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Sample records for cap binding complex

  1. Specificity of recognition of mRNA 5' cap by human nuclear cap-binding complex.

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    Worch, Remigiusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Mazza, Catherine; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    The heterodimeric nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) binds to the mono-methylated 5' cap of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcripts such as mRNA and U snRNA. The binding is important for nuclear maturation of mRNAs and possibly in the first round of translation and nonsense-mediated decay. It is also essential for nuclear export of U snRNAs in metazoans. We report characterization by fluorescence spectroscopy of the recognition of 5' capped RNA by human CBC. The association constants (K(as)) for 17 mono- and dinucleotide cap analogs as well as for the oligomer m7GpppA(m2') pU(m2')pA(m2') cover the range from 1.8 x 10(6) M(-1) to 2.3 x 10(8) M(-1). Higher affinity for CBC is observed for the dinucleotide compared with mononucleotide analogs, especially for those containing a purine nucleoside next to m7G. The mRNA tetramer associates with CBC as tightly as the dinucleotide analogs. Replacement of Tyr138 by alanine in the CBP20 subunit of CBC reduces the cap affinity except for the mononucleotide analogs, consistent with the crystallographic observation of the second base stacking on this residue. Our spectroscopic studies showed that contrary to the other known cap-binding proteins, the first two nucleotides of a capped-RNA are indispensable for its specific recognition by CBC. Differences in the cap binding of CBC compared with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) are analyzed and discussed regarding replacement of CBC by eIF4E.

  2. Diverse role of three tyrosines in binding of the RNA 5' cap to the human nuclear cap binding complex.

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    Worch, Remigiusz; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Mazza, Catherine; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2009-01-16

    The heterodimeric nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) specifically recognizes the monomethylguanosine 5' cap structure of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcripts such as mRNA and U snRNA. The binding is essential for nuclear maturation of mRNA, for nuclear export of U snRNA in metazoans, and for nonsense-mediated decay of mRNA and the pioneer round of translation. We analysed the recognition of the cap by native human CBC and mutants in which each tyrosine that stacks with the 7-methylguanosine moiety was replaced by phenylalanine or alanine and both tyrosines were replaced by phenylalanines. The equilibrium association constants (K(as)) for two selected cap analogues, P(1)-7-methylguanosine-5' P(3)-guanosine-5' triphosphate and 7-methylguanosine triphosphate, were determined by two independent methods, fluorescence titration and surface plasmon resonance. We could distinguish two tyrosines, Y43 and Y20, in stabilization of the cap inside the CBC-binding pocket. In particular, lack of Y20 in CBC leads to a greater affinity of the mono- than the dinucleotide cap analogue, in contrast to the wild-type protein. A crucial role of cation-pi stacking in the mechanism of the specific cap recognition by CBC was postulated from the comparison of the experimentally derived Gibbs free binding energy (DeltaG degrees) with the stacking energy (DeltaE) of the 7-methylguanosine/Y binary and ternary complexes calculated by the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation method. The resulting kinetic model of the association between the capped RNA and CBC, based on the experimental data and quantum calculations, is discussed with respect to the "CBC-to-eukaryotic initiation factor 4E handoff" of mRNA.

  3. Novel way of capping mRNA trimer and studies of its interaction with human nuclear cap-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Remigiusz; Stepinski, Janusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Mazza, Catherine; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Binding of mRNA 5' cap by the nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) is crucial for a wide variety of mRNA metabolic events. The interaction involving the CBP20 subunit of CBC is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and by stacking of the tyrosine sidechains with two first bases of the capped mRNA. To examine a possible role of a longer mRNA chain in the CBC-cap recognition, we have synthesized an mRNA tetramer using a novel way of capping an RNA trimer and determined its affinity for CBC by fluorescence titration.

  4. Significance of the first transcribed nucleoside of capped RNA for ligand-induced folding of the cap-binding complex

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    Worch, Remigiusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Mazza, Catherine; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2005-05-01

    Many proteins, including those that bind RNA, change conformation upon binding a ligand, a phenomenon known as induced fit. CBP20, the small subunit of the nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), recognizes specifically the 5' cap of eukaryotic mRNA and snRNA. The N- and C-terminal regions of the CBP20 subunit of the human nuclear cap-binding complex only acquire a proper fold in complex with capped RNA. The cap is composed of 7-methylguanosine linked by a 5'-to-5' triphosphate bridge to the first transcribed nucleoside of the RNA. The significance of the latter for the capped RNA-CBC association and local folding of CBC has been characterized by emission spectroscopy. Fluorescence titration of CBC has been performed for three selected, mono- and dinucleotide mRNA 5' cap analogues. The measured values of the equilibrium association constant and the corresponding Gibbs free energy depend on the type of the first transcribed nucleoside (purine or pyrimidine), and decrease ~10-fold in the case of a mononucleotide analogue, 7-methylguanosine triphosphate. However, the total quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence is similar for each analogue. Changes of the solvent-accessible CBC hydrophobic surface of CBC on binding of the structurally different cap analogues have been followed using bis-ANS fluorescent probe.

  5. The Nuclear Cap-Binding Complex Mediates Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA

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    Decker, Logan M.; Xiao, Hua; Boone, Erin C.; Vierling, Michael M.; Shanker, Benjamin S.; Kingston, Shanika L.; Boone, Shannon F.; Haynes, Jackson B.; Shiu, Patrick K.T.

    2017-01-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cross walls between individual cells are normally incomplete, making the entire fungal network vulnerable to attack by viruses and selfish DNAs. Accordingly, several genome surveillance mechanisms are maintained to help the fungus combat these repetitive elements. One of these defense mechanisms is called meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD), which identifies and silences unpaired genes during meiosis. Utilizing common RNA interference (RNAi) proteins, such as Dicer and Argonaute, MSUD targets mRNAs homologous to the unpaired sequence to achieve silencing. In this study, we have identified an additional silencing component, namely the cap-binding complex (CBC). Made up of cap-binding proteins CBP20 and CBP80, CBC associates with the 5′ cap of mRNA transcripts in eukaryotes. The loss of CBC leads to a deficiency in MSUD activity, suggesting its role in mediating silencing. As confirmed in this study, CBC is predominantly nuclear, although it is known to travel in and out of the nucleus to facilitate RNA transport. As seen in animals but not in plants, CBP20’s robust nuclear import depends on CBP80 in Neurospora. CBC interacts with a component (Argonaute) of the perinuclear meiotic silencing complex (MSC), directly linking the two cellular factors. PMID:28179391

  6. The Nuclear Cap-Binding Complex Mediates Meiotic Silencing by Unpaired DNA

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    Logan M. Decker

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cross walls between individual cells are normally incomplete, making the entire fungal network vulnerable to attack by viruses and selfish DNAs. Accordingly, several genome surveillance mechanisms are maintained to help the fungus combat these repetitive elements. One of these defense mechanisms is called meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD, which identifies and silences unpaired genes during meiosis. Utilizing common RNA interference (RNAi proteins, such as Dicer and Argonaute, MSUD targets mRNAs homologous to the unpaired sequence to achieve silencing. In this study, we have identified an additional silencing component, namely the cap-binding complex (CBC. Made up of cap-binding proteins CBP20 and CBP80, CBC associates with the 5′ cap of mRNA transcripts in eukaryotes. The loss of CBC leads to a deficiency in MSUD activity, suggesting its role in mediating silencing. As confirmed in this study, CBC is predominantly nuclear, although it is known to travel in and out of the nucleus to facilitate RNA transport. As seen in animals but not in plants, CBP20’s robust nuclear import depends on CBP80 in Neurospora. CBC interacts with a component (Argonaute of the perinuclear meiotic silencing complex (MSC, directly linking the two cellular factors.

  7. HIV-1 Gag Blocks Selenite-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Altering the mRNA Cap-Binding Complex

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    Alessandro Cinti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are dynamic accumulations of stalled preinitiation complexes and translational machinery that assemble under stressful conditions. Sodium selenite (Se induces the assembly of noncanonical type II SGs that differ in morphology, composition, and mechanism of assembly from canonical SGs. Se inhibits translation initiation by altering the cap-binding activity of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1. In this work, we show that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Gag is able to block the assembly of type II noncanonical SGs to facilitate continued Gag protein synthesis. We demonstrate that expression of Gag reduces the amount of hypophosphorylated 4EBP1 associated with the 5′ cap potentially through an interaction with its target, eIF4E. These results suggest that the assembly of SGs is an important host antiviral defense that HIV-1 has evolved for inhibition through several distinct mechanisms.

  8. The human cap-binding complex is functionally connected to the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing; Domanski, Michal; Kristiansen, Maiken S

    2013-01-01

    of combinatorial depletion of CBCN and exosome components underscore the functional relevance of CBC-exosome bridging at the level of target RNA. Specifically, CBCA suppresses read-through products of several RNA families by promoting their transcriptional termination. We suggest that the RNP 5' cap links...

  9. The virion host shutoff endonuclease (UL41) of herpes simplex virus interacts with the cellular cap-binding complex eIF4F.

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    Page, Heidi G; Read, G Sullivan

    2010-07-01

    The herpes simplex virus Vhs endonuclease degrades host and viral mRNAs. Isolated Vhs cuts any RNA at many sites. Yet, within cells, it targets mRNAs and cuts at preferred sites, including regions of translation initiation. Previous studies have shown that Vhs binds the translation factors eIF4A and eIF4H. Here, we show that Vhs binds the cap-binding complex eIF4F. Association with eIF4F correlated with the ability of Vhs to bind eIF4A but not eIF4H. All Vhs proteins that degrade mRNAs associated with eIF4F. However, simply tethering an active endonuclease to eIF4F is not sufficient to degrade mRNAs. Binding to eIF4H may also be required.

  10. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

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    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis.

  11. Molecular recognition of mRNA 5' cap by 3' poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) differs from interactions known for other cap-binding proteins.

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    Niedzwiecka, Anna; Nilsson, Per; Worch, Remigiusz; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Virtanen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    The mRNA 5' cap structure plays a pivotal role in coordination of eukaryotic translation and mRNA degradation. Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) is a dimeric exoribonuclease that efficiently degrades mRNA 3' poly(A) tails while also simultaneously interacting with the mRNA 5' cap. The cap binding amplifies the processivity of PARN action. We used surface plasmon resonance kinetic analysis, quantitative equilibrium fluorescence titrations and circular dichroism to study the cap binding properties of PARN. The molecular mechanism of 5' cap recognition by PARN has been demonstrated to differ from interactions seen for other known cap-binding proteins in that: i) the auxiliary biological function of 5' cap binding by the 3' degrading enzyme is accomplished by negative cooperativity of PARN dimer subunits; ii) non-coulombic interactions are major factors in the complex formation; and iii) PARN has versatile activity toward alternative forms of the cap. These characteristics contribute to stabilization of the PARN-cap complex needed for the deadenylation processivity. Our studies provide a consistent biophysical basis for elucidation of the processive mechanism of PARN-mediated 3' mRNA deadenylation and provide a new framework to interpret the role of the 5' cap in mRNA degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Genome-Wide Mapping of Uncapped and Cleaved Transcripts Reveals a Role for the Nuclear mRNA Cap-Binding Complex in Cotranslational RNA Decay in Arabidopsis[OPEN

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    Willmann, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA turnover is necessary for controlling proper mRNA levels posttranscriptionally. In general, RNA degradation is via exoribonucleases that degrade RNA either from the 5′ end to the 3′ end, such as XRN4, or in the opposite direction by the multisubunit exosome complex. Here, we use genome-wide mapping of uncapped and cleaved transcripts to reveal the global landscape of cotranslational mRNA decay in the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome. We found that this process leaves a clear three nucleotide periodicity in open reading frames. This pattern of cotranslational degradation is especially evident near the ends of open reading frames, where we observe accumulation of cleavage events focused 16 to 17 nucleotides upstream of the stop codon because of ribosomal pausing during translation termination. Following treatment of Arabidopsis plants with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide, cleavage events accumulate 13 to 14 nucleotides upstream of the start codon where initiating ribosomes have been stalled with these sequences in their P site. Further analysis in xrn4 mutant plants indicates that cotranslational RNA decay is XRN4 dependent. Additionally, studies in plants lacking CAP BINDING PROTEIN80/ABA HYPERSENSITIVE1, the largest subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap binding complex, reveal a role for this protein in cotranslational decay. In total, our results demonstrate the global prevalence and features of cotranslational RNA decay in a plant transcriptome. PMID:27758893

  13. Analysis of Cap-binding Proteins in Human Cells Exposed to Physiological Oxygen Conditions.

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    Timpano, Sara; Melanson, Gaelan; Evagelou, Sonia L; Guild, Brianna D; Specker, Erin J; Uniacke, James

    2016-12-28

    Translational control is a focal point of gene regulation, especially during periods of cellular stress. Cap-dependent translation via the eIF4F complex is by far the most common pathway to initiate protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, but stress-specific variations of this complex are now emerging. Purifying cap-binding proteins with an affinity resin composed of Agarose-linked m(7)GTP (a 5' mRNA cap analog) is a useful tool to identify factors involved in the regulation of translation initiation. Hypoxia (low oxygen) is a cellular stress encountered during fetal development and tumor progression, and is highly dependent on translation regulation. Furthermore, it was recently reported that human adult organs have a lower oxygen content (physioxia 1-9% oxygen) that is closer to hypoxia than the ambient air where cells are routinely cultured. With the ongoing characterization of a hypoxic eIF4F complex (eIF4F(H)), there is increasing interest in understanding oxygen-dependent translation initiation through the 5' mRNA cap. We have recently developed a human cell culture method to analyze cap-binding proteins that are regulated by oxygen availability. This protocol emphasizes that cell culture and lysis be performed in a hypoxia workstation to eliminate exposure to oxygen. Cells must be incubated for at least 24 hr for the liquid media to equilibrate with the atmosphere within the workstation. To avoid this limitation, pre-conditioned media (de-oxygenated) can be added to cells if shorter time points are required. Certain cap-binding proteins require interactions with a second base or can hydrolyze the m(7)GTP, therefore some cap interactors may be missed in the purification process. Agarose-linked to enzymatically resistant cap analogs may be substituted in this protocol. This method allows the user to identify novel oxygen-regulated translation factors involved in cap-dependent translation.

  14. Reconstitution and dissection of the 600-kDa Srv2/CAP complex: roles for oligomerization and cofilin-actin binding in driving actin turnover.

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    Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Jonasson, Erin M; Bertling, Enni; Talarico, Lou; Chaudhry, Faisal; Sihvo, Maarit; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2009-04-17

    Srv2/cyclase-associated protein is expressed in virtually all plant, animal, and fungal organisms and has a conserved role in promoting actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-mediated actin turnover. This is achieved by the abilities of Srv2 to recycle cofilin from ADP-actin monomers and to promote nucleotide exchange (ATP for ADP) on actin monomers. Despite this important and universal role in facilitating actin turnover, the mechanism underlying Srv2 function has remained elusive. Previous studies have demonstrated a critical functional role for the G-actin-binding C-terminal half of Srv2. Here we describe an equally important role in vivo for the N-terminal half of Srv2 in driving actin turnover. We pinpoint this activity to a conserved patch of surface residues on the N-terminal dimeric helical folded domain of Srv2, and we show that this functional site interacts with cofilin-actin complexes. Furthermore, we show that this site is essential for Srv2 acceleration of cofilin-mediated actin turnover in vitro. A cognate Srv2-binding site is identified on a conserved surface of cofilin, suggesting that this function likely extends to other organisms. In addition, our analyses reveal that higher order oligomerization of Srv2 depends on its N-terminal predicted coiled coil domain and that oligomerization optimizes Srv2 function in vitro and in vivo. Based on these data, we present a revised model for the mechanism by which Srv2 promotes actin turnover, in which coordinated activities of its N- and C-terminal halves catalyze sequential steps in recycling cofilin and actin monomers.

  15. Secretory vesicle priming by CAPS is independent of its SNARE-binding MUN domain.

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    Nguyen Truong, Cuc Quynh; Nestvogel, Dennis; Ratai, Olga; Schirra, Claudia; Stevens, David R; Brose, Nils; Rhee, JeongSeop; Rettig, Jens

    2014-11-06

    Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca(2+)-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS) also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs prime vesicles through the same mechanism as Munc13s. We studied naturally occurring splice variants of CAPS2 in CAPS1/CAPS2-deficient cells and found that CAPS2 primes vesicles independently of its MUN domain. Instead, the pleckstrin homology domain of CAPS2 seemingly is essential for its priming function. Our findings indicate a priming mode for secretory vesicles. This process apparently requires membrane phospholipids, does not involve the binding or direct conformational regulation of syntaxin by MUN domains of CAPSs, and is therefore not redundant with Munc13 action.

  16. Secretory Vesicle Priming by CAPS Is Independent of Its SNARE-Binding MUN Domain

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    Cuc Quynh Nguyen Truong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca2+-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs prime vesicles through the same mechanism as Munc13s. We studied naturally occurring splice variants of CAPS2 in CAPS1/CAPS2-deficient cells and found that CAPS2 primes vesicles independently of its MUN domain. Instead, the pleckstrin homology domain of CAPS2 seemingly is essential for its priming function. Our findings indicate a priming mode for secretory vesicles. This process apparently requires membrane phospholipids, does not involve the binding or direct conformational regulation of syntaxin by MUN domains of CAPSs, and is therefore not redundant with Munc13 action.

  17. Identification of gemin5 as a novel 7-methylguanosine cap-binding protein.

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    Shelton S Bradrick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A unique attribute of RNA molecules synthesized by RNA polymerase II is the presence of a 7-methylguanosine (m(7G cap structure added co-transcriptionally to the 5' end. Through its association with trans-acting effector proteins, the m(7G cap participates in multiple aspects of RNA metabolism including localization, translation and decay. However, at present relatively few eukaryotic proteins have been identified as factors capable of direct association with m(7G. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Employing an unbiased proteomic approach, we identified gemin5, a component of the survival of motor neuron (SMN complex, as a factor capable of direct and specific interaction with the m(7G cap. Gemin5 was readily purified by cap-affinity chromatography in contrast to other SMN complex proteins. Investigating the underlying basis for this observation, we found that purified gemin5 associates with m(7G-linked sepharose in the absence of detectable eIF4E, and specifically crosslinks to radiolabeled cap structure after UV irradiation. Deletion analysis revealed that an intact set of WD repeat domains located in the N-terminal half of gemin5 are required for cap-binding. Moreover, using structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified two proximal aromatic residues located within the WD repeat region that significantly impact m(7G association. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study rigorously identifies gemin5 as a novel cap-binding protein and describes an unprecedented role for WD repeat domains in m(7G recognition. The findings presented here will facilitate understanding of gemin5's role in the metabolism of non-coding snRNAs and perhaps other RNA pol II transcripts.

  18. Analysis of the function of the 70-kilodalton cyclase-associated protein (CAP) by using mutants of yeast adenylyl cyclase defective in CAP binding.

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    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T

    1993-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase forms a complex with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP). By in vitro mutagenesis, we assigned a CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase to a small segment near its C terminus and created mutants which lost the ability to bind CAP. CAP binding was assessed first by observing the ability of the overproduced C-terminal 150 residues of adenylyl cyclase to sequester CAP, thereby suppressing the heat shock sensitivity of yeast cells bearing the activated RAS2 gene (RAS2Val-19), and then by immunoprecipitability of adenylyl cyclase activity with anti-CAP antibody and by direct measurement of the amount of CAP bound. Yeast cells whose chromosomal adenylyl cyclase genes were replaced by the CAP-nonbinding mutants possessed adenylyl cyclase activity fully responsive to RAS2 protein in vitro. However, they did not exhibit sensitivity to heat shock in the RAS2Val-19 background. When glucose-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was measured in these mutants carrying RAS2Val-19, a rapid transient rise indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells was observed and a high peak level and following persistent elevation of the cAMP concentration characteristic of RAS2Val-19 were abolished. In contrast, in the wild-type RAS2 background, similar cyclase gene replacement did not affect the glucose-induced cAMP response. These results suggest that the association with CAP, although not involved in the in vivo response to the wild-type RAS2 protein, is somehow required for the exaggerated response of adenylyl cyclase to activated RAS2.

  19. Secretory vesicle priming by CAPS is independent of the SNARE-bind MUN domain

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    Cuc Quynh Nguyen Truong; Dennis Nestvogel; Olga Ratai; Claudia Schirra; David R. Stevens; Nils Brose; JeongSeop Rhee; Jens Rettig

    2014-01-01

    Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca2+-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS) also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs pri...

  20. Kinetic analyses of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to mRNA cap analogues.

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    Khan, Mateen A; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-08-08

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factors was previously shown to interact with m(7)G cap and play an important role in the regulation of translation initiation of protein synthesis. To gain further insight into the phosphorylation process of plant protein synthesis, the kinetics of phosphorylated wheat eIFiso4E binding to m(7)G cap analogues were examined. Phosphorylation of wheat eIFiso4E showed similar kinetic effects to human eIF4E binding to m(7)-G cap. Phosphorylation of eIFiso4E decreased the kinetic rate (2-fold) and increased the dissociation rate (2-fold) as compared to non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to both mono- and di-nucleotide analogues at 22°C. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E-m(7)G cap binding rates were found to be independent of concentration, suggesting conformational changes were rate limiting. Rate constant for phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E binding to m(7)-G cap increased with temperature. Phosphorylation of eIFiso4E decreased (2-fold) the activation energy for both m(7)-G cap analogues binding as compared to non-phosphorylated eIFiso4E. The reduced energy barrier for the formation of eIFiso4E-m(7)-G cap complex suggests a more stable platform for further initiation complex formation and possible means of adapting variety of environmental conditions. Furthermore, the formation of phosphorylated eIFiso4E-cap complex may contribute to modulation of the initiation of protein synthesis in plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

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    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  2. Structural changes of eIF4E upon binding to the mRNA 5' monomethylguanosine and trimethylguanosine Cap.

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    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Stepinski, Janusz; Dadlez, Michal; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Stolarski, Ryszard; Niedzwiecka, Anna

    2008-03-04

    Recognition of the 5' cap by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is the rate-limiting step in the ribosome recruitment to mRNAs. The regular cap consists of 7-monomethylguanosine (MMG) linked by a 5'-5' triphosphate bridge to the first transcribed nucleoside, while some primitive eukaryotes possess a N (2), N (2),7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap structure as a result of trans splicing. Mammalian eIF4E is highly specific to the MMG form of the cap in terms of association constants and thermodynamic driving force. We have investigated conformational changes of eIF4E induced by interaction with two cap analogues, 7-methyl-GTP and N (2), N (2),7-trimethyl-GTP. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electrospray mass spectrometry were applied to probe local dynamics of murine eIF4E in the apo and cap-bound forms. The data show that the cap binding induces long-range conformational changes in the protein, not only in the cap-binding pocket but also in a distant region of the 4E-BP/eIF4G binding site. Formation of the complex with 7-methyl-GTP makes the eIF4E structure more compact, while binding of N (2), N (2),7-trimethyl-GTP leads to higher solvent accessibility of the protein backbone in comparison with the apo form. The results suggest that the additional double methylation at the N (2)-amino group of the cap causes sterical effects upon binding to mammalian eIF4E which influence the overall solution dynamics of the protein, thus precluding formation of a tight complex.

  3. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17. cap alpha. -methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

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    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10/sup -10/M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 ..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  4. Analysis of RNA binding by the dengue virus NS5 RNA capping enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney R Henderson

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are small, capped positive sense RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Dengue virus and other related flaviviruses have evolved RNA capping enzymes to form the viral RNA cap structure that protects the viral genome and directs efficient viral polyprotein translation. The N-terminal domain of NS5 possesses the methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase activities necessary for forming mature RNA cap structures. The mechanism for flavivirus guanylyltransferase activity is currently unknown, and how the capping enzyme binds its diphosphorylated RNA substrate is important for deciphering how the flavivirus guanylyltransferase functions. In this report we examine how flavivirus NS5 N-terminal capping enzymes bind to the 5' end of the viral RNA using a fluorescence polarization-based RNA binding assay. We observed that the K(D for RNA binding is approximately 200 nM Dengue, Yellow Fever, and West Nile virus capping enzymes. Removal of one or both of the 5' phosphates reduces binding affinity, indicating that the terminal phosphates contribute significantly to binding. RNA binding affinity is negatively affected by the presence of GTP or ATP and positively affected by S-adensyl methoninine (SAM. Structural superpositioning of the dengue virus capping enzyme with the Vaccinia virus VP39 protein bound to RNA suggests how the flavivirus capping enzyme may bind RNA, and mutagenesis analysis of residues in the putative RNA binding site demonstrate that several basic residues are critical for RNA binding. Several mutants show differential binding to 5' di-, mono-, and un-phosphorylated RNAs. The mode of RNA binding appears similar to that found with other methyltransferase enzymes, and a discussion of diphosphorylated RNA binding is presented.

  5. Human Cells Cultured under Physiological Oxygen Utilize Two Cap-binding Proteins to recruit Distinct mRNAs for Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpano, Sara; Uniacke, James

    2016-05-13

    Translation initiation is a focal point of translational control and requires the binding of eIF4E to the 5' cap of mRNA. Under conditions of extreme oxygen depletion (hypoxia), human cells repress eIF4E and switch to an alternative cap-dependent translation mediated by a homolog of eIF4E, eIF4E2. This homolog forms a complex with the oxygen-regulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α and can escape translation repression. This complex mediates cap-dependent translation under cell culture conditions of 1% oxygen (to mimic tumor microenvironments), whereas eIF4E mediates cap-dependent translation at 21% oxygen (ambient air). However, emerging evidence suggests that culturing cells in ambient air, or "normoxia," is far from physiological or "normal." In fact, oxygen in human tissues ranges from 1-11% or "physioxia." Here we show that two distinct modes of cap-dependent translation initiation are active during physioxia and act on separate pools of mRNAs. The oxygen-dependent activities of eIF4E and eIF4E2 are elucidated by observing their polysome association and the status of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (eIF4E-dependent) or hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression (eIF4E2-dependent). We have identified oxygen conditions where eIF4E is the dominant cap-binding protein (21% normoxia or standard cell culture conditions), where eIF4E2 is the dominant cap-binding protein (1% hypoxia or ischemic diseases and cancerous tumors), and where both cap-binding proteins act simultaneously to initiate the translation of distinct mRNAs (1-11% physioxia or during development and stem cell differentiation). These data suggest that the physioxic proteome is generated by initiating translation of mRNAs via two distinct but complementary cap-binding proteins.

  6. Condensin II Regulates Interphase Chromatin Organization Through the Mrg-Binding Motif of Cap-H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Heather A; Klebba, Joseph E; Kusch, Thomas; Rogers, Gregory C; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-03-09

    The spatial organization of the genome within the eukaryotic nucleus is a dynamic process that plays a central role in cellular processes such as gene expression, DNA replication, and chromosome segregation. Condensins are conserved multi-subunit protein complexes that contribute to chromosome organization by regulating chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that the Cap-H2 subunit of condensin II physically and genetically interacts with the Drosophila homolog of human MORF4-related gene on chromosome 15 (MRG15). Like Cap-H2, Mrg15 is required for interphase chromosome compaction and homolog pairing. However, the mechanism by which Mrg15 and Cap-H2 cooperate to maintain interphase chromatin organization remains unclear. Here, we show that Cap-H2 localizes to interband regions on polytene chromosomes and co-localizes with Mrg15 at regions of active transcription across the genome. We show that co-localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes is partially dependent on Mrg15. We have identified a binding motif within Cap-H2 that is essential for its interaction with Mrg15, and have found that mutation of this motif results in loss of localization of Cap-H2 on polytene chromosomes and results in partial suppression of Cap-H2-mediated compaction and homolog unpairing. Our data are consistent with a model in which Mrg15 acts as a loading factor to facilitate Cap-H2 binding to chromatin and mediate changes in chromatin organization. Copyright © 2015 Wallace et al.

  7. Synthesis, capping and binding of colloidal gold nanoparticles to proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Huyen La, Thi; Hoa Vu, Xuan; Chu, Viet Ha; Hai Nguyen, Thanh; Huan Le, Quang; Fort, Emmanuel; Hoa Do, Quang; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2010-06-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a stabilizing agent and biofunctionalized layer for water-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized from metal precursor HAuCl4. The BSA binding to gold NPs was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by transmission electron microscopy, UV-VIS and FTIR spectrophotometers. HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) specific phage antibodies were attached to BSA stabilized gold NPs to form a gold-antibody complex. An ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test was done to confirm the bioactivity of antibodies attached to gold NPs.

  8. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  9. Weak binding affinity of human 4EHP for mRNA cap analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberek, Joanna; Kubacka, Dorota; Jablonowska, Agnieszka; Jemielity, Jacek; Stepinski, Janusz; Sonenberg, Nahum; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2007-05-01

    Ribosome recruitment to the majority of eukaryotic mRNAs is facilitated by the interaction of the cap binding protein, eIF4E, with the mRNA 5' cap structure. eIF4E stimulates translation through its interaction with a scaffolding protein, eIF4G, which helps to recruit the ribosome. Metazoans also contain a homolog of eIF4E, termed 4EHP, which binds the cap structure, but not eIF4G, and thus cannot stimulate translation, but it instead inhibits the translation of only one known, and possibly subset mRNAs. To understand why 4EHP does not inhibit general translation, we studied the binding affinity of 4EHP for cap analogs using two methods: fluorescence titration and stopped-flow measurements. We show that 4EHP binds cap analogs m(7)GpppG and m(7)GTP with 30 and 100 lower affinity than eIF4E. Thus, 4EHP cannot compete with eIF4E for binding to the cap structure of most mRNAs.

  10. Structural basis for nematode eIF4E binding an m(2,2,7)G-Cap and its implications for translation initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhi; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Piecyk, Karolina; Dickson, Laura; Wallace, Adam; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Kieft, Jeffrey; Zhao, Rui; Jones, David N M; Davis, Richard E

    2011-11-01

    Metazoan spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing generates mRNAs with an m(2,2,7)G-cap and a common downstream SL RNA sequence. The mechanism for eIF4E binding an m²²⁷G-cap is unknown. Here, we describe the first structure of an eIF4E with an m(2,2,7)G-cap and compare it to the cognate m⁷G-eIF4E complex. These structures and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) data indicate that the nematode Ascaris suum eIF4E binds the two different caps in a similar manner except for the loss of a single hydrogen bond on binding the m(2,2,7)G-cap. Nematode and mammalian eIF4E both have a low affinity for m(2,2,7)G-cap compared with the m⁷G-cap. Nematode eIF4E binding to the m⁷G-cap, m(2,2,7)G-cap and the m(2,2,7)G-SL 22-nt RNA leads to distinct eIF4E conformational changes. Additional interactions occur between Ascaris eIF4E and the SL on binding the m(2,2,7)G-SL. We propose interactions between Ascaris eIF4E and the SL impact eIF4G and contribute to translation initiation, whereas these interactions do not occur when only the m(2,2,7)G-cap is present. These data have implications for the contribution of 5'-UTRs in mRNA translation and the function of different eIF4E isoforms.

  11. Structural insights into parasite eIF4E binding specificity for m7G and m2,2,7G mRNA caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhi; Zhao, Rui; McFarland, Craig; Kieft, Jeffrey; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Jones, David N M; Davis, Richard E

    2009-11-06

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E recognizes the mRNA cap, a key step in translation initiation. Here we have characterized eIF4E from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. Schistosome mRNAs have either the typical monomethylguanosine (m(7)G) or a trimethylguanosine (m(2,2,7)G) cap derived from spliced leader trans-splicing. Quantitative fluorescence titration analyses demonstrated that schistosome eIF4E has similar binding specificity for both caps. We present the first crystal structure of an eIF4E with similar binding specificity for m(7)G and m(2,2,7)G caps. The eIF4E.m(7)GpppG structure demonstrates that the schistosome protein binds monomethyl cap in a manner similar to that of single specificity eIF4Es and exhibits a structure similar to other known eIF4Es. The structure suggests an alternate orientation of a conserved, key Glu-90 in the cap-binding pocket that may contribute to dual binding specificity and a position for mRNA bound to eIF4E consistent with biochemical data. Comparison of NMR chemical shift perturbations in schistosome eIF4E on binding m(7)GpppG and m(2,2,7)GpppG identified key differences between the two complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated significant thermodynamics differences for the binding process with the two caps (m(7)G versus m(2,2,7)G). Overall the NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry data suggest the importance of intrinsic conformational flexibility in the schistosome eIF4E that enables binding to m(2,2,7)G cap.

  12. Formation of STIM and Orai complexes: puncta and distal caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Valarie A; Bernot, Kelsie M; Shaffer, Meredith H; Burkhardt, Janis K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2009-09-01

    In the last few years, great progress has been made in understanding how stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), a protein containing a calcium sensor that is located in the endoplasmic reticulum, and Orai1, a protein that forms a calcium channel in the plasma membrane, interact and give rise to store-operated calcium entry. Pharmacological depletion of calcium stores leads to the formation of clusters containing STIM and Orai that appear to be sites for calcium influx. Similar puncta are also produced in response to physiological stimuli in immune cells. In T cells engaged with antigen-presenting cells, clusters containing STIM and Orai accumulate at the immunological synapse. We recently discovered that in activated T cells, STIM1 and Orai1 also accumulate in cap-like structures opposite the immune synapse at the distal pole of the cell. Both caps and puncta are long-lived stable structures containing STIM1 and Orai1 in close proximity. The function of puncta as sites of calcium influx is clear. We speculate that the caps may provide a secondary site of calcium entry. Alternatively, they may serve as a source of preformed channel complexes that move to new immune synapses as T cells repeatedly engage antigen-presenting cells.

  13. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) binds the mRNA cap, blocking eIF4F assembly on TOP mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Roni M; Fonseca, Bruno D; Ciotti, Gabrielle E; Al-Ashtal, Hiba A; Jia, Jian-Jun; Niklaus, Marius R; Blagden, Sarah P; Alain, Tommy; Berman, Andrea J

    2017-04-07

    The 5'terminal oligopyrimidine (5'TOP) motif is a cis-regulatory RNA element located immediately downstream of the 7-methylguanosine [m(7)G] cap of TOP mRNAs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. In eukaryotes, this motif coordinates the synchronous and stoichiometric expression of the protein components of the translation machinery. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) binds TOP mRNAs, regulating their stability and translation. We present crystal structures of the human LARP1 DM15 region in complex with a 5'TOP motif, a cap analog (m(7)GTP), and a capped cytidine (m(7)GpppC), resolved to 2.6, 1.8 and 1.7 Å, respectively. Our binding, competition, and immunoprecipitation data corroborate and elaborate on the mechanism of 5'TOP motif binding by LARP1. We show that LARP1 directly binds the cap and adjacent 5'TOP motif of TOP mRNAs, effectively impeding access of eIF4E to the cap and preventing eIF4F assembly. Thus, LARP1 is a specialized TOP mRNA cap-binding protein that controls ribosome biogenesis.

  14. eIF4F-like complexes formed by cap-binding homolog TbEIF4E5 with TbEIF4G1 or TbEIF4G2 are implicated in post-transcriptional regulation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Eden R; Vashisht, Ajay A; Malvezzi, Amaranta M; Zuberek, Joanna; Langousis, Gerasimos; Saada, Edwin A; Nascimento, Janaína De F; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Hill, Kent; De Melo Neto, Osvaldo P; Wohlschlegel, James A; Sturm, Nancy R; Campbell, David A

    2014-08-01

    Members of the eIF4E mRNA cap-binding family are involved in translation and the modulation of transcript availability in other systems as part of a three-component complex including eIF4G and eIF4A. The kinetoplastids possess four described eIF4E and five eIF4G homologs. We have identified two new eIF4E family proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, and define distinct complexes associated with the fifth member, TbEIF4E5. The cytosolic TbEIF4E5 protein binds cap 0 in vitro. TbEIF4E5 was found in association with two of the five TbEIF4Gs. TbIF4EG1 bound TbEIF4E5, a 47.5-kDa protein with two RNA-binding domains, and either the regulatory protein 14-3-3 II or a 117.5-kDa protein with guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase domains in a potentially dynamic interaction. The TbEIF4G2/TbEIF4E5 complex was associated with a 17.9-kDa hypothetical protein and both 14-3-3 variants I and II. Knockdown of TbEIF4E5 resulted in the loss of productive cell movement, as evidenced by the inability of the cells to remain in suspension in liquid culture and the loss of social motility on semisolid plating medium, as well as a minor reduction of translation. Cells appeared lethargic, as opposed to compromised in flagellar function per se. The minimal use of transcriptional control in kinetoplastids requires these organisms to implement downstream mechanisms to regulate gene expression, and the TbEIF4E5/TbEIF4G1/117.5-kDa complex in particular may be a key player in that process. We suggest that a pathway involved in cell motility is affected, directly or indirectly, by one of the TbEIF4E5 complexes. © 2014 Freire et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. An Aromatic Cap Seals the Substrate Binding Site in an ECF-Type S Subunit for Riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jinmei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2016-06-13

    ECF transporters are a family of active membrane transporters for essential micronutrients, such as vitamins and trace metals. Found exclusively in archaea and bacteria, these transporters are composed of four subunits: an integral membrane substrate-binding subunit (EcfS), a transmembrane coupling subunit (EcfT), and two ATP-binding cassette ATPases (EcfA and EcfA'). We have characterized the structural basis of substrate binding by the EcfS subunit for riboflavin from Thermotoga maritima, TmRibU. TmRibU binds riboflavin with high affinity, and the protein–substrate complex is exceptionally stable in solution. The crystal structure of riboflavin-bound TmRibU reveals an electronegative binding pocket at the extracellular surface in which the substrate is completely buried. Analysis of the intermolecular contacts indicates that nearly every available substrate hydrogen bond is satisfied. A conserved aromatic residue at the extracellular end of TM5, Tyr130, caps the binding site to generate a substrate-bound, occluded state, and non-conservative mutation of Tyr130 reduces the stability of this conformation. Using a novel fluorescence binding assay, we find that an aromatic residue at this position is essential for high-affinity substrate binding. Comparison with other S subunit structures suggests that TM5 and Loop5-6 contain a dynamic, conserved motif that plays a key role in gating substrate entry and release by S subunits of ECF transporters.

  16. Anionic Calixarene-Capped Silver Nanoparticles Show Species-Dependent Binding to Serum Albumins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W. Coleman

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The anionic calixarenes para-sulphonatocalix[4]arene and 1,3-di-Ophosphonatocalix[ 4]arene, have been used to cap silver nanoparticles. The binding of these functional particles with regard to various serum albumins (bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, porcine serum albumin and sheep serum albumin has been studied by variable temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. The quenching of the fluorescence of the proteins was shown to vary as a function of the anionic calixarene capping molecule and also as a function of the origin of the serum albumin. It is thus possible to discriminate between the different species.

  17. Anionic calixarene-capped silver nanoparticles show species-dependent binding to serum albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauran, Yannick; Brioude, Arnaud; Kim, Beomjoon; Perret, Florent; Coleman, Anthony W

    2013-05-21

    The anionic calixarenes para-sulphonatocalix[4]arene and 1,3-di-O-phosphonatocalix[ 4]arene, have been used to cap silver nanoparticles. The binding of these functional particles with regard to various serum albumins (bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, porcine serum albumin and sheep serum albumin) has been studied by variable temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. The quenching of the fluorescence of the proteins was shown to vary as a function of the anionic calixarene capping molecule and also as a function of the origin of the serum albumin. It is thus possible to discriminate between the different species.

  18. Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (. cap alpha. -hANP) specific binding sites in bovine adrenal gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, K.; Nawata, H.; Kato, K.I.; Ibayashi, H.; Matsuo, H.

    1986-06-13

    The effects of synthetic ..cap alpha..-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..-hANP) on steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical cells in primary monolayer culture were investigated. ..cap alpha..-hANP did not inhibit basal aldosterone secretion. ..cap alpha..-hANP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of basal levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion and also of aCTH (10/sup -8/M)-stimulated increases in aldosterone, cortisol and DHEA secretion. Visualization of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha..-hANP binding sites in bovine adrenal gland by an in vitro autoradiographic technique demonstrated that these sites were highly localized in the adrenal cortex, especially the zona glomerulosa. These results suggest that the adrenal cortex may be a target organ for direct receptor-mediated actions of ..cap alpha..-hANP.

  19. Neuronal actin dynamics, spine density and neuronal dendritic complexity are regulated by CAP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapse. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics.

  20. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagedorn, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained /sup 32/P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a approx. 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not.

  1. The solution structure of the active domain of CAP18--a lipopolysaccharide binding protein from rabbit leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Brock, R; Luh, F; Chou, P J; Larrick, J W; Huang, R F; Huang, T H

    1995-08-14

    We have employed the circular dichroism (CD) technique to characterize the solution structure of CAP18(106-137), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding, antimicrobial protein, and its interaction with lipid A. Our results revealed that CAP18(106-137) may exist in at least three lipid A concentration-dependent, primarily helix conformations. The 'model' structure of CAP18(106-137) in 30% (v/v) TFE, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, was found to be a complete and very rigid helix. In this conformation, the cationic and hydrophobic groups of CAP18(106-137) are separated into patches and stripes in such a way that it can favorably interact with lipid A through either coulombic interaction with the diphosphoryl groups or hydrophobic interaction with the fatty acyl chains.

  2. Genetic recombination within the human T-cell receptor. cap alpha. -chain gene complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, M.A.; Kindt, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    Genetic analyses of the human T-cell receptor (TCR) ..cap alpha..-chain genes indicate that recombination events may occur frequently within this gene complex. Examination of the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) detected by using probes for constant or variable region gene segments made it possible to assign TCR..cap alpha.. haplotypes to the 16 parents and 43 offspring of eight families studied. A total of six RFLP, three for the constant region and three for variable region segments, were examined in the present studies. Most enzyme and probe combinations tested revealed no polymorphism and those finally selected for the study showed limited polymorphism in that only two or, in one case, three allelic forms of the gene were seen. In spite of limited variability at this level, extensive heterogeneity was observed for the combinations of markers present in haplotypes, suggesting that frequent recombination events have occurred. Most strikingly, multiple combinations of RFLP occurring in close proximity of the TCR..cap alpha.. constant region gene were observed in this study. A high recombination frequency for the TCR..cap alpha.. gene complex is further supported by the observation that two children, one in each of two families, inherited recombinant TCR..cap alpha.. haplotypes.

  3. Viral and cellular mRNA-specific activators harness PABP and eIF4G to promote translation initiation downstream of cap binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard W P; Anderson, Ross C; Larralde, Osmany; Smith, Joel W S; Gorgoni, Barbara; Richardson, William A; Malik, Poonam; Graham, Sheila V; Gray, Nicola K

    2017-06-13

    Regulation of mRNA translation is a major control point for gene expression and is critical for life. Of central importance is the complex between cap-bound eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), eIF4G, and poly(A) tail-binding protein (PABP) that circularizes mRNAs, promoting translation and stability. This complex is often targeted to regulate overall translation rates, and also by mRNA-specific translational repressors. However, the mechanisms of mRNA-specific translational activation by RNA-binding proteins remain poorly understood. Here, we address this deficit, focusing on a herpes simplex virus-1 protein, ICP27. We reveal a direct interaction with PABP that is sufficient to promote PABP recruitment and necessary for ICP27-mediated activation. PABP binds several translation factors but is primarily considered to activate translation initiation as part of the PABP-eIF4G-eIF4E complex that stimulates the initial cap-binding step. Importantly, we find that ICP27-PABP forms a complex with, and requires the activity of, eIF4G. Surprisingly, ICP27-PABP-eIF4G complexes act independently of the effects of PABP-eIF4G on cap binding to promote small ribosomal subunit recruitment. Moreover, we find that a cellular mRNA-specific regulator, Deleted in Azoospermia-like (Dazl), also employs the PABP-eIF4G interaction in a similar manner. We propose a mechanism whereby diverse RNA-binding proteins directly recruit PABP, in a non-poly(A) tail-dependent manner, to stimulate the small subunit recruitment step. This strategy may be particularly relevant to biological conditions associated with hypoadenylated mRNAs (e.g., germ cells/neurons) and/or limiting cytoplasmic PABP (e.g., viral infection, cell stress). This mechanism adds significant insight into our knowledge of mRNA-specific translational activation and the function of the PABP-eIF4G complex in translation initiation.

  4. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S

    2006-01-01

    enzymes. Here, we established that MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex through its PUA domain and recruits the density-regulated protein (DENR/DRP), containing the SUI1 translation initiation domain. Through the use of microarray analysis on polysome-associated mRNAs, we showed that up...

  5. Enzymatically stable 5' mRNA cap analogs: synthesis and binding studies with human DcpS decapping enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalek, Marcin; Jemielity, Jacek; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew M; Bojarska, Elzbieta; Stepinski, Janusz; Stolarski, Ryszard; Davis, Richard E; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2006-05-01

    Four novel 5' mRNA cap analogs have been synthesized with one of the pyrophosphate bridge oxygen atoms of the triphosphate linkage replaced with a methylene group. The analogs were prepared via reaction of nucleoside phosphor/phosphon-1-imidazolidates with nucleoside phosphate/phosphonate in the presence of ZnCl2. Three of the new cap analogs are completely resistant to degradation by human DcpS, the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of free cap resulting from 3' to 5' cellular mRNA decay. One of the new analogs has very high affinity for binding to human DcpS. Two of these analogs are Anti Reverse Cap Analogs which ensures that they are incorporated into mRNA chains exclusively in the correct orientation. These new cap analogs should be useful in a variety of biochemical studies, in the analysis of the cellular function of decapping enzymes, and as a basis for further development of modified cap analogs as potential anti-cancer and anti-parasite drugs.

  6. Flaviviral Replication Complex: Coordination between RNA Synthesis and 5'-RNA Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klema, Valerie J; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Choi, Kyung H

    2015-08-13

    Genome replication in flavivirus requires (-) strand RNA synthesis, (+) strand RNA synthesis, and 51-RNA capping and methylation. To carry out viral genome replication, flavivirus assembles a replication complex, consisting of both viral and host proteins, on the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Two major components of the replication complex are the viral non-structural (NS) proteins NS3 and NS5. Together they possess all the enzymatic activities required for genome replication, yet how these activities are coordinated during genome replication is not clear. We provide an overview of the flaviviral genome replication process, the membrane-bound replication complex, and recent crystal structures of full-length NS5. We propose a model of how NS3 and NS5 coordinate their activities in the individual steps of (-) RNA synthesis, (+) RNA synthesis, and 51-RNA capping and methylation.

  7. A cytoskeletal localizing domain in the cyclase-associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates access to a distant SH3-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Wang, C; Palmieri, S J; Haarer, B K; Field, J

    1999-07-09

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase consists of a 200-kDa catalytic subunit (CYR1) and a 70-kDa subunit (CAP/SRV2). CAP/Srv2p assists the small G protein Ras to activate adenylyl cyclase. CAP also regulates the cytoskeleton through an actin sequestering activity and is directed to cortical actin patches by a proline-rich SH3-binding site (P2). In this report we analyze the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Ras/cAMP signaling. Two alleles of CAP, L16P(Srv2) and R19T (SupC), first isolated in genetic screens for mutants that attenuate cAMP levels, reduced adenylyl cyclase binding, and cortical actin patch localization. A third mutation, L27F, also failed to localize but showed no loss of either cAMP signaling or adenylyl cyclase binding. However, all three N-terminal mutations reduced CAP-CAP multimer formation and SH3 domain binding, although the SH3-binding site is about 350 amino acids away. Finally, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A did not affect the cAMP phenotypes of the hyperactive Ras2(Val19) allele. These data identify a novel region of CAP that controls access to the SH3-binding site and demonstrate that cytoskeletal localization of CAP or an intact cytoskeleton per se is not necessary for cAMP signaling.

  8. Calcium-sensitive modulation of Ig capping: evidence supporting a cytoplasmic control of ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, G F; Unanue, E R

    1976-01-01

    Capping of anti-Ig-Ig complexes was studied in murine B lymphocytes. Morphological studies indicated that caps formed rapidly on cells before any changes in shape. The first changes in cell shape were evident as a contraction right under the cap area. The removal of extracellular calcium had no effect on cap formation. Furthermore, the introduction of calcium by the ionophore A-23187 stopped capping. The ionophere by itself in the absence of extracellular calcium had no effect. Caps were found to be disrupted, the complexes scattering over the entire cell surface if the cells were treated by A-23187 after the caps had formed. The disruptive effect of A-23187 as dependent on extracellular calcium and could be stopped by drugs that affected energy metabolism. The cytochalasins also disrupted the formed caps. Drugs that affect energy metabolism by themselves did not disrupt the caps. We interpret the effects of the ionophore as resulting from a systemic hypercontractility of microfilaments. A theory for explaining the formation and disruption of capping is discussed.

  9. Demonstration of. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors in the rabbit bladder base and urethra with /sup 3/H-dihydroergocryptine ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, B. (Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital of Lund, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the presence of ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors in a crude membrane preparation made from rabbit bladder base and urethra. This was achieved by radioligand binding studies, using /sup 3/H-dihydro-..cap alpha..-ergocryptine (/sup 3/H-DHE) as the radioligand. The specific binding, i.e. the binding that could be inhibited by 10/sup -5/ M phentolamine, was saturable with 73 fmol /sup 3/H-DHE bound per mg membrane protein. Binding was at steady state after 60 min., and reversible. Rate constants for association and dissocation were 3x10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ min./sup -1/, and 2x10/sup -2/ min./sup -1/, respectively. A number of compounds were tested for their abilities to compete with /sup 3/H-DHE for the binding sites. The relative affinity of some adrenoceptor agonists was (-)-adrenaline>(-)-noradrenaline much larger than (+-)-isoprenaline. Steroselectivity was shown, since (-)-noradrenaline had 42 times higher affinity than (+)-noradrenaline. Adrenoceptor antagonists inhibited /sup 3/H-DHE binding in the following order of potency: DHE>phentolamine much larger than (+-)-propranolol. The dissociation constant, Ksub(D), for DHE to the binding sites was estimated in three different ways. The constants were derived from saturation, competition, and kinetic studies, and gave Ksub(D) values of 1.1,1.4 and 0.7 nM, respectively. The results suggest that ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors were labelled by /sup 3/H-DHE in the tissue homogenates.

  10. Toxin a from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with therminal Gal. cap alpha. 1-3Gal. beta. 1-4GlcNaC sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.; Wilkins, T.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-05-01

    Toxin A is one of two clostridial toxins implicated as the causative agent of pseudomembranous colitis in patients undergoing postoperative antibiotic therapy. Evidence that the carbohydrate binding determinant for this toxin is a glycoconjugate(s) with non-reducing Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc has recently been reported. Specific agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes by Toxin A is inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin and prevented by pretreatment of cells with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin layer chromatography and the chromatogram overlaid with purified /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected following autoradiography. The major toxin-binding glycolipids were identified as pentasaccharide- and decasaccharide-ceramides expressing terminal Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc sequences. Treatment of the toxin-binding glycolipids with ..cap alpha..-galactosidase abolished binding. Forsmann glycolipid, globoside, Gal..cap alpha..1-4 Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer, and Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4Glc-cer did not bind the toxin. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate specificity of the toxin for the non-reducing terminal sequence, Gal..cap alpha..1-3Gal..beta..1-4GlcNAc.

  11. Effects of thyroid status on presynaptic. cap alpha. 2-adrenoceptor and. beta. -adrenoceptor binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atterwill, C.K.; Bunn, S.J.; Atkinson, D.J. (Development Neurobiology Unit, London (UK). Inst. of Neurology); Smith, S.L.; Heal, D.J. (Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (UK))

    1984-01-01

    The effect of thyroid status on noradrenergic synaptic function in the mature brain was examined by measuring presynaptic ..cap alpha..2- and postsynaptic ..beta..-adrenoceptors. Repeated triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) administration to rats (100..mu..g/kg x 14 days hyperthyroid) caused an 18% increase in striatal ..beta..-adrenoceptors as shown by (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol binding with no change in membranes from cerebral cortex or hypothalamus. In contrast, hypothyroidism (propylthiouracil, PTU x 14 days) produced significant 12% and 30% reductions in striatal and hypothalamic ..beta..-adrenoceptors respectively with no change in the cerebral cortex. Presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function was measured in the two dysthyroid states using the clonidine-induced hypoactivity model. Experimental hyperthyroidism increased the degree of clonidine-induced hypoactivity, and suggests increased presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function compared with control rats, whereas hypothyroidism suppressed presynaptic ..cap alpha..2-adrenoceptor function. These results show firstly that changes of thyroid status in the mature rat may produce homeostatic alterations at central noradrenergic synapses as reflected by changes in pre- and postsynaptic adrenoceptor function. Secondly, there appear to be T/sub 3/-induced changes in ..beta..-adrenoceptors in the striatum where changes in dopaminergic neuronal activity have previously been demonstrated.

  12. Reticence or vigilance at the nest: a cruel bind for the endangered Black-capped Vireo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Walker

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Breeding birds vocalize to find mates and establish and defend territories, but these same critical communications may also attract predators or brood parasites, placing birds in a cruel bind. Although vigilant birds may better maintain social relationships with mates and neighbors through frequent vocalizations, reticent birds may reduce risk to their nests by being relatively quiet and making infrequent vocalizations. Selection for vocalization patterns that minimize brood parasitism might be particularly strong for birds that are unable to fledge both their own young and the parasite. Temporal plasticity in the frequency of vocalizations near nests, however, may allow birds to balance trade-offs and optimize nest-defense strategies. The Black-capped Vireo (Vireo atricapilla is an endangered songbird that faces intensive brood parasitism in areas where Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater are present. Vireo nests that produce cowbird fledglings always fail to fledge vireo young. We recorded vocalizations at vireo nests across three nesting stages (building, laying, and early incubation and three periods of the day (morning, midday, and evening and compared vocalization frequency with eventual depredation or parasitism fate as well as local cowbird density to test two hypotheses. The predator-attraction hypothesis predicts that predators will be attracted by frequent vocalizations, whereas cowbirds will parasitize nests with relatively quiet parents and less predation risk; thus, vireos will experience trade-offs between reticence and vigilance in mediating specific risks. The parasite-assessment hypothesis predicts that vireos will become more secretive as local cowbird densities increase. Vireo vocalization response to nest predation and parasitism risk interacted with nest stage, and we found little evidence of risk mediation through vocalizations except during the building stage. Vireos, however, did benefit overall by optimizing temporal

  13. Synthesis, complexation, and coordination oligomerization of 1,8-pyrazine-capped 5,12-dioxocyclams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Louis S; Sundermann, Michael J; Dorhout, Peter K

    2003-07-14

    (Methyl)(methoxy)-5,12-dioxocyclam 1 was alkylated on the secondary amines (capped) with 2,6-bis(bromomethyl)pyrazine. The resulting macrocycle was complexed to copper(II) to produce a five-coordinate complex 5a which was fully characterized by a range of spectroscopic methods (IR, UV-vis, ESR) as well as by X-ray crystallography. The structure of this complex is similar to the previously reported pyridine complex, with the five-coordinate copper having distorted square pyramidal geometry and a Cu-Pz bond length of 2.125 A. Attempts to prepare this same complex under microwave irradiation instead produced a trinuclear complex 6a having an octahedral copper(II) center complexed to two pyrazine-cyclam copper units through the amide carbonyl oxygen and the methoxyl group oxygen of the cyclam unit. The X-ray crystal structure of the trinuclear complex showed extensive distortion in the cyclam rings. The remote nitrogen of pyrazine-cyclam complex 5a was capable of coordinating an additional metal. Treatment with RuCl(2)(DMSO)(4) or Rh(2)(OAc)(4), respectively, produced trimetallic Cu-Ru-Cu complex 7 or tetrametallic Cu-Rh-Rh-Cu complex 8. The latter was fully characterized, including an X-ray crystal structure, and had two pyrazine-cyclam complexes bridged by a Rh(2)(OAc)(4) unit through the remote pyrazine nitrogens. There was little distortion in the pyrazine-cyclam copper units as compared to complex 5a: the four metals were collinear, and the two cyclam units were eclipsed. All of the copper complexes were subjected to cyclic voltametry measurements, and no reversible redox changes were observed. Magnetic measurements of 6a and 8 showed the copper atoms to be weakly antiferromagnetically coupled.

  14. The DEAD-box helicase DDX3 substitutes for the cap-binding protein eIF4E to promote compartmentalized translation initiation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-07-01

    Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism promoted by the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 for translation of the HIV-1 genomic RNA. This occurs through the adenosine triphosphate-dependent formation of a translation initiation complex that is assembled at the 5' m(7)GTP cap of the HIV-1 mRNA. This is due to the property of DDX3 to substitute for the initiation factor eIF4E in the binding of the HIV-1 m(7)GTP 5' cap structure where it nucleates the formation of a core DDX3/PABP/eIF4G trimeric complex on the HIV-1 genomic RNA. By using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to indirect immunofluorescence, we further show that this viral ribonucleoprotein complex is addressed to compartmentalized cytoplasmic foci where the translation initiation complex is assembled.

  15. The nematode eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E/G complex works with a trans-spliced leader stem-loop to enable efficient translation of trimethylguanosine-capped RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Adam; Filbin, Megan E; Veo, Bethany; McFarland, Craig; Stepinski, Janusz; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Davis, Richard E

    2010-04-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA translation begins with recruitment of the 40S ribosome complex to the mRNA 5' end through the eIF4F initiation complex binding to the 5' m(7)G-mRNA cap. Spliced leader (SL) RNA trans splicing adds a trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap and a sequence, the SL, to the 5' end of mRNAs. Efficient translation of TMG-capped mRNAs in nematodes requires the SL sequence. Here we define a core set of nucleotides and a stem-loop within the 22-nucleotide nematode SL that stimulate translation of mRNAs with a TMG cap. The structure and core nucleotides are conserved in other nematode SLs and correspond to regions of SL1 required for early Caenorhabditis elegans development. These SL elements do not facilitate translation of m(7)G-capped RNAs in nematodes or TMG-capped mRNAs in mammalian or plant translation systems. Similar stem-loop structures in phylogenetically diverse SLs are predicted. We show that the nematode eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E/G (eIF4E/G) complex enables efficient translation of the TMG-SL RNAs in diverse in vitro translation systems. TMG-capped mRNA translation is determined by eIF4E/G interaction with the cap and the SL RNA, although the SL does not increase the affinity of eIF4E/G for capped RNA. These results suggest that the mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) can play a positive and novel role in translation initiation through interaction with the eIF4E/G complex in nematodes and raise the issue of whether eIF4E/G-RNA interactions play a role in the translation of other eukaryotic mRNAs.

  16. An actin-binding protein, CAP, is expressed in a subset of rat taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Y; Yasuoka, A; Asano-Miyoshi, M; Abe, K; Emori, Y

    2001-02-12

    Single cell cDNA libraries were constructed from taste bud cells of rat circumvallate papillae. Using three steps of screening, including differential hybridization, sequence analyses and in situ hybridization, a clone encoding a rat homolog of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) was identified to be highly expressed in a subset of taste bud cells.

