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Sample records for cannabinoid-induced psychosis thc-iomazenil

  1. Clinical characteristics of synthetic cannabinoid-induced psychosis in relation to schizophrenia: a single-center cross-sectional analysis of concurrently hospitalized patients

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    Altintas M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Merih Altintas,1 Leman Inanc,2 Gamze Akcay Oruc,1 Selim Arpacioglu,1 Huseyin Gulec1 1Department of Psychiatry, Erenköy Mental and Neurological Diseases Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, 2Department of Psychiatry, Dr Cevdet Aykan Mental Health and Diseases Hospital, Tokat, Turkey Background: This study aimed to evaluate synthetic cannabinoid (SC-induced psychosis in terms of patient profile and clinical characteristics with reference to concurrently hospitalized schizophrenic patients. Methods: A total of 81 male patients diagnosed with psychotic disorder induced by the use of SCs (n=50; mean (standard deviation [SD] age: 25.9 (5.5 years or with schizophrenia (n=31, mean (SD age: 42.9 (11.6 years based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, diagnosis criteria who were concurrently hospitalized at Erenköy Mental and Neurological Diseases Training and Research Hospital were included in this cross-sectional study. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD, and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A were recorded in all the patients. Results: Mean (SD age at disease onset in SC-induced psychosis patients was 22.3 (5.6 years; 26.0% had suicidal ideation and 58.4% were hospitalized involuntarily. Marijuana was the most common first used substance (72.0%, and solitary use of SC was noted in 38.0% of patients. SC-induced psychosis patients had similar PANSS positive, BPRS, HRSD, and FAB scores and significantly lower PANSS negative scores (18.0 [6.5] vs 22.3 [6.0], P=0.004 than patients with schizophrenia, while they had similar HAM-A scores (17.8 [10.3] vs 21.6 [5.5], P=0.085 as young schizophrenics. Age at onset for SC (r=0.364, P=0.05 or substance (r=0.395, P=0.01 use was correlated positively with total FAB scores.Conclusion: In conclusion, our

  2. Postpartum Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... survivors of postpartum psychosis never had delusions containing violent commands. Delusions take many forms, and not all ... and families PP Psychosis Books Resources and Creative Media Help in an Emergency Emergency Hotlines are available ...

  3. Cannabinoid-induced effects on the nociceptive system: a neurophysiological study in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Antonella; Bettolo, Chiara Marini; Onesti, Emanuela; Frasca, Vittorio; Iacovelli, Elisa; Gilio, Francesca; Giacomelli, Elena; Gabriele, Maria; Aragona, Massimiliano; Tomassini, Valentina; Pantano, Patrizia; Pozzilli, Carlo; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2009-05-01

    Although clinical studies show that cannabinoids improve central pain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) neurophysiological studies are lacking to investigate whether they also suppress these patients' electrophysiological responses to noxious stimulation. The flexion reflex (FR) in humans is a widely used technique for assessing the pain threshold and for studying spinal and supraspinal pain pathways and the neurotransmitter system involved in pain control. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study we investigated cannabinoid-induced changes in RIII reflex variables (threshold, latency and area) in a group of 18 patients with secondary progressive MS. To investigate whether cannabinoids act indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating lower motoneuron excitability we also evaluated the H-reflex size after tibial nerve stimulation and calculated the H wave/M wave (H/M) ratio. Of the 18 patients recruited and randomized 17 completed the study. After patients used a commercial delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol mixture as an oromucosal spray the RIII reflex threshold increased and RIII reflex area decreased. The visual analogue scale score for pain also decreased, though not significantly. Conversely, the H/M ratio measured before patients received cannabinoids remained unchanged after therapy. In conclusion, the cannabinoid-induced changes in the RIII reflex threshold and area in patients with MS provide objective neurophysiological evidence that cannabinoids modulate the nociceptive system in patients with MS.

  4. First Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Psychosis Treatment Share Fact Sheet: First Episode Psychosis Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy En Español Facts About Psychosis The word psychosis is used to describe conditions ...

  5. Menstrual psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    BROCKINGTON, IAN

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on menstrual psychosis and proposes a new classification, adapting that of v. Krafft-Ebing (1902) and Jolly (1914). The world literature consists mainly of case reports; they include a few with data good enough for a statistical demonstration of the link between onset and menses. These well-documented cases include examples of pre-menstrual, catamenial, paramenstrual and mid-cycle onsets, and continuous illnesses with phasic shifts rhythmic ...

  6. Lithium attenuates cannabinoid-induced dependence in the animal model: involvement of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and GSK-3β signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis is one of the most banned drugs in the world. Cannabinoid-induced dependence or withdrawal signs are indicated by the result of complex molecular mechanisms including upstream protein kinases (PKs, such as an extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2 and downstream glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β, which lead to neuronal plasticity. In this study, we examined the protective effect of lithium (Li as a potent ERK1/2 and GSK-3β modulator to prevent the development of dependence on cannabinoids. For this purpose, rats were treated twice daily with increasing doses of WIN 55,212-2 (WIN, 2-8 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p., for five consecutive days. AM251 (AM, 2 mg/kg, a cannabinoid antagonist, was injected i.p to induce manifestations of abstinence in rat dependency on WIN, and the subsequent withdrawal signs were recorded. To evaluate the preventive effect of Li, the rats were pre-treated with Li (10 mg/kg, i.p. twice daily, 30 minutes before every injection of WIN. SL327, as an ERK1/2 inhibitor, was also injected (SL, 50 mg/kg, i.p. 30 minutes before the last doses of WIN in separate groups. The p-ERK1/2, total ERK1/2, p-GSK-3β and total GSK-3β expressions were determined with Western blot method after 60 minutes, prior to the Li, WIN or AM injections. Li and SL pre-treatment attenuated the global withdrawal signs in regarding their modulation effect on the up-regulation of p-ERK1/2 cascade enhanced by AM injection. Furthermore, the p-GSK-3β expression was up-regulated with SL and Li pre-treatment against AM injection, without alteration on the total contents of ERK1/2 and GSK-3β level. Therefore, p-ERK1/2 and p-GSK-3β pathways are involved in the cannabinoid-induced dependence. However, no crosstalk was indicated between these two pathways. In conclusion, Li neuroprotectionwith regard to cannabinoid abstinence may occur through the regulation of the p-ERK1/2 cascade inconsequent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathways in rats.

  7. Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ffytche, Dominic H; Aarsland, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Although illusions, hallucinations and delusions did not play a prominent role in James Parkinson's original clinical descriptions, the longitudinal view of disease progression he advocated has important lessons for the study of such symptoms today. A focus on longitudinal progression rather than individual symptoms led to the concept of PD psychosis-a spectrum of positive symptoms in Parkinson's disease. The publication of criteria for PD psychosis in 2007 helped unify the disparate set of symptoms, raising their profile and resulting in a rapid expansion of literature focussing on clinical aspects, mechanisms, and treatment. Here we review this literature and the evolving view of PD psychosis. Adding to previous evidence of a prospective risk for dementia and the move to supervised care, key recent developments include: recognition of prevalence increase with disease duration; a broadening of symptoms included in PD psychosis; better characterization of higher visual and cognitive dysfunction risk factors; structural, functional, and neurotransmitter imaging biomarker evidence; and approval of pimavanserin in the United States for the treatment of PD psychosis. The accumulating evidence raises novel questions and directions for future research that promise a better understanding of the clinical management of PD psychosis and its role as a biomarker for PD stage and progression. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Momentary Assessment Research in Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oorschot, Margreet; Kwapil, Thomas; Delespaul, Philippe; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2009-01-01

    There is an expanding interest to study psychosis in the realm of daily life. The study of the person in the context of daily life may provide a powerful addition to more conventional and cross-sectional research strategies in the study of psychosis. This article first discusses the nature of experience sampling research in psychosis and…

  9. Unemployment, ethnicity and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, J; Bebbington, P; Bhavsar, V; Kravariti, E; van Os, J; Murray, R M; Dutta, R

    2013-03-01

    This study describes the incidence of psychosis in unemployed people and determines whether unemployment has a greater impact on the development of psychosis amongst Black minority groups than White groups. Patients with a first diagnosis of Research Diagnostic Criteria psychosis, in a defined area of London from 1998 to 2004, were identified. Crude and standardised incidence rates of psychosis amongst unemployed people for each ethnic group were calculated. Poisson regression modelling tested for interactions between unemployment and ethnicity. Hundred cases occurred amongst employed people and 78 cases occurred amongst the unemployed people. When standardised to the employed White population of the area, White unemployed people had a standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 11.7 (95% CI 6.4-19.7), Black Caribbean people had a SIR of 60.1(95% CI 39.3-88) and Black African people had a SIR of 40.7 (95% CI 25.8-61.1). There was no interaction however between ethnicity and unemployment (Likelihood ratio test P = 0.54). Rates of psychosis are high amongst unemployed people in south London and extremely high amongst Black Caribbean and Black African unemployed people. There was no evidence however that the minority groups were particularly sensitive to the stresses, limitations or meaning of unemployment. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Posttraumatic growth in psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Mazor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recent research has shown high rates of exposure to trauma among people with serious mental illness (SMI. In addition studies suggest that psychosis and mental illness-related experiences can be extremely traumatic. While some individuals develop full blown PTSD related to these experiences, it has been noted that some may also experience posttraumatic growth (PTG. However, few studies have examined PTG as a possible outcome in people who have experienced psychosis. Method: To further understand the relationships between psychosis and PTG, 121 participants were recruited from community mental health rehabilitation centers and administered trauma and psychiatric questionnaires. Results: High levels of traumatic exposure were found in the sample. Regarding our main focus of study we observed that people who endured psychosis can experience PTG, and that PTG is mediated by meaning making and coping self-efficacy appraisal. Psychotic symptoms were found to be a major obstacle to meaning making, coping self-efficacy, and PTG, whereas negative symptoms were found to be significantly related to PTG when mediated by meaning making and coping self-efficacy. Conclusion: The current research provides preliminary evidence for potential role of meaning making and coping self-efficacy as mediators of PTG in the clinical, highly traumatized population of people with SMI who have experienced psychosis. This may have both research as well as clinical practice relevance for the field of psychiatric rehabilitation.

  11. Early detection of psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor Ketil; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background During the last decades we have seen a new focus on early treatment of psychosis. Several reviews have shown that duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is correlated to better outcome. However, it is still unknown whether early treatment will lead to a better long-term outcome....... This study reports the effects of reducing DUP on 5-year course and outcome. Method During 1997–2000 a total of 281 consecutive patients aged >17 years with first episode non-affective psychosis were recruited, of which 192 participated in the 5-year follow-up. A comprehensive early detection (ED) programme...... and cognitive factors and for global assessment of functioning for social functioning at 5-year follow-up. The ED group also had more contacts with friends. Regression analysis did not find that these differences could be explained by confounders. Conclusions Early treatment had positive effects on clinical...

  12. Focus on psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Wolfgang; Zielasek, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The concept of psychosis has been shaped by traditions in the concepts of mental disorders during the last 170 years. The term “psychosis” still lacks a unified definition, but denotes a clinical construct composed of several symptoms. Delusions, hallucinations, and thought disorders are the core clinical features. The search for a common denominator of psychotic symptoms points toward combinations of neuropsychological mechanisms resulting in reality distortion. To advance the elucidation of the causes and the pathophysiology of the symptoms of psychosis, a deconstruction of the term into its component symptoms is therefore warranted. Current research is dealing with the delineation from “normality”, the genetic underpinnings, and the causes and pathophysiology of the symptoms of psychosis. PMID:25987859

  13. Social cognition and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, I.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes studies on psychological mechanisms and associated social risk factors for the onset of psychotic symptoms. In the first part, studies are described that examined psychological mechanisms of psychosis at the level of the individual, such as changes in theory of mind and

  14. Introduction to "Early psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGorry, Patrick; Nordentoft, Merete; Simonsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    warrants careful analysis. The Third International Early Psychosis Conference proved to be a watershed and was the largest and most vibrant meeting to that point. This preface aims to set the scene for a selection of contributions, derived from the array of new evidence reported in Copenhagen, and recently...

  15. Characteristics of early psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, P.F.; Emck, C.; van Engeland, H.

    2006-01-01

    There is little research on characteristics related to course and prognosis of early-onset psychosis. The present article aims to advance our knowledge of this disorder for the purpose of proper diagnosis and treatment. It focuses on premorbid and prodromal characteristics, treatment history,

  16. Pellagra Associated with Psychosis

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    B B Lal

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of pellagra who had psychosis, dermatitis and gastrointestinal system involvement in the form of constipation has been described. In this case mental symptoms in the form of insomnia appeared prior to dermal lesions. The case was successfully treated both for the mental and skin condition with nicotinamide and other ancillary treatment.

  17. Attachment and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to further our understanding of current psychosocial models by introducing attachment as a relevant developmental framework. Firstly, attachment theory provides a psychosocial model for a developmental pathway to psychosis. Secondly, after expression of psychotic

  18. Do emotions drive psychosis?

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    João G. Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: How important is the emotional life of persons who manifest psychotic symptoms? Aims: The aim of this paper is to review evidence on a causal role for emotions in psychotic processes. Methods: Selective review of literature on affective symptoms in psychoses, on emotions in the production of psychotic symptoms and on dopaminergic models of psychosis. Results: Affective symptoms are relevant across psychoses. Persons with schizophrenia have high levels of emotional reactivity and the intensification of negative affects not only is associated with but also precedes the intensification of psychotic symptoms, which is evidence that negative emotions drive the course of psychotic symptoms. Negative self‑representations are central in psychotic processes and can be the link between negative emotions and psychosis. Evidence favours the notion that persecutory delusions are consistent with negative affects and self‑representations, while grandiose delusions are consistent with a defensive amplification of positive affects and self‑representations. Shame has been proposed as the core emotional experience of psychosis, one in which the self becomes vulnerable to the external world, which is consistent with persecutory experiences. Assaults on the self, under the form of hostility in the family environment and society, are strong predictors of relapse and development of schizophrenia. Assaults on the self which induce social defeat are also strong stimulants of mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, whose hyperactivity is associated with acute psychotic episodes and the experience of “aberrant salience”, put forward as a dopaminergic model of psychosis. Conclusions: The “defeat of the self” emerges as a central link that binds the experience of negative emotions to the expression of psychotic symptoms and its psychological and neurobiological correlates. The hypothesis gains support that the emotions related to that defeat control

  19. Early Identification of Psychosis: A Primer

    OpenAIRE

    Early Psychosis Initiative of British Columbia

    2000-01-01

    This document is an educational resource concerning the early identification of psychosis. Primary topics addressed include: an outline of the importance of early intervention; signs and symptoms of psychosis; and strategies for recognizing psychosis.  

  20. Treatment emergent psychosis associated with mirtazapine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychosis, in vulnerable individuals, may emerge on anti - depressant treatment. Treatment emergent psychosis is reported with two newer generation antidepressants. Keywords: Antidepressants, Psychosis, Mirtazapine, Tianeptine South African Psychiatry Review - November 2002 ...

  1. Psychosis improved dysphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ruth Ann; Hallahan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old single man with a diagnosis of Schizoaffective Disorder since 1989 and a comorbid diagnosis of functional (dissociative) dysphonia since 2011. Although receiving ongoing treatment from a Speech and Language Therapist, the patient's symptoms of dysphonia have remained prominent from the time of diagnosis in 2011 and have been particularly apparent during times of psychosocial and interpersonal stress. He had a dramatic and complete resolution of all dysphonic symptoms during an acute relapse of the psychosis in February 2013 and experienced a gradual re-emergence of dysphonic symptoms when his episode of psychosis resolved. This is the first case report to demonstrate such an association and we discuss potential mechanisms for the resolution of dysphonic symptoms during this psychotic relapse. PMID:24323380

  2. First-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Patients with first-episode psychosis had significantly high NEO-PI-R scores for neuroticism and agreeableness, and lower scores for conscientiousness and extroversion. The median time for remission in the total sample was three months. Female gender and better premorbid functioning were predictive of less...... negative symptoms and shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was predictive for shorter time to remission, stable remission, less severe positive psychotic symptoms, and better social functioning. Female gender, better premorbid social functioning and more education also contributed to a better...... should warn clinicians to pay attention to the more elaborate needs of these patients. A re-evaluation at three months should reveal that non-remitted patients with longer DUPs indicate high risk of continuous non-remission. A possible shift to clozapine for this group should be strongly considered....

  3. Early intervention in psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, Claudio; Nordentoft, Merete; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is a well-established approach with the intention of early detection and treatment of psychotic disorders. Its clinical and economic benefits are well documented. This paper presents basic aspects of EIP services, discusses challenges to their implementa......AIM: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) is a well-established approach with the intention of early detection and treatment of psychotic disorders. Its clinical and economic benefits are well documented. This paper presents basic aspects of EIP services, discusses challenges...... benefits alone is not enough to promote implementation, as economic arguments and political and social pressure have shown to be important elements in efforts to achieve implementation. CONCLUSIONS: Users' narratives, close collaboration with community organizations and support from policy-makers and known...

  4. Psychosis in dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Suprakash Chaudhury; Biswajit Jagtap; Deepak Kumar Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    An 18-year-old male student developed abnormal behavior while undergoing treatment for dengue fever. He was ill-kempt, irritable and had auditory and visual hallucinations and vague persecutory delusions in clear sensorium with impaired insight. The psychotic episode had a temporal correlation with dengue fever. Psychiatric comorbidities of dengue fever including mania, anxiety, depression, and catatonia are mentioned in literature but the literature on the psychosis following dengue is spars...

