more frequently. The present study was undertaken to describe the incidence o...

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of routine postoperative body temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Hester; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Goossens, Astrid; Speelman, Peter; Legemate, Dink A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On surgical wards, body temperature is routinely measured, but there is no proof that this is useful for detecting postoperative infection. The aim of this study was to compare temperature measurements (the test) with the confirmed absence or presence of a postoperative infection (the

  17. Alternative therapy applications for postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiravalle, Paulette; McCaffrey, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The potential for postoperative nausea and vomiting is present in any patient who undergoes surgery and both are unpleasant and potentially dangerous consequences of surgery. Three types of complementary and alternative therapies that may help patients with postoperative nausea and vomiting include acupressure, acupuncture, and aromatherapy.

  18. Post-operative urinary retention in a general surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreijer, Bjørn; Møller, Morten H; Bartholdy, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Post-operative urine retention is a frequent and serious complication. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of post-operative urinary retention in a general surgical population and to identify the perioperative risk factors for developing this condition....

  19. Postoperative studies following ventral and dorsal cystotomy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was however no urine leakage into the peritoneal cavity following either of the approaches. The incision wounds were also seen to have healed by the fourteen postoperative day when the postmortem studies were carried out. KEY WORDS: Cystotomy, incisions, postoperative, adhesions, dogs. Nigerian Veterinary ...

  20. Postoperative ileus involves interleukin-1 receptor signaling in enteric glia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Burkhard; Hupa, Kristof Johannes; Snoek, Susanne A.; van Bree, Sjoerd; Stein, Kathy; Schwandt, Timo; Vilz, Tim O.; Lysson, Mariola; Veer, Cornelis Van't; Kummer, Markus P.; Hornung, Veit; Kalff, Joerg C.; de Jonge, Wouter J.; Wehner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a common consequence of abdominal surgery that increases the risk of postoperative complications and morbidity. We investigated the cellular mechanisms and immune responses involved in the pathogenesis of POI. We studied a mouse model of POI in which intestinal

  1. Post-operative Transient Hypoparathyroidism: Incidence and Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is limited data on the incidence and risk factors for developing postoperative hypoparathyroidism (POHP) in the South African setting. Objectives: This study aims to calculate the incidence of postoperative hypoparathyroidism in a South African tertiary setting, and to compare local risk factors for POHP to ...

  2. Effects of a thermal ceiling on postoperative hypothermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Eklund, A; Joachimsson, P O

    1985-01-01

    Moderate per- and postoperative hypothermia initiates an increased metabolism in the postoperative period. The subsequent demands on oxygen transport may be critical in poor risk patients. Nineteen healthy young women with moderate hypothermia after abdominal surgery were studied for 2 h...

  3. Induction behaviour and race and its association with postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have suggested that adult African patients have a lower incidence of postoperative nausea and ... patients in a South African hospital and their association with preoperative agitation and patient race. Methods: A ... Watcha behavioural scale was used to assess pre- and postoperative agitation. A Watcha ...

  4. Post-operative pain prevalence, predictors, management practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MWASHAMBWA

    developing countries however, the prevalence of post-operative pain is relatively very high and pain control strategies ... Keywords: post-operative pain, prevalence, predictors, pain management, satisfaction, Tanzania. Introduction ..... perception and patterns of cerebral activation during noxious heat stimulation in humans.

  5. Influence of intravenous opioid dose on postoperative ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Jeffrey F; Asgeirsson, Theodor; Senagore, Anthony J