  17. The pathogen-related yeast protein Pry1, a member of the CAP protein superfamily, is a fatty acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiche, Rabih; Mène-Saffrané, Laurent; Gfeller, David; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Schneiter, Roger

    2017-05-19

    Members of the CAP superfamily (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5, and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins), also known as SCP superfamily (sperm-coating proteins), have been implicated in many physiological processes, including immune defenses, venom toxicity, and sperm maturation. Their mode of action, however, remains poorly understood. Three proteins of the CAP superfamily, Pry1, -2, and -3 (pathogen related in yeast), are encoded in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We have shown previously that Pry1 binds cholesterol in vitro and that Pry function is required for sterol secretion in yeast cells, indicating that members of this superfamily may generally bind sterols or related small hydrophobic compounds. On the other hand, tablysin-15, a CAP protein from the horsefly Tabanus yao, has been shown to bind leukotrienes and free fatty acids in vitro Therefore, here we assessed whether the yeast Pry1 protein binds fatty acids. Computational modeling and site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the mode of fatty acid binding is conserved between tablysin-15 and Pry1. Pry1 bound fatty acids with micromolar affinity in vitro, and its function was essential for fatty acid export in cells lacking the acyl-CoA synthetases Faa1 and Faa4. Fatty acid binding of Pry1 is independent of its capacity to bind sterols, and the two sterol- and fatty acid-binding sites are nonoverlapping. These results indicate that some CAP family members, such as Pry1, can bind different lipids, particularly sterols and fatty acids, at distinct binding sites, suggesting that the CAP domain may serve as a stable, secreted protein domain that can accommodate multiple ligand-binding sites. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Cap-proximal nucleotides via differential eIF4E binding and alternative promoter usage mediate translational response to energy stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin-Ben-Harush, Ana; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise; Ulitsky, Igor; Dikstein, Rivka

    2017-01-01

    Transcription start-site (TSS) selection and alternative promoter (AP) usage contribute to gene expression complexity but little is known about their impact on translation. Here we performed TSS mapping of the translatome following energy stress. Assessing the contribution of cap-proximal TSS nucleotides, we found dramatic effect on translation only upon stress. As eIF4E levels were reduced, we determined its binding to capped-RNAs with different initiating nucleotides and found the lowest affinity to 5'cytidine in correlation with the translational stress-response. In addition, the number of differentially translated APs was elevated following stress. These include novel glucose starvation-induced downstream transcripts for the translation regulators eIF4A and Pabp, which are also translationally-induced despite general translational inhibition. The resultant eIF4A protein is N-terminally truncated and acts as eIF4A inhibitor. The induced Pabp isoform has shorter 5'UTR removing an auto-inhibitory element. Our findings uncovered several levels of coordination of transcription and translation responses to energy stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21907.001 PMID:28177284

  19. Luminescent behavior of CdTe quantum dots: Neodymium(III) complex-capped nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Margarida S. [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Algarra, Manuel, E-mail: magonzal@fc.up.pt [Centro de Geologia do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Jimenez-Jimenez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n 29071, Malaga (Spain); Campos, Bruno B.; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C.G. [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica (CIQ-UP), Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2013-02-15

    A water soluble complex of neodymium(III) with CdTe quantum dots nanoparticles was synthesized. The obtained homogeneous solutions were characterized by fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. The effect of the refluxing time of the reaction on the fluorescence intensity and emission wavelength has been studied. It was found that the emission wavelength of the solutions of neodymium(III) complex capped CdTe QDs nanoparticles shifted from about 540 to 735 nm. For an emission wavelength of 668 nm, the most reproducible nanoparticles obtained, the pH effect over the fluorescence emission and its intensity were studied. The purified and lyophilized solid obtained was morphologically characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The quantitative composition was determined by fluorescence X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) and the X-ray photoelectron analysis (XPS) confirmed the presence of neodymium(III) at the surface of the CdTe nanoparticles forming a complex with the carboxylate groups from 3-mercaptopropanoic acid of the CdTe QDs. Due to the optical behavior of this complex, it could be of potential interest as a light source in optical devices. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CdTe quantum dots nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neodymium(III) complexed quantum dots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong red fluorescent emission nanomaterial soluble in water.

  20. Simulation of 125I induced DNA strand breaks in a CAP-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Friedland, W; Jacob, P; Paretzke, H G; Panyutin, I; Neumann, R D

    2002-01-01

    The E. coli catabolite gene activator protein (CAP)-DNA complex with 125I located at the position of the H5 atom of the cytosine near the centre was incorporated into the PARTRAC track structure code. DNA strand breaks due to irradiation were calculated by track structure and radical attack simulations; strand breaks due to neutralisation of the highly charged 125Te ion were derived from a semi-empirical distribution. According to the calculations, the neutralisation effect dominates the strand breakage frequency at 2 bases away from the 125I decay site on both strands. The first breakage distribution counted from a 32P labelled end on the strand with 125I agreed well with experimental data, but on the opposite strand, the calculated distribution is more concentrated around the decay site and its yield is about 20% larger than the measured data.

  1. Synthesis of Leishmania cap-4 intermediates, cap-2 and cap-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewdorowicz, Magdalena; Stepinski, Janusz; Kierzek, Ryszard; Jemielity, Jacek; Zuberek, Joanna; Yoffe, Yael; Shapira, Michal; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of Leishmania mRNA 5'-cap analogs, m(7)Gpppm(2)(6)AmpAm (cap-2), and m(7)Gpppm(2)(6)AmpAmpCm (cap-3) is reported. Binding affinities of those cap analogs for LeishIF4E proteins were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy. Cap-3 showed similar affinity to LeishIF4Es compared to the mature trypanosomatids cap structure (cap-4).

  2. Characterization of citrate capped gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex: Experimental and quantum chemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rajat; Panigrahi, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2013-08-01

    Quercetin and several other bioflavonoids possess antioxidant property. These biomolecules can reduce the diabetic complications, but metabolize very easily in the body. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of a flavonoid may further increase its efficacy. Gold nanoparticle is used by different groups as vehicle for drug delivery, as it is least toxic to human body. Prior to search for the enhanced efficacy, the gold nanoparticle-flavonoid complex should be prepared and well characterized. In this article, we report the interaction of gold nanoparticle with quercetin. The interaction is confirmed by different biophysical techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier-Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and cross checked by quantum chemical calculations. These studies indicate that gold clusters are covered by citrate groups, which are hydrogen bonded to the quercetin molecules in the complex. We have also provided evidences how capping is important in stabilizing the gold nanoparticle and further enhances its interaction with other molecules, such as drugs. Our finding also suggests that gold nanoparticle-quercetin complex can pass through the membranes of human red blood cells.

  3. The Interaction of Arp2/3 Complex with Actin: Nucleation, High Affinity Pointed End Capping, and Formation of Branching Networks of Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyche Mullins, R.; Heuser, John A.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1998-05-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is a stable assembly of seven protein subunits including two actin-related proteins (Arp2 and Arp3) and five novel proteins. Previous work showed that this complex binds to the sides of actin filaments and is concentrated at the leading edges of motile cells. Here, we show that Arp2/3 complex purified from Acanthamoeba caps the pointed ends of actin filaments with high affinity. Arp2/3 complex inhibits both monomer addition and dissociation at the pointed ends of actin filaments with apparent nanomolar affinity and increases the critical concentration for polymerization at the pointed end from 0.6 to 1.0 μ M. The high affinity of Arp2/3 complex for pointed ends and its abundance in amoebae suggest that in vivo all actin filament pointed ends are capped by Arp2/3 complex. Arp2/3 complex also nucleates formation of actin filaments that elongate only from their barbed ends. From kinetic analysis, the nucleation mechanism appears to involve stabilization of polymerization intermediates (probably actin dimers). In electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep-etched samples, we see Arp2/3 bound to sides and pointed ends of actin filaments and examples of Arp2/3 complex attaching pointed ends of filaments to sides of other filaments. In these cases, the angle of attachment is a remarkably constant 70 ± 7 degrees. From these in vitro biochemical properties, we propose a model for how Arp2/3 complex controls the assembly of a branching network of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells.

  4. In silico properties characterization of water-soluble γ-cyclodextrin bi-capped C60 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Ruyin; Wu, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    Cyclodextrin-related host-guest encapsulation is pivotal to modulate the solubility of C60, thereby promoting its potential therapeutic applications. Here we present a computational study on γ-cyclodextrin bi-capped C60 complex, probing characteristics for all the possible stoichiometry in aqueous...

  5. Application of the modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas in complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, application of a modified Wheeler cap method for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas is presented. It is shown that the limitations on the cavity dimension can be overcome and thus measurement in a large cavity is possible. The cavity loss...... is investigated, and a modified radiation efficiency formula that includes the cavity loss is introduced. Moreover, a modification of the technique is proposed that involves the antenna working complex environment inside the Wheeler Cap and thus makes possible measurement of an antenna close to a hand or head...

  6. N,C-Capped dipeptides with selectivity for mycobacterial proteasome over human proteasomes: role of S3 and S1 binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gang; Chidawanyika, Tamutenda; Tsu, Christopher; Warrier, Thulasi; Vaubourgeix, Julien; Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth; Sintchak, Michael; Dick, Lawrence; Nathan, Carl

    2013-07-10

    We identified N,C-capped dipeptides that are selective for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome over human constitutive and immunoproteasomes. Differences in the S3 and S1 binding pockets appeared to account for the species selectivity. The inhibitors can penetrate mycobacteria and kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis under nitrosative stress.

  7. Poly(A binding protein 1 enhances cap-independent translation initiation of neurovirulence factor from avian herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessamad Tahiri-Alaoui

    Full Text Available Poly(A binding protein 1 (PABP1 plays a central role in mRNA translation and stability and is a target by many viruses in diverse manners. We report a novel viral translational control strategy involving the recruitment of PABP1 to the 5' leader internal ribosome entry site (5L IRES of an immediate-early (IE bicistronic mRNA that encodes the neurovirulence protein (pp14 from the avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1. We provide evidence for the interaction between an internal poly(A sequence within the 5L IRES and PABP1 which may occur concomitantly with the recruitment of PABP1 to the poly(A tail. RNA interference and reverse genetic mutagenesis results show that a subset of virally encoded-microRNAs (miRNAs targets the inhibitor of PABP1, known as paip2, and therefore plays an indirect role in PABP1 recruitment strategy by increasing the available pool of active PABP1. We propose a model that may offer a mechanistic explanation for the cap-independent enhancement of the activity of the 5L IRES by recruitment of a bona fide initiation protein to the 5' end of the message and that is, from the affinity binding data, still compatible with the formation of 'closed loop' structure of mRNA.

  8. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  9. The mRNA cap-binding protein Cbc1 is required for high and timely expression of genes by promoting the accumulation of gene-specific activators at promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianlu; De Clercq, Nikki; Medina, Daniel A; Garre, Elena; Sunnerhagen, Per; Pérez-Ortín, José E; Alepuz, Paula

    2016-02-01

    The highly conserved Saccharomyces cerevisiae cap-binding protein Cbc1/Sto1 binds mRNA co-transcriptionally and acts as a key coordinator of mRNA fate. Recently, Cbc1 has also been implicated in transcription elongation and pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation. Previously, we described Cbc1 to be required for cell growth under osmotic stress and to mediate osmostress-induced translation reprogramming. Here, we observe delayed global transcription kinetics in cbc1Δ during osmotic stress that correlates with delayed recruitment of TBP and RNA polymerase II to osmo-induced promoters. Interestingly, we detect an interaction between Cbc1 and the MAPK Hog1, which controls most gene expression changes during osmostress, and observe that deletion of CBC1 delays the accumulation of the activator complex Hot1-Hog1 at osmostress promoters. Additionally, CBC1 deletion specifically reduces transcription rates of highly transcribed genes under non-stress conditions, such as ribosomal protein (RP) genes, while having low impact on transcription of weakly expressed genes. For RP genes, we show that recruitment of the specific activator Rap1, and subsequently TBP, to promoters is Cbc1-dependent. Altogether, our results indicate that binding of Cbc1 to the capped mRNAs is necessary for the accumulation of specific activators as well as PIC components at the promoters of genes whose expression requires high and rapid transcription.

  10. Exploring the inhibitor binding pocket of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendel, Uta; Tocilescu, Maja A; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Numerous hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including several detergents are known to inhibit the ubiquinone reductase reaction of respiratory chain complex I (proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Guided by the X-ray structure of the peripheral arm of complex I from Thermus thermophilus we have generated a large collection of site-directed mutants in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica targeting the proposed ubiquinone and inhibitor binding pocket of this huge multiprotein complex at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits. We could identify a number of residues where mutations changed I(50) values for representatives from all three groups of hydrophobic inhibitors. Many mutations around the domain of the 49-kDa subunit that is homologous to the [NiFe] centre binding region of hydrogenase conferred resistance to DQA (class I/type A) and rotenone (class II/type B) indicating a wider overlap of the binding sites for these two types of inhibitors. In contrast, a region near iron-sulfur cluster N2, where the binding of the n-alkyl-polyoxyethylene-ether detergent C(12)E(8) (type C) was exclusively affected, appeared comparably well separated. Taken together, our data provide structure-based support for the presence of distinct but overlapping binding sites for hydrophobic inhibitors possibly extending into the ubiquinone reduction site of mitochondrial complex I.

  11. Two-headed tetraphosphate cap analogs are inhibitors of the Dcp1/2 RNA decapping complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemniak, Marcin; Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Kowalska, Joanna; Rhoads, Robert E; Gross, John D; Jemielity, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    Dcp1/2 is the major eukaryotic RNA decapping complex, comprised of the enzyme Dcp2 and activator Dcp1, which removes the 5' m(7)G cap from mRNA, committing the transcript to degradation. Dcp1/2 activity is crucial for RNA quality control and turnover, and deregulation of these processes may lead to disease development. The molecular details of Dcp1/2 catalysis remain elusive, in part because both cap substrate (m(7)GpppN) and m(7)GDP product are bound by Dcp1/2 with weak (mM) affinity. In order to find inhibitors to use in elucidating the catalytic mechanism of Dcp2, we screened a small library of synthetic m(7)G nucleotides (cap analogs) bearing modifications in the oligophosphate chain. One of the most potent cap analogs, m(7)GpSpppSm(7)G, inhibited Dcp1/2 20 times more efficiently than m(7)GpppN or m(7)GDP. NMR experiments revealed that the compound interacts with specific surfaces of both regulatory and catalytic domains of Dcp2 with submillimolar affinities. Kinetics analysis revealed that m(7)GpSpppSm(7)G is a mixed inhibitor that competes for the Dcp2 active site with micromolar affinity. m(7)GpSpppSm(7)G-capped RNA undergoes rapid decapping, suggesting that the compound may act as a tightly bound cap mimic. Our identification of the first small molecule inhibitor of Dcp2 should be instrumental in future studies aimed at understanding the structural basis of RNA decapping and may provide insight toward the development of novel therapeutically relevant decapping inhibitors.

  12. Core-level spectra and binding energies of transition metal nitrides by non-destructive x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy through capping layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greczynski, G.; Primetzhofer, D.; Lu, J.; Hultman, L.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first measurements of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core level binding energies (BE:s) for the widely-applicable group IVb-VIb polycrystalline transition metal nitrides (TMN's) TiN, VN, CrN, ZrN, NbN, MoN, HfN, TaN, and WN as well as AlN and SiN, which are common components in the TMN-based alloy systems. Nitride thin film samples were grown at 400 °C by reactive dc magnetron sputtering from elemental targets in Ar/N2 atmosphere. For XPS measurements, layers are either (i) Ar+ ion-etched to remove surface oxides resulting from the air exposure during sample transfer from the growth chamber into the XPS system, or (ii) in situ capped with a few nm thick Cr or W overlayers in the deposition system prior to air-exposure and loading into the XPS instrument. Film elemental composition and phase content is thoroughly characterized with time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (ToF-E ERDA), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and x-ray diffraction. High energy resolution core level XPS spectra acquired with monochromatic Al Kα radiation on the ISO-calibrated instrument reveal that even mild etching conditions result in the formation of a nitrogen-deficient surface layer that substantially affects the extracted binding energy values. These spectra-modifying effects of Ar+ ion bombardment increase with increasing the metal atom mass due to an increasing nitrogen-to-metal sputter yield ratio. The superior quality of the XPS spectra obtained in a non-destructive way from capped TMN films is evident from that numerous metal peaks, including Ti 2p, V 2p, Zr 3d, and Hf 4f, exhibit pronounced satellite features, in agreement with previously published spectra from layers grown and analyzed in situ. In addition, the N/metal concentration ratios are found to be 25-90% higher than those obtained from the corresponding ion-etched surfaces, and in most cases agree very well with the RBS and ToF-E ERDA values. The N 1 s BE:s extracted from

  13. Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like protein 4 (SmVAL4) is a novel lipid-binding SCP/TAPS protein that lacks the prototypical CAP motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, Alan [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Darwiche, Rabih [University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 10, CH 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Rezende, Wanderson C. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Farias, Leonardo P.; Leite, Luciana C. C. [Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Schneiter, Roger [University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 10, CH 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: asojo@bcm.edu [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The first structure of an S. mansoni venom allergen-like protein is presented. Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people. Vaccine candidates have been identified, including Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins (SmVALs) from the SCP/TAPS (sperm-coating protein/Tpx/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1/Sc7) superfamily. The first SmVAL structure, SmVAL4, was refined to a resolution limit of 2.16 Å. SmVAL4 has a unique structure that could not be predicted from homologous structures, with longer loops and an unusual C-terminal extension. SmVAL4 has the characteristic α/β-sandwich and central SCP/TAPS cavity. Furthermore, SmVAL4 has only one of the signature CAP cavity tetrad amino-acid residues and is missing the histidines that coordinate divalent cations such as Zn{sup 2+} in other SCP/TAPS proteins. SmVAL4 has a cavity between α-helices 1 and 4 that was observed to bind lipids in tablysin-15, suggesting the ability to bind lipids. Subsequently, SmVAL4 was shown to bind cholesterol in vitro. Additionally, SmVAL4 was shown to complement the in vivo sterol-export phenotype of yeast mutants lacking their endogenous CAP proteins. Expression of SmVAL4 in yeast cells lacking endogenous CAP function restores the block in sterol export. These studies suggest an evolutionarily conserved lipid-binding function shared by CAP proteins such as SmVAL4 and yeast CAP proteins such as Pry1.

  14. Synthesis and NMR spectral properties of spin-labelled mRNA 5' cap analogue: a new tool for biochemical studies of cap binding proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Janusz [Division of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, 93 Zwirki and Wigury Street, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland); Wojcik, Jacek [Laboratory of Biological NMR, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 5a Pawinskiego Street, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Sienkiewicz, Andrzej [Biological Physics Group, Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 32/46 Lotnikow Avenue, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Niedzwiecka, Anna [Division of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, 93 Zwirki and Wigury Street, 02-089 Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-07-18

    All eukaryotic messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) comprise a unique chemical structure called a 'cap', i.e. 7-methylguanosine linked by a 5',5' triphosphate bridge to the first transcribed nucleoside. Biophysical studies of interactions between the RNA 5' terminus and proteins that specifically recognize its structure require suitable chemical cap analogues. For the needs of electron spin resonance spectroscopy, a spin-labelled cap analogue, m{sup 7}GTP-TEMPO, P{sup 1}-(7-methylguanosine-5') P{sup 3}-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy-4) triphosphate, has been synthesized and fully characterized spectroscopically. The structure has been confirmed by one-dimensional (1D) and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spin resonance (ESR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Despite the presence of a free radical (TEMPO) in the small molecule, complete {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 31}P NMR spectra have been acquired that allowed us to assign all these resonances, including the radical moiety. These are the first well resolved NMR spectra of the TEMPO-containing paramagnetic species, directly obtained and analysed without conversion to an N-hydroxylamine derivative.

  15. Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects for Metal-DNA Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, Eteri

    2008-01-01

    The stoichiometric binding constants of Nickel(II), Cobalt(II), Manganese(II), Silver(I), Zinc(II) ions with DNA, from Spirulina platensis were determined from their binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. It was shown, that the nature of these ions interaction with DNA, from S .platensis is different. For Cobalt(II), Zinc(II) ions were observed cooperative effects and existence of two different types of the binding sites. Nickel(II)_, Silver(I) -DNA complexes shows independent and identical binding sites and Manganese(II)_ negative cooperative interaction. The logarithm of binding constants for Cobalt (II)_, Nickel (II)_, Manganese (II)_, Zinc (II)_, Silver (I) - DNA, from S. platensis in 3 mM Na(I) are 5.11; 5.18; 4.77; 5.05; 5.42; respectively. The linear correlation of logarithm of binding constants (for complexes of metal-DNA from S. platensis) and the covalent index of Pauling are observed.

  16. The human Ago2 MC region does not contain an eIF4E-like mRNA cap binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishin Nick V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Argonaute (Ago proteins interact with small regulatory RNAs to mediate gene regulatory pathways. A recent report by Kiriakidou et al. 1 describes an MC sequence region identified in Ago2 that displays similarity to the cap-binding motif in translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. In a cap-bound eIF4E structure, two important aromatic residues of the motif stack on either side of a 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7Gppp base. The corresponding Ago2 aromatic residues (F450 and F505 were hypothesized to perform the same cap-binding function. However, the detected similarity between the MC sequence and the eIF4E cap-binding motif was questionable. Results A number of sequence-based and structure-based bioinformatics methods reveal the reported similarity between the Ago2 MC sequence region and the eIF4E cap-binding motif to be spurious. Alternatively, the MC sequence region is confidently assigned to the N-terminus of the Ago piwi module, within the mid domain of experimentally determined prokaryotic Ago structures. Confident mapping of the Ago2 MC sequence region to the piwi mid domain results in a homology-based structure model that positions the identified aromatic residues over 20 Å apart, with one of the aromatic side chains (F450 contributing instead to the hydrophobic core of the domain. Conclusion Correct functional prediction based on weak sequence similarity requires substantial evolutionary and structural support. The evolutionary context of the Ago mid domain suggested by multiple sequence alignment is limited to a conserved hydrophobicity profile required for the fold and a motif following the MC region that binds guide RNA. Mapping of the MC sequence to the mid domain structure reveals Ago2 aromatics that are incompatible with eIF4E-like mRNA cap-binding, yet display some limited local structure similarities that cause the chance sequence match to eIF4E. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian

  17. GluR2 ligand-binding core complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Lunn, M-L; Liljefors, T

    2002-01-01

    X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-Des-Me-AMPA and in the presence and absence of zinc ions have been determined. (S)-Des-Me-AMPA, which is devoid of a substituent in the 5-position of the isoxazolol ring, only has limited interactions with the partly hydrophobic...

  18. Pulpo-dentin complex response after direct capping with self-etch adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Alicja; Parafiniuk, Miroslaw; Lipski, Mariusz; Lichota, Damian; Buczkowska-Radlinska, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate morphologically the response of feline teeth pulp to direct pulp capping with two different self-etch adhesive systems. Twenty-four cavities in feline teeth were mechanically exposed and assigned to one of two experimental groups: AdheSE + Tetric Ceram (the ASE group), or Adper Prompt L-Pop + Filtek Supreme (the APLP group). There was also a control group Dycal Ca(OH)(2) liner + Amalgam (the CH group eight teeth), and six teeth were used as an intact control group. The animals were sacrificed after 40 days. The teeth were removed and processed for standard histological evaluation, using a scoring system for inflammatory cell response, pulp tissue disorganisation, reparative tissue formation, and the presence of bacteria. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the ASE and APLP self-etching resin systems during the observation period. The majority of the specimens presented inflammatory pulp response with tissue disorganisation and a lack of dentinal bridge formation. CH capping resulted in a significantly smaller inflammatory pulp response and a considerably higher incidence of reparative dentin formation. ASE and APLP were comparably effective as direct pulp capping materials, but their application resulted in significantly greater pulp tissue damage than CH capping. Further in vivo human studies are necessary to determine which adhesive resin systems should be clinically used for direct pulp capping without incurring severe damage to the pulpal tissue.

  19. Pt(II) diimine complexes bearing carbazolyl-capped acetylide ligands: synthesis, tunable photophysics and nonlinear absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Hongbin; Chang, Jin; Li, Yuhao; Zhu, Hongjun; Sun, Wenfang

    2013-01-01

    A series of new Pt(II) diimine complexes with different carbazolyl-capped acetylide ligands (Pt-1–Pt-5) were synthesized and characterized. Their photophysical properties were investigated systematically via spectroscopic and theoretical methods. All complexes exhibit ligand-centered 1π,π* transitions in the UV region, and broad, structureless metal-to-ligand charge transfer (1MLCT)/ligand-to-ligand charge transfer (1LLCT) absorption bands in the visible spectral region. All complexes are emissive in solution at room temperature, with the emitting state being tentatively assigned to the 3MLCT/3LLCT states for Pt-1–Pt-4, and the emitting state of Pt-5 exhibiting a switch from the 3π,π* state in high-polarity solvents to the 3MLCT state in low-polarity solvents. Complexes Pt-1–Pt-5 all exhibit moderate triplet transient absorption (TA) from the visible to the NIR region, where reverse saturable absorption (RSA) could occur. The spectroscopic studies and theoretical calculations indicate that the photophysical properties of these Pt complexes can be tuned drastically by the carbazolyl-capped acetylide ligand, which would be useful for rational design of transition-metal complexes with high emission quantum yield, long excited-state lifetime, broadband excited-state absorption, and strong nonlinear transmittance for organic light-emitting and/or broadband nonlinear transmission applications.

  20. Exploring the ubiquinone binding cavity of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocilescu, Maja A; Fendel, Uta; Zwicker, Klaus; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2007-10-05

    Proton pumping respiratory complex I is a major player in mitochondrial energy conversion. Yet little is known about the molecular mechanism of this large membrane protein complex. Understanding the details of ubiquinone reduction will be prerequisite for elucidating this mechanism. Based on a recently published partial structure of the bacterial enzyme, we scanned the proposed ubiquinone binding cavity of complex I by site-directed mutagenesis in the strictly aerobic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. The observed changes in catalytic activity and inhibitor sensitivity followed a consistent pattern and allowed us to define three functionally important regions near the ubiquinone-reducing iron-sulfur cluster N2. We identified a likely entry path for the substrate ubiquinone and defined a region involved in inhibitor binding within the cavity. Finally, we were able to highlight a functionally critical structural motif in the active site that consisted of Tyr-144 in the 49-kDa subunit, surrounded by three conserved hydrophobic residues.

  1. Non-covalent conjugation of CdTe QDs with lysozyme binding DNA for fluorescent sensing of lysozyme in complex biological sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujia; Gao, Zhidan; Shao, Na

    2014-11-01

    Water-soluble cysteamine (CA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) conjugated with lysozyme binding DNA (LBD) was constructed for luminescent sensing of lysozyme by forming a ternary self-assembly complex. Addition of negatively charged lysozyme binding DNA to the positively charged CA capped CdTe QDs buffer solution (Tris-HCl pH 7.4) could lead to the formation of QDs-LBD complex through electrostatic interactions. Once lysozyme was introduced into the CdTe QDs-LBD system, it could bind specifically with the QDs-LBD complex, resulting in fluorescence emission enhancement of the QDs due to the surface inert of QDs. At a given amount of LBD and CdTe QDs (LBD: QDs=2: 1), the fluorescence intensity enhancement of QDs was linear with lysozyme concentration over the range of 8.9-71.2 nM, with a detection limit of 4.3 nM. Due to the specific binding of LBD with lysozyme, this approach displayed high selectivity for lysozyme recognition. The sensing mechanism was confirmed by DLS and zeta potential measurement, and agarose gel electrophoresis experiment. Furthermore, the proposed CA-capped CdTe QDs-LBD sensor was applied to lysozyme detection in mouse serum and human morning urine samples, which showed high sensitivity and selectivity in the complex biological sample.

  2. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Cervical Cap KidsHealth > For Teens > Cervical Cap Print A A ... and a female's egg. How Does a Cervical Cap Work? The cervical cap keeps sperm from entering ...

  3. Application of the modified Wheeler cap method for radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas in complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiaying; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, application of a modified Wheeler cap method for the radiation efficiency measurement of balanced electrically small antennas is presented. It is shown that the limitations on the cavity dimension can be overcome and thus measurement in a large cavity is possible. The cavity loss...... is investigated, and a modified radiation efficiency formula that includes the cavity loss is introduced. Moreover, a modification of the technique is proposed that involves the antenna working complex environment inside the Wheeler Cap and thus makes possible measurement of an antenna close to a hand or head...... phantom. The measurement procedures are described and the key features of the technique are discussed. The results of simulations and measurements by the proposed method are presented and compared....

  4. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxic activities of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Sreekanth; Vallala, Srujana; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Rodrigues, Daniel Alencar; Raghavendra, Nulgumnalli Manjunathaiah; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel Ru(II) compounds (Ru-1 to Ru-8) bearing R-pdc, 4-Cl-pbinh ligands (where R=4-CF3, 4-F, 4-OH pdc=3-phenyl-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide, pbinh=phenoxybenzylidene isonicotinyl hydrazides) and their in vitro antitumor activity toward the cell lines murine leukemia L1210, human lymphocyte CEM, human epithelial cervical carcinoma HeLa, BEL-7402 and Molt4/C8. Some of the complexes exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines than the standard drug cisplatin. Ruthenium complex Ru-2 displayed potent cytotoxicity with than that of cisplatin. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and protein binding properties of ruthenium complexes with these ligands are reported. Interactions of these ruthenium complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra proved that the interaction of ruthenium complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) resulted in a conformational change of the latter.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor induces phosphorylation of a 28-kDa mRNA cap-binding protein in human cervical carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, M.W.; Guidon, P.T. Jr.; Donner, D.B. (Cornell Univ. Graduate School of Medical Sciences, New York, NY (USA)); Pfeffer, L.M. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) stimulated the phosphorylation of a 28-kDa protein (p28) in the ME-180 line of human cervical carcinoma cells. The effect of TNF-{alpha} on the phosphorylation state of p28 was rapid (4-fold increase within 15 min) and persistent, remaining above the basal level for at least 2 hr. The specific binding of {sup 125}I-labeled TNF-{alpha} to cell-surface binding sites, the stimulation of p28 phosphorylation by TNF-{alpha}, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by TNF-{alpha} occurred with nearly identical dose-response relationships. Two-dimensional SDS/PAGE resolved p28 into two isoforms having pI values of 6.2 and 6.1. A phosphorylated cap-binding protein was substantially enriched from lysates of control or TNF-{alpha}-treated ME-180 cells by affinity chromatography with 7-methylguanosine 5{prime}-triposphate-Sepharose. The phosphoprotein recovered from this procedure was the substrate for TNF-{alpha}-promoted phosphorylation, p28. Thus, TNF-{alpha} stimulates the phosphorylation of this mRNA cap-binding protein, which may be involved in the transduction of TNF-{alpha}-receptor binding into cellular responses.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor induces phosphorylation of a 28-kDa mRNA cap-binding protein in human cervical carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, M W; Pfeffer, L M; Guidon, P T; Donner, D B

    1989-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulated the phosphorylation of a 28-kDa protein (p28) in the ME-180 line of human cervical carcinoma cells. The effect of TNF-alpha on the phosphorylation state of p28 was rapid (4-fold increase within 15 min) and persistent, remaining above the basal level for at least 2 hr. The specific binding of 125I-labeled TNF-alpha to cell-surface binding sites, the stimulation of p28 phosphorylation by TNF-alpha, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by TNF-alpha occurred with nearly identical dose-response relationships. Two-dimensional SDS/PAGE resolved p28 into two isoforms having pI values of 6.2 and 6.1. A phosphorylated cap-binding protein was substantially enriched from lysates of control or TNF-alpha-treated ME-180 cells by affinity chromatography with 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate-Sepharose. The phosphoprotein recovered from this procedure was the substrate for TNF-alpha-promoted phosphorylation, p28. Thus, TNF-alpha stimulates the phosphorylation of this mRNA cap-binding protein, which may be involved in the transduction of TNF-alpha-receptor binding into cellular responses.

  7. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-02

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases.

  8. A short conserved motif in ALYREF directs cap- and EJC-dependent assembly of export complexes on spliced mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromadzka, Agnieszka M; Steckelberg, Anna-Lena; Singh, Kusum K; Hofmann, Kay; Gehring, Niels H

    2016-03-18

    The export of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) is the final of several nuclear posttranscriptional steps of gene expression. The formation of export-competent mRNPs involves the recruitment of export factors that are assumed to facilitate transport of the mature mRNAs. Using in vitro splicing assays, we show that a core set of export factors, including ALYREF, UAP56 and DDX39, readily associate with the spliced RNAs in an EJC (exon junction complex)- and cap-dependent manner. In order to elucidate how ALYREF and other export adaptors mediate mRNA export, we conducted a computational analysis and discovered four short, conserved, linear motifs present in RNA-binding proteins. We show that mutation in one of the new motifs (WxHD) in an unstructured region of ALYREF reduced RNA binding and abolished the interaction with eIF4A3 and CBP80. Additionally, the mutation impaired proper localization to nuclear speckles and export of a spliced reporter mRNA. Our results reveal important details of the orchestrated recruitment of export factors during the formation of export competent mRNPs.

  9. Multimodal microtubule binding by the Ndc80 kinetochore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alushin, Gregory M; Musinipally, Vivek; Matson, Daniel; Tooley, John; Stukenberg, P Todd; Nogales, Eva

    2012-11-01

    The Ndc80 complex is a key site of kinetochore-microtubule attachment during cell division. The human complex engages microtubules with a globular 'head' formed by tandem calponin-homology domains and an 80-amino-acid unstructured 'tail' that contains sites of phosphoregulation by the Aurora B kinase. Using biochemical, cell biological and electron microscopy analyses, we dissected the roles of the tail in binding of microtubules and mediation of cooperative interactions between Ndc80 complexes. Two segments of the tail that contain Aurora B phosphorylation sites become ordered at interfaces; one with tubulin and the second with an adjacent Ndc80 head on the microtubule surface, forming interactions that are disrupted by phosphorylation. We propose a model in which Ndc80's interaction with either growing or shrinking microtubule ends can be tuned by the phosphorylation state of its tail.

  10. Model of turnover kinetics in the lamellipodium: implications of slow- and fast- diffusing capping protein and Arp2/3 complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Laura M.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2016-12-01

    Cell protrusion through polymerization of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells may be influenced by spatial gradients of diffuse actin and regulators. Here we study the distribution of two of the most important regulators, capping protein and Arp2/3 complex, which regulate actin polymerization in the lamellipodium through capping and nucleation of free barbed ends. We modeled their kinetics using data from prior single molecule microscopy experiments on XTC cells. These experiments have provided evidence for a broad distribution of diffusion coefficients of both capping protein and Arp2/3 complex. The slowly diffusing proteins appear as extended ‘clouds’ while proteins bound to the actin filament network appear as speckles that undergo retrograde flow. Speckle appearance and disappearance events correspond to assembly and dissociation from the actin filament network and speckle lifetimes correspond to the dissociation rate. The slowly diffusing capping protein could represent severed capped actin filament fragments or membrane-bound capping protein. Prior evidence suggests that slowly diffusing Apr2/3 complex associates with the membrane. We use the measured rates and estimates of diffusion coefficients of capping protein and Arp2/3 complex in a Monte Carlo simulation that includes particles in association with a filament network and diffuse in the cytoplasm. We consider two separate pools of diffuse proteins, representing fast and slowly diffusing species. We find a steady state with concentration gradients involving a balance of diffusive flow of fast and slow species with retrograde flow. We show that simulations of FRAP are consistent with prior experiments performed on different cell types. We provide estimates for the ratio of bound to diffuse complexes and calculate conditions where Arp2/3 complex recycling by diffusion may become limiting. We discuss the implications of slowly diffusing populations and suggest experiments to distinguish

  11. New Class of Half-Sandwich Ruthenium(II) Arene Complexes Bearing the Water-Soluble CAP Ligand as an in Vitro Anticancer Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Antonella; Oberhauser, Werner; Riedel, Tina; Peruzzini, Maurizio; Dyson, Paul J; Gonsalvi, Luca

    2017-05-15

    Ruthenium(II) arene complexes of 1,4,7-triaza-9-phosphatricyclo[5.3.2.1]tridecane (CAP) were obtained. Cytotoxicity studies against cancer cell lines reveal higher activity than the corresponding PTA analogues and, in comparison to the effects on noncancerous cells, the complexes are endowed with a reasonable degree of cancer cell selectivity.

  12. Inorganic Sn–X complex ligands capped CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals with high electron mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jinjie; Shen, Huaibin, E-mail: shenhuaibin@henu.edu.cn; Zhou, Changhua; Li, Ning; Wang, Hongzhe; Li, Lin Song, E-mail: lsli@henu.edu.cn [Henan University, Key Laboratory for Special Functional Materials of the Ministry of Education (China)

    2014-12-15

    We report a facile method for the synthesis of size-controlled triangular CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) in the organic phase, and then, molecular metal chalcogenide complexes capped CIS NCs can be synthesized by exchanging original organic compounds with (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Sn{sub 2}S{sub 6} inorganic ligands in environmentally benign solvent. The properties of CIS NCs (coated by both organic and inorganic ligands) were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. CuInS{sub 2} NCs (before and after ligand exchange) films were spin coated on cleaned ITO glass substrates, and the charge transport properties were detected by current-voltage characteristic. We observed that the ligands on the surface of CIS NCs have been exchanged successfully, and the electrical transparency of (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Sn{sub 2}S{sub 6}-CIS NCs films was obviously increased than CIS NCs with organic capping ligands.

  13. MCT-1 protein interacts with the cap complex and modulates messenger RNA translational profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line; Shi, B; Nandi, S;

    2006-01-01

    MCT-1 is an oncogene that was initially identified in a human T cell lymphoma and has been shown to induce cell proliferation as well as activate survival-related pathways. MCT-1 contains the PUA domain, a recently described RNA-binding domain that is found in several tRNA and rRNA modification e...

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure of CAP-Gly Domain of Mammalian Dynactin Determined by Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy: Conformational Plasticity and Interactions with End Binding Protein EB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si; Hou, Guangjin; Schwieters, Charles D.; Ahmed, Shubbir; Williams, John C.; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) and their associated proteins (MAPs) play important roles in vesicle and organelle transport, cell motility and cell division. Perturbation of these processes by mutation typically gives rise to severe pathological conditions. In our efforts to obtain atomic information on MAP/MT interactions with the goal to understand mechanisms that might potentially assist in the development of treatments for these diseases, we have determined the 3D structure of CAP-Gly domain of mammalian dynactin by MAS NMR spectroscopy. We observe two conformations in the β2 strand encompassing residues T43-V44-A45, residues that are adjacent to the disease associated mutation, G59S. Upon binding of CAP-Gly to microtubule plus-end tracking protein EB1, the CAP-Gly shifts to a single conformer. We find extensive chemical shift perturbations in several stretches of residues of CAP-Gly upon binding to EB1, from which we define accurately the CAP-Gly/EB1 binding interface. We also observe that the loop regions may exhibit unique flexibility, especially in the GKNDG motif, which participates in the microtubule binding. This study in conjunction with our previous reports suggests that conformational plasticity is an intrinsic property of CAP-Gly likely due to its unusually high loop content and may be required for its biological functions. PMID:23648839

  15. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Y., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Murakawa, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Shimamura, K., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Oishi, M., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Ohyama, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Kurita, N., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  16. Capping of Silybin with β-Cyclodextrin Influences its Binding with Bovine Serum Albumin: A Study by Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, Sudha; Sowrirajan, Chandrasekaran; Dhanaraj, Premnath; Enoch, Israel V. M. V. [Karunya Univ., Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-07-15

    The association of silybin with β-cyclodextrin and its influence on silybin's binding with bovine serum albumin are reported. The stoichiometry, binding constant, and the structure of silybin-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex are reported. The titrations of silybin with bovine serum albumin in the absence and presence of β-cyclodextrin are carried out and the differences in binding strengths are discussed. Molecular modeling is used to optimize the sites and mode of binding of silybin with bovine serum albumin. Forster resonance energy transfer is calculated and the proximity of interacting molecules is reported in the presence and absence of β-cyclodextrin.

  17. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  18. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) coordinates interactions with eIF4A, eIF4B, and eIF4E in binding and translation of the barley yellow dwarf virus 3' cap-independent translation element (BTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Liu, Qiao; Miller, W Allen; Goss, Dixie J

    2017-04-07

    Barley yellow dwarf virus RNA, lacking a 5' cap and a 3' poly(A) tail, contains a cap-independent translation element (BTE) in the 3'-untranslated region that interacts with host translation initiation factor eIF4G. To determine how eIF4G recruits the mRNA, three eIF4G deletion mutants were constructed: (i) eIF4G601-1196, containing amino acids 601-1196, including the putative BTE-binding region, and binding domains for eIF4E, eIF4A, and eIF4B; (ii) eIF4G601-1488, which contains an additional C-terminal eIF4A-binding domain; and (iii) eIF4G742-1196, which lacks the eIF4E-binding site. eIF4G601-1196 binds BTE tightly and supports efficient translation. The helicase complex, consisting of eIF4A, eIF4B, and ATP, stimulated BTE binding with eIF4G601-1196 but not eIF4G601-1488, suggesting that the eIF4A binding domains may serve a regulatory role, with the C-terminal binding site having negative effects. eIF4E binding to eIF4G601-1196 induced a conformational change, significantly increasing the binding affinity to BTE. A comparison of the binding of eIF4G deletion mutants with BTEs containing mutations showed a general correlation between binding affinity and ability to facilitate translation. In summary, these results reveal a new role for the helicase complex in 3' cap-independent translation element-mediated translation and show that the functional core domain of eIF4G plus an adjacent probable RNA-binding domain mediate translation initiation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Predicting DNA-binding proteins and binding residues by complex structure prediction and application to human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhao

    Full Text Available As more and more protein sequences are uncovered from increasingly inexpensive sequencing techniques, an urgent task is to find their functions. This work presents a highly reliable computational technique for predicting DNA-binding function at the level of protein-DNA complex structures, rather than low-resolution two-state prediction of DNA-binding as most existing techniques do. The method first predicts protein-DNA complex structure by utilizing the template-based structure prediction technique HHblits, followed by binding affinity prediction based on a knowledge-based energy function (Distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state for protein-DNA interactions. A leave-one-out cross validation of the method based on 179 DNA-binding and 3797 non-binding protein domains achieves a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.77 with high precision (94% and high sensitivity (65%. We further found 51% sensitivity for 82 newly determined structures of DNA-binding proteins and 56% sensitivity for the human proteome. In addition, the method provides a reasonably accurate prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins based on predicted DNA-binding complex structures. Its application to human proteome leads to more than 300 novel DNA-binding proteins; some of these predicted structures were validated by known structures of homologous proteins in APO forms. The method [SPOT-Seq (DNA] is available as an on-line server at http://sparks-lab.org.

  20. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites: the EPLYA and EGLYA motifs have a key role in tyrosine phosphorylation and Csk binding, and are substrates of the Abl kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Repetto

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation. p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes phosphorylation and tunes its interactions with other regulatory molecules via post-translation modification. In this work, using mass spectrometry, we found that p140Cap is in vivo phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y within the peptide GEGLpYADPYGLLHEGR (from now on referred to as EGLYA as well as on three serine residues. Consistently, EGLYA has the highest score of in silico prediction of p140Cap phosphorylation. To further investigate the p140Cap function, we performed site specific mutagenesis on tyrosines inserted in EGLYA and EPLYA, a second sequence with the same highest score of phosphorylation. The mutant protein, in which both EPLYA/EGLYA tyrosines were converted to phenylalanine, was no longer tyrosine phosphorylated, despite the presence of other tyrosine residues in p140Cap sequence. Moreover, this mutant lost its ability to bind the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk, previously shown to interact with p140Cap by Far Western analysis. In addition, we found that in vitro and in HEK-293 cells, the Abelson kinase is the major kinase involved in p140Cap tyrosine phosphorylation on the EPLYA and EGLYA sequences. Overall, these data represent an original attempt to in vivo characterise phosphorylated residues of p140Cap. Elucidating the function of p140Cap will provide novel insights into its biological activity not only in normal cells, but also in tumors.

  1. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites: the EPLYA and EGLYA motifs have a key role in tyrosine phosphorylation and Csk binding, and are substrates of the Abl kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Daniele; Aramu, Simona; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Sharma, Nanaocha; Grasso, Silvia; Russo, Isabella; Jensen, Ole N; Cabodi, Sara; Turco, Emilia; Di Stefano, Paola; Defilippi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation). p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes phosphorylation and tunes its interactions with other regulatory molecules via post-translation modification. In this work, using mass spectrometry, we found that p140Cap is in vivo phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y) within the peptide GEGLpYADPYGLLHEGR (from now on referred to as EGLYA) as well as on three serine residues. Consistently, EGLYA has the highest score of in silico prediction of p140Cap phosphorylation. To further investigate the p140Cap function, we performed site specific mutagenesis on tyrosines inserted in EGLYA and EPLYA, a second sequence with the same highest score of phosphorylation. The mutant protein, in which both EPLYA/EGLYA tyrosines were converted to phenylalanine, was no longer tyrosine phosphorylated, despite the presence of other tyrosine residues in p140Cap sequence. Moreover, this mutant lost its ability to bind the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk), previously shown to interact with p140Cap by Far Western analysis. In addition, we found that in vitro and in HEK-293 cells, the Abelson kinase is the major kinase involved in p140Cap tyrosine phosphorylation on the EPLYA and EGLYA sequences. Overall, these data represent an original attempt to in vivo characterise phosphorylated residues of p140Cap. Elucidating the function of p140Cap will provide novel insights into its biological activity not only in normal cells, but also in tumors.

  2. Abnormal actin binding of aberrant β-tropomyosins is a molecular cause of muscle weakness in TPM2-related nemaline and cap myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttila, Minttu; Lemola, Elina; Wallefeld, William; Memo, Massimiliano; Donner, Kati; Laing, Nigel G; Marston, Steven; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2012-02-15

    NM (nemaline myopathy) is a rare genetic muscle disorder defined on the basis of muscle weakness and the presence of structural abnormalities in the muscle fibres, i.e. nemaline bodies. The related disorder cap myopathy is defined by cap-like structures located peripherally in the muscle fibres. Both disorders may be caused by mutations in the TPM2 gene encoding β-Tm (tropomyosin). Tm controls muscle contraction by inhibiting actin-myosin interaction in a calcium-sensitive manner. In the present study, we have investigated the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying five disease-causing mutations in Tm. We show that four of the mutations cause changes in affinity for actin, which may cause muscle weakness in these patients, whereas two show defective Ca2+ activation of contractility. We have also mapped the amino acids altered by the mutation to regions important for actin binding and note that two of the mutations cause altered protein conformation, which could account for impaired actin affinity.

  3. Ribosome binding to a 5' translational enhancer is altered in the presence of the 3' untranslated region in cap-independent translation of turnip crinkle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, Vera A; Yuan, Xuefeng; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Simon, Anne E

    2011-05-01

    Plus-strand RNA viruses without 5' caps require noncanonical mechanisms for ribosome recruitment. A translational enhancer in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) contains an internal T-shaped structure (TSS) that binds to 60S ribosomal subunits. We now report that the 63-nucleotide (nt) 5' UTR of TCV contains a 19-nt pyrimidine-rich element near the initiation codon that supports translation of an internal open reading frame (ORF) independent of upstream 5' UTR sequences. Addition of 80S ribosomes to the 5' UTR reduced the flexibility of the polypyrimidine residues and generated a toeprint consistent with binding to this region. Binding of salt-washed 40S ribosomal subunits was reduced 6-fold when the pyrimidine-rich sequence was mutated. 40S subunit binding generated the same toeprint as 80S ribosomes but also additional ones near the 5' end. Generation of out-of-frame AUGs upstream of the polypyrimidine region reduced translation, which suggests that 5'-terminal entry of 40S subunits is followed by scanning and that the polypyrimidine region is needed for an alternative function that requires ribosome binding. No evidence for RNA-RNA interactions between 5' and 3' sequences was found, suggesting that TCV utilizes an alternative means for circularizing its genome. Combining 5' and 3' UTR fragments in vitro had no discernible effect on the structures of the RNAs. In contrast, when 80S ribosomes were added to both fragments, structural changes were found in the 5' UTR polypyrimidine tract that were not evident when ribosomes interacted with the individual fragments. This suggests that ribosomes can promote an interaction between the 5' and 3' UTRs of TCV.

  4. Molecular and electronic structure of terminal and alkali metal-capped uranium(V) nitride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M.; Cleaves, Peter A.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Chilton, Nicholas F.; Tuna, Floriana; Lewis, William; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2016-12-01

    Determining the electronic structure of actinide complexes is intrinsically challenging because inter-electronic repulsion, crystal field, and spin-orbit coupling effects can be of similar magnitude. Moreover, such efforts have been hampered by the lack of structurally analogous families of complexes to study. Here we report an improved method to U≡N triple bonds, and assemble a family of uranium(V) nitrides. Along with an isoelectronic oxo, we quantify the electronic structure of this 5f1 family by magnetometry, optical and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies and modelling. Thus, we define the relative importance of the spin-orbit and crystal field interactions, and explain the experimentally observed different ground states. We find optical absorption linewidths give a potential tool to identify spin-orbit coupled states, and show measurement of UV...UV super-exchange coupling in dimers by EPR. We show that observed slow magnetic relaxation occurs via two-phonon processes, with no obvious correlation to the crystal field.

  5. From intercalation to groove binding: switching the DNA-binding mode of isostructural transition-metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Haslina; Wragg, Ashley; Cullen, Will; Wombwell, Claire; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-03-10

    The interaction with duplex DNA of a small library of structurally related complexes that all contain a d6-metal ion coordinated to either the 2,2′:4,4′′:4′,4′′′-quaterpyridyl ligand or its methylated derivative are reported. This library is made up of a mixture of newly synthesised and previously reported systems. Despite their structural similarities the complexes display an almost 20-fold variation in binding affinities. Although effects due to the overall charge of the complexes are apparent, the differences in binding characteristics are deeper than this; indeed, in a number of cases, changes in overall charge have little effect on binding affinity. Intriguingly, despite interacting with DNA through unfused ring systems, although two of the complexes studied are groove binders, the majority are non-classical intercalators. A rationale for these effects has been obtained through a combination of experimental and computational studies.

  6. An expeditious synthesis of tailed tren-capped porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Pascale; Ruzié, Christian; Ricard, David; Boitrel, Bernard

    2005-09-29

    [structure: see text] A one-pot two-step versatile synthesis of tailed tren-capped porphyrins has been achieved. The two resulting ligands demonstrate that this expeditious method can be applied to various axial bases to obtain highly functionalized macromolecules attractive for heme modeling purposes. Dioxygen binding of the pyridine-tailed iron complex is reported as a direct application.

  7. Antioxidant activity of bovine serum albumin binding amino acid Schiff-bases metal complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Glutamic acid-salicylaldehyde Schiff-base metal complexes are bound into bovine serum albumin (BSA), which afforded BSA binding Schiff-base metal complexes (BSA-SalGluM, M=Cu, Co, Ni, Zn). The BSA binding metal complexes were characterized by UV-vis spectra and Native PAGE. It showed that the protein structures of BSA kept after coordinating amino acid Schiff-bases metal complexes. The effect of the antioxidant activity was investigated. The results indicate that the antioxidant capacity of BSA increased more than 10 times after binding Schiff-base metal complexes.

  8. Identification of Cytoplasmic Capping Targets Reveals a Role for Cap Homeostasis in Translation and mRNA Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrama Mukherjee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The notion that decapping leads irreversibly to messenger RNA (mRNA decay was contradicted by the identification of capped transcripts missing portions of their 5′ ends and a cytoplasmic complex that can restore the cap on uncapped mRNAs. In this study, we used accumulation of uncapped transcripts in cells inhibited for cytoplasmic capping to identify the targets of this pathway. Inhibition of cytoplasmic capping results in the destabilization of some transcripts and the redistribution of others from polysomes to nontranslating messenger ribonucleoproteins, where they accumulate in an uncapped state. Only a portion of the mRNA transcriptome is affected by cytoplasmic capping, and its targets encode proteins involved in nucleotide binding, RNA and protein localization, and the mitotic cell cycle. The 3′ untranslated regions of recapping targets are enriched for AU-rich elements and microRNA binding sites, both of which function in cap-dependent mRNA silencing. These findings identify a cyclical process of decapping and recapping that we term cap homeostasis.

  9. Biophysical approach to studies of cap-eIF4E interaction by synthetic cap analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Antosiewicz, Jan M; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Specific recognition of mRNA 5' cap by eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E is a rate-limiting step in the translation initiation. Structural determination of the eIF4E-cap complexes, as well as complexes of eIF4E with other proteins regulating its activity, requires complementary experiments that allow for energetic and dynamic aspects of formation and stability of the complexes. Such a combined approach provides information on the binding mechanisms and, hence, may lead to mechanistic models of eIF4E functioning and regulation on the molecular level. This chapter summarizes in detail the method of experiments used to probe the cap-binding center of eIF4E, steady state and stopped-flow fluorescence, and microcalorimetry. The studies were performed with a wide class of synthetic, structurally modified cap analogs that resembles in some respect an application of site directed mutagenesis of the protein. The chapter presents a general recipe as to how to investigate protein-ligand interactions if the protein has no enzymatic activity and both the protein and the ligand absorb and emit UV/VIS radiation in the same spectral ranges.

  10. Quantitative fitness analysis shows that NMD proteins and many other protein complexes suppress or enhance distinct telomere cap defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gregory Addinall

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available To better understand telomere biology in budding yeast, we have performed systematic suppressor/enhancer analyses on yeast strains containing a point mutation in the essential telomere capping gene CDC13 (cdc13-1 or containing a null mutation in the DNA damage response and telomere capping gene YKU70 (yku70Δ. We performed Quantitative Fitness Analysis (QFA on thousands of yeast strains containing mutations affecting telomere-capping proteins in combination with a library of systematic gene deletion mutations. To perform QFA, we typically inoculate 384 separate cultures onto solid agar plates and monitor growth of each culture by photography over time. The data are fitted to a logistic population growth model; and growth parameters, such as maximum growth rate and maximum doubling potential, are deduced. QFA reveals that as many as 5% of systematic gene deletions, affecting numerous functional classes, strongly interact with telomere capping defects. We show that, while Cdc13 and Yku70 perform complementary roles in telomere capping, their genetic interaction profiles differ significantly. At least 19 different classes of functionally or physically related proteins can be identified as interacting with cdc13-1, yku70Δ, or both. Each specific genetic interaction informs the roles of individual gene products in telomere biology. One striking example is with genes of the nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD pathway which, when disabled, suppress the conditional cdc13-1 mutation but enhance the null yku70Δ mutation. We show that the suppressing/enhancing role of the NMD pathway at uncapped telomeres is mediated through the levels of Stn1, an essential telomere capping protein, which interacts with Cdc13 and recruitment of telomerase to telomeres. We show that increased Stn1 levels affect growth of cells with telomere capping defects due to cdc13-1 and yku70Δ. QFA is a sensitive, high-throughput method that will also be useful to understand other

  11. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V;

    1994-01-01

    The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC-binding to granulo......The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC...

  12. DNA structure, binding mechanism and biology functions of polypyridyl complexes in biomedicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is considerable research interest and vigorous debate about the DNA binding of polypyridyl complexes including the electron transfer involving DNA. In this review, based on the fluorescence quenching experiments, it was proposed that DNA might serve as a conductor. From the time-interval CD spectra, the different binding rates of D- and L-enantiomer to calf thymus DNA were observed. The factors influencing the DNA-binding of polypyridyl complexes, and the potential bio-functions of the complexes are also discussed.

  13. Generation of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex-specific Fab antibody blocking the binding of the complex to CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Ivo R; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    During intravascular hemolysis hemoglobin (Hb) binds to haptoglobin (Hp) leading to endocytosis of the complex by the macrophage receptor, CD163. In the present study, we used a phage-display Fab antibody strategy to explore if the complex formation between Hp and Hb leads to exposure of antigenic...

  14. A RSC/nucleosome complex determines chromatin architecture and facilitates activator binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floer, Monique; Wang, Xin; Prabhu, Vidya; Berrozpe, Georgina; Narayan, Santosh; Spagna, Dan; Alvarez, David; Kendall, Jude; Krasnitz, Alexander; Stepansky, Asya; Hicks, James; Bryant, Gene O; Ptashne, Mark

    2010-04-30

    How is chromatin architecture established and what role does it play in transcription? We show that the yeast regulatory locus UASg bears, in addition to binding sites for the activator Gal4, sites bound by the RSC complex. RSC positions a nucleosome, evidently partially unwound, in a structure that facilitates Gal4 binding to its sites. The complex comprises a barrier that imposes characteristic features of chromatin architecture. In the absence of RSC, ordinary nucleosomes encroach over the UASg and compete with Gal4 for binding. Taken with our previous work, the results show that both prior to and following induction, specific DNA-binding proteins are the predominant determinants of chromatin architecture at the GAL1/10 genes. RSC/nucleosome complexes are also found scattered around the yeast genome. Higher eukaryotic RSC lacks the specific DNA-binding determinants found on yeast RSC, and evidently Gal4 works in those organisms despite whatever obstacle broadly positioned nucleosomes present.

  15. Sapovirus translation requires an interaction between VPg and the cap binding protein eIF4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Kim, Deok-Song; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2014-11-01

    Sapoviruses of the Caliciviridae family of small RNA viruses are emerging pathogens that cause gastroenteritis in humans and animals. Molecular studies on human sapovirus have been hampered due to the lack of a cell culture system. In contrast, porcine sapovirus (PSaV) can be grown in cell culture, making it a suitable model for understanding the infectious cycle of sapoviruses and the related enteric caliciviruses. Caliciviruses are known to use a novel mechanism of protein synthesis that relies on the interaction of cellular translation initiation factors with the virus genome-encoded viral protein genome (VPg) protein, which is covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral genome. Using PSaV as a representative member of the Sapovirus genus, we characterized the role of the viral VPg protein in sapovirus translation. As observed for other caliciviruses, the PSaV genome was found to be covalently linked to VPg, and this linkage was required for the translation and the infectivity of viral RNA. The PSaV VPg protein was associated with the 4F subunit of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF4F) complex in infected cells and bound directly to the eIF4E protein. As has been previously demonstrated for feline calicivirus, a member of the Vesivirus genus, PSaV translation required eIF4E and the interaction between eIF4E and eIF4G. Overall, our study provides new insights into the novel mechanism of sapovirus translation, suggesting that sapovirus VPg can hijack the cellular translation initiation mechanism by recruiting the eIF4F complex through a direct eIF4E interaction. Sapoviruses, which are members of the Caliciviridae family, are one of the causative agents of viral gastroenteritis in humans. However, human sapovirus remains noncultivable in cell culture, hampering the ability to characterize the virus infectious cycle. Here, we show that the VPg protein from porcine sapovirus, the only cultivatable sapovirus, is essential for viral translation and

  16. Binding and interaction of di- and tri-substituted organometallic triptycene palladium complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rina; Bhowmick, Sourav; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2014-10-01

    Two triptycene-based ligands with pendant bromophenyl units have been prepared. These triptycene derivatives have been used as synthons for the synthesis of di and tri nuclear palladium complexes. The organic molecules and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been fully characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The mode of binding and effect of the complexes on pUC19 plasmid, calf thymus DNA and oligomer duplex DNA have been investigated by a host of analytical methods. The complexes brought about unwinding of supercoiled plasmid and the unwinding angle was found to be related to the binding affinity of the complexes with DNA, where both these parameters were guided by the structure of the complexes. Concentration-dependent inhibition of endonuclease activity of SspI and BamHI by the complexes indicates preference for G/C sequence for binding to DNA. However, neither the complexes did not introduce any cleavage at abasic site in oligomer duplex DNA, nor they created linear form of the plasmid upon co-incubation with the DNA samples. The interactions of the complexes with DNA were found to be strongly guided by the structure of the complexes, where intercalation as well as groove binding was observed, without inflicting any damage to the DNA. The mode of interaction of the complexes with DNA was further confirmed by isothermal calorimetry.

  17. A DNA immunoprecipitation assay used in quantitative detection of in vitro DNA-protein complex binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Young; Chae, Ji Hyung; Oh, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chul Geun

    2013-10-15

    To begin gene transcription, several transcription factors must bind to specific DNA sequences to form a complex via DNA-protein interactions. We established an in vitro method for specific and sensitive analyses of DNA-protein interactions based on a DNA immunoprecipitation (DIP) method. We verified the accuracy and efficiency of the DIP assay in quantitatively measuring DNA-protein binding using transcription factor CP2c as a model. With our DIP assay, we could detect specific interactions within a DNA-CP2c complex, with reproducible and quantitative binding values. In addition, we were able to effectively measure the changes in DNA-CP2c binding by the addition of a small molecule, FQI1 (factor quinolinone inhibitor 1), previously identified as a specific inhibitor of this binding. To identify a new regulator of DNA-CP2c binding, we analyzed several CP2c binding peptides and found that only one class of peptide severely inhibits DNA-CP2c binding. These data show that our DIP assay is very useful in quantitatively detecting the binding dynamics of DNA-protein complex. Because DNA-protein interaction is very dynamic in different cellular environments, our assay can be applied to the detection of active transcription factors, including promoter occupancy in normal and disease conditions. Moreover, it may be used to develop a targeted regulator of specific DNA-protein interaction.