  5. Early psychosis symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, H.A.; Hussain, S.; Islam, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia in the pathways to help-seeking. Study Design: A cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Department of Psychiatry, the Aga Khan University, Karachi, from 2008 to 2009. Methodology: A total of 93 patients were interviewed in the pathways to care of schizophrenia. The diagnosis was based on ICD-10 criteria. The pathways to care were assessed through a semi-structured questionnaire. The onset, course and symptoms of psychosis were assessed through Interview for Retrospective Assessment at Age at Onset of Psychosis (IROAS). Results: Fifty five (59%) participants were male while 41% (n=38%) were female. Using IROAS, 108 symptoms were identified as concerning behaviour. Alternatively, 60 (55%) concerning behaviours were reported in the open-ended inquiry of the reasons for help seeking as assessed by the pathways to care questionnaire with a statistically significant difference between most symptoms category. The difference was most pronounced (p < 0.001) for depressed mood (66%), worries (65%), tension (63%), withdrawal/mistrust (54%) and loss of self-confidence (53%). Thought withdrawal (22%) and passivity (15%) were elicited only through structured interview (IROAS). When symptoms were categorized together, about 83% of the subjects presented with affective and non-specific prodromal symptoms. Roughly, 10% of the subjects presented with positive symptoms and 3% presented with the negative symptoms of psychosis. The non-specific, affective symptoms appear to predominate the prodromal phase of the illness. Conclusion: Prodromal symptoms of schizophrenia include non-specific, affective symptoms. Attention needs to be paid on identifying the prodromal symptoms and change in social functioning in order to identify those who are at risk of long term psychosis. (author)

  6. Psychosis following Tramadol Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Rajabizadeh, Ghodratolah; Kheradmand, Ali; Nasirian, Mansoureh

    2009-01-01

    Background: Tramadol is a centrally acting opioid analgesic used to treat moderate to sever pain. It has more advantage and less opioid adverse effects than conventional opioid analgesia. Case Report: This article reports a patient with tramadol dependency that had psychosis after tramadol withdrawal. Conclusion: By the increase of tramadol usage for relief of chronic pain, tramadol abuse and dependency is increased. Some of tramadol withdrawal symptoms are not related to opioid, for example ...

  7. Brain dysfunction in psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warkentin, S.

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation focused on the questions whether previously reported functional brain abnormalities in schizophrenia could be related to the clinical state of the patient (i.e. the degree of psychosis) at time of study, and whether similar findings in patients with schizophrenia, could be made in patients with cycloid psychosis. To this effect, patients were investigated with regional cerebral blood flow measurements and clinical rating on repeated occasions during their most extreme fluctuations during a psychotic episode, i.e. while they were in an exacerbated state and during clinical remission. A subgroup of schizophrenic patients were investigated before and after neuroleptic treatment and during mental activation with a word fluency test. The schizophrenic group has a normal mean hemispheric blood flow irrespective of clinical state and treatment. During exacerbation a highly significant positive correlation was seen between the frontal-occipital (F/O) ratio and the degree of psychosis, suggesting that the more psychotic the patients was, the higher was the ratio. During remission, the F/O ratio decreased. Schizophrenic patients did not activate their prefrontal cortex during exacerbation, but showed a normal frontal response to the word fluency test during remission. The regional cerebral blood flow of the cycloid patients differed clearly from that of the schizophrenic patients. During exacerbation they had elevated mean hemispheric flow levels, and a decreased F/O ration, while rCBF was normal during remission. The findings suggest that variability in the degree of psychosis can be an important factor underlying the heterogeneity of rCBF findings in schizophrenia. (au)

  8. Epileptic peri-ictal psychosis, a reversible cause of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Mingot, C; Gil Villar, M P; Calvo Medel, D; Corbalán Sevilla, T; Martínez Martínez, L; Iñiguez Martínez, C; Santos Lasaosa, S; Mauri Llerda, J A

    2013-03-01

    Epileptic psychoses are categorised as peri-ictal and interictal according to their relationship with the occurrence of seizures. There is a close temporal relationship between peri-ictal psychosis and seizures, and psychosis may present before (preictal), during (ictal) or after seizures (postictal). Epileptic psychoses usually have acute initial and final phases, with a short symptom duration and complete remission with a risk of recurrence. There is no temporal relationship between interictal or chronic psychosis and epileptic seizures. Another type of epileptic psychosis is related to the response to epilepsy treatment: epileptic psychosis caused by the phenomenon of forced normalisation (alternative psychosis), which includes epileptic psychosis secondary to epilepsy surgery. Although combination treatment with antiepileptic and neuroleptic drugs is now widely used to manage this condition, there are no standard treatment guidelines for epileptic psychosis. We present 5 cases of peri-ictal epileptic psychosis in which we observed an excellent response to treatment with levetiracetam. Good control was achieved over both seizures and psychotic episodes. Levetiracetam was used in association with neuroleptic drugs with no adverse effects, and our patients did not require high doses of the latter. Categorising psychotic states associated with epilepsy according to their temporal relationship with seizures is clinically and prognostically useful because it provides important information regarding disease treatment and progression. The treatment of peri-ictal or acute mental disorders is based on epileptic seizure control, while the treatment of interictal or chronic disorders has more in common with managing disorders which are purely psychiatric in origin. In addition to improving the patient's quality of life and reducing disability, achieving strict control over seizures may also prevent the development of interictal psychosis. For this reason, we believe that

  9. Contemporary Perspectives on Lacanian Theories of Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Douglas Redmond

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:In contemporary Lacanian psychoanalysis, Verhaeghe’s theory of actualpathology / psychopathology in psychosis and the Millerian idea of ordinary psychosis provide diverging conceptual approaches to psychosis. In this paper, the two approaches to psychosis are examined with a particular emphasis on mild psychosis and compensatory mechanisms. Despite the shared focus on similar clinical phenomena, particularly body disturbances, these two theories provide different explanations of psychosis. Verhaeghe’s theory of psychosis is a synthesis of Lacanian theory, Freud’s idea of actual neurosis and psychoanalytic attachment concepts. Moreover, these ideas are situated in the schizophrenia / paranoia dichotomy an important heuristic device utilised in clinical practice with psychosis. In contrast, the Millerian field of ordinary psychosis aims to broaden the idea of psychosis by reviving the idea of mild psychosis and the different forms of stabilisation possible in psychosis. Clinicians adapting the idea of ordinary psychosis aim to rethink pivotal Lacanian concepts - untriggered psychosis and stabilisation - beyond the scope of the schizophrenia / paranoia dichotomy. Although the idea of ordinary psychosis requires further development, it promise greater utility than Verhaeghe’s model, as it provides a broader and more nuanced approach to the complex vicissitudes of triggering and restitution in psychosis.

  10. Psychosis and Transformation: A Phenomenological Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Gary; Hagen, Brad; Peters, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Conventional views towards psychosis typically portray psychosis as an illness of the brain with a generally poor prognosis, even if treated with antipsychotics. However, there is a growing body of literature which presents an alternative view of psychosis, whereby people are not only able to recover from psychosis, but can also experience…

  11. Contemporary perspectives on Lacanian theories of psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Redmond, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:In contemporary Lacanian psychoanalysis, Verhaeghe’s theory of actualpathology / psychopathology in psychosis and the Millerian idea of ordinary psychosis provide diverging conceptual approaches to psychosis. In this paper, the two approaches to psychosis are examined with a particular emphasis on mild psychosis and compensatory mechanisms. Despite the shared focus on similar clinical phenomena, particularly body disturbances, these two theories provide different explanations of psyc...

  12. Cannabis and psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevlin, Mark; McElroy, Eoin; Murphy, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: While research has consistently identified an association between cannabis use and psychosis, few studies have examined this relationship in a polydrug context (i.e. combining cannabis with other illicit substances). The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach: The ......Purpose: While research has consistently identified an association between cannabis use and psychosis, few studies have examined this relationship in a polydrug context (i.e. combining cannabis with other illicit substances). The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design....../methodology/approach: The present study sought to examine the association between recreational drug use (cannabis only vs polydrug) and psychotic disorders. Analysis was conducted on a large, representative survey of young Danish people aged 24 (n=4,718). Participants completed self-report measures of lifetime drug use...... and this information was linked to the Danish psychiatric registry system. Findings: Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between drug use (no drug use, cannabis only, cannabis and other drug) and ICD-10 psychotic disorders, while controlling for gender and parental...

  13. Psychosis and cannabis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Häfner

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol and cannabis misuse is currently the most frequent co-morbidity disorder of schizophrenia. The following four issues will be dealt with: 1 the neurobiological basis of the psychosis-inducing, pathogenic effects of THC, the agent contained in cannabis products. 2 Can cannabis use - and for comparison alcohol abuse - prematurely trigger or even cause schizophrenia? 3 Are persons genetically liable to schizophrenia, psychosis-prone individuals or young persons before completion of brain development at an increased risk? 4 What consequences does cannabis use have on the symptomatology and further course of schizophrenia? Results from recent literature and the ABC Schizophrenia Study show that the risk for cannabis use in schizophrenia is about twice the size in healthy controls. In most cases cannabis use starts before first admission, in a third of cases before schizophrenia onset. There is an increased affinity to misuse already at the prodromal stage. Cannabis can prematurely trigger schizophrenia onset - on average eight years earlier than in non-use - and cause the illness partly in interaction with predisposing factors. Cannabis use in the course of schizophrenia increases positive symptoms and reduces affective flattening, thus leading to dysfunctional coping in some cases.

  14. Questions and Answers about Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Home Science News Meetings and Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us ... episode may also experience depression, anxiety, sleep problems, social withdrawal, lack of motivation and difficulty functioning overall. Q: What causes psychosis? ...

  15. Scientific Letter: Monosymptomatic Hypochondriacal Psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific Letter: Monosymptomatic Hypochondriacal Psychosis (somatic delusional disorder): A report of two cases. ... African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives.

  16. Early Intervention in Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorry, Patrick D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Early intervention for potentially serious disorder is a fundamental feature of healthcare across the spectrum of physical illness. It has been a major factor in the reductions in morbidity and mortality that have been achieved in some of the non-communicable diseases, notably cancer and cardiovascular disease. Over the past two decades, an international collaborative effort has been mounted to build the evidence and the capacity for early intervention in the psychotic disorders, notably schizophrenia, where for so long deep pessimism had reigned. The origins and rapid development of early intervention in psychosis are described from a personal and Australian perspective. This uniquely evidence-informed, evidence-building and cost-effective reform provides a blueprint and launch pad to radically change the wider landscape of mental health care and dissolve many of the barriers that have constrained progress for so long. PMID:25919380

  17. Early detection of first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven.......Early intervention is assumed to improve outcome in first-episode psychosis, but this has not been proven....

  18. Neurocognitive dysfunction in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Melle, Ingrid; Friis, Svein

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of neurocognitive function with duration of untreated psychosis, premorbid illness factors, and clinical symptoms to determine whether long duration of untreated psychosis independently compromises cognitive function....

  19. Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress in Psychosis and Psychosis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Barron

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although our understanding of psychotic disorders has advanced substantially in the past few decades, very little has changed in the standard of care for these illnesses since the development of atypical anti-psychotics in the 1990s. Here, we integrate new insights into the pathophysiology with the increasing interest in early detection and prevention. First, we explore the role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in a subpopulation of cortical parvalbumin-containing interneurons (PVIs. Postmortem and preclinical data has implicated these neurons in the positive and negative symptoms, as well as the cognitive dysfunction present in schizophrenia. These neurons also appear to be sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress during the perinatal and peripubertal periods, which may be mediated in large part by aberrant synaptic pruning. After exploring some of the molecular mechanisms through which neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are thought to exert their effects, we highlight the progress that has been made in identifying psychosis prior to onset through the identification of individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR. By combining our understanding of psychosis pathogenesis with the increasing characterization of endophenotypes that precede frank psychosis, it may be possible to identify patients before they present with psychosis and intervene to reduce the burden of the disease to both patients and families.

  20. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  1. [Poor insight and psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotakos, O

    2017-01-01

    A variety of phenomena might be considered as reflecting impaired insight in psychosis, like failure to recognize signs, symptoms or disease, failure to derive appropriate cognitive representations, despite recognition of the disease, and misattribution of the source or cause of the disease. The unawareness of tardive dyskinesia symptoms in schizophrenic patients points that self-awareness deficits in schizophrenia may be domain specific. Poor insight is an independent phenomenological and a prevalent feature in psychotic disorders in general, and in schizophrenia in particular, but we don't know yet if delusions in schizophrenia are the result of an entirely normal attempt to account for abnormal perceptual experiences or a product of abnormal experience but of normal reasoning. The theoretical approaches regarding impaired insight include the disturbed perceptual input, the impaired linkage between thought and emotion and the breakdown of the process of self-monitoring and error checking. The inability to distinguish between internally and externally generated mental events has been described by the metarepresentation theory. This theory includes the awareness of ones' goals, which leads to disorders of willed action, the awareness of intention, which leads to movement disorders, and the awareness of intentions of others, which leads to paranoid delusions. The theory of metarepresentation implies mainly output mechanisms, like the frontal cortex, while the input mechanism implies posterior brain systems, including the parietal lobe. There are many similarities between the disturbances of awareness seen in schizophrenia and those seen as a result of known neurological impairment. Neuropsychological models of impaired insight typically attribute the disturbance to any of a variety of core deficits in the processing of information. In this respect, lack of insight is on conceptual par with alogia, apraxia or aphasia in reflecting disturbed cognitive processing. In

  2. Recovery from Psychosis: A Phenomenological Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Gary; Hagen, Brad; Peters, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    While mainstream psychiatry tends to view psychosis as an enduring and chronic condition, there is growing interest in the possibility of recovery from psychosis. A phenomenological research method was utilized in interviewing 17 individuals who all self-identified as being in recovery from psychosis. The research question was, "What was the lived…

  3. Loneliness in psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Michelle H; Gleeson, John F M; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Penn, David L

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the review is to understand the relationships between loneliness and related psychological and social factors in individuals with psychosis. Loneliness is poorly understood in people with psychosis. Given the myriad of social challenges facing individuals with psychosis, these findings can inform psychosocial interventions that specifically target loneliness in this vulnerable group. We adhered to the PRISMA guidelines and systematically reviewed empirical studies that measured loneliness either as a main outcome or as an associated variable in individuals with psychosis. A total of ten studies examining loneliness in people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder were examined. Heterogeneity in the assessment of loneliness was found, and there were contradictory findings on the relationship between loneliness and psychotic symptomatology. In individuals with psychosis, loneliness may be influenced by psychological and social factors such as increased depression, psychosis, and anxiety, poor social support, poor quality of life, more severe internalised stigma and perceived discrimination, and low self-esteem. The relationship between loneliness and psychosis remains poorly understood due to a lack of rigorous studies. Although having strong social relationships is crucial to facilitate recovery from serious mental illness, psychosocial interventions that specifically target loneliness in individuals with psychosis are lacking and sorely needed. Interventions targeting loneliness in those with psychosis will also need to account for additional barriers associated with psychosis (e.g., social skill deficits, impoverished social networks, and negative symptoms).

  4. Methamphetamine psychosis: epidemiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J

    2014-12-01

    Psychotic symptoms and syndromes are frequently experienced among individuals who use methamphetamine, with recent estimates of up to approximately 40 % of users affected. Although transient in a large proportion of users, acute symptoms can include agitation, violence, and delusions, and may require management in an inpatient psychiatric or other crisis intervention setting. In a subset of individuals, psychosis can recur and persist and may be difficult to distinguish from a primary psychotic disorder such as schizophrenia. Differential diagnosis of primary vs. substance-induced psychotic disorders among methamphetamine users is challenging; nevertheless, with careful assessment of the temporal relationship of symptoms to methamphetamine use, aided by state-of-the art psychodiagnostic assessment instruments and use of objective indicators of recent substance use (i.e., urine toxicology assays), coupled with collateral clinical data gathered from the family or others close to the individual, diagnostic accuracy can be optimized and the individual can be appropriately matched to a plan of treatment. The pharmacological treatment of acute methamphetamine-induced psychosis may include the use of antipsychotic medications as well as benzodiazepines, although symptoms may resolve without pharmacological treatment if the user is able to achieve a period of abstinence from methamphetamine. Importantly, psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence has a strong evidence base and is the optimal first-line treatment approach to reducing rates of psychosis among individuals who use methamphetamines. Prevention of methamphetamine relapse is the most direct means of preventing recurrence of psychotic symptoms and syndromes. Long-term management of individuals presenting with recurrent and persistent psychosis, even in the absence of methamphetamine use, may include both behavioral treatment to prevent resumption of methamphetamine use and pharmacological treatment

  5. Amphetamine-induced psychosis - a separate diagnostic entity or primary psychosis triggered in the vulnerable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramness Jørgen G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Use of amphetamine and methamphetamine is widespread in the general population and common among patients with psychiatric disorders. Amphetamines may induce symptoms of psychosis very similar to those of acute schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. This has been an argument for using amphetamine-induced psychosis as a model for primary psychotic disorders. To distinguish the two types of psychosis on the basis of acute symptoms is difficult. However, acute psychosis induced by amphetamines seems to have a faster recovery and appears to resolve more completely compared to schizophrenic psychosis. The increased vulnerability for acute amphetamine induced psychosis seen among those with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality and, to a certain degree other psychiatric disorders, is also shared by non-psychiatric individuals who previously have experienced amphetamine-induced psychosis. Schizophrenia spectrum disorder and amphetamine-induced psychosis are further linked together by the finding of several susceptibility genes common to both conditions. These genes probably lower the threshold for becoming psychotic and increase the risk for a poorer clinical course of the disease. The complex relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis has received much attention but is still not adequately explored. Our paper reviews the literature in this field and proposes a stress-vulnerability model for understanding the relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis.

  6. Amphetamine-induced psychosis - a separate diagnostic entity or primary psychosis triggered in the vulnerable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Use of amphetamine and methamphetamine is widespread in the general population and common among patients with psychiatric disorders. Amphetamines may induce symptoms of psychosis very similar to those of acute schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. This has been an argument for using amphetamine-induced psychosis as a model for primary psychotic disorders. To distinguish the two types of psychosis on the basis of acute symptoms is difficult. However, acute psychosis induced by amphetamines seems to have a faster recovery and appears to resolve more completely compared to schizophrenic psychosis. The increased vulnerability for acute amphetamine induced psychosis seen among those with schizophrenia, schizotypal personality and, to a certain degree other psychiatric disorders, is also shared by non-psychiatric individuals who previously have experienced amphetamine-induced psychosis. Schizophrenia spectrum disorder and amphetamine-induced psychosis are further linked together by the finding of several susceptibility genes common to both conditions. These genes probably lower the threshold for becoming psychotic and increase the risk for a poorer clinical course of the disease. The complex relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis has received much attention but is still not adequately explored. Our paper reviews the literature in this field and proposes a stress-vulnerability model for understanding the relationship between amphetamine use and psychosis. PMID:23216941

  7. Apathy in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evensen, Julie; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Barder, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored.......Apathy is a common symptom in first episode psychosis (FEP), and is associated with poor functioning. Prevalence and correlates of apathy 10 years after the first psychotic episode remain unexplored....