    2011-07-01

    Intravenous opioids represent a major component in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI). However, the most appropriate measure and threshold to quantify the association between opioid dose (eg, average daily, cumulative, maximum daily) and POI remains unknown. To evaluate the relationship between opioid dose, POI, and length of stay (LOS) and identify the opioid measure that was most strongly associated with POI. Consecutive patients admitted to a community teaching hospital who underwent elective colorectal surgery by any technique with an enhanced-recovery protocol postoperatively were retrospectively identified. Patients were excluded if they received epidural analgesia, developed a major intraabdominal complication or medical complication, or had a prolonged workup prior to surgery. Intravenous opioid doses were quantified and converted to hydromorphone equivalents. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis was used to determine the dosing threshold for the opioid measure most associated with POI and define high versus low use of opioids. Risk factors for POI and prolonged LOS were determined through multivariate analysis. The incidence of POI in 279 patients was 8.6%. CART analysis identified a maximum daily intravenous hydromorphone dose of 2 mg or more as the opioid measure most associated with POI. Multivariate analysis revealed maximum daily hydromorphone dose of 2 mg or more (p = 0.034), open surgical technique (p = 0.045), and days of intravenous narcotic therapy (p = 0.003) as significant risk factors for POI. Variables associated with increased LOS were POI (p POI and prolonged LOS, particularly when the maximum hydromorphone dose per day exceeds 2 mg. Clinicians should consider alternative, nonopioid-based pain management options when this occurs.

  6. Effect of antibiotics on implant failure and postoperative infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafail, Arwa S; Alamri, Ahmed M; Spivakovsky, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Medline and hand search of the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, Clinical Oral Investigations, Clinical Oral Implants Research, European Journal of Oral Implantology, Implant Dentistry, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Oral Implantology, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Periodontology Medicina Oral, Patologa Oral y Cirugía Bucal, and Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontology. Search of the literature was made to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of antibiotics compared with a control group (not receiving antibiotics or receiving placebo. All articles selected from the electronic and manual searches were independently assessed by the first and second authors of this study, in accordance with the established inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently and in duplicate evaluated the quality of the included RCTs as part of the data extraction process. Four RCTs were included in the final review. These four RCTs grouped a total of 2063 implants and a total of 1002 patients. Antibiotic use significantly lowered the implant failure rate (P = 0.003), with an odds ratio of 0.331, implying that antibiotic treatment reduced the odds of failure by 66.9%. The number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one patient from having an implant failure was 48 (95% confidence interval 31-109). In contrast, antibiotic use did not significantly reduce the incidence of postoperative infection (P = 0.754). Based on the results of this meta-analysis, and pending further research in the field, it can be concluded that there is evidence in favour of systematic antibiotic use in patients receiving dental implants, since such treatment significantly reduces implant failure. In contrast, antibiotic use does not exert a

  7. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction; postoperative morbidity and mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Khan, K.I.; Vaseem, M.; Rana, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the surgical management, both definitive and palliative, in selected patients with biliary obstruction and to find out the postoperative morbidity and mortality in these patients. Duration of the study is two years conducted from June 2002 to May 2004. The study was carried out at. the surgical. unit 4 of the Combined Military Hospital and surgical department of the Military Hospital. Thirty eight cases of biliary obstruction were included. A convenient sampling technique was followed. Data analyzed by using SPSS version 10.0 for windows on computer. Descriptive statistics like frequency, percentage, average etc were computed for data presentation. Any inferential test-was not found to be applicable for this descriptive type case series. We selected 38 patients with features of extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Out of these (n 38) 15 patients (39.5%) suffered from benign diseases while those having malignant diseases were 23 (60.5%). 19 (50%) patients died within two years of follow up while 19 (50%) were the survivors. Mortality was maximum for the malignant cases. In benign cases only one patient died. Maximum deaths 6 (31.6%) occurred in the period of up to one month of operation. 20 patients had one or another complication of operation and hence the morbidity came out to be 52%. According to our results the mortality and morbidity related to extrahepatic biliary obstruction in our patients was higher compared to other studies which can only be reduced by early detection and treatment. (author)

  8. Postoperative radiation therapy for malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Inoue, Toshihiko; Chatani, Masashi; Hata, Kiyoshi; Taki, Takuyu; Nii, Yasuo; Nakagawa, Hidemitsu

    1987-01-01

    From December 1977 through September 1984, a total of 39 cases of malignant glioma were treated with radiation therapy (RT) postoperatively. Twenty-nine cases were classified into glioblastoma (GM) and 10 astrocytoma (AS) (low grade : 6 and anaplastic : 4) histologically. One third of cases received 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of whole brain RT. Another two thirds of cases underwent 60 Gy/30 FRX/6 WKS of whole brain or 50 Gy/25 FRX/5 WKS of