  18. Simultaneous Determination of Binding Constants for Multiple Carbohydrate Hosts in Complex Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Beeren, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    to determine binding constants for all other detectable and resolvable hosts. With the use of high-resolution 1H−13C HSQC experiments, complexes of amphiphiles with more than 10 different maltooligosaccharides can be resolved. Hereby, the binding capabilities of a set of structurally related hosts can...

  19. The complex interplay between ligand binding and conformational structure of the folate binding protein (folate receptor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Hansen, Steen I.

    2015-01-01

    , and the binding induces a conformational change with formation of hydrophilic and stable holo-FBP. Holo-FBP exhibits a ligand-mediated concentration-dependent self-association into multimers of great thermal and chemical stability due to strong intermolecular forces. Both ligand and FBP are thus protected against...

  20. Proteoform-specific protein binding of small molecules in complex matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the specific binding between protein targets and small molecules is critically important for drug discovery. Conventional assays require isolation and purification of small molecules from complex matrices through multistep chromatographic fractionation, which may alter their original ...

  1. DNA binding, DNA cleavage, and cytotoxicity studies of two new copper (II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Rezvani, Alireza; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2011-05-01

    The DNA binding behavior of [Cu(phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (1) and [Cu(bpy)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (2) was studied with a series of techniques including UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and viscometric methods. Cytotoxicity effect and DNA unwinding properties were also investigated. The results indicate that the Cu(II) complexes interact with calf-thymus DNA by both partially intercalative and hydrogen binding. These findings have been further substantiated by the determination of intrinsic binding constants spectrophotometrically, 12.5 × 10(5) and 5 × 10(5) for 1 and 2, respectively. Our findings suggest that the type of ligands and structure of complexes have marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes involving CT-DNA. Circular dichroism results show that complex 1 causes considerable increase in base stacking of DNA, whereas 2 decreases the base stacking, which is related to more extended aromatic area of 1,10-phenanthroline in 1 rather than bipyridine in 2. Slow decrease in DNA viscosity indicates partially intercalative binding in addition to hydrogen binding on the surface of DNA. The second binding mode was also confirmed by additional tests: interaction in denaturation condition and acidic pH. Also, these new complexes induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) cells.

  2. Interaction of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and proteasome protein complexes with multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeger, Michael; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Wilkinson, Caroline R M

    2003-01-01

    Fission yeast Rhp23 and Pus1 represent two families of multiubiquitin chain-binding proteins that associate with the proteasome. We show that both proteins bind to different regions of the proteasome subunit Mts4. The binding site for Pus1 was mapped to a cluster of repetitive sequences also found...... in the proteasome subunit SpRpn2 and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunit Cut4. The putative role of Pus1 as a factor involved in allocation of ubiquitinylated substrates for the proteasome is discussed....

  3. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) KidsHealth > For Parents > Cradle Cap ( ... many babies develop called cradle cap. About Cradle Cap Cradle cap is the common term for seborrheic ...

  4. Effective DNA binding and cleaving tendencies of malonic acid coupled transition metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin, Narayanaperumal; Utthra, Ponnukalai Ponya; Kumaravel, Ganesan; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-11-01

    Eight transition metal complexes were designed to achieve maximum biological efficacy. They were characterized by elemental analysis and various other spectroscopic techniques. The monomeric complexes were found to espouse octahedral geometry and non-electrolytic nature. The DNA interaction propensity of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), studied at physiological pH by spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, cyclic voltammetry, and viscometric techniques revealed intercalation as the possible binding mode. Fascinatingly, the complexes were found to exhibit greater binding strength than that of the free ligands. A strong hypochromism and a slight red shift were exhibited by complex 5 among the other complexes. The intrinsic binding constant values of all the complexes compared to cisplatin reveal that they are excellent metallonucleases than that of cisplatin. The complexes were also shown to reveal displacement of the ethidium bromide, a strong intercalator using fluorescence titrations. Gel electrophoresis was used to divulge the competence of the complexes in cleaving the supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA. From the results, it is concluded that the complexes, especially 5, are excellent chemical nucleases in the presence of H2O2. Furthermore, the in vitro antimicrobial screening of the complexes exposes that these complexes are excellent antimicrobial agents. Overall the effect of coligands is evident from the results of all the investigations.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  6. Synthesis of trimethoprim metal complexes: Spectral, electrochemical, thermal, DNA-binding and surface morphology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirezen, Nihat; Tarınç, Derya; Polat, Duygu; Ceşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Complexes of trimethoprim (TMP), with Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Fe(III) have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic techniques involving UV-vis, IR, mass and (1)H NMR. CHN elemental analysis, electrochemical and thermal behavior of complexes have also been investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that these compounds can bind to CT DNA. The binding constants of the complexes with CT DNA have also been calculated. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA have shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA by both the intercalative and the electrostatic binding mode. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against two different fungi has been evaluated and compared with the reference drug TMP. Almost all types of complexes show excellent activity against all type of bacteria and fungi. The morphology of the CT DNA, TMP, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with CT DNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at CT DNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism.

  7. Study on the Binding Mode of a Co(Ⅱ) Complex with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qing-Hua; YANG Pin

    2005-01-01

    The mode of binding of CoLCl2, here L=bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine, with calf thymus DNA has been investigated by fluorescence measurements, equilibrium dialysis, viscosity experiments and gel electrophoresis. The complex was found to bind but weakly to DNA, with binding constant of 1.96× 104 L/mol determind at 20 ℃ in a solution containing 5 mmol/L Tris-HCl (pH 7.1) and 50 mmol/L NaCl. Polyelectrolyte theory was applied to analyse these values. Viscosity experiments show that binding did not alter the relative viscosity of DNA with any complexes to an appreciable extent. Electrophoresis test displayed that the compound could not cleave the DNA.These results show that the complex is essentially electrostatically bound to DNA.

  8. Computational protocol for predicting the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tarun; Jayaram, B

    2007-06-01

    Zinc is one of the most important metal ions found in proteins performing specific functions associated with life processes. Coordination geometry of the zinc ion in the active site of the metalloprotein-ligand complexes poses a challenge in determining ligand binding affinities accurately in structure-based drug design. We report here an all atom force field based computational protocol for estimating rapidly the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes, considering electrostatics, van der Waals, hydrophobicity, and loss in conformational entropy of protein side chains upon ligand binding along with a nonbonded approach to model the interactions of the zinc ion with all the other atoms of the complex. We examined the sensitivity of the binding affinity predictions to the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters, partial atomic charges, and dielectric treatments adopted for system preparation and scoring. The highest correlation obtained was R2 = 0.77 (r = 0.88) for the predicted binding affinity against the experiment on a heterogenous dataset of 90 zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes consisting of five unique protein targets. Model validation and parameter analysis studies underscore the robustness and predictive ability of the scoring function. The high correlation obtained suggests the potential applicability of the methodology in designing novel ligands for zinc-metalloproteins. The scoring function has been web enabled for free access at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/bapplz.jsp as BAPPL-Z server (Binding Affinity Prediction of Protein-Ligand complexes containing Zinc metal ions).

  9. Water soluble heptakis(6-deoxy-6-thio)cyclomaltoheptaose capped gold nanoparticles via metal vapour synthesis: NMR structural characterization and complexation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccello-Barretta, Gloria; Evangelisti, Claudio; Balzano, Federica; Vanni, Letizia; Aiello, Federica; Jicsinszky, Laszlo

    2011-05-01

    The complexation of heptakis(6-deoxy-6-thio)cyclomaltoheptaose to gold nanoparticles prepared by using the Metal Vapour Synthesis (MVS) led to water soluble gold nanoaggregates, thermally stable at 25°C. The role of gold concentration in the MVS-derived starting solution as well as of the cyclodextrin to gold molar ratio on the size of cyclodextrin-capped gold nanoparticles were investigated. The ability of cyclodextrin bonded to gold nanoparticles to include deoxycytidine was also probed in comparison with that of 1-thio-β-D-glucose sodium salt.

  10. Understanding TR binding to pMHC complexes: how does a TR scan many pMHC complexes yet preferentially bind to one.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Mohammed Khan

    Full Text Available Understanding the basis of the binding of a T cell receptor (TR to the peptide-MHC (pMHC complex is essential due to the vital role it plays in adaptive immune response. We describe the use of computed binding (free energy (BE, TR paratope, pMHC epitope, molecular surface electrostatic potential (MSEP and calculated TR docking angle (θ to analyse 61 TR/pMHC crystallographic structures to comprehend TR/pMHC interaction. In doing so, we have successfully demonstrated a novel/rational approach for θ calculation, obtained a linear correlation between BE and θ without any "codon" or amino acid preference, provided an explanation for TR ability to scan many pMHC ligands yet specifically bind one, proposed a mechanism for pMHC recognition by TR leading to T cell activation and illustrated the importance of the peptide in determining TR specificity, challenging the "germline bias" theory.

  11. Mutations at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex Strongly Affect Oxygen Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2017-01-01

    The homodimeric bc1 protein complex is embedded in membranes of mitochondria and photosynthetic bacteria, where it transports protons across the membrane to maintain an electrostatic potential used to drive ATP synthesis as part of the respiratory or photosynthetic pathways. The reaction cycle...... of the bc1 complex is driven by series of redox processes involving substrate molecules from the membrane, but occasional side reactions between an intermediate semiquinone substrate and molecular oxygen are suspected to be a source of toxic superoxide, which is believed to be a factor in aging. The present...... investigation employs molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of mutations in the Qo binding sites of the bc1 complex on the ability of oxygen molecules to migrate to and bind at various locations within the complex. It is found that the mutations strongly affect the ability of oxygen to bind...

  12. Discovery of a cobalt complex with high MEK1 binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyue; Zhou, Tongliang; Liu, Hui; Xu, Fengrong; Niu, Yan; Wang, Chao; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ping

    2017-05-15

    A series of Schiff base ligands (L(1)-L(5)) and their cobalt(II) complexes (1-5) were designed and synthesized for MEK1 binding experiment. The biological evaluation results showed that Bis(N,N'-disalicylidene)-3,4-phenylenediamine-cobalt(II) 1 and Bis(N,N'-disalicylidene)-1,2-cyclohexanediamine-cobalt(II) 2 are much more effective than the parent Schiff bases (L(1) and L(2)). Importantly, 2 exhibited MEK1 binding affinity with IC5071nM, which is so far the best result for metal complexes and more potent than U0126 (7.02μM) and AZD6244 (2.20μM). Docking study was used to elucidate the binding modes of complex 2 with MEK1. Thus cobalt(II) complex 2 may be further developed as a novel MEK1 inhibitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anticancer and DNA binding activities of platinum (IV) complexes; importance of leaving group departure rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouryasin, Zahra; Yousefi, Reza; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Hamidizadeh, Peyman; Alavianmehr, Mohammad-Mehdi; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2014-03-01

    The two six-coordinate Pt(IV) complexes, containing bidentate nitrogen donor/methyl ligands with general formula [Pt(X)2Me2((t)bu2bpy)], where (t)bu2bpy = 4,4'-ditert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine and X = Cl (C1) or Br (C2), serving as the leaving groups were synthesized for evaluation of their anticancer activities and DNA binding properties. To examine anticancer activities of the synthetic complexes, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and ethidium bromide/acridine orange (EB/AO) staining method were performed. The binding properties of these complexes to DNA and purine nucleotides were examined, using different spectroscopic techniques. These complexes demonstrated significant anticancer activities against three cancer cell lines Jurkat, K562, and MCF-7. On the basis of the results of EB/AO staining, C1 and C2 were also capable to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. These complexes comprise halide leaving groups, displaying different departure rates; accordingly, they demonstrated slightly dissimilar anticancer activity and significantly different DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. The results of DNA interaction studies of these complexes suggest a mixed-binding mode, comprising partial intercalation and groove binding. Overall, the results presented herein indicate that the newly synthesized Pt(IV) complexes are promising class of the potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing novel platinum anticancer drugs. This study also highlights the importance of leaving group in anticancer activity and DNA binding properties of Pt(IV) complexes.

  14. Analytical methods to determine the comparative DNA binding studies of curcumin-Cu(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban; Rajasekaran, Marichamy; Rajagopal, Gurusamy; Athappan, Periakaruppan

    2012-11-01

    DNA interaction studies of two mononuclear [1:1(1); 1:2(2)] copper(II) complexes of curcumin have been studied. The interaction of these complexes with CT-DNA has been explored by physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption spectral titrations of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 3 nm with the DNA binding affinity of K(b), 5.21×10(4)M(-1) that are higher than that obtained for 2 (red-shift, 2 nm; K(b), 1.73×10(4)M(-1)) reveal that the binding occurs in grooves as a result of the interaction is via exterior phosphates. The CD spectra of these Cu(II) complexes show a red shift of 3-10nm in the positive band with increase in intensities. This spectral change of induced CD due to the hydrophobic interaction of copper complexes with DNA is the characteristic of B to A conformational change. The EB displacement assay also reveals the same trend as observed in UV-Vis spectral titration. The addition of complexes 1 and 2 to the DNA bound ethidium bromide (EB) solutions causes an obvious reduction in emission intensities indicating that these complexes competitively bind to DNA with EB. The positive shift of both the E(pc) and E(0)' accompanied by reduction of peak currents in differential pulse voltammogram (DPV), upon adding different concentrations of DNA to the metal complexes, are obviously in favor of strong binding to DNA. The super coiled plasmid pUC18 DNA cleavage ability of Cu(II) complexes in the presence of reducing agent reveals the single strand DNA cleavage (ssDNA) is observed. The hydroxyl radical (HO()) and the singlet oxygen are believed to be the reactive species responsible for the cleavage.

  15. Cytotoxic, DNA binding, DNA cleavage and antibacterial studies of ruthenium-fluoroquinolone complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohan N Patel; Hardik N Joshi; Chintan R Patel

    2014-05-01

    Six new Ru(II) and Ru(III) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, LC-MS, electronic spectra, IR spectra and magnetic moment measurements. DNA-binding properties of Ru complexes have been studied by means of absorption spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements as well as their HS DNA cleavage properties by means of agarose gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that all the complexes can bind to DNA via partial intercalative mode. The b values of complexes were found in the range 2.14 × 104 to 2.70 × 105 M-1. All the complexes show excellent efficiency of cleaving DNA than respective fluoroquinolones. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay has been performed to check the cytotoxic activity. The IC50 values of the complexes are in the range of 6.27 to 16.05 g mL-1.

  16. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  17. CARMIL is a bona fide capping protein interactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Kirsten; Olszewski, Thomas E; Bowers, M Blair; Dimitrova, Mariana; Ginsburg, Ann; Hammer, John A

    2004-01-23

    CARMIL, also known as Acan 125, is a multidomain protein that was originally identified on the basis of its interaction with the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of type I myosins from Acanthamoeba. In a subsequent study of CARMIL from Dictyostelium, pull-down assays indicated that the protein also bound capping protein and the Arp2/3 complex. Here we present biochemical evidence that Acanthamoeba CARMIL interacts tightly with capping protein. In biochemical preparations, CARMIL copurified extensively with two polypeptides that were shown by microsequencing to be the alpha- and beta-subunits of Acanthamoeba capping protein. The complex between CARMIL and capping protein, which is readily demonstratable by chemical cross-linking, can be completely dissociated by size exclusion chromatography at pH 5.4. Analytical ultracentrifugation, surface plasmon resonance and SH3 domain pull-down assays indicate that the dissociation constant of capping protein for CARMIL is approximately 0.4 microm or lower. Using CARMIL fusion proteins, the binding site for capping protein was shown to reside within the carboxyl-terminal, approximately 200 residue, proline-rich domain of CARMIL. Finally, chemical cross-linking, analytical ultracentrifugation, and rotary shadowed electron microscopy revealed that CARMIL is asymmetric and that it exists in a monomer dimer equilibrium with an association constant of 1.0 x 10(6) m(-1). Together, these results indicate that CARMIL self-associates and interacts with capping protein with affinities that, given the cellular concentrations of the proteins ( approximately 1 and 2 microm for capping protein and CARMIL, respectively), indicate that both activities should be physiologically relevant.

  18. The DNA-binding and bioactivity of rare earth metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wang, Bochu; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Liancai

    2013-08-01

    Recently more and more attention is paid to the rare earth metal complexes, because the properties of the rare earth metals are similar to those of the transition metals such as the similar atomic and the ionic radius. A large number of rare metal complexes were synthesized, and their bioactivities were also studied. This review highlights recent researches on the interaction of some rare earth metal complexes with DNA, analyzes how the configuration of the complexes influences the binding affinity, and focuses on the pharmacological activities of the complexes, such as anticancer, antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-virus.

  19. Death cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbæk, Torsten R; Kofoed, Pernille Bouteloup; Bove, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Death cap (Amanita phalloides) is commonly found and is one of the five most toxic fungi in Denmark. Toxicity is due to amatoxin, and poisoning is a serious medical condition, causing organ failure with potential fatal outcome. Acknowledgement and clarification of exposure, symptomatic and focused...

  20. Binding of properdin to solid-phase immune complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, A; Baatrup, G; Svehag, S E

    1998-01-01

    The capacity of serum to support deposition of C3, properdin and factor B was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using solid-phase immune complexes (IC) for activation of complement. Deposition of C3 and properdin occurred in fairly dilute normal human serum (NHS), but factor B uptake...... was hardly detectable. Alternative pathway-mediated deposition of C3 with slow kinetics was demonstrated in C2-deficient serum and in NHS depleted of C1q, factor D and properdin (C1qDP-depleted serum) after reconstitution with factor D and properdin. Efficient uptake of properdin required a functional...... classical pathway, in the presence of which C3 and properdin were rapidly deposited onto the IC. Judging from findings in C3-deficient serum, factor I-deficient serum, and C1qDPB-depleted serum, the uptake of properdin was strictly C3-dependent, and did not require the presence of factors B and D. Thus, C3b...

  1. The complexity of condensed tannin binding to bovine serum albumin--An isothermal titration calorimetry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilmister, Rachel L; Faulkner, Peta; Downey, Mark O; Darby, Samuel J; Falconer, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was applied to study the binding of purified proanthocyanidin oligomers to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The molecular weight of the proanthocyanidin oligomer had a major impact on its binding to BSA. The calculated change in enthalpy (ΔH) and association constant (Ka) became greater as the oligomer size increased then plateaued at the heptameric oligomer. These results support a model for precipitation of proteins by proanthocyanidin where increased oligomer size enhanced the opportunity for cross linkages between proteins ultimately forming sediment-able complexes. The authors suggest tannin binding to proteins is opportunistic and involves multiple sites, each with a different Ka and ΔH of binding. The ΔH of binding comprises both an endothermic hydrophobic interaction and exothermic hydrogen bond component. This suggests the calculated entropy value (ΔS) for tannin-protein interactions is subject to a systematic error and should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, superoxide scavenging activity and DNA-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M.

    2012-05-01

    A new series of nickel(II) complexes with the tetraaza macrocyclic ligand have been synthesized as possible functional models for nickel-superoxide dismutase enzyme. The reaction of 5-amino-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole-4-carbaldehyde (AMPC) with itself in the presence of nickel(II) ion yields, the new macrocyclic cationic complex, [NiL(NO3)2], containing a ligand composed of the self-condensed AMPC (4 mol) bound to a single nickel(II) ion. A series of metathetical reactions have led to the isolation of a number of newly complexes of the types [NiL]X2; X = ClO4 and BF4, [NiLX2], X = Cl and Br (Scheme 1). Structures and characterizations of these complexes were achieved by several physicochemical methods namely, elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductivity, and spectral (IR and UV-Vis) measurements. The electrochemical properties and thermal behaviors of these chelates were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG) techniques. A distorted octahedral stereochemistry has been proposed for the six-coordinate nitrato, and halogeno complexes. For the four-coordinate, perchlorate and fluoroborate, complex species a square-planar geometry is proposed. The measured superoxide dismutase mimetic activities of the complexes indicated that they are potent NiSOD mimics and their activities are compared with those obtained previously for nickel(II) complexes. The probable mechanistic implications of the catalytic dismutation of O2rad - by the synthesized nickel(II) complexes are discussed. The DNA-binding properties of representative complexes [NiLCl2] and [NiL](PF4)2 have been investigated by the electronic absorption and fluorescence measurements. The results obtained suggest that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode and the binding affinity for DNA follows the order: [NiLCl2] □ [NiL](PF4)2.

  3. Arabidopsis CAP1 - a key regulator of actin organisation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Michael J; Rodrigues, Cecília; Dimmock, Simon; Ketelaar, Tijs; Maciver, Sutherland K; Malhó, Rui; Hussey, Patrick J

    2007-08-01

    Maintenance of F-actin turnover is essential for plant cell morphogenesis. Actin-binding protein mutants reveal that plants place emphasis on particular aspects of actin biochemistry distinct from animals and fungi. Here we show that mutants in CAP1, an A. thaliana member of the cyclase-associated protein family, display a phenotype that establishes CAP1 as a fundamental facilitator of actin dynamics over a wide range of plant tissues. Plants homozygous for cap1 alleles show a reduction in stature and morphogenetic disruption of multiple cell types. Pollen grains exhibit reduced germination efficiency, and cap1 pollen tubes and root hairs grow at a decreased rate and to a reduced length. Live cell imaging of growing root hairs reveals actin filament disruption and cytoplasmic disorganisation in the tip growth zone. Mutant cap1 alleles also show synthetic phenotypes when combined with mutants of the Arp2/3 complex pathway, which further suggests a contribution of CAP1 to in planta actin dynamics. In yeast, CAP interacts with adenylate cyclase in a Ras signalling cascade; but plants do not have Ras. Surprisingly, cap1 plants show disruption in plant signalling pathways required for co-ordinated organ expansion suggesting that plant CAP has evolved to attain plant-specific signalling functions.

  4. ATP-dependent DNA binding, unwinding, and resection by the Mre11/Rad50 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqi; Sung, Sihyun; Kim, Youngran; Li, Fuyang; Gwon, Gwanghyun; Jo, Aera; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Kim, Taeyoon; Song, Ok-Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Yunje

    2016-04-01

    ATP-dependent DNA end recognition and nucleolytic processing are central functions of the Mre11/Rad50 (MR) complex in DNA double-strand break repair. However, it is still unclear how ATP binding and hydrolysis primes the MR function and regulates repair pathway choice in cells. Here,Methanococcus jannaschii MR-ATPγS-DNA structure reveals that the partly deformed DNA runs symmetrically across central groove between two ATPγS-bound Rad50 nucleotide-binding domains. Duplex DNA cannot access the Mre11 active site in the ATP-free full-length MR complex. ATP hydrolysis drives rotation of the nucleotide-binding domain and induces the DNA melting so that the substrate DNA can access Mre11. Our findings suggest that the ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes in both DNA and the MR complex coordinate the melting and endonuclease activity.

  5. Cu(II) complexes of glyco-imino-aromatic conjugates in DNA binding, plasmid cleavage and cell cytotoxicity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Kumar; Atanu Mitra; Amrendra Kumar Ajay; Manoj Kumar Bhat; Chebrolu P Rao

    2012-11-01

    Binding of metal complexes of C2-glucosyl conjugates with DNA has been established by absorption and fluorescence studies. Conformational changes occurred in DNA upon binding have been studied by circular dichroism. All these studies are suggestive that the metal complexes bind to DNA through intercalation. Binding of di-nuclear copper complex 5 was found to be stronger when compared to the other complexes studied. Copper complexes were found to cleave the plasmid DNA in the absence of oxidizing or reducing agent, whereas, zinc complexes do not cleave. Metal complexes have shown toxicity to the HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines.Morphological studies, western blot and FACS analysis are suggestive of apoptotic cell death induced by the metal complexes. Di-nuclear copper complexes were found to be better as compared to the mononuclear ones in binding, plasmid cleavage and also in causing more cell death.

  6. In silico properties characterization of water-soluble γ-cyclodextrin bi-capped C60 complex: free energy and geometrical insights for stability and solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruyin; Wu, Shanshan

    2015-06-25

    Cyclodextrin-related host-guest encapsulation is pivotal to modulate the solubility of C60, thereby promoting its potential therapeutic applications. Here we present a computational study on γ-cyclodextrin bi-capped C60 complex, probing characteristics for all the possible stoichiometry in aqueous solution. The potential of mean force (PMF) delineating the association process was computed, while the geometrical features of corresponding thermodynamically-favored stoichiometry are captured by molecular dynamics simulations, which provides insightful explanations to previous experimental and computational results. PMF partitioning indicates that intermolecular van der Waals dispersion forces are essential for molecular recognition and self-assembly, and the hydrogen-bonding interactions play a key role in dissolving the complex in water.

  7. Insights into the binding properties of a cuprous ion embedded in the tren cap of a calix[6]arene and supramolecular trapping of an intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzet, Guillaume; Rager, Marie-Noëlle; Reinaud, Olivia

    2007-02-21

    Coordination of Cu(I) to a tren unit that is covalently linked to a calix[6]arene has been explored. The resulting complex revealed itself very stable in solution under an inert atmosphere, but extremely sensitive to O2 in solution as well as in the solid state. Therefore, its binding properties towards non-redox ligands have been studied in detail. The electron-rich metal center displays moderate affinity for nitrilo ligands compared to the calix[6]tris-pyridine ligand. Indeed, the binding enthalpy with acetonitrile is only -30 kJ mol(-1), whereas it is -72 kJ mol(-1) with the tris-pyridine system. In contrast, CO binding is relatively strong due to important pi-back donation from the metal center, as evidenced by the CO stretch, which was found to be less energetic (2075 cm(-1)) than that measured for ligands based on aromatic donors such as imidazole or pyridine. The conformational and dynamic properties of this calix-system have also been studied in detail. With an empty cavity or with the very small CO guest-ligand, the calix-core undergoes partial self-inclusion leading to dissymmetrical conformations. In contrast, nitrilo ligands act as "shoe-trees" that maintain the calix-core in a C(3v) symmetrical cone conformation. Very interestingly, the variable T study relative to the ligand exchange process highlighted a two-step dissociative pathway, where Cu-N bond cleavage/formation is differentiated from the nitrilo guest expulsion/inclusion from/into the calixarene cavity.

  8. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  9. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-05

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  10. RAD50 and NBS1 form a stable complex functional in DNA binding and tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eddy; Sanchez, Humberto; Kinoshita, Eri; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2009-04-01

    The RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 protein complex (RMN) plays an essential role during the early steps of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. Previous data suggest that one important role for RMN in DSB repair is to provide a link between DNA ends. The striking architecture of the complex, a globular domain from which two extended coiled coils protrude, is essential for this function. Due to its DNA-binding activity, ability to form dimers and interact with both RAD50 and NBS1, MRE11 is considered to be crucial for formation and function of RMN. Here, we show the successful expression and purification of a stable complex containing only RAD50 and NBS1 (RN). The characteristic architecture of the complex was not affected by absence of MRE11. Although MRE11 is a DNA-binding protein it was not required for DNA binding per se or DNA-tethering activity of the complex. The stoichiometry of NBS1 in RMN and RN complexes was estimated by SFM-based volume analysis. These data show that in vitro, R, M and N form a variety of stable complexes with variable subunit composition and stoichiometry, which may be physiologically relevant in different aspects of RMN function.

  11. Apical cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLoud, T.C.; Isler, R.J.; Novelline, R.A.; Putman, C.E.; Simeone, J.; Stark, P.

    1981-08-01

    Apical caps, either unilateral or bilateral, are a common feature of advancing age and are usually the result of subpleural scarring unassociated with other diseases. Pancoast (superior sulcus) tumors are a well recognized cause of unilateral asymmetric apical density. Other lesions arising in the lung, pleura, or extrapleural space may produce unilateral or bilateral apical caps. These include: (1) inflammatory: tuberculosis and extrapleural abscesses extending from the neck; (2) post radiation fibrosis after mantle therapy for Hodgkin disease or supraclavicular radiation in the treatment of breast carcinoma; (3) neoplasm: lymphoma extending from the neck or mediastinum, superior sulcus bronchogenic carcinoma, and metastases; (4) traumatic: extrapleural dissection of blood from a ruptured aorta, fractures of the ribs or spine, or hemorrhage due to subclavian line placement; (5) vascular: coarctation of the aorta with dilated collaterals over the apex, fistula between the subclavian artery and vein; and (6) miscellaneous: mediastinal lipomatosis with subcostal fat extending over the apices.

  12. Munc18-1 mutations that strongly impair SNARE-complex binding support normal synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marieke; Burkhardt, Pawel; de Wit, Heidi; Toonen, Ruud F; Fasshauer, Dirk; Verhage, Matthijs

    2012-05-02

    Synaptic transmission depends critically on the Sec1p/Munc18 protein Munc18-1, but it is unclear whether Munc18-1 primarily operates as a integral part of the fusion machinery or has a more upstream role in fusion complex assembly. Here, we show that point mutations in Munc18-1 that interfere with binding to the free Syntaxin1a N-terminus and strongly impair binding to assembled SNARE complexes all support normal docking, priming and fusion of synaptic vesicles, and normal synaptic plasticity in munc18-1 null mutant neurons. These data support a prevailing role of Munc18-1 before/during SNARE-complex assembly, while its continued association to assembled SNARE complexes is dispensable for synaptic transmission.

  13. A Novel Cobalt(Ⅲ) Mixed-polypyridyl Complex: Synthesis,Characterization and DNA Binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,Hui-Li(陈绘丽); YANG,Pin(杨频)

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex[Co(phen)2HPIP]Cl3[phen=phenanethroline,HPIP=2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanethroline]has been synthesized and structurally characterized by elemental analysis,UV,IR and 1H NMR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complex with calf thymus DNA(CT DNA)has been studied using absorption and emission spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques and cyclic voltammetry. The compound shows absorption hypochromicity, fluorescence enhancement and DNA melting temperature increment when binding to CT DNA. CV measurement shows a shift in reduction potential and a change in peak current with addition of DNA.These results prove that the compound inserts into DNA base pairs. The shift of peak potential indicates the ion interaction mode between the complex and DNA. The binding constant of the compound to DNA is 4.37×104. The complex also seems to be an efficient photocleavage reagent.

  14. Prediction of peptide binding to a major histocompatibility complex class I molecule based on docking simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Binding between major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and immunogenic epitopes is one of the most important processes for cell-mediated immunity. Consequently, computational prediction of amino acid sequences of MHC class I binding peptides from a given sequence may lead to important biomedical advances. In this study, an efficient structure-based method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules was developed, in which the binding free energy of the peptide was evaluated by two individual docking simulations. An original penalty function and restriction of degrees of freedom were determined by analysis of 361 published X-ray structures of the complex and were then introduced into the docking simulations. To validate the method, calculations using a 50-amino acid sequence as a prediction target were performed. In 27 calculations, the binding free energy of the known peptide was within the top 5 of 166 peptides generated from the 50-amino acid sequence. Finally, demonstrative calculations using a whole sequence of a protein as a prediction target were performed. These data clearly demonstrate high potential of this method for predicting peptide binding to MHC class I molecules.

  15. CTCF genomic binding sites in Drosophila and the organisation of the bithorax complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eimear E Holohan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulator or enhancer-blocking elements are proposed to play an important role in the regulation of transcription by preventing inappropriate enhancer/promoter interaction. The zinc-finger protein CTCF is well studied in vertebrates as an enhancer blocking factor, but Drosophila CTCF has only been characterised recently. To date only one endogenous binding location for CTCF has been identified in the Drosophila genome, the Fab-8 insulator in the Abdominal-B locus in the Bithorax complex (BX-C. We carried out chromatin immunopurification coupled with genomic microarray analysis to identify CTCF binding sites within representative regions of the Drosophila genome, including the 3-Mb Adh region, the BX-C, and the Antennapedia complex. Location of in vivo CTCF binding within these regions enabled us to construct a robust CTCF binding-site consensus sequence. CTCF binding sites identified in the BX-C map precisely to the known insulator elements Mcp, Fab-6, and Fab-8. Other CTCF binding sites correlate with boundaries of regulatory domains allowing us to locate three additional presumptive insulator elements; "Fab-2," "Fab-3," and "Fab-4." With the exception of Fab-7, our data indicate that CTCF is directly associated with all known or predicted insulators in the BX-C, suggesting that the functioning of these insulators involves a common CTCF-dependent mechanism. Comparison of the locations of the CTCF sites with characterised Polycomb target sites and histone modification provides support for the domain model of BX-C regulation.

  16. Binding energies of nucleobase complexes: Relevance to homology recognition of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Sergio Cruz; Prentiss, Mara; Fyta, Maria

    2016-06-01

    The binding energies of complexes of DNA nucleobase pairs are evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations at the level of dispersion corrected density functional theory. We begin with Watson-Crick base pairs of singlets, duplets, and triplets and calculate their binding energies. At a second step, mismatches are incorporated into the Watson-Crick complexes in order to evaluate the variation in the binding energy with respect to the canonical Watson-Crick pairs. A linear variation of this binding energy with the degree of mismatching is observed. The binding energies for the duplets and triplets containing mismatches are further compared to the energies of the respective singlets in order to assess the degree of collectivity in these complexes. This study also suggests that mismatches do not considerably affect the energetics of canonical base pairs. Our work is highly relevant to the recognition process in DNA promoted through the RecA protein and suggests a clear distinction between recognition in singlets, and recognition in duplets or triplets. Our work assesses the importance of collectivity in the homology recognition of DNA.

  17. Analysis of binding ability of two tetramethylpyridylporphyrins to albumin and its complex with bilirubin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, Alexey V.; Shipitsyna, Maria K.; Vashurin, Arthur S.; Rumyantsev, Evgeniy V.; Timin, Alexander S.; Ivanov, Sergey P.

    2016-11-01

    An interaction between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(N-methyl-x-pyridyl)porphyrins, x = 2; 4 (TMPyPs) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and its bilirubin (BR) complex was investigated by UV-Viz and fluorescence spectroscopy under imitated physiological conditions involving molecular docking studies. The parameters of forming intermolecular complexes (binding constants, quenching rate constants, quenching sphere radius etc.) were determined. It was showed that the interaction between proteins and TMPyPs occurs via static quenching of protein fluorescence and has predominantly hydrophobic and electrostatic character. It was revealed that obtained complexes are relatively stable, but in the case of TMPyP4 binding with proteins occurs better than TMPyP2. Nevertheless, both TMPyPs have better binding ability with free protein compared to BRBSA at the same time. The influence of TMPyPs on the conformational changes in protein molecules was studied using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that there is no competition of BR with TMPyPs for binging sites on protein molecule and BR displacement does not occur. Molecular docking calculations have showed that TMPyPs can bind with albumin via tryptophan residue in the hydrophilic binding site of protein molecule but it is not one possible interaction way.

  18. Crystal structures of multidrug binding protein TtgR in complex with antibiotics and plant antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Meng, Cuixiang; Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan L; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2007-06-08

    Antibiotic resistance is a widely spread phenomenon. One major mechanism that underlies antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the active extrusion of toxic compounds through the membrane-bound efflux pumps that are often regulated at the transcriptional level. TtgR represses the transcription of TtgABC, a key efflux pump in Pseudomonas putida, which is highly resistant to antibiotics, solvents and toxic plant secondary products. Previously we showed that TtgR is the only reported repressor that binds to different classes of natural antimicrobial compounds, which are also extruded by the efflux pump. We report here five high-resolution crystal structures of TtgR from the solvent-tolerant strain DOT-T1E, including TtgR in complex with common antibiotics and plant secondary metabolites. We provide structural basis for the unique ligand binding properties of TtgR. We identify two distinct and overlapping ligand binding sites; the first one is broader and consists of mainly hydrophobic residues, whereas the second one is deeper and contains more polar residues including Arg176, a unique residue present in the DOT-T1E strain but not in other Pseudomonas strains. Phloretin, a plant antimicrobial, can bind to both binding sites with distinct binding affinities and stoichiometries. Results on ligand binding properties of native and mutant TtgR proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the binding affinities and stoichiometries, and suggest a potential positive cooperativity between the two binding sites. The importance of Arg176 in phloretin binding was further confirmed by the reduced ability of phloretin in releasing the mutant TtgR from bound DNA compared to the native protein. The results presented here highlight the importance and versatility of regulatory systems in bacterial antibiotic resistance and open up new avenues for novel antimicrobial development.

  19. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven (BMS)

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  20. Synthetic Detergents: Their Influence upon Iron-Binding Complexes of Natural Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, F; Hooper, F F

    1966-07-29

    Organic compounds extracted from Michigan lakes and streams and added to algal cultures increase the growth rate of the green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardi) when iron is present. Two-dimensional paper chromatography has shown that the iron is complexed by organic fractions containing an amine group. When isolated from natural waters containing a concentration of over 0.3 part per million alkyl benzene sulfonate, these compounds do not show an iron-binding capacity. Separation of this sulfonate from the amine complexes restores the iron-binding capability. These findings suggest that detergents may influence the mobility of iron by reducing the number of binding sites, and in this way may have an important secondary effect upon the primary production of lakes and streams.

  1. Dual binding mode in cohesin-dockerin complexes as assessed through stretching studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Michał; Cieplak, Marek

    2016-10-01

    A recent experimental study by Jobst et al. of stretching of a wild-type (WT) cohesin-dockerin complex has identified two kinds of the force-displacement patterns, with a single or double-peaked final rupture, which are termed "short" and "long" here. This duality has been interpreted as arising from the existence of two kinds of binding. Here, we analyze the separation of two cohesin-dockerin complexes of C. thermocellum theoretically. We use a coarse-grained structure-based model and the values of the pulling speeds are nearly experimental. In their native states, the two systems differ in the mutual binding orientations of the molecules in the complex. We demonstrate that the WT complex (PDB:1OHZ) unravels along two possible pathways that are qualitatively consistent with the presence of the short and long patterns observed experimentally. On the other hand, the mutated complex (PDB:2CCL) leads only to short trajectories. The short and long stretching pathways also appear in the cohesin-dockerin-Xmodule complex (PDB:4IU3, WT) of R. flavefaciens. Thus the duality in the stretching patterns need not be necessarily due to the duality in binding.

  2. WAVE binds Ena/VASP for enhanced Arp2/3 complex-based actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Noguera, Philippe; Abou-Ghali, Majdouline; Manzi, John; Faqir, Fahima; Lamora, Audrey; Guérin, Christophe; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WAVE complex is the main activator of the Arp2/3 complex for actin filament nucleation and assembly in the lamellipodia of moving cells. Other important players in lamellipodial protrusion are Ena/VASP proteins, which enhance actin filament elongation. Here we examine the molecular coordination between the nucleating activity of the Arp2/3 complex and the elongating activity of Ena/VASP proteins for the formation of actin networks. Using an in vitro bead motility assay, we show that WAVE directly binds VASP, resulting in an increase in Arp2/3 complex-based actin assembly. We show that this interaction is important in vivo as well, for the formation of lamellipodia during the ventral enclosure event of Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. Ena/VASP's ability to bind F-actin and profilin-complexed G-actin are important for its effect, whereas Ena/VASP tetramerization is not necessary. Our data are consistent with the idea that binding of Ena/VASP to WAVE potentiates Arp2/3 complex activity and lamellipodial actin assembly.

  3. DNA binding mode of novel tetradentate amino acid based 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.; Selvaganapathy, M.; Mahalakshmi, R.

    2012-10-01

    Few transition metal complexes of tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff base ligands containing 2-hydroxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrine and amino acids (alanine/valine) abbreviated to KHL1/KHL2 have been synthesized. All the metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The Schiff bases KHL1/KHL2 are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around the metal ions. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA have been investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The DNA binding constants reveal that all these complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding mode. The studies on mechanism of photocleavage reveal that singlet oxygen (1O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2rad -) may play an important role in the photocleavage. The Schiff bases and their metal complexes have been screened for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Fusarium solani, Culvularia lunata, Rhizoctonia bataicola and Candida albicans by MIC method.

  4. Characterization of interactions of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase with its binding protein in the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yun-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Patel, Mulchand S., E-mail: mspatel@buffalo.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Unlike pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes (PDCs) from prokaryotes, PDCs from higher eukaryotes have an additional structural component, E3-binding protein (BP), for binding of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) in the complex. Based on the 3D structure of the subcomplex of human (h) E3 with the di-domain (L3S1) of hBP, the amino acid residues (H348, D413, Y438, and R447) of hE3 for binding to hBP were substituted singly by alanine or other residues. These substitutions did not have large effects on hE3 activity when measured in its free form. However, when these hE3 mutants were reconstituted in the complex, the PDC activity was significantly reduced to 9% for Y438A, 20% for Y438H, and 18% for D413A. The binding of hE3 mutants with L3S1 determined by isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the binding affinities of the Y438A, Y438H, and D413A mutants to L3S1 were severely reduced (1019-, 607-, and 402-fold, respectively). Unlike wild-type hE3 the binding of the Y438A mutant to L3S1 was accompanied by an unfavorable enthalpy change and a large positive entropy change. These results indicate that hE3-Y438 and hE3-D413 play important roles in binding of hE3 to hBP.

  5. Zinc complexes of the antibacterial drug oxolinic acid: structure and DNA-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarushi, Alketa; Psomas, George; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P

    2009-06-01

    The neutral mononuclear zinc complexes with the quinolone antibacterial drug oxolinic acid in the absence or presence of a nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline have been synthesized and characterized. The experimental data suggest that oxolinic acid is on deprotonated mode acting as a bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ion through the ketone and one carboxylato oxygen atoms. The crystal structures of (chloro)(oxolinato)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II), 2, and bis(oxolinato)(1,10-phenanthroline)zinc(II), 3, have been determined with X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV and fluorescence spectroscopies. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that they can bind to CT DNA and the DNA-binding constants have been calculated. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that complex 3 exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that it binds to DNA in strong competition with EB.

  6. Serum and plasma fibronectin binds to complement reacted immune complexes primarily via Clq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Svehag, S E

    1986-01-01

    The binding of fibronectin to human Clq, C3b, and complement-reacted immune complexes (IC) was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Microplates were coated with BSA followed by incubation with rabbit-anti-BSA IgG or F(ab')2 fragments of rabbit anti-BSA. Incubation of the solid phas...

  7. Synthesis, characterization, thermal and DNA-binding properties of new zinc complexes with 2-hydroxyphenones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrkalić, Emina; Zianna, Ariadni; Psomas, George; Gdaniec, Maria; Czapik, Agnieszka; Coutouli-Argyropoulou, Evdoxia; Lalia-Kantouri, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The neutral mononuclear zinc complexes with 2-hydroxyphenones (ketoH) having the formula [Zn(keto)2(H2O)2] and [Zn(keto)2(enR)], where enR stands for a N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 2,2'-dipyridylamine (dpamH), have been synthesized and characterized by IR, UV and (1)H NMR spectroscopies. The 2-hydroxyphenones are chelated to the metal ion through the phenolate and carbonyl oxygen atoms. The crystal structures of [bis(2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II)] dimethanol solvate and [bis(2-hydroxy-benzophenone)(2,2'-bipyridine)zinc(II)] dimethanol solvate have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The thermal stability of the zinc complexes has been investigated by simultaneous TG/DTG-DTA technique. The ability of the complexes to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been studied by UV-absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy as well as viscosity measurements. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that they can bind to CT DNA and the corresponding binding constants to DNA have been calculated and evaluated. The complexes most probably bind to CT DNA via intercalation as concluded by studying the viscosity of a DNA solution in the presence of the complexes. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that the reported complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB, suggesting strong competition with EB for the intercalation site.

  8. Synthesis, Cytotoxic Activity, and DNA Binding Properties of Copper (II Complexes with Hesperetin, Naringenin, and Apigenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxiong Tan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of copper (II with hesperetin, naringenin, and apigenin of general composition [CuL2(H2O2]⋅nH2O (1–3 have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, FT-IR, ESI-MS, and TG-DTG thermal analysis. The free ligands and the metal complexes have been tested in vitro against human cancer cell lines hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG-2, gastric carcinomas (SGC-7901, and cervical carcinoma (HeLa. Complexes 1 and 3 were found to exhibit growth inhibition of SGC-7901 and HepG2 cell lines with respect to the free ligands; the inhibitory rate of complex 1 is 43.2% and 43.8%, while complex 3 is 46% and 36%, respectively. The interactions of complex 1 and its ligand Hsp with calf thymus DNA were investigated by UV-Vis, fluorescence, and CD spectra. Both complex 1 and Hsp were found to bind DNA in intercalation modes, and the binding affinity of complex 1 was stronger than that of free ligand.

  9. CO{sub 2} binding in the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Jacob D.; Buytendyk, Allyson M.; Wang, Yi; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kim, Seong K. [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-21

    We have studied the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex by a combination of mass spectrometry, anion photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. The (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex has much in common with previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complexes both in terms of geometric structure and covalent bonding character. Unlike the previously studied N-heterocycles, however, quinoline has a positive electron affinity, and this provided a pathway for determining the binding energy of CO{sub 2} in the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex. From the theoretical calculations, we found CO{sub 2} to be bound within the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex by 0.6 eV. We also showed that the excess electron is delocalized over the entire molecular framework. It is likely that the CO{sub 2} binding energies and excess electron delocalization profiles of the previously studied (N-heterocycle-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complexes are quite similar to that of the (quinoline-CO{sub 2}){sup −} anionic complex. This class of complexes may have a role to play in CO{sub 2} activation and/or sequestration.

  10. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikeska, Ruth [Institute of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, Building 22a, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Wacker, Roland [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 4, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Arni, Raghuvir [Department of Physics, IBILCE/UNESP, São Jose do Rio Preto, São Paul (Brazil); Singh, Tej P. [Department of Biophysics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India); Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat [Institute of Crystallography of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 59, 117333 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voelter, Wolfgang [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University of Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 4, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Betzel, Christian, E-mail: betzel@unisgi1.desy.de [Institute of Biochemistry and Food Chemistry, University of Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, Building 22a, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  11. Mammalian CAP interacts with CAP, CAP2, and actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberstey, A; Yu, G; Loewith, R; Lakusta, C; Young, D

    1996-06-01

    We previously identified human CAP, a homolog of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein. Previous studies suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CAP have distinct functions. We have explored the interactions of human CAP with various proteins. First, by performing yeast two-hybrid screens, we have identified peptides from several proteins that interact with the C-terminal and/or the N-terminal domains of human CAP. These peptides include regions derived from CAP and BAT3, a protein with unknown function. We have further shown that MBP fusions with these peptides can associate in vitro with the N-terminal or C-terminal domains of CAP fused to GST. Our observations indicate that CAP contains regions in both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains that are capable of interacting with each other or with themselves. Furthermore, we found that myc-epitope-tagged CAP coimmunoprecipitates with HA-epitope-tagged CAP from either yeast or mammalian cell extracts. Similar results demonstrate that human CAP can also interact with human CAP2. We also show that human CAP interacts with actin, both by the yeast two-hybrid test and by coimmunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged CAP from yeast or mammalian cell extracts. This interaction requires the C-terminal domain of CAP, but not the N-terminal domain. Thus CAP appears to be capable of interacting in vivo with other CAP molecules, CAP2, and actin. We also show that actin co-immunoprecipitates with HA-CAP2 from mammalian cell extracts.

  12. Effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation: ionic binding and chain stiffening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiping; Fang, Yapeng; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Phillips, Glyn O

    2016-03-31

    Coupling of electrostatic complexation with conformational transition is rather general in protein/polyelectrolyte interaction and has important implications in many biological processes and practical applications. This work studied the electrostatic complexation between κ-carrageenan (κ-car) and type B gelatin, and analyzed the effects of the conformational ordering of κ-car induced upon cooling in the presence of potassium chloride (KCl) or tetramethylammonium iodide (Me4NI). Experimental results showed that the effects of conformational ordering on protein/polyelectrolyte electrostatic complexation can be decomposed into ionic binding and chain stiffening. At the initial stage of conformational ordering, electrostatic complexation can be either suppressed or enhanced due to the ionic bindings of K(+) and I(-) ions, which significantly alter the charge density of κ-car or occupy the binding sites of gelatin. Beyond a certain stage of conformational ordering, i.e., helix content θ > 0.30, the effect of chain stiffening, accompanied with a rapid increase in helix length ζ, becomes dominant and tends to dissociate the electrostatic complexation. The effect of chain stiffening can be theoretically interpreted in terms of double helix association.

  13. Complexities in human herpesvirus-6A and -6B binding to host cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon Metz; Höllsberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Human herpesvirus-6A and -6B uses the cellular receptor CD46 for fusion and infection of the host cell. The viral glycoprotein complex gH-gL from HHV-6A binds to the short consensus repeat 2 and 3 in CD46. Although all the major isoforms of CD46 bind the virus, certain isoforms may have higher...... affinity than others for the virus. Within recent years, elucidation of the viral complex has identified additional HHV-6A and -6B specific glycoproteins. Thus, gH-gL associates with a gQ1-gQ2 dimer to form a heterotetrameric complex. In addition, a novel complex consisting of gH-gL-gO has been described...... that does not bind CD46. Accumulating evidence suggests that an additional HHV-6A and -6B receptor exists. The previous simple picture of HHV-6A/B-host cell contact therefore includes more layers of complexities on both the viral and the host cell side of the interaction....

  14. Purification and characterization of a DNA-binding recombinant PREP1:PBX1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Bruckmann, Chiara; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Human PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain transcriptional factors, whose biochemical and structural characterization has not yet been fully described. Expression of full-length recombinant PREP1 (47.6 kDa) and PBX1 (46.6 kDa) in E. coli is difficult because of poor yield, high instability and insufficient purity, in particular for structural studies. We cloned the cDNA of both proteins into a dicistronic vector containing an N-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and co-expressed and co-purified a stable PBX1:PREP1 complex. For structural studies, we produced two C-terminally truncated complexes that retain their ability to bind DNA and are more stable than the full-length proteins through various purification steps. Here we report the production of large amounts of soluble and pure recombinant human PBX1:PREP1 complex in an active form capable of binding DNA.

  15. The use of airborne radar reflectometry to establish snow/firn density distribution on Devon Ice Cap, Canadian Arctic: A path to understanding complex heterogeneous internal layering patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, A.; Grima, C.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The internal layer stratigraphy of polar ice sheets revealed by airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) contains valuable information about past ice sheet mass balance and dynamics. Internal layers in the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are considered to be isochrones and are continuous over several hundreds of kilometres. In contrast, internal layers in Canadian Arctic ice caps appear to be very heterogeneous and fragmentary, consisting of highly discontinuous layers that can be traced over only a few to several tens of kilometres. Internal layers most likely relate to former ice surfaces (the upper few meters of snow/firn), the properties which are directly influenced by atmospheric conditions including the air temperature, precipitation rate, and prevailing wind pattern. We hypothesize that the heterogeneous and complex nature of layers in the Canadian Arctic results from highly variable snow and firn conditions at the surface. Characterizing surface properties such as variations in the snow/firn density from dry to wet snow/firn, as well as high-density shallow ice layers and lenses of refrozen water can help to elucidate the complex internal layer pattern in the Canadian Arctic ice caps. Estimates of the snow/firn surface density and roughness can be derived from reflectance and scattering information using the surface radar returns from RES measurements. Here we present estimates of the surface snow/firn density distribution over Devon Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic derived by the Radar Statistical Reconnaissance (RSR) methodology (Grima et al., 2014, Planetary & Space Sciences) using data collected by recent airborne radar sounding programs. The RSR generates estimates of the statistical distribution of surface echo amplitudes over defined areas along a survey transect. The derived distributions are best-fitted with a theoretical stochastic envelope, parameterized with the signal reflectance and scattering, in order to separate those two components. Finally

  16. Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 binds to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholl, P.; Diez, A.; Mourad, W.; Parsonnet, J.; Geha, R.S.; Chatila, T. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a 22-kDa exotoxin produced by strains of Staphylococcus aureus and implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. In common with other staphylococcal exotoxins, TSST-1 has diverse immunological effects. These include the induction of interleukin 2 receptor expression, interleukin 2 synthesis, proliferation of human T lymphocytes, and stimulation of interleukin 1 synthesis by human monocytes. In the present study, the authors demonstrate that TSST-1 binds with saturation kinetics and with a dissociation constant of 17-43 nM to a single class of binding sites on human mononuclear cells. There was a strong correlation between the number of TSST-1 binding sites and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules. Affinity chromatography of {sup 125}I-labeled cell membranes over TSST-1-agarose resulted in the recovery of two bands of 35 kDa and 31 kDa that comigrated, respectively, with the {alpha} and {beta} chains of HLA-DR and that could be immunoprecipitated with anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibodies. Binding of TSST-1 was demonstrated to HLA-DR and HLA-DQ L-cell transfectants. These results indicate that major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represent the major binding site for TSST-1 on human cells.

  17. Crystal structures of starch binding domain from Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase in complex with isomaltooligosaccharide: insights into polysaccharide binding mechanism of CBM21 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chen-Hsi; Li, Kun-Mou; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Jiang, Ting-Ying; Sun, Yuh-Ju

    2014-06-01

    Glucoamylases are responsible for hydrolysis of starch and polysaccharides to yield β-D-glucose. Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoGA) is composed of an N-terminal starch binding domain (SBD) and a C-terminal catalytic domain connected by an O-glycosylated linker. Two carbohydrate binding sites in RoSBD have been identified, site I is created by three highly conserved aromatic residues, Trp47, Tyr83, and Tyr94, and site II is built up by Tyr32 and Phe58. Here, the two crystal structures of RoSBD in complex with only α-(1,6)-linked isomaltotriose (RoSBD-isoG3) and isomaltotetraose (RoSBD-isoG4) have been determined at 1.2 and 1.3 Å, respectively. Interestingly, site II binding is observed in both complexes, while site I binding is only found in the RoSBD-isoG4 complex. Hence, site II acts as the recognition binding site for carbohydrate and site I accommodates site II to bind isoG4. Site I participates in sugar binding only when the number of glucosyl units of oligosaccharides is more than three. Taken together, two carbohydrate binding sites in RoSBD cooperate to reinforce binding mode of glucoamylase with polysaccharides as well as the starch.

  18. Mechanism of Coupled Folding and Binding in the siRNA-PAZ Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Feng

    2008-08-01

    The PAZ domain plays a key role in gene silencing pathway. The PAZ domain binds with siRNAs to form the multimeric RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC identifies mRNAs homologous to the siRNAs and promotes their degradation. It was found that binding with siRNA significantly enhances apo-PAZ folding. However, the mechanism by which folding is coupled to binding is poorly understood. Thus, the coupling relationship between binding and folding is very important for understanding the function of gene silencing. We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) of both bound and apo-PAZ to study the coupling mechanism between binding and folding in the siRNA-PAZ complex. Room-temperature MD simulations suggest that both PAZ and siRNA become more rigid and stable upon siRNA binding. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature MD simulations shows that both bound and apo-PAZ unfold via a two-state process. The unfolding pathways are different between bound and apo-PAZ: the order of helix III and helices I & II unfolding is switched. Furthermore, transition probability was used to determine the transition state ensemble for both bound and apo-PAZ. It was found that the transition state of bound PAZ is more compact than that of apo-PAZ. The predicted Φ-values suggest that the Φ-values of helix III and sheets of β3-β7 for bound PAZ are more native-like than those of apo-PAZ upon the binding of siRNA. The results can help us to understand the mechanism of gene silencing.

  19. Quercetin-Iron Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, DNA Cleavage, and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Xu, Xiuquan; Xia, Li; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin-iron (II) complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron micrography and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal:ligand) of the complex. Antioxidant study of the quercetin and its metal complex against 2, 2-di-phenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical showed that the complex has much more radical scavenging activity than free quercetin. The interaction of quercetin-iron (II) complex with DNA was determined using ultraviolet visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that quercetin-iron (II) complex can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form to nicked circular form and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was an oxidative cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of complex to cleave DNA. In addition, antibacterial activity of complex on E.coli and S. aureus was also investigated. The results showed that complex has higher antibacterial activity than ligand.

  20. CCAN Assembly Configures Composite Binding Interfaces to Promote Cross-Linking of Ndc80 Complexes at the Kinetochore

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pekgöz Altunkaya, Gülsah; Malvezzi, Francesca; Demianova, Zuzana; Zimniak, Tomasz; Litos, Gabriele; Weissmann, Florian; Mechtler, Karl; Herzog, Franz; Westermann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    .... Kinetochores contain two supramolecular protein assemblies. The ten-protein KMN network harbors key microtubule-binding sites in the Ndc80 complex and mediates assembly of checkpoint complexes via the KNL-1/Spc105 protein [1, 2...

  1. Visualization of coupled protein folding and binding in bacteria and purification of the heterodimeric complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyong; Chong, Shaorong

    2003-01-01

    During overexpression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, misfolded proteins often aggregate and form inclusion bodies. If an aggregation-prone recombinant protein is fused upstream (as an N-terminal fusion) to GFP, aggregation of the recombinant protein domain also leads to misfolding of the downstream GFP domain, resulting in a decrease or loss of fluorescence. We investigated whether the GFP domain could fold correctly if aggregation of the upstream protein domain was prevented in vivo by a coupled protein folding and binding interaction. Such interaction has been previously shown to occur between the E. coli integration host factors and , and between the domains of the general transcriptional coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein and the activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors. In this study, fusion of integration host factor or the CREB-binding protein domain upstream to GFP resulted in aggregation of the fusion protein. Coexpression of their respective partners, on the other hand, allowed soluble expression of the fusion protein and a dramatic increase in fluorescence. The study demonstrated that coupled protein folding and binding could be correlated to GFP fluorescence. A modified miniintein containing an affinity tag was inserted between the upstream protein domain and GFP to allow rapid purification and identification of the heterodimeric complex. The GFP coexpression fusion system may be used to identify novel protein-protein interactions that involve coupled folding and binding or protein partners that can solubilize aggregation-prone recombinant proteins.

  2. Comparison and analysis on the serum-binding characteristics of aspirin-zinc complex and aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-Xin; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Hong-Lin; Li, Li-Wei

    2017-09-01

    This study was designed to compare the protein-binding characteristics of aspirin-zinc complex (AZN) with those of aspirin itself. AZN was synthesized and interacted with a model transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Three-dimensional fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were used to characterize the interaction of AZN with HSA under physiological conditions. The interaction mechanism was explored using a fluorescence quenching method and thermodynamic calculation. The binding site and binding locality of AZN on HSA were demonstrated using a fluorescence probe technique and Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. Synchronous fluorescence and CD spectra were employed to reveal the effect of AZN on the native conformation of the protein. The HSA-binding results for AZN were compared with those for aspirin under consistent experimental conditions, and indicated that aspirin acts as a guide in AZN when binding to Sudlow's site I, in subdomain IIA of the HSA molecule. Moreover, compared with aspirin, AZN showed greater observed binding constants with, but smaller changes in the α-helicity of, HSA, which proved that AZN might be easier to transport and have less toxicity in vivo. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Major histocompatibility complex class I binding predictions as a tool in epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2010-01-01

    for any human leucocyte antigen (HLA) -A or -B molecule with known protein sequence. Furthermore, peptide binding to MHC molecules from several non-human primates, mouse strains and other mammals can now be predicted. In this review, a number of different prediction methods are briefly explained......Over the last decade, in silico models of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway have developed significantly. Before, peptide binding could only be reliably modelled for a few major human or mouse histocompatibility molecules; now, high-accuracy predictions are available...