  8. Early psychosis workforce development: Core competencies for mental health professionals working in the early psychosis field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Helen; Jorm, Anthony F; Killackey, Eoin; Francey, Shona; Mulcahy, Dianne

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this study was to identify the core competencies required of mental health professionals working in the early psychosis field, which could function as an evidence-based tool to support the early psychosis workforce and in turn assist early psychosis service implementation and strengthen early psychosis model fidelity. The Delphi method was used to establish expert consensus on the core competencies. In the first stage, a systematic literature search was conducted to generate competency items. In the second stage, a panel consisting of expert early psychosis clinicians from around the world was formed. Panel members then rated each of the competency items on how essential they are to the clinical practice of all early psychosis clinicians. In total, 1023 pieces of literature including textbooks, journal articles and grey literature were reviewed. A final 542 competency items were identified for inclusion in the questionnaire. A total of 63 early psychosis experts participated in 3 rating rounds. Of the 542 competency items, 242 were endorsed as the required core competencies. There were 29 competency items that were endorsed by 62 or more experts, and these may be considered the foundational competencies for early psychosis practice. The study generated a set of core competencies that provide a common language for early psychosis clinicians across professional disciplines and country of practice, and potentially are a useful professional resource to support early psychosis workforce development and service reform. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Neurocognition and Duration of Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rund, Bjørn Rishovd; Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Evensen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A substantial proportion of schizophrenia-spectrum patients exhibit a cognitive impairment at illness onset. However, the long-term course of neurocognition and a possible neurotoxic effect of time spent in active psychosis, is a topic of controversy. Furthermore, it is of importance to find out...... assessed neuropsychologically on one or more occasions. Patients were tested after remission of psychotic symptoms and reassessed 1, 2, 5, and 10 years after inclusion. The neurocognitive battery consisted of California Verbal Learning Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Controlled Oral Word Association...

  10. The psychosis spectrum in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ffytche, Dominic H.; Creese, Byron; Politis, Marios; Chaudhuri, K. Ray; Weintraub, Daniel; Ballard, Clive; Aarsland, Dag

    2017-01-01

    In 2007, the clinical and research profile of illusions, hallucinations, delusions and related symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD) was raised with the publication of a consensus definition of PD psychosis. Symptoms that were previously deemed benign and clinically insignificant were incorporated into a continuum of severity, leading to the rapid expansion of literature focusing on clinical aspects, mechanisms and treatment. Here, we review this literature and the evolving view of PD psychosis. Key topics include the prospective risk of dementia in individuals with PD psychosis, and the causal and modifying effects of PD medication. We discuss recent developments, including recognition of an increase in the prevalence of psychosis with disease duration, addition of new visual symptoms to the psychosis continuum, and identification of frontal executive, visual perceptual and memory dysfunction at different disease stages. In addition, we highlight novel risk factors — for example, autonomic dysfunction — that have emerged from prospective studies, structural MRI evidence of frontal, parietal, occipital and hippocampal involvement, and approval of pimavanserin for the treatment of PD psychosis. The accumulating evidence raises novel questions and directions for future research to explore the clinical management and biomarker potential of PD psychosis. PMID:28106066

  11. [Current peculiarities of alcoholic psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksin, D S; Egorov, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The follow-up study of alcoholic psychoses in male patients admitted to a clinical department of a psychiatric hospital in 2005-2007 was carried out. Patients with alcoholic psychoses made up from 15 to 30% of all patients. The number of psychosis had seasonal variations with the elevations in spring and autumn, peaks in January, lune and October. Alcoholic delirium morbidity made up from 69 to 82% of the total number of alcoholic psychoses, alcoholic hallucinosis varied from 14 to 27%. Other forms were presented by single cases. In alcoholic delirium hallucinations had brighter, sated character. The most specific were visual hallucinations in the form of zoohallucinations, hallucinations of an oral cavity ("sensation of threads, hair etc"). The most often observable characters were "extraneous people, animal, demons". In alcoholic hallucinosis, verbal contrast hallucinations, making comment hallucinations, visual illusions were most frequent. The family history of mental disorders and alcoholism was noted in 30% of patients with alcoholic psychosis. The probability of occurrence of alcoholic psychoses depended on the quality of consumed drinks. The presence of a cranial-brain injury in the anamnesis considerably aggravated the disease forecast and increased the risk of seizure syndrome.

  12. Acute Psychosis after Recent Isoniazid Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhija, Gagandeep; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Isoniazid as part of Directly Observed Treatment-Short course (DOTS) regimen is universally used. Although, associated psychosis in certain cases is documented earlier, type of symptoms and onset of symptoms remains highly variable. We describe a case of 54-year-old female on anti-tubercular therapy with onset of psychosis within three days of Isoniazid initiation characterised by agitation, loosening of association, echolalia with spontaneous remission after drug stoppage. This case highlights the importance of remaining vigilant and considering isoniazid as possible causative agent for psychosis even within days of its intiation and avoiding delay in management. PMID:26266198

  13. First-episode psychosis: An update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia is a devastating illness for the majority of its sufferers. Despite ... The concerns raised include stigma, ... to reduce the rate of conversion to psychosis and also delay ..... produce superior outcomes compared with generic mental.

  14. A Transdiagnostic Network Approach to Psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, Johanna T. W.; de Vos, Stijn; Wichers, Marieke; van Os, Jim; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A.

    Our ability to accurately predict development and outcome of early expression of psychosis is limited. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying psychopathology, a broader, transdiagnostic approach that acknowledges the complexity of mental illness is required. The upcoming network paradigm may be

  15. Alternative psychosis (forced normalisation) in epilepsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    changed, this should always be considered as a potential cause of a new or ... psychosis with thought disorder, delusions, hallucinations. • significant .... On mental status examination, the patient's behaviour was .... appeared for the first time.

  16. Olfactory Functioning in First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Vidyulata; Lasutschinkow, Patricia; Ishizuka, Koko; Sawa, Akira

    2018-04-06

    Though olfactory deficits are well-documented in schizophrenia, fewer studies have examined olfactory performance profiles across the psychosis spectrum. The current study examined odor identification, discrimination, and detection threshold performance in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder with psychotic features, major depression with psychotic features, and other psychotic conditions. FEP patients (n = 97) and healthy adults (n = 98) completed birhinal assessments of odor identification, discrimination, and detection threshold sensitivity for lyral and citralva. Participants also completed measures of anticipatory pleasure, anhedonia, and empathy. Differences in olfactory performances were assessed between FEP patients and controls and within FEP subgroups. Sex-stratified post hoc analyses were employed for a complete analysis of sex differences. Relationships between self-report measures and olfactory scores were also examined. Individuals with psychosis had poorer scores across all olfactory measures when compared to the control group. Within the psychosis cohort, patients with schizophrenia-associated psychosis had poorer odor identification, discrimination, and citralva detection threshold scores relative to controls. In schizophrenia patients, greater olfactory disturbance was associated with increased negative symptomatology, greater self-reported anhedonia, and lower self-reported anticipatory pleasure. Patients with mood-associated psychosis performed comparable to controls though men and women in this cohort showed differential olfactory profiles. These findings indicate that olfactory deficits extend beyond measures of odor identification in FEP with greater deficits observed in schizophrenia-related subgroups of psychosis. Studies examining whether greater olfactory dysfunction confers greater risk for developing schizophrenia relative to other forms of psychosis are

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Prodromal Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Addington, Jean; Marshall, Catherine; French, Paul

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong impetus in the psychosis research field to develop interventions that aim to prevent the onset of psychotic disorders. Over the past 15 years there has been a tremendous development in the work aimed at understanding the pre-psychotic period. More recently there has been a focus on developing and testing treatments both pharmacological and psychological that could potentially prevent or delay the onset of psychosis. One of the psychological treatments that has received the m...

  18. Early intervention services in psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, Claudio; Nordentoft, Merete; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Early intervention (EI) in psychosis is a comprehensive and evidence-based approach aimed at detection and treatment of psychotic symptoms in their early stages. This paper presents core features and noteworthy aspects of the evidence basis and limitations of EI, the importance of programme ....... Wider dissemination of EI services will probably benefit from better integration of potential funders, promotion of joint targets and shared financial or budgetary incentives....... overcome these difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Funding for mental health in general and for EI services appears low relative to need. One key argument for better funding for EI can be found in its favourable cost-effectiveness, but not all stakeholders beyond mental health administrators are aware of this...

  19. Family Intervention in First-Episode Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anvar Sadath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Family interventions have produced benefits on clinical and family outcomes in long standing psychosis. However, little is known about the efficacy of such interventions in the early stages of psychosis. This article reviews published research over the last two decades on family intervention in first-episode psychosis. Electronic databases, such as PubMed, PsycINFO, and ScienceDirect, have been systematically searched. In addition, an exhaustive Internet search was also carried out using Google and Google Scholar to identify the potential studies that evaluated family interventions in first-episode psychosis. We have identified seven reports of five randomized controlled trials (RCTs and five non-randomized and uncontrolled studies of family intervention. Our review on 12 reports of family intervention studies has shown mixed effects on outcomes in first-episode psychosis. Most of the reports showed no added benefits or very short-term benefits on primary clinical or family outcome variables. There is a dearth of family intervention studies in first-episode psychosis. More RCTs are needed to reach reliable conclusions.

  20. Epilepsy and psychosis: a practical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Melissa; Singh, Jasvinder; Marson, Anthony

    2018-04-01

    The psychoses of epilepsy can be classified according to their temporal relationship with seizures, namely as ictal, postictal and interictal psychosis. Interictal psychosis is the most common and may resemble schizophrenia. They can be challenging to diagnose and to manage, especially given the perception that some antipsychotic drugs may exacerbate seizures, while some antiepileptic medications may worsen psychosis. The current uncertainty around their best management means that some patients may not receive appropriate care. We propose a practical stepwise approach to managing psychosis in patients with epilepsy, summarising the key clinical features. We provide a framework for diagnosis, investigation and management of psychosis in the acute and long term. We also summarise the available evidence on the risk of psychosis with current antiepileptic drugs and the risk of seizures with antipsychotic drugs. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Relationship between menarche and psychosis onset in women with first episode of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Abadal, Elena; Usall, Judith; Barajas, Anna; Carlson, Janina; Iniesta, Raquel; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Baños, Iris; Dolz, Montserrat; Sánchez, Bernardo; Ochoa, Susana

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between age at menarche and age at first episode of psychosis, as well as clinical severity and outcome, in a population of women with first-episode psychosis. Clinical and socio-demographical data, age at menarche and at first-episode psychosis, parental history of psychosis and cannabis-use habits were obtained from 42 subjects with a first episode of psychosis. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression, Global Assessment Function, Disability Assessment Schedule, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, European Quality of Life, and Lewis and Murray Obstetric Complication Scales were administered. Statistical analysis was performed by means of zero-order correlations and Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests using SPSS version 17.0. We found no significant correlation between age at menarche and age at first-episode psychosis, or with the clinical scores performed. We observed that subjects with earlier age at menarche had more parental history of psychosis. Our negative results do not support the theory of a possible protective role of oestrogen, which seems to be more complex than previously thought. We would suggest that further research is needed to investigate developmental influences of sex steroids on the onset of psychosis and potentially therapeutic benefits based upon oestrogen. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library Public Policy Research Find Support Free Support 24/7 Text NAMI to 741741 Find Help Living with ... 6264 Press & Media In A Crisis? Stay Connected facebook twitter Instagram tumblr youtube Discussion Groups Terms of ...

  3. Prevalence of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction in postpartum psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Veerle; Kushner, Steven A.; Pop, Victor; Kuijpens, Hans; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P.; Drexhage, Roos C.; Wiersinga, Wilmar; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    Background Postpartum psychosis is a life-threatening psychiatric emergency, which often occurs without significant premorbid symptoms. Although many studies have postulated an involvement of the immune and endocrine systems in the onset of postpartum psychosis, the specific aetiological factors

  4. Substance use in adolescence and psychosis: clarifying the relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkus, Emma; Murray, Robin M

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of exploration of the self, and this exploration may involve the use of alcohol and drugs. Sadly, for some, adolescence also marks the first signs of a psychosis. The temporal proximity between the onset of substance use and of psychosis has been the cause of much debate. Here we review the association of alcohol, cannabis, stimulants, and other drugs with psychosis, and we conclude that the use of cannabis and the amphetamines significantly contributes to the risk of psychosis.

  5. Reducing the duration of untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, Ingrid; Larsen, Tor K; Haahr, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    Most studies on first-episode psychosis show an association between a long duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and poorer short-term outcome, but the mechanisms of this relationship are poorly understood.......Most studies on first-episode psychosis show an association between a long duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and poorer short-term outcome, but the mechanisms of this relationship are poorly understood....

  6. Hyperthyroidism–cause of depression and psychosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Marian, G; Nica, AE; Ionescu, BE; Ghinea, D

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms have been reported quite frequently in certain thyroid diseases, but more frequently in association with hypothyroidism. Thyrotoxicosis can be associated with various psychiatric symptoms, such as emotional lability, anxiety, restlessness and rarely frank psychosis. Psychotic symptoms in the context of hyperthyroidism typically present as an affective psychosis. The link between psychosis and hyperthyroidism is poorly understood. Because of this association of psychiatric...

  7. The Neurobiology of Methamphetamine Induced Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hsin-Wen Hsieh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic methamphetamine abuse commonly leads to psychosis, with positive and cognitive symptoms that are similar to those of schizophrenia. Methamphetamine induced psychosis (MAP can persist and diagnoses of MAP often change to a diagnosis of schizophrenia over time. Studies in schizophrenia have found much evidence of cortical GABAergic dysfunction. Methamphetamine psychosis is a well studied model for schizophrenia, however there is little research on the effects of methamphetamine on cortical GABAergic function in the model, and the neurobiology of MAP is unknown. This paper reviews the effects of methamphetamine on dopaminergic pathways, with focus on its ability to increase glutamate release in the cortex. Excess cortical glutamate would likely damage GABAergic interneurons, and evidence of this disturbance as a result of methamphetamine treatment will be discussed. We propose that cortical GABAergic interneurons are particularly vulnerable to glutamate overflow as a result of subcellular location of NMDA receptors on interneurons in the cortex. Damage to cortical GABAergic function would lead to dysregulation of cortical signals, resulting in psychosis, and further support methamphetamine induced psychosis as a model for schizophrenia.

  8. Flakka-Induced Prolonged Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Crespi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In South Florida, there has been a highly addictive new synthetic drug flooding the streets for people looking for a cheap high. Alpha-PVP, better known as Flakka, is an illegal substance that sells on the streets for as little as $5 a hit and delivers an instant high that can last from hours to days with lingering effects for weeks after it has been ingested. Although people use Flakka for its potential euphoric high, symptoms are known to easily escalate into frightening delusions, paranoid psychosis, extreme agitation, and a multitude of other altered mental states. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Florida appears to be the nation’s hot spot for reports of Flakka. In this case report, a 17-year-old female with no prior psychiatric diagnosis presents to the hospital under a 72-hour involuntary placement for altered mental status with agitation and psychotic behaviors. After multiple days of symptomatic treatment with benzodiazepines and antipsychotics, the patient became coherent enough to give a history of a “friend” putting Flakka in her food at school as a joke. Although she continues to have residual symptoms including psychomotor agitation and slowing of cognition, she was alert, oriented, and able to be discharged home with proper follow-up.

  9. Social, familial and psychological risk factors for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevlin, Mark; McElroy, Eoin; Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    psychosis and a broad range of familial (advanced paternal age, family dissolution, parental psychosis), environmental (urbanicity,deprivation) and psychological factors (childhood adversity). Findings indicated that all types of risk factors were significantly associated with psychosis. In conclusion......, large scale cohort studies using the Danish registry system is a powerful way of assessing the relative impact ofdifferent risk factors for psychosis.......A broad range of biological, genetic, environmental, and psychological riskfactors for psychosis have been reported. However most research studies have tended to focus on one explanatory factor. The aim of this study wasto use data from a large Danish birth cohort to examine the associationsbetween...

  10. [Managing aggression and violence associated with psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallikainen, Tero; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila

    2015-01-01

    Risk for violence in psychosis is associated with the subject's history of early-onset antisocial behavior, substance abuse, suicidal ideation, lack of insight, and non-adherence to antipsychotic medication. These risk factors can be managed by effective treatment for psychosis, with the exception of predatory antisocial aggression. Generally, this group of patients is at considerable risk for untreated conditions. There is, however, no pharmacological treatment indicated solely for aggression. Physical violence can often be avoided by alertness and risk monitoring, and by attentive customer service skills. Safety at work is our shared responsibility.

  11. Does duration of untreated psychosis bias study samples of first-episode psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, S; Melle, I; Larsen, T K

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While findings are contradictory, many studies report that long Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) correlates with poorer outcome in first episode psychosis. In an outcome study of first-episode psychosis, we compared the patients who refused to participate in a follow-along with th......OBJECTIVE: While findings are contradictory, many studies report that long Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) correlates with poorer outcome in first episode psychosis. In an outcome study of first-episode psychosis, we compared the patients who refused to participate in a follow......-along with those who consented to estimate the importance of this factor in sample recruitment bias. Our questions were: (i) What is the percentage of refusers? (ii) Are there systematic differences between refusers and consenters on DUP and/or other admission variables? (iii) What is the risk of refusal...... for different values of DUP? METHOD: In an unselected group of consecutively admitted patients we compared follow-along refusers and consenters on the following admission variables: sex, age, diagnostic group, substance abuse, being in-patient, coming from an early detection site and DUP. We conducted...

  12. Predictors of recovery in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen F; Mors, Ole; Secher, Rikke Gry

    2013-01-01

    Recovery, the optimal goal in treatment, is the attainment of both symptomatic and functional remission over a sustained period of time. Identification of factors that promote recovery can help develop interventions that facilitate good outcomes for people with first episode psychosis....

  13. Childhood and later life stressors and psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie J. Roper

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of psychosis consists of a complex integration of several risk factors including genetic vulnerability, adverse life events and trauma, and substance use. This review discusses the current theories of the genesis of psychosis, with an emphasis on the importance of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs and later life events. ACEs in particular have a profound impact on an individual’s health later in life; and specifically, those who have experienced ACEs are at an increased risk for psychosis. In addition, stressful life events later in life may be relevant for onset and relapse of psychotic episodes. Associations between types of life adversity and specific symptomatology of a psychotic episode have also been suggested. A multi-factorial approach is suggested for linking genetic and environmental contributors to the onset of psychosis. This approach may have an advantage over a purely bio-medical model by focusing less on disability and more on underlying contributors that may be responsive to intervention.