  4. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Pohl, Ehmke, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Durham University, (United Kingdom); Usón, Isabel, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); University of Göttingen, (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The structure solution of DNA-binding protein structures and complexes based on the combination of location of DNA-binding protein motif fragments with density modification in a multi-solution frame is described. Protein–DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein–DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein–DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein–DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  5. Free-energy analysis of enzyme-inhibitor binding: aspartic proteinase-pepstatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, P; Das, A; Jayaram, B

    2001-01-01

    Expeditious in silico determinations of the free energies of binding of a series of inhibitors to an enzyme are of immense practical value in structure-based drug design efforts. Some recent advances in the field of computational chemistry have rendered a rigorous thermodynamic treatment of biologic molecules feasible, starting from a molecular description of the biomolecule, solvent, and salt. Pursuing the goal of developing and making available a software for assessing binding affinities, we present here a computationally rapid, albeit elaborate, methodology to estimate and analyze the molecular thermodynamics of enzyme-inhibitor binding with crystal structures as the point of departure. The complexes of aspartic proteinases with seven inhibitors have been adopted for this study. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of six distinct steps decomposed into a total of 18 well-defined components. The model we employed involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of electrostatic interactions, solvent screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of salt effects. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated using the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, and solvent accessibility measures. Estimates of translational and rotational entropy losses on complexation as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy are also included. The calculated standard free energies of binding at this stage are within an order of magnitude of the observed inhibition constants and necessitate further improvements in the computational protocols to enable quantitative predictions. Some areas such as inclusion of structural adaptation effects, incorporation of site-dependent amino acid pKa shifts, consideration of the dynamics of the active site for fine-tuning the methodology are easily

  6. Identification of Ubiquinol Binding Motifs at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Schulten, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    for the function of the bc1 complex is the initial redox process that involves a bifurcated electron transfer in which the two electrons from a quinol substrate are passed to different electron acceptors in the bc1 complex. The electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The overall mechanism of quinol......Enzymes of the bc1 complex family power the biosphere through their central role in respiration and photosynthesis. These enzymes couple the oxidation of quinol molecules by cytochrome c to the transfer of protons across the membrane, to generate a proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. Key...... oxidation by the bc1 complex is well enough characterized to allow exploration at the atomistic level, but details are still highly controversial. The controversy stems from the uncertain binding motifs of quinol at the so-called Qo active site of the bc1 complex. Here we employ a combination of classical...

  7. Tuning affinity and reversibility for O2 binding in dinuclear Co(II) complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vad, Mads Sørensen; Johansson, Frank Bartnik; Seidler-Egdal, Rune Kirk

    2013-01-01

    of the peroxido O–O stretch in the solid-state resonance Raman spectra at 298 K (830–836 cm−1). Using density functional theory calculations, we conclude that the Co(II) atoms of the deoxy complexes coordinate solvent molecules as auxiliary ligands and that a conformation change of the ligand is involved...... in the reversible O2 binding process. The alternative of five coordination in the deoxy Co(II) complexes is therefore seen as less likely. The crystal structure and p(O2)50% are also reported for the 1-naphthoato-bridged oxy complex [Co2(bpbp)(O2)(C10H7O2)]2+, and the O2 binding affinity in that case is also......The O2 binding affinity of a series of dicobalt(II) complexes can be tuned between p(O2)50% = 2.3 × 10−3 and 700 × 10−3 atm at 40 °C by varying the number of H and Cl atoms in the bridging acetato ligands of [Co2(bpbp)(CH(3−n)ClnCO2)(CH3CN)2]2+, where bpbp− = 2,6-bis(N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of mRNA cap analogs containing phosphorothioate substitutions that bind tightly to eIF4E and are resistant to the decapping pyrophosphatase DcpS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Joanna; Lewdorowicz, Magdalena; Zuberek, Joanna; Grudzien-Nogalska, Ewa; Bojarska, Elzbieta; Stepinski, Janusz; Rhoads, Robert E; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Davis, Richard E; Jemielity, Jacek

    2008-06-01

    Analogs of the mRNA cap are widely employed to study processes involved in mRNA metabolism as well as being useful in biotechnology and medicinal applications. Here we describe synthesis of six dinucleotide cap analogs bearing a single phosphorothioate modification at either the alpha, beta, or gamma position of the 5',5'-triphosphate chain. Three of them were also modified with methyl groups at the 2'-O position of 7-methylguanosine to produce anti-reverse cap analogs (ARCAs). Due to the presence of stereogenic P centers in the phosphorothioate moieties, each analog was obtained as a mixture of two diastereomers, D1 and D2. The mixtures were resolved by RP HPLC, providing 12 different compounds. Fluorescence quenching experiments were employed to determine the association constant (K(AS)) for complexes of the new analogs with eIF4E. We found that phosphorothioate modifications generally stabilized the complex between eIF4E and the cap analog. The most strongly bound phosphorothioate analog (the D1 isomer of the beta-substituted analog m(7)Gpp(S)pG) was characterized by a K(AS) that was more than fourfold higher than that of its unmodified counterpart (m(7)GpppG). All analogs modified in the gamma position were resistant to hydrolysis by the scavenger decapping pyrophosphatase DcpS from both human and Caenorhabditis elegans sources. The absolute configurations of the diastereomers D1 and D2 of analogs modified at the alpha position (i.e., m(7)Gppp(S)G and m(2) (7,2'-O )Gppp(S)G) were established as S(P) and R(P) , respectively, using enzymatic digestion and correlation with the S(P) and R(P) diastereomers of guanosine 5'-O-(1-thiodiphosphate) (GDPalphaS). The analogs resistant to DcpS act as potent inhibitors of in vitro protein synthesis in rabbit reticulocyte lysates.

  9. Synthesis, structure, DNA binding and cleavage activity of a new copper(Ⅱ) complex of bispyridylpyrrolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Rui; HU Xiao-hui; YI Xiao-yi; ZHANG Shou-chun

    2015-01-01

    A copper-bispyridylpyrrolide complex [Cu(PDPH)Cl] (PDPH = 2,5-bis(2′-pyridyl)pyrrole) was synthesized and characterized. The complex crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space groupPccn,a = 0.9016(3) nm,b = 1.0931(4) nm,c = 2.5319(8) nm, andV = 2.4951(15) nm3. The copper center is situated in a square planar geometry. The interaction of the copper(Ⅱ) complexwith calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by electronic absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectra. It is proposed that the complex binds to CT-DNA through groove binding mode. Nuclease activity of the complex was also studied by gel electrophoresis method. The complex can efficiently cleave supercoiled pBR322 DNA in the presence of ascorbate (H2A) via oxidative pathway. The preliminary mechanism of DNA cleavage by the complex with different inhibiting reagents indicates that the hydroxyl radicals were involved as the active species in the DNA cleavage process.

  10. Synthesis of New Benzimidazole and Benzothiazole Disulfide Metal Complexes as G-quadruplex Binding Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saour, Kawkab; Lafta, Dunya

    2016-01-01

    Compounds that can bind and stabilize non-canonical DNA structures are named quadruplex and are of interest in anticancer drug design due to their selective inhibitions of telomerase and consequent effects on cell proliferation. In this study, we report novel Co/Cu [II] complex compounds as G-quadruplex DNA binding ligands. The results from the preliminary assay indicated that the introduction of a positively charged 6-membered tail to the aromatic terminal group of benzimidazole significantly enhanced the binding affinity with the quadruplex and exhibited anti-telomerase activity. These derivatives showed significant selectivities for the telomeric quadruplex over duplex nucleic acids. The stabilization of non-canonical forms estimated with the FRET DNA technology using different sequences, such as F21T, c-kit1 and c-kit2, in cancer cell lines were assessed. Three members of this family showed to be very selective in stabilizing one particular G-quadruplex.

  11. Structural evidence for variable oligomerization of the N-terminal domain of cyclase-associated protein (CAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wlodawer, Alexander; Hofmann, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved and widely distributed protein that links the nutritional response signaling to cytoskeleton remodeling. In yeast, CAP is a component of the adenylyl cyclase complex and helps to activate the Ras-mediated catalytic cycle of the cyclase. While the N-terminal domain of CAP (N-CAP) provides a binding site for adenylyl cyclase, the C-terminal domain (C-CAP) possesses actin binding activity. Our attempts to crystallize full-length recombinant CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum resulted in growth of orthorhombic crystals containing only the N-terminal domain (residues 42-227) due to auto-proteolytic cleavage. The structure was solved by molecular replacement with data at 2.2 A resolution. The present crystal structure allows the characterization of a head-to-tail N-CAP dimer in the asymmetric unit and a crystallographic side-to-side dimer. Comparison with previously published structures of N-CAP reveals variable modes of dimerization of this domain, but the presence of a common interface for the side-to-side dimer.

  12. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikeska, Ruth; Wacker, Roland; Arni, Raghuvir; Singh, Tej P.; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R free = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R free = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound. PMID:16508080

  13. Borel-Moore homology and cap product operations

    OpenAIRE

    Hanamura, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    We show that, for a simplicial complex, the supported cap product operation on Borel-Moore homology coincides with the supported cap product on simplicial homology. For this purpose we introduce the supported cap product for locally finite singular homology, and compare the cap product on the three homology theories.

  14. Mixed-ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) incorporating a diazo ligand: Synthesis, characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Megha S Deshpande; Avinash S Kumbhar

    2005-03-01

    Mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Ru(N-N)2(dzdf)]Cl2, where N-N is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and 9-diazo-4,5-diazafluorene (dzdf), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR and NMR spectroscopy. Binding of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by absorption spectroscopy, steady-state emission spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The experimental results indicate that the size and shape of the intercalating ligands have marked effect on the binding affinity of the complexes to CT-DNA. The complex [Ru(phen)2(dzdf)]Cl2 binds with CT-DNA through an intercalative binding mode, while the complex [Ru(bpy)2(dzdf)]Cl2 binds electrostatically.

  15. DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, apoptosis and photocleavage studies of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Deepika; C Shobha Devi; Y Praveen Kumar; K Laxma Reddy; P Venkat Reddy; D Anil Kumar; Surya S Singh; S Satyanarayana

    2016-07-01

    Two Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2bppp](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(phen)27-Br-dppz](ClO4)2 (2) [phen=1,10 phenanthroline, 7-Br-dppz=7-fluorodipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine, bppp=11-bromo-pyrido[2',3':5,6]pyrazino[2,3-f] [1,10]phenanthroline] have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ES-MS, (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and IR. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes examined against a panel of cancer cell lines (HeLa, Du145 and A549) by MTT method, both complexes show prominent anticancer activity against various cancer cells. Live cell imaging study and flow cytometric analysis demonstrate that both the complexes 1 and 2 could cross the cell membrane accumulating in the nucleus. Further, flow cytometry experiments showed that the cytotoxic Ru(II) complexes 1 and 2 induced apoptosis of HeLa tumor cell lines. Photo induced DNA cleavage studies have been performed and results indicate that both the complexes efficiently photo cleave pBR322 DNA. The binding properties of two complexes toward CT-DNA were investigated by various optical methods and viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggested that both Ru(II) complexes can intercalate into DNA base pairs. The complexes were docked into DNA-base pairs using the GOLD docking program.

  16. Synthesis and thermal studies of tetraaza macrocylic ligand and its transition metal complexes. DNA binding affinity of copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M; Mashaly, Mahmoud M; Eid, Mohamed F; Fouad, R

    2011-09-01

    A Tetraaza Macrocylic Ligand (H2L) and its complexes, [Cd(H2L)(OH2)2](NO3)(2)·1/2OH2 (I), [Co(H2L)(OH2)](NO3)(2)·1/2OH2 (II), [Cu(H2L)(NO3)2]·3/2OH2 (III) and [Ni(H2L)(NO3)(OH2)]NO3·OH2 (IV), have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductivity, 1H NMR, UV-vis, FT-IR and mass spectroscopy. All results confirm that the prepared compounds have 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry, octahedral configuration and the ligand behaves as a neutral tetradendate towards the metal ions. [CdL(OH2)2] (V), [CoL(OH2)2] (VI), [CuL(OH2)2] (VII) and [Ni(H2L)(NO3)2] (VIII) were synthesized pyrolytically in solid state from corresponding compounds (I-IV). Analytical results of complexes (V-VIII) show that the ligand behaves either as a neutral tetradendate or dianionic tetradentate ligand towards the metal ions. The binding of H2L and its copper complex (III) to DNA has been investigated by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The experiments indicate that H2L and its copper complex (III) can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The H2L and its copper complex (III) exhibited anti-tumor activity against Ehrlich Acites Carcinoma (E.A.C) at the concentration of 100 μg/ml.

  17. Synthesis and thermal studies of tetraaza macrocylic ligand and its transition metal complexes. DNA binding affinity of copper complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, M.; Mashaly, Mahmoud M.; Eid, Mohamed F.; Fouad, R.

    2011-09-01

    A Tetraaza Macrocylic Ligand (H 2L) and its complexes, [Cd(H 2L)(OH 2) 2](NO 3) 2·1/2OH 2 (I), [Co(H 2L)(OH 2)](NO 3) 2·1/2OH 2 (II), [Cu(H 2L)(NO 3) 2]·3/2OH 2 (III) and [Ni(H 2L)(NO 3)(OH 2)]NO 3·OH 2 (IV), have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, molar conductivity, 1H NMR, UV-vis, FT-IR and mass spectroscopy. All results confirm that the prepared compounds have 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry, octahedral configuration and the ligand behaves as a neutral tetradendate towards the metal ions. [CdL(OH 2) 2] (V), [CoL(OH 2) 2] (VI), [CuL(OH 2) 2] (VII) and [Ni(H 2L)(NO 3) 2] (VIII) were synthesized pyrolytically in solid state from corresponding compounds (I-IV). Analytical results of complexes (V-VIII) show that the ligand behaves either as a neutral tetradendate or dianionic tetradentate ligand towards the metal ions. The binding of H 2L and its copper complex (III) to DNA has been investigated by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The experiments indicate that H 2L and its copper complex (III) can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The H 2L and its copper complex (III) exhibited anti-tumor activity against Ehrlich Acites Carcinoma (E.A.C) at the concentration of 100 μg/ml.

  18. Thermal Study of a Newly Synthesized Cu(II Complex Binding to Bovine β-Lactoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleh Divsalar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the interactions between β-lactoglobulin, BLG, and new synthesized Cu(II complex (2,2′-dibipyridine Cu(II chloride using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC methods at different temperatures of 298 and 310 K. The heats of BLG + Cu(II interactions are reported and analyzed in terms of the extended solvation theory for calculation of binding and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction. The results suggested that binding of Cu(II complex on BLG resulted in significant changes on the tertiary structure and conformation of protein via increasing of hydrophobicity and inducing partially unfolded structure in BLG which has a good agreement with the solvation parameters recovered by the extended solvation model suggesting destabilization of the protein.

  19. Structural Studies of Neuropilin/Antibody Complexes Provide Insights Into Semaphorin And VEGF Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, B.A.; Wu, P.; Maloney, J.; Yin, J.; Liang, W.-C.; Stawicki, S.; Mortara, K.; Bowman, K.A.; Elliott, J.Michael.; Desmarais, W.; Koch, A.W.; Wu, Y.; Watts, R.J.; Wiesmann, C.

    2009-06-01

    Neuropilins (Nrps) are co-receptors for class 3 semaphorins and vascular endothelial growth factors and important for the development of the nervous system and the vasculature. The extracellular portion of Nrp is composed of two domains that are essential for semaphorin binding (a1a2), two domains necessary for VEGF binding (b1b2), and one domain critical for receptor dimerization (c). We report several crystal structures of Nrp1 and Nrp2 fragments alone and in complex with antibodies that selectively block either semaphorin or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) binding. In these structures, Nrps adopt an unexpected domain arrangement in which the a2, b1, and b2 domains form a tightly packed core that is only loosely connected to the a1 domain. The locations of the antibody epitopes together with in vitro experiments indicate that VEGF and semaphorin do not directly compete for Nrp binding. Based upon our structural and functional data, we propose possible models for ligand binding to neuropilins.

  20. Three classes of inhibitors share a common binding domain in mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, J G; Lümmen, P; Brandt, U

    1999-01-29

    We have developed two independent methods to measure equilibrium binding of inhibitors to membrane-bound and partially purified NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) to characterize the binding sites for the great variety of hydrophobic compounds acting on this large and complicated enzyme. Taking advantage of a partial quench of fluorescence upon binding of the fenazaquin-type inhibitor 2-decyl-4-quinazolinyl amine to complex I in bovine submitochondrial particles, we determined a Kd of 17 +/- 3 nM and one binding site per complex I. Equilibrium binding studies with [3H]dihydrorotenone and the aminopyrimidine [3H]AE F119209 (4(cis-4-[3H]isopropyl cyclohexylamino)-5-chloro-6-ethyl pyrimidine) using partially purified complex I from Musca domestica exhibited little unspecific binding and allowed reliable determination of dissociation constants. Competition experiments consistently demonstrated that all tested hydrophobic inhibitors of complex I share a common binding domain with partially overlapping sites. Although the rotenone site overlaps with both the piericidin A and the capsaicin site, the latter two sites do not overlap. This is in contrast to the interpretation of enzyme kinetics that have previously been used to define three classes of complex I inhibitors. The existence of only one large inhibitor binding pocket in the hydrophobic part of complex I is discussed in the light of possible mechanisms of proton translocation.

  1. AIScore chemically diverse empirical scoring function employing quantum chemical binding energies of hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, Stephan; Steffen, Andreas; Kämper, Andreas; Marian, Christel M

    2008-07-01

    In this work we report on a novel scoring function that is based on the LUDI model and focuses on the prediction of binding affinities. AIScore extends the original FlexX scoring function using a chemically diverse set of hydrogen-bonded interactions derived from extensive quantum chemical ab initio calculations. Furthermore, we introduce an algorithmic extension for the treatment of multifurcated hydrogen bonds (XFurcate). Charged and resonance-assisted hydrogen bond energies and hydrophobic interactions as well as a scaling factor for implicit solvation were fitted to experimental data. To this end, we assembled a set of 101 protein-ligand complexes with known experimental binding affinities. Tightly bound water molecules in the active site were considered to be an integral part of the binding pocket. Compared to the original FlexX scoring function, AIScore significantly improves the prediction of the binding free energies of the complexes in their native crystal structures. In combination with XFurcate, AIScore yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of R P = 0.87 on the training set. In a validation run on the PDBbind test set we achieved an R P value of 0.46 for 799 attractively scored complexes, compared to a value of R P = 0.17 and 739 bound complexes obtained with the FlexX original scoring function. The redocking capability of AIScore, on the other hand, does not fully reach the good performance of the original FlexX scoring function. This finding suggests that AIScore should rather be used for postscoring in combination with the standard FlexX incremental ligand construction scheme.

  2. Native mitochondrial RNA-binding complexes in kinetoplastid RNA editing differ in guide RNA composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madina, Bhaskara R; Kumar, Vikas; Metz, Richard; Mooers, Blaine H M; Bundschuh, Ralf; Cruz-Reyes, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial mRNAs in kinetoplastids require extensive U-insertion/deletion editing that progresses 3'-to-5' in small blocks, each directed by a guide RNA (gRNA), and exhibits substrate and developmental stage-specificity by unsolved mechanisms. Here, we address compositionally related factors, collectively known as the mitochondrial RNA-binding complex 1 (MRB1) or gRNA-binding complex (GRBC), that contain gRNA, have a dynamic protein composition, and transiently associate with several mitochondrial factors including RNA editing core complexes (RECC) and ribosomes. MRB1 controls editing by still unknown mechanisms. We performed the first next-generation sequencing study of native subcomplexes of MRB1, immunoselected via either RNA helicase 2 (REH2), that binds RNA and associates with unwinding activity, or MRB3010, that affects an early editing step. The particles contain either REH2 or MRB3010 but share the core GAP1 and other proteins detected by RNA photo-crosslinking. Analyses of the first editing blocks indicate an enrichment of several initiating gRNAs in the MRB3010-purified complex. Our data also indicate fast evolution of mRNA 3' ends and strain-specific alternative 3' editing within 3' UTR or C-terminal protein-coding sequence that could impact mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, we found robust specific copurification of edited and pre-edited mRNAs, suggesting that these particles may bind both mRNA and gRNA editing substrates. We propose that multiple subcomplexes of MRB1 with different RNA/protein composition serve as a scaffold for specific assembly of editing substrates and RECC, thereby forming the editing holoenzyme. The MRB3010-subcomplex may promote early editing through its preferential recruitment of initiating gRNAs.

  3. Isolation of a cadmium-binding complex from cabbage and tobacco leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, C

    1980-01-01

    Cd binding complexes with mol wts of approximately 10k daltons were observed in extracts, protoplast lysates, and protoplast cytosol obtained from the leaves of several plants. Extracts of the roots and stems of cabbage also contain the complex. In cabbage and tobacco the ligand appears to be both inducible and constitutive as determined by its association with Cd acquired either during growth of plants in the presence of the metal or after addition of the metal to extracts of Cd free leaves. Current efforts are directed toward determining the nature of the ligand.

  4. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Luis [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Berrios, Cristhian [Laboratorio de Electrocatalisis, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Yanez, Mauricio [Laboratorio de Recursos Renovables, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla-160 C, Concepcion (Chile); Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I., E-mail: gloria.cardenas@usach.cl [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-11-26

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  5. PRIC320, a transcription coactivator, isolated from peroxisome proliferator-binding protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapureddi, Sailesh; Viswakarma, Navin; Yu, Songtao; Guo, Dongsheng; Rao, M Sambasiva; Reddy, Janardan K

    2006-05-05

    Ciprofibrate, a potent peroxisome proliferator, induces pleiotropic responses in liver by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), a nuclear receptor. Transcriptional regulation by liganded nuclear receptors involves the participation of coregulators that form multiprotein complexes possibly to achieve cell and gene specific transcription. SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometric analyses of ciprofibrate-binding proteins from liver nuclear extracts obtained using ciprofibrate-Sepharose affinity matrix resulted in the identification of a new high molecular weight nuclear receptor coactivator, which we designated PRIC320. The full-length human cDNA encoding this protein has an open-reading frame that codes for a 320kDa protein containing 2882 amino acids. PRIC320 contains five LXXLL signature motifs that mediate interaction with nuclear receptors. PRIC320 binds avidly to nuclear receptors PPARalpha, CAR, ERalpha, and RXR, but only minimally with PPARgamma. PRIC320 also interacts with transcription cofactors CBP, PRIP, and PBP. Immunoprecipitation-immunoblotting as well as cellular localization studies confirmed the interaction between PPARalpha and PRIC320. PRIC320 acts as a transcription coactivator by stimulating PPARalpha-mediated transcription. We conclude that ciprofibrate, a PPARalpha ligand, binds a multiprotein complex and PRIC320 cloned from this complex functions as a nuclear receptor coactivator.

  6. Association of Catechin Molecules in Water: Quantitative Binding Study and Complex Structure Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Tomomi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-22

    Associations between catechin molecules were investigated by (1)H NMR titration experiments. Eight green tea catechins formed self-assembled dimers in water, and gallate-type catechins had a greater tendency to self-associate than non-gallate-type catechins. All eight catechins also associated as 1:1 heterodimer complexes. Investigation of complex formation of epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCg) and epigallocatechin (EGC) with the other catechins showed that the affinity between EGCg and 2,3-trans-gallate-type catechins was remarkably high, and the binding affinity of EGCg for ECg was also rather strong. In contrast, the non-gallate-type catechin EGC exhibited generally low binding affinity for other catechins. Structural analyses of the complexes by ROESY experiments and density functional theory calculations demonstrated that the higher binding abilities of gallate-type catechins are due to providing multiple intermolecular interactions that remain effective in an aqueous environment, such as aromatic/aromatic or CH/π interactions.

  7. Binding mode and free energy prediction of fisetin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodee Nutho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, our aim is to investigate the preferential binding mode and encapsulation of the flavonoid fisetin in the nano-pore of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD at the molecular level using various theoretical approaches: molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. The molecular docking suggested four possible fisetin orientations in the cavity through its chromone or phenyl ring with two different geometries of fisetin due to the rotatable bond between the two rings. From the multiple MD results, the phenyl ring of fisetin favours its inclusion into the β-CD cavity, whilst less binding or even unbinding preference was observed in the complexes where the larger chromone ring is located in the cavity. All MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA free energy predictions supported the more stable fisetin/β-CD complex of the bound phenyl ring. Van der Waals interaction is the key force in forming the complexes. In addition, the quantum mechanics calculations with M06-2X/6-31G(d,p clearly showed that both solvation effect and BSSE correction cannot be neglected for the energy determination of the chosen system.

  8. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröpper, Kevin; Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M; Pohl, Ehmke; Usón, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein-DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein-DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein-DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  9. Spectrophotometric study on the binding of two water soluble Schiff base complexes of Mn(III) with ct-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khlegh; Mehrgardi, Masood Ayatolahi; Mirkhani, Valiolah

    2011-07-01

    In this work, binding of two water soluble Schiff base complexes: Bis sodium (5-sulfosalicylaldehyde) o-phenylendiiminato) Manganese (III) acetate (Salophen complex) and Bis sodium (5-sulfosalicylaldehyde) 1, 2 ethylendiiminato) Manganese (III) acetate (Salen complex) with calf thymus (ct) DNA were investigated by using different spectroscopic and electrometric techniques including UV-vis, Circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, viscommetry and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Both complexes have shown a hyperchromic and a small bathochromic shift in the visible region spectra. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by the addition of the two Schiff base complexes indicating that they displace EB from its binding site in DNA. Moreover structural changes in the CD spectra and an increase in the CV spectra with addition of DNA were observed. The results show that both complexes bind to DNA. The binding constants have been calculated using fluorescence data for two complexes also K(b) was calculated with fluorescence Scatchard plot for Salophen. Ultimately, the experimental results show that the dominant interactions are electrostatic while binding mode is surface binding then followed by hydrophobic interactions in grooves in high concentration of complexes.

  10. Rutin-Nickel Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, and DNA Cleavage Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Aun; Bano, Shumaila; Xu, Xiuquan; Zhang, Rong Xian; Khalid, Haider; Iqbal, Furqan Muhammad; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-12-17

    The rutin-nickel (II) complex (RN) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-visible spectroscopy, IR, mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, TG-DSC, SEM, and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal/ligand) of the complex. An antioxidant study of rutin and its metal complex against DPPH radical showed that the complex has more radical scavenging activity than free rutin. The interaction of complex RN with DNA was determined using fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that RN can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide (EB), and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form (SC) to nicked circular form (NC), and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was a hydrolytic cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of the complex to cleave DNA.

  11. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  12. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A; Zhou, Z Hong; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-06-23

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits--the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles.

  13. Chromosome-biased binding and gene regulation by the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko M Tabuchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available DRM is a conserved transcription factor complex that includes E2F/DP and pRB family proteins and plays important roles in development and cancer. Here we describe new aspects of DRM binding and function revealed through genome-wide analyses of the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM subunit LIN-54. We show that LIN-54 DNA-binding activity recruits DRM to promoters enriched for adjacent putative E2F/DP and LIN-54 binding sites, suggesting that these two DNA-binding moieties together direct DRM to its target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling reveals conserved roles for DRM in regulating genes involved in cell division, development, and reproduction. We find that LIN-54 promotes expression of reproduction genes in the germline, but prevents ectopic activation of germline-specific genes in embryonic soma. Strikingly, C. elegans DRM does not act uniformly throughout the genome: the DRM recruitment motif, DRM binding, and DRM-regulated embryonic genes are all under-represented on the X chromosome. However, germline genes down-regulated in lin-54 mutants are over-represented on the X chromosome. We discuss models for how loss of autosome-bound DRM may enhance germline X chromosome silencing. We propose that autosome-enriched binding of DRM arose in C. elegans as a consequence of germline X chromosome silencing and the evolutionary redistribution of germline-expressed and essential target genes to autosomes. Sex chromosome gene regulation may thus have profound evolutionary effects on genome organization and transcriptional regulatory networks.

  14. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  15. Excitonic fine structure and binding energies of excitonic complexes in single InAs quantum dashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowiński, P.; Zieliński, M.; Świderski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.; Sek, G.

    2016-09-01

    The fundamental electronic and optical properties of elongated InAs nanostructures embedded in quaternary InGaAlAs barrier are investigated by means of high-resolution optical spectroscopy and many-body atomistic tight-binding theory. These wire-like shaped, self-assembled nanostructures are known as quantum dashes and are typically formed during the molecular beam epitaxial growth on InP substrates. In this paper, we study properties of excitonic complexes confined in quantum dashes emitting in a broad spectral range from below 1.2 to 1.55 μm. We find peculiar trends for the biexciton and negative trion binding energies, with pronounced trion binding in smaller size quantum dashes. These experimental findings are then compared and qualitatively explained by atomistic theory. The theoretical analysis shows a fundamental role of correlation effects for the absolute values of excitonic binding energies. Eventually, we determine the bright exciton fine structure splitting (FSS), where both the experiment and theory predict a broad distribution of the splitting varying from below 50 to almost 180 μeV. We identify several key factors determining the FSS values in such nanostructures, including quantum dash size variation and composition fluctuations.

  16. Detection of Water Binding to the Oxygen Evolving Complex Using Low Frequency Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Jain, Prashant

    2017-06-01

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II (PSII) is a hallmark catalyst for efficiently splitting water to generate molecular oxygen. Much of what is known about the structure of the OEC has been provided by X-ray analysis of PSII at low temperatures, from which the mechanism of water splitting has been inferred. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) offers an opportunity to build on our current understanding of this catalytic system as it can provide time-resolved, molecular vibrational information in a physiological environment. With low frequency SERS, we are able to separate the manganese oxide vibrational modes of the OEC from those in a complex, biological environment. With isotopically labelled water, we use SERS to identify water binding to the OEC. Raman spectra calculated by density functional theory support the assignment of water binding to a manganese atom outside of the cuboidal OEC. Detection of water binding sites on the OEC with SERS can not only compliment previous structural studies, but can also provide a powerful platform for in operando mechanistic studies.

  17. DNA binding and cleavage activity of a structurally characterized Ni(II) Schiff base complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sarat Chandra Kumar; Abhijit Pal; Merry Mitra; V M Manikandamathavan; Chia -Her Lin; Balachandran Unni Nair; Rajarshi Ghosh

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis and characterization of a mononuclear Ni(II) compound [Ni(L)(H2O)2](NO3)2 [L = N,N'-bis((pyridine-2-yl)phenylidene)-1,3-diaminopropan-2-ol] (1) is reported. 1 crystallizes in triclinic P-1 space group with a = 8.1911(2) Å, b = 11.6624(3) Å, c = 16.5356(4) Å and = 108.8120(10)° , = 91.2010(10)° , = 91.1500(10)° . The binding property of the complex with DNA has been investigated using absorption and emission studies, and viscosity experiment. The binding constant (Kb) and the linear Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv) of the complex have been determined as 9.23 × 10 4 M−1 and 2.0 × 10 4 M−1, respectively. Spectroscopic and hydrodynamic investigations revealed groove or electrostatic nature of binding of 1 with DNA. 1 is also found to induce oxidative cleavage of the supercoiled pUC 18 DNA to its nicked circular form in a concentration dependent manner.

  18. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes ( = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields.

  19. SELEX-seq, a method for characterizing the complete repertoire of binding site preferences for transcription factor complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Todd R.; Slattery, Matthew; Abe, Namiko; Rastogi, Chaitanya; Mann, Richard; Bussemaker, Harmen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The closely related members of the Hox family of homeodomain transcription factors have similar DNA-binding preferences as monomers, yet carry out distinct functions in vivo. Transcription factors often bind DNA as multiprotein complexes, raising the possibility that complex formation might modify their DNA binding specificities. To test this hypothesis we developed a new experimental and computational platform, termed SELEX-seq, to characterize DNA binding specificities of Hox-based multiprotein complexes. We found that complex formation with the same cofactor reveals latent specificities that are not observed for monomeric Hox factors. The findings from this in vitro platform are consistent with in vivo data, and the ‘latent specificity’ concept serves as a precedent for how the specificities of similar transcription factors might be distinguished in vivo. Importantly, the SELEX-seq platform is flexible and can be used to determine the relative affinities to any DNA sequence for any transcription factor or multiprotein complex. PMID:25151169

  20. Multi-modal microtubule binding by the Ndc80 kinetochore complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alushin, Gregory M.; Musinipally, Vivek; Matson, Daniel; Tooley, John; Stukenberg, P. Todd; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Ndc80 complex is a key site of kinetochore-microtubule attachment during cell division. The human complex engages microtubules with a globular “head” formed by tandem calponin-homology domains and an 80 amino-acid unstructured “tail” that contains sites of phospho-regulation by the Aurora B kinase. Using biochemical, cell biological, and electron microscopy analyses, we have dissected the tail’s roles in microtubule binding and mediating cooperative interactions between Ndc80 complexes. Two segments of the tail that contain Aurora B sites become ordered at interfaces; one with tubulin and the second with an adjacent Ndc80 head on the microtubule surface, forming interactions which are disrupted by phosphorylation. We propose a model in which Ndc80’s interaction with either growing or shrinking microtubule ends can be tuned by the phosphorylation state of its tail. PMID:23085714

  1. Mannan-binding protein forms complexes with alpha-2-macroglobulin. A protein model for the interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, P; Holm Nielsen, E; Skriver, E;

    1995-01-01

    We report that alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) can form complexes with a high molecular weight porcine mannan-binding protein (pMBP-28). The alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes was isolated by PEG-precipitation and affinity chromatography on mannan-Sepharose, protein A-Sepharose and anti-IgM Sepharose......-PAGE, which reacted with antibodies against alpha 2M and pMBP-28, respectively, in Western blotting. Furthermore, alpha 2M/pMBP-28 complexes were demonstrated by electron microscopy. Fractionation of pMBP-containing D-mannose eluate from mannan-Sepharose on Superose 6 showed two protein peaks which reacted...

  2. Protein-binding, cytotoxicity in vitro and cell cycle arrest of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Hong; Zhu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Hui-Hua; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ya-Min; Liang, Jun-Bo; Zhang, Gui-Qiang; Cao, Di-Hua; Lin, Yang-Yang; Wu, Yong; Guo, Qi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxic activity of two Ru(II) complexes against A549, BEL-7402, HeLa, PC-12, SGC-7901 and SiHa cell lines was investigated by MTT method. Complexes 1 and 2 show moderate cytotoxicity toward BEL-7402 cells with an IC50 value of 53.9 ± 3.4 and 39.3 ± 2.1 μM. The effects of the complexes inducing apoptosis, cellular uptake, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential in BEL-7402 cells have been studied by fluorescence microscopy. The percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells and cell cycle arrest were studied by flow cytometry. The BSA-binding behaviors were investigated by UV/visible and fluorescent spectra.

  3. Insights into amine binding to biaryl phosphine palladium oxidative addition complexes and reductive elimination from biaryl phosphine arylpalladium amido complexes via density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barder, Timothy E; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2007-10-03

    We present results on the binding of a variety amines to monoligated oxidative addition complexes of the type L1Pd(Ar)Cl, where L is 2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2',6'-dimethoxybiphenyl (SPhos, 1) or 2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2',4',6'-tri-ispropylbiphenyl (XPhos, 2). The binding of an amine to oxidative addition complexes composed of 1 and 2 is more complex than with smaller ligands as intermediate Pd(II) complexes with bulky biaryl phosphine ligands disfavor amine binding to favorable conformations of oxidative addition complexes. Additionally, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for reductive elimination from complexes of the type L1Pd(amido)Ph (where amido = EtNH, Me2N, PhNH) are discussed. From this data, we suggest a possible mechanism for (biaryl phosphine) Pd-catalyzed amination reactions that is more intricate than previously thought.

  4. Single hepatitis-B virus core capsid binding to individual nuclear pore complexes in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Yoriko; Lill, Markus A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Schwarz-Herion, Kyrill; Paulillo, Sara; Aebi, Ueli; Hecht, Bert

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the interaction of hepatitis B virus capsids lacking a nuclear localization signal with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in permeabilized HeLa cells. Confocal and wide-field optical images of the nuclear envelope show well-spaced individual NPCs. Specific interactions of capsids with single NPCs are characterized by extended residence times of capsids in the focal volume which are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In addition, single-capsid-tracking experiments using fast wide-field fluorescence microscopy at 50 frames/s allow us to directly observe specific binding via a dual-color colocalization of capsids and NPCs. We find that binding occurs with high probability on the nuclear-pore ring moiety, at 44 +/- 9 nm radial distance from the central axis.

  5. Fluoride binding in water with the use of micellar nanodevices based on salophen complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keymeulen, Flore; De Bernardin, Paolo; Giannicchi, Ilaria; Galantini, Luciano; Bartik, Kristin; Dalla Cort, Antonella

    2015-02-28

    The use of micelles to transpose lipophilic receptors, such as uranyl-salophen complexes, into an aqueous environment is a valuable and versatile tool. Receptor 1 incorporated into CTABr micelles forms a supramolecular system that exhibits excellent binding properties towards fluoride in water, despite the competition of the aqueous medium. To fully evaluate the potential of micellar nanodevices, we extended our previous study to other types of surfactants and to a uranyl-salophen receptor with a more extended aromatic surface. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments were used to obtain information on the location of the two receptors within the micelles and complementary information was obtained from dynamic light scattering experiments. With these data it is possible to account for the key factors necessary to obtain an efficient supramolecular device for anion binding in water.

  6. Post-transcriptional regulator Hfq binds catalase HPII: crystal structure of the complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Yonekura

    Full Text Available We report a crystal structure of Hfq and catalase HPII from Escherichia coli. The post-transcriptional regulator Hfq plays a key role in the survival of bacteria under stress. A small non-coding RNA (sRNA DsrA is required for translation of the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, which is the central regulator of the general stress response. Hfq facilitates efficient translation of rpoS mRNA, which encodes RpoS. Hfq helps in the function of other specific proteins involved in RNA processing, indicating its versatility in the cell. However, structural information regarding its interactions with partners is missing. Here we obtained crystals of Hfq and HPII complexes from cell lysates following attempts to overexpress a foreign membrane protein. HPII is one of two catalases in E. coli and its mRNA is transcribed by an RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing RpoS, which in turn is under positive control of small non-coding RNAs and of the RNA chaperone Hfq. This sigma factor is known to have a pronounced effect on the expression of HPII. The crystal structure reveals that a Hfq hexamer binds each subunit of a HPII tetramer. Each subunit of the Hfq hexamer exhibits a unique binding mode with HPII. The hexamer of Hfq interacts via its distal surface. The proximal and distal surfaces are known to specifically bind different sRNAs, and binding of HPII could affect Hfq function. Hfq-HPII complexation has no effect on catalase HPII activity.

  7. Searching the conformational complexity and binding properties of HDAC6 through docking and molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixto-López, Yudibeth; Bello, Martiniano; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Rolando Alberto; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Gómez-Vidal, José Antonio; Correa-Basurto, José

    2017-10-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of proteins involved in the deacetylation of histones and other non-histones substrates. HDAC6 belongs to class II and shares similar biological functions with others of its class. Nevertheless, its three-dimensional structure that involves the catalytic site remains unknown for exploring the ligand recognition properties. Therefore, in this contribution, homology modeling, 100-ns-long Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation and docking calculations were combined to explore the conformational complexity and binding properties of the catalytic domain 2 from HDAC6 (DD2-HDAC6), for which activity and affinity toward five different ligands have been reported. Clustering analysis allowed identifying the most populated conformers present during the MD simulation, which were used as starting models to perform docking calculations with five DD2-HDAC6 inhibitors: Cay10603 (CAY), Rocilinostat (RCT), Tubastatin A (TBA), Tubacin (TBC), and Nexturastat (NXT), and then were also submitted to 100-ns-long MD simulations. Docking calculations revealed that the five inhibitors bind at the DD2-HDAC6 binding site with the lowest binding free energy, the same binding mode is maintained along the 100-ns-long MD simulations. Overall, our results provide structural information about the molecular flexibility of apo and holo DD2-HDAC6 states as well as insight of the map of interactions between DD2-HDAC6 and five well-known DD2-HDAC6 inhibitors allowing structural details to guide the drug design. Finally, we highlight the importance of combining different theoretical approaches to provide suitable structural models for structure-based drug design.

  8. Surface tension method for determining binding constants for cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of ionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmawardana, U.R.; Christian, S.D.; Tucker, E.E.; Taylor, R.W.; Scamehorn, J.F. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A new method has been developed for determining binding constants of complexes of cyclodextrins with surface-active compounds, including water-soluble ionic surfactants. The technique requires measuring the change in surface tension caused by addition of a cyclodextrin (CD) to aqueous solutions of the surfactant; the experimental results lead directly to inferred values of the thermodynamic activity of the surfactant. Surface tension results are reported for three different surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) in the presence and in the absence of added [beta]-CD. Data for CPC have been obtained at surfactant concentrations below and above the critical micelle concentration. Correlations between surface tension and surfactant activity are expressed by the Szyszkowski equation, which subsumes the Langmuir adsorption model and the Gibbs equation. It is observed that the surface tension increases monotonically as [beta]-cyclodextrin is added to ionic surfactant solutions. At concentrations of CD well in excess of the surfactant concentration, the surface tension approaches that of pure water, indicating that neither the surfactant-CD complexes nor CD itself are surface active. Binding constants are inferred from a model that incorporates the parameters of the Szyszkowski equation and mass action constants relating to the formation of micelles from monomers of the surfactant and the counterion. Evidence is given that two molecules of CD can complex the C-16 hydrocarbon chain of the cetyl surfactants. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Quantifying Pb and Cd complexation by alginates and the role of metal binding on macromolecular aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, Cristina; Avaltroni, Fabrice; Benedetti, Marc; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2005-01-01

    The Pb and Cd binding capacity of alginates were quantified by the determination of their complex stability constants and the concentration of complexing sites using H+, Pb2+, or Cd2+ selective electrodes in both static and dynamic titrations. Centrifugation filter devices (30 kDa filter cutoff), followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements of lead or cadmium in the filtrates, were used to validate the results. The influence of ionic strength, pH, and the metal-to-alginate ratio was determined for a wide range of metal concentrations. Because of their polyelectrolytic properties, alginates may adopt different conformations depending on the physicochemistry of the medium, including the presence of metals. Therefore, molecular diffusion coefficients of the alginate were determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy under the same conditions of pH, ionic strength, and metal-to-alginate ratios that were used for the metal binding studies. The complexation and conformational properties of the alginate were related within the framework of the nonideal competitive adsorption isotherm (NICA) combined with a Donnan approach to account for both intrinsic and electrostatic contributions.

  10. DNA binding, BSA interaction and SOD activity of two new nickel(II) complexes with glutamine Schiff base ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Dong, Jianfang; Zhao, Peiran; Li, Manman; Cheng, Fengling; Kong, Jinming; Li, Lianzhi

    2016-08-01

    Two hexacoordinated octahedral nickel(II) complexes, [Ni(o-van-gln)(phen)(H2O)](1) and [Ni(sal-gln)(phen)(H2O)](2) [o-van-gln=a Schiff base derived from o-vanillin and glutamine, sal-gln=a Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and glutamine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. X-ray studies showed that nickel atoms of both 1 and 2 exhibit distorted NiN3O3 octahedral geometry. In each crystal, intermolecular hydrogen bonds form a two-dimensional network structure. DNA-binding properties of these two nickel(II) complexes were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the two complexes can bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) via an intercalative mode, and complex 1 exhibits higher interaction with CT-DNA than complex 2. Furthermore, the interactions between the nickel(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been studied by spectroscopies. The results indicated that both complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process. The binding constants (Kb) and the numbers of binding sites (n) obtained are 1.10×10(5)M(-1) and 1.05 for complex 1 and 5.05×10(4)M(-1) and 0.997 for complex 2, respectively. Site-selective competitive binding investigation indicated that the binding sites of both the complexes are located in site I of sub-domains IIA of BSA. Assay of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the nickel(II) complexes revealed that they exhibit significant superoxide scavenging activity with IC50=3.4×10(-5)M for complex 1 and 4.3×10(-5)M for complex 2, respectively.

  11. Multifunctional nanomesoporous materials with upconversion (in vivo) and downconversion (in vitro) luminescence imaging based on mesoporous capping UCNPs and linking lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lining; Ge, Xiaoqian; Liu, Jinliang; Qiu, Yannan; Wei, Zuwu; Tian, Bo; Shi, Liyi

    2014-10-01

    A series of new multifunctional nanomesoporous materials based on upconversion nanophosphors NaYF4:Yb,Tm@NaGdF4 (UCNPs) and lanthanide complexes were designed and synthesized through mesoporous capping UCNPs nanophosphors and linking lanthanide (Ln) complexes. The obtained UCNPs@mSiO2-Ln(dbm)4 (Ln = Eu, Sm, Er, Nd, Yb) materials can achieve downconversion and upconversion luminescence to show multicolor emission (covering the spectral region from 450 nm to 1700 nm) under visible-light excitation and 980 nm excitation, respectively. In addition, low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility was found as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay, and the nanomesoporous materials were successfully applied to cell imaging in vitro based on Eu3+ luminescence (under 405 nm excitation) and small animal imaging based on Tm3+ luminescence (under 980 nm excitation). The doped Gd3+ ion endows the nanomesoporous materials UCNPs@mSiO2-Ln(dbm)4 with effective T1 signal enhancement, which affords them as potential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Therefore, our results may provide more exciting opportunities for multimodal bioimaging and multifunctional applications.A series of new multifunctional nanomesoporous materials based on upconversion nanophosphors NaYF4:Yb,Tm@NaGdF4 (UCNPs) and lanthanide complexes were designed and synthesized through mesoporous capping UCNPs nanophosphors and linking lanthanide (Ln) complexes. The obtained UCNPs@mSiO2-Ln(dbm)4 (Ln = Eu, Sm, Er, Nd, Yb) materials can achieve downconversion and upconversion luminescence to show multicolor emission (covering the spectral region from 450 nm to 1700 nm) under visible-light excitation and 980 nm excitation, respectively. In addition, low cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility was found as determined by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay, and the nanomesoporous materials were successfully applied to cell imaging in vitro based on Eu3+ luminescence (under 405 nm excitation) and small

  12. Cu(I) complexes of bis(methyl)(thia/selena) salen ligands: Synthesis, characterization, redox behavior and DNA binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asatkar, Ashish K.; Tripathi, Mamta; Panda, Snigdha; Pande, Rama; Zade, Sanjio S.

    2017-01-01

    Mononuclear cuprous complexes 1 and 2, [{CH3E(o-C6H4)CH = NCH2}2Cu]ClO4; E = S/Se, have been synthesized by the reaction of bis(methyl)(thia/selena) salen ligands and [Cu(CH3CN)4]ClO4. Both the products were characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, FT-IR, 1H/13C/77Se NMR, and cyclic voltammetry. The complexes possess tetrahedral geometry around metal center with the N2S2/N2Se2 coordination core. Cyclic voltammograms of complexes 1 and 2 displayed reversible anodic waves at E1/2 = + 0.08 V and + 0.10 V, respectively, corresponding to the Cu(I)/Cu(II) redox couple. DNA binding studies of both the complexes were performed applying absorbance, fluorescence and molecular docking techniques. Competitive binding experiment of complexes with ct-DNA against ethidium bromide is performed to predict the mode of binding. The results indicate the groove binding mode of complexes 1 and 2 to DNA. The binding constants revealed the strong binding affinity of complexes towards ct-DNA.

  13. Bovine lactoferrin binds oleic acid to form an anti-tumor complex similar to HAMLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bing; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Mai; Jiang, Lu; Guo, Hui Yuan; Ren, Fa Zheng

    2014-04-04

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) can bind oleic acid (OA) to form HAMLET-like complexes, which exhibited highly selective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Considering the structural similarity to α-LA, we conjectured that lactoferrin (LF) could also bind OA to obtain a complex with anti-tumor activity. In this study, LF-OA was prepared and its activity and structural changes were compared with α-LA-OA. The anti-tumor activity was evaluated by methylene blue assay, while the apoptosis mechanism was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blot. Structural changes of LF-OA were measured by fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism. The interactions of OA with LF and α-LA were evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). LF-OA was obtained by heat-treatment at pH8.0 with LD50 of 4.88, 4.95 and 4.62μM for HepG2, HT29, and MCF-7 cells, respectively, all of which were 10 times higher than those of α-LA-OA. Similar to HAMLET, LF-OA induced apoptosis in tumor cells through both death receptor- and mitochondrial-mediated pathways. Exposure of tryptophan residues and the hydrophobic regions as well as the loss of tertiary structure were observed in LF-OA. Besides these similarities, LF showed different secondary structure changes when compared with α-LA, with a decrease of α-helix and β-turn and an increase of β-sheet and random coil. ITC results showed that there was a higher binding number of OA to LF than to α-LA, while both of the proteins interacted with OA through van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds. This study provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of protein-OA complexes. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Centromere binding specificity in assembly of the F plasmid partition complex

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The segregation of plasmid F of Escherichia coli is highly reliable. The Sop partition locus, responsible for this stable maintenance, is composed of two genes, sopA and sopB and a centromere, sopC, consisting of 12 direct repeats of 43 bp. Each repeat carries a 16-bp inverted repeat motif to which SopB binds to form a nucleoprotein assembly called the partition complex. A database search for sequences closely related to sopC revealed unexpected features that appeared highly conserved. We hav...

  15. Synthesis, characterization and DNA binding of the complexes of rare earth with phenanthroline and demethylcantharate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fan; ZHU Wenzhong; LIN Qiuyue; GUO Weidong; ZHANG Lingling; LI Shikun

    2011-01-01

    Three novel rare earth complexes, [Ln2(DCA)2(phen)2](NO3)2·6H2O (Ln(Ⅲ)=Sm(Ⅲ)(1), Er(Ⅲ)(2), Yb(Ⅲ)(3); DCA2-=demethylcantharate, 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1] heptane-2,3-dicarboxylate, C8H8O52-; phen=1,10-phenanthroline, C12H8N2) were synthesized. The structures were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR and TGA. The results suggested that the structural features of the complexes were: in each DCA2-, one carboxylate group, as bidentate bridging group, connected two rare earth ions; the other carboxylate group, as bidentate chelate group took part in the coordination with rare earth ion. And cyclic ether oxygen of DCA2- and nitrogen atoms of phen took part in the coordination. The probable coordination number was seven. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was studied by UV-spectra, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements. Following increasing the concentration of DNA, the UV absorption bands nearby 265 mn of the three complexes appeared hypochromism and red-shift phenomena. And the values of binding constants Kb were 1.89× 105 L/mol (1), 3.54× 104 L/mol (2) and 3.83× 104 L/mol (3). The complexes could quench the fluorescence of EB-DNA system, and the values of equilibrium constants Ksq were 1.72(1), 0.56(2) and 1.09(3). The relative viscosity of DNA steadily decreased with increasing theconcentration of complexes. So, we could infer that the complexes may partially insert into DNA. The study of agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the complexes could cleave plasmid DNA, and the process of the reaction was through unclassical redox mechanism.

  16. Three Classes of Inhibitors Share a Common Binding Domain in Mitochondrial Complex I (NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jürgen G. Okun; Peter Lümmen; Ulrich Brandt

    1999-01-01

    .... Taking advantage of a partial quench of fluorescence upon binding of the fenazaquin-type inhibitor 2-decyl-4-quinazolinyl amine to complex I in bovine submitochondrial particles, we determined a K d of 17 Â...

  17. SYNTHESIS OF POLY(3,4-AZOPYRIDYLENE) AND OXYGEN-BINDING AFFINITY OF ITS COMPLEX WITH COBALTPORPHYRIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-qing Shentu; Zhi-xue Weng; Hiroyuki Nishide

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis and characteristics of poly(3,4-azopyridylene) (PAP), conductivity and oxygen-binding affinity of its complex with meso-α,α,α,α-tetrakis(o-pivalamidophenyl) porphyrinatocobalt(Ⅱ) (CoP) were studied. PAP was prepared by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-diaminopyridine (DAP) in DMF solution using CuCl/pyridine as the catalyst. IR and NMR results showed that the peak of amido group in DAP was converted to the azo group in PAP and a π conjugated polymer was synthesized. The average molecular weight of PAP was determined to be 5.0 × 103. The PAP-CoP complex was prepared by complexing the pyridyl group of PAP with the fifth coordination site of CoP in DMF solution. In comparison with the CoP complex with a non-π conjugated polymer, the PAP-CoP complex shows good electroconductivity of 5.8 × 10-6 Scm-1. The PAP-CoP complex displays a reversible change in the UV-Visible absorption spectrum from the deoxy form to the oxy or oxygen-binding one with an isosbestic point, in response to the partial oxygen pressure of the atmosphere. The oxygen-response behavior was monitored at the absorbance ascribed to the oxy form at 548 nm to give the oxygen-binding affinity.The oxygen-binding equilibrium curves of PAP-CoP complex obey a Langmuir isotherm. DMF has great effects on the oxygen-binding properties of the PAP-CoP complex. The oxygen-binding affinity of PAP-CoP complex in the solid state is higher than that in DMF solution. With decreasing temperature, the oxygen-binding affinity of the PAP-CoP complex increases.

  18. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  19. Synthesis, characterization, biological studies (DNA binding, cleavage, antibacterial and topoisomerase I) and molecular docking of copper(II) benzimidazole complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Parveen, Shazia; Afzal, Mohd; Shahid, Mohd

    2012-09-03

    To explore the therapeutic potential of copper-based benzimidazole complexes, tetranuclear Cu(II) complex 1 and dinuclear ternary amino acid complexes 2 and 3 {L-trp and L-val, respectively} were synthesized and thoroughly characterized. In vitro DNA binding studies of complexes 1-3 were carried out employing UV-vis titrations, fluorescence, circular dichroic and viscosity measurements which revealed that the complexes 1-3 bind to CT DNA preferably via groove binding. Complex 1 cleaved pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (validated by T4 DNA ligase assay), accessible to major groove while 2 followed oxidative mechanism, binding to minor groove of DNA double helix; binding events were further validated by molecular docking studies. Additionally, the complexes 1 and 2 exhibit high Topo-I inhibitory activity at different concentrations. The complexes 1-3 were evaluated for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, and 2 was found to be most effective against Gram-positive bacteria.

  20. DMPD: Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1373512 Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complex....html) (.csml) Show Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complex...ride (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. Authors Schuma

  1. Calculating the contribution of different binding modes to Quinacrine - DNA complex formation from polarized fluorescence data

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, Igor; Karachevtsev, Victor; Zozulya, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Binding of acridine derivative quinacrine (QA) to chicken erythrocyte DNA was studied by methods of absorption and polarized fluorescent spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out in aqueous buffered solutions (pH 6.9) of different dye concentrations (QA concentration range from $10^{-6}$ till $10^{-4}$ M) and ionic strengths ($Na^{+}$ concentration rang from $10^{-3}$ till 0.15 M) in a wide range of phosphate-to-dye molar ratios ($P/D$). It is established that the minimum of fluorescent titration curve plotted as relative fluorescence intensity $vs$ $P/D$ is conditioned by the competition between the two types of QA binding to DNA which posses by different emission parameters: (i) intercalative one dominating under high $P/D$ values, and (ii) outside electrostatic binding dominating under low $P/D$ values, which is accompanied by the formation of non-fluorescent dye associates on the DNA backbone. Absorption and fluorescent characteristics of complexes formed were determined. The method of calculation of di...

  2. Interaction and Binding Modes of bis-Ruthenium(II Complex to Synthetic DNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasi Rani Barai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available [μ-(linkerL2(dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]phenazine2(phenanthroline2Ru(II2]2+ with linker: 1,3-bis-(4-pyridyl-propane, L: PF6 (bis-Ru-bpp was synthesized and their binding properties to a various polynucleotides were investigated by spectroscopy, including normal absorption, circular dichroism(CD, linear dichroism(LD, and luminescence techniques in this study. On binding to polynucleotides, the bis-Ru-bpp complex with poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2] exhibited a negative LDr signal whose intensity was as large as that in the DNA absorption region, followed by a complicated LDr signal in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer region. Also, the emission intensity and equilibrium constant of the bis-Ru-bpp complex with poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2] were enhanced. It was reported that both of dppz ligand of the bis-Ru-bpp complex intercalated between DNA base-pairs when bound to native, mixed sequence DNA. Observed spectral properties resemble to those observed for poly[d(A-T2] and poly[d(I-C2], led us to be concluded that both dppz ligands intercalate between alternated AT and IC bases-pairs In contrast when bis-Ru-bpp complex was bound to poly[d(G-C2], the magnitude of the LDr in the dppz absorption region, as well as the emission intensity, was half in comparison to that of bound to poly[d(A-T2], and poly[d(I-C2]. Therefore the spectral properties of the bis-Ru-bpp-poly[d(G-C2] complex suggested deviation from bis-intercalation model in the poly[d(G-C2] case. These results can be explained by a model whereby one of the dppz ligands is intercalated while the other is exposed to solvent or may exist near to phosphate. Also it is indicative that the amine group of guanine in the minor groove provides the steric hindrance for incoming intercalation binder and it also takes an important role in a difference in binding of bis-Ru-bpp bound to poly[d(A-T2] and poly[d(I-C2].

  3. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: A comparative approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, N.; Sakthivel, A.; Pravin, N.

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 102 to 105 indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  4. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: a comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, N; Sakthivel, A; Pravin, N

    2014-05-05

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 10(2) to 10(5) indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  5. Probing heterobivalent binding to the endocytic AP-2 adaptor complex by DNA-based spatial screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diezmann, F; von Kleist, L; Haucke, V; Seitz, O

    2015-08-01

    The double helical DNA scaffold offers a unique set of properties, which are particularly useful for studies of multivalency in biomolecular interactions: (i) multivalent ligand displays can be formed upon nucleic acid hybridization in a self-assembly process, which facilitates spatial screening (ii) valency and spatial arrangement of the ligand display can be precisely controlled and (iii) the flexibility of the ligand display can be adjusted by integrating nick sites and unpaired template regions. Herein we describe the use of DNA-based spatial screening for the characterization of the adaptor complex 2 (AP-2), a central interaction hub within the endocytic protein network in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2 is comprised of a core domain and two, so-called appendage domains, the α- and the β2-ear, which associate with cytoplasmatic proteins required for the formation or maturation of clathrin/AP-2 coated pits. Each appendage domain has two binding grooves which recognize distinct peptide motives with micromolar affinity. This provides opportunities for enhanced interactions with protein molecules that contain two (or more) different peptide motives. To determine whether a particular, spatial arrangement of binding motifs is required for high affinity binding we probed the distance-affinity relationships by means of DNA-programmed spatial screening with self-assembled peptide-DNA complexes. By using trimolecular and tetramolecular assemblies two different peptides were positioned in 2-22 nucleotide distance. The binding data obtained with both recombinant protein in well-defined buffer systems and native AP-2 in brain extract suggests that the two binding sites of the AP-2 α-appendage can cooperate to provide up to 40-fold enhancement of affinity compared to the monovalent interaction. The distance between the two recognized peptide motives was less important provided that the DNA duplex segments were connected by flexible, single strand segments. By

  6. First complexomic study of alkane-binding protein complexes in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Pagot, Yves; Joubert-Caron, Raymonde; Caron, Michel; Hardouin, Julie

    2010-02-15

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica uses hydrophobic substrates, such as alkanes, fatty acids and oils, for its growth. It has developed a strategy for the use of such substrates, involving the production of hydrophobic binding structures called protrusions on the cell surface. These protrusions are resemble channels connecting the cell wall to the inside of the cell, and are probably involved in transport mechanisms that we do not yet fully understand. The complete genome of the haploid Y. lipolytica strain E150 (CLIB99) was sequenced in 2004 by the Génolevures Consortium. The availability of a complete genome sequence for this species has made it possible to carry out proteomic and other investigations, leading to the characterization of lipid bodies (LB) in terms of (i) their lipid composition, (ii) the major LB proteins, as identified by mass spectrometry, and (iii) differences in protein or lipid composition as a function of the carbon source used. Functional analyses would provide insight into the biological processes associated with these bodies and 2D BN/SDS-PAGE is a highly suitable method for the analysis of protein complexes. This report provides a first description of the analysis and identification of hydrophobic binding protein complexes in Y. lipolytica. For this purpose, we used 2D BN/SDS-PAGE for the separation of protein complexes and HPLC-chip-MS for protein identification. We separated and identified 40 protein complexes (11 heteromultimeric and 29 homomultimeric), providing insight into their function. This study represents a major step forward, as most previous studies identified proteins either on the basis of sequence similarity to proteins from other organisms (44% of the proteins identified in this study) or by prediction (50% of proteins identified in this study) alone. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A mononuclear zinc(II) complex with piroxicam: crystal structure, DNA- and BSA-binding studies; in vitro cell cytotoxicity and molecular modeling of oxicam complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesari, Zahra; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Amirghofran, Zahra; Simpson, Jim; Khayamian, Taghi; Maleki, Batool

    2015-02-05

    A new mononuclear Zn(II) complex, trans-[Zn(Pir)2(DMSO)2], where Pir(-) is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex was obtained by the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The interaction of the complex with DNA and BSA was investigated. The complex interacts with FS-DNA by two binding modes, viz., electrostatic and groove binding (major and minor). The microenvironment and the secondary structure of BSA are changed in the presence of the complex. The anticancer effects of the seven complexes of oxicam family were also determined on the human K562 cell lines and the results showed reasonable cytotoxicities. The interactions of the oxicam complexes with BSA and DNA were modeled by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods.

  8. A mononuclear zinc(II) complex with piroxicam: Crystal structure, DNA- and BSA-binding studies; in vitro cell cytotoxicity and molecular modeling of oxicam complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesari, Zahra; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Amirghofran, Zahra; Simpson, Jim; Khayamian, Taghi; Maleki, Batool

    2015-02-01

    A new mononuclear Zn(II) complex, trans-[Zn(Pir)2(DMSO)2], where Pir- is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex was obtained by the single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The interaction of the complex with DNA and BSA was investigated. The complex interacts with FS-DNA by two binding modes, viz., electrostatic and groove binding (major and minor). The microenvironment and the secondary structure of BSA are changed in the presence of the complex. The anticancer effects of the seven complexes of oxicam family were also determined on the human K562 cell lines and the results showed reasonable cytotoxicities. The interactions of the oxicam complexes with BSA and DNA were modeled by molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulation methods.

  9. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  10. The CENP-T/-W complex is a binding partner of the histone chaperone FACT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Lisa; Müller, Sebastian; Liu, Yiwei; Huang, Hongda; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Vassias, Isabelle; Patel, Dinshaw J; Sullivan, Kevin F; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2016-06-01

    The CENP-T/-W histone fold complex, as an integral part of the inner kinetochore, is essential for building a proper kinetochore at the centromere in order to direct chromosome segregation during mitosis. Notably, CENP-T/-W is not inherited at centromeres, and new deposition is absolutely required at each cell cycle for kinetochore function. However, the mechanisms underlying this new deposition of CENP-T/-W at centromeres are unclear. Here, we found that CENP-T deposition at centromeres is uncoupled from DNA synthesis. We identified Spt16 and SSRP1, subunits of the H2A-H2B histone chaperone facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT), as CENP-W binding partners through a proteomic screen. We found that the C-terminal region of Spt16 binds specifically to the histone fold region of CENP-T/-W. Furthermore, depletion of Spt16 impairs CENP-T and CENP-W deposition at endogenous centromeres, and site-directed targeting of Spt16 alone is sufficient to ensure local de novo CENP-T accumulation. We propose a model in which the FACT chaperone stabilizes the soluble CENP-T/-W complex in the cell and promotes dynamics of exchange, enabling CENP-T/-W deposition at centromeres.

  11. Trigger Factor Binds to Ribosome-Signal-Recognition Particle (SRP) Complexes and Is Excluded by Binding of the SRP Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwona Buskiewicz; Elke Deuerling; Shan-Qing Gu; Johannes Jöckel; Marina V. Rodnina; Bernd Bukau; Wolfgang Wintermeyer; Thomas A. Steitz

    2004-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) and signal recognition particle (SRP) bind to the bacterial ribosome and are both crosslinked to protein L23 at the peptide exit, where they interact with emerging nascent peptide chains...

  12. Ku80 binds to human replication origins prior to the assembly of the ORC complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, Sahar; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2005-05-31

    The Ku heterodimer, an abundant nuclear protein, binds DNA replication origins in a sequence-specific manner and promotes initiation. In this study, using HCT116 Ku80+/- haplo-insufficient and Orc2(delta/-) hypomorphic cells, the order of binding of Ku and the human origin recognition complex (HsORC) was determined. The nuclear expression of Ku80 was found to be decreased by 60% in Ku80+/- cells, while its general association with chromatin was decreased by 33%. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that the Ku heterodimer associates specifically with the human HsOrc-2, -3, -4, and -6 subunits. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, using cells synchronized to late G1, showed that the association of Ku80 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins in vivo was decreased by 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold, respectively, in Ku80+/- cells. The association of HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 was consistently decreased in all three origins examined in Ku80+/- cells, while that of HsOrc-2 showed no significant variation, indicating that the HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 subunits bind to the origins after Ku80. In Orc2(delta/-) cells, the association of HsOrc-2 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins was decreased by 2.8-, 4.9-, and 2.8-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type HCT116 cells. Furthermore, nascent strand abundance at these three origins was decreased by 4.5-, 2.3-, and 2.6-fold in Orc2(delta/-) relative to HCT116 cells, respectively. Interestingly, the association of Ku80 with these origins was not affected in this hypomorphic cell line, indicating that Ku and HsOrc-2 bind to origins independently of each other.

  13. A novel V(IV)O-pyrimidinone complex: synthesis, solution speciation and human serum protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Gisela; Tomaz, Isabel; Correia, Isabel; Veiros, Luís F; Castro, M Margarida C A; Avecilla, Fernando; Palacio, Lorena; Maestro, Miguel; Kiss, Tamás; Jakusch, Tamás; Garcia, M Helena V; Pessoa, João Costa

    2013-09-07

    The pyrimidinones mhcpe, 2-methyl-3H-5-hydroxy-6-carboxy-4-pyrimidinone ethyl ester (mhcpe, 1), 2,3-dimethyl-5-benzyloxy-6-carboxy-4-pyrimidinone ethyl ester (dbcpe, 2) and N-methyl-2,3-dimethyl-5-hydroxy-6-carboxyamido-4-pyrimidinone (N-MeHOPY, 3), are synthesized and their structures determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The acid-base properties of 1 are studied by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods, the pK(a) values being 1.14 and 6.35. DFT calculations were carried out to determine the most stable structure for each of the H2L(+), HL and L(-) forms (HL = mhcpe) and assign the groups involved in the protonation-deprotonation processes. The mhcpe(-) ligand forms stable complexes with V(IV)O(2+) in the pH range 2 to 10, and potentiometry, EPR and UV-Vis techniques are used to identify and characterize the V(IV)O-mhcpe species formed. The results are consistent with the formation of V(IV)O, (V(IV)O)L, (V(IV)O)L2, (V(IV)O)2L2H(-2), (V(IV)O)L2H(-1), (V(IV)O)2L2H(-3), (V(IV)O)LH(-2) species and V(IV)O-hydrolysis products. Calculations indicate that the global binding ability of mhcpe towards V(IV)O(2+) is similar to that of maltol (Hmaltol = 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-one) and lower than that of 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone (Hdhp). The interaction of V(IV)O-complexes with human plasma proteins (transferrin and albumin) is studied by circular dichroism (CD), EPR and (51)V NMR spectroscopy. V(IV)O-mhcpe-protein ternary complexes are formed in both cases. The binding of V(IV)O(2+) to transferrin (hTF) in the presence of mhcpe involves mainly (V(IV)O)1(hTF)(mhcpe)1, (V(IV)O)2(hTF)(mhcpe)1 and (V(IV)O)2(hTF)(mhcpe)2 species, bound at the Fe(III) binding sites, and the corresponding conditional formation constants are determined. Under the conditions expected to prevail in human blood serum, CD data indicate that the V(IV)O-mhcpe complexes mainly bind to hTF; the formation of V(IV)O-hTF-mhcpe complexes occurs in the presence of Fe(III) as well

  14. DNA binding studies of hematoxylin-Dy(ш) complex by spectrometry using acridine orange as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Huang, Jianhang; Wang, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of a hematoxylin(HE)-Dy(Ш) complex with herring sperm DNA(hsDNA) was studied using acridine orange(AO) as a probe by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism(CD), fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. From the results of the probe experiment, we found that the HE-Dy(Ш) complex could compete with AO for intercalating into hsDNA. The binding constants of the HE-Dy(Ш) complex to hsDNA was obtained by the double reciprocal method and indicated that the affinity between hsDNA and the complex is weaker than that between hsDNA and classical intercalators. The thermodynamic parameters(ΔH°, ΔG°, ΔS°) were calculated from the UV-vis absorption data measured at two different temperatures. Further experimental results suggested that there exist groove binding and partial intercalation binding between hsDNA and HE-Dy(Ш) complex.

  15. Mechanism and biological role of profilin-Srv2/CAP interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Enni; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Mattila, Pieta K; Goode, Bruce L; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2007-04-01

    Profilin and cyclase-associated protein (CAP, known in yeast as Srv2) are ubiquitous and abundant actin monomer-binding proteins. Profilin catalyses the nucleotide exchange on actin monomers and promotes their addition to filament barbed ends. Srv2/CAP recycles newly depolymerized actin monomers from ADF/cofilin for subsequent rounds of polymerization. Srv2/CAP also harbors two proline-rich motifs and has been suggested to interact with profilin. However, the mechanism and biological role of the possible profilin-Srv2/CAP interaction has not been investigated. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Srv2 and profilin interact directly (K(D) approximately 1.3 microM) and demonstrate that a specific proline-rich motif in Srv2 mediates this interaction in vitro and in vivo. ADP-actin monomers and profilin do not interfere with each other's binding to Srv2, suggesting that these three proteins can form a ternary complex. Genetic and cell biological analyses on an Srv2 allele (srv2-201) defective in binding profilin reveals that a direct interaction with profilin is not essential for Srv2 cellular function. However, srv2-201 causes a moderate increase in cell size and partially suppresses the cell growth and actin organization defects of an actin binding mutant profilin (pfy1-4). Together these data suggest that Srv2 is an important physiological interaction partner of profilin.

  16. Experimental and molecular modeling studies on the DNA-binding of diazacyclam-based acrocyclic copper complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hakimi, Mohammad; Morovati, Teimoor; Falsafi, Monireh; Fili, Soraya Moradi

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of a new macrocyclic copper complex, [CuL(NO3)2] in which L is 1,3,6,10,12,15-hexaaza tricyclo[13.3.1.1(6,10)] eicosane was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated the complex interacted with ct-DNA in a groove binding mode while the binding constant of UV-vis and the number of binding sites were 1.0±0.2×10(4)Lmol(-1) and 1.01, respectively. The fluorometric studies showed that the reaction between the complex with ct-DNA is exothermic (ΔH=14.85kJmol(-1); ΔS=109.54Jmol(-1)K(-1)). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of DNA in the presence of [CuL(NO3)2] complex. Furthermore, the complex induces detectable changes in the viscosity of DNA. The molecular modeling results illustrated that the complex strongly binds to groove of DNA. Experimental and molecular modeling results showed that Cu(II) complex bound to DNA by a groove binding mode.

  17. Arabidopsis SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex binds both promoters and terminators to regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archacki, Rafal; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Buszewicz, Daniel; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Patryn, Jacek; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Wilczynski, Bartek; Koblowska, Marta; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2017-04-07

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are important regulators of gene expression in Eukaryotes. In plants, SWI/SNF-type complexes have been shown critical for transcriptional control of key developmental processes, growth and stress responses. To gain insight into mechanisms underlying these roles, we performed whole genome mapping of the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit BRM in Arabidopsis thaliana, combined with transcript profiling experiments. Our data show that BRM occupies thousands of sites in Arabidopsis genome, most of which located within or close to genes. Among identified direct BRM transcriptional targets almost equal numbers were up- and downregulated upon BRM depletion, suggesting that BRM can act as both activator and repressor of gene expression. Interestingly, in addition to genes showing canonical pattern of BRM enrichment near transcription start site, many other genes showed a transcription termination site-centred BRM occupancy profile. We found that BRM-bound 3΄ gene regions have promoter-like features, including presence of TATA boxes and high H3K4me3 levels, and possess high antisense transcriptional activity which is subjected to both activation and repression by SWI/SNF complex. Our data suggest that binding to gene terminators and controlling transcription of non-coding RNAs is another way through which SWI/SNF complex regulates expression of its targets. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Modeling RNA-ligand interactions: the Rev-binding element RNA-aminoglycoside complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1998-01-15

    An approach to the modeling of ligand-RNA complexes has been developed by combining three-dimensional structure-activity relationship (3D-SAR) computations with a docking protocol. The ability of 3D-SAR to predict bound conformations of flexible ligands was first assessed by attempting to reconstruct the known, bound conformations of phenyloxazolines complexed with human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) RNA. Subsequently, the same 3D-SAR analysis was applied to the identification of bound conformations of aminoglycosides which associate with the Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA. Bound conformations were identified by parsing ligand conformational data sets with pharmacophores determined by the 3D-SAR analysis. These "bioactive" structures were docked to the receptor RNA, and optimization of the complex was undertaken by extensive searching of ligand conformational space coupled with molecular dynamics computations. The similarity between the bound conformations of the ligand from the 3D-SAR analysis and those found in the docking protocol suggests that this methodology is valid for the prediction of bound ligand conformations and the modeling of the structure of the ligand-RNA complexes.

  19. Adenylyl cyclase 3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) complex mediates the anti-migratory effect of forskolin in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Sierra N; Graves, Sarai H; Dains-McGahee, Clayton; Friedman, Emilee M; Hassan, Humma; Witkowski, Piotr; Sabbatini, Maria E

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human malignancies. A better understanding of the intracellular mechanism of migration and invasion is urgently needed to develop treatment that will suppress metastases and improve overall survival. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is a second messenger that has shown to regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. The rise of cyclic AMP suppressed migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Cyclic AMP is formed from cytosolic ATP by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). There are ten isoforms of ACs; nine are anchored in the plasma membrane and one is soluble. What remains unknown is the extent to which the expression of transmembrane AC isoforms is both modified in pancreatic cancer and mediates the inhibitory effect of forskolin on cell motility. Using real-time PCR analysis, ADCY3 was found to be highly expressed in pancreatic tumor tissues, resulting in a constitutive increase in cyclic AMP levels. On the other hand, ADCY2 was down-regulated. Migration, invasion, and filopodia formation in two different pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, HPAC and PANC-1 deficient in AC1 or AC3, were studied. We found that AC3, upon stimulation with forskolin, enhanced cyclic AMP levels and inhibited cell migration and invasion. Unlikely to be due to a cytotoxic effect, the inhibitory effects of forskolin involved the quick formation of AC3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1)/G-actin complex, which inhibited filopodia formation and cell motility. Using Western blotting analysis, forskolin, through AC3 activation, caused phosphorylation of CREB, but not ERK. The effect of CREB phosphorylation is likely to be associated with long-term signaling changes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hexanuclear, heterometallic, Ni₃Ln₃ complexes possessing O-capped homo- and heterometallic structural subunits: SMM behavior of the dysprosium analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goura, Joydeb; Guillaume, Rogez; Rivière, Eric; Chandrasekhar, Vadapalli

    2014-08-04

    The reaction of hetero donor chelating mannich base ligand 6,6'-{(2-(dimethylamino)ethylazanediyl)bis(methylene)}bis(2-methoxy-4-methylphenol) with Ni(ClO4)2·6H2O and lanthanide(III) salts [Dy(III) (1); Tb(III) (2); Gd (III) (3); Ho(III) (4); and Er(III) (5)] in the presence of triethylamine and pivalic acid afforded a series of heterometallic hexanuclear Ni(II)-Ln(III) coordination compounds, [Ni3Ln3(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)3(L)3(μ-OOCCMe3)3]·(ClO4)·wCH3CN·xCH2Cl2·yCH3OH·zH2O [for 1, w = 8, x = 3, y = 0, z = 5.5; for 2, w = 0, x = 5, y = 0, z = 6.5; for 3, w = 15, x = 18, y = 3, z = 7.5; for 4, w = 15, x = 20, y = 6, z = 9.5; and for 5, w = 0, x = 3, y = 2, z = 3]. The molecular structure of these complexes reveals the presence of a monocationic hexanuclear derivative containing one perchlorate counteranion. The asymmetric unit of each of the hexanuclear derivatives comprises the dinuclear motif [NiLn(L)(μ3-O)(μ3-OH)(μ-Piv)]. The cation contains three interlinked O-capped clusters: one Ln(III)3O and three Ni(II)Ln(III)2O. Each of the lanthanide centers is eight- coordinated (distorted trigonal-dodecahedron), while the nickel centers are hexacoordinate (distorted octahedral). The study of the magnetic properties of all compounds are reported and suggests single molecule magnet behavior for the Dy(III) derivative (1).

  1. Electrostatic interactions in the binding pathway of a transient protein complex studied by NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-10-03

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes.

  2. Electrostatic Interactions in the Binding Pathway of a Transient Protein Complex Studied by NMR and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Erick; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Much of our knowledge of protein binding pathways is derived from extremely stable complexes that interact very tightly, with lifetimes of hours to days. Much less is known about weaker interactions and transient complexes because these are challenging to characterize experimentally. Nevertheless, these types of interactions are ubiquitous in living systems. The combination of NMR relaxation dispersion Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) experiments and isothermal titration calorimetry allows the quantification of rapid binding kinetics for complexes with submillisecond lifetimes that are difficult to study using conventional techniques. We have used this approach to investigate the binding pathway of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain from the Fyn tyrosine kinase, which forms complexes with peptide targets whose lifetimes are on the order of about a millisecond. Long range electrostatic interactions have been shown to play a critical role in the binding pathways of tightly binding complexes. The role of electrostatics in the binding pathways of transient complexes is less well understood. Similarly to previously studied tight complexes, we find that SH3 domain association rates are enhanced by long range electrostatics, whereas short range interactions are formed late in the docking process. However, the extent of electrostatic association rate enhancement is several orders of magnitudes less, whereas the electrostatic-free basal association rate is significantly greater. Thus, the SH3 domain is far less reliant on electrostatic enhancement to achieve rapid association kinetics than are previously studied systems. This suggests that there may be overall differences in the role played by electrostatics in the binding pathways of extremely stable versus transient complexes. PMID:25122758

  3. An alternate mode of binding of the polyphenol quercetin with serum albumins when complexed with Cu(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singha Roy, Atanu; Tripathy, Debi Ranjan; Ghosh, Arup Kumar [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Dasgupta, Swagata, E-mail: swagata@chem.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2012-11-15

    Polyphenols find wide use as antioxidants, cancer chemopreventive agents and metal chelators. The latter activity has proved interesting in many aspects. We have probed the binding characteristics of the polyphenol quercetin-Cu(II) complex with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Fluorescence studies reveal that the quercetin-Cu(II) complex can quench the fluorescence of the serum albumins. The binding constant (K{sub b}) values are of the order of 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} which increased with rise in temperature in case of HSA and BSA interacting with the quercetin-Cu(II) complex. Displacement studies reveal that both the ligands bind to site 1 (subdomain IIA) of the serum albumins. However, thermodynamic parameters calculated from temperature dependent studies indicated that the mode of interaction of the complexes with the proteins differs. Both {Delta}H Degree-Sign and {Delta}S Degree-Sign were positive for the interaction of the quercetin-Cu(II) complex with both proteins but the value of {Delta}H Degree-Sign was negative in case of the interaction of quercetin with the proteins. This implies that after chelation with metal ions, the polyphenol alters its mode of interaction which could have varying implications on its other physicochemical activities. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mode of binding of quercetin with SAs is altered after complexation with Cu(II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrophobic forces play a key role in the binding of the copper complex with SAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Negative {Delta}G Degree-Sign values indicate the spontaneity of the binding processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin and its copper complex bind at the same site of the SAs.

  4. Photochemical and DFT studies on DNA-binding ability and antibacterial activity of lanthanum(III)-phenanthroline complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niroomand, Sona; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Jahani, Shohreh; Moodi, Asieh

    2017-02-01

    The binding of the lanthanum(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [La(phen)3Cl3·OH2], to DNA is investigated by absorption and emission methods. This complex shows absorption decreasing in a charge transfer band, and fluorescence decrement when it binds to DNA. Electronic absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectra, iodide quenching experiments, salt effect and viscosity measurements, ethidium bromide (EB) competition test, circular dichroism (CD) spectra as well as variable temperature experiments indicate that the La(III) complex binds to fish salmon (FS) DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. The binding constants (Kb) of the La(III) complex with DNA is (2.55 ± 0.02) × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the binding site size, n, the Stern-Volmer constant KSV and thermodynamic parameters; enthalpy change (ΔH0) and entropy change (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and the Van't Hoff equation. The La(III) complex has been screened for its antibacterial activities by the disc diffusion method. Also, in order to supplement the experimental findings, DFT computation and NBO analysis are carried out.

  5. Co(III and Ni(II Complexes Containing Bioactive Ligands: Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Photocleavage Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Prabhakara

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA binding and photocleavage characteristics of a series of mixed ligand complexes of the type [M(bpy2qbdp](PF6n⋅xH2O (where M=Co(III or Ni(II, bpy=2.2′-bipryidine, qbdp = Quinolino[3,2-b]benzodiazepine, n=3 or 2 and x=5 or 2 have been investigated. The DNA binding property of the complexes with calf thymus DNA has been investigated by using absorption spectra, viscosity measurements, as well as thermal denaturation studies. Intrinsic binding constant (Kb has been estimated under similar set of experimental conditions. Absorption spectral studies indicate that the Co(III and Ni(II complexes intercalate between the base pairs of the CT-DNA tightly with intrinsic DNA binding constant of 1.3×106 and 3.1×105 M-1 in Tris-HCl buffer containing 50 mM NaCl, respectively. The proposed DNA binding mode supports the large enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA on binding to quinolo[3,2-b]benzodiazepine. The oxidative as well as photo-induced cleavage reactions were monitered by gel electrophoresis for both complexes. The photocleavage experiments showed that the cobalt(III complex can cleave pUC19 DNA effectively in the absence of external additives as an effective inorganic nuclease.

  6. Synthesis, micellization behavior, antimicrobial and intercalative DNA binding of some novel surfactant copper(II) complexes containing modified phenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Ambika, Subramanian; Rajasri, Shanmugasundaram; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2014-10-01

    The novel surfactant copper(II) complexes, [Cu(ip)2DA](ClO4)21, [Cu(dpqc)2DA](ClO4)22, [Cu(dppn)2DA](ClO4)23, where ip=imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline, dpqc=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',4'-c](6,7,8,9-tetrahydro)phenazine, dppn=benzo[1]dipyrido[3,2-a':2',3'-c]phenazine and DA-dodecylamine, were synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. In these complexes 1-3, the geometry of copper metal ions was described as square pyramidal. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of these surfactant copper(II) complexes in aqueous solution was found out from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data at different temperatures served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔGm°, ΔHm° and ΔSm°). The binding interaction of these complexes with DNA (calf thymus DNA) in Tris buffer was studied by physico-chemical techniques. In the presence of the DNA UV-vis spectrum of complexes showed red shift of the absorption band along with significant hypochromicity indicating intercalation of our complexes with nucleic acids. Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) shows that the complexes exhibit the ability to displace the nucleic acid-bound EB indicating that the complexes bind to nucleic acids in strong competition with EB for the intercalative binding site. Observed changes in the circular dichoric spectra of DNA in the presence of surfactant complexes support the strong binding of complexes with DNA. CV results also confirm this mode of binding. Some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the titled complexes to DNA have also been determined. The results reveal that the extent of DNA binding of 3 was greater than that of 1 and 2. The antibacterial and antifungal screening tests of these complexes have shown good results compared to its precursor chloride complexes.

  7. The first example of a nitrile hydratase model complex that reversibly binds nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jason; Jackson, Henry L; Schweitzer, Dirk; Rittenberg, Durrell K; Leavy, Tanya M; Kaminsky, Werner; Scarrow, Robert C; Kovacs, Julie A

    2002-09-25

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) is an iron-containing metalloenzyme that converts nitriles to amides. The mechanism by which this biochemical reaction occurs is unknown. One mechanism that has been proposed involves nucleophilic attack of an Fe-bound nitrile by water (or hydroxide). Reported herein is a five-coordinate model compound ([Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+)) containing Fe(III) in an environment resembling that of NHase, which reversibly binds a variety of nitriles, alcohols, amines, and thiocyanate. XAS shows that five-coordinate [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+) reacts with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding studies demonstrate that MeCN preferentially binds over ROH, suggesting that nitriles would be capable of displacing the H(2)O coordinated to the iron site of NHase. Thermodynamic parameters were determined for acetonitrile (DeltaH = -6.2(+/-0.2) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -29.4(+/-0.8) eu), benzonitrile (-4.2(+/-0.6) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -18(+/-3) eu), and pyridine (DeltaH = -8(+/-1) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -41(+/-6) eu) binding to [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Et,Pr))](+) using variable-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso-propylnitrile, benzonitrile, and 4-tert-butylpyridine using (13)C NMR line-broadening analysis, at a variety of temperatures. Activation parameters for ligand exchange were determined to be DeltaH(+ +) = 7.1(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -10(+/-1) eu (acetonitrile), DeltaH(+ +) = 5.4(+/-0.6) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -17(+/-2) eu (iso-propionitrile), DeltaH(+ +) = 4.9(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS(+ +) = -20(+/-3) eu (benzonitrile), and DeltaH(+ +) = 4.7(+/-1.4) kcal/mol DeltaS(+ +) = -18(+/-2) eu (4-tert-butylpyridine). The thermodynamic parameters for pyridine binding to a related complex, [Fe(III)(S(2)(Me2)N(3)(Pr,Pr))](+) (DeltaH = -5.9(+/-0.8) kcal/mol, DeltaS = -24(+/-3) eu), are also reported, as well as kinetic

  8. The First Example of a Nitrile Hydratase Model Complex that Reversibly Binds Nitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jason; Jackson, Henry L.; Schweitzer, Dirk; Rittenberg, Durrell K.; Leavy, Tanya M.; Kaminsky, Werner; Scarrow, Robert C.; Kovacs, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrile hydratase (NHase) is an iron-containing metalloenzyme that converts nitriles to amides. The mechanism by which this biochemical reaction occurs is unknown. One mechanism that has been proposed involves nucleophilic attack of an Fe-bound nitrile by water (or hydroxide). Reported herein is a five-coordinate model compound ([FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+) containing Fe(III) in an environment resembling that of NHase, which reversibly binds a variety of nitriles, alcohols, amines, and thiocyanate. XAS shows that five-coordinate [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+ reacts with both methanol and acetonitrile to afford a six-coordinate solvent-bound complex. Competitive binding studies demonstrate that MeCN preferentially binds over ROH, suggesting that nitriles would be capable of displacing the H2O coordinated to the iron site of NHase. Thermodynamic parameters were determined for acetonitrile (ΔH = −6.2(±0.2) kcal/mol, ΔS = −29.4(±0.8) eu), benzonitrile (−4.2(±0.6) kcal/mol, ΔS = −18(±3) eu), and pyridine (ΔH = −8(±1) kcal/mol, ΔS = −41(±6) eu) binding to [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Et,Pr))]+ using variable-temperature electronic absorption spectroscopy. Ligand exchange kinetics were examined for acetonitrile, iso-propylnitrile, benzonitrile, and 4-tert-butylpyridine using 13C NMR line-broadening analysis, at a variety of temperatures. Activation parameters for ligand exchange were determined to be ΔH‡ = 7.1(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −10(±1) eu (acetonitrile), ΔH‡ = 5.4(±0.6) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −17(±2) eu (iso-propionitrile), ΔH‡ = 4.9(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡ = −20(±3) eu (benzonitrile), and ΔH‡ = 4.7(±1.4) kcal/mol ΔS‡ = −18(±2) eu (4-tert-butylpyridine). The thermodynamic parameters for pyridine binding to a related complex, [FeIII(S2Me2N3(Pr,Pr))]+ (ΔH = −5.9(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS = −24(±3) eu), are also reported, as well as kinetic parameters for 4-tert-butylpyridine exchange (ΔH‡ = 3.1(±0.8) kcal/mol, ΔS‡)−25(±3) eu

  9. Binding of scandium ions to metalloporphyrin-flavin complexes for long-lived charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takahiko; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Ishizuka, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Shinya; Kotani, Hiroaki; Nakanishi, Tatsuaki; Ohkubo, Kei; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-11-17

    A porphyrin-flavin-linked dyad and its zinc and palladium complexes (MPor-Fl: 2-M, M=2 H, Zn, and Pd) were newly synthesized and the X-ray crystal structure of 2-Pd was determined. The photodynamics of 2-M were examined by femto- and nanosecond laser flash photolysis measurements. Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) in 2-H2 occurred from the singlet excited state of the porphyrin moiety (H2 Por) to the flavin (Fl) moiety to produce the singlet charge-separated (CS) state (1) (H2 Por(.+) -Fl(.-) ), which decayed through back ET (BET) to form (3) [H2 Por]*-Fl with rate constants of 1.2×10(10) and 1.2×10(9)  s(-1) , respectively. Similarly, photoinduced ET in 2-Pd afforded the singlet CS state, which decayed through BET to form (3) [PdPor]*Fl with rate constants of 2.1×10(11) and 6.0×10(10)  s(-1) , respectively. The rate constant of photoinduced ET and BET of 2-M were related to the ET and BET driving forces by using the Marcus theory of ET. One and two Sc(3+) ions bind to the flavin moiety to form the Fl-Sc(3+) and Fl-(Sc(3+) )2 complexes with binding constants of K1 =2.2×10(5)  M(-1) and K2 =1.8×10(3)  M(-1) , respectively. Other metal ions, such as Y(3+) , Zn(2+) , and Mg(2+) , form only 1:1 complexes with flavin. In contrast to 2-M and the 1:1 complexes with metal ions, which afforded the short-lived singlet CS state, photoinduced ET in 2-Pd⋅⋅⋅Sc(3+) complexes afforded the triplet CS state ((3) [PdPor(.+) -Fl(.-) (Sc(3+) )2 ]), which exhibited a remarkably long lifetime of τ=110 ms (kBET =9.1 s(-1) ).

  10. Structure of a Blm10 Complex Reveals Common Mechanisms for Proteasome Binding and Gate Opening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadre-Bazzaz, K.; Robinson, H.; Whitby, F. G.; Formosa, T.; Hill, C. P.

    2010-03-12

    The proteasome is an abundant protease that is critically important for numerous cellular pathways. Proteasomes are activated in vitro by three known classes of proteins/complexes, including Blm10/PA200. Here, we report a 3.4 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a proteasome-Blm10 complex, which reveals that Blm10 surrounds the proteasome entry pore in the 1.2 MDa complex to form a largely closed dome that is expected to restrict access of potential substrates. This architecture and the observation that Blm10 induces a disordered proteasome gate structure challenge the assumption that Blm10 functions as an activator of proteolysis in vivo. The Blm10 C terminus binds in the same manner as seen for 11S activators and inferred for 19S/PAN activators and indicates a unified model for gate opening. We also demonstrate that Blm10 acts to maintain mitochondrial function. Consistent with the structural data, the C-terminal residues of Blm10 are needed for this activity.

  11. Structural studies on dinuclear ruthenium(II) complexes that bind diastereoselectively to an antiparallel folded human telomere sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tom; Costa, Paulo J; Félix, Vítor; Williamson, Mike P; Thomas, Jim A

    2013-11-14

    We report DNA binding studies of the dinuclear ruthenium ligand [{Ru(phen)2}2tpphz](4+) in enantiomerically pure forms. As expected from previous studies of related complexes, both isomers bind with similar affinity to B-DNA and have enhanced luminescence. However, when tested against the G-quadruplex from human telomeres (which we show to form an antiparallel basket structure with a diagonal loop across one end), the ΛΛ isomer binds approximately 40 times more tightly than the ΔΔ, with a stronger luminescence. NMR studies show that the complex binds at both ends of the quadruplex. Modeling studies, based on experimentally derived restraints obtained for the closely related [{Ru(bipy)2}2tpphz](4+), show that the ΛΛ isomer fits neatly under the diagonal loop, whereas the ΔΔ isomer is unable to bind here and binds at the lateral loop end. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the ΔΔ isomer is prevented from binding under the diagonal loop by the rigidity of the loop. We thus present a novel enantioselective binding substrate for antiparallel basket G-quadruplexes, with features that make it a useful tool for quadruplex studies.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding properties, fluorescence studies and toxic activity of cobalt(III) and ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Penumaka; Shilpa, Mynam; Latha, J Naveena Lavanya; Bhatnagar, Ira; Srinivas, P N B S; Kumar, Yata Praveen; Reddy, Kotha Laxma; Satyanarayana, Sirasani

    2011-03-01

    The new ligand 4-(isopropylbenzaldehyde)imidazo[4,5-f ][1,10]phenanthroline (ippip) and its complexes [Ru(phen)(2)(ippip)](2+)(1),[Co(phen)(2)(ippip)](3+)(2),[Ru(bpy)(2)(ippip)](2+)(3),[Co(bpy)(2)(ippip)](3+)(4)(bpy=2,2-bipyridine) and (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized and characterized by ES(+)-MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR. The DNA binding properties of the four complexes were investigated by different spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that complexes bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. When irradiated at 365 nm, the complexes promote the photocleavage of pBR322 DNA, and complex 1 cleaves DNA more effectively than 2, 3, 4 complexes under comparable experimental conditions. Furthermore, photocleavage studies reveal that singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) plays a significant role in the photocleavage.

  13. DNA binding and biological studies of some novel water-soluble polymer-copper(II)-phenanthroline complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajendran Senthil; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Preethy, Christo Paul; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2008-10-01

    Some novel water-soluble polymer-copper(II)-phenanthroline complex samples, [Cu(phen)2(BPEI)]Cl(2).4H2O (phen=1,10-phenanthroline, BPEI=branched polyethyleneimine), with different degrees of copper complex content in the polymer chain have been prepared by ligand substitution method in water-ethanol medium and characterized by infrared, UV-visible, EPR spectral and elemental analysis methods. The binding of these complex samples with DNA has been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy and gel retardation assay. Electrostatic interactions between DNA molecule and polymer-copper(II) complex molecule containing many high positive charges have been observed. Besides these ionic interactions, van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding and other partial intercalation binding modes may also exist in this system. The polymer-copper(II) complex with higher degree of copper complex content was screened for its antimicrobial activity and antitumor activity.

  14. Binding site structure of one LRP-RAP complex: implications for a common ligand-receptor binding motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gitte A; Andersen, Olav M; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2006-01-01

    domains of RAP and alpha2-macroglobulin, which promotes the catabolism of the Abeta-peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. To understand the receptor-ligand cross-talk, the NMR structure of CR56 has been solved and ligand binding experiments with RAP domain 1 (RAPd1) have been performed. From chemical...

  15. RhoGTPase-binding proteins, the exocyst complex and polarized vesicle trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Debarati; Sen, Arpita; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Cell polarity, the asymmetric distribution of proteins and lipids, is essential for a variety of cellular functions. One mechanism orchestrating cell polarity is polarized vesicle trafficking; whereby cargo loaded secretory vesicles are specifically transported to predetermined areas of the cell. The evolutionarily conserved exocyst complex and its small GTPase regulators play crucial roles in spatiotemporal control of polarized vesicle trafficking. In studies on neuronal membrane remodeling and synaptic plasticity, conserved mechanisms of exocyst regulation and cargo recycling during polarized vesicle trafficking are beginning to emerge as well. Recently, our lab demonstrated that RhoGTPase-binding proteins in both yeast (Bem3) and mammals (Ocrl1) are also required for the efficient traffic of secretory vesicles to sites of polarized growth and signaling. Together with our studies, we highlight the evolutionary conservation of the basic elements essential for polarized vesicle traffic across different cellular functions and model systems. In conclusion, we emphasize that studies on RhoGTPase-binding proteins in these processes should be included in the next level of investigation, for a more complete understanding of their hitherto unknown roles in polarized membrane traffic and exocyst regulation.

  16. An overview of the binding models of FGFR tyrosine kinases in complex with small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiyan; Wang, Mixiang; Tian, Xin; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2017-01-27

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) includes four structurally related members, termed as FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Given its intimate role in the progression of several solid tumors, excessive FGFR signaling provides an opportunity for anticancer therapy. Along with extensive pharmacological studies validating the therapeutic potential of targeting the FGFRs for cancer treatment, co-crystal structures of FGFRs/inhibitors are continuously coming up to study the mechanism of actions and explore new inhibitors. Herein, we review the reported co-crystals of FGFRs in complex with the corresponding inhibitors, main focusing our attention on the binding models and the pharmacological activities of the inhibitors.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C

    1991-01-01

    , Man-6-P induces cellular responses. We have studied rat brain neuronal precursor cells where Man-6-P acted as a mitogen suggesting that phosphomannosylated proteins may act as growth factors via the Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor. In conclusion, the gene expression and mechanism of action of IGF-II is very...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...... complex suggesting that its biological actions can be regulated at different levels including the transcription, translation, posttranslational processing, receptor binding and intracellular signalling....

  18. The cervical cap (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cervical cap is a flexible rubber cup-like device that is filled with spermicide and self-inserted over the cervix ... left in place several hours after intercourse. The cap is a prescribed device fitted by a health ...

  19. A platinum complex that binds non-covalently to DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Mendoza, Oscar; Duarte, Alexandra A; Mann, David J; Vilar, Ramon

    2013-05-01

    Cisplatin and some of its derivatives have been shown to be very successful anticancer agents. Their main mode of action has been proposed to be via covalent binding to DNA. However, one of the limitations of these drugs is their poor activity against some tumours due to intrinsic or acquired resistance. Therefore, there is interest in developing complexes with different binding modes and mode of action. Herein we present a novel platinum(ii)-terpyridine complex (1) which interacts non-covalently with DNA and induces cell death via a different mechanism than cisplatin. The interaction of this complex with DNA was studied by UV/Vis spectroscopic titrations, fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assays and circular dichroism (CD) titrations. In addition, computational docking studies were carried out with the aim of establishing the complex's binding mode. These experimental and computational studies showed the complex to have an affinity constant for DNA of ∼10(4) M(-1), a theoretical free energy of binding of -10.83 kcal mol(-1) and selectivity for the minor groove of DNA. Long-term studies indicated that 1 did not covalently bind (or nick) DNA. The cancer cell antiproliferative properties of this platinum(ii) complex were probed in vitro against human and murine cell lines. Encouragingly the platinum(ii) complex displayed selective toxicity for the cancerous (U2OS and SH-SY5Y) and proliferating NIH 3T3 cell lines. Further cell based studies were carried out to establish the mode of action. Cellular uptake studies demonstrated that the complex is able to penetrate the cell membrane and localize to the nucleus, implying that genomic DNA could be a cellular target. Detailed immunoblotting studies in combination with DNA-flow cytometry showed that the platinum(ii) complex induced cell death in a manner consistent with necrosis.

  20. Kinetics and thermodynamics of small molecule binding to pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Doherty, Mark D.

    2013-04-15

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the binding of several small molecules, L (L = N2, H2, D2, and C2H 4), to the coordinatively unsaturated pincer-PCP rhodium(I) complexes Rh[tBu2PCH2(C6H3)CH 2PtBu2] (1) and Rh[tBu 2P(CH2)2(CH)(CH2)2P tBu2] (2) in organic solvents (n-heptane, toluene, THF, and cyclohexane-d12) have been investigated by a combination of kinetic flash photolysis methods, NMR equilibrium studies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Using various gas mixtures and monitoring by NMR until equilibrium was established, the relative free energies of binding of N2, H2, and C2H4 in cyclohexane-d12 were found to increase in the order C 2H4 < N2 < H2. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that 355 nm excitation of 1-L and 2-L results in the photoejection of ligand L. The subsequent mechanism of binding of L to 1 and 2 to regenerate 1-L and 2-L is determined by the structure of the PCP ligand framework and the nature of the solvent. In both cases, the primary transient is a long-lived, unsolvated species (τ = 50-800 ns, depending on L and its concentration in solution). For 2, this so-called less-reactive form (LRF) is in equilibrium with a more-reactive form (MRF), which reacts with L at diffusion-controlled rates to regenerate 2-L. These two intermediates are proposed to be different conformers of the three-coordinate (PCP)Rh fragment. For 1, a similar mechanism is proposed to occur, but the LRF to MRF step is irreversible. In addition, a parallel reaction pathway was observed that involves the direct reaction of the LRF of 1 with L, with second-order rate constants that vary by almost 3 orders of magnitude, depending on the nature of L (in n-heptane, k = 6.7 × 10 5 M-1 s-1 for L = C2H4; 4.0 × 106 M-1 s-1 for L = N2; 5.5 × 108 M-1 s-1 for L = H2). Experiments in the more coordinating solvent, THF, revealed the binding of THF to 1 to generate 1-THF, and its subsequent reaction with L, as a

  1. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    cap arcs Citation: Hosokawa, K., J. I. Moen, K. Shiokawa, and Y. Otsuka ( 2011 ), Motion of polar cap arcs , J. Geophys. Res. , 116 , A01305, doi...K., J. I. Moen, K. Shiokawa, and Y. Otsuka , (2011), Decay of polar cap patch, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A05308, doi:10.1029/2010JA016287, Abstract. We

  2. Cradle Cap: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradle cap Treatment Cradle cap usually doesn't require medical treatment. It clears up on its own within a few months. In the meantime, wash ... tips can help you control and manage cradle cap. Gently rub your baby's scalp with your fingers ...

  3. ANTI-NUCLEOSOME ANTIBODIES COMPLEXED TO NUCLEOSOMAL ANTIGENS SHOW ANTI-DNA REACTIVITY AND BIND TO RAT GLOMERULAR-BASEMENT-MEMBRANE IN-VIVO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRAMERS, C; HYLKEMA, MN; VANBRUGGEN, MCJ; VANDELAGEMAAT, R; DIJKMAN, HBPM; ASSMANN, KJM; SMEENK, RJT; BERDEN, JHM; Hylkema, Machteld

    1994-01-01

    Histones can mediate the binding of DNA and anti-DNA to the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Zn ELISA histone/DNA/anti-DNA complexes are able to bind to heparan sulfate (HS), an intrinsic constituent of the GBM. We questioned whether histone containing immune complexes are able to bind to the GBM

  4. Exploring the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-4-AHCP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina B; Pickering, Darryl S; Greenwood, Jeremy R;

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the ionotropic GluR2 ligand-binding core (GluR2-S1S2J) in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-6H-cyclohepta[d]-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-4-AHCP] has been determined, as well as the binding pharmacology of this construct...

  5. Multispectroscopic DNA-binding studies of a terbium(III) complex containing 2,2'-bipyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh-Boroujeni, Zahra; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2016-01-01

    Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, fluorescence, viscosity, and circular dichroism (CD) have been used in exploring the interaction of terbium(III) complex, [Tb(bpy)2Cl3(OH2)] where bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine, with Fish salmon DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the corresponding complex and FS-DNA. Also, the binding constants (Kb) and the Stern-Volmer quenching constants (Ksv) of Tb(III) complex with FS-DNA were determined. The calculated thermodynamic parameters suggested that the binding of mentioned complex to FS-DNA was driven mainly by hydrophobic interactions. A comparative study of this complex with respect to the effect of iodide-induced quenching, ionic strength effect, and ethidium bromide exclusion assay reflects binding of explicit to the FS-DNA primarily in a groove fashion. CD and viscosity data also support the groove binding mode. Furthermore, Tb(III) complex have been simultaneously screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  6. DNA interaction studies of a platinum (II) complex containing an antiviral drug, ribavirin: the effect of metal on DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mirzaei kalar, Zeinab; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2012-10-01

    The water-soluble Pt (II) complex, [PtCl (DMSO)(N(4)N(7)-ribavirin)]· H(2)O (ribavirin is an antiviral drug) has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interactions of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism and viscosimetry. The complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode. The calculated binding constant, K(b), was 7.2×10(5) M(-1). In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH0) changes of the reaction between the Pt (II) complex with CT-DNA showed hydrophobic interaction. In addition, CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of CT-DNA. All these results prove that the complex interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative mode of binding. In comparison with the previous study of the DNA interaction with ribavirin, these results show that platinum complex has greater affinity to CT-DNA.

  7. Functional dissection of the Clostridium botulinum type B hemagglutinin complex: identification of the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Sugawara

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT inhibits neurotransmitter release in motor nerve endings, causing botulism, a condition often resulting from ingestion of the toxin or toxin-producing bacteria. BoNTs are always produced as large protein complexes by associating with a non-toxic protein, non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and some toxin complexes contain another non-toxic protein, hemagglutinin (HA, in addition to NTNH. These accessory proteins are known to increase the oral toxicity of the toxin dramatically. NTNH has a protective role against the harsh conditions in the digestive tract, while HA is considered to facilitate intestinal absorption of the toxin by intestinal binding and disruption of the epithelial barrier. Two specific activities of HA, carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding, appear to be involved in these processes; however, the exact roles of these activities in the pathogenesis of botulism remain unclear. The toxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A through G. In this study, we identified the amino acid residues critical for carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding in serotype B HA. We constructed mutants defective in each of these two activities and examined the relationship of these activities using an in vitro intestinal cell culture model. Our results show that the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding activities are functionally and structurally independent. Carbohydrate binding potentiates the epithelial barrier-disrupting activity by enhancing cell surface binding, while E-cadherin binding is essential for the barrier disruption.

  8. A Rac1-GDP Trimer Complex Binds Zinc with Tetrahedral and Octahedral Coordination, Displacing Magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prehna,G.; Stebbins, E.

    2007-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases represent well characterized signaling molecules that regulate many cellular functions such as actin cytoskeletal arrangement and the cell cycle by acting as molecular switches. A Rac1-GDP-Zn complex has been crystallized in space group P3{sub 2}21 and its crystal structure has been solved at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. These trigonal crystals reveal the unexpected ability of Rac1 to coordinate Zn atoms in a tetrahedral fashion by use of its biologically relevant switch I and switch II regions. Upon coordination of zinc, the switch I region is stabilized in the GDP-bound conformation and contributes to a Rac1 trimer in the asymmetric unit. Zinc coordination causes switch II to adopt a novel conformation with a symmetry-related molecule. Additionally, zinc was found to displace magnesium from its octahedral coordination at switch I, although GDP binding remained stable. This structure represents the first reported Rac1-GDP-Zn complex, which further underscores the conformational flexibility and versatility of the small GTPase switch regions.

  9. A Rac1--GDP trimer complex binds zinc with tetrahedral and octahedral coordination, displacing magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prehna, G.; Stebbins, C

    2007-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases represent well characterized signaling molecules that regulate many cellular functions such as actin cytoskeletal arrangement and the cell cycle by acting as molecular switches. A Rac1-GDP-Zn complex has been crystallized in space group P3221 and its crystal structure has been solved at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. These trigonal crystals reveal the unexpected ability of Rac1 to coordinate Zn atoms in a tetrahedral fashion by use of its biologically relevant switch I and switch II regions. Upon coordination of zinc, the switch I region is stabilized in the GDP-bound conformation and contributes to a Rac1 trimer in the asymmetric unit. Zinc coordination causes switch II to adopt a novel conformation with a symmetry-related molecule. Additionally, zinc was found to displace magnesium from its octahedral coordination at switch I, although GDP binding remained stable. This structure represents the first reported Rac1-GDP-Zn complex, which further underscores the conformational flexibility and versatility of the small GTPase switch regions.

  10. Different types of copper complexes with the quinolone antimicrobial drugs ofloxacin and norfloxacin: structure, DNA- and albumin-binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živec, Petra; Perdih, Franc; Turel, Iztok; Giester, Gerald; Psomas, George

    2012-12-01

    Three novel copper(II) complexes with the second-generation quinolone antibacterial agents norfloxacin (nfH) and ofloxacin (ofloH) have been synthesized resulting in the complexes [Cu(nfH)(phen)Cl]Cl·5H(2)O (1·5H(2)O), [Cu(nfH)(2)]Cl(2)·6H(2)O (2·6H(2)O) and [Cu(II)(ofloH)(2)][(Cu(I)Cl(2))(2)] (3), respectively. The crystal structures of the complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography revealing that the quinolones act as bidentate ligands coordinated to Cu(II) atom through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. UV study of the interaction of the quinolones and the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has shown that they can bind to CT DNA with [Cu(II)(ofloxacin)(2)][(Cu(I)Cl(2))(2)] exhibiting the highest binding constant to CT DNA. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA solution have shown that the interaction of the complexes with CT DNA is mainly through electrostatic binding. DNA solution viscosity measurements have shown that the interaction of the compounds with CT DNA by classical intercalation may be ruled out. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) indicate that the complexes can partially displace the DNA-bound EB suggesting low to moderate competition with EB. Norfloxacin, ofloxacin and their copper complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human or bovine serum albumin protein having relatively high binding constant values. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of Oxorhenium(V) and Oxotechnetium(V) Complexes That Bind to Amyloid-β Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, David J; White, Jonathan M; McLean, Catriona A; Villemagne, Victor L; Barnham, Kevin J; Donnelly, Paul S

    2016-08-15

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The primary constituents of the plaques are aggregated forms of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. With the goal of preparing technetium-99(m) complexes that bind to Aβ plaques with the potential to be diagnostic imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease, new tetradentate ligands capable of forming neutral and lipophilic complexes with oxotechentium(V) and oxorhenium(V) were prepared. Nonradioactive isotopes of technetium are not available so rhenium was used as a surrogate for exploratory chemistry. Two planar tetradentate N3O ligands were prepared that form charge-neutral complexes with oxorhenium(v) as well as a ligand featuring a styrylpyridyl functional group designed to bind to Aβ plaques. All three ligands formed complexes with oxorhenium(V), and each complex was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. The oxorhenium(V) complex with a styrylpyridyl functional group binds to Aβ plaques present in post-mortem human brain tissue. The chemistry was extrapolated to technetium-99(m) at the tracer level for two of the ligands. The resulting oxotechnetium(V) complexes were sufficiently lipophilic and charge-neutral to suggest that they have the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier but exhibited modest stability with respect to exchange with histidine. The chemistry presented here identifies a strategy to integrate styrylpyridyl functional groups into tetradentate ligands capable of forming complexes with [M═O](3+) cores (M = Re or Tc).

  12. Structural comparison of the Caenorhabditis elegans and human Ndc80 complexes bound to microtubules reveals distinct binding behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Cheeseman, Iain M.; Milligan, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, kinetochores must remain tethered to the plus ends of dynamic microtubule polymers. However, the molecular basis for robust kinetochore–microtubule interactions remains poorly understood. The conserved four-subunit Ndc80 complex plays an essential and direct role in generating dynamic kinetochore–microtubule attachments. Here we compare the binding of the Caenorhabditis elegans and human Ndc80 complexes to microtubules at high resolution using cryo–electron microscopy reconstructions. Despite the conserved roles of the Ndc80 complex in diverse organisms, we find that the attachment mode of these complexes for microtubules is distinct. The human Ndc80 complex binds every tubulin monomer along the microtubule protofilament, whereas the C. elegans Ndc80 complex binds more tightly to β-tubulin. In addition, the C. elegans Ndc80 complex tilts more toward the adjacent protofilament. These structural differences in the Ndc80 complex between different species may play significant roles in the nature of kinetochore–microtubule interactions. PMID:26941333

  13. Elementary steps in the reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from pig heart. Kinetics of thiamine diphosphate binding to the complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümegi, B; Alkonyi, I

    1983-11-02

    In the progress curve of the reaction of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a lag phase was observed when the concentration of thiamin diphosphate was lower than usual (about 0.2-1 mM) in the enzyme assay. The length of the lag phase was dependent on thiamin diphosphate concentration, ranging from 0.2 min to 2 min as the thiamin diphosphate concentration varied from 800 nM to 22 nM. The lag phase was also observed in the elementary steps catalyzed by the pyruvate dehydrogenase component. A Km value of 107 nM was found for thiamin diphosphate with respect to the steady-state reaction rate following the lag phase. The pre-steady-state kinetic data indicate that the resulting lag phase was the consequence of a slow holoenzyme formation from apoenzyme and thiamin diphosphate. The thiamin diphosphate can bind to the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the absence of pyruvate, but the presence of 2 mM pyruvate increases the rate constant of binding from 1.4 X 10(4) M-1 S-1 to 1.3 X 10(5) M-1 S-1 and decreases the rate constant of dissociation from 2.3 X 10(-2) S-1 to 4.1 X 10(-3) S-1. On the other hand, the effect of pyruvate on the thiamin diphosphate binding revealed the existence of a thiamin-diphosphate-independent pyruvate-binding site in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Direct evidence was also obtained with fluorescence techniques for the existence of this binding site and the dissociation constant of pyruvate was found to be 0.38 mM. On the basis of these data we have proposed a random mechanism for the binding of pyruvate and thiamin diphosphate to the complex. Binding of substrates to the enzyme complex caused an increase in the fluorescence of the dansylaziridine-labelled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, showing that binding of substrates to the complex is accompanied by structural changes.

  14. An ‘open’ structure of the RecOR complex supports ssDNA binding within the core of the complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Dehez, François; Round, Adam; Bidon-Chanal, Axel; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Efficient DNA repair is critical for cell survival and the maintenance of genome integrity. The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks within cells. Initiation of this pathway in bacteria can be carried out by either the RecBCD or the RecFOR proteins. An important regulatory player within the RecFOR pathway is the RecOR complex that facilitates RecA loading onto DNA. Here we report new data regarding the assembly of Deinococcus radiodurans RecOR and its interaction with DNA, providing novel mechanistic insight into the mode of action of RecOR in homologous recombination. We present a higher resolution crystal structure of RecOR in an ‘open’ conformation in which the tetrameric RecR ring flanked by two RecO molecules is accessible for DNA binding. We show using small-angle neutron scattering and mutagenesis studies that DNA binding does indeed occur within the RecR ring. Binding of single-stranded DNA occurs without any major conformational changes of the RecOR complex while structural rearrangements are observed on double-stranded DNA binding. Finally, our molecular dynamics simulations, supported by our biochemical data, provide a detailed picture of the DNA binding motif of RecOR and reveal that single-stranded DNA is sandwiched between the two facing oligonucleotide binding domains of RecO within the RecR ring. PMID:23814185

  15. Mutually exclusive CBC-containing complexes determine RNA fate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacometti, Simone; Benbahouche, Nour El Houda; Domanski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The cap-binding complex (CBC) stimulates processing reactions of capped RNAs, including their splicing, 3'end formation, degradation and nuclear transport. CBC effects are particular for individual RNA families, but how such selectivity is achieved remains elusive. Here, we map in vivo RNA binding...... specificities of CBC partners: PHAX, which functions in pre-sn(o)RNAs transport; ZC3H18, which associates with the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex to trigger RNA degradation and ARS2, which stimulates 3' end-formation/transcription termination of several transcript types. Surprisingly, these proteins...... all bind capped RNAs without strong preferences for given families or individual transcripts. Despite this, PHAX and ZC3H18 compete for CBC-binding, which is functionally relevant, since depletion of one factor sensitizes RNAs to the presence of the other. This suggests that interactions of factors...

  16. Human CAP1 is a key factor in the recycling of cofilin and actin for rapid actin turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yahara, Ichiro

    2002-04-15

    Cofilin-ADF (actin-depolymerizing factor) is an essential driver of actin-based motility. We discovered two proteins, p65 and p55, that are components of the actin-cofilin complex in a human HEK293 cell extract and identified p55 as CAP1/ASP56, a human homologue of yeast CAP/SRV2 (cyclase-associated protein). CAP is a bifunctional protein with an N-terminal domain that binds to Ras-responsive adenylyl cyclase and a C-terminal domain that inhibits actin polymerization. Surprisingly, we found that the N-terminal domain of CAP1, but not the C-terminal domain, is responsible for the interaction with the actin-cofilin complex. The N-terminal domain of CAP1 was also found to accelerate the depolymerization of F-actin at the pointed end, which was further enhanced in the presence of cofilin and/or the C-terminal domain of CAP1. Moreover, CAP1 and its C-terminal domain were observed to facilitate filament elongation at the barbed end and to stimulate ADP-ATP exchange on G-actin, a process that regenerates easily polymerizable G-actin. Although cofilin inhibited the nucleotide exchange on G-actin even in the presence of the C-terminal domain of CAP1, its N-terminal domain relieved this inhibition. Thus, CAP1 plays a key role in speeding up the turnover of actin filaments by effectively recycling cofilin and actin and through its effect on both ends of actin filament.

  17. Photoinduced intercalation and coordination of a dirhodium complex to DNA: dual DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Alycia M; Burya, Scott J; Gallucci, Judith C; Turro, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Two new complexes, cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (LL)(CH3 CN)2 ](2+) , where LL=bpy (2, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) and dppz (3, dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), were prepared from the reaction of cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (CH3 CN)6 ](2+) (1) with the corresponding bidentate ligand. The bpy and dppz ligands chelate to the same rhodium atom and are positioned trans to the amidato N atoms, as determined by the single crystal X-ray structure of 2. Irradiation of 2 and 3 with visible light in water results in the exchange of one CH3 CNeq ligand for an H2 O molecule with quantum yields, Φ400 , of 0.040 and 0.044, respectively (λirr =400 nm). The identities of the photoproducts of 2 and 3 were determined to be cis-H,H-[Rh2 (OCCH3 NH)2 (L)(H2 O)(CH3 CN)](2+) , where L is bpy (4) and dppz (5), respectively. Mobility shift assays show that 4 crosslinks double-stranded DNA, and ESI-MS experiments indicate that both 4 and 5 form covalent adducts with single-stranded DNA. In addition, relative viscosity and 2D NMR experiments show that the dppz ligand of 5 also intercalates into DNA upon irradiation, making 3 a dual-binding agent that both intercalates and covalently binds to DNA upon the absorption of visible light.

  18. First structural evidence of sequestration of mRNA cap structures by type 1 ribosome inactivating protein from Momordica balsamina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Yamini, Shavait; Kumar, Mukesh; Sinha, Mau; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2013-05-01

    This is the first structural evidence of recognition of mRNA cap structures by a ribosome inactivating protein. It is well known that a unique cap structure is formed at the 5' end of mRNA for carrying out various processes including mRNA maturation, translation initiation, and RNA turnover. The binding studies and crystal structure determinations of type 1 ribosome inactivating protein (RIP-1) from Momordica balsamina (MbRIP-1) were carried out with mRNA cap structures including (i) N7-methyl guanine (m7G), (ii) N7-methyl guanosine diphosphate (m7GDP), and (iii) N7-methyl guanosine triphosphate (m7GTP). These compounds showed affinities to MbRIP-1 at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes of MbRIP-1 with m7G, m7GDP, and m7GTP at 2.65, 1.77, and 1.75 Å resolutions revealed that all the three compounds bound to MbRIP-1 in the substrate binding site at the positions which are slightly shifted towards Glu85 as compared to those of rRNA substrates. In this position, Glu85 forms several hydrogen bonds with guanine moiety while N-7 methyl group forms van der Waals contacts. However, the guanine rings are poorly stacked in these complexes. Thus, the mode of binding by MbRIP-1 to mRNA cap structures is different which results in the inhibition of depurination. Since some viruses are known to exploit the capping property of the host, this action of MbRIP-1 may have implications for the antiviral activity of this protein in vivo. The understanding of the mode of binding of MbRIP-1 to cap structures may also assist in the design of anti-viral agents. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and DNA-binding study of four cadmium(II) pyridine-carboxamide complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BIPLAB MONDAL; BUDDHADEB SEN; SANDIPAN SARKAR; ENNIO ZANGRANDO; PABITRA CHATTOPADHYAY

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of perchlorate or nitrate salt of cadmium(II) with carboxamide derivatives (L) generated four novel mononuclear metal complexes, represented as [Cd(L)₄](ClO₄)₂ (1a and 1b) and [Cd(L)₂(ONO₂)₂] (2a and 2b) in appreciable yields (L = L¹ = N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-2-pyridine carboxamide and L = L² = N-(thiophen-2-ylmethyl)-2-pyridine carboxamide). The complexes have been characterized by FT-IR, UVVisible, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray crystallographic analysis which revealed eight coordinated cadmium ions, but in different coordination environments, depending on the counter anion used. In addition,electronic absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements revealed a significant interaction of the four complexes with CT-DNA via intercalative/groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constant Kbobtained varies from 0.4 × 10⁴ to 1.11 × 10⁵ M⁻¹. The results suggest that neutral complexes 2a and 2b bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. On the other hand, cationic complexes 1a and 1b bind with DNA via weak electrostatic/covalent interaction.