  14. If psychosis were cancer: a speculative comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Zoë; Newton, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Recently, health policy in the UK has begun to engage with the concept of ‘parity of esteem’ between physical and mental healthcare. This has led one recent initiative to improve service provision for first episode psychosis, which aims to bring it into line with some of the principles underpinning good practice in cancer care. In this paper, we consider some of the metaphorical consequences of likening psychosis to cancer. While we find the comparison unhelpful for clinical purposes, we argue that it can be a helpful lens through which to examine service provision for psychosis in young people. Through this lens, specialist community-based services would appear to compare reasonably well. Inpatient care for young people with psychosis, on the other hand, suffers very badly by comparison with inpatient facilities for teenage cancer care. We note some of the many positive features of inpatient cancer care for young adults, and—drawing upon previous research on inpatient psychiatric care—observe that many of these are usually absent from mental health facilities. We conclude that this metaphor may be a helpful rhetorical device for communicating the lack of ‘parity of esteem’ between mental and physical healthcare. This inequity must be made visible in health policy, in commissioning, and in service provision. PMID:28559369

  15. The traumagenic neurodevelopmental model of psychosis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, John; Fosse, Roar; Moskowitz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    of this paper, therefore, is to summarize the literature on biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis published since 2001. A comprehensive search for relevant papers was undertaken via Medline, PubMed and psycINFO. In total, 125 papers were identified...

  16. Person-environmental interactions in psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pos, K.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis’ first aim was to evaluate various potential pathways to development- and course of psychotic symptoms and disorders. The data used concerned part of the Dutch national Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (GROUP) study. In particular research questions addressed processes related to

  17. 38 CFR 3.384 - Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....384 Psychosis. For purposes of this part, the term “psychosis” means any of the following disorders listed in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM-IV-TR): (a) Brief Psychotic Disorder; (b) Delusional Disorder; (c...

  18. Cannabis and psychosis: what is the link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Amar, Mohamed; Potvin, Stéphane

    2007-06-01

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that cannabis consumption is a risk factor for the development of psychotic symptoms. Nonetheless, controversy remains about the causal nature of the association. This review takes the debate further through a critical appraisal of the evidence. An electronic search was performed, allowing to identify 622 studies published until June 1st 2005. Longitudinal studies and literature reviews were selected if they addressed specifically the issues of the cannabis/psychosis relationship or possible mechanisms involved. Ten epidemiological studies were relevant: three supported a causal relationship between cannabis use and diagnosed psychosis; five suggested that chronic cannabis intake increases the frequency of psychotic symptoms, but not of diagnosed psychosis; and two showed no causal relationship. Potential neurobiological mechanisms were also identified, involving dopamine, endocannabinoids, and brain growth factors. Although there is evidence that cannabis use increases the risk of developing psychotic symptoms, the causal nature of this association remains unclear. Contributing factors include heavy consumption, length and early age of exposure, and psychotic vulnerability. This conclusion should be mitigated by uncertainty arising from cannabis use assessment, psychosis measurement, reverse causality and control of residual confounding.

  19. [Schizophrenia and psychosis on the internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, Beate; Seyringer, Michaela-Elena; Berger, Peter; Katschnig, Heinz; Amering, Michaela

    2006-09-01

    The internet is an increasingly important source of information for patients concerning their illness. This has to be borne in mind concerning its growing influence on communications between patients and clinicians. The aim of this study is to assess the quality of German-language information on schizophrenia on the internet. Two searches of the terms schizophrenia and psychosis were conducted, using the Google search engine set to produce only German hits. The quality of the first hundred resulting sites was assessed according to a range of criteria, including diagnosis and therapy, links and interactive offers. Evidence-based medical information was provided by more than half of the sites resulting from the search term schizophrenia and by less than one third of psychosis hits. Information and discussion on the relationship between drugs and psychosis appeared almost exclusively under the term psychosis. It is suggested that mental health care professionals can use knowledge on what sort of information their patients are confronted with on the internet in order to assist them in profiting from this source of information.

  20. Depressive symptoms in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sönmez, Nasrettin; Røssberg, Jan Ivar; Evensen, Julie

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The present study examined if any patient characteristics at baseline predicted depressive symptoms at 10 years and whether patients prone to depressive symptoms in the first year of treatment had a different prognosis in the following years. METHOD: A total of 299 first-episode psychosis...

  1. Antipsychotic interventions in prodromal psychosis: safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Demjaha, Arsime

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, psychopharmacological intervention in prodromal psychosis, also known as the ultra-high risk (UHR) mental state for psychosis, has attracted much attention. Whilst it has been shown that antipsychotic use in UHR individuals may be effective in potentially delaying or even averting progression to frank psychosis, their use in subjects that do not necessarily convert to psychosis has raised considerable ethical concerns because of their adverse effects. Recent treatment guidelines for patients at UHR for psychosis recommend the use of antipsychotics only in exceptional conditions and with great precautions. To date only a few studies have investigated the use of antipsychotic medications in UHR patients and the potential benefits and risks related to their use in prodromal psychosis remain unclear. We review here all published studies that included UHR patients treated with antipsychotics, regardless of study design. These studies were all of second-generation antipsychotics, given that first-generation antipsychotics cannot be recommended because of their adverse drug reactions. We specifically examine the available descriptions of adverse reactions of the individual antipsychotic medication in each study and discuss the potential effects of various demographic and clinical factors that may impact on safety issues of pharmacological interventions in UHR patients. Clinical trials to date investigating potential benefits of antipsychotic treatments in preventing transition to psychosis were of relatively short duration and have involved a small number of patients. Whilst it appears that pharmacological intervention at this stage may be effective in both reducing the psychopathology and decreasing transition rates, and is potentially safe, in the absence of sufficient evidence-based knowledge to guide treatment, definitive clinical recommendations and guidelines cannot be derived. Certain adverse events take time to develop, such as metabolic syndrome

  2. Gene-environment interplay in the etiology of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Alyson; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Uher, Rudolf

    2018-01-15

    Schizophrenia and other types of psychosis incur suffering, high health care costs and loss of human potential, due to the combination of early onset and poor response to treatment. Our ability to prevent or cure psychosis depends on knowledge of causal mechanisms. Molecular genetic studies show that thousands of common and rare variants contribute to the genetic risk for psychosis. Epidemiological studies have identified many environmental factors associated with increased risk of psychosis. However, no single genetic or environmental factor is sufficient to cause psychosis on its own. The risk of developing psychosis increases with the accumulation of many genetic risk variants and exposures to multiple adverse environmental factors. Additionally, the impact of environmental exposures likely depends on genetic factors, through gene-environment interactions. Only a few specific gene-environment combinations that lead to increased risk of psychosis have been identified to date. An example of replicable gene-environment interaction is a common polymorphism in the AKT1 gene that makes its carriers sensitive to developing psychosis with regular cannabis use. A synthesis of results from twin studies, molecular genetics, and epidemiological research outlines the many genetic and environmental factors contributing to psychosis. The interplay between these factors needs to be considered to draw a complete picture of etiology. To reach a more complete explanation of psychosis that can inform preventive strategies, future research should focus on longitudinal assessments of multiple environmental exposures within large, genotyped cohorts beginning early in life.

  3. Improvement of cycloid psychosis following electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jonas; Brus, Ole; Båve, Ullvi; Landen, Mikael; Lundberg, Johan; Nordanskog, Pia; von Knorring, Lars; Nordenskjöld, Axel

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of choice for cycloid psychosis has traditionally been electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), but there is a lack of studies on its effectiveness. The primary aim of this register study was to determine the rates of remission and response after ECT for cycloid psychosis. The secondary aim was to examine possible predictors of outcome. Data were obtained from the National Quality Register for ECT in Sweden. The study population was patients (n = 42) who received ECT for acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia or for cycloid psychosis between 2011-2015 in 13 hospitals. Remission and response rates were calculated using Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement scores, respectively. Variables with possible predictive value were tested using Chi-square and Fisher's exact test. The response rate was 90.5%. The remission rate was 45.2%. Of 42 patients, 40 improved their CGI-S score after ECT (p < 0.001). The mean number of ECT treatments was 2.5 for non-responders and 7.0 for responders (p = 0.010). The mean number of ECT treatments did not differ significantly between remitters and non-remitters (7.2 vs 6.1, p = 0.31). None of the other investigated potential predictors was statistically significantly associated with outcome. ECT is an effective treatment for cycloid psychosis. Future studies need to compare the outcome of ECT to that of other treatment strategies. The high response rate with ECT indicates that cycloid psychosis is a clinically useful diagnosis.

  4. Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis with Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AND TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION, DEMENTIA, AND PSYCHOSIS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common in people with Parkinson disease. These conditions can affect how people with ...

  5. Explanatory models of psychosis amongst British South Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhikha, Aqeela; Farooq, Saeed; Chaudhry, Nasim; Naeem, Farooq; Husain, Nusrat

    2015-08-01

    A strong interest in the understanding, exploring, and extracting explanatory models of psychosis has recently arisen. Explanatory models (EMs) offer justifications and propose explanations when coping with and treating illnesses. Therefore, they may be important predictors of clinical outcome. Explanatory models of psychosis have been explored in many non-Western countries. However, very little research has examined EMs of psychosis in the UK. We therefore, aimed to elicit and describe explanatory models of psychosis amongst British South Asians, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. EMs of psychosis were examined using the Short Explanatory Model Interview (SEMI) in a cross-sectional sample of 45 patients. Most patients (55.5%) attributed their illness to supernatural causes. Few patients cited a biological (4.4%) cause. Majority of patients held dual EMs of psychosis (77.7%), combining prescribed medication and seeing a traditional healer as a treatment method. Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) was not significantly associated with EMs of psychosis. The results suggest that patients hold multi-explanatory models in order to make sense of their illness and these stem from deep rooted traditional beliefs. This highlights the importance of educational intervention, culturally adapted psychological interventions and possibly working together with traditional healers in the UK to provide a positive support system. Further work is required in order to fully understand the relationship between EMs of psychosis and DUP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathways from cannabis to psychosis: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K Burns

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The nature of the relationship between cannabis use and psychosis is complex and remains unclear. Researchers and clinicians remain divided regarding key issues such as whether or not cannabis is an independent cause of psychosis and schizophrenia. This paper reviews the field in detail, examining questions of causality, the neurobiological basis for such causality and for differential inter-individual risk, the clinical and cognitive features of psychosis in cannabis users, and patterns of course and outcome of psychosis in the context of cannabis use. The author proposes two major pathways from cannabis to psychosis based on a differentiation between early-initiated lifelong cannabis use and a scenario where vulnerable individuals without a lifelong pattern of use consume cannabis over a relatively brief period of time just prior to psychosis onset. Additional key factors determining the clinical and neurobiological manifestation of psychosis as well as course and outcome in cannabis users include: underlying genetic and developmental vulnerability to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders; and whether or not cannabis use ceases or continues after the onset of psychosis. Finally, methodological guidelines are presented for future research aimed at both elucidating the pathways that lead from cannabis to psychosis and clarifying the long-term outcome of the disorder in those who have a history of using cannabis.

  7. Recent life events and psychosis: The role of childhood adversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansueto, Giovanni; Faravelli, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    Life events are commonly reported to be related to psychosis. However, less attention has been given to the role that recent events play on psychosis, in relation to exposure to childhood adversity. The current study aimed to evaluate the relationship between recent events and psychosis, taking into account the role of early adversities. 78 psychotic patients and 156 controls were enrolled. Childhood adversity was evaluated using a validated semi-structured interview and the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Recent events were recorded using a semi-structured interview with a normative and contextual approach. The diagnosis of psychosis was made according to Jablenski's criteria. Chi-square, t-test, odds ratio, and binary logistic regression statistical analyses were performed. Psychotic patients reported an excess of recent events. The occurrence of more than one recent event increased the risk of psychosis; there was a cumulative effect between recent and childhood events on psychosis. Recent events were significantly related to psychosis, even in the absence of childhood adversity or when adjusted for it. Our findings suggested that the effect of recent events on psychosis may be amplified by previous exposure to early adversity. Recent events alone, could be also linked to psychosis independently of childhood adversity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Association Between Cannabis and Psychosis: Epidemiologic Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Suzanne H; Hickman, Matthew; Zammit, Stanley

    2016-04-01

    Associations between cannabis use and psychotic outcomes are consistently reported, but establishing causality from observational designs can be problematic. We review the evidence from longitudinal studies that have examined this relationship and discuss the epidemiologic evidence for and against interpreting the findings as causal. We also review the evidence identifying groups at particularly high risk of developing psychosis from using cannabis. Overall, evidence from epidemiologic studies provides strong enough evidence to warrant a public health message that cannabis use can increase the risk of psychotic disorders. However, further studies are required to determine the magnitude of this effect, to determine the effect of different strains of cannabis on risk, and to identify high-risk groups particularly susceptible to the effects of cannabis on psychosis. We also discuss complementary epidemiologic methods that can help address these questions. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute psychosis as a presentation of hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Shruti; Dhanwal, Dinesh Kumar; Kumar, Shishir; Bharti, Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Acute onset neuropsychiatric manifestations in hypopituitarism are uncommon. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who was a follow-up case of macroprolactinoma with hypopituitarism for the last 9 years. He was on medical treatment with cabergoline, thyroxine and depot testosterone. During the last 2 years he was non-adherent to medications especially cabergoline. He was hospitalised for 2 days through emergency services following acute onset psychosis. His pituitary hormone profile was suggestive of adrenal insufficiency, secondary hypothyroidism and hypogonadism. MRI of the hypothalamic pituitary region revealed a pituitary macroadenoma which was larger in size compared to the previous scan. Further, this lesion was compressing on the adjoining structures including optic chiasma. The patient was treated with intravenous fluids, hydrocortisone and thyroxine replacement therapy. With this treatment he completely recovered from psychosis within 48 h. PMID:23853186

  10. Biomarkers of suicide risk in psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carlborg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Suicide and attempted suicide are major health problems. Approximately 1400 people die from suicide every year in Sweden and ten times more attempt suicide. Patients with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis have an increased risk of suicide and suicide rates have been suggested to be as high as 10%. Important risk factors include a prior suicide attempt and depressive disorder. Low concentrations of monoamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been related to suicida...

  11. Insight in psychosis: Metacognitive processes and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    de Vos, Annerieke

    2016-01-01

    Insight is impaired in 50- 80% of the patients with schizophrenia. Annerieke de Vos working at GGZ Drenthe and the University Medical Hospital Groningen, aimed to elucidate which processes underlie impaired insight and tried to improve insight in patients by targeting these processes. On September 21st she will defend her thesis entitled: "Insight in psychosis. Metacognitive processes and treatment.". Patients with impaired insight may fail to recognize that things in life are not going well ...

  12. Sensory deprivation leading to late onset psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnajeet Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory deprivation is understood as diminution or absence of perceptual experiences to the usual external stimuli. Sensory deprivation in elderly is reported to be associated with depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, etc. In this report, we present the case of an 84-year- elderly man who developed auditory hallucination and after 1 year of onset of hearing difficulties. He was managed with quetiapine, with which he showed significant improvement.

  13. Theory of mind in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Robyn; Still, Megan; Connors, Michael H; Ward, Philip B; Catts, Stanley V

    2014-08-01

    A deficit in theory of mind--the ability to infer and reason about the mental states of others - might underpin the poor social functioning of patients with psychosis. Unfortunately, however, there is considerable variation in how such a deficit is assessed. The current study compared three classic tests of theory of mind in terms of their ability to detect impairment in patients in the early stages of psychosis. Twenty-three patients within 2 years of their first psychotic episode and 19 healthy controls received picture-sequencing, joke-appreciation and story-comprehension tests of theory of mind. Whereas the picture-sequencing and joke-appreciation tests successfully detected a selective theory-of-mind deficit in patients, the story-comprehension test did not. The findings suggest that tests that place minimal demands on language processing and involve indirect, rather than explicit, instructions to assess theory of mind might be best suited to detecting theory-of-mind impairment in early stages of psychosis. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Developmental mechanisms in the prodrome to psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elaine F.; Trotman, Hanan D.; Goulding, Sandra M.; Holtzman, Carrie W.; Ryan, Arthur T.; McDonald, Allison; Shapiro, Daniel I.; Brasfield, Joy L.

    2014-01-01

    Psychotic disorders continue to be among the most disabling and scientifically challenging of all mental illnesses. Accumulating research findings suggest that the etiologic processes underlying the development of these disorders are more complex than had previously been assumed. At the same time, this complexity has revealed a wider range of potential options for preventive intervention, both psychosocial and biological. In part, these opportunities result from our increased understanding of the dynamic and multifaceted nature of the neurodevelopmental mechanisms involved in the disease process, as well as the evidence that many of these entail processes that are malleable. In this article, we review the burgeoning research literature on the prodrome to psychosis, based on studies of individuals who meet clinical high risk criteria. This literature has examined a range of factors, including cognitive, genetic, psychosocial, and neurobiological. We then turn to a discussion of some contemporary models of the etiology of psychosis that emphasize the prodromal period. These models encompass the origins of vulnerability in fetal development, as well as postnatal stress, the immune response, and neuromaturational processes in adolescent brain development that appear to go awry during the prodrome to psychosis. Then, informed by these neurodevelopmental models of etiology, we turn to the application of new research paradigms that will address critical issues in future investigations. It is expected that these studies will play a major role in setting the stage for clinical trials aimed at preventive intervention. PMID:24342857

  15. Psychosis in parkinsonism: an unorthodox approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofrj M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Marco Onofrj,1,2 Danilo Carrozzino,3,4 Aurelio D’Amico,1,2 Roberta Di Giacomo,1,2 Stefano Delli Pizzi,1 Astrid Thomas,1,2 Valeria Onofrj,5 John-Paul Taylor,6 Laura Bonanni1,2 1Department of Neuroscience Imaging and Clinical Sciences, University “G. d’Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara, 2CE.S.I. University Foundation, 3Department of Psychological, Health, and Territorial Sciences, University “G. d’Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy; 4Psychiatric Research Unit, Psychiatric Centre North Zealand, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark; 5Department of Bioimaging, University Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; 6Institute of Neuroscience, Campus for Ageing and Vitality Newcastle University Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Abstract: Psychosis in Parkinson’s disease (PD is currently considered as the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions. The historical meaning of the term psychosis was, however, broader, encompassing a disorganization of both consciousness and personality, including behavior abnormalities, such as impulsive overactivity and catatonia, in complete definitions by the International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10 and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. Our review is aimed at reminding that complex psychotic symptoms, including impulsive overactivity and somatoform disorders (the last being a recent controversial entity in PD, were carefully described in postencephalitic parkinsonism (PEP, many decades before dopaminergic treatment era, and are now described in other parkinsonisms than PD. Eminent neuropsychiatrists of the past century speculated that studying psychosis in PEP might highlight its mechanisms in other conditions. Yet, functional assessments were unavailable at the time. Therefore, the second part of our article reviews the studies of neural correlates of psychosis in parkinsonisms, by taking into account both theories on

  16. Measuring quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melle, I; Friis, Svein; Haahr, U

    2005-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) measures are increasingly recognized as necessary parts of outcome assessments in psychosis. The present paper is a comprehensive study of patients with first-episode psychosis where QoL is measured by the commonly used Lehman Quality of Life Interview (L-QoLI). The aim...