  20. DNA binding propensity and nuclease efficacy of biosensitive Schiff base complexes containing pyrazolone moiety: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulpandiyan, Rajakkani; Raman, Natarajan

    2016-12-01

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes (1-8) were synthesized from pyrazolone precursor Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-amino-2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one (4-aminoantipyrine) with cinnamaldehyde/benzaldehyde and respective metal(II) chloride. They have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, molar conductance measurements, UV-Vis., IR, NMR, ESI mass spectra and EPR studies. These complexes show lower conductance values, supporting their non-electrolytic nature. Spectroscopic and other analytical data of the complexes suggest octahedral geometry. The binding properties of these complexes with DNA have been explored by electronic absorption spectra, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements which reveal that the complexes have the ability to interact with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) by intercalative mode. The binding constant (Kb) values clearly signify that the complex 1 has more intercalating ability than other complexes. DNA cleavage efficacy of these complexes with pUC18 DNA has been investigated by gel electrophoresis technique. All the complexes have been found to promote cleavage of pUC18 DNA from the super coiled form I to the open circular form II in presence of hydrogen peroxide. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay, investigated by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) method indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens.

  1. Solution NMR Structure of a Ligand/Hybrid-2-G-Quadruplex Complex Reveals Rearrangements that Affect Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirmer-Bartoschek, Julia; Bendel, Lars Erik; Jonker, Hendrik R A; Grün, J Tassilo; Papi, Francesco; Bazzicalupi, Carla; Messori, Luigi; Gratteri, Paola; Schwalbe, Harald

    2017-06-12

    Telomeric G-quadruplexes have recently emerged as drug targets in cancer research. Herein, we present the first NMR structure of a telomeric DNA G-quadruplex that adopts the biologically relevant hybrid-2 conformation in a ligand-bound state. We solved the complex with a metalorganic gold(III) ligand that stabilizes G-quadruplexes. Analysis of the free and bound structures reveals structural changes in the capping region of the G-quadruplex. The ligand is sandwiched between one terminal G-tetrad and a flanking nucleotide. This complex structure involves a major structural rearrangement compared to the free G-quadruplex structure as observed for other G-quadruplexes in different conformations, invalidating simple docking approaches to ligand-G-quadruplex structure determination. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity of lanthanide(III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine acetylhydrazone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KARREDDULA RAJA; AKKILI SUSEELAMMA; KATREDDI HUSSAIN REDDY

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanide(III) complexes of general formula [La(BPAH)₂(NO₃)₃] and [Ce(BPAH)₂(NO₃)(H₂O)₂] 2NO₃.H₂O (where, BPAH = 2-benzoylpyridine acetyl hydrazone), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction and Hirschfeld studies. The central metal ion is 12-coordinate in lanthanum complex and 10-coordinated in the cerium complex. The coordination polyhedra around the lanthanum and cerium were found to have distorted icosahedron and distorted bicapped square antiprism respectively. DNA binding and nuclease activity of these complexes were also investigated in the present work.

  3. An actin monomer binding activity localizes to the carboxyl-terminal half of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, N L; Chen, Z; Horenstein, J; Weber, A; Field, J

    1995-03-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex contains at least two subunits, a 200-kDa catalytic subunit and a 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein, CAP (also called Srv2p). Genetic studies suggested two roles for CAP, one as a positive regulator of cAMP levels in yeast and a second role as a cytoskeletal regulator. We present evidence showing that CAP sequesters monomeric actin (Kd in the range of 0.5-5 microM), decreasing actin incorporation into actin filaments. Anti-CAP monoclonal antibodies co-immunoprecipitate a protein with a molecular size of about 46 kDa. When CAP was purified from yeast using an anti-CAP monoclonal antibody column, the 46-kDa protein co-purified with a stoichiometry of about 1:1 with CAP. Western blots identified the 46-kDa protein as yeast actin. CAP also bound to muscle actin in vitro in immunoprecipitation assays and falling ball viscometry assays. Experiments with pyrene-labeled actin demonstrated that CAP sequesters actin monomers. The actin monomer binding activity is localized to the carboxyl-terminal half of CAP. Together, these data suggest that yeast CAP regulates the yeast cytoskeleton by sequestering actin monomers.

  4. Accessory NUMM (NDUFS6) subunit harbors a Zn-binding site and is essential for biogenesis of mitochondrial complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmita, Katarzyna; Wirth, Christophe; Warnau, Judith; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Hunte, Carola; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.; Zwicker, Klaus; Brandt, Ulrich; Zickermann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I) comprises more than 40 polypeptides and contains eight canonical FeS clusters. The integration of subunits and insertion of cofactors into the nascent complex is a complicated multistep process that is aided by assembly factors. We show that the accessory NUMM subunit of complex I (human NDUFS6) harbors a Zn-binding site and resolve its position by X-ray crystallography. Chromosomal deletion of the NUMM gene or mutation of Zn-binding residues blocked a late step of complex I assembly. An accumulating assembly intermediate lacked accessory subunit N7BM (NDUFA12), whereas a paralog of this subunit, the assembly factor N7BML (NDUFAF2), was found firmly bound instead. EPR spectroscopic analysis and metal content determination after chromatographic purification of the assembly intermediate showed that NUMM is required for insertion or stabilization of FeS cluster N4. PMID:25902503

  5. Quantifying the binding strength of salicylaldoxime-uranyl complexes relative to competing salicylaldoxime-transition metal ion complexes in aqueous solution: a combined experimental and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehio, Nada; Ivanov, Alexander S; Williams, Neil J; Mayes, Richard T; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Hancock, Robert D; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-31

    The design of new ligands and investigation of UO2(2+) complexations are an essential aspect of reducing the cost of extracting uranium from seawater, improving the sorption efficiency for uranium and the selectivity for uranium over competing ions (such as the transition metal cations). The binding strengths of salicylaldoxime-UO2(2+) complexes were quantified for the first time and compared with the binding strengths of salicylic acid-UO2(2+) and representative amidoxime-UO2(2+) complexes. We found that the binding strengths of salicylaldoxime-UO2(2+) complexes are ∼2-4 log β2 units greater in magnitude than their corresponding salicylic acid-UO2(2+) and representative amidoxime-UO2(2+) complexes; moreover, the selectivity of salicylaldoxime towards the UO2(2+) cation over competing Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) cations is far greater than those reported for salicylic acid and glutarimidedioxime in the literature. The higher UO2(2+) selectivity can likely be attributed to the different coordination modes observed for salicylaldoxime-UO2(2+) and salicylaldoxime-transition metal complexes. Density functional theory calculations indicate that salicylaldoxime can coordinate with UO2(2+) as a dianion species formed by η(2) coordination of the aldoximate and monodentate binding of the phenolate group. In contrast, salicylaldoxime coordinates with transition metal cations as a monoanion species via a chelate formed between phenolate and the oxime N; the complexes are stabilized via hydrogen bonding interactions between the oxime OH group and phenolate. By coupling the experimentally determined thermodynamic constants and the results of theoretical computations, we are able to derive a number of ligand design principles to further improve the UO2(2+) cation affinity, and thus further increase the selectivity of salicylaldoxime derivatives.

  6. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  7. Voltammetric and spectroscopic studies on binding of antitumor Morin, Morin-Cu complex and Morin-β-cyclodextrin with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temerk, Y. M.; Ibrahim, M. S.; Kotb, M.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic comparative study of the binding of antitumor Morin and its complexes with DNA has been investigated in the Britton-Robison (BR) buffer solutions using voltammetric and spectroscopic methods. The results show that Morin molecule, acting as an intercalator, is inserted into the cavity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) as well as into the base stacking domain of the DNA double helix. The interaction of Morin-Cu complex or the inclusion complex of Morin-β-CD with ds-DNA causes hypochromism in the absorption spectra, along with pronounced changes in the electrochemical behavior of the Morin complexes. An isobestic point and a new spectrum band appeared indicating the formation of the new system of Morin-Cu-DNA at λm = 391 nm and Morin-β-CD-DNA at λm = 375 nm. The intercalation of Morin-Cu and Morin-β-CD complexes with DNA produces an electrochemically inactive supramolecular complex. The binding constants were calculated from the increase of the solubility, the strong hypochromism, and the decrease in peak current of Morin and its complexes upon the addition of the host molecules. Calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of the inclusion complex of Morin-β-CD with DNA, including Gibbs free energy change, Helmholz free energy and entropy change shows that the complexation is a spontaneous process of association.

  8. In vitro evaluation of Zn-norfloxacin complex as a potent cytotoxic and antibacterial agent, proposed model for DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, F; Saberkari, M; Abiri, R; Motlagh, H Mohammadi; Saberkari, H

    2013-06-01

    A tetrahedral Zn(II) complex with the second generation fluoroquinolone, norfloxacin, was prepared and characterized (NOR-Zn complex, NZC). The antibacterial efficiency of the NZC was tested on two Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria by minimum inhibitory concentration method. The cytotoxic potential of NZC on MDA (human breast adenocarcinoma), Caco-2 (human colon adenocarcinoma), and Hela (human cervix carcinoma) cell lines was studied. The DNA interaction property of the NZC has been investigated using UV-vis, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared, as well as cyclic voltammetry methods. Intrinsic binding constant (K(b)), thermodynamic, and other spectroscopic and voltammetric data indicate that the NZC has more affinity for DNA than for norfloxacin and interacted with DNA via two modes: electrostatic and outside hydrogen binding. The proposed DNA binding mode supports the large enhancement in the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of NZC.

  9. ct-DNA Binding and Antibacterial Activity of Octahedral Titanium (IV) Heteroleptic (Benzoylacetone and Hydroxamic Acids) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Raj; Thakur, Sheetal; Nehra, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Five structurally related titanium (IV) heteroleptic complexes, [TiCl2(bzac)(L1–4)] and [TiCl3(bzac)(HL5)]; bzac = benzoylacetonate; L1–5 = benzohydroximate (L1), salicylhydroximate (L2), acetohydroximate (L3), hydroxyurea (L4), and N-benzoyl-N-phenyl hydroxylamine (L5), were used for the assessment of their antibacterial activities against ten pathogenic bacterial strains. The titanium (IV) complexes (1–5) demonstrated significant level of antibacterial properties as measured using agar well diffusion method. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique was applied, to get a better insight into the nature of binding between titanium (IV) complexes with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). On the basis of the results of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, the interaction between ct-DNA and the titanium (IV) complexes is likely to occur through the same mode. Results indicated that titanium (IV) complex can bind to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) via an intercalative mode. The intrinsic binding constant (Kb) was calculated by absorption spectra by using Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Further, Gibbs free energy was also calculated for all the complexes. PMID:27119022

  10. ct-DNA Binding and Antibacterial Activity of Octahedral Titanium (IV Heteroleptic (Benzoylacetone and Hydroxamic Acids Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kaushal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five structurally related titanium (IV heteroleptic complexes, [TiCl2(bzac(L1–4] and [TiCl3(bzac(HL5]; bzac = benzoylacetonate; L1–5 = benzohydroximate (L1, salicylhydroximate (L2, acetohydroximate (L3, hydroxyurea (L4, and N-benzoyl-N-phenyl hydroxylamine (L5, were used for the assessment of their antibacterial activities against ten pathogenic bacterial strains. The titanium (IV complexes (1–5 demonstrated significant level of antibacterial properties as measured using agar well diffusion method. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique was applied, to get a better insight into the nature of binding between titanium (IV complexes with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA. On the basis of the results of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, the interaction between ct-DNA and the titanium (IV complexes is likely to occur through the same mode. Results indicated that titanium (IV complex can bind to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA via an intercalative mode. The intrinsic binding constant (Kb was calculated by absorption spectra by using Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Further, Gibbs free energy was also calculated for all the complexes.

  11. Circular Dichroism is Sensitive to Monovalent Cation Binding in Monensin Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedzhib, Ahmed; Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr; Gyurcsik, Béla; Pantcheva, Ivayla

    2016-05-01

    Monensin is a natural antibiotic that exhibits high affinity to certain metal ions. In order to explore its potential in coordination chemistry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra of monensic acid A (MonH) and its derivatives containing monovalent cations (Li(+) , Na(+) , K(+) , Rb(+) , Ag(+) , and Et4 N(+) ) in methanolic solutions were measured and compared to computational models. Whereas the conventional CD spectroscopy allowed recording of the transitions down to 192 nm, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) revealed other bands in the 178-192 nm wavelength range. CD signs and intensities significantly varied in the studied compounds, in spite of their similar crystal structure. Computational modeling based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and continuum solvent model suggests that the solid state monensin structure is largely conserved in the solutions as well. Time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) simulations did not allow band-to-band comparison with experimental spectra due to their limited precision, but indicated that the spectral changes were caused by a combination of minor conformational changes upon the monovalent cation binding and a direct involvement of the metal electrons in monensin electronic transitions. Both the experiment and simulations thus show that the CD spectra of monensin complexes are very sensitive to the captured ions and can be used for their discrimination. Chirality 28:420-428, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Complex regulation of CREB-binding protein by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2

    KAUST Repository

    Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2015-11-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are transcriptional coactivators involved in numerous biological processes that affect cell growth, transformation, differentiation, and development. In this study, we provide evidence of the involvement of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) in the regulation of CBP activity. We show that HIPK2 interacts with and phosphorylates several regions of CBP. We demonstrate that serines 2361, 2363, 2371, 2376, and 2381 are responsible for the HIPK2-induced mobility shift of CBP C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, we show that HIPK2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional activity of CBP. However, our data suggest that HIPK2 activates CBP mainly by counteracting the repressive action of cell cycle regulatory domain 1 (CRD1), located between amino acids 977 and 1076, independently of CBP phosphorylation. Our findings thus highlight a complex regulation of CBP activity by HIPK2, which might be relevant for the control of specific sets of target genes involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  13. In vitro DNA binding studies of the sweetening agent saccharin and its copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T

    2014-01-05

    The interactions of fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) with the sodium salt of sweetener saccharin (sacH) and its copper and zinc complexes, namely [M(sac)2(H2O)4]·2H2O (M=Cu(II) or Zn(II)) were studied by using UV-Vis titration, fluorometric competition, thermal denaturation, viscosity and gel electrophoresis measurements. The intrinsic binding constants (Kb) obtained from absorption titrations were estimated to be 2.86 (±0.06)×10(4)M(-1) for Na(sac), 6.67 (±0.12)×10(4)M(-1) for Cu-sac and 4.01 (±0.08)×10(4)M(-1) for Zn-sac. The Cu-sac complex binds to FS-DNA via intercalation with a KA value of 50.12 (±0.22)×10(4)M(-1) as evidenced by competitive binding studies with ethidium bromide. Moreover, competition experiments with Hoechst 33258 are indicative of a groove binding mode of Na(sac) and Zn-sac with binding constants of 3.13 (±0.16)×10(4)M(-1) and 5.25 (±0.22)×10(4)M(-1), respectively. The spectroscopic measurements indicate a moderate DNA binding affinity of Na(sac) and its metal complexes. The suggested binding modes are further confirmed by the thermal denaturation and viscosity measurements. In addition, Cu-sac and Zn-sac show weak ability to damage to pBR322 supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  14. Interaction between the C-terminal domains of measles virus nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein: a tight complex implying one binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocquel, David; Habchi, Johnny; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Doizy, Anthony; Oglesbee, Michael; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-10-01

    The intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (N(TAIL) ) of the measles virus (MeV) nucleoprotein undergoes α-helical folding upon binding to the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the phosphoprotein. The N(TAIL) region involved in binding coupled to folding has been mapped to a conserved region (Box2) encompassing residues 489-506. In the previous studies published in this journal, we obtained experimental evidence supporting a K(D) for the N(TAIL) -XD binding reaction in the nM range and also showed that an additional N(TAIL) region (Box3, aa 517-525) plays a role in binding to XD. In striking contrast with these data, studies published in this journal by Kingston and coworkers pointed out a much less stable complex (K(D) in the μM range) and supported lack of involvement of Box3 in complex formation. The objective of this study was to critically re-evaluate the role of Box3 in N(TAIL) -XD binding. Since our previous studies relied on N(TAIL) -truncated forms possessing an irrelevant Flag sequence appended at their C-terminus, we, herein, generated an N(TAIL) devoid of Box3 and any additional C-terminal residues, as well as a form encompassing only residues 482-525. We then used isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize the binding reactions between XD and these N(TAIL) forms. Results effectively argue for the presence of a single XD-binding site located within Box2, in agreement with the results by Kingston et al., while providing clear experimental support for a high-affinity complex. Altogether, the present data provide mechanistic insights into the replicative machinery of MeV and clarify a hitherto highly debated point. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  15. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-01

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298 K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb = (7.6 ± 0.21) × 105) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298 K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2 ± 0.11) × 106 M- 1. Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  16. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-05

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb=(7.6±0.21)×10(5)) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2±0.11)×10(6)M(-1). Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  17. The antiviral drug ribavirin does not mimic the 7-methylguanosine moiety of the mRNA cap structure in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Belinda; Beeren, Lisa; Grudzien, Ewa; Stepinski, Janusz; Worch, Remigiusz; Zuberek, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Rhoads, Robert E; Preiss, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    The eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E binds the mRNA 5' cap structure and has a central role during translational initiation. eIF4E and the mechanisms to control its activity have oncogenic properties and thus have become targets for anticancer drug development. A recent study (Kentsis et al. 2004) presented evidence that the antiviral nucleoside ribavirin and its phosphorylated derivatives were structural mimics of the mRNA cap, high-affinity ligands for eIF4E, and potent repressors of eIF4E-mediated cell transformation and tumor growth. Based on these findings, we tested ribavirin, ribavirin triphosphate (RTP), and the dinucleotide RpppG for their ability to inhibit translation in vitro. Surprisingly, the ribavirin-based compounds did not affect translation at concentrations where canonical cap analogs efficiently block cap-dependent translation. Using a set of reporter mRNAs that are translated via either cap-dependent or viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRES)-dependent initiation, we found that these ribavirin-containing compounds did inhibit translation at high (millimolar) concentrations, but there was no correlation of this inhibition with an eIF4E requirement for translation. The addition of a ribavirin-containing cap to mRNA did not stimulate translation. Fluorescence titration experiments with eIF4E and the nuclear cap-binding complex CBC indicated affinities for RTP and RpppG that were two to four orders of magnitude lower than those of m(7)GTP and m(7)GpppG. We conclude that, at least with respect to translation, ribavirin does not act in vitro as a functional mimic of the mRNA cap.

  18. A major prolactin-binding complex on human milk fat globule membranes contains cyclophilins A and B: the complex is not the prolactin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, Mary Y; Ueda, Eric K; Chen, KuanHui E; Walker, Ameae M

    2012-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) in milk influences maturation of gastrointestinal epithelium and development of both the hypothalamo-pituitary and immune systems of offspring. Here, we demonstrate that most PRL in human milk is part of a novel, high-affinity, multicomponent binding complex found on the milk fat globule membrane and not in whey. To examine properties of the complex, a sensitive ELISA was developed such that human PRL (hPRL) binding to the complex was measured by loss of hPRL detectability; thus, as much as 50 ng of hPRL was undetectable in the presence of 10 μl of human milk. Using the same methodology, no comparable complex formation was observed with human serum or amniotic fluid. hPRL complexation in milk was rapid, time dependent, and cooperative. Antibodies to or competitors of the hPRL receptor (placental lactogen and growth hormone) showed the hPRL receptor was not involved in the complex. However, hPRL complexation was antagonized by cyclosporine A and anti-cyclophilins. The complex was very stable, resisting dissociation in SDS, urea, and dithiothreitol. Western analysis revealed an ∼75-kDa complex that included hPRL, cyclophilins A and B, and a 16-kDa cyclophilin A. Compared with noncomplexed hPRL, complexed hPRL in whole milk showed similar activation of STAT5 but markedly delayed activation of ERK. Alteration of signaling suggests that complex formation may alter hPRL biological activity. This is the first report of a unique, multicomponent, high-capacity milk fat reservoir of hPRL; all other analyses of milk PRL have utilized defatted milk.

  19. Structural insights into reptarenavirus cap-snatching machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Maria; Gogrefe, Nadja; Vogel, Dominik; Reguera, Juan; Rauschenberger, Bianka; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2017-05-01

    Cap-snatching was first discovered in influenza virus. Structures of the involved domains of the influenza virus polymerase, namely the endonuclease in the PA subunit and the cap-binding domain in the PB2 subunit, have been solved. Cap-snatching endonucleases have also been demonstrated at the very N-terminus of the L proteins of mammarena-, orthobunya-, and hantaviruses. However, a cap-binding domain has not been identified in an arena- or bunyavirus L protein so far. We solved the structure of the 326 C-terminal residues of the L protein of California Academy of Sciences virus (CASV), a reptarenavirus, by X-ray crystallography. The individual domains of this 37-kDa fragment (L-Cterm) as well as the domain arrangement are structurally similar to the cap-binding and adjacent domains of influenza virus polymerase PB2 subunit, despite the absence of sequence homology, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. This enabled identification of a region in CASV L-Cterm with similarity to a cap-binding site; however, the typical sandwich of two aromatic residues was missing. Consistent with this, cap-binding to CASV L-Cterm could not be detected biochemically. In addition, we solved the crystal structure of the corresponding endonuclease in the N-terminus of CASV L protein. It shows a typical endonuclease fold with an active site configuration that is essentially identical to that of known mammarenavirus endonuclease structures. In conclusion, we provide evidence for a presumably functional cap-snatching endonuclease in the N-terminus and a degenerate cap-binding domain in the C-terminus of a reptarenavirus L protein. Implications of these findings for the cap-snatching mechanism in arenaviruses are discussed.

  20. Synthesis, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Ni(II) complexes with fused aromatic N-containing ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Naik, H. S. Bhojya; Naik, T. R. Ravikumar; Prabhakara, M. C.

    2009-04-01

    The three Ni(II) complexes of fused aromatic N-containing ligands such as [Ni(bnp) 3](PF 6) 2 ( 1), [Ni(phen) 2(bnp)](PF 6) 2 ( 2) and [Ni(bpy) 2(bnp)](PF 6) 2 ( 3) (where bnp = dibenzo(b)1,8-naphthpyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline and bpy = bipyridine) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Elemental analysis, magnetic and spectroscopic data suggested octahedral geometry for all the complexes. Binding of these complexes with (ds)DNA were analyzed by absorption spectra, viscosity and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The oxidative cleavage activities of the complexes were studied with supercoiled (SC)pUC19 DNA by using gel electrophoresis, and the results show that complexes have potent nuclease activity.

  1. Rif1 provides a new DNA-binding interface for the Bloom syndrome complex to maintain normal replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongyi; Muniandy, Parameswary; Leo, Elisabetta; Yin, Jinhu; Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Shen, Xi; Ii, Miki; Agama, Keli; Guo, Rong; Fox, David; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Wilson, Lauren; Nguyen, Huy; Weng, Nan-ping; Brill, Steven J; Li, Lei; Vindigni, Alessandro; Pommier, Yves; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2010-09-15

    BLM, the helicase defective in Bloom syndrome, is part of a multiprotein complex that protects genome stability. Here, we show that Rif1 is a novel component of the BLM complex and works with BLM to promote recovery of stalled replication forks. First, Rif1 physically interacts with the BLM complex through a conserved C-terminal domain, and the stability of Rif1 depends on the presence of the BLM complex. Second, Rif1 and BLM are recruited with similar kinetics to stalled replication forks, and the Rif1 recruitment is delayed in BLM-deficient cells. Third, genetic analyses in vertebrate DT40 cells suggest that BLM and Rif1 work in a common pathway to resist replication stress and promote recovery of stalled forks. Importantly, vertebrate Rif1 contains a DNA-binding domain that resembles the αCTD domain of bacterial RNA polymerase α; and this domain preferentially binds fork and Holliday junction (HJ) DNA in vitro and is required for Rif1 to resist replication stress in vivo. Our data suggest that Rif1 provides a new DNA-binding interface for the BLM complex to restart stalled replication forks.

  2. New mixed ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) that incorporate a modified phenanthroline ligand: Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Murali; C V Sastri; Bhaskar G Maiya

    2002-08-01

    The hexafluorophosphate and chloride salts of two ruthenium(II) complexes, viz. [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ and [Ru(ptzo)3]2+, where ptzo = 1,10-phenanthrolino[5,6-]1,2,4-triazine-3-one (ptzo) - a new modified phenanthroline (phen) ligand, have been synthesised. These complexes have been characterised by infrared, UV-Vis, steady-state emission and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods. Results of absorption and fluorescence titration as well as thermal denaturation studies reveal that both the bis- and tris-complexes of ptzo show moderately strong affinity for binding with calf thymus (CT) DNA with the binding constants being close to 105M-1 in each case. An intercalative mode of DNA binding has been suggested for both the complexes. Emission studies carried out in non-aqueous solvents and in aqueous media without DNA reveal that both [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ and [Ru(ptzo)3]2+ are weakly luminescent under these solution conditions. Successive addition of CT DNA to buffered aqueous solutions containing [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ results in an enhancement of the emission. These results have been discussed in the light of the dependence of the structure-specific deactivation processes of the MLCT state of the metallointercalator with the characteristic features of its DNA interaction. In doing so, attempts have been made to compare and contrast its properties with those of the analogous phenanthroline-based complexes including the ones reported by us previously.

  3. Synthesis, Characterization and Fluorescence Properties of Zn(II) and Cu(II) Complexes: DNA Binding Study of Zn(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaee, Parirokh; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Mague, Joel T; Esmaeili, Abbas Ali; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Zinc(II) and copper(II) complexes containing Schiff base, 2- methoxy-6((E)-(phenylimino) methyl) phenol ligand (HL) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The fluorescence properties and quantum yield of zinc complex were studied. Our data showed that Zn complex could bind to DNA grooves with Kb = 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, Zn complex could successfully be used in staining of DNA following agarose gel electrophoresis. MTT assay showed that Zn complex was not cytotoxic in MCF-7 cell line. Here, we introduce a newly synthesized fluorescence probe that can be used for single and double stranded DNA detection in both solution and agarose gels.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary studies of the DNA-binding domain Za from ADAR1 complexed to left-handed DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, T; Shafer, K; Lowenhaupt, K; Hanlon, E; Herbert, A; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    The proteolytically defined Z-DNA binding domain Za of human adenosine deaminase type 1 (hADAR1) has been crystallized in complex with the DNA oligomer d(TCGCGCG). The crystals were obtained from a solution containing ammonium sulfate as precipitating agent and belong to the tetragonal space group P4212. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to a resolution of 2.4 A. The unit-cell dimensions are a = b = 85.9, c = 71.3 A. A Raman spectrum of the complex indicates that the DNA in the complex adopts the left-handed Z conformation.

  5. A computational study of ligand binding affinities in iron(III) porphine and protoporphyrin IX complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Marcus C

    2014-07-01

    The search for novel anti-malarial drugs that can disrupt biomineralization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX to haemozoin requires an understanding of the fundamental chemistry of the porphyrin's iron(iii) centre at the water-lipid interface. Towards this end, the binding affinities for a diverse set of 31 small ligands with iron(iii) porphine have been calculated using density functional theory, in the gas phase and also with implicit solvent corrections for both water and n-octanol. In addition, the binding of hydroxide, chloride, acetate, methylamine and water to ferriprotoporphyrin IX has been studied, and very similar trends are observed for the smaller and larger models. Anionic ligands generally give stronger binding than neutral ones; the strongest binding is observed for RO(-) and OH(-) ligands, whilst acetate binds relatively weakly among the anions studied. Electron-rich nitrogen donors tend to bind more strongly than electron-deficient ones, and the weakest binding is found for neutral O and S donors such as oxazole and thiophene. In all cases, ligand binding is stronger in n-octanol than in water, and the differences in binding energies for the two solvents are greater for ionic ligands than for neutrals. Finally, dimerization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX by means of iron(iii)-carboxylate bond formation has been modelled. The results are discussed in terms of haemozoin crystal growth and its disruption by known anti-malarial drugs.

  6. Using remote substituents to control solution structure and anion binding in lanthanide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tropiano, Manuel; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Tilney, James A.

    2013-01-01

    of the molecule, at a substantial distance from the binding pocket. Herein, we explore these remote substituent effects and explain the observed behaviour through discussion of the way in which remote substituents can influence and control the global structure of a molecule through their demands upon...... to isophthalate through a well-defined conformer. Addition of steric bulk remote from the binding site restricts conformational mobility, giving rise to an increase in binding constant on entropic grounds as long as the ideal binding conformation is not excluded from the available range of conformers....

  7. Crystal structure of the FK506 binding domain of human FKBP25 in complex with FK506.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajit; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-04-01

    Human FKBP25 (hFKBP25) is a nuclear immunophilin and interacts with several nuclear proteins, hence involving in many nuclear events. Similar to other FKBPs, FK506 binding domain (FKBD) of hFKBP25 also binds to immunosuppressive drugs such as rapamycin and FK506, albeit with a lower affinity for the latter. The molecular basis underlying this difference in affinity could not be addressed due to the lack of the crystal structure of hFKBD25 in complex with FK506. Here, we report the crystal structure of hFKBD25 in complex with FK506 determined at 1.8 Å resolution and its comparison with the hFKBD25-rapamycin complex, bringing out the microheterogeneity in the mode of interaction of these drugs, which could possibly explain the lower affinity for FK506.

  8. A monofunctional platinum complex coordinated to a rhodium metalloinsertor selectively binds mismatched DNA in the minor groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Alyson G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2015-10-05

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a bimetallic complex derived from a new family of potent and selective metalloinsertors containing an unusual Rh-O axial coordination. This complex incorporates a monofunctional platinum center containing only one labile site for coordination to DNA, rather than two, and coordinates DNA nonclassically through adduct formation in the minor groove. This conjugate displays bifunctional, interdependent binding of mismatched DNA via metalloinsertion at a mismatch as well as covalent platinum binding. DNA sequencing experiments revealed that the preferred site of platinum coordination is not the traditional N7-guanine site in the major groove, but rather N3-adenine in the minor groove. The complex also displays enhanced cytotoxicity in mismatch repair-deficient and mismatch repair-proficient human colorectal carcinoma cell lines compared to the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, and it triggers cell death via an apoptotic pathway, rather than the necrotic pathway induced by rhodium metalloinsertors.

  9. Storage of cellular 5' mRNA caps in P bodies for viral cap-snatching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, M A; Duran, W A; Hjelle, B L; Ye, C; Panganiban, A T

    2008-12-09

    The minus strand and ambisense segmented RNA viruses include multiple important human pathogens and are divided into three families, the Orthomyxoviridae, the Bunyaviridae, and the Arenaviridae. These viruses all initiate viral transcription through the process of "cap-snatching," which involves the acquisition of capped 5' oligonucleotides from cellular mRNA. Hantaviruses are emerging pathogenic viruses of the Bunyaviridae family that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Cellular mRNAs can be actively translated in polysomes or physically sequestered in cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies) where they are degraded or stored for subsequent translation. Here we show that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein binds with high affinity to the 5' cap of cellular mRNAs, protecting the 5' cap from degradation. We also show that the hantavirus nucleocapsid protein accumulates in P bodies, where it sequesters protected 5' caps. P bodies then serve as a pool of primers during the initiation of viral mRNA synthesis by the viral polymerase. We propose that minus strand segmented viruses replicating in the cytoplasm have co-opted the normal degradation machinery of P bodies for storage of cellular caps. Our data also indicate that modification of the cap-snatching model is warranted to include a role for the nucleocapsid protein in cap acquisition and storage.

  10. Rapid dynamics of general transcription factor TFIIB binding during preinitiation complex assembly revealed by single-molecule analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengjian; English, Brian P.; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Kazane, Stephanie A.; Hu, Wenxin; Tsai, Albert; Inouye, Carla; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob; Schultz, Peter G.; Lavis, Luke D.; Revyakin, Andrey; Tjian, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of protein-encoding genes in eukaryotic cells requires the coordinated action of multiple general transcription factors (GTFs) and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). A “step-wise” preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly model has been suggested based on conventional ensemble biochemical measurements, in which protein factors bind stably to the promoter DNA sequentially to build a functional PIC. However, recent dynamic measurements in live cells suggest that transcription factors mostly interact with chromatin DNA rather transiently. To gain a clearer dynamic picture of PIC assembly, we established an integrated in vitro single-molecule transcription platform reconstituted from highly purified human transcription factors and complemented it by live-cell imaging. Here we performed real-time measurements of the hierarchal promoter-specific binding of TFIID, TFIIA, and TFIIB. Surprisingly, we found that while promoter binding of TFIID and TFIIA is stable, promoter binding by TFIIB is highly transient and dynamic (with an average residence time of 1.5 sec). Stable TFIIB–promoter association and progression beyond this apparent PIC assembly checkpoint control occurs only in the presence of Pol II–TFIIF. This transient-to-stable transition of TFIIB-binding dynamics has gone undetected previously and underscores the advantages of single-molecule assays for revealing the dynamic nature of complex biological reactions. PMID:27798851

  11. Thermodynamic and structural study of phenanthroline derivative ruthenium complex/DNA interactions: probing partial intercalation and binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueso, E; López-Pérez, G; Castellano, M; Prado-Gotor, R

    2012-01-01

    The binding of [Ru(PDTA-H(2))(phen)]Cl (PDTA = propylene-1,2-diaminetetra-acetic acid; phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) with ctDNA (=calf thymus DNA) has been investigated through intrinsic and induced circular dichroism, UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, steady-state fluorescence, thermal denaturation technique, viscosity and electrochemical measurements. The latter indicate that the cathodic and anodic peak potentials of the ruthenium complex shift to more positive values on increasing the DNA concentration, this behavior being a direct consequence of the interaction of both the reduced and oxidized form with DNA binding. From spectrophotometric titration experiments, the equilibrium binding constant and the number of monomer units of the polymer involved in the binding of one ruthenium molecule (site size) have been quantified. The intrinsic circular dichroism (CD) spectra show an unwinding and a conformational change of the DNA helix upon interaction of the ruthenium complex. Quenching process, thermal denaturation experiments and induced circular dichroism (ICD) are consistent with a partial intercalative binding mode. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Steady-state EB cap size fluctuations are determined by stochastic microtubule growth and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Jamie; Duellberg, Christian; Cade, Nicholas I; Griffin, Lewis D; Surrey, Thomas

    2017-03-28

    Growing microtubules are protected from depolymerization by the presence of a GTP or GDP/Pi cap. End-binding proteins of the EB1 family bind to the stabilizing cap, allowing monitoring of its size in real time. The cap size has been shown to correlate with instantaneous microtubule stability. Here we have quantitatively characterized the properties of cap size fluctuations during steady-state growth and have developed a theory predicting their timescale and amplitude from the kinetics of microtubule growth and cap maturation. In contrast to growth speed fluctuations, cap size fluctuations show a characteristic timescale, which is defined by the lifetime of the cap sites. Growth fluctuations affect the amplitude of cap size fluctuations; however, cap size does not affect growth speed, indicating that microtubules are far from instability during most of their time of growth. Our theory provides the basis for a quantitative understanding of microtubule stability fluctuations during steady-state growth.

  13. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repetto, Daniele; Aramu, Simona; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation). p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes phosp...

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-03

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M=Co, Ni or Cu, m=4, 0 and n=2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34×10(4) and 2.5×10(4) M(-1), respectively.

  15. CCAN Assembly Configures Composite Binding Interfaces to Promote Cross-Linking of Ndc80 Complexes at the Kinetochore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekgöz Altunkaya, Gülsah; Malvezzi, Francesca; Demianova, Zuzana; Zimniak, Tomasz; Litos, Gabriele; Weissmann, Florian; Mechtler, Karl; Herzog, Franz; Westermann, Stefan

    2016-09-12

    Partitioning of the genome requires kinetochores, large protein complexes that mediate dynamic attachment of chromosomes to the spindle. Kinetochores contain two supramolecular protein assemblies. The ten-protein KMN network harbors key microtubule-binding sites in the Ndc80 complex and mediates assembly of checkpoint complexes via the KNL-1/Spc105 protein [1, 2]. As KMN does not contact DNA directly, it relies on different centromere-binding proteins for recruitment and cell-cycle-dependent assembly. These proteins are collectively referred to as the CCAN (constitutive centromere-associated network) [2-4]. The molecular mechanisms by which CCAN subunits associate, however, have remained incompletely defined. In particular, it is unclear how CCAN subunits facilitate the assembly of a microtubule-binding interface that contains multiple Ndc80 molecules bound to different receptors [5]. Here, we dissect molecular mechanisms that underlie targeting of the CCAN subunit Cnn1/CENP-T to the sequence-determined point centromeres of budding yeast. Systematic quantitative mass spectrometry experiments reveal association dependencies within the yeast CCAN network. We show that evolutionarily conserved residues in the histone-fold domain of Cnn1 are required for the formation of a stable five-subunit CCAN subassembly with the Ctf3 complex. Cnn1 localizes in a Ctf3-dependent manner to the core of the yeast point centromere, overlapping with the yeast CENP-A protein Cse4. By arranging the N-terminal domains of the CCAN subunits Mcm16, Mcm22, and Cnn1 into close proximity, the Ctf3c-Cnn1-Wip1 complex configures a composite interaction site for two molecules of the Ndc80 complex. Our experiments show how cooperative assembly mechanisms organize the microtubule-binding interface of the kinetochore. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular analysis of the notch repressor-complex in Drosophila: characterization of potential hairless binding sites on suppressor of hairless.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Kurth

    Full Text Available The Notch signalling pathway mediates cell-cell communication in a wide variety of organisms. The major components, as well as the basic mechanisms of Notch signal transduction, are remarkably well conserved amongst vertebrates and invertebrates. Notch signalling results in transcriptional activation of Notch target genes, which is mediated by an activator complex composed of the DNA binding protein CSL, the intracellular domain of the Notch receptor, and the transcriptional coactivator Mastermind. In the absence of active signalling, CSL represses transcription from Notch target genes by the recruitment of corepressors. The Notch activator complex is extremely well conserved and has been studied in great detail. However, Notch repressor complexes are far less understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CSL protein is termed Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H]. Su(H functions as a transcriptional repressor by binding Hairless, the major antagonist of Notch signalling in Drosophila, which in turn recruits two general corepressors--Groucho and C-terminal binding protein CtBP. Recently, we determined that the C-terminal domain (CTD of Su(H binds Hairless and identified a single site in Hairless, which is essential for contacting Su(H. Here we present additional biochemical and in vivo studies aimed at mapping the residues in Su(H that contact Hairless. Focusing on surface exposed residues in the CTD, we identified two sites that affect Hairless binding in biochemical assays. Mutation of these sites neither affects binding to DNA nor to Notch. Subsequently, these Su(H mutants were found to function normally in cellular and in vivo assays using transgenic flies. However, these experiments rely on Su(H overexpression, which does not allow for detection of quantitative or subtle differences in activity. We discuss the implications of our results.

  17. Exploring the interplay between experimental methods and the performance of predictors of binding affinity change upon mutations in protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Cunliang; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2016-08-01

    Reliable prediction of binding affinity changes (ΔΔG) upon mutations in protein complexes relies not only on the performance of computational methods but also on the availability and quality of experimental data. Binding affinity changes can be measured by various experimental methods with different accuracies and limitations. To understand the impact of these on the prediction of binding affinity change, we present the Database of binding Affinity Change Upon Mutation (DACUM), a database of 1872 binding affinity changes upon single-point mutations, a subset of the SKEMPI database (Moal,I.H. and Fernández-Recio,J. Bioinformatics, 2012;28:2600-2607) extended with information on the experimental methods used for ΔΔG measurements. The ΔΔG data were classified into different data sets based on the experimental method used and the position of the mutation (interface and non-interface). We tested the prediction performance of the original HADDOCK score, a newly trained version of it and mutation Cutoff Scanning Matrix (Pires,D.E.V., Ascher,D.B. and Blundell,T.L. Bioinformatics 2014;30:335-342), one of the best reported ΔΔG predictors so far, on these various data sets. Our results demonstrate a strong impact of the experimental methods on the performance of binding affinity change predictors for protein complexes. This underscores the importance of properly considering and carefully choosing experimental methods in the development of novel binding affinity change predictors. The DACUM database is available online at https://github.com/haddocking/DACUM.

  18. Nucleotide specificity of DNA binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor:ARNT complex is unaffected by ligand structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) and a wide variety of structurally diverse ligands through its ability to translocate into the nucleus and bind to a specific DNA recognition site (the dioxin-responsive element [DRE]) adjacent to responsive genes. Although the sequence of the DRE is well defined, several reports suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may vary depending on the structure of its bound ligand. Given the potential toxicological significance of this hypothesis, an unbiased DNA-selection-and-PCR-amplification approach was utilized to directly determine whether binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding. Guinea pig hepatic cytosolic AhR activated in vitro by equipotent concentrations of TCDD, 3-methylcholanthrene, β-naphthoflavone, indirubin, L-kynurenine, or YH439 was incubated with a pool of DNA oligonucleotides containing a 15-base pair variable region consisting of all possible nucleotides. The AhR-bound oligonucleotides isolated by immunoprecipitation were PCR amplified and used in subsequent rounds of selection. Sequence analysis of a total of 196 isolated oligonucleotides revealed that each ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complex only bound to DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides; no non-DRE-containing DNA oligonucleotides were identified. These results demonstrate that the binding and activation of the AhR by structurally diverse agonists do not appear to alter its nucleotide specificity of DNA binding and suggest that stimulation of gene expression mediated by direct DNA binding of ligand-activated AhR:ARNT complexes is DRE dependent.

  19. Restricted diversity of antigen binding residues of antibodies revealed by computational alanine scanning of 227 antibody-antigen complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Gautier; Sato, Yoshiteru; Desplancq, Dominique; Rochel, Natacha; Weiss, Etienne; Martineau, Pierre

    2014-11-11

    Antibody molecules are able to recognize any antigen with high affinity and specificity. To get insight into the molecular diversity at the source of this functional diversity, we compiled and analyzed a non-redundant aligned collection of 227 structures of antibody-antigen complexes. Free energy of binding of all the residue side chains was quantified by computational alanine scanning, allowing the first large-scale quantitative description of antibody paratopes. This demonstrated that as few as 8 residues among 30 key positions are sufficient to explain 80% of the binding free energy in most complexes. At these positions, the residue distribution is not only different from that of other surface residues but also dependent on the role played by the side chain in the interaction, residues participating in the binding energy being mainly aromatic residues, and Gly or Ser otherwise. To question the generality of these binding characteristics, we isolated an antibody fragment by phage display using a biased synthetic repertoire with only two diversified complementarity-determining regions and solved its structure in complex with its antigen. Despite this restricted diversity, the structure demonstrated that all complementarity-determining regions were involved in the interaction with the antigen and that the rules derived from the natural antibody repertoire apply to this synthetic binder, thus demonstrating the robustness and universality of our results. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. 9-cis-Neoxanthin in Light Harvesting Complexes of Photosystem II Regulates the Binding of Violaxanthin and Xanthophyll Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Tu, Wenfeng; Liu, Cheng; Rao, Yan; Gao, Zhimin; Yang, Chunhong

    2017-05-01

    The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex of photosystem II (LHCII) is able to switch to multiple functions under different light conditions (i.e. harvesting solar energy for photosynthesis and dissipating excess excitation energy for photoprotection). The role of the different carotenoids bound to LHCII in regulating the structure and function of the complex is a long-lasting question in photosynthesis research. 9-cis-Neoxanthin (Nx) is one of the important carotenoids, which can only be found in the LHCIIs. High-resolution structural analysis of LHCII shows that Nx is located between different monomeric LHCIIs, with one side protruding into the lipid membrane. In this study, the various functional significances of this unique feature of Nx binding in LHCII are studied with the in vitro reconstituted LHCIIs both with and without Nx and the native complexes isolated either from wild-type Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) or from its mutant aba4-3 lacking Nx Our results reveal that the binding of Nx affects the binding affinity of violaxanthin (Vx) to LHCII significantly. In the absence of Nx, Vx has a much higher binding affinity to trimeric LHCII. The strong coordination between Nx and Vx at the interfaces of adjacent monomers of LHCII plays an important role both in operating the xanthophyll cycle and in the transient modulation of nonphotochemical quenching. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Fluorescent and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy studies on the antioxidation and DNA binding properties of binuclear Tb(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; Jiang, Xinhui; Yang, Zhengyin; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Jianning; Zhou, Tianlin

    2010-09-01

    Tb(III) complexes were prepared from Tb(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O and four Schiff-base ligands derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxaldehyde with aroylhydrazines. X-ray crystal and other structural analyses indicate that Tb(III) and every ligand can form a binuclear Tb(III) complex with 1:1 metal-to-ligand stoichiometry and nine-coordination at the Tb(III) center. Viscosity titration experiments and fluorescent and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy results indicate that all the Tb(III) complexes can bind to Calf thymus DNA through intercalation with the binding constants at the order of magnitude of 10(6)-10(7) M(-1), and they may be used as potential anticancer drugs, but complexes containing active phenolic hydroxy groups may have stronger antitumor activities. Antioxidation results indicate that all the Tb(III) complexes have strong abilities of scavenging hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals, but complexes containing active phenolic hydroxy groups show stronger scavenging effects on hydroxyl radicals and complexes containing N-heteroaromatic substituent show stronger scavenging effects on superoxide radicals. However, Tb(III) emission with these systems is not observed, for these ligands rather are quenchers and unable to sensitize this metal ion.

  2. Co-solvation effect on the binding mode of the α-mangostin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chompoonut Rungnim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins (CDs have been extensively utilized as host molecules to enhance the solubility, stability and bioavailability of hydrophobic drug molecules through the formation of inclusion complexes. It was previously reported that the use of co-solvents in such studies may result in ternary (host:guest:co-solvent complex formation. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of ethanol as a co-solvent on the inclusion complex formation between α-mangostin (α-MGS and β-CD, using both experimental and theoretical studies. Experimental phase-solubility studies were carried out in order to assess complex formation, with the mechanism of association being probed using a mathematical model. It was found that α-MGS was poorly soluble at low ethanol concentrations (0–10% v/v, but higher concentrations (10–40% v/v resulted in better α-MGS solubility at all β-CD concentrations studied (0–10 mM. From the equilibrium constant calculation, the inclusion complex is still a binary complex (1:1, even in the presence of ethanol. The results from our theoretical study confirm that the binding mode is binary complex and the presence of ethanol as co-solvent enhances the solubility of α-MGS with some effects on the binding affinity with β-CD, depending on the concentration employed.

  3. GA binding protein augments autophagy via transcriptional activation of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wan; Swaminathan, Gayathri; Plowey, Edward D

    2014-09-01

    Macroautophagy is a vesicular catabolic trafficking pathway that is thought to protect cells from diverse stressors and to promote longevity. Recent studies have revealed that transcription factors play important roles in the regulation of autophagy. In this study, we have identified GA binding protein (GABP) as a transcriptional regulator of the combinatorial expression of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes involved in autophagosome initiation. We performed bioinformatics analyses that demonstrated highly conserved putative GABP sites in genes that encode BECN1/Beclin 1, several BECN1 interacting proteins, and downstream autophagy proteins including the ATG12-ATG5-ATG16L1 complex. We demonstrate that GABP binds to the promoter regions of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex genes and activates their transcriptional activities. Knockdown of GABP reduced BECN1-PIK3C3 complex transcripts, BECN1-PIK3C3 complex protein levels and autophagy in cultured cells. Conversely, overexpression of GABP increased autophagy. Nutrient starvation increased GABP-dependent transcriptional activity of BECN1-PIK3C3 complex gene promoters and increased the recruitment of GABP to the BECN1 promoter. Our data reveal a novel function of GABP in the regulation of autophagy via transcriptional activation of the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex.

  4. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  5. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  6. A Highly Expressed High-Molecular-Weight S-Layer Complex of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Binds Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorgersen, Michael P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Lancaster, W. Andrew [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Rajeev, Lara [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division; Ge, Xiaoxuan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Vaccaro, Brian J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Poole, Farris L. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Arkin, Adam P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems and Engineering Division; Adams, Michael W. W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    2016-12-02

    Cell suspensions of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 were previously shown, using spectroscopic analysis, to sequester uranium as U(IV) complexed with carboxyl and phosphoryl group ligands on proteins. The goal of our present study was to characterize the proteins involved in uranium binding. Virtually all of the uranium in UFO1 cells was associated with a heterodimeric protein, which was termed the uranium-binding complex (UBC). The UBC was composed of two S-layer domain proteins encoded by UFO1_4202 and UFO1_4203. Samples of UBC purified from the membrane fraction contained 3.3 U atoms/heterodimer, but significant amounts of phosphate were not detected. The UBC had an estimated molecular mass by gel filtration chromatography of 15 MDa, and it was proposed to contain 150 heterodimers (UFO1_4203 and UFO1_4202) and about 500 uranium atoms. The UBC was also the dominant extracellular protein, but when purified from the growth medium, it contained only 0.3 U atoms/heterodimer. The two genes encoding the UBC were among the most highly expressed genes within the UFO1 genome, and their expressions were unchanged by the presence or absence of uranium. Therefore, the UBC appears to be constitutively expressed and is the first line of defense against uranium, including by secretion into the extracellular medium. Although S-layer proteins were previously shown to bind U(VI), here we showed that U(IV) binds to S-layer proteins, we identified the proteins involved, and we quantitated the amount of uranium bound. Widespread uranium contamination from industrial sources poses hazards to human health and to the environment. Here in this paper, we identified a highly abundant uranium-binding complex (UBC) from Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1. The complex makes up the primary protein component of the S-layer of strain UFO1 and binds 3.3 atoms of U(IV) per heterodimer. Finally, while other bacteria have been shown to bind U(VI) on their S-layer, we demonstrate here an example of U(IV) bound by

  7. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.; Taveau, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  8. Study on DNA binding behavior and light switch effect of new coumarin-derived Ru(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Wen; Shen, You-Ming; Li, Zhi-Xin; Zhong, Xiao; Chen, Yuan-Dao; Zhang, Song-Bai

    2015-10-01

    A new ligand mhcip (mhcip = 2-(4-methyl-7-hydroxyl-8-coumarinyl)imidazo[4,5-f]-[1,10]phenanthroline) and its ruthenium complexes, [Ru(L)2mhcip]2+ (L = bpy (2,2‧-bipyridine), phen (1,10-phenanthroline)), have been synthesized and characterized. The introduction of coumarin ring may play an important role in the strong fluorescence of the complexes. Intercalative binding mode between both complexes and CT-DNA was determined by UV-visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The two complexes show efficient DNA photocleavage under irradiation at 365 nm. The cycling of light switch off and on has been achieved for both complexes through the introduction of Cu2+ and EDTA in the absence or presence of DNA.

  9. Theoretical and experimental studies on binding mode of 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid in its new La(III) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peica, Niculina; Kostova, Irena; Kiefer, Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    A new La(III) complex with 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid (HPy) was synthesized and characterized with elemental analysis, IR, and Raman spectroscopies. Significant differences in the IR and Raman spectra of the complex were observed as compared to the spectra of the ligand. The metal-ligand binding mode was studied on the basis of theoretical and experimental data. B3PW91 and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G ∗∗ and LANL2DZ basis sets were successfully applied to study the molecular and vibrational structures as well as the conformational behavior of the neutral ligand and its new La(III) complex. The theoretical calculations of HPy suggested bidentate binding mode through the carboxylic oxygens. Detailed vibrational analysis of HPy and La(III)-Py systems based on both the calculated and experimental spectra confirmed the suggested metal-ligand binding mode. The density functional theory (DFT) calculated geometries, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers including IR and Raman scattering activities for the ligand and its La(III) complex were in good agreement with the experimental data, a complete vibrational assignment being proposed.

  10. Molecular Dynamics of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II Ternary Complex and Identification of Their Putative Drug Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Meenakshi; Saini, Vandana; Piplani, Sakshi; Kumar, A

    2013-01-01

    The structure-function correlation of membrane proteins have been a difficult task, particularly in context to transient protein complexes. The molecular simulation of ternary complex of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II was carried out to understand the basic structural events occurring during the prenylation event of Rab proteins, using the software YASARA. The study suggested that the C-terminus of Rab7 has to be in completely extended conformation during prenylation to reach the active site of RabGGTase-II. Also, attempt was made to find putative drug binding sites on the ternary complex of Rab7::REP1::GGTase-II using Q-SiteFinder programme. The comprehensive consensus probe generated by the program revealed a total of 10 major pockets as putative drug binding sites on Rab7::REP:: GGTase-II ternary complex. These pockets were found on REP protein and GGTase protein subunits. The Rab7 was found to be devoid of any putative drug binding sites in the ternary complex. The phylogenetic analysis of 60 Rab proteins of human was carried out using PHYLIP and study indicated the close phylogenetic relationship between Rab7 and Rab9 proteins of human and hence with further in silico study, the present observations can be extrapolated to Rab9 proteins. The study paves a good platform for further experimental verifications of the findings and other in silico studies like identifying the potential drug targets by searching the putative drug binding sites, generating pharmacophoric pattern, searching or constructing suitable ligand and docking studies.

  11. Design, synthesis, DNA-binding affinity, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest of Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Reddy, Putta; Reddy, Mallepally Rajender; Avudoddi, Srishailam; Praveen Kumar, Yata; Nagamani, Chintakuntla; Deepika, Nancherla; Nagasuryaprasad, K; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Satyanarayana, Sirasani

    2015-09-15

    A novel polypyridyl ligand CNPFIP (CNPFIP=2-(5(4-chloro-2-nitrophenyl)furan-2-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5f][1,10]phenanthroline) and its mononuclear Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes of [Ru(phen)2CNPFIP](2+)(1) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline), [Ru(bpy)2CNPFIP](2+)(2) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine), and [Ru(dmb)2CNPFIP](2+)(3) (dmb=4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) have been synthesized successfully and characterized thoroughly by elemental analysis, UV/Vis, IR, NMR, and ESI-MS. The interaction of the Ru(II) complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by absorption titration, fluorescence, viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggest that three complexes bind to CT-DNA through an intercalative mode and the DNA-binding affinity of complex 1 is greater than that of complexes 2 and 3. The photocleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA by ruthenium complexes 1, 2, and 3 was investigated. We have also tested three complexes for their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) bacteria. The in vitro cytotoxicity of these complexes was evaluated by MTT assay, and complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than 2 and 3 on HeLa cells. The induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of HeLa cells were investigated by flow cytometry for 24h. The molecular docking of ruthenium complexes 1, 2, and 3 with the active site pocket residues of human DNA TOP1 was performed using LibDock.

  12. Copper(II) complexes with 4-hydroxyacetophenone-derived acylhydrazones: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gup, Ramazan; Gökçe, Cansu; Aktürk, Selçuk

    2015-01-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes of Schiff base-hydrazone ligands, hydroxy-N‧-[(1Z)-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene]benzohydrazide [H3L1] and ethyl 2-(4-(1-(2-(4-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethoxy)benzoyl)hydrazono)ethyl)phenoxy)acetate (HL2) have been synthesized and then characterized by microcopy and spectral studies. X-ray powder diffraction illustrates that [Cu(L2)2] complex is crystalline in nature whereas [Cu(H2L1)2]·2H2O has an amorphous structure. Binding of the copper complexes with Calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by UV-visible spectra, exhibiting non-covalent binding to CT-DNA. DNA cleavage experiments have been also investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of an oxidative agent (H2O2). The effect of complex concentration on the DNA cleavage reaction has been also studied. Both copper complexes show nuclease activity, which significantly depends on concentrations of the complexes, in the presence of H2O2 through oxidative mechanism whereas they slightly cleavage DNA in the absence an oxidative agent.

  13. Crystal and solution structures of an odorant-binding protein from the southern house mosquito complexed with an oviposition pheromone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mao, Yang; Xu, Xianzhong; Xu, Wei;

    2010-01-01

    to controlling their populations. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the female's antenna play a crucial, if yet imperfectly understood, role in sensing oviposition cues. Here, we report the X-ray crystallography and NMR 3D structures of OBP1 for Culex quinquefasciatus (CquiOBP1) bound to an oviposition...... of the pheromone from an internal binding pocket in a pH-dependent fashion and (ii) detection of a pheromone-induced conformational change in the OBP·pheromone complex. Although CquiOBP1 binds MOP in a pH-dependent fashion, it lacks the C terminus required for the pH-dependent release model. This study shows...

  14. Computational prediction of binding affinity for CYP1A2-ligand complexes using empirical free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2010-01-01

    , and methods based on statistical mechanics. In the present investigation, we started from an LIE model to predict the binding free energy of structurally diverse compounds of cytochrome P450 1A2 ligands, one of the important human metabolizing isoforms of the cytochrome P450 family. The data set includes both...... substrates and inhibitors. It appears that the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy becomes negligible in this particular protein and a simple empirical model was derived, based on a training set of eight compounds. The root mean square error for the training set was 3.7 kJ/mol. Subsequent......Predicting binding affinities for receptor-ligand complexes is still one of the challenging processes in computational structure-based ligand design. Many computational methods have been developed to achieve this goal, such as docking and scoring methods, the linear interaction energy (LIE) method...

  15. Synthesis, characterization and DNA-binding studies of 2-carboxybenzaldehydeisonicotinoylhydrazone and its La(III), Sm(III) and Eu(III) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Zheng-Yin

    2007-02-01

    2-Carboxybenzaldehydeisonicotinoylhydrazone (HL), and its three lanthanide complexes, LnL 3·4H 2O [Ln = La( 1), Sm( 2), Eu( 3)], have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductivities, IR spectra and thermal analyses. In addition, the DNA-binding properties of the ligand and its complexes have been investigated by absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The experimental results indicated that the complexes ( 2) and ( 3) can bind to DNA, but the ligand and the complex ( 1) cannot; the binding affinity of the complex ( 3) is higher than that of the complex ( 2) and the intrinsic binding constant Kb of the complex ( 3) is 7.86 × 10 4 M -1.

  16. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4.

  17. Structure, mechanics, and binding mode heterogeneity of LEDGF/p75-DNA nucleoprotein complexes revealed by scanning force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; de Feyter, Steven

    2014-04-01

    LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease.LEDGF/p75 is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in the pathogenesis of AIDS and leukemia. In these contexts, LEDGF/p75 acts as a cofactor by tethering protein cargo to transcriptionally active regions in the human genome. Our study - based on scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging - is the first to provide structural information on the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with DNA. Two novel approaches that allow obtaining insights into the DNA conformation inside nucleoprotein complexes revealed (1) that LEDGF/p75 can bind at least in three different binding modes, (2) how DNA topology and protein dimerization affect these binding modes, and (3) geometrical and mechanical aspects of the nucleoprotein complexes. These structural and mechanical details will help us to better understand the cellular mechanisms of LEDGF/p75 as a transcriptional coactivator and as a cofactor in disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SFM topographs of phage lambda DNA in situ, in the absence and presence of LEDGF/p75; model-independent tests for DNA chain equilibration in 2D; SFM topographs of

  18. Extracellular Fibrinogen-binding Protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the Formation of Platelet-Leukocyte Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bagby, Stefan; Pula, Giordano

    2016-02-05

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to platelets proceeds via two independent mechanisms: fibrinogen-mediated and fibrinogen-independent. By proteomic analysis of Efb-interacting proteins within platelets and confirmation by pulldown assays followed by immunoblotting, we identified P-selectin and multimerin-1 as novel Efb interaction partners. The interaction of both P-selectin and multimerin-1 with Efb is independent of fibrinogen. We focused on Efb interaction with P-selectin. Excess of P-selectin extracellular domain significantly impaired Efb binding by activated platelets, suggesting that P-selectin is the main receptor for Efb on the surface of activated platelets. Efb-N interaction with P-selectin inhibited P-selectin binding to its physiological ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), both in cell lysates and in cell-free assays. Because of the importance of P-selectin-PSGL-1 binding in the interaction between platelets and leukocytes, we tested human whole blood and found that Efb abolishes the formation of platelet-monocyte and platelet-granulocyte complexes. In summary, we present evidence that in addition to its documented antithrombotic activity, Efb can play an immunoregulatory role via inhibition of P-selectin-PSGL-1-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes.