  17. Prevalence of autoimmune thyroid dysfunction in postpartum psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergink, Veerle; Kushner, Steven A.; Pop, Victor; Kuijpens, Hans; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P.; Drexhage, Roos C.; Wiersinga, Wilmar; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2011-01-01

    Postpartum psychosis is a life-threatening psychiatric emergency, which often occurs without significant premorbid symptoms. Although many studies have postulated an involvement of the immune and endocrine systems in the onset of postpartum psychosis, the specific aetiological factors have remained

  18. A Clinical Report of Psychosis Associated with Hyperthyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Asagami, Yoshifumi

    1996-01-01

    A case of hyperthyroidism associated with psychosis of a 49-year-old housewife was reported. A pararell relationship between the hyperthyroidism and the associated psychotic symptoms was observed. The psychotic symptoms was improved by treatment of hyperthyroidism and by administration of psychotonica. It might be noted that the patient in the present report has a predisposition to psychosis.

  19. Intrinsic motivation and amotivation in first episode and prolonged psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Lauren; Lysaker, Paul H; Firmin, Ruth L; Breier, Alan; Vohs, Jenifer L

    2015-12-01

    The deleterious functional implications of motivation deficits in psychosis have generated interest in examining dimensions of the construct. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding whether dimensions of motivation differ over the course of psychosis. Therefore, this study examined two motivation dimensions, trait-like intrinsic motivation, and the negative symptom of amotivation, and tested the impact of illness phase on the 1) levels of these dimensions and 2) relationship between these dimensions. Participants with first episode psychosis (FEP; n=40) and prolonged psychosis (n=66) completed clinician-rated measures of intrinsic motivation and amotivation. Analyses revealed that when controlling for group differences in gender and education, the FEP group had significantly more intrinsic motivation and lower amotivation than the prolonged psychosis group. Moreover, intrinsic motivation was negatively correlated with amotivation in both FEP and prolonged psychosis, but the magnitude of the relationship did not statistically differ between groups. These findings suggest that motivation deficits are more severe later in the course of psychosis and that low intrinsic motivation may be partially independent of amotivation in both first episode and prolonged psychosis. Clinically, these results highlight the importance of targeting motivation in early intervention services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased language lateralization is characteristic of psychosis, not auditory hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, Kelly M. J.; De Weijer, Antoin D.; Daalman, Kirstin; Blom, Jan Dirk; Neggers, Sebastiaan F. W.; Kahn, Rene S.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Decreased language lateralization is a well-replicated finding in psychotic patients. It is currently unclear, however, whether this abnormality is related to a particular symptom of psychosis or to psychosis in general. It has been argued that decreased language lateralization may be related to

  1. The key to reducing duration of untreated first psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Auestad, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    The TIPS early intervention program reduced the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) in first-episode schizophrenia from 16 to 5 weeks in a health care sector using a combination of easy access detection teams (DTs) and a massive information campaign (IC) about the signs and symptoms of psychosis...

  2. Learning to trust: trust and attachment in early psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fett, A.J.; Shergill, S.; Korver-Nieberg, N.; Yakub, F.; Gromann, P.; Krabbendam, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Distrust and social dysfunction are characteristic in psychosis and may arise from attachment insecurity, which is elevated in the disorder. The relationship between trust and attachment in the early stages of psychosis is unknown, yet could help to understand interpersonal difficulties

  3. Glucocorticosteroids Associated With a Decreased Risk of Psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Wijnand; Smeets, Hugo; de Wit, Niek J.; Kahn, Rene S.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Burger, Huibert

    The hypothesis that chronic inflammation may play a role in psychosis receives increasing attention. In this study, we aim to investigate whether the use of steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with a decreased risk of psychosis. A longitudinal nested case-control study was performed

  4. Cannabis and psychosis: have we found the missing links?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Preeti; Basu, Debasish

    2013-08-01

    The association between cannabis and psychosis has long been a matter of debate, with cannabis widely perceived as a harmless recreational drug. Electronic bibliographic databases like PubMed and Google Scholar were searched using the format "(psychosis or schizophrenia or synonyms) and (cannabis or synonyms)". Cross-linked searches were made taking the lead from key articles. Recent articles and those exploring the genetic factors or gene-environment interaction between cannabis use and psychosis were focussed upon. Heavy cannabis use at a n young age, in association with genetic liability to psychosis and exposure to environmental stressors like childhood trauma and urban upbringing increases the risk of psychotic outcome in later life. Cannabis acts as a component cause of psychosis, that is, it increases the risk of psychosis in people with certain genetic or environmental vulnerabilities, though by itself, it is neither a sufficient nor a necessary cause of psychosis. Although significant progress has been made over the last few years, we are yet to find all the missing links. Further work is necessary to identify all the factors that underlie individual vulnerability to cannabis-related psychosis and to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying this risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SCHIZO-AFFECTIVE PSYCHOSIS : IS IT AN ENTITY?

    OpenAIRE

    Raju, S.S.; Mani, Annie J.

    1982-01-01

    SUMMARY The nature of schizo-affective psychos is remains elusive even nearly 5 decades after its recognition. A brief review of the controversies in the nosological status of schizo-affective psychosis is presented and the observations made by the authors in 9 cases of schizo-effective psychosis are discussed.

  6. Economic aspects of peer support groups for psychosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stant, A.D.; Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; Busschbach, J.T.; van der Gaag, M.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer support groups are rarely available for patients with psychosis, despite potential clinical and economic advantages of such groups. In this study, 106 patients with psychosis were randomly allocated to minimally guided peer support in addition to care as usual (CAU), or CAU only. No relevant

  7. The Aberrant Salience Inventory: A New Measure of Psychosis Proneness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, David C.; Kerns, John G.; McCarthy, Denis M.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant salience is the unusual or incorrect assignment of salience, significance, or importance to otherwise innocuous stimuli and has been hypothesized to be important for psychosis and psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Despite the importance of this concept in psychosis research, no questionnaire measures are available to assess…

  8. Premorbid adjustment in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Friis, Svein; Haahr, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge about premorbid development in psychosis can shed light upon theories about aetiology and schizophrenic heterogeneity, and form a basis for early detection initiatives.......Knowledge about premorbid development in psychosis can shed light upon theories about aetiology and schizophrenic heterogeneity, and form a basis for early detection initiatives....

  9. Social capital, pathway to care and duration of untreated psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Socio-environmental factors are associated with an increased incidence of psychosis and may affect the pathway to care in first-episode psychosis (FEP). Objective. To determine the relationship between individual- and neighbourhood-level socio-environmental factors (household income and rated measures ...

  10. Psychosis screening practices in schools: A survey of school-based mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Emily R; Chokran, Cole; Rodenhiser-Hill, Janine; Seidman, Larry J; Woodberry, Kristen A

    2018-05-04

    Many school districts in the United States employ mental health professionals to provide assessment, counselling and crisis interventions within the school setting; however, little is known about actual clinical practices of psychosis screening in schools. The aim of the present study is to examine attitudes and practices regarding psychosis screening among school mental health providers in metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts. School-based mental health clinicians (N = 100) completed an anonymous survey assessing familiarity, screening, and involvement with psychosis and psychosis risk prior to attending trainings on psychosis. Providers reported screening for psychosis less often than other mental health problems and rated themselves as less confident treating psychosis relative to other mental health concerns. Frequency of screening for psychosis was significantly associated with familiarity with psychosis assessment and case management, confidence providing treatment for individuals experiencing psychosis, and the number of students with or at risk for psychosis with whom providers had been involved. Frequency of screening for psychosis was not associated with years of practice, suggesting that both novice and experienced school-based providers may benefit from training on this issue. Community outreach via school-based provider training on assessment and management of psychosis may help to increase providers' understanding of psychosis and increase the practice of verbal or written screening for psychosis and psychosis risk within schools. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. 78 FR 28140 - Tentative Eligibility Determinations; Presumptive Eligibility for Psychosis and Other Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ...; Presumptive Eligibility for Psychosis and Other Mental Illness AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION... time periods and for Persian Gulf War veterans who developed a mental illness other than psychosis... veterans, 38 CFR 17.37, to include veterans with psychosis or mental illness other than psychosis. We are...

  12. Risk of psychosis and internal migration: Results from the Bologna First Episode Psychosis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarricone, Ilaria; Boydell, Jane; Kokona, Arnisa; Triolo, Federico; Gamberini, Lisa; Sutti, Enrico; Marchetta, Michela; Menchetti, Marco; Di Forti, Marta; Murray, Robin M; Morgan, Craig; Berardi, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    Incidence of psychotic disorders is higher in many migrant groups; however little is known about internal migrants (IM). This study aims to describe the IR in natives (NA), IM and external migrants (EM). All patients aged 18-64years, with First Episode Psychosis (FEP), who made contact with the Bologna West psychiatric services, between 2002 and 2010, were included. 187 cases were included. Age and sex adjusted IR of psychosis per 100,000per year were: 12.6 for NA, 25.3 for IM and 21.4 for EM. The IRR was 1.93 (1.19-3.13, P=0.007) for IM and 1.79 (1.06-3.02, P=0.03) for EM compared to NA. Rates of psychosis were significantly elevated in IM as well as in EM. This result adds evidence as to the role of migration itself (versus ethnicity) on the risk of psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Duration of Untreated Psychosis Is Associated with More Negative Schizophrenia Symptoms after Acute Treatment for First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Niklas; Lindsberg, Jenni; Karjalainen, Marjaana; Gronroos, Peter; Blomberg, Ari-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Evidence of association between duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and negative symptoms of schizophrenia in first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients is inconsistent in the recent literature. In the present study, DUP, schizophrenia symptoms, duration of medication, and diagnosis were obtained from hospital archives in a sample of FEP patients.…

  14. Contributions of experimental psychiatry to research on the psychosis prodrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja eBodatsch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent decades, a paradigmatic change in psychosis research and treatment shifted attention towards the early and particularly the prodromal stages of illness. Despite substantial progress with regard to the neuronal underpinnings of psychosis development, the crucial biological mechanisms leading to manifest illness are yet insufficiently understood. Until today, one significant approach to elucidate the neurobiology of psychosis has been the modeling of psychotic symptoms by psychedelic substances in healthy individuals. These models bear the opportunity to evoke particular neuronal aberrations and the respective psychotic symptoms in a controlled experimental setting. In the present paper, we hypothesize that experimental psychiatry bears unique opportunities in elucidating the biological mechanisms of the prodromal stages of psychosis. Psychosis risk symptoms are attenuated, transient, and often only retrospectively reported. The respective neuronal aberrations are thought being dynamic. The correlation of unstable psychopathology with observed, e. g., neurophysiological disturbances is thus yet largely unclear. In modeling psychosis, the experimental setting allows not only for evoking particular symptoms, but for the concomitant assessment of psychopathology, neurophysiology, and neuropsychology. Herein, the glutamatergic model will be highlighted exemplarily, with special emphasis on its potential contribution to the elucidation of psychosis development. This model of psychosis appears as candidate for modeling the prodrome since it induces psychopathological, neurocognitive and neurofunctional changes that are comparable to clinical features of the prodrome.As exemplarily illustrated by the PCP/NMDA model of psychosis many aspects advocate that prodromal stages might be validly mimicked by psychedelic substances. In summary, experimental psychiatry bears the potential to further elucidate the biological mechanisms of the psychosis

  15. Urinary tract infections in children and adolescents with acute psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Chelsea M; Phillip, Niju; Miller, Brian J

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with increased infections. We previously found an association between urinary tract infection (UTI) and acute psychosis in adults. The aims of this study were to 1) evaluate the prevalence of UTI at the time of admission in children and adolescents with non-affective psychosis and psychotic depression versus those with non-psychotic major depressive disorder, and 2) compare demographic and clinical features between children and adolescents with acute psychosis with and without comorbid UTI. We performed a retrospective chart review of 227 subjects ages 10-18 who were hospitalized between 2005 and 2014 for an acute episode of DSM-IV non-affective psychosis (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, psychosis NOS, or delusional disorder; n=80), major depressive disorder (MDD) with psychotic features (n=47); or MDD without psychotic features (n=100). The prevalence of UTI was 20% in non-affective psychosis, 9% in MDD with psychotic features, and 13% in non-psychotic MDD. After controlling for potential confounders, UTI was 3.5 times more likely in subjects with non-affective psychosis than non-psychotic MDD (OR=3.5, 95% CI 1.3-9.2, p=0.01). Subjects with UTI had a higher prevalence of manic symptoms, but otherwise there were no associations between clinical characteristics and UTI in acute psychosis. We found an association between UTIs and children and adolescents with acute non-affective psychosis. The results highlight the potential importance of screening for comorbid UTI in patients with acute psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Duration of untreated psychosis/illness and brain volume changes in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Charlotte; Canela, Carlos; Studerus, Erich; Walter, Anna; Aston, Jacqueline; Borgwardt, Stefan; Riecher-Rössler, Anita

    2017-09-01

    The time period during which patients manifest psychotic or unspecific symptoms prior to treatment (duration of untreated psychosis, DUP, and the duration of untreated illness, DUI) has been found to be moderately associated with poor clinical and social outcome. Equivocal evidence exists of an association between DUP/DUI and structural brain abnormalities, such as reduced hippocampus volume (HV), pituitary volume (PV) and grey matter volume (GMV). Thus, the goal of the present work was to examine if DUP and DUI are associated with abnormalities in HV, PV and GMV. Using a region of interest (ROI) based approach, we present data of 39 patients from the Basel FePsy (Früherkennung von Psychosen, early detection of psychosis) study for which information about DUP, DUI and HV, PV and GMV data could be obtained. Twenty-three of them were first episode psychosis (FEP) and 16 at-risk mental state (ARMS) patients who later made the transition to frank psychosis. In unadjusted analyses, we found a significant positive correlation between DUP and PV in FEP patients. However, when adjusted for covariates, we found no significant correlation between DUP or DUI and HV, PV or GMV anymore. There only was a trend for decreasing GMV with increasing DUI in FEP. Our results do not comprehensively support the hypothesis of a "toxic" effect of the pathogenic mechanism underlying untreated psychosis on brain structure. If there is any effect, it might rather occur very early in the disease process, during which patients experience only unspecific symptoms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The Psychosis High-Risk State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan; Bechdolf, Andreas; Addington, Jean; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Keshavan, Matcheri; Wood, Stephen; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Seidman, Larry J.; Valmaggia, Lucia; Cannon, Tyrone; Velthorst, Eva; De Haan, Lieuwe; Cornblatt, Barbara; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Birchwood, Max; McGlashan, Thomas; Carpenter, William; McGorry, Patrick; Klosterkötter, Joachim; McGuire, Philip; Yung, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Context During the past 2 decades, a major transition in the clinical characterization of psychotic disorders has occurred. The construct of a clinical high-risk (HR) state for psychosis has evolved to capture the prepsychotic phase, describing people presenting with potentially prodromal symptoms. The importance of this HR state has been increasingly recognized to such an extent that a new syndrome is being considered as a diagnostic category in the DSM-5. Objective To reframe the HR state in a comprehensive state-of-the-art review on the progress that has been made while also recognizing the challenges that remain. Data Sources Available HR research of the past 20 years from PubMed, books, meetings, abstracts, and international conferences. Study Selection and Data Extraction Critical review of HR studies addressing historical development, inclusion criteria, epidemiologic research, transition criteria, outcomes, clinical and functional characteristics, neurocognition, neuroimaging, predictors of psychosis development, treatment trials, socioeconomic aspects, nosography, and future challenges in the field. Data Synthesis Relevant articles retrieved in the literature search were discussed by a large group of leading worldwide experts in the field. The core results are presented after consensus and are summarized in illustrative tables and figures. Conclusions The relatively new field of HR research in psychosis is exciting. It has the potential to shed light on the development of major psychotic disorders and to alter their course. It also provides a rationale for service provision to those in need of help who could not previously access it and the possibility of changing trajectories for those with vulnerability to psychotic illnesses. PMID:23165428

  18. Understanding the social costs of psychosis: the experience of adults affected by psychosis identified within the second Australian National Survey of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stain, Helen J; Galletly, Cherrie A; Clark, Scott; Wilson, Jacqueline; Killen, Emily A; Anthes, Lauren; Campbell, Linda E; Hanlon, Mary-Claire; Harvey, Carol

    2012-09-01

    Social inclusion is a key priority of the Fourth National Mental Health Plan for Australia (2009-2014), with strong evidence for its protective impact on mental health. Social integration has been associated with enhanced well-being for people with mental illnesses such as psychosis. To explore the impact of psychosis on an individual's social and community participation. The second Australian national survey of psychosis was conducted across seven Australian sites. Semi-structured interviews with adults living with psychosis assessed mental health status, social and role functioning, life satisfaction and future goals. The cohort comprised 1825 adults with a psychotic illness (59.6% were male; 42.4% were aged 18-34 years; 31.5% had 12 years or more of education) of whom 32.7% had been employed in the past year. Most adults indicated experiencing loneliness (80.1%) and a need for more friends (48.1%). Men were more likely to have never had a long-term relationship (59.4% M, 33.2% F). Even though women were more likely to experience anxiety in social situations [(χ(2)(1) = 8.95, p social activity in the past year [χ(2)(2) = 11.84, p social activity and 43% described stigma as a barrier. Although 63.2% showed significant impairment in social functioning, only 29.5% had received help for this in the last year. Social isolation and loneliness were rated as major challenges by 37.2% of the cohort. Social isolation and dysfunction experienced by people with psychosis have not decreased since the last Australian national survey of people with psychosis. Alongside education and employment, social functioning and participation must be addressed to improve social inclusion for people with psychosis. Programs targeting social opportunities (befriending, peer support), social anxiety and social functioning for all stages of psychosis are warranted.

  19. Neuropsychology of the Prodrome to Psychosis in the NAPLS Consortium: Relationship to Family History and Conversion to Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Larry J.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Meyer, Eric C.; Addington, Jean; Cadenhead, Kristin S.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Perkins, Diana O.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Walker, Elaine F.; Woods, Scott W.; Bearden, Carrie E.; Christensen, Bruce K.; Hawkins, Keith; Heaton, Robert; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Heinssen, Robert; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Context Early detection and prospective evaluation of clinical high-risk (CHR) individuals who may develop schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders is critical for predicting psychosis onset and for testing preventive interventions. Objective To elucidate the neuropsychology of the CHR syndrome, to determine the association of neuropsychological function with conversion to psychosis and family history (FH) of psychosis, and to examine whether baseline neuropsychological functioning predicts subsequent psychosis. Design, Setting, and Participants Longitudinal study with 2 1/2 years follow-up of 304 prospectively identified CHR individuals meeting Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) criteria, 52 non-CHR persons with a FH of psychosis in first- or second-degree relatives (“family HR”/FHR), and 193 normal controls with neither a FH of psychosis nor a CHR syndrome, all of whom had baseline neuropsychological evaluations, recruited across eight centers as part of the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS). Main Measures A neurocognitive composite score, eight individual neuropsychological measures, an IQ estimate, and HR status. Results Global (“composite”) neuropsychological functioning was comparably impaired in CHR and FHR groups compared to controls, but profiles differed significantly between groups. Neuropsychological functioning in the CHR group was significantly lower in persons who progressed to psychosis than in those who did not, and worst in the subgroup with a FH of psychosis. Tests of processing speed and verbal learning and memory were most sensitive in discriminating CHR from controls, although reductions were less severe than in established schizophrenia. Neuropsychological functioning did not contribute uniquely to the prediction of psychosis beyond clinical criteria, but worse verbal memory predicted more rapid conversion. Conclusion These findings document that CHR individuals have significant neuropsychological

  20. Developments in early intervention for psychosis in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G H Y; Hui, C L M; Wong, D Y; Tang, J Y M; Chang, W C; Chan, S K W; Lee, E H M; Xu, J Q; Lin, J J X; Lai, D C; Tam, W; Kok, J; Chung, D W S; Hung, S F; Chen, E Y H

    2012-09-01

    The year 2011 marked the 10-year milestone of early intervention for psychosis in Hong Kong. Since 2001, the landscape of early psychosis services has changed markedly in Hong Kong. Substantial progress has been made in the areas of early intervention service implementation, knowledge generation, and public awareness promotion. Favourable outcomes attributable to the early intervention service are supported by solid evidence from local clinical research studies; early intervention service users showed improved functioning, ameliorated symptoms, and decreased hospitalisation and suicide rates. Continued development of early intervention in Hong Kong over the decade includes the introduction and maturation of several key platforms, such as the Hospital Authority Early Assessment Service for Young People with Psychosis programme, the Psychosis Studies and Intervention Unit by the University of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Early Psychosis Intervention Society, the Jockey Club Early Psychosis Project, and the postgraduate Psychological Medicine (Psychosis Studies) programme. In this paper, we reviewed some of the major milestones in local service development with reference to features of the Hong Kong mental health system. We describe chronologically the implementation and consolidation of public early intervention services as well as recent progresses in public awareness work that are tied in with knowledge generation and transfer, and outline the prospects for early intervention in the next decade and those that follow.

  1. Forgotten family members: the importance of siblings in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Siann; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Wade, Darryl; McGorry, Patrick; Howie, Linsey

    2014-08-01

    This paper reviews the evidence on the significance of sibling inclusion in family interventions and support during early psychosis. This narrative review presents the current research related to the importance of family work during early psychosis, the needs and developmental significance of siblings during adolescence and early adulthood, the protective effects of sibling relationships, and the characteristics of early psychosis relevant to the sibling experience. It will also review the evidence of the sibling experience in chronic physical illness and disability, as well as long-term psychotic illness. Despite the evidence that working with families is important during early psychosis, siblings have been largely ignored. Siblings are an important reciprocal relationship of long duration. They play an important role in development during adolescence and early adulthood. These relationships may be an underutilized protective factor due to their inherent benefits and social support. Developmental theories imply that early psychosis could negatively impact the sibling relationship and their quality of life, effecting personality development and health outcomes. The evidence shows that adolescent physical illness or disability has a significantly negative impact on the sibling's quality of life and increases the risk for the onset of mental health issues. Long-term psychotic illness also results in negative experiences for siblings. Current evidence shows that siblings in early psychosis experience psychological distress and changes in functional performance. Further research using standard measures is required to understand the impact early psychosis has on the sibling relationship and their quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Internalized stigma in adults with early phase versus prolonged psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Ruth L; Lysaker, Paul H; Luther, Lauren; Yanos, Philip T; Leonhardt, Bethany; Breier, Alan; Vohs, Jenifer L

    2018-03-30

    Although internalized stigma is associated with negative outcomes among those with prolonged psychosis, surprisingly little work has focused on when in the course of one's illness stigma is internalized and the impact of internalization on symptoms or social functioning over the course of the illness. Therefore, this study investigated whether (1) internalized stigma is greater among those later in the course of psychosis and (2) whether internalized stigma has a stronger negative relationship with social functioning or symptoms among those with prolonged compared to early phase psychosis. Individuals with early phase (n = 40) and prolonged psychosis (n = 71) who were receiving outpatient services at an early-intervention clinic and a VA medical center, respectively, completed self-report measures of internalized stigma and interview-rated measures of symptoms and social functioning. Controlling for education, race and sex differences, internalized stigma was significantly greater among those with prolonged psychosis compared to early phase. Internalized stigma was negatively related to social functioning and positively related to symptoms in both groups. Furthermore, the magnitude of the relationship between cognitive symptoms and internalized stigma was significantly greater among those with early phase. Stereotype endorsement, discrimination experiences and social withdrawal also differentially related to symptoms and social functioning across the 2 samples. Findings suggest that internalized stigma is an important variable to incorporate into models of early psychosis. Furthermore, internalized stigma may be a possible treatment target among those with early phase psychosis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years, consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification. No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age.

  4. STRESS AND NEURODEVELOPMENTAL PROCESSES IN THE EMERGENCE OF PSYCHOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, C. W.; Trotman, H. D.; Goulding, S. M.; Ryan, A. T.; Macdonald, A. N.; Shapiro, D. I.; Brasfield, J. L.; Walker, E. F.

    2014-01-01

    The notion that stress plays a role in the etiology of psychotic disorders, especially schizophrenia, is longstanding. However, it is only in recent years that the potential neural mechanisms mediating this effect have come into sharper focus. The introduction of more sophisticated models of the interplay between psychosocial factors and brain function has expanded our opportunities for conceptualizing more detailed psychobiological models of stress in psychosis. Further, scientific advances in our understanding of adolescent brain development have shed light on a pivotal question that has challenged researchers; namely, why the first episode of psychosis typically occurs in late adolescence/young adulthood. In this paper, we begin by reviewing the evidence supporting associations between psychosocial stress and psychosis in diagnosed patients as well as individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis. We then discuss biological stress systems and examine changes that precede and follow psychosis onset. Next, research findings on structural and functional brain characteristics associated with psychosis are presented; these findings suggest that normal adolescent neuromaturational processes may go awry, thereby setting the stage for the emergence of psychotic syndromes. Finally, a model of neural mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of psychosis is presented and directions for future research strategies are explored. PMID:23298853

  5. Fetishistic transvestism in a patient with mental retardation and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayudhan, Rajmohan; Khaleel, Asfia; Sankar, Nideesh; Kumar, Manoj; Kazhungil, Firoz; Raghuram, Thazhe Mangool

    2014-04-01

    Fetishistic transvestism is a disorder of sexual preference associated with fantasies and sexual urges to dress in opposite gender clothing as a means of arousal and as an adjunct to masturbation and coitus. The disorder has been reported in people with learning disabilities. The disorder has been reported in a young male with dull normal intelligence. Transvestism though has been described in schizophrenia and psychosis and fetishism has been described in the course of simple schizophrenia, there are no reports of fetishistic transvestism in a patient with mental retardation and psychosis. A case of fetishistic transvestism in a patient with mental retardation and psychosis with treatment and relevant review of literature is reported.

  6. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Premorbid multivariate prediction of adult psychosis-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Kline, Emily; Jameson, Nicole D.

    2015-01-01

    whose parents had no mental illness, and children with at least one parent with a non-psychotic psychiatric diagnosis). Premorbid neurological factors and an indication of social function, as measured when participants were 10-13years of age, were combined to predict psychosis-spectrum disorders......Premorbid prediction of psychosis-spectrum disorders has implications for both understanding etiology and clinical identification. The current study used a longitudinal high-risk for psychosis design that included children of parents with schizophrenia as well as two groups of controls (children...

  8. Psychosis and the control of lucid dreaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Bezerra Mota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dreaming and psychosis share important features, such as intrinsic senseperceptions independent of external stimulation, and a general lack of criticism that is associated with reduced frontal cerebral activity. Awareness of dreaming while a dream is happening defines lucid dreaming (LD, a state in which the prefrontal cortex is more active than during regular dreaming. For this reason, LD has been proposed to be potentially therapeutic for psychotic patients. According to this view, psychotic patients would be expected to report LD less frequently, and with lower control ability, than healthy subjects. Furthermore, psychotic patients able to experience LD should present milder psychiatric symptoms, in comparison with psychotic patients unable to experience LD. To test these hypotheses, we investigated LD features (occurrence, control abilities, frequency, and affective valence and psychiatric symptoms (measure by PANSS, BPRS and automated speech analysis in 45 subjects with psychotic symptoms (25 with Schizophrenia (S and 20 with Bipolar Disorder (B diagnosis versus 28 non-psychotic control (C subjects. Psychotic lucid dreamers reported control of their dreams more frequently (67% of S and 73% of B than non-psychotic lucid dreamers (only 23% of C; S > C with p=0. 0283, B > C with p=0.0150. Importantly, there was no clinical advantage for lucid dreamers among psychotic patients, even for the diagnostic question specifically related to lack of judgment and insight. Despite some limitations (e.g. transversal design, large variation of medications, these preliminary results support the notion that lucid dreaming is associated with psychosis, but falsify the hypotheses that we set out to test. A possible explanation is that psychosis enhances the experience of internal reality in detriment of external reality, and therefore lucid dreamers with psychotic symptoms would be more able to control their internal reality than non-psychotic lucid dreamers

  9. Psychosis and the Control of Lucid Dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Natália B; Resende, Adara; Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2016-01-01

    Dreaming and psychosis share important features, such as intrinsic sense perceptions independent of external stimulation, and a general lack of criticism that is associated with reduced frontal cerebral activity. Awareness of dreaming while a dream is happening defines lucid dreaming (LD), a state in which the prefrontal cortex is more active than during regular dreaming. For this reason, LD has been proposed to be potentially therapeutic for psychotic patients. According to this view, psychotic patients would be expected to report LD less frequently, and with lower control ability, than healthy subjects. Furthermore, psychotic patients able to experience LD should present milder psychiatric symptoms, in comparison with psychotic patients unable to experience LD. To test these hypotheses, we investigated LD features (occurrence, control abilities, frequency, and affective valence) and psychiatric symptoms (measure by PANSS, BPRS, and automated speech analysis) in 45 subjects with psychotic symptoms [25 with Schizophrenia (S) and 20 with Bipolar Disorder (B) diagnosis] versus 28 non-psychotic control (C) subjects. Psychotic lucid dreamers reported control of their dreams more frequently (67% of S and 73% of B) than non-psychotic lucid dreamers (only 23% of C; S > C with p = 0.0283, B > C with p = 0.0150). Importantly, there was no clinical advantage for lucid dreamers among psychotic patients, even for the diagnostic question specifically related to lack of judgment and insight. Despite some limitations (e.g., transversal design, large variation of medications), these preliminary results support the notion that LD is associated with psychosis, but falsify the hypotheses that we set out to test. A possible explanation is that psychosis enhances the experience of internal reality in detriment of external reality, and therefore lucid dreamers with psychotic symptoms would be more able to control their internal reality than non-psychotic lucid dreamers. Training dream

  10. Exploring the applicability of a network approach to psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our ability to accurately predict development and outcome of early expression of psychosis is limited. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying psychopathology, a broader, transdiagnostic approach that acknowledges the complexity of mental illness is required. The application of the novel

  11. Complete remission of epileptic psychosis after temporal lobectomy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Renato Luiz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient with refractory complex partial seizures since 15 years of age, recurrent postictal psychotic episodes since 35 which evolved to a chronic refractory interictal psychosis and MRI with right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS. After a comprehensive investigation (video-EEG intensive monitoring, interictal and ictal SPECT, and a neuropsychological evaluation including WADA test she was submitted to a right temporal lobectomy. Since then, she has been seizure-free with remission of psychosis, although with some persistence of personality traits (hiperreligiosity, viscosity which had been present before surgery. This case supports the idea that temporal lobectomy can be a safe and effective therapeutic measure for patients with MTS, refractory epilepsy and recurrent postictal epileptic psychosis or interictal epileptic psychosis with postictal exacerbation.

  12. Depression and quality of life in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Renwick, Laoise

    2012-07-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has gained recognition as a valid measure of outcome in first-episode psychosis (FEP). This study aimed to determine the influence of specific groups of depressive symptoms on separate domains of subjectively appraised QOL.

  13. GAD65 Antibodies, Chronic Psychosis, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Yarlagadda, Atmaram; Taylor, Jerome H.; Hampe, Christiane S.; Alfson, Elizabeth; Clayton, Anita H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of gamma aminobutyric acid, an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Autoantibodies to the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 isoform have been associated with chronic psychotic disorders and are found in neurons and pancreatic islets. Blood samples were collected from normal controls (n=16), individuals with chronic psychosis with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=3), and patients with chronic psychosis without diabetes (n=8). No differe...

  14. Glucocorticosteroids Associated With a Decreased Risk of Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Laan, Wijnand; Smeets, Hugo; de Wit, Niek J.; Kahn, Rene S.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Burger, Huibert

    2009-01-01

    The hypothesis that chronic inflammation may play a role in psychosis receives increasing attention. In this study, we aim to investigate whether the use of steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with a decreased risk of psychosis. A longitudinal nested case-control study was performed investigating the association of glucocorticosteroid (GCS) consumption with a new diagnosis of a psychotic disorder. Significantly reduced odds ratios of 0.52 (95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.75) were ...

  15. Prescription Stimulant Use is Associated with Earlier Onset of Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Lauren V.; Masters, Grace A.; Pingali, Samira; Cohen, Bruce M.; Liebson, Elizabeth; Rajarethinam, R.P.; Ongur, Dost

    2015-01-01

    A childhood history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common in psychotic disorders, yet prescription stimulants may interact adversely with the physiology of these disorders. Specifically, exposure to stimulants leads to long-term increases in dopamine release. We therefore hypothesized that individuals with psychotic disorders previously exposed to prescription stimulants will have an earlier onset of psychosis. Age of onset of psychosis (AOP) was compared in individuals...

  16. Dissociative Disorders: Between Neurosis and Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillé, C.; Moeglin, C.; Sentissi, O.

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative disorders are a set of disorders defined by a disturbance affecting functions that are normally integrated with a prevalence of 2.4 percent in industrialised countries. These disorders are often poorly diagnosed or misdiagnosed because of sharing common clinical features with psychotic disorders, but requiring a very different trajectory of care. Repeated clinical situations in a crisis centre in Geneva provided us with a critical overview of current evidence of knowledge in clinical and etiopathological field about dissociative disorders. Because of their multiple expressions and the overlap with psychotic disorders, we focused on the clinical aspects using three different situations to better understand their specificity and to extend our thinking to the relevance of terms “neurosis” and “psychosis.” Finally, we hope that this work might help physicians and psychiatrists to become more aware of this complex set of disorders while making a diagnosis. PMID:25405051

  17. Dissociative Disorders: Between Neurosis and Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Devillé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissociative disorders are a set of disorders defined by a disturbance affecting functions that are normally integrated with a prevalence of 2.4 percent in industrialised countries. These disorders are often poorly diagnosed or misdiagnosed because of sharing common clinical features with psychotic disorders, but requiring a very different trajectory of care. Repeated clinical situations in a crisis centre in Geneva provided us with a critical overview of current evidence of knowledge in clinical and etiopathological field about dissociative disorders. Because of their multiple expressions and the overlap with psychotic disorders, we focused on the clinical aspects using three different situations to better understand their specificity and to extend our thinking to the relevance of terms “neurosis” and “psychosis.” Finally, we hope that this work might help physicians and psychiatrists to become more aware of this complex set of disorders while making a diagnosis.

  18. Schizencephaly and Psychosis: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Carvalho Aguiar Melo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizencephaly is a rare malformation of the central nervous system defined as a gray matter-lined cleft filled with cerebrospinal fluid that extends from the pial surface to the ventricle. Few cases of association with psychosis were reported in the scientific literature. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman, admitted into a psychiatric hospital with crises of psychomotor agitation, disorganized and erotized behavior, persecutory and self-reference delusions, and auditory and visual hallucinations. She also reported seizures since her childhood. A head CT scan revealed a large subarachnoid space communication with the adjacent lateral ventricle in the topography of occipital, temporal, and parietal lobes to the right, suggestive of schizencephaly.

  19. Forced Normalization: Antagonism Between Epilepsy and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Itoh, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    The antagonism between epilepsy and psychosis has been discussed for a long time. Landolt coined the term "forced normalization" in the 1950s to describe psychotic episodes associated with the remission of seizures and disappearance of epileptiform activity on electroencephalograms in individuals with epilepsy. Since then, neurologists and psychiatrists have been intrigued by this phenomenon. However, although collaborative clinical studies and basic experimental researches have been performed, the mechanism of forced normalization remains unknown. In this review article, we present a historical overview of the concept of forced normalization, and discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms and clinical diagnosis. We also discuss the role of dopamine, which appears to be a key factor in the mechanism of forced normalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [The discourse of psychosis in contemporary philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stompe, Thomas; Ritter, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    The preoccupation of philosophy with madness can be traced back till the Greek antiquity. For many philosophers like Descartes psychotic phenomena were symbols for the fragility of human mental powers, while others like Plato or Nietzsche saw madness as a way to escape the constraints of rationality. After 1960 three direction of contemporary philosophy dealt with the topics madness--schizophrenia--psychosis: Following Nietzsche and Bataille, Foucault as well as Deleuze and Guattari considered schizophrenia as the societal oppressed reverse of modern rationality, a notion which had a strong influence on the anti-psychiatric movement. Philosophical phenomenology primarily focussed on ontological problems of the psychotic existence. Finally Philosophy of Mind, the modern Anglo-American version of analytical philosophy, analyzed the logical coherence of psychotic inferences and experiences. Especially the insights of analytical philosophy may be important for a more sophisticated interpretation of psychopathological research as well as of the new findings of neuroscience.