  19. The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel helical scaffold bridging binding pockets on separate subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H.; Wu, Sau-Ching; Tjia, Wai-Mui; Wong, Sui-Lam; Ng, Kenneth K. S., E-mail: ngk@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2013-05-01

    The structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex reveals a novel mode of peptide recognition in which a single peptide binds simultaneously to biotin-binding pockets from adjacent subunits of streptavidin. The molecular details of peptide recognition suggest how the SBP-Tag can be further modified to become an even more useful tag for a wider range of biotechnological applications. The 38-residue SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin more tightly (K{sub d} ≃ 2.5–4.9 nM) than most if not all other known peptide sequences. Crystallographic analysis at 1.75 Å resolution shows that the SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin in an unprecedented manner by simultaneously interacting with biotin-binding pockets from two separate subunits. An N-terminal HVV peptide sequence (residues 12–14) and a C-terminal HPQ sequence (residues 31–33) form the bulk of the direct interactions between the SBP-Tag and the two biotin-binding pockets. Surprisingly, most of the peptide spanning these two sites (residues 17–28) adopts a regular α-helical structure that projects three leucine side chains into a groove formed at the interface between two streptavidin protomers. The crystal structure shows that residues 1–10 and 35–38 of the original SBP-Tag identified through in vitro selection and deletion analysis do not appear to contact streptavidin and thus may not be important for binding. A 25-residue peptide comprising residues 11–34 (SBP-Tag2) was synthesized and shown using surface plasmon resonance to bind streptavidin with very similar affinity and kinetics when compared with the SBP-Tag. The SBP-Tag2 was also added to the C-terminus of β-lactamase and was shown to be just as effective as the full-length SBP-Tag in affinity purification. These results validate the molecular structure of the SBP-Tag–streptavidin complex and establish a minimal bivalent streptavidin-binding tag from which further rational design and optimization can proceed.

  20. Cradle Cap: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradle cap Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Common signs of cradle cap include: Patchy scaling or thick crusts on the ... on the ears, eyelids, nose and groin. Cradle cap is common in newborns. It usually isn't ...

  1. A Manganese(V)-Oxo Complex: Synthesis by Dioxygen Activation and Enhancement of Its Oxidizing Power by Binding Scandium Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seungwoo; Lee, Yong-Min; Sankaralingam, Muniyandi; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Park, Young Jun; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Ogura, Takashi; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-07-13

    A mononuclear non-heme manganese(V)-oxo complex, [Mn(V)(O)(TAML)](-) (1), was synthesized by activating dioxygen in the presence of olefins with weak allylic C-H bonds and characterized structurally and spectroscopically. In mechanistic studies, the formation rate of 1 was found to depend on the allylic C-H bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of olefins, and a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 16 was obtained in the reactions of cyclohexene and cyclohexene-d10. These results suggest that a hydrogen atom abstraction from the allylic C-H bonds of olefins by a putative Mn(IV)-superoxo species, which is formed by binding O2 by a high-spin (S = 2) [Mn(III)(TAML)](-) complex, is the rate-determining step. A Mn(V)-oxo complex binding Sc(3+) ion, [Mn(V)(O)(TAML)](-)-(Sc(3+)) (2), was also synthesized in the reaction of 1 with Sc(3+) ion and then characterized using various spectroscopic techniques. The binding site of the Sc(3+) ion was proposed to be the TAML ligand, not the Mn-O moiety, probably due to the low basicity of the oxo group compared to the basicity of the amide carbonyl group in the TAML ligand. Reactivity studies of the Mn(V)-oxo intermediates, 1 and 2, in oxygen atom transfer and electron-transfer reactions revealed that the binding of Sc(3+) ion at the TAML ligand of Mn(V)-oxo enhanced its oxidizing power with a positively shifted one-electron reduction potential (ΔEred = 0.70 V). This study reports the first example of tuning the second coordination sphere of high-valent metal-oxo species by binding a redox-inactive metal ion at the supporting ligand site, thereby modulating their electron-transfer properties as well as their reactivities in oxidation reactions.

  2. Benthic foraminiferal thanatocoenoses from the Cap-Ferret Canyon area (NE Atlantic): A complex interplay between hydro-sedimentary and biological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duros, P.; Jorissen, F. J.; Cesbron, F.; Zaragosi, S.; Schmidt, S.; Metzger, E.; Fontanier, C.

    2014-06-01

    Benthic foraminiferal thanatocoenoses from the Cap-Ferret Canyon area were studied in the >150-μm fraction of 4-5 cm deep sediment levels, at 13 stations. The shallowest station (151 m depth) is located at the shelf break, close to the canyon head. All other stations are located along two bathymetric transects: seven stations along the canyon axis between 300 and 3000 m depth, and five stations from 300 m to 2000 m depth along the southern flank of the canyon. The comparison between the live (Rose-Bengal-stained) and dead assemblages shows that biological (i.e. population dynamic) and taphonomic processes (i.e. test destruction, transport) generate important discrepancies between live and dead assemblages. An important question is, to what degree post-mortem transport and redeposition of foraminiferal tests contribute to the difference between living and dead assemblages? The composition of the thanatocoenoses (shells >150 μm from the inner continental shelf to the Cap-Ferret Canyon axis. However, transport of tests from outer shelf or upper canyon axis towards deeper sites occurs, as indicated by an increase of diversity indices of the dead fauna along the canyon axis. Moreover, some species (e.g., Cassidulina carinata) are observed in the living fauna restricted to the shallow sites, but occur in important amounts in the dead fauna at deeper stations, suggesting that these taxa have been transported from upper canyon stations toward deeper sites. Since Cap-Ferret Canyon is inactive in terms of massive sediment transport (i.e. gravity events), downslope transport of foraminiferal tests probably takes place in nepheloid layers. Downslope transports of foraminiferal tests may create important biases for the utilisation of paleoceanographic proxies using the assemblage characteristics and/or the geochemical composition of selected species. However, the study of dead assemblages along a canyon axis can give important clues about the sedimentary dynamics, especially

  3. More than just scanning: the importance of cap-independent mRNA translation initiation for cellular stress response and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Rafaela; Menezes, Juliane; Romão, Luísa

    2017-05-01

    The scanning model for eukaryotic mRNA translation initiation states that the small ribosomal subunit, along with initiation factors, binds at the cap structure at the 5' end of the mRNA and scans the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) until an initiation codon is found. However, under conditions that impair canonical cap-dependent translation, the synthesis of some proteins is kept by alternative mechanisms that are required for cell survival and stress recovery. Alternative modes of translation initiation include cap- and/or scanning-independent mechanisms of ribosomal recruitment. In most cap-independent translation initiation events there is a direct recruitment of the 40S ribosome into a position upstream, or directly at, the initiation codon via a specific internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element in the 5'UTR. Yet, in some cellular mRNAs, a different translation initiation mechanism that is neither cap- nor IRES-dependent seems to occur through a special RNA structure called cap-independent translational enhancer (CITE). Recent evidence uncovered a distinct mechanism through which mRNAs containing N (6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) residues in their 5'UTR directly bind eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) and the 40S ribosomal subunit in order to initiate translation in the absence of the cap-binding proteins. This review focuses on the important role of cap-independent translation mechanisms in human cells and how these alternative mechanisms can either act individually or cooperate with other cis-acting RNA regulons to orchestrate specific translational responses triggered upon several cellular stress states, and diseases such as cancer. Elucidation of these non-canonical mechanisms reveals the complexity of translational control and points out their potential as prospective novel therapeutic targets.

  4. Role of LAMP1 Binding and pH Sensing by the Spike Complex of Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Israeli, Hadar; Shani, Orly; Katz, Aliza; Diskin, Ron

    2016-11-15

    To effectively infect cells, Lassa virus needs to switch in an endosomal compartment from its primary receptor, α-dystroglycan, to a protein termed LAMP1. A unique histidine triad on the surface of the receptor-binding domain from the glycoprotein spike complex of Lassa virus is important for LAMP1 binding. Here we investigate mutated spikes that have an impaired ability to interact with LAMP1 and show that although LAMP1 is important for efficient infectivity, it is not required for spike-mediated membrane fusion per se Our studies reveal important regulatory roles for histidines from the triad in sensing acidic pH and preventing premature spike triggering. We further show that LAMP1 requires a positively charged His230 residue to engage with the spike complex and that LAMP1 binding promotes membrane fusion. These results elucidate the molecular role of LAMP1 binding during Lassa virus cell entry and provide new insights into how pH is sensed by the spike.

  5. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean (UC)

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  6. Nucleoprotein of influenza B virus binds to its type A counterpart and disrupts influenza A viral polymerase complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaru-ampornpan, Peera, E-mail: peera.jar@biotec.or.th; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan, E-mail: anan.jon@biotec.or.th

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FluB nucleoprotein (BNP) can bind to FluA nucleoprotein (ANP). •BNP–ANP interaction inhibits FluA polymerase activity. •BNP binding prevents ANP from forming a functional FluA polymerase complex. •Nuclear localization of BNP is necessary for FluA polymerase inhibition. •Viral RNA is not required for the BNP–ANP interaction. -- Abstract: Upon co-infection with influenza B virus (FluB), influenza A virus (FluA) replication is substantially impaired. Previously, we have shown that the nucleoprotein of FluB (BNP) can inhibit FluA polymerase machinery, retarding the growth of FluA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this inhibitory action awaited further investigation. Here, we provide evidence that BNP hinders the proper formation of FluA polymerase complex by competitively binding to the nucleoprotein of FluA. To exert this inhibitory effect, BNP must be localized in the nucleus. The interaction does not require the presence of the viral RNA but needs an intact BNP RNA-binding motif. The results highlight the novel role of BNP as an anti-influenza A viral agent and provide insights into the mechanism of intertypic interference.

  7. Molecular determinants for the complex binding specificity of the PDZ domain in PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Beuming, Thijs; Niv, Masha Y

    2005-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains a single PDZ domain known to mediate interaction with the C termini of several receptors, transporters, ion channels, and kinases. In contrast to most PDZ domains, the PICK1 PDZ domain interacts with binding sequences classifiable as type I...... (terminating in (S/T)XPhi; X, any residue) as well as type II (PhiXPhi; Phi, any hydrophobic residue). To enable direct assessment of the affinity of the PICK1 PDZ domain for its binding partners we developed a purification scheme for PICK1 and a novel quantitative binding assay based on fluorescence...... polarization. Our results showed that the PICK1 PDZ domain binds the type II sequence presented by the human dopamine transporter (-WLKV) with an almost 15-fold and >100-fold higher affinity than the type I sequences presented by protein kinase Calpha (-QSAV) and the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (-DSLL...

  8. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  9. Synthesis,Crystal Structure and DNA-binding Properties of a New Copper(Ⅱ) Schiff Base Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Bei

    2012-01-01

    A new asymmetric bidentate copper(Ⅱ) complex,CuL 2(HL=2-((E)-(4-bromophenylimino)methyl)-6-bromo-4-chlorophenol),has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2 1 /c with a=11.218(3),b=9.355(3),c=13.449(4),β=108.722(4)°,V=1336.8(6)3,Z=2,Dc=2.008 g/cm 3,μ(MoKα)=7.024 mm-1,F(000)=806,S=0.999,the final R=0.0342 and wR=0.0641for2611observed reflections (I〉2σ(I)).The central copper(Ⅱ) is four-coordinate and bonds to two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms from two Schiff base ligands.The complex is linked into a two-dimensional supramolecular structure by weak intermolecular interactions.In addition,DNA-binding properties of the metal complex were investigated using spectrometric titrations and viscosity measurements.The results show that the complex binds with calf-thymus DNA(CT-DNA),presumably via a partial intercalative mode.The intrinsic binding constant of the Cu(Ⅱ) complex with DNA is 7.335×10 3 M-1.

  10. Spontaneous Binding of Molecular Oxygen at the Qo-Site of the bc1 Complex Could Stimulate Superoxide Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    to drive ATP synthesis. This molecular machinery, however, is suspected to be a source of superoxide, which is toxic to the cell, even in minuscular quantities, and believed to be a factor in aging. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate here the migration of molecular oxygen in the bc1...... complex in order to identify possible reaction sites that could lead to superoxide formation. It is found, in particular, that oxygen penetrates spontaneously the Qo binding site of the bc1 complex in the presence of an intermediate semiquinone radical, thus making the Qo-site a strong candidate for being...... a center of superoxide production....

  11. A novel bioactive tyramine derived Schiff base and its transition metal complexes as selective DNA binding agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.; Thamaraichelvan, A.

    2011-02-01

    A novel tyramine derived Schiff base, 3-4-dimethoxybenzylidene-4-aminoantipyrinyl-4-aminoethylphenol(L) and a series of its transition metal complexes of the type, ML 2Cl 2 where, M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) have been designed and synthesized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding properties of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated using electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, cyclic voltammetry and molecular docking analysis. The results reveal that the metal(II) complexes interact with DNA through minor groove binding. The interaction has also been investigated by gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, it was found that all the complexes could cleave the circular plasmid pUC19 super coiled (SC) DNA efficiently in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). The complexes showed enhanced antifungal and antibacterial activities compared to the free ligand.

  12. G1/S-regulated E2F-containing protein complexes bind to the mouse thymidine kinase gene promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Q P; Zhao, S; Levin, A H;

    1994-01-01

    By performing DNase I footprint analysis, we had identified three distinct protein binding sequences (MT1, MT2, and MT3) located on the mouse thymidine kinase (TK) upstream promoter (Dou, Q.-P., Fridovich-Keil, J. L., and Pardee, A.B. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 1157-1161). Here we...... report that MT2 includes an E2F-like binding site (GTTCGCGGGCAAA), as shown by the following evidence. (i) MT2 bound specifically to an affinity-purified fusion human E2F protein. (ii) Both MT2 and an authentic E2F site (TTTCGCGCGCTTT) bound specifically to similar or identical nuclear protein complexes....... (iii) Formation of both these DNA-protein complexes were cell cycle-dependent: a G0/G1 phase-specific complex (E2F.G0/G1) was replaced by an S phase-specific complex(es) (E2F.S), whereas "free" E2F increased after the G1/S transition. (iv) Pulse inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide...

  13. Pdx-1 regulation of the INGAP promoter involves sequestration of NeuroD into a non-DNA-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, David A; Shi, Wenjing; Hughes, Laura; Vinik, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Islet neogenesis-associated protein (INGAP) can enhance beta-cell mass to offset progression of diabetes. Identifying how transcription factors regulate INGAP gene expression could reveal key checkpoints governing islet neogenesis. Protein complex interactions at the INGAP promoter were detected using a beta-galactosidase reporter, these protein-DNA complexes being validated in competitive electrophoresis mobility shift assays. The relevance of the revealed promoter interactions was confirmed in small interfering RNA (siRNA) gene knockdown studies. Pdx-1 negatively regulates stimulation of the INGAP promoter by Pan-1/NeuroD. Independently, Pdx-1, Pan-1, and NeuroD bind to the INGAP promoter as revealed by electrophoresis mobility shift assay studies. In combination, Pdx-1 selectively displaces NeuroD from a DNA-binding complex with Pan-1 to form a non-DNA-binding unit. The importance of this interaction is shown in HIT cells that have a forced reduction of Pdx-1 expression. In siRNA/Pdx-1-depleted HIT cells, the interaction of Pan-1/NeuroD with the INGAP promoter is increased 6-fold. Furthermore, endogenous INGAP expression is detected in Pdx-1-depleted cells. These data reveal a dynamic interaction between Pdx-1, NeuroD, and Pan-1 for the regulation of INGAP promoter activity. Modulating molecular regulators of DNA expression may be a consideration in diabetic therapies that translate exogenous stimuli into new endogenous beta-cell mass.

  14. Steric effects of CO2 binding to transition metal-benzene complexes: a first-principles study

    CERN Document Server

    Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigated the adsorption of CO2 molecules on 3d transition metal (TM)-benzene complexes. Our calculations show that the maximum number of CO2 molecules adsorbable on Sc or Ti atoms is three, but the 18-electron rule predicts it should be four. The 18-electron rule is generally successful in predicting the maximum H2 adsorption number for TM atoms including Sc or Ti atoms. We found that the 18-electron rule fails to correctly predict CO2 binding on Sc- or Ti-benzene complexes because CO2 binding, in contrast to H2 binding, requires additional consideration for steric hindrance due to the large bond length of CO2. We calculated the occupation function for CO2 using the Tolman cone angle, which shows that three CO2 molecules fully occupy the available space around Sc- and Ti-benzene complexes. This estimation is the same maximum CO2 adsorption number predicted by DFT calculations. Therefore, we propose that the occupation function for CO2 using the Tolman...

  15. Cycloalkane and alicyclic heterocycle complexation by new switchable resorcin[4]arene-based container molecules: NMR and ITC binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Jens; Fankhauser, Daniel; Shirtcliff, Laura D; Praetorius, Antonia; Schweizer, W Bernd; Diederich, François

    2011-10-24

    The synthesis and structural characterization of novel, "molecular basket"-type bridged cavitands is reported. The resorcin[4]arene-based container molecules feature well-defined cavities that bind a wide variety of cycloalkanes and alicyclic heterocycles. Association constants (K(a)) of the 1:1 inclusion complexes were determined by both (1)H NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The obtained K(a) values in mesitylene ranged from 1.7×10(2) M(-1) for cycloheptane up to 1.7×10(7) M(-1) for morpholine. Host-guest complexation by the molecular baskets is generally driven by dispersion interactions, C-H···π interactions of the guests with the aromatic walls of the cavity, and optimal cavity filling. Correlations between NMR-based structural data and binding affinities support that the complexed heterocyclic guests undergo additional polar C-O···C=O, N-H···π, and S···π interactions. The first crystal structure of a cavitand-based molecular basket is reported, providing precise information on the geometry and volume of the inner cavity in the solid state. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations provided information on the size and conformational preorganization of the cavity in the presence of encapsulated guests. The strongest binding of heterocyclic guests, engaging in polar interactions with the host, was observed at a cavity filling volume of 63 ± 9%.

  16. Model-based cap thickness and peak cap stress prediction for carotid MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Annette M; van der Lugt, Aad; Verhagen, Hence J M; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2017-07-26

    A rupture-prone carotid plaque can potentially be identified by calculating the peak cap stress (PCS). For these calculations, plaque geometry from MRI is often used. Unfortunately, MRI is hampered by a low resolution, leading to an overestimation of cap thickness and an underestimation of PCS. We developed a model to reconstruct the cap based on plaque geometry to better predict cap thickness and PCS. We used histological stained plaques from 34 patients. These plaques were segmented and served as the ground truth. Sections of these plaques contained 93 necrotic cores with a cap thickness Caps below the MRI resolution (n=31) were (digitally removed and) reconstructed according to the geometry-based model. Cap thickness and PCS were determined for the ground truth, readers, and reconstructed geometries. Cap thickness was 0.07mm for the ground truth, 0.23mm for the readers, and 0.12mm for the reconstructed geometries. The model predicts cap thickness significantly better than the readers. PCS was 464kPa for the ground truth, 262kPa for the readers and 384kPa for the reconstructed geometries. The model did not predict the PCS significantly better than the readers. The geometry-based model provided a significant improvement for cap thickness estimation and can potentially help in rupture-risk prediction, solely based on cap thickness. Estimation of PCS estimation did not improve, probably due to the complex shape of the plaques. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of the complex structure, comparative DNA-binding and DNA cleavage of two water-soluble mono-nuclear lanthanum(III) complexes and cytotoxic activity of chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles as drug delivery for the complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Zahra; Nasrollahi, Neda; Karbalaei-Heidari, Hamidreza; Eigner, Vaclav; Dusek, Michal; Mobaraki, Nabiallah; Pournejati, Roya

    2017-05-01

    Two water-soluble mono-nuclear macrocyclic lanthanum(III) complexes of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol with 1,3-diamino-2-propanol (C1) or 1,3-propylenediamine (C2) were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis, FT-IR, 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. C1 complex was structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, which revealed that the complex was mononuclear and ten-coordinated. The coordination sites around lanthanum(III) were occupied with a five-dentate ligand, two bidentate nitrates, and one water molecule. The interaction of complexes with DNA was studied in buffered aqueous solution at pH 7.4. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and viscometric measurements provided clear evidence of the intercalation mechanism of binding. The obtained intrinsic binding constants (Kb) 9.3 × 103 and 1.2 × 103 M- 1 for C1 and C2, respectively confirmed that C1 is better intercalator than C2. The DNA docking studies suggested that the complexes bind with DNA in a groove binding mode with the binding affinity of C1 > C2. Moreover, agarose gel electrophoresis study of the DNA-complex for both compounds revealed that the C1 intercalation cause ethidium bromide replacement in a competitive manner which confirms the suggested mechanism of binding. Finally, the anticancer experiments for the treated cancerous cell lines with both synthesized compounds show that these hydrophilic molecules need a suitable carrier to pass through the hydrophobic nature of cell membrane efficiently.

  18. Enzymatic synthesis of RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues reveals the molecular basis for substrate selectivity of RNA capping enzyme: impacts on RNA metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    Full Text Available RNA cap binding proteins have evolved to specifically bind to the N7-methyl guanosine cap structure found at the 5' ends of eukaryotic mRNAs. The specificity of RNA capping enzymes towards GTP for the synthesis of this structure is therefore crucial for mRNA metabolism. The fact that ribavirin triphosphate was described as a substrate of a viral RNA capping enzyme, raised the possibility that RNAs capped with nucleotide analogues could be generated in cellulo. Owing to the fact that this prospect potentially has wide pharmacological implications, we decided to investigate whether the active site of the model Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus-1 RNA capping enzyme was flexible enough to accommodate various purine analogues. Using this approach, we identified several key structural determinants at each step of the RNA capping reaction and generated RNAs harboring various different cap analogues. Moreover, we monitored the binding affinity of these novel capped RNAs to the eIF4E protein and evaluated their translational properties in cellulo. Overall, this study establishes a molecular rationale for the specific selection of GTP over other NTPs by RNA capping enzyme It also demonstrates that RNAs can be enzymatically capped with certain purine nucleotide analogs, and it also describes the impacts of modified RNA caps on specific steps involved in mRNA metabolism. For instance, our results indicate that the N7-methyl group of the classical N7-methyl guanosine cap is not always indispensable for binding to eIF4E and subsequently for translation when compensatory modifications are present on the capped residue. Overall, these findings have important implications for our understanding of the molecular determinants involved in both RNA capping and RNA metabolism.

  19. Thermodynamics of molecular recognition of mRNA 5' cap by yeast eukaryotic initiation factor 4E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraga-Motoszko, Katarzyna; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Modrak-Wojcik, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2011-07-14

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the recognition of the mRNA 5' terminal structure called "cap" by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) are crucial for cap-dependent translation. To gain a deeper insight into how the yeast eIF4E interacts with the cap structure, isothermal titration calorimetry and the van't Hoff analysis based on intrinsic protein fluorescence quenching upon titration with a series of chemical cap analogs were performed, providing a consistent thermodynamic description of the binding process in solution. Equilibrium association constants together with thermodynamic parameters revealed similarities and differences between yeast and mammalian eIF4Es. The yeast eIF4E complex formation was enthalpy-driven and entropy-opposed for each cap analog at 293 K. A nontrivial isothermal enthalpy–entropy compensation was found, described by a compensation temperature, T(c) = 411 ± 18 K. For a low affinity analog, 7-methylguanosine monophosphate, a heat capacity change was detected, ΔC(p)° = +5.2 ± 1.3 kJ·mol(-1)·K(-1). The charge-related interactions involving the 5′-5′ triphosphate bridge of the cap and basic amino acid side chains at the yeast eIF4E cap-binding site were significantly weaker (by ΔΔH°(vH) of about +10 kJ·mol(-1)) than those for the mammalian homologues, suggesting their optimization during the evolution. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Synthesis and characterization of dopamine substitue tripodal trinuclear [(salen/salophen/salpropen)M] (Mdbnd Cr(III), Mn(III), Fe(III) ions) capped s-triazine complexes: Investigation of their thermal and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Şaban; Koç, Ziya Erdem

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we aimed to synthesize and characterize a novel tridirectional ligand including three catechol groups and its novel tridirectional-trinuclear triazine core complexes. For this purpose, we used melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) (MA) as starting material. 2,4,6-tris(4-carboxybenzimino)-1,3,5-triazine (II) was synthesized by the reaction of an equivalent melamine (I) and three equivalent 4-carboxybenzaldehyde. 4,4‧,4″-((1E,1‧E,1″E)-((1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(azanylylidene))tris(methanylylidene))tris(N-(3,4-dihydroxyphenethyl)benzamide) L (IV) was synthesized by the reaction of one equivalent (II) and three equivalent dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) (DA) by using two different methods. (II, III, IV) and nine novel trinuclear Cr(III), Mn(III) and Fe(III) complexes of (IV) were characterized by means of elemental analyses, 1H NMR, FT-IR spectrometry, LC-MS (ESI+) and thermal analyses. The metal ratios of the prepared complexes were performed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). We also synthesized novel tridirectional-trinuclear systems and investigated their effects on magnetic behaviors of [salen, salophen, salpropen Cr(III)/Mn(III)/Fe(III)] capped complexes. The complexes were determined to be low-spin distorted octahedral Mn(III) and Fe(III), and distorted octahedral Cr(III) all bridged by catechol group.

  1. Alkali metal cation-hexacyclen complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on the structure and binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, C A; Rodgers, M T

    2014-07-24

    Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of alkali metal cation-hexacyclen (ha18C6) complexes, M(+)(ha18C6), with xenon is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The alkali metal cations examined here include: Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). In all cases, M(+) is the only product observed, corresponding to endothermic loss of the intact ha18C6 ligand. The cross-section thresholds are analyzed to extract zero and 298 K M(+)-ha18C6 bond dissociation energies (BDEs) after properly accounting for the effects of multiple M(+)(ha18C6)-Xe collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the M(+)(ha18C6) and Xe reactants, and the lifetimes for dissociation of the activated M(+)(ha18C6) complexes. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations are used to determine the structures of ha18C6 and the M(+)(ha18C6) complexes, provide molecular constants necessary for the thermodynamic analysis of the energy-resolved CID data, and theoretical estimates for the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs. Calculations using a polarizable continuum model are also performed to examine solvent effects on the binding. In the absence of solvent, the M(+)-ha18C6 BDEs decrease as the size of the alkali metal cation increases, consistent with the noncovalent nature of the binding in these complexes. However, in the presence of solvent, the ha18C6 ligand exhibits selectivity for K(+) over the other alkali metal cations. The M(+)(ha18C6) structures and BDEs are compared to those previously reported for the analogous M(+)(18-crown-6) and M(+)(cyclen) complexes to examine the effects of the nature of the donor atom (N versus O) and the number donor atoms (six vs four) on the nature and strength of binding.

  2. Structural analysis of human 2'-O-ribose methyltransferases involved in mRNA cap structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smietanski, Miroslaw; Werner, Maria; Purta, Elzbieta; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Nowotny, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The 5' cap of human messenger RNA contains 2'-O-methylation of the first and often second transcribed nucleotide that is important for its processing, translation and stability. Human enzymes that methylate these nucleotides, termed CMTr1 and CMTr2, respectively, have recently been identified. However, the structures of these enzymes and their mechanisms of action remain unknown. In the present study, we solve the crystal structures of the active CMTr1 catalytic domain in complex with a methyl group donor and a capped oligoribonucleotide, thereby revealing the mechanism of specific recognition of capped RNA. This mechanism differs significantly from viral enzymes, thus providing a framework for their specific targeting. Based on the crystal structure of CMTr1, a comparative model of the CMTr2 catalytic domain is generated. This model, together with mutational analysis, leads to the identification of residues involved in RNA and methyl group donor binding.

  3. A Novel Ni-capped Silverton-type Complex: H4{[Ni(H2O)3]2[CeMo12O42]}·13.5H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-Ping; SHEN Yue; GUO Gui-Ling; NIU Jing-Yang

    2006-01-01

    A novel Ni-capped complex H4{[Ni(H2O)3]2[CeMo12O42]}·13.5H2O has been synthe- sized, which is the first Silverton-type anion capped with two Ni units via three terminal oxygen atoms. Crystallographic data for the title compound: Trigonal, space group R-3, a = 13.0950(19), b = 13.0950(19), c = 33.029(7)(A), α=β=γ= 58.727(17)°, V = 4905.1(14)(A)3, Z = 3, Mr = 2437.17, Dc = 2.475 g/cm3, F(000) = 3462, T = 293(2) K, μ(MoKα) = 3.564 mm-1, R1 = 0.0369, wR2 = 0.0905 and GOF = 1.079 for 151 parameters and 1963 reflections with I > 2σ(I) in the range of 1.85≤θ≤25.50°.

  4. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the common term for seborrheic dermatitis , or seborrhea, which is called dandruff in older kids and ... another factor in the development of cradle cap. Seborrhea happens most often in babies and teenagers. In ...

  5. Binding of copper(II) polypyridyl complexes to DNA and consequences for DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Leising, Miriam; Meetsma, Auke; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-02-28

    The interaction between salmon testes DNA (st-DNA) and a series of Cu(II) polypyridyl complexes, i.e. [Cu(dmbpy)(NO3)2] (1) (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine), [Cu(bpy)(NO3)2] (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), [Cu(phen)(NO3)2] (3) (phen = phenanthroline), [Cu(terpy)(NO3)2]·H2O (4) (terpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine), [Cu(dpq)(NO3)2] (5) (dpq = dipyrido-[3,2-d:2',3'-f]-quinoxaline) and [Cu(dppz)(NO3)2] (6) (dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was studied by UV/Vis absorption, Circular Dichroism, Linear Dichroism, EPR, Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies and viscometry. These complexes catalyse enantioselective C-C bond forming reactions in water with DNA as the source of chirality. Complex 1 crystallizes as an inorganic polymer with nitrate ligands bridging the copper ions, which adopt essentially a distorted square pyramidal structure with a fifth bridging nitrate ligand at the axial position. Raman spectroscopy indicates that in solution the nitrate ligands in 1, 2, 3 and 4 are displaced by solvent (H2O). For complex 1, multiple supramolecular species are observed in the presence of st-DNA in contrast to the other complexes, which appear to interact relatively uniformly as a single species predominantly, when st-DNA is present. Overall the data suggest that complexes 1 and 2 engage primarily through groove binding with st-DNA while 5 and 6 undergo intercalation. For complexes 3 and 4 the data indicates that both groove binding and intercalation takes place, albeit primarily intercalation. Although it is tempting to conclude that the groove binders give highest ee and rate acceleration, it is proposed that the flexibility and dynamics in binding of Cu(II) complexes to DNA are key parameters that determine the outcome of the reaction. These findings provide insight into the complex supramolecular structure of these DNA-based catalysts.

  6. Alpha-catenin-Dependent Recruitment of the Centrosomal Protein CAP350 to Adherens Junctions Allows Epithelial Cells to Acquire a Columnar Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbano, Angel; Formstecher, Etienne; Martinez-Morales, Juan R.; Bornens, Michel; Rios, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. How this complex process is controlled at the molecular level is still largely unknown. Here, we report that the centrosomal microtubule (MT)-binding protein CAP350 localises at adherens junctions in epithelial cells. By two-hybrid screening, we identified a direct interaction of CAP350 with the adhesion protein α-catenin that was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Block of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin)-mediated cell-cell adhesion or α-catenin depletion prevented CAP350 localisation at cell-cell junctions. Knocking down junction-located CAP350 inhibited the establishment of an apico-basal array of microtubules and impaired the acquisition of columnar shape in Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCKII) cells grown as polarised epithelia. Furthermore, MDCKII cystogenesis was also defective in junctional CAP350-depleted cells. CAP350-depleted MDCKII cysts were smaller and contained either multiple lumens or no lumen. Membrane polarity was not affected, but cortical microtubule bundles did not properly form. Our results indicate that CAP350 may act as an adaptor between adherens junctions and microtubules, thus regulating epithelial differentiation and contributing to the definition of cell architecture. We also uncover a central role of α-catenin in global cytoskeleton remodelling, in which it acts not only on actin but also on MT reorganisation during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25764135

  7. Alternative conformations of the Tau repeat domain in complex with an engineered binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, Clara S R; Mirecka, Ewa A; Klein, Antonia N; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Willbold, Dieter; Marino, Stephen F; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The aggregation of Tau into paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. The aggregation reaction is characterized by conformational conversion of the repeat domain, which partially adopts a cross-β-structure in the resulting amyloid-like fibrils. Here, we report the selection and characterization of an engineered binding protein, β-wrapin TP4, targeting the Tau repeat domain. TP4 was obtained by phage display using the four-repeat Tau construct K18ΔK280 as a target. TP4 binds K18ΔK280 as well as the longest isoform of human Tau, hTau40, with nanomolar affinity. NMR spectroscopy identified two alternative TP4-binding sites in the four-repeat domain, with each including two hexapeptide motifs with high β-sheet propensity. Both binding sites contain the aggregation-determining PHF6 hexapeptide within repeat 3. In addition, one binding site includes the PHF6* hexapeptide within repeat 2, whereas the other includes the corresponding hexapeptide Tau(337-342) within repeat 4, denoted PHF6**. Comparison of TP4-binding with Tau aggregation reveals that the same regions of Tau are involved in both processes. TP4 inhibits Tau aggregation at substoichiometric concentration, demonstrating that it interferes with aggregation nucleation. This study provides residue-level insight into the interaction of Tau with an aggregation inhibitor and highlights the structural flexibility of Tau. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of dinucleotide mRNA cap analog containing propargyl moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Muthian; Charles, Irudaya; Kore, Anilkumar R

    2016-03-15

    The first example of the synthesis of new dinucleotide cap analog containing propargyl group such as m(7,3'-O-propargyl)G[5']ppp[5']G is reported. The effect of propargyl cap analog with standard cap was evaluated with respect to their capping efficiency, in vitro T7 RNA polymerase transcription efficiency, and translation activity using cultured HeLa cells. It is noteworthy that propargyl cap analog outperforms standard cap by 3.1 fold in terms of translational properties. The propargyl cap analog forms a more stable complex with translation initiation factor eIF4E based on the molecular modeling studies.

  9. Structure prediction of LDLR-HNP1 complex based on docking enhanced by LDLR binding 3D motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaielbeiki, Reyhaneh; Naughton, Declan P; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including defensins, have come under intense scrutiny owing to their key multiple roles as antimicrobial agents. Not only do they display direct action on microbes, but also recently they have been shown to interact with the immune system to increase antimicrobial activity. Unfortunately, since mechanisms involved in the binding of AMPs to mammalian cells are largely unknown, their potential as novel anti-infective agents cannot be exploited yet. Following the reported interaction of Human Neutrophil Peptide 1 dimer (HNP1) with a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), a computational study was conducted to discover their putative mode of interaction. State-of-the-art docking software produced a set of LDLR-HNP1 complex 3D models. Creation of a 3D motif capturing atomic interactions of the LDLR binding interface allowed selection of the most plausible configurations. Eventually, only two models were in agreement with the literature. Binding energy estimations revealed that only one of them is particularly stable, but also interaction with LDLR weakens significantly bonds within the HNP1 dimer. This may be significant since it suggests a mechanism for internalisation of HNP1 in mammalian cells. In addition to a novel approach for complex structure prediction, this study proposes a 3D model of the LDLR-HNP1 complex which highlights the key residues which are involved in the interactions. The putative identification of the receptor binding mechanism should inform the future design of synthetic HNPs to afford maximum internalisation, which could lead to novel anti-infective drugs.

  10. Two alternative binding mechanisms connect the protein translocation Sec71-Sec72 complex with heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Arati; Mandon, Elisabet C; Gilmore, Reid; Rapoport, Tom A

    2017-05-12

    The biosynthesis of many eukaryotic proteins requires accurate targeting to and translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Post-translational protein translocation in yeast requires both the Sec61 translocation channel, and a complex of four additional proteins: Sec63, Sec62, Sec71, and Sec72. The structure and function of these proteins are largely unknown. This pathway also requires the cytosolic Hsp70 protein Ssa1, but whether Ssa1 associates with the translocation machinery to target protein substrates to the membrane is unclear. Here, we use a combined structural and biochemical approach to explore the role of Sec71-Sec72 subcomplex in post-translational protein translocation. To this end, we report a crystal structure of the Sec71-Sec72 complex, which revealed that Sec72 contains a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that is anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by Sec71. We also determined the crystal structure of this TPR domain with a C-terminal peptide derived from Ssa1, which suggests how Sec72 interacts with full-length Ssa1. Surprisingly, Ssb1, a cytoplasmic Hsp70 that binds ribosome-associated nascent polypeptide chains, also binds to the TPR domain of Sec72, even though it lacks the TPR-binding C-terminal residues of Ssa1. We demonstrate that Ssb1 binds through its ATPase domain to the TPR domain, an interaction that leads to inhibition of nucleotide exchange. Taken together, our results suggest that translocation substrates can be recruited to the Sec71-Sec72 complex either post-translationally through Ssa1 or co-translationally through Ssb1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Two alternative binding mechanisms connect the protein translocation Sec71-Sec72 complex with heat shock proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Arati; Mandon, Elisabet C.; Gilmore, Reid; Rapoport, Tom A. (UMASS, MED); (Harvard-Med)

    2017-03-12

    The biosynthesis of many eukaryotic proteins requires accurate targeting to and translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Post-translational protein translocation in yeast requires both the Sec61 translocation channel, and a complex of four additional proteins: Sec63, Sec62, Sec71, and Sec72. The structure and function of these proteins are largely unknown. This pathway also requires the cytosolic Hsp70 protein Ssa1, but whether Ssa1 associates with the translocation machinery to target protein substrates to the membrane is unclear. Here, we use a combined structural and biochemical approach to explore the role of Sec71-Sec72 subcomplex in post-translational protein translocation. To this end, we report a crystal structure of the Sec71-Sec72 complex, which revealed that Sec72 contains a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that is anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by Sec71. We also determined the crystal structure of this TPR domain with a C-terminal peptide derived from Ssa1, which suggests how Sec72 interacts with full-length Ssa1. Surprisingly, Ssb1, a cytoplasmic Hsp70 that binds ribosome-associated nascent polypeptide chains, also binds to the TPR domain of Sec72, even though it lacks the TPR-binding C-terminal residues of Ssa1. We demonstrate that Ssb1 binds through its ATPase domain to the TPR domain, an interaction that leads to inhibition of nucleotide exchange. Taken together, our results suggest that translocation substrates can be recruited to the Sec71-Sec72 complex either post-translationally through Ssa1 or co-translationally through Ssb1.

  12. Estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates with β-cyclodextrin by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šolínová, Veronika; Mikysková, Hana; Kaiser, Martin Maxmilián; Janeba, Zlatko; Holý, Antonín; Kašička, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) has been applied to estimation of apparent binding constant of complexes of (R,S)-enantiomers of selected acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) with chiral selector β-cyclodextrin (βCD) in aqueous alkaline medium. The noncovalent interactions of five pairs of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs-based antiviral drugs and their derivatives with βCD were investigated in the background electrolyte (BGE) composed of 35 or 50 mM sodium tetraborate, pH 10.0, and containing variable concentration (0-25 mM) of βCD. The apparent binding constants of the complexes of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs with βCD were estimated from the dependence of effective electrophoretic mobilities of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs (measured simultaneously by ACE at constant reference temperature 25°C inside the capillary) on the concentration of βCD in the BGE using different nonlinear and linear calculation methodologies. Nonlinear regression analysis provided more precise and accurate values of the binding constants and a higher correlation coefficient as compared to the regression analysis of the three linearized plots of the effective mobility dependence on βCD concentration in the BGE. The complexes of (R,S)-enantiomers of ANPs with βCD have been found to be relatively weak - their apparent binding constants determined by the nonlinear regression analysis were in the range 13.3-46.4 L/mol whereas the values from the linearized plots spanned the interval 12.3-55.2 L/mol.

  13. Macrophage Capping Protein CapG Is a Putative Oncogene Involved in Migration and Invasiveness in Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Glaser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The actin binding protein CapG modulates cell motility by interacting with the cytoskeleton. CapG is associated with tumor progression in different nongynecologic tumor entities and overexpression in breast cancer cell lines correlates with a more invasive phenotype in vitro. Here, we report a significant CapG overexpression in 18/47 (38% of ovarian carcinomas (OC analyzed by qRealTime-PCR analyses. Functional analyses in OC cell lines through siRNA mediated CapG knockdown and CapG overexpression showed CapG-dependent cell migration and invasiveness. A single nucleotide polymorphism rs6886 inside the CapG gene was identified, affecting a CapG phosphorylation site and thus potentially modifying CapG function. The minor allele frequency (MAF of SNP rs6886 (c.1004A/G was higher and the homozygous (A/A, His335 genotype was significantly more prevalent in patients with fallopian tube carcinomas (50% as in controls (10%. With OC being one of the most lethal cancer diseases, the detection of novel biomarkers such as CapG could reveal new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Moreover, in-depth analyses of SNP rs6886 related to FTC and OC will contribute to a better understanding of carcinogenesis and progression of OC.

  14. APOOL is a cardiolipin-binding constituent of the Mitofilin/MINOS protein complex determining cristae morphology in mammalian mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias A; Koob, Sebastian; Heide, Heinrich; Wittig, Ilka; Head, Brian; van der Bliek, Alexander; Brandt, Ulrich; Mittelbronn, Michel; Reichert, Andreas S

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial cristae morphology is highly variable and altered under numerous pathological conditions. The protein complexes involved are largely unknown or only insufficiently characterized. Using complexome profiling we identified apolipoprotein O (APOO) and apolipoprotein O-like protein (APOOL) as putative components of the Mitofilin/MINOS protein complex which was recently implicated in determining cristae morphology. We show that APOOL is a mitochondrial membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. It specifically binds to cardiolipin in vitro but not to the precursor lipid phosphatidylglycerol. Overexpression of APOOL led to fragmentation of mitochondria, a reduced basal oxygen consumption rate, and altered cristae morphology. Downregulation of APOOL impaired mitochondrial respiration and caused major alterations in cristae morphology. We further show that APOOL physically interacts with several subunits of the MINOS complex, namely Mitofilin, MINOS1, and SAMM50. We conclude that APOOL is a cardiolipin-binding component of the Mitofilin/MINOS protein complex determining cristae morphology in mammalian mitochondria. Our findings further assign an intracellular role to a member of the apolipoprotein family in mammals.

  15. Theoretical binding affinities and spectroscopy of complexes formed by cyclobis(paraquat- p-anthrancene) with some pharmaceutical molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xin; Luo, Zhouyang; Du, Jinpei; Wu, Shi

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical investigation on the stabilities and spectroscopic properties of the complexes formed by cyciobis(paraquat- p-anthracene) with pharmaceutical molecules were performed using the semi-empirical PM3 and B3LYP/3-21G methods. Based on the B3LYP/3-21G optimized geometries, the energies of the complexes were calculated at B3LYP/6-31G( d) level. The binding energies of the complexes were computed after the correction of basis set superposition error (BSSE). The energy gaps of the complexes are decreased due to the formation of the hydrogen bonds. The stretching vibrations of the C-H bonds adjacent to the hydrogen bonds in the IR spectra of the complexes calculated with PM3 method are red-shifted compared with those of the host. The chemical shifts of α-C and β-C atoms in the complexes calculated at B3LYP/3-21G level are shifted downfield due to the formation of the hydrogen bonds and the electron-withdrawing effect of the nitrogen atoms. The aromaticities of the complexes are improved because of the enlargement of the conjugation system and the overlap of electron cloud based on the nuclear independent chemical shifts (NICS) calculated at B3LYP/3-21G level.

  16. Purification and characterization of a native zinc-binding high molecular weight multiprotein complex from human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Kumar, Vijay; Chhikara, Nirmal; Kumar, Sanjay; Manral, Pallavi; Kashav, Tara; Saini, Savita; Srinivasan, A; Singh, Sarman; Singh, Tej P; Yadav, Savita

    2011-05-01

    The seminal plasma comprises secretions from various accessory sex glands. During fertilization spermatozoa undergo complex sequences of precisely timed events that are regulated by the activation of different intracellular signaling pathways. The precision and efficacy of these pathways are often influenced by the assembly and interactions of multiprotein complexes, thereby directing the flow of regulatory information. Our knowledge about these protein complexes present in human seminal plasma (HuSP) is limited. Here we report the identification and characterization of a native high molecular weight zinc-binding multiprotein complex from HuSP by utilizing 2-DE followed by MS. Twenty-six proteins representing isoforms and/or fragments of 11 different proteins were found to be assembled in this complex. Prostate-specific antigen, zinc α2-glycoprotein, prostatic acid phosphatase, and prolactin inducible protein were the major proteins of this complex. Dynamic light scattering experiments revealed changes in aggregation pattern accompanied with deviation from physiological pH and in presence of SDS. However, no significant changes were observed in the presence of physiological ligands such as zinc and fructose. The present study will be useful and contribute to guide the future studies performed for elucidation of biological significance of this native complex in HuSP.

  17. Cyclase-associated Protein 1 (CAP1) Promotes Cofilin-induced Actin Dynamics in Mammalian Nonmuscle CellsV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta; Mattila, Pieta K.; Matilainen, Tanja; Salminen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved actin monomer binding proteins present in all eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which CAPs contribute to actin dynamics has been elusive. In mammals, the situation is further complicated by the presence of two CAP isoforms whose differences have not been characterized. Here, we show that CAP1 is widely expressed in mouse nonmuscle cells, whereas CAP2 is the predominant isoform in developing striated muscles. In cultured NIH3T3 and B1...

  18. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  19. High-affinity small molecule-phospholipid complex formation: binding of siramesine to phosphatidicacid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu

    2008-01-01

    , comparable to the affinities for the binding of small molecule ligands to proteins, was measured for phosphatidic acid (PA, mole fraction of XPA ) 0.2 in phosphatidylcholine vesicles), yielding a molecular partition coefficient of 240 ( 80 × 106. An MD simulation on the siramesine:PA interaction...

  20. Increased C1q binding immune complexes in Felty's syndrome: comparison with uncomplicated rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurd, E.R.; Chubick, A.; Jasin, H.E.; Ziff, M.

    1979-07-01

    Sera from patients with Felty's syndrome (FS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were examined for the presence of circulating immune complexes (IC) by using the 125I-C1q binding and monoclonal rheumatoid factor (mRF) techniques. Of 15 patients with FS, 9 (60%) had high 125I-C1q binding as compared to 3 of 26 RA patients (12%). The average C1q binding was significantly higher in the FS patients than in the RA patients without FS. C1q binding in both FS and RA patients was significantly higher than a group of 90 normal controls. In addition, serum C4 levels were significantly lower in the FS patients than in the RA patients. In contrast to these findings, IC levels in FS and RA patients were very similar when measured by the mRF technique. These studies indicate that FS patients have higher levels of complement-fixing IC in their sera than RA patients without FS. These findings raise the possibility that the complement-fixing IC found in these patients may play a role in the pathogenesis of neutropenia of FS.

  1. Crystal and solution structures of an odorant-binding protein from the southern house mosquito complexed with an oviposition pheromone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yang; Xu, Xianzhong; Xu, Wei; Ishida, Yuko; Leal, Walter S.; Ames, James B.; Clardy, Jon (Harvard-Med); (UCD)

    2010-11-15

    Culex mosquitoes introduce the pathogens responsible for filariasis, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis, and other diseases into humans. Currently, traps baited with oviposition semiochemicals play an important role in detection efforts and could provide an environmentally friendly approach to controlling their populations. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the female's antenna play a crucial, if yet imperfectly understood, role in sensing oviposition cues. Here, we report the X-ray crystallography and NMR 3D structures of OBP1 for Culex quinquefasciatus (CquiOBP1) bound to an oviposition pheromone (5R,6S)-6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide (MOP). In both studies, CquiOBP1 had the same overall six-helix structure seen in other insect OBPs, but a detailed analysis revealed an important previously undescribed feature. There are two models for OBP-mediated signal transduction: (i) direct release of the pheromone from an internal binding pocket in a pH-dependent fashion and (ii) detection of a pheromone-induced conformational change in the OBP {center_dot} pheromone complex. Although CquiOBP1 binds MOP in a pH-dependent fashion, it lacks the C terminus required for the pH-dependent release model. This study shows that CquiOBP binds MOP in an unprecedented fashion using both a small central cavity for the lactone head group and a long hydrophobic channel for its tail.

  2. Cooperative binding of the outer arm-docking complex underlies the regular arrangement of outer arm dynein in the axoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owa, Mikito; Furuta, Akane; Usukura, Jiro; Arisaka, Fumio; King, Stephen M.; Witman, George B.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) in cilia and flagella is bound to the outer doublet microtubules every 24 nm. Periodic binding of OADs at specific sites is important for efficient cilia/flagella beating; however, the molecular mechanism that specifies OAD arrangement remains elusive. Studies using the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that the OAD-docking complex (ODA-DC), a heterotrimeric complex present at the OAD base, functions as the OAD docking site on the doublet. We find that the ODA–DC has an ellipsoidal shape ∼24 nm in length. In mutant axonemes that lack OAD but retain the ODA-DC, ODA-DC molecules are aligned in an end-to-end manner along the outer doublets. When flagella of a mutant lacking ODA-DCs are supplied with ODA-DCs upon gamete fusion, ODA-DC molecules first bind to the mutant axonemes in the proximal region, and the occupied region gradually extends toward the tip, followed by binding of OADs. This and other results indicate that a cooperative association of the ODA-DC underlies its function as the OAD-docking site and is the determinant of the 24-nm periodicity. PMID:24979786

  3. DNA binding and cleavage activity by a mononuclear iron(II)Schiff base complex: Synthesis and structural characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Pal; Bhaskar Biswas; Merry Mitra; Subramaniyam Rajalakshmi; Chandra Shekhar Purohit; Soumitra Hazra; Gopinatha Suresh Kumar; Balachandran Unni Nair; Rajarshi Ghosh

    2013-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of a mononuclear Fe(II) compound [Fe(L)](ClO4)2 (1) [L = N-(1-pyridin-2-yl-phenylidene)-N'-[2-({2-[(1-pyridin-2-ylphenylidene)amino]ethyl}amino)ethyl] ethane-1,2-diamine] (1) is reported. 1 crystallizes in P-1 space group with a = 11.9241(3) Å, b = 12.1994(3) Å and c = 13.0622(4) Å. The binding property of the complex with DNA has been investigated using absorption and emission studies, thermal melting, viscosity experiments and circular dichroism studies. The binding constant (b) and the linear Stern-Volmer quenching constant (sv) of the complex have been determined as 3.5 × 103M-1 and 2.73 × 104M-1, respectively. Spectroscopic and hydrodynamic investigations revealed intercalative mode of binding of 1 with DNA. 1 is also found to induce oxidative cleavage of the supercoiled pUC 18 DNA to its nicked circular form in a concentration dependent manner.

  4. Crystal structure of human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of a neutralizing antibody reveals insights into receptor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Lammens

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a multifunctional cytokine playing a key role in tissue regeneration and remodeling. Dysregulation of TWEAK signaling is involved in various pathological processes like autoimmune diseases and cancer. The unique interaction with its cognate receptor Fn14 makes both ligand and receptor promising targets for novel therapeutics. To gain insights into this important signaling pathway, we determined the structure of soluble human TWEAK in complex with the Fab fragment of an antibody selected for inhibition of receptor binding. In the crystallized complex TWEAK is bound by three Fab fragments of the neutralizing antibody. Homology modeling shows that Fab binding overlaps with the putative Fn14 binding site of TWEAK. Docking of the Fn14 cysteine rich domain (CRD to that site generates a highly complementary interface with perfectly opposing charged and hydrophobic residues. Taken together the presented structure provides new insights into the biology of TWEAK and the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway, which will help to optimize the therapeutic strategy for treatment of related cancer types and autoimmune diseases.

  5. CD163 Binding to Haptoglobin-Hemoglobin Complexes Involves a Dual-point Electrostatic Receptor-Ligand Pairing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2013-01-01

    Formation of the haptoglobin (Hp)-hemoglobin (Hb) complex in human plasma leads to a high affinity recognition by the endocytic macrophage receptor CD163. A fast segregation of Hp-Hb from CD163 occurs at endosomal conditions (pH CD163 has previously been shown to involve the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain 3. This domain and the adjacent SRCR domain 2 of CD163 contain a consensus motif for a calcium-coordinated acidic amino acid triad cluster as originally identified in the SRCR domain of the scavenger receptor MARCO. Here we show that site-directed mutagenesis in each of these acidic triads of SRCR domains 2 and 3 abrogates the high affinity binding of recombinant CD163 to Hp-Hb. In the ligand, Hp Arg-252 and Lys-262, both present in a previously identified CD163 binding loop of Hp, were revealed as essential residues for the high affinity receptor binding. These findings are in accordance with pairing of the calcium-coordinated acidic clusters in SRCR domains 2 and 3 with the two basic Arg/Lys residues in the Hp loop. Such a two-point electrostatic pairing is mechanistically similar to the pH-sensitive pairings disclosed in crystal structures of ligands in complex with tandem LDL receptor repeats or tandem CUB domains in other endocytic receptors. PMID:23671278

  6. ATLAS: A database linking binding affinities with structures for wild-type and mutant TCR-pMHC complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrman, Tyler; Cimons, Jennifer; Cosiano, Michael; Purcaro, Michael; Pierce, Brian G; Baker, Brian M; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-02-03

    The ATLAS (Altered TCR Ligand Affinities and Structures) database (https://zlab.umassmed.edu/atlas/web/) is a manually curated repository containing the binding affinities for wild-type and mutant T cell receptors (TCRs) and their antigens, peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC). The database links experimentally measured binding affinities with the corresponding three dimensional (3D) structures for TCR-pMHC complexes. The user can browse and search affinities, structures, and experimental details for TCRs, peptides, and MHCs of interest. We expect this database to facilitate the development of next-generation protein design algorithms targeting TCR-pMHC interactions. ATLAS can be easily parsed using modeling software that builds protein structures for training and testing. As an example, we provide structural models for all mutant TCRs in ATLAS, built using the Rosetta program. Utilizing these structures, we report a correlation of 0.63 between experimentally measured changes in binding energies and our predicted changes. Proteins 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Binding free energy calculations on E-selectin complexes with sLe(x) oligosaccharide analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Pabla A; Ribeiro, António J M; Ramos, Maria J; Jiménez, Verónica A; Alderete, Joel B; Fernandes, Pedro A

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations were employed to examine the interaction between E-selectin and six structurally related oligosaccharides including the physiological ligand sialyl Lewis x. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that sialyl Lewis x and its mimics share a common binding region and similar interactions with E-selectin involving the formation of hydrogen bonds with Glu80, Asn82, Asn83, Arg97, Asn105, Asp106, and Glu107 residues and electrostatic contacts with Ca(2+) and the positively charged Lys111 and Lys 113 residues. Regarding binding free energy calculations, the performance of the rigorous but computationally expensive pathway methods TI, BAR, and MBAR was compared to the less rigorous but faster end-point methods MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA aimed at identifying a suitable approach to deal with the very subtle binding free energy differences within the ligands under study. All methods succeeded in predicting increased binding affinities for sialyl Lewis x analogs compared to the native ligand with absolute errors <1 kcal/mol. The best correlation with experimental data was obtained by TI (r(2)  = 0.84), followed by MBAR (r(2)  = 0.80), BAR (r(2)  = 0.73), MM/PBSA (r(2)  = 0.73) and MM/GBSA (r(2)  = 0.47). These results provide valuable information to increase understanding about E-selectin-oligosaccharide interactions and conduct further research aimed at designing novel ligands targeting this protein. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Single-Step Affinity Purification of ERK Signaling Complexes Using the Streptavidin-Binding Peptide (SBP) Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Veraksa, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of biological functions of signaling proteins is facilitated by studying their protein-protein interaction networks. Affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a favorite method to study protein complexes. Here we describe a procedure for single-step purification of ERK (Rolled) and associated proteins from Drosophila cultured cells. The use of the streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) tag allows for a highly efficient isolation of native ERK signaling complexes, which are suitable for subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. Our analysis of the ERK interactome has identified both known and novel signaling components. This method can be easily adapted for SBP-based purification of protein complexes in any expression system.

  9. Inclusion complex formation of ionic liquids with 4-sulfonatocalixarenes studied by competitive binding of berberine alkaloid fluorescent probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, Zsombor; Biczók, László

    2009-07-01

    A clinically important natural isoquinoline alkaloid, berberine, was used as a fluorescent probe to study the encapsulation of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (C nMIm +) type ionic liquids in 4-sulfonato-substituted calix[4]arene (SCX4) and calix[6]arene (SCX6) at pH 2. Addition of ionic liquids to the aqueous solution of berberine-SCXn inclusion complexes brought about considerable fluorescence intensity diminution due to the extrusion of berberine from the macrocycle into the aqueous phase by the competitive inclusion of C nMIm + cation. The lengthening of the aliphatic side chain of the imidazolium moiety diminished the equilibrium constant of complexation with SCX4, but enhanced the stability of SCX6 complexes. Larger binding strength was found for SCX4.

  10. Synthesis, DNA-binding and photocleavage studies of Ru(II) complexes of phenyl-(4,5,9,14-tetraaza-benzo[]triphenylen-1,1-)-methanone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Li-Feng Tan; Xue-Jiao Chen; Jian-Liang Shen; Xi-Ling Liang

    2009-07-01

    A novel polypyridyl ligand phenyl-(4,5,9,14-tetraaza-benzo[]triphenylen-1,1-)-methanone (PTBM) and its complexes [Ru(phen)2(PTBM)]2+ (1) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) and [Ru(bpy)2 (PTBM)]2+ (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectroscopy, and 1H NMR. The DNA-binding properties of the two complexes were investigated by spectroscopic and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that both complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative mode and the DNA-binding affinity of complex 1 is greater than that of complex 2. When irradiated at 365 nm, complex 1 was found to be a more-effective DNA-cleaving agent than complex 2.

  11. New cobalt(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyl carbazate Schiff bases: Syntheses, crystal structures, in vitro DNA and HSA binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, Palanivelu; Helena, Sannasi; Simpson, Jim; Ilanchelian, Malaichamy; Muthusankar, Aathi; Govindarajan, Subbiah

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, new Schiff base complexes with the composition [M(NCS)2(L1)2]·nH2O, where M=Co (n=0) (1) and Ni (n=2) (2); [M(NCS)2(L2)2], M=Co (3) and Ni (4) as well as [M(NCS)2(L3)2], M=Co (5) and Ni (6); (L1=benzyl 2-(propan-2-ylidene)hydrazinecarboxylate, L2=benzyl 2-(butan-2-ylidene)hydrazinecarboxylate and L3=benzyl 2-(pentan-3-ylidene)hydrazinecarboxylate) have been synthesized by a template method. The complexes were characterised by analytical methods, spectroscopic studies, thermal and X-ray diffraction techniques. The structures of all the complexes explore that the metal(II) cation has a trans-planar coordination environment, the monomeric units containing a six-coordinated metal center in octahedral geometry with N-bound isothiocyanate anions coordinated as terminal ligands. Furthermore, the binding of the two Schiff base ligands to the metal centers involves the azomethine nitrogen and the carbonyl oxygen in mutually trans configuration. The binding interactions of all the complexes with Calf thymus-deoxyribonucleic acid (CT-DNA) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated using absorption and emission spectral techniques. The CT-DNA binding properties of these complexes reveal that they bind to CT-DNA through a partial intercalation mode and the binding constant values were calculated using the absorption and emission spectral data. The binding constant values (~10×10(6)moldm(-3)) indicate strong binding of metal complexes with CT-DNA. HSA binding interaction studies showed that the cobalt and nickel complexes can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA through static quenching process. Also, molecular docking studies were supported out to apprehend the binding interactions of these complexes with DNA and HSA which offer new understandings into the experimental model observations.

  12. Uranium pyrrolylamine complexes featuring a trigonal binding pocket and interligand noncovalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Williams, Ursula J; Kikkawa, James M; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2012-01-02

    The syntheses of tri- and tetravalent uranium complexes of the Ar(F)(3)TPA(3-) ligand [Ar(F) = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl; TPA = tris(pyrrolyl-α-methylamine)] are described. Interligand noncovalent interactions between arene groups within the complexes are detected both in the solid state and in solution.

  13. Cap0037, a Novel Global Regulator of Clostridium acetobutylicum Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Phuong-Thao; Linder, Sonja; Flitsch, Stefanie K; Schiel-Bengelsdorf, Bettina; Dürre, Peter; Soucaille, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    An operon comprising two genes, CA_P0037 and CA_P0036, that encode proteins of unknown function that were previously shown to be highly expressed in acidogenic cells and repressed in solventogenic and alcohologenic cells is located on the pSOL1 megaplasmid of Clostridium acetobutylicum upstream of adhE2 A CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant in which an intron was inserted at position 189/190 in the sense strand of CA_P0037 was successfully generated by the Targetron technique. The resultant mutant showed significantly different metabolic flux patterns in acidogenic (producing mainly lactate, butyrate, and butanol) and alcohologenic (producing mainly butyrate, acetate, and lactate) chemostat cultures but not in solventogenic or batch cultures. Transcriptomic investigation of the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant showed that inactivation of CA_P0037 significantly affected the expression of more than 258 genes under acidogenic conditions. Surprisingly, genes belonging to the Fur regulon, involved in iron transport (CA_C1029-CA_C1032), or coding for the main flavodoxin (CA_C0587) were the most significantly expressed genes under all conditions, whereas fur (coding for the ferric uptake regulator) gene expression remained unchanged. Furthermore, most of the genes of the Rex regulon, such as the adhE2 and ldhA genes, and of the PerR regulon, such as rbr3A-rbr3B and dfx, were overexpressed in the mutant. In addition, the whole CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon was highly expressed under all conditions in the CA_P0037::int (189/190s) mutant, suggesting a self-regulated expression mechanism. Cap0037 was shown to bind to the CA_P0037-CA_P0036 operon, sol operon, and adc promoters, and the binding sites were determined by DNA footprinting. Finally, a putative Cap0037 regulon was generated using a bioinformatic approach. Clostridium acetobutylicum is well-known for its ability to produce solvents, especially n-butanol. Understanding the regulatory network of C. acetobutylicum will be

  14. Complex behavior of marine animal tissue extracts in the competitive binding assay of brevetoxins with rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, P L; Delgado, J A; Baden, D G

    1997-01-01

    Brevetoxins are produced by the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis, an organism linked to red tide outbreaks, and the accompanying toxicity to marine animals and to neurotoxic shellfish poisoning in humans. Brevetoxins bind with high affinity to voltage-sensitive sodium channels and cause increased sodium ion conductance and nerve cell depolarization. The brevetoxin competitive binding assay with tritium-labeled brevetoxin 3 (3H-PbTx-3) and rat brain synaptosomes is a sensitive and specific assay for pure brevetoxins. Here we report that extracts of manatee, turtle, fish, and clam tissues contain components that interfere with the assay by cooperative, noncompetitive inhibition of 3H-PbTx-3 specific binding and increased nonspecific binding to synaptosomes. By determining the "apparent" toxin concentration ("[Toxin]") in the extract at several assay concentrations, a reasonable correction for the complex inhibition could be made using a semilog plot to extrapolate [Toxin] to zero extract concentration to obtain [Toxin]0. Spiking 4 extracts with 60 nM PbTx-3 caused [Toxin]0 to increase by 41 +/- 8 nM, indicating that the noncompetitive components did not prevent the assay of toxin but did reduce the accuracy of the result. Fourfold repetition of the assay of 4 samples gave standard deviations of 25 to 60% of the value of [Toxin]0, so the error can be fairly large, especially for samples with little toxin. Purification of an extract with a 1 g sample prep column of C-18 decreased the complex inhibition by about 3-fold but did not eliminate interference in the assay.

  15. A Highly Expressed High-Molecular-Weight S-Layer Complex of Pelosinus sp. Strain UFO1 Binds Uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgersen, Michael P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Rajeev, Lara; Ge, Xiaoxuan; Vaccaro, Brian J; Poole, Farris L; Arkin, Adam P; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-02-15

    Cell suspensions of Pelosinus sp. strain UFO1 were previously shown, using spectroscopic analysis, to sequester uranium as U(IV) complexed with carboxyl and phosphoryl group ligands on proteins. The goal of our present study was to characterize the proteins involved in uranium binding. Virtually all of the uranium in UFO1 cells was associated with a heterodimeric protein, which was termed the uranium-binding complex (UBC). The UBC was composed of two S-layer domain proteins encoded by UFO1_4202 and UFO1_4203. Samples of UBC purified from the membrane fraction contained 3.3 U atoms/heterodimer, but significant amounts of phosphate were not detected. The UBC had an estimated molecular mass by gel filtration chromatography of 15 MDa, and it was proposed to contain 150 heterodimers (UFO1_4203 and UFO1_4202) and about 500 uranium atoms. The UBC was also the dominant extracellular protein, but when purified from the growth medium, it contained only 0.3 U atoms/heterodimer. The two genes encoding the UBC were among the most highly expressed genes within the UFO1 genome, and their expressions were unchanged by the presence or absence of uranium. Therefore, the UBC appears to be constitutively expressed and is the first line of defense against uranium, including by secretion into the extracellular medium. Although S-layer proteins were previously shown to bind U(VI), here we showed that U(IV) binds to S-layer proteins, we identified the proteins involved, and we quantitated the amount of uranium bound.

  16. A new arene-Ru based supramolecular coordination complex for efficient binding and selective sensing of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Song, Young Ho; Prabhu, Nadarajan Saravanan; Kim, Hyunuk; Hong, Soon Ho; Cheon, Seyeon; Noh, Jaegeun; Chi, Ki-Whan

    2014-04-28

    A new dipyridyl ligand is encoded with 120° angularity between its coordination vectors by using a central pyridine carboxamide scaffold to orient two 4-(pyridin-4-ylethynyl)phenyl moieties. The N,N'-bis(4-(pyridin-4-ylethynyl)phenyl)pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide ligand undergoes self-assembly with a diruthenium arene complex to furnish a [2 + 2] metallacycle with a wedge-like structure. The metallacycle binds to the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) variant of GFP, resulting in steady-state spectral changes in UV-Vis absorption and emission experiments. These studies indicate that the metallacycle induces conformation changes to the EGFP, disrupting the tripeptide chromophore. Furthermore, gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy studies indicate that binding ultimately leads to aggregation of the protein. Computational investigations indicate a favorable interaction, predominantly between the metallacycle and the Arg168 residue of the EGFP. An interaction with Arg168 and related residues was previously observed for an emission-attenuating antibody, supporting that these interactions induce changes to the photophysical properties of EGFP by disrupting the tripeptidechromophore in a similar manner. Additionally, we have also described the quenching study of the reporter GFP protein in vivo by a new metal complex using reflected fluorescence microscopy. We anticipate that such metal complexes which can passively diffuse into the cells in vivo can serve as potential tools in molecular and drug targeting based biological studies.

  17. Structural basis for the assembly and nucleic acid binding of the TREX-2 transcription-export complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellisdon, Andrew M; Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2012-02-19

    The conserved TREX-2 transcription-export complex integrates transcription and processing of many actively transcribed nascent mRNAs with the recruitment of export factors at nuclear pores and also contributes to transcriptional memory and genomic stability. We report the crystal structure of the Sac3-Thp1-Sem1 segment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TREX-2 that interfaces with the gene expression machinery. Sac3-Thp1-Sem1 forms a previously uncharacterized PCI-domain complex characterized by the juxtaposition of Sac3 and Thp1 winged helix domains, forming a platform that mediates nucleic acid binding. Our structure-guided mutations support the idea that the Thp1-Sac3 interaction is an essential requirement for mRNA binding and for the coupling of transcription and processing to mRNP assembly and export. These results provide insight into how newly synthesized transcripts are efficiently transferred from TREX-2 to the principal mRNA export factor, and they reveal how Sem1 stabilizes PCI domain-containing proteins and promotes complex assembly.

  18. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras.

  19. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Xiao-qin; Li, He; Liang, Kai-ni [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Miner, Jeffrey N.; Hong, Mei; Kallel, E. Adam; Oeveren, Arjan van; Zhi, Lin [Discovery Research, Ligand Pharmaceuticals Inc., 10275 Science Center Drive, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: x-ray@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2006-11-01

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents.

  20. Synthesis, structure, DNA/protein binding, and cytotoxic activity of a rhodium(III) complex with 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamat-Panah, Roya; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Simpson, Jim; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    A new mononuclear rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(bzimpy)Cl3] (bzimpy = 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, emission titration, and viscosity measurement in order to evaluate the possible DNA-binding mode and to calculate the corresponding DNA-binding constant. The results reveal that the Rh(III) complex interacts with DNA through groove binding mode with a binding affinity on the order of 10(4). In addition, the binding of the Rh(III) complex to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by UV-Vis and fluorescence emission spectroscopy at different temperatures. The mechanism of the complex interaction was found to be static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy data show that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the binding of the Rh(III) complex to BSA. For the comparison of the DNA- and BSA-binding affinities of the free bzimpy ligand with its Rh(III) complex, the absorbance titration and fluorescence quenching experiments of the free bzimpy ligand with DNA and BSA were carried out. Competitive experiments using eosin Y and ibuprofen as site markers indicated that the complex was mainly located in the hydrophobic cavity of site I of the protein. These experimental results were confirmed by the results of molecular docking. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity properties of the Rh(III) complex against the MCF-7, K562, and HT-29 cell lines were evaluated and compared with those of the free ligand (bzimpy). It was found that the complexation process improved the anticancer activity significantly.

  1. Rhenium complexes of chromophore-appended dipicolylamine ligands: syntheses, spectroscopic properties, DNA binding and X-ray crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullice, L.A.; Buurma, N.J.; Pope, S.J.A. [Cardiff Univ., School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Laye, R.H. [Sheffield Univ., Dept. of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Harding, L.P. [Huddersfield Univ., School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The syntheses of two chromophore-appended dipicolylamine-derived ligands and their reactivity with penta-carbonyl-chloro-rhenium have been studied. The resultant complexes each possess the fac-Re(CO){sub 3} core. The ligands L{sup 1} 1-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-pyrene and L{sup 2} 2-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-quinoxaline were isolated via a one-pot reductive amination in moderate yield. The corresponding rhenium complexes were isolated in good yields and characterised by {sup 1}H NMR, MS, IR and UV-Vis studies. X-Ray crystallographic data were obtained for fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}), C{sub 34}H{sub 26}BF{sub 4}N{sub 4}O{sub 3}Re: monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a 18.327(2) Angstroms, {alpha} = 90.00 degrees, b 14.1537(14) Angstroms, {beta}96.263(6) degrees, c = 23.511(3) Angstroms, {gamma} 90.00 Angstroms, 6062.4(11) (Angstroms){sup 3}, Z=8. The luminescence properties of the ligands and complexes were also investigated, with the emission attributed to the appended chromophore in each case. Isothermal titration calorimetry suggests that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) self-aggregates cooperatively in aqueous solution, probably forming micelle-like aggregates with a cmc of 0.18 mM. Investigations into the DNA-binding properties of fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) were undertaken and revealed that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) binding to fish sperm DNA (binding constant 1.5 {+-} 0.2 * 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}, binding site size 3.2 {+-} 0.3 base pairs) is accompanied by changes in the UV-Vis spectrum as typically observed for pyrene-based intercalators while the calorimetrically determined binding enthalpy (-14 {+-} 2 kcal mol{sup -1}) also agrees favourably with values as typically found for intercalators. (authors)

  2. Copper(II) complex formation with a linear peptide encompassing the putative cell binding site of angiogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Vagliasindi, Laura I; Hansson, Örjan; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2010-11-28

    Angiogenin is one of the more potent angiogenic factors known, whose activity may be affected by the presence of copper ions. Copper(II) complexes with the peptides encompassing the putative endothelial cell binding domain of angiogenin, Ac-KNGNPHREN-NH(2) and Ac-PHREN-NH(2), have been characterized by potentiometric, UV-vis, CD and EPR spectroscopic methods. The coordination features of all the copper complex species derived by both peptides are practically the same, as predictable because of the presence of a proline residue within their aminoacidic sequence. In particular, Ac-PHREN-NH(2) is really the aminoacidic sequence involved in the binding to copper(II). Thermodynamic and spectroscopic evidence are given that side chain oxygen donor atom of glutamyl residue is involved in the copper binding up to physiological pH. EPR parameters suggest that the carboxylate group is still involved also in the predominant species [Cu(L)H(-2)], the metal coordination environment being probably formed by N(Im), 2N(-), H(2)O in equatorial plane and an oxygen atom from COO(-) in apical position, or vice versa, with the carboxylate oxygen atom in the copper coordination plane and the water molecule confined to one of the apical positions. Moreover, the comparison with the thermodynamic and spectroscopic results in the case of the copper(ii) complex species formed by the single point mutated peptide, Ac-PHRQN-NH(2), provides further evidence of the presence of carboxylate oxygen atom in the copper coordination sphere.

  3. Chiral discrimination asserted by enantiomers of Ni (II), Cu (II) and Zn (II) Schiff base complexes in DNA binding, antioxidant and antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Noor-ul Hasan; Pandya, Nirali; Prathap, K Jeya; Kureshy, Rukhsana Ilays; Abdi, Sayed Hasan Razi; Mishra, Sandhya; Bajaj, Hari Chandra

    2011-10-15

    Chiral Schiff base ligands (S)-H(2)L and (R)-H(2)L and their complexes (S-Ni-L, R-Ni-L, S-Cu-L, R-Cu-L, S-Zn-L and R-Zn-L) were synthesized, characterized and examined for their DNA binding, antioxidant and antibacterial activities. The complexes showed higher binding affinity to calf thymus DNA with binding constant ranging from 2.0×10(5) to 4.5×10(6) M(-1). All the complexes also exhibited remarkable superoxide (56-99%) and hydroxyl scavenging (45-89%) activities as well as antibacterial activities against gram (+) and gram (-) bacteria. However, none of the complexes showed antifungal activity. Conclusively, S enantiomers of the complexes were found to be relatively more efficient for DNA interaction, antioxidant and antibacterial activities than their R enantiomers. This study reveals the possible utilization of chiral Schiff base complexes for pharmaceutical applications.

  4. Distinct pathways of mannan-binding lectin (MBL)- and C1-complex autoactivation revealed by reconstitution of MBL with recombinant MBL-associated serine protease-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup-Jensen, T; Petersen, Steen Vang; Hansen, A G;

    2000-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) plays a pivotal role in innate immunity by activating complement after binding carbohydrate moieties on pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Structural similarities shared by MBL and C1 complexes and by the MBL- and C1q-associated serine proteases, MBL-associated serine...

  5. The binding of [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex to hypothalamic chromatin of male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Burgos, J; Ventanas, J

    1985-01-01

    Histones and masking acidic proteins were removed from hypothalamic chromatin in order to evaluate/measure the number of available acceptor sites for the [3H]oestradiol-receptor complex. This number increases after dehistonizing and unmasking and is lower than published values for comparable preparations. No sex-related difference in [3H]oestradiol-receptor binding to hypothalamic chromatin in vitro was observed. Failure to observe such a difference suggests that sexual differentiation and steroid sensitivity cannot be attributed to marked differences in the degree of chromatin masking.

  6. Structure-function relations in oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex. Fluorescence and infrared approaches to monitor oxomalonate and Na(+ binding effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Granjon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxaloacetate decarboxylase (OAD is a member of the Na(+ transport decarboxylase enzyme family found exclusively in anaerobic bacteria. OAD of Vibrio cholerae catalyses a key step in citrate fermentation, converting the chemical energy of the decarboxylation reaction into an electrochemical gradient of Na(+ ions across the membrane, which drives endergonic membrane reactions such as ATP synthesis, transport and motility. OAD is a membrane-bound enzyme composed of alpha, beta and gamma subunits. The alpha subunit contains the carboxyltransferase catalytic site. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, spectroscopic techniques were used to probe oxomalonate (a competitive inhibitor of OAD with respect to oxaloacetate and Na(+ effects on the enzyme tryptophan environment and on the secondary structure of the OAD complex, as well as the importance of each subunit in the catalytic mechanism. An intrinsic fluorescence approach, Red Edge Excitation Shift (REES, indicated that solvent molecule mobility in the vicinity of OAD tryptophans was more restricted in the presence of oxomalonate. It also demonstrated that, although the structure of OAD is sensitive to the presence of NaCl, oxomalonate was able to bind to the enzyme even in the absence of Na(+. REES changes due to oxomalonate binding were also observed with the alphagamma and alpha subunits. Infrared spectra showed that OAD, alphagamma and alpha subunits have a main component band centered between 1655 and 1650 cm(-1 characteristic of a high content of alpha helix structures. Addition of oxomalonate induced a shift of the amide-I band of OAD toward higher wavenumbers, interpreted as a slight decrease of beta sheet structures and a concomitant increase of alpha helix structures. Oxomalonate binding to alphagamma and alpha subunits also provoked secondary structure variations, but these effects were negligible compared to OAD complex. CONCLUSION: Oxomalonate binding affects the

  7. Non-coding roX RNAs prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatic regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida L A Figueiredo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs contribute to dosage compensation in both mammals and Drosophila by inducing changes in the chromatin structure of the X-chromosome. In Drosophila melanogaster, roX1 and roX2 are long non-coding RNAs that together with proteins form the male-specific lethal (MSL complex, which coats the entire male X-chromosome and mediates dosage compensation by increasing its transcriptional output. Studies on polytene chromosomes have demonstrated that when both roX1 and roX2 are absent, the MSL-complex becomes less abundant on the male X-chromosome and is relocated to the chromocenter and the 4th chromosome. Here we address the role of roX RNAs in MSL-complex targeting and the evolution of dosage compensation in Drosophila. We performed ChIP-seq experiments which showed that MSL-complex recruitment to high affinity sites (HAS on the X-chromosome is independent of roX and that the HAS sequence motif is conserved in D. simulans. Additionally, a complete and enzymatically active MSL-complex is recruited to six specific genes on the 4th chromosome. Interestingly, our sequence analysis showed that in the absence of roX RNAs, the MSL-complex has an affinity for regions enriched in Hoppel transposable elements and repeats in general. We hypothesize that roX mutants reveal the ancient targeting of the MSL-complex and propose that the role of roX RNAs is to prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatin.

  8. DNA Binding and Cleavage Activity of Binuclear Metal Complexes with Benzil-α-Monoxime Thiosemicarbzone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Surendra Babu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal complexes of copper(II, nickel(II, cobalt(II and iron(II with benzil-α-monoxime thiosemicarbazone (BMOT have been synthesized and characterized by molar conductance, magnetic moments, IR, electronic and ESR spectroscopy. Electrochemical behaviors of these complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetric studies. The nuclease activity of these complexes has been investigated on double-stranded pBR322 circular plasmid DNA by using the gel electrophoresis experiments in presence and absence of oxidant (H2O2. In the absence of oxidant DNA cleavage by hydrolytically was observed a less discernable, whereas in presence of oxidant (H2O2 all complexes showed increased nuclease activity.

  9. DJ-1 binds to mitochondrial complex I and maintains its activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takuya; Ishimori, Chikako [Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Taira, Takahiro [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Yamanashi University, Chuoh 409-3898 (Japan); Kim, Yun-chul; Maita, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Maita, Chinatsu [Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan); Ariga, Hiroyoshi, E-mail: hiro@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M.M. [Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589 (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by neuronal cell death, and oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are thought to be responsible for onset of PD. DJ-1, a causative gene product of a familial form of Parkinson's disease, PARK7, plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress. The possible mitochondrial function of DJ-1 has been proposed, but its exact function remains unclear. In this study, we found that DJ-1 directly bound to NDUFA4 and ND1, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I, respectively, and was colocalized with complex I and that complex I activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockdown NIH3T3 and HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 is an integral mitochondrial protein and that DJ-1 plays a role in maintenance of mitochondrial complex I activity.

  10. Crystal structure of the capsular polysaccharide synthesizing protein CapE of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyafusa, Takamitsu; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Tanner, Martin E; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2013-06-11

    Enzymes synthesizing the bacterial CP (capsular polysaccharide) are attractive antimicrobial targets. However, we lack critical information about the structure and mechanism of many of them. In an effort to reduce that gap, we have determined three different crystal structures of the enzyme CapE of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The structure reveals that CapE is a member of the SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) super-family of proteins. CapE assembles in a hexameric complex stabilized by three major contact surfaces between protein subunits. Turnover of substrate and/or coenzyme induces major conformational changes at the contact interface between protein subunits, and a displacement of the substrate-binding domain with respect to the Rossmann domain. A novel dynamic element that we called the latch is essential for remodelling of the protein-protein interface. Structural and primary sequence alignment identifies a group of SDR proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis that share the two salient features of CapE: the mobile loop (latch) and a distinctive catalytic site (MxxxK). The relevance of these structural elements was evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis.

  11. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex binding regions of protein antigens by sequence pattern analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E;

    1989-01-01

    We have previously experimentally analyzed the structural requirements for interaction between peptide antigens and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of the d haplotype. We describe here two procedures devised to predict specifically the capacity of peptide molecules to inter......We have previously experimentally analyzed the structural requirements for interaction between peptide antigens and mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of the d haplotype. We describe here two procedures devised to predict specifically the capacity of peptide molecules...

  12. Inclusion complexation between baicalein and β-cyclodextrin and the influence of β-cyclodextrin on the binding of baicalein with DNA: a spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameena, Yousuf; Chandrasekaran, Sowrirajan; Israel V M V, Enoch

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the commonly studied cyclic oligosaccharide and gains importance as it is entered on a drug delivering carbohydrate and provides insight into the oligosaccharide complex-biomolecular interaction. The binding of a flavone, baicalein, to β-cyclodextrin and calf thymus DNA is studied. The binding of baicalein to calf thymus DNA in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is analysed using the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The mode of binding and structure of the baicalein-β-cyclodextrin complex are reported. The role of the structure and the stoichiometry of the inclusion complex of baicalein-β-cyclodextrin in its influence on DNA binding are analysed. Highlights • This paper deals with the binding of a flavone, baicalein to β-cyclodextrin and/or DNA. • The inclusion complexation between baicalein and β-cyclodextrin is analysed. • The stoichiometry and the binding strength of the inclusion complex is reported. • The role of β-cyclodextrin in tuning the binding of baicalein to DNA is emphasized. • Spectroscopic and docking analysis are used to articulate the results.

  13. Pulsed-field ionization electron spectroscopy and binding energies of alkali metal-dimethyl ether and -dimethoxyethane complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohnlein, Bradford R; Li, Shenggang; Fuller, Jason F; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2005-07-01

    Lithium and sodium complexes of dimethyl ether (DME) and dimethoxyethane (DXE) were produced by reactions of laser-vaporized metal atoms with organic vapors in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. The mono-ligand complexes were studied by photoionization and pulsed field ionization zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. Vibrationally resolved ZEKE spectra were obtained for Li(DME), Na(DME) and Li(DXE) and a photoionization efficiency spectrum for Na(DXE). The ZEKE spectra were analyzed by comparing with the spectra of other metal-ether complexes and with electronic structure calculations and spectral simulations. Major vibrations measured for the M(DME) (M=Li,Na) ions were M-O and C-O stretches and M-O-C and C-O-C bends. These vibrations and additional O-Li-O and O-C-C-O bends were observed for the Li(DXE) ion. The M(DME) complexes were in C2v symmetry with the metal atom binding to oxygen, whereas Li(DXE) was in a C2 ring configuration with the Li atom attaching to both oxygen atoms. Moreover, the ionization energies of these complexes were measured from the ZEKE or photoionization spectra and bond dissociation energies were derived from a thermodynamic cycle.

  14. Novel complexes of Co(III) and Ni(II) containing peptide ligands: Synthesis, DNA binding and photonuclease activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Girija, D.; Sangeetha Gowda, K. R.; Giridhar, M.; Arvinda, T.

    2014-01-01

    The new cobalt(III) and nickel(II) complexes of the type [M(L)2(H2O)2]n+ (where M = Co(III) or Ni(II) ion, n = 3 for Co and 2 for Ni, L = peptides Fmoc. Ala-val-OH (F-AVOH), Fmoc-Phe-Leu-Ome (F-PLOMe) and Z-Ala-Phe-COsbnd NH2 (Z-APCONH2)) were synthesized and structurally characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis and electronic spectral data. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the synthesized Co(III) and Ni(II) metal complexes. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation.

  15. Novel complexes of Co(III) and Ni(II) containing peptide ligands: synthesis, DNA binding and photonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamani, C N; Bhojya Naik, H S; Girija, D; Sangeetha Gowda, K R; Giridhar, M; Arvinda, T

    2014-01-24

    The new cobalt(III) and nickel(II) complexes of the type [M(L)2(H2O)2](n)(+) (where M = Co(III) or Ni(II) ion, n = 3 for Co and 2 for Ni, L = peptides Fmoc. Ala-val-OH (F-AVOH), Fmoc-Phe-Leu-Ome (F-PLOMe) and Z-Ala-Phe-CONH2 (Z-APCONH2)) were synthesized and structurally characterized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, elemental analysis and electronic spectral data. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the synthesized Co(III) and Ni(II) metal complexes. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. Detailed analysis revealed that the metal complexes intercalates into the DNA base stack as intercalator. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation.

  16. Ca(2+)-binding reduces conformational flexibility of RC-LH1 core complex from thermophile Thermochromatium tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob-Grun, Selma; Radeck, Jara; Braun, Paula

    2012-03-01

    The light-harvesting complex, LH1, of thermophile purple bacteria Thermochromatium tepidum consists of an array of α- and β-polypeptides which assemble the photoactive bacteriochlorophyll and closely interact with the membrane-lipids. In this study, we investigated the effect of calcium and manganese ions on the protein structure and thermostability of the reaction centre (RC)-LH1/lipid complex. The binding of Ca(2+), but not Mn(2+) is shown to shift the LH1 Q ( y ) absorption maximum from ~889 to 915 nm and to significantly raise the thermostability of the RC-LH1 complex. The ATR-FTIR spectra indicate that interaction of Ca(2+) as monitored by the carboxylates' vibration of aspartate residues, but not Mn(2+) induces changes in the α-helix packing arrangement. The reduced rate of (1)H/(2)H exchange of proteins' amide protons shows that the accessibility to (2)H(2)O is significantly lowered in Ca(2+)-substituted RC-LH1/lipid complexes. In particular, exchange with the associated lipid molecules, is significantly retarded. These results suggest that the thermostability of the RC-LH1 complex is raised by the distinct interaction with calcium cations which reduces the RC-LH1/lipid dynamics, particularly, at the membrane-water interface.

  17. Synthesis, CMC Determination, Antimicrobial Activity and Nucleic Acid Binding of A Surfactant Copper(II) Complex Containing Phenanthroline and Alanine Schiff-Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2014-03-01

    A new water-soluble surfactant copper(II) complex [Cu(sal-ala)(phen)(DA)] (sal-ala = salicylalanine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, DA = dodecylamine), has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) values of this surfactant-copper(II) complex in aqueous solution were obtained from conductance measurements. Specific conductivity data (at 303, 308, 313. 318 and 323 K) served for the evaluation of the temperature-dependent CMC and the thermodynamics of micellization (ΔG(0)m, ΔH(0)m and ΔS(0)m). The interaction of this complex with nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) has been explored by using electronic absorption spectral titration, competitive binding experiment, cyclic voltammetry, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and viscosity measurements. Electronic absorption studies have revealed that the complex can bind to nucleic acids by the intercalative binding mode which has been verified by viscosity measurements. The DNA binding constants have also been calculated (Kb = 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for DNA and Kb = 1.6 × 10(5) M(-1) for RNA). Competitive binding study with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complex exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound-EB indicating that the complex binds to DNA in strong competition with EB for the intercalative binding site. The presence of hydrophobic ligands, alanine Schiff-base, phenanthroline and long aliphatic chain amine in the complex were responsible for this strong intercalative binding. The surfactant-copper (II) complex was screened for its antibacterial and antifungal activities against various microorganisms. The results were compared with the standard drugs, amikacin(antibacterial) and ketokonazole(antifungal).

  18. Genome-wide identification and characterization of Notch transcription complex-binding sequence-paired sites in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, Eric; Arnett, Kelly L; Wang, Hongfang; Zang, Chongzhi; Taing, Len; Liu, Hudan; Pear, Warren S; Shirley Liu, X; Blacklow, Stephen C; Aster, Jon C

    2017-05-02

    Notch transcription complexes (NTCs) drive target gene expression by binding to two distinct types of genomic response elements, NTC monomer-binding sites and sequence-paired sites (SPSs) that bind NTC dimers. SPSs are conserved and have been linked to the Notch responsiveness of a few genes. To assess the overall contribution of SPSs to Notch-dependent gene regulation, we determined the DNA sequence requirements for NTC dimerization using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay and applied insights from these in vitro studies to Notch-"addicted" T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. We found that SPSs contributed to the regulation of about a third of direct Notch target genes. Although originally described in promoters, SPSs are present mainly in long-range enhancers, including an enhancer containing a newly described SPS that regulates HES5 expression. Our work provides a general method for identifying SPSs in genome-wide data sets and highlights the widespread role of NTC dimerization in Notch-transformed leukemia cells. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Novel bis-(-)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Juan; Qiu, Zhuibai; Xia, Zheng; Li, Wei; Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao; Xie, Qiong; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(-)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC(50) values of 9.63μM (for ZLA) and 8.64μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC(50) values of 49.1μM (for ZLA) and 55.3μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD.

  20. Trans-Binding Mechanism of Ubiquitin-like Protein Activation Revealed by a UBA5-UFM1 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Oweis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs is a critical cellular process implicated in a variety of cellular states and outcomes. A prerequisite for target protein modification by a UBL is the activation of the latter by activating enzymes (E1s. Here, we present the crystal structure of the non-canonical homodimeric E1, UBA5, in complex with its cognate UBL, UFM1, and supporting biochemical experiments. We find that UBA5 binds to UFM1 via a trans-binding mechanism in which UFM1 interacts with distinct sites in both subunits of the UBA5 dimer. This binding mechanism requires a region C-terminal to the adenylation domain that brings UFM1 to the active site of the adjacent UBA5 subunit. We also find that transfer of UFM1 from UBA5 to the E2, UFC1, occurs via a trans mechanism, thereby requiring a homodimer of UBA5. These findings explicitly elucidate the role of UBA5 dimerization in UFM1 activation.

  1. Role of heparin and non heparin binding serpins in coagulation and angiogenesis: A complex interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakuni, Teena; Ali, Mohammad Farhan; Ahmad, Irshad; Bano, Shadabi; Ansari, Shoyab; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2016-08-15

    Pro-coagulant, anti-coagulant and fibrinolytic pathways are responsible for maintaining hemostatic balance under physiological conditions. Any deviation from these pathways would result in hypercoagulability leading to life threatening diseases like myocardial infarction, stroke, portal vein thrombosis, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Angiogenesis is the process of sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones and plays a critical role in vascular repair, diabetic retinopathy, chronic inflammation and cancer progression. Serpins; a superfamily of protease inhibitors, play a key role in regulating both angiogenesis and coagulation. They are characterized by the presence of highly conserved secondary structure comprising of 3 β-sheets and 7-9 α-helices. Inhibitory role of serpins is modulated by binding to cofactors, specially heparin and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) present on cell surfaces and extracellular matrix. Heparin and HSPGs are the mainstay of anti-coagulant therapy and also have therapeutic potential as anti-angiogenic inhibitors. Many of the heparin binding serpins that regulate coagulation cascade are also potent inhibitors of angiogenesis. Understanding the molecular mechanism of the switch between their specific anti-coagulant and anti-angiogenic role during inflammation, stress and regular hemostasis is important. In this review, we have tried to integrate the role of different serpins, their interaction with cofactors and their interplay in regulating coagulation and angiogenesis.

  2. Simplifying complex sequence information: a PCP-consensus protein binds antibodies against all four Dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, David M; Lewis, Jessica A; Lu, Wenzhe; Schein, Catherine H

    2012-09-14

    Designing proteins that reflect the natural variability of a pathogen is essential for developing novel vaccines and drugs. Flaviviruses, including Dengue (DENV) and West Nile (WNV), evolve rapidly and can "escape" neutralizing monoclonal antibodies by mutation. Designing antigens that represent many distinct strains is important for DENV, where infection with a strain from one of the four serotypes may lead to severe hemorrhagic disease on subsequent infection with a strain from another serotype. Here, a DENV physicochemical property (PCP)-consensus sequence was derived from 671 unique sequences from the Flavitrack database. PCP-consensus proteins for domain 3 of the envelope protein (EdomIII) were expressed from synthetic genes in Escherichia coli. The ability of the purified consensus proteins to bind polyclonal antibodies generated in response to infection with strains from each of the four DENV serotypes was determined. The initial consensus protein bound antibodies from DENV-1-3 in ELISA and Western blot assays. This sequence was altered in 3 steps to incorporate regions of maximum variability, identified as significant changes in the PCPs, characteristic of DENV-4 strains. The final protein was recognized by antibodies against all four serotypes. Two amino acids essential for efficient binding to all DENV antibodies are part of a discontinuous epitope previously defined for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The PCP-consensus method can significantly reduce the number of experiments required to define a multivalent antigen, which is particularly important when dealing with pathogens that must be tested at higher biosafety levels.

  3. Peptide-based antibodies against glutathione-binding domains suppress superoxide production mediated by mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingfeng; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Rawale, Sharad; Chen, Chun-An; Zweier, Jay L; Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-29

    Complex I (NQR) is a critical site of superoxide (O2-*) production and the major host of redox protein thiols in mitochondria. In response to oxidative stress, NQR-derived protein thiols at the 51- and 75-kDa subunits are known to be reversibly S-glutathionylated. Although several glutathionylated domains from NQR 51 and 75 kDa have been identified, their roles in the regulatory functions remain to be explored. To gain further insights into protein S-glutathionylation of complex I, we used two peptides of S-glutathionylated domain ((200)GAGAYICGEETALIESIEGK(219) of 51-kDa protein and (361)VDSDTLCTEEVFPTAGAGTDLR(382) of 75-kDa protein) as chimeric epitopes incorporating a "promiscuous" T-cell epitope to generate two polyclonal antibodies, AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367. Binding of AbGSCA206 and AbGSCB367 inhibited NQR-mediated O2-* generation by 37 and 57%, as measured by EPR spin-trapping. To further provide an appropriate control, two peptides of non-glutathionylated domain ((21)SGDTTAPKKTSFGSLKDFDR(40) of 51-kDa peptide and (100)WNILTNSEKTKKAREGVMEFL(120) of 75-kDa peptide) were synthesized as chimeric epitopes to generate two polyclonal antibodies, Ab51 and Ab75. Binding of A51 did not affect NQR-mediated generation to a significant level. However, binding of Ab75 inhibited NQR-mediated O2-*generation by 35%. None of AbGSCA206, AbGSCB367, Ab51, or Ab75 showed an inhibitory effect on the electron transfer activity of NQR, suggesting that antibody binding to the glutathione-binding domain decreased electron leakage from the hydrophilic domain of NQR. When heart tissue homogenates were immunoprecipitated with Ab51 or Ab75 and probed with an antibody against glutathione, protein S-glutathionylation was enhanced in post-ischemic myocardium at the NQR 51-kDa subunit, but not at the 75-kDa subunit, indicating that the 51-kDa subunit of flavin subcomplex is more sensitive to oxidative stress resulting from myocardial infarction.

  4. CAP2, cyclase-associated protein 2, is a dual compartment protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peche, V; Shekar, S; Leichter, M; Korte, H; Schröder, R; Schleicher, M; Holak, T A; Clemen, C S; Ramanath-Y, B; Pfitzer, G; Karakesisoglou, I; Noegel, A A

    2007-10-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins with roles in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and in signal transduction. Mammals have two CAP genes encoding the related CAP1 and CAP2. We studied the distribution and subcellular localization of CAP1 and CAP2 using specific antibodies. CAP1 shows a broad tissue distribution, whereas CAP2 is significantly expressed only in brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and skin. CAP2 is found in the nucleus in undifferentiated myoblasts and at the M-line of differentiated myotubes. In PAM212, a mouse keratinocyte cell line, CAP2 is enriched in the nucleus, and sparse in the cytosol. By contrast, CAP1 localizes to the cytoplasm in PAM212 cells. In human skin, CAP2 is present in all living layers of the epidermis localizing to the nuclei and the cell periphery. In in vitro studies, a C-terminal fragment of CAP2 interacts with actin, indicating that CAP2 has the capacity to bind to actin.

  5. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE OF CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY INTEGRATED WITH OLEIC ACID COMPLEXED WITH DE-GLYCOSYLATED VITAMIN D BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Ward

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins highly represented in milk such as α-lactalbumin and lactoferrin bind Oleic Acid (OA to form complexes with selective anti-tumor activity. A protein present in milk, colostrum and blood, vitamin D binding protein is the precursor of a potent Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF and in analogy with other OA-protein complexes, we proposed that OA-GcMAF could demonstrate a greater immunotherapeutic activity than that of GcMAF alone. We describe a preliminary experience treating patients with advanced cancers, often labelled as “incurable” with an integrative immunotherapy centred on OA-GcMAF. Patients with advanced cancer were treated at the Immuno Biotech Treatment Centre with OA-GcMAF-based integrative immunotherapy in combination with a very low carbohydrate, high protein diet, fermented milk products containing naturally produced GcMAF, vitamin D3 and low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. When the primary tumor or a metastasis could be measured by ultrasonographic techniques, we observed, on average, a decrease of tumor volume of approximately 25% in a week. We also observed a consistent increase in splenic blood flow that was interpreted in the context of generalised immune system activation and allowed to assess the degree of responsiveness of the individual patient. The results reported here are consistent with the results previously described in the experimental animal harbouring a human hepatocellular carcinoma as well as with the results reported for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. OA-protein complexes are bound to play a leading role in cancer therapy thanks to selectivity of antitumoral effects, absence of any side effects, safety and oral availability. We hypothesise that OA-GcMAF, combines the known anticancer effects OA-protein complexes with the well established immune stimulating effects of GcMAF.

  6. CAPS-1 and CAPS-2 are essential synaptic vesicle priming proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jockusch, Wolf J; Speidel, Dina; Sigler, Albrecht; Sørensen, Jakob B; Varoqueaux, Frederique; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Brose, Nils

    2007-11-16

    Before transmitter-filled synaptic vesicles can fuse with the plasma membrane upon stimulation they have to be primed to fusion competence. The regulation of this priming process controls the strength and plasticity of synaptic transmission between neurons, which in turn determines many complex brain functions. We show that CAPS-1 and CAPS-2 are essential components of the synaptic vesicle priming machinery. CAPS-deficient neurons contain no or very few fusion competent synaptic vesicles, which causes a selective impairment of fast phasic transmitter release. Increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels can transiently revert this defect. Our findings demonstrate that CAPS proteins generate and maintain a highly fusion competent synaptic vesicle pool that supports phasic Ca(2+) triggered release of transmitters.

  7. Non-enolisable Knoevenagel condensate appended Schiff bases-metal (II) complexes: Spectral characteristics, DNA-binding and nuclease activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubendran, Ammavasi; Kesavan, Mookkandi Palsamy; Ayyanaar, Srinivasan; Mitu, Liviu; Athappan, Periyakaruppan; Rajesh, Jegathalaprathaban

    2017-06-01

    New Schiff base complexes [Cu(L1)Cl] (1), [Ni(L1)Cl] (2), [Zn(L1)Cl] (3), and [Fe(L2)H2OCl] (4) {L1 = (4E)-3-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-(2-hydroxyphenylimino)pentan-2-one, L2 = 2,2‧-(1E,1‧E)-(3-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-pentane-2,4-diylidene)bis(azan-1-yl-1 idene)diphenol} have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR, FAB-mass, EPR, spectral studies and electrochemical studies, the ligands L1 &L2 were characterized by 1H and 13C NMR spectra. Complex 1 show a visible spectral d-d band near 600 nm and display cyclic voltammetric quasireversible response for the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple vs Ag/AgCl in DMSO. The EPR spectrum of 1 show g‖ > g⊥ suggesting a square planar geometry around copper with dx2 - y2 as the ground state. The mass spectral results have confirmed the proposed structure for complexes 1-4. DNA binding properties of these complexes 1-4 have been investigated by absorption titrations, cyclic voltammetric studies and circular dichroism studies. On titration with DNA, the complexes 1-4 show hypochromism at the MLCT band (13-31%) with a red shift of 1-8 nm in the electronic spectrum and positive shift of voltammetric E1/2 in the CV studies are in favour of intercalative binding. CD spectra of 1 showed an increase in molar ellipticity (θ278) of the positive band with a minor red shift indicating the transition of B-form of DNA to A like form. DNA cleavage studies of complexes 1 and 4 with pUC18 DNA were studied by gel electrophoresis and complex 4 cleaves supercoiled pUC18 DNA in an oxidative manner in the presence of H2O2 and on photo irradiation at 312 nm.

  8. Differences in Glycoprotein Complex Receptor Binding Site Accessibility Prompt Poor Cross-Reactivity of Neutralizing Antibodies between Closely Related Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillette, Rachel B; Phillips, Elisabeth K; Ayithan, Natarajan; Maury, Wendy

    2017-04-01

    The glycoprotein complex (GPC) of arenaviruses, composed of stable signal peptide, GP1, and GP2, is the only antigen correlated with antibody-mediated neutralization. However, despite strong cross-reactivity of convalescent antisera between related arenavirus species, weak or no cross-neutralization occurs. Two closely related clade B viruses, Machupo virus (MACV) and Junín virus (JUNV), have nearly identical overall GPC architecture and share a host receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). Given structural and functional similarities of the GP1 receptor binding site (RBS) of these viruses and the recent demonstration that the RBS is an important target for neutralizing antibodies, it is not clear how these viruses avoid cross-neutralization. To address this, MACV/JUNV chimeric GPCs were assessed for interaction with a group of α-JUNV GPC monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and mouse antisera against JUNV or MACV GPC. All six MAbs targeted GP1, with those that neutralized JUNV GPC-pseudovirions competing with each other for RBS binding. However, these MAbs were unable to bind to a chimeric GPC composed of JUNV GP1 containing a small disulfide bonded loop (loop 10) unique to MACV GPC, suggesting that this loop may block MAbs interaction with the GP1 RBS. Consistent with this loop causing interference, mouse anti-JUNV GPC antisera that solely neutralized pseudovirions bearing autologous GP1 provided enhanced neutralization of MACV GPC when this loop was removed. Our studies provide evidence that loop 10, which is unique to MACV GP1, is an important impediment to binding of neutralizing antibodies and contributes to the poor cross-neutralization of α-JUNV antisera against MACV.IMPORTANCE Multiple New World arenaviruses can cause severe disease in humans, and some geographic overlap exists among these viruses. A vaccine that protects against a broad range of New World arenaviruses is desirable for purposes of simplicity, cost, and broad protection against multiple National

  9. Analysis of Heme Iron Coordination in DGCR8: The Heme-Binding Component of the Microprocessor Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M; Bradley, Justin M; Cheesman, Myles R; Kincaid, James R; Liu, Yilin; Czarnecki, Kazimierz; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-09-13

    DGCR8 is the RNA-binding partner of the nuclease Drosha. Their complex (the "Microprocessor") is essential for processing of long, primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the nucleus. Binding of heme to DGCR8 is essential for pri-miRNA processing. On the basis of the split Soret ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of ferric DGCR8, bis-thiolate sulfur (cysteinate, Cys(-)) heme iron coordination of DGCR8 heme iron was proposed. We have characterized DGCR8 heme ligation using the Δ276 DGCR8 variant and combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), electron nuclear double resonance, resonance Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. These studies indicate DGCR8 bis-Cys heme iron ligation, with conversion from bis-thiolate (Cys(-)/Cys(-)) axial coordination in ferric DGCR8 to bis-thiol (CysH/CysH) coordination in ferrous DGCR8. Pri-miRNA binding does not perturb ferric DGCR8's optical spectrum, consistent with the axial ligand environment being separated from the substrate-binding site. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe(II) and Fe(II)-CO forms indicate discrete species exhibiting peaks with absorption coefficients substantially larger than those for ferric DGCR8 and that previously reported for a ferrous form of DGCR8. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy data exclude histidine or water as axial ligands for ferric DGCR8 and favor bis-thiolate coordination in this form. UV-vis MCD and near-infrared MCD provide data consistent with this conclusion. UV-vis MCD data for ferrous DGCR8 reveal features consistent with bis-thiol heme iron coordination, and resonance Raman data for the ferrous-CO form are consistent with a thiol ligand trans to the CO. These studies support retention of DGCR8 cysteine coordination upon reduction, a conclusion distinct from those of previous studies of a different ferrous DGCR8 isoform.

  10. Gas-phase complexes of Ni2+ and Ca2+ with deprotonated histidylhistidine (HisHis): A model case for polyhistidyl-metal binding motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckelsen, Katrin; Martens, Jonathan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Dunbar, Robert C.; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Schäfer, Mathias

    2017-02-01

    In the complex formed between the calcium cation (Ca2+) and a deprotonated HisHis dipeptide, the complex adopts a charge solvation (CS) structure. Ca2+, a weak binding main group metal cation, interacts with the oxygens of the peptide carbonyl moiety and the deprotonated C-terminus. In contrast, the much stronger binding Ni2+ cation deprotonates the peptide nitrogen and induces an iminolate (Im) ligand structure in the [Ni(HisHis-H)]+ complex ion. The combination of infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and quantum chemistry evidence these two representative binding motifs. The iminolate coordination pattern identified and characterized in the [Ni(HisHis-H)]+ complex serves as a model case for nickel complexes of poly-histidyl-domains and is thereby also of interest to better understand the fundamentals of immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography as well as of Ni co-factor chemistry in enzymology.

  11. RAD50 and NBS1 form a stable complex functional in DNA binding and tethering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Linden (Eddy); H. Sanchez (Humberto); E. Kinoshita (Eri); R. Kanaar (Roland); C. Wyman (Claire)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD50/MRE11/NBS1 protein complex (RMN) plays an essential role during the early steps of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination. Previous data suggest that one important role for RMN in DSB repair is to provide a link between DNA ends. The striking architect

  12. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...

  13. Chemodynamics of metal complexation by natural soft colloids: Cu(II) binding by humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Duval, J.F.L.; Buffle, J.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2012-01-01

    The chemodynamics of Cu(II) complexation by humic acid is interpreted in terms of recently developed theory for permeable charged nanoparticles. Two opposing electric effects are operational with respect to the overall rate of association, namely, (i) the conductive enhancement of the diffusion of

  14. JARID2 regulates binding of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 to target genes in ES cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Cloos, Paul A C; Walfridsson, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have an important role in controlling the expression of genes essential for development, differentiation and maintenance of cell fates. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is believed to regulate transcriptional repression by catalysing the di- and tri-methy...

  15. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of copper(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Jin; Lan, Tao-Yu; Cao, Xiu-Hui; Yang, Huang-Hao; Shi, Yupeng; Yi, Changqing; Chen, Guo-Nan

    2014-02-21

    Three new mononuclear copper(II) complexes, [Cu(L2)](2+) (1), [Cu(acac)(L)](+) (2), and [Cu(acac-Cl)(L)](+) (3) (L = 2-(4-pyridine)oxazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline (4-PDOP); acac = acetylacetone; acac-Cl = 3-chloroacetylacetone), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, high resolution mass spectrometry (Q-TOF), and IR spectroscopy. Two of the complexes were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Their interactions with DNA were studied by UV-vis absorption and emission spectra, viscosity, thermal melting, DNA unwinding assay and CD spectroscopy. The nucleolytic cleavage activity of the compounds was carried out on double stranded pBR322 circular plasmid DNA by using a gel electrophoresis experiment in the presence and absence of an oxidant (H2O2). Active oxygen intermediates such as hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide generated in the presence of L and complexes 1-3 may act as active species for the DNA scission. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against HepG2 cancer cells was also studied.

  16. Metal Cation Binding to Gas-Phase Pentaalanine: Divalent Ions Restructure the Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R. C.; Steill, J. D.; Polfer, N. C.; Oomens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ion-neutral complexes of pentaalalanine with several singly- and doubly charged metal ions are examined using conformation analysis by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) computations. The infrared spectroscopy in the 1500-1800 cm(-1) region

  17. Synthesis and ion-binding studies of platinum(Ⅱ) phenanthroline complexes containing crown ether moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Two new benzo-[15]-crown-5 attached phenanthroline platinum(Ⅱ) complexes with the general formula Pt(phen)X2, where X = Cl (1), C≡CC6H5 (2) have been synthesized, and their absorption and luminescence response towards metal ions have been studied.

  18. Metal Cation Binding to Gas-Phase Pentaalanine: Divalent Ions Restructure the Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R.C.; Steill, J.D.; Polfer, N.C.; Oomens, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ion-neutral complexes of pentaalalanine with several singly- and doubly charged metal ions are examined using conformation analysis by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) computations. The infrared spectroscopy in the 1500-1800 cm(-1) region

  19. Kinetically inert lanthanide complexes as reporter groups for binding of potassium by 18-crown-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anne Kathrine Ravnsborg; Tropiano, Manuel; Faulkner, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    in a copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) “click” reaction with azide-functionalized crown ethers. The resulting complexes were investigated using NMR and optical methods. Titrations with potassium chloride in methanol observing the sensititzed europium- and terbium-centered emissions were...

  20. A complex water network contributes to high-affinity binding in an antibody–antigen interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Marino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This data article presents an analysis of structural water molecules in the high affinity interaction between a potent tumor growth inhibiting antibody (fragment, J22.9-xi, and the tumor marker antigen CD269 (B cell maturation antigen, BCMA. The 1.89 Å X-ray crystal structure shows exquisite details of the binding interface between the two molecules, which comprises relatively few, mostly hydrophobic, direct contacts but many indirect interactions over solvent waters. These are partly or wholly buried in, and therefore part of, the interface. A partial description of the structure is included in an article on the tumor inhibiting effects of the antibody: “Potent anti-tumor response by targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA in a mouse model of multiple myeloma”, Mol. Oncol. 9 (7 (2015 pp. 1348–58.

  1. Nitric oxide binding and photodelivery based on ruthenium(II) complexes of 4-arylazo-3,5-dimethylpyrazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Mayreli; Torréns, Mabel; Mola, José L; Ortiz, Pedro J; Fragoso, Alex; Díaz, Alicia; Cao, Roberto; Prados, Pilar; de Mendoza, Javier; Otero, Antonio; Antiñolo, Antonio; Lara, Agustin

    2008-07-21

    Two fluorescent ligands, 3,5-dimethyl-4-(6'-sulfonylammonium-1'-azonaphthyl)pyrazole (dmpzn, 1) and 3,5-dimethyl-4-(4'-N,N'-dimethylaminoazophenyl)pyrazole (dmpza, 2) were obtained by condensation of ketoenolic derivatives with hydrazine. 1 and 2 formed the novel dinuclear complexes [(H(2)O)(3)ClRu(micro-L)(2)RuCl(H(2)O)(3)] (3 or 4) and [(H(2)O)(NO)Cl(2)Ru(micro-L)(2)RuCl(2)(NO)(H(2)O)] (6 or 7) (where L 1 = 2 or , respectively) which were characterized by IR, NMR and elemental analysis. The nitrosyl complexes were prepared by bubbling purified nitric oxide through methanol solutions of the corresponding ruthenium(II) chloroderivative or by reaction of the appropriate ligands with Ru(NO)Cl(3). Complexes 3 and 4 were found to bind NO, resulting in an increase in fluorescence. Ligand 1 also formed the mononuclear nitrosyl complex [Ru(NO)(bpy)(2)(dmpzn)]Cl(2) (8) which released NO in water at physiological pH and in the solid state as revealed by fluorescence and IR measurements, respectively.

  2. Lyso-Sulfatide Binds Factor Xa and Inhibits Thrombin Generation by the Prothrombinase Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Yegneswaran

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation reactions are strongly influenced by phospholipids, but little is known about the influence of sphingolipids on coagulation mechanisms. Lysosulfatide (lyso-SF (sulfogalactosyl sphingosine prolonged factor Xa (fXa 1-stage plasma clotting assays, showing it had robust anticoagulant activity. In studies using purified clotting factors, lyso-SF inhibited >90% of prothrombin (II activation for reaction mixtures containing fXa/factor Va (fVa/II, and also inhibited II activation generation by fXa/ phospholipids and by Gla-domainless-fXa/fVa/phospholipids. When lyso-SF analogs were tested, results showed that N-acetyl-sulfatide was not anticoagulant, implying that the free amine group was essential for the anticoagulant effects of lyso-SF. Lyso-SF did not inhibit fXa enzymatic hydrolysis of small peptide substrates, showing it did not directly inhibit the fXa activity. In surface plasmon resonance studies, lyso-SF bound to immobilized inactivated fXa as well as inactivated Gla-domainless-fXa. Confirming this lyso-SF:fXa interaction, fluorescence studies showed that fluorescently-labeled-fXa in solution bound to lyso-SF. Thus, lyso-SF is an anticoagulant lipid that inhibits fXa when this enzyme is bound to either phospholipids or to fVa. Mechanisms for inhibition of procoagulant activity are likely to involve lyso-SF binding to fXa domain(s that are distinct from the fXa Gla domain. This suggests that certain sphingolipids, including lyso-SF and some of its analogs, may down-regulate fXa activity without inhibiting the enzyme's active site or binding to the fXa Gla domain.

  3. North Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour. In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime. The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and DNA-binding studies of ruthenium complexes [Ru(tpy)(ptn)]2+ and Ru(dmtpy)(ptn)]2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lü-Ying; Jia, Hai-Na; Yu, Hui-Juan; Du, Ke-Jie; Lin, Qi-Tian; Qiu, Kang-Qiang; Chao, Hui; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2012-08-01

    Two ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(tpy)(ptn)](2+) (1) and Ru(dmtpy)(ptn)](2+) (2) (ptn=3-(1,10-phenanthrolin-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]naphthalene, tpy=2,2':6',2"-terpyridine, dmtpy=5,5'-dimethyl-2,2':6',2"-terpyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, mass spectrometry and crystal structure analysis. Spectroscopic studies together with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and viscosity measurements prove that two complexes bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. ITC experiments show that the binding mode for complex 2 is entropically driven, while an entropy-driven initial binding of complex 1 is followed by an entropically and enthalpically favorable process. This difference may be attributed to the ancillary ligand effects on the DNA binding of Ru(II) complexes. Circular dichroism titrations of calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Ru(II) complexes show that complexes 1 and 2 induce B to Z conformational transition of calf thymus DNA at low ionic strength (0.05 M NaCl). The induced Z-DNA conformation can revert to B form when Ru(II) complexes are displaced by ethidium bromide or at high ionic strengths ([NaCl]=0.4 M), but keeps intact with temperature ranged from 25 to 90 °C. The unique structure and characteristics of Ru(II) complexes designed in this investigation will be useful for the study of Z-DNA.

  5. Dynamic chiral-at-metal stability of tetrakis(d/l-hfc)Ln(III) complexes capped with an alkali metal cation in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yiji; Zou, Fang; Wan, Shigang; Ouyang, Jie; Lin, Lirong; Zhang, Hui

    2012-06-14

    Chiral tetrakis(β-diketonate) Ln(III) complexes Δ-[NaLa(d-hfc)(4)(CH(3)CN)] (1) and Λ-[NaLa(l-hfc)(4) (CH(3)CN)] (2) (d/l-hfc(-) = 3-heptafluo-robutylryl-(+)/(-)-camphorate) are a pair of enantiomers and crystallize in the same Sohncke space group (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) with dodecahedral (DD) geometry. Typically positive and negative exciton splitting patterns around 320 nm were observed in the solid-state circular dichroism (CD) spectra of complexes 1 and 2, which indicate that their shell configurational chiralities are Δ and Λ, respectively. The apparent bisignate couplets in the solid-state CD spectra of [CsLn(d-hfc)(4)(H(2)O)] [Ln = La (3), Yb (5)] and [CsLn(l-hfc)(4)(H(2)O)] [Ln = La (4), Yb (6)] show that they are a pair of enantiomers and their absolute configurations are denoted Δ and Λ, respectively. The crystallographic data of 5 reveals that its coordination polyhedron is the square antiprism (SAP) geometry and it undergoes a phase transition from triclinic (α phase, P1) to monoclinic (β phase, C2) upon cooling. The difference between the two phases is brought about by the temperature dependent behaviour of the coordination water molecules, but this did not affect the configurational chirality of the Δ-SAP-[Yb(d-hfc)(4)](-) moiety. Furthermore, time-dependent CD, UV-vis and (19)F NMR were applied to study the solution behavior of these complexes. It was found that the chiral-at-metal stability of the three pairs of complexes is different and affected by both the Ln(3+) and M(+) ion size. The results show that the Cs(+) cation can retain the metal center chirality and stablize the structures of [Ln(d/l-hfc)(4)](-) or the dissociated tris(d/l-hfc)Ln(III) species in solution for a longer time than that of the Na(+) cation, and it is important that the Cs(+) ion successfully lock the configurational chirality around the Yb(3+) center of the complex species in solution. This is reasoned by the short Cs(+)···FC, Cs(+)···O-Yb and Cs(+)···Yb(3

  6. Copper(II) complexes of terminally free alloferon mutants containing two histidyl binding sites inside peptide chain structure and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadej, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2015-12-21

    Mononuclear and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations, H1A/H12A H2N-A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVA(12)G-COOH, H1A/H9A H2N-A(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G-COOH, and H1A/H6A H2N-A(1)GVSGA(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G-COOH, have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, and EPR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1 : 1 to 3 : 1 was obtained. Over a wide 6-8 pH range, including physiological pH 7.4, and a 1 : 1 metal-to-ligand molar ratio, the peptides studied formed a CuH-1L complex with the 4N{NH2,N(-),2NIm} coordination mode. The presence of the 4N binding site for the CuH-1L complexes prevented the deprotonation and coordination of the second amide nitrogen atom to copper(II) ions (pK-1/-2 7.83-8.07) compared to that of pentaGly (6.81). The amine nitrogen donor and two imidazole nitrogen atoms (H(6)H(9), H(6)H(12) and H(9)H(12)) can be considered to be independent metal-binding sites in the species formed. As a consequence, di- and trinuclear complexes for the metal-to-ligand 2 : 1 and 3 : 1 molar ratios dominate in the solution, respectively. For the Cu(II)-H1A/H9A and Cu(II)-H1A/H12A systems, the Cu3H-9L complexes are likely formed by the coordination of amide nitrogen atoms towards C-termini with ring sizes (7,5,5).

  7. Luminescent Behavior of Ru(II) Polypyridyl Morpholine Complexes, Synthesis, Characterization, DNA, Protein Binding, Sensor Effect of Ions/Solvents and Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuradi, Ravi Kumar; Putta, Venkat Reddy; Nancherla, Deepika; Sirasani, Satyanarayana

    2016-03-01

    New three ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(phen)2mpip](2+)(1) {mpip = 2-(4-morpholinophenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline}, (phen = 1,10-Phenanthrolene), [Ru(bpy)2mpip](2+)(2) (bpy = 2,2'bipyridyl), [Ru(dmb)2mpip](2+)(3) (dmb = 4, 4-dimethyl 2, 2'-bipyridine) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral studies IR, UV-vis, (1)H, (13)C-NMR, mass and elemental analysis. The