  1. White matter volume changes in people who develop psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterfang, Mark; McGuire, Philip K; Yung, Alison R; Phillips, Lisa J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Wood, Stephen J; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T; Brewer, Warrick; Soulsby, Bridget; Desmond, Patricia; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos

    2008-09-01

    Grey matter changes have been described in individuals who are pre- and peri-psychotic, but it is unclear if these changes are accompanied by changes in white matter structures. To determine whether changes in white matter occur prior to and with the transition to psychosis in individuals who are pre-psychotic who had previously demonstrated grey matter reductions in frontotemporal regions. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine regional white matter volume in 75 people with prodromal symptoms. A subset of the original group (n=21) were rescanned at 12-18 months to determine white matter volume changes. Participants were retrospectively categorised according to whether they had or had not developed psychosis at follow-up. Comparison of the baseline MRI data from these two subgroups revealed that individuals who later developed psychosis had larger volumes of white matter in the frontal lobe, particularly in the left hemisphere. Longitudinal comparison of data in individuals who developed psychosis revealed a reduction in white matter volume in the region of the left fronto-occipital fasciculus. Participants who had not developed psychosis showed no reductions in white matter volume but increases in a region subjacent to the right inferior parietal lobule. The reduction in volume of white matter near the left fronto-occipital fasciculus may reflect a change in this tract in association with the onset of frank psychosis.

  2. [Cannabis use and risk of psychosis, an etiological link?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoux, Hélène; Tournier, Marie

    2004-04-24

    CANNABIS TO TREAT PSYCHOSIS: The nature of the link between cannabis use and psychosis remains to be clarified. Cross-sectional epidemiological studies have shown that individuals with psychosis use cannabis more often than other individuals in the general population. It has long been considered that this association was explained by the self-medication hypothesis, postulating that cannabis is used to self-medicate psychotic symptoms. This hypothesis has been recently challenged. PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS ENHANCED BY CANNABIS: Several prospective studies carried out in population-based samples, showed that cannabis exposure was associated with an increased risk of psychosis. A dose-response relationship was found between cannabis exposure and risk of psychosis, and this association was independent from potential confounding factors such as exposure to other drugs and pre-existence of psychotic symptoms. The brain mechanisms underlying the association have to be elucidated; they may implicate deregulation of cannabinoid and dopaminergic systems. A RISK FACTOR NOT TO BE NEGLECTED: Cannabis exposure may be a risk factor for psychotic disorders by interacting with a pre-existing vulnerability for these disorders. If further studies confirm that cannabis is a risk factor for psychosis, its impact on the population's mental health may not be negligible considering the growing number of adolescents exposed to this substance.

  3. Online social networking in people with psychosis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highton-Williamson, Elizabeth; Priebe, Stefan; Giacco, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    Online social networking might facilitate the establishment of social contacts for people with psychosis, who are often socially isolated by the symptoms and consequences of their disorder. We carried out a systematic review exploring available evidence on the use of online social networking in people with psychosis. The review was conducted following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Included studies examined the use of the online social networking by people with an a priori diagnosis of psychosis (inclusive of bipolar disorder). Data from included studies were extracted and narratively synthesised. A total of 11 studies, published between 2005 and 2013, reported data on online social networking in people with psychosis. People with psychosis seem to spend more time in chat rooms or playing online games than control groups. The use of other online tools, such as Facebook or communication through e-mail, is lower or the same than controls. Online social networking was used by patients with psychosis for establishing new relationships, maintaining relationships/reconnecting with people and online peer support. Online social networking, in the form of forums or online chats, could play a role in strategies aimed at enhancing social networks and reduce the risk of isolation in this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Association between age at onset of psychosis and age at onset of cannabis use in non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Buccollini, Juan A; Proal, Ashley C; Tomaselli, Veronica; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Coconcea, Cristinel; Chun, Jinsoo; Manschreck, Theo; Fleming, Jerry; Delisi, Lynn E

    2012-08-01

    Several studies have associated cannabis use with the development of schizophrenia. However, it has been difficult to disentangle the effects of cannabis from that of other illicit drugs, as previous studies have not evaluated pure cannabis users. To test whether the onset of cannabis use had an effect on the initiation of psychosis, we examined the time relationship between onset of use and onset of psychosis, restricting our analysis to a cohort of individuals who only used cannabis and no other street drugs. Fifty-seven subjects with non-affective psychoses who used cannabis prior to developing a psychosis were interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS). The Family Interview for Genetic Studies (FIGS) was also used to interview a family informant about psychiatric illness in the patient and the entire family. Multiple linear regression techniques were used to estimate the association between variables. After adjusting for potential confounding factors such as sex, age, lifetime diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence, and family history of schizophrenia, the age at onset of cannabis was significantly associated with age at onset of psychosis (β=0.4, 95% CI=0.1-0.7, p=0.004) and age at first hospitalization (β=0.4, 95% CI=0.1-0.8, p=0.008). The mean time between beginning to use cannabis and onset of psychosis was 7.0±4.3. Age at onset of alcohol use was not associated with age at onset of psychosis or age at first hospitalization. Age at onset of cannabis is directly associated with age at onset of psychosis and age at first hospitalization. These associations remain significant after adjusting for potential confounding factors and are consistent with the hypothesis that cannabis could cause or precipitate the onset of psychosis after a prolonged period of time. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Do People With Psychosis Have Specific Difficulties Regulating Emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M; Hartmann, Maike; Köther, Ulf; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Difficulties in emotion regulation (ER) are present in psychotic disorders, but their precise nature is not yet fully understood and it is unclear which difficulties are unique to psychosis compared with other disorders. This study investigated whether ER difficulties in psychosis are more prominent for the ability to modify emotions or for the ability to tolerate and accept them. Furthermore, it investigated whether ER difficulties occur for sadness, anxiety, anger and shame likewise. ER skills were assessed in participants with psychotic disorders (n = 37), participants with depression (n = 30) and healthy controls (n = 28) using the Emotion Regulation Skill Questionnaire that asks participants to rate the intensity of different emotions over the past week and the skills employed to handle each of them. Compared with healthy controls, participants with psychosis showed reduced skills related to awareness, understanding and acceptance of potentially distressing emotions, but not in the ability to modify them. These differences remained significant after controlling for depression. Participants with psychosis showed reduced ER skills in regard to all of the assessed emotions compared with the healthy controls, despite the fact that they only reported sadness as being significantly more intense. The participants with depression showed a similar pattern of ER skills to the psychosis sample, although with a tendency towards even more pronounced difficulties. It is concluded that psychosis is characterized by difficulties in using specific ER skills related to awareness, understanding and acceptance to regulate anger, shame, anxiety and sadness. These difficulties are not unique to psychosis but nevertheless present a promising treatment target. The participants with psychosis found it more difficult to be aware of their emotions, to understand them and to accept them than the healthy control group. However, they reported equal skills when it came to

  6. Integrated treatment ameliorates negative symptoms in first episode psychosis--results from the Danish OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard; Petersen, L; Jeppesen, P

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of integrated treatment on negative, psychotic and disorganised symptoms in patients with first episode psychosis.......To investigate the effect of integrated treatment on negative, psychotic and disorganised symptoms in patients with first episode psychosis....

  7. Duration of untreated psychosis: a proposition regarding treatment definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polari, Andrea; Lavoie, Suzie; Sarrasin, Pascale; Pellanda, Veronica; Cotton, Sue; Conus, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) refers to the time elapsing between psychosis onset and treatment initiation. Despite a certain degree of consensus regarding the definition of psychosis onset, the definition of treatment commencement varies greatly between studies and DUP may be underestimated due to lack of agreement. In the present study, three sets of criteria to define the end of the untreated period were applied in a first-episode psychosis cohort to assess the impact of the choice of definition on DUP estimation. The DUP of 117 patients admitted in the Treatment and Early Intervention in Psychosis Program Psychosis in Lausanne was measured using the following sets of criteria to define treatment onset: (i) initiation of antipsychotic medication; (ii) entry into a specialized programme; and (iii) entry into a specialized programme and adequate medication with a good compliance. DUP varied greatly according to definitions, the most restrictive criteria leading to the longest DUP (median DUP1=2.2 months, DUP2=7.4 months and DUP3=13.6 months). A percentage of 19.7 of the patients who did not meet these restrictive criteria had poorer premorbid functioning and were more likely to use cannabis. Longer DUP3 was associated with poorer premorbid functioning and with younger age at onset of psychosis. These results underline the need for a unique and standardized definition of the end of DUP. We suggest that the most restrictive definition of treatment should be used when using the DUP concept in future research. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Childhood trauma and cognitive function in first-episode affective and non-affective psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aas, Monica

    2011-06-01

    A history of childhood trauma is reportedly more prevalent in people suffering from psychosis than in the general population. Childhood trauma has also been linked to cognitive abnormalities in adulthood, and cognitive abnormalities, in turn, are one of the key clinical features of psychosis. Therefore, this study investigated whether there was a relationship between childhood trauma and cognitive function in patients with first-episode psychosis. The potential impact of diagnosis (schizophrenia or affective psychosis) and gender on this association was also examined.

  9. Persistence of the extended psychosis phenotype in young people: Link between vulnerability and clinical need

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, J.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    Psychosis is one of the most severe psychiatric conditions, in terms of both individual and societal burden. The pathway from the earliest and mildest expressions of psychosis to clinical disorder is highly variable and heterogeneous. A better understanding of the psychosis phenotype and its

  10. Psychosis associated with acute recreational drug toxicity: a European case series

    OpenAIRE

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Dines, Alison M.; Wood, David M.; Yates, Christopher; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Hovda, Knut Erik; Giraudon, Isabelle; Dargan, Paul I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychosis can be associated with acute recreational drug and novel psychoactive substance (NPS) toxicity. However, there is limited data available on how common this is and which drugs are most frequently implicated. We describe a European case series of psychosis associated with acute recreational drug toxicity, and estimate the frequency of psychosis for different recreational drugs. Methods ...

  11. 77 FR 12522 - Tentative Eligibility Determinations; Presumptive Eligibility for Psychosis and Other Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ...; Presumptive Eligibility for Psychosis and Other Mental Illness AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION... psychosis within specified time periods and for Persian Gulf War veterans who developed a mental illness... eligibility determinations; Presumptive eligibility for psychosis and other mental illness.'' Copies of...

  12. Intervention in individuals at ultra high risk for psychosis: a review and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGorry, Patrick D; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G Paul

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Over the last 15 years, a focus on early intervention in psychotic disorders has emerged. Initially, the early psychosis movement focused on timely recognition and phase-specific treatment of first-episode psychosis. However, early psychosis researchers suspected that pushing the point...

  13. The clinical impact of a positive family history of psychosis or mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A family history of psychosis is associated with negative clinical characteristics of psychosis. Aim: We aimed to determine the relationship between a family history (in first-degree relatives) of psychosis (FHP) or of any mental illness (FHM), and the clinical features (including cannabis use) of first episode early ...

  14. Clinical correlates of first episode early onset psychosis in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The study of first episode early onset psychosis can yield many clues to understanding the early development of psychosis and guide interventions to decrease psychosis risk and improve outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate the socio-demographic profile and clinical correlates in early onset ...

  15. Risk factors for psychosis: impaired social and role functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornblatt, Barbara A; Carrión, Ricardo E; Addington, Jean; Seidman, Larry; Walker, Elaine F; Cannon, Tyronne D; Cadenhead, Kristin S; McGlashan, Thomas H; Perkins, Diana O; Tsuang, Ming T; Woods, Scott W; Heinssen, Robert; Lencz, Todd

    2012-11-01

    Risk for psychosis is currently defined primarily on the basis of attenuated positive symptoms (APS), with no inclusion of the functional deficits characteristic of schizophrenia. Impaired social and role functioning have been of interest for reflecting poor outcome but far less is known about the developmental impact of these deficits as vulnerability or risk factors. Age-appropriate social and role functioning were prospectively assessed in 100 individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis included in the 8-site North American Prodromal Longitudinal Study database. A nested case-control design was used to compare changes in social and role functioning in 26 individuals converting to psychosis shortly after baseline assessment and 24 converting over a year later. Individuals in each converter subgroup were directly matched to a non-converter at the same site, controlling for time to conversion, age, gender, and severity of baseline symptoms. At baseline, CHR subjects who later became psychotic were significantly more likely to be impaired socially than matched non-converters. Onset of psychosis did not further disrupt social difficulties. Role functioning showed some of the same trends, but the overall pattern was not as consistent as for the social domain. Controlling for neurocognition did not change the pattern of group differences. Early impaired social functioning appears to be a risk factor for psychosis and, added to APS, could potentially contribute to accurate identification of CHR individuals and provide a new direction for early intervention to reduce long-term disability.

  16. Social Dysfunction and Diet Outcomes in People with Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen Mucheru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This analysis aimed to examine the association of social dysfunction with food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption in people with psychosis from the Hunter New England (HNE catchment site of the Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP. Social dysfunction and dietary information were collected using standardised tools. Independent binary logistic regressions were used to examine the association between social dysfunction and food security status, fruit intake, vegetable intake, meal frequency and breakfast consumption. Although social dysfunction did not have a statistically significant association with most diet variables, participants with obvious to severe social dysfunction were 0.872 (95% CI (0.778, 0.976 less likely to eat breakfast than those with no social dysfunction p < 0.05. Participants with social dysfunction were therefore, 13% less likely to have breakfast. This paper highlights high rates of social dysfunction, significant food insecurity, and intakes of fruits and vegetables below recommendations in people with psychosis. In light of this, a greater focus needs to be given to dietary behaviours and social dysfunction in lifestyle interventions delivered to people with psychosis. Well-designed observational research is also needed to further examine the relationship between social dysfunction and dietary behaviour in people with psychosis.

  17. Social cognition and neurocognition as independent domains in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooren, S; Versmissen, D; Janssen, I; Myin-Germeys, I; à Campo, J; Mengelers, R; van Os, J; Krabbendam, L

    2008-08-01

    Patients with psychosis display alterations in social cognition as well as in the realm of neurocognition. It is unclear, however, to what degree these cognitive domains represent two separate dimensions of liability or the pleiotropic expression of a single deficit. The purpose of the present study was to investigate (i) to what extent alterations in social cognition represent an independent area of vulnerability to psychosis, separate from neurocognitive deficits and (ii) whether social cognition is one construct or can be divided into several subcomponents. Five social cognition and three neurocognitive tasks were completed by 186 participants with different levels of vulnerability for psychosis: 44 patients with psychotic disorder; 47 subjects at familial risk; 41 subjects at psychometric risk and 54 control subjects. The social cognition tasks covered important basic subcomponents of social cognition, i.e. mentalisation (or theory of mind), data gathering bias (jumping to conclusions), source monitoring and attribution style. Neurocognitive tasks assessed speed of information processing, inhibition, cognitive shifting and strategy-driven retrieval from semantic memory. The results of factor analysis suggested that neurocognition and social cognition are two separate areas of vulnerability in psychosis. Furthermore, the social cognition measures lacked significant overlap, suggesting a multidimensional construct. Cognitive liabilities to psychosis are manifold, and include key processes underlying basic person-environment interactions in daily life, independent of cognition quantified by neuropsychological tests.

  18. Interictal psychosis following temporal lobe surgery: dentate gyrus pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, M; Kensche, M; Maynard, J; Liu, J; Reeves, C; Goc, J; Marsdon, D; Fluegel, D; Foong, J

    2014-10-01

    De novo interictal psychosis, albeit uncommon, can develop in patients following temporal lobe surgery for epilepsy. Pathological alterations of the dentate gyrus, including cytoarchitectural changes, immaturity and axonal reorganization that occur in epilepsy, may also underpin co-morbid psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to study candidate pathways that may be associated with the development of interictal psychosis post-operatively in patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS). A total of 11 patients with HS who developed interictal psychosis (HS-P) post-operatively were compared with a matched surgical HS group without psychosis (HS-NP). Resected tissues were investigated for the extent of granule cell dispersion, mossy fibre sprouting and calbindin expression in the granule cells. We quantified doublecortin, mini-chromosome maintenance protein 2 (MCM2) and reelin-expressing neuronal populations in the dentate gyrus as well as the distribution of cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CBR1). The patterns of neuronal loss and gliosis were similar in both groups. HS-P patients demonstrated less mossy fibre sprouting and granule cell dispersion (p gyrus pathology found in HS-P patients could indicate underlying differences in the cellular response to seizures. These mechanisms may predispose to the development of psychosis in epilepsy and warrant further investigation.

  19. Cannabis use and risk of psychosis: an etiological link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoux, Helene; Tournier, Marie

    2004-01-01

    The nature of the link between cannabis use and psychosis remains to be clarified. The paper reviews the evidence suggesting that cannabis may be a risk factor for psychosis onset. Cross-sectional and retrospective epidemiological studies show that individuals with psychosis use cannabis more often than other individuals in the general population. It has long been considered that this association is explained by the self-medication hypothesis, postulating that cannabis is used to self-medicate psychotic symptoms. This hypothesis has been recently challenged by several prospective studies carried out in population-based samples, showing that cannabis exposure is associated with an increased risk of psychosis, possibly by interacting with a pre-existing vulnerability for these disorders. A dose-response relationship was found between cannabis exposure and risk of psychosis, and this association was independent from potential confounding factors such as exposure to other drugs and pre-existence of psychotic symptoms. However, the diagnostic specificity is weak, as cannabis exposure may be a risk factor for the occurrence of a large spectrum of psychiatric disorders, ranging from schizophrenia to mood and anxiety disorders. Considering the growing number of adolescents exposed to cannabis, the impact of this substance on the population mental health should be further explored.

  20. Prescription stimulant use is associated with earlier onset of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lauren V; Masters, Grace A; Pingali, Samira; Cohen, Bruce M; Liebson, Elizabeth; Rajarethinam, R P; Ongur, Dost

    2015-12-01

    A childhood history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common in psychotic disorders, yet prescription stimulants may interact adversely with the physiology of these disorders. Specifically, exposure to stimulants leads to long-term increases in dopamine release. We therefore hypothesized that individuals with psychotic disorders previously exposed to prescription stimulants will have an earlier onset of psychosis. Age of onset of psychosis (AOP) was compared in individuals with and without prior exposure to prescription stimulants while controlling for potential confounding factors. In a sample of 205 patients recruited from an inpatient psychiatric unit, 40% (n = 82) reported use of stimulants prior to the onset of psychosis. Most participants were prescribed stimulants during childhood or adolescence for a diagnosis of ADHD. AOP was significantly earlier in those exposed to stimulants (20.5 vs. 24.6 years stimulants vs. no stimulants, p drugs of abuse, and family history of a first-degree relative with psychosis, the association between stimulant exposure and earlier AOP remained significant. There was a significant gender × stimulant interaction with a greater reduction in AOP for females, whereas the smaller effect of stimulant use on AOP in males did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, individuals with psychotic disorders exposed to prescription stimulants had an earlier onset of psychosis, and this relationship did not appear to be mediated by IQ or cannabis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insight in psychosis: Standards, science, ethics and value judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, K S

    2017-06-01

    The clinical assessment of insight solely employs biomedical perspectives and criteria to the complete exclusion of context and culture and to the disregard of values and value judgments. The aim of this discussion article is to examine recent research from India on insight and explanatory models in psychosis and re-examine the framework of assessment, diagnosis and management of insight and explanatory models. Recent research from India on insight in psychosis and explanatory models is reviewed. Recent research, which has used longitudinal data and adjusted for pretreatment variables, suggests that insight and explanatory models of illness at baseline do not predict course, outcome and treatment response in schizophrenia, which seem to be dependent on the severity and quality of the psychosis. It supports the view that people with psychosis simultaneously hold multiple and contradictory explanatory models of illness, which change over time and with the trajectory of the illness. It suggests that insight, like all explanatory models, is a narrative of the person's reality and a coping strategy to handle with the varied impact of the illness. This article argues that the assessment of insight necessarily involves value entailments, commitments and consequences. It supports a need for a broad-based approach to assess awareness, attribution and action related to mental illness and to acknowledge the role of values and value judgment in the evaluation of insight in psychosis.

  2. Childhood abuse in the etiological continuum underlying psychosis from first-episode psychosis to psychotic experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, S; Ayesa-Arriola, R; Arias, B; Fatjó-Vilas, M; Ibáñez, M I; Ortet, G; Crespo-Facorro, B; Fañanás, L

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the prevalence of child abuse across the continuum of psychosis. The sample consisted of 198 individuals divided in three groups: (1) 48 FEP patients, (2) 77 individuals scoring high in Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), classified as "High CAPE" group and (3) 73 individuals scoring low, classified as "Low CAPE" group. Childhood abuse was assessed using self-report instruments. Chi(2) tests and logistic regression models controlling by sex, age and cannabis were used to perform three comparisons: (i) FEP vs. Low CAPE; (ii) FEP vs. High CAPE and (iii) High CAPE vs. Low CAPE. The frequency of individuals exposed to childhood abuse for FEP, High CAPE and Low CAPE groups were 52.1%, 41.6% and 11%, respectively. FEP and High CAPE group presented significantly higher rates of childhood abuse compared to Low CAPE group, however, no significant differences were found between FEP and High CAPE groups regarding the frequency of childhood abuse. There is an increasing frequency of childhood abuse from low subclinical psychosis to FEP patients. However, childhood abuse is equally common in FEP and at risk individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Work life after psychosis: A detailed examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Niall; O'Mahony, Paul; Hill, Michelle; Fanning, Felicity; Larkin, Conall; Waddington, John; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Clarke, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Conducting research on the work outcomes of first episode psychosis (FEP) samples may extend our understanding of the factors associated with the work outcome of people with schizophrenia and other psychotic illnesses. To conduct a detailed study of the work outcome of an FEP sample. Members of a FEP cohort, who had completed a 12-year clinical outcome assessment, were invited to participate in an adjunctive work outcome study. Engagement in paid and non-paid work was first established and the relationship with potentially influential baseline characteristics investigated. Subsequently the influence of work outcome to participants' level of quality of life, mental health, recovery, and social inclusion were examined. Among the 38 participants the mean percentage of time spent in work was 62% of which 50% was in paid work and 12% was in non-paid work. Being employed at inception was the only independent predictor of the duration of the follow-up period spent in work. Relationships between work outcome and all measures of wellbeing were found. The paid and non-paid work attained by people affected by a psychotic illness played an important role in the extent of their wellbeing, recovery, and social inclusion.

  4. Cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaud, Emilie; Nyman, Karissa; Addington, Jean

    2013-11-01

    Several studies suggest an association between experiences of childhood trauma including bullying and the development of psychotic symptoms. The use of communications technology has created a new media for bullying called 'cyberbullying'. Research has demonstrated associations between traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Negative effects of cyberbullying appear similar in nature and severity to the reported effects of traditional bullying. Our aim was to examine the prevalence and correlates of cyberbullying in those at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. Fifty young people at CHR for psychosis were administered the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire with added questions about cyberbullying. Cyberbullying was reported in 38% of the sample. Those who experienced cyberbullying also reported experiencing previous trauma. It is possible that cyberbullying may be a problem for those at CHR of psychosis, and due to the vulnerable nature of these young people may have longitudinal implications. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. The dreaming brain/mind, consciousness and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limosani, Ivan; D'Agostino, Armando; Manzone, Maria Laura; Scarone, Silvio

    2011-12-01

    Several independent lines of research in neurobiology seem to support the phenomenologically-grounded view of the dreaming brain/mind as a useful model for psychosis. Hallucinatory phenomena and thought disorders found in psychosis share several peculiarities with dreaming, where internally generated, vivid sensorimotor imagery along with often heightened and incongruous emotion are paired with a decrease in ego functions which ultimately leads to a severe impairment in reality testing. Contemporary conceptualizations of severe mental disorders view psychosis as one psychopathological dimension that may be found across several diagnostic categories. Some experimental data have shown cognitive bizarreness to be equally elevated in dreams and in the waking cognition of acutely psychotic subjects and in patients treated with pro-dopaminergic drugs, independent of the underlying disorder. Further studies into the neurofunctional underpinnings of both conditions will help to clarify the use and validity of this model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Substance abuse in first-episode non-affective psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor K; Melle, Ingrid; Auestad, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and drugs is an important and clinically challenging aspect of first-episode psychosis. Only a few studies have been carried out on large-sized and reliably characterized samples. These are reviewed, and the results are compared with a sample of 300 first-episode psychosis patients...... recruited for the TIPS (Early Treatment and Identification of Psychosis) study from Norway and Denmark. Prevalence rates from the literature vary from 6% to 44% for drugs and 3% to 35% for alcohol. In our sample, 23% abused drugs and 15% abused alcohol during the last 6 months. When compared to non......-abusers, the drug-abusing group is characterized by the following: male gender, younger age, better premorbid social, poor premorbid academic functioning, and more contact with friends in the last year before onset. Alcohol abusers were the oldest group and they had the least contact with friends. A group...

  7. Hyperthyroidism--cause of depression and psychosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, G; Nica, E A; Ionescu, B E; Ghinea, D

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms have been reported quite frequently in certain thyroid diseases, but more frequently in association with hypothyroidism. Thyrotoxicosis can be associated with various psychiatric symptoms, such as emotional lability, anxiety, restlessness and rarely frank psychosis. Psychotic symptoms in the context of hyperthyroidism typically present as an affective psychosis. The link between psychosis and hyperthyroidism is poorly understood. Because of this association of psychiatric symptoms is important to exclude a somatic cause, when assessing a patient first. We present the case of young woman who was followed over 2 years and who initially presented to psychiatric consultation for depressive symptoms, after being diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and specific therapy instituted, but who developed psychotic symptoms.

  8. Hyperthyroidism–cause of depression and psychosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, G; Ionescu, BE; Ghinea, D

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms have been reported quite frequently in certain thyroid diseases, but more frequently in association with hypothyroidism. Thyrotoxicosis can be associated with various psychiatric symptoms, such as emotional lability, anxiety, restlessness and rarely frank psychosis. Psychotic symptoms in the context of hyperthyroidism typically present as an affective psychosis. The link between psychosis and hyperthyroidism is poorly understood. Because of this association of psychiatric symptoms is important to exclude a somatic cause, when assessing a patient first. We present the case of young woman who was followed over 2 years and who initially presented to psychiatric consultation for depressive symptoms, after being diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and specific therapy instituted, but who developed psychotic symptoms. PMID:20108759

  9. CLINICAL RESEARCH ON ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF DEPRESSIVE PSYCHOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Wenbin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of acupuncture in the treatment of depressive psychosis.Methods: A total of 62 cases of depressive psychosis patients were randomly divided into treatment group (n=32) and control group (n=30). Acupoints used in treatment group were bilateral Hegu (LI 4), bilateral Taichong (LR 3), Baihui (GV 20) and Yintang (EX-HN 3). Patients of control group were asked to take Fluoxertine hydrochloride 20 mg/d.The therapeutic effect was assessed using Hamilton's depression (HAMD) scales. Results: After 8 weeks' treatment,in treatment and control groups, 4 and 3 cases were cured, 8 and 6 experienced marked improvement, 14 and 14 had improvement, 6 and 7 had no effect, with the effective rates being 81.25% and 76. 66% separately, and no significant difference was found between two groups in HAMD scales (P>0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture therapy is an effective method for treatment of depressive psychosis.

  10. Drugs of abuse and increased risk of psychosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururajan, Anand; Manning, Elizabeth E; Klug, Maren; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2012-12-01

    There is considerable evidence to suggest that the abuse of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis and methamphetamine, has aetiological roles in the pathogenesis of psychosis and schizophrenia. Factors that may increase susceptibility to the propsychotic effects of these drugs include the age at which the abuse starts as well as family history of genetic polymorphisms relevant to the pathophysiology of this disorder. However, the neurobiological mechanisms involved in drug abuse-associated psychosis remain largely unclear. This paper presents an overview of the available evidence, including clinical, animal model, and molecular studies, with a focus on brain regions and neurotransmitters systems, such as dopamine and glutamate, previously implicated in psychosis. It is clear that further studies are urgently needed to provide a greater insight into the mechanisms that mediate the long-term and neurodevelopmental effects of cannabis and methamphetamine. A dialogue between basic science and clinical research may help to identify at-risk individuals and novel pathways for treatment and prevention.

  11. Pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis in Parkinson's disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2008-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are relatively common and, in addition to creating a disturbance in patients' daily lives, have consistently been shown to be associated with poor outcome. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of psychosis in PD has expanded dramatically over the past 15 years, from an initial interpretation of symptoms as dopaminergic drug adverse effects to the current view of a complex interplay of extrinsic and disease-related factors.PD psychosis has unique clinical features, namely that it arises within a context of a clear sensorium and retained insight, there is relative prominence of visual hallucinations and progression occurs over time. PD psychosis tends to emerge later in the disease course, and disease duration represents one risk factor for its development. The use of anti-PD medications (particularly dopamine receptor agonists) has been the most widely identified risk factor for PD psychosis. Other risk factors discussed in the literature include older age, disease severity, sleep disturbance, cognitive impairment, dementia and/or depression.Recent efforts have aimed to explore the complex pathophysiology of PD psychosis, which is now known to involve an interaction between extrinsic, drug-related and intrinsic, disease-related components. The most important extrinsic factor is use of dopaminergic medication, which plays a prominent role in PD psychosis. Intrinsic factors include visual processing deficits (e.g. lower visual acuity, colour and contrast recognition deficits, ocular pathology and functional brain abnormalities identified amongst hallucinating PD patients); sleep dysregulation (e.g. sleep fragmentation and altered dream phenomena); neurochemical (dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, etc.) and structural abnormalities involving site-specific Lewy body deposition; and genetics (e.g. apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele and tau H1H1 genotype). Preliminary reports have also shown a potential relationship

  12. School-based approaches to reducing the duration of untreated psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Jason; Stephan, Sharon Hoover; Hong, L Elliot; Reeves, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Students with emerging psychosis often experience delays in diagnosis and treatment that impact mental health and academic outcomes. School systems have tremendous potential to improve early identification and treatment of adolescent psychosis. As a community-based resource, schools can support outreach, education, and screening for adolescents with psychosis and engage identified students and their families for treatment. The concept of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP; the gap between symptom onset and treatment initiation) in adolescent psychosis and the potential role of schools in reducing DUP are reviewed. Future directions for clinical care and research needed to support school-based interventions are proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Juliana; Grice, Sarah; Garety, Philippa; Bebbington, Paul; Dunn, Graham; Freeman, Daniel; Fowler, David; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Aggressive behaviour in psychosis is not uncommon. Community provision for people with psychosis has left informal caregivers to take on a greater role in their care. However, few studies have explored links between patient-initiated violence in mental health caregiving relationships and caregiver functioning. Our study investigated caregiver reports of aggressive acts committed by their relative with psychosis and their links to caregiver appraisals of the caregiving relationship and caregiver outcomes. Caregivers of patients with a recent relapse of psychosis, recruited to a psychological therapy trial, completed the audiotaped Camberwell Family Interview at baseline. This semi-structured interview includes questions on the quality of the relationship between caregiver and patient, and patient history of violence. Seventy-two transcripts of interviews were assessed for reports of patient-initiated violence. One-half of the caregiver sample (52.9%) reported an incident of patient-initiated violence during their interview; 62.2% of these involved violence toward themselves, and 24.3% toward property. Reports of patient violence were associated with caregiver ratings of hostility expressed toward patients, lower self-esteem, and emotion-focused coping. People caring on their own were more likely to report incidents of patient violence. Younger patients, males, and inpatients were more frequently identified as having a history of this kind of violence. Our findings suggested that caregiver reports of patient-initiated violence in psychosis are not uncommon. Mental health staff need to be aware of the risks of such violence for caregivers of people with psychosis, and consider appropriate procedures for minimizing it.

  14. Improving outcomes of first‐episode psychosis: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar‐Poli, Paolo; McGorry, Patrick D.; Kane, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Outcomes of psychotic disorders are associated with high personal, familiar, societal and clinical burden. There is thus an urgent clinical and societal need for improving those outcomes. Recent advances in research knowledge have opened new opportunities for ameliorating outcomes of psychosis during its early clinical stages. This paper critically reviews these opportunities, summarizing the state‐of‐the‐art knowledge and focusing on recent discoveries and future avenues for first episode research and clinical interventions. Candidate targets for primary universal prevention of psychosis at the population level are discussed. Potentials offered by primary selective prevention in asymptomatic subgroups (stage 0) are presented. Achievements of primary selected prevention in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis (stage 1) are summarized, along with challenges and limitations of its implementation in clinical practice. Early intervention and secondary prevention strategies at the time of a first episode of psychosis (stage 2) are critically discussed, with a particular focus on minimizing the duration of untreated psychosis, improving treatment response, increasing patients’ satisfaction with treatment, reducing illicit substance abuse and preventing relapses. Early intervention and tertiary prevention strategies at the time of an incomplete recovery (stage 3) are further discussed, in particular with respect to addressing treatment resistance, improving well‐being and social skills with reduction of burden on the family, treatment of comorbid substance use, and prevention of multiple relapses and disease progression. In conclusion, to improve outcomes of a complex, heterogeneous syndrome such as psychosis, it is necessary to globally adopt complex models integrating a clinical staging framework and coordinated specialty care programmes that offer pre‐emptive interventions to high‐risk groups identified across the early stages of the disorder

  15. Treating methamphetamine-induced resistant psychosis with clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Ruohollah; Keshavarz-Akhlaghi, Amir-Abbas; Shariati, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Background. Methamphetamine-induced psychosis (MIP) in Iran has turned into a serious issue in terms of health and treatment, lacking any obvious treatment methods for its resistant cases. Aims of Case Report. In the present study, a number of two cases of treatment of MIP with clozapine, which were resistant to the treatment with other antipsychotics, have been reported. Both cases completely responded to the treatment in only 2 weeks and no signs of psychosis relapse were seen in an 8-9 follow-up. Conclusion. Because of its particular pharmacologic features, clozapine may be effective in treating MIP.

  16. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, W F C; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder......, delusional disorder or other non-organic psychosis), aged 10-18 to those of 29 matched controls, using optimized voxel-based morphometry. RESULTS: Psychotic patients had frontal white matter abnormalities, but expected (regional) gray matter reductions were not observed. Post hoc analyses revealed...

  17. Psychosis and the dynamics of the psychotherapy process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment of the 's......The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment...

  18. Preventing Poor Vocational Functioning in Psychosis Through Early Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Bronnick, Kolbjorn S; Barder, Helene Eidsmo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study tested the hypothesis that early detection of psychosis improves long-term vocational functioning through the prevention of negative symptom development. METHODS: Generalized estimating equations and mediation analysis were conducted to examine the association between...... employment and negative symptoms over ten years among patients in geographic areas characterized by usual detection (N=140) or early detection (N=141) of psychosis. RESULTS: Improved vocational outcome after ten years among patients in the early-detection area was mediated by lower levels of negative...

  19. The Cannabis Pathway to Non-Affective Psychosis may Reflect Less Neurobiological Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løberg, Else-Marie; Helle, Siri; Nygård, Merethe; Berle, Jan Øystein; Kroken, Rune A.; Johnsen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    There is a high prevalence of cannabis use reported in non-affective psychosis. Early prospective longitudinal studies conclude that cannabis use is a risk factor for psychosis, and neurochemical studies on cannabis have suggested potential mechanisms for this effect. Recent advances in the field of neuroscience and genetics may have important implications for our understanding of this relationship. Importantly, we need to better understand the vulnerability × cannabis interaction to shed light on the mediators of cannabis as a risk factor for psychosis. Thus, the present study reviews recent literature on several variables relevant for understanding the relationship between cannabis and psychosis, including age of onset, cognition, brain functioning, family history, genetics, and neurological soft signs (NSS) in non-affective psychosis. Compared with non-using non-affective psychosis, the present review shows that there seem to be fewer stable cognitive deficits in patients with cannabis use and psychosis, in addition to fewer NSS and possibly more normalized brain functioning, indicating less neurobiological vulnerability for psychosis. There are, however, some familiar and genetic vulnerabilities present in the cannabis psychosis group, which may influence the cannabis pathway to psychosis by increasing sensitivity to cannabis. Furthermore, an earlier age of onset suggests a different pathway to psychosis in the cannabis-using patients. Two alternative vulnerability models are presented to integrate these seemingly paradoxical findings PMID:25477825

  20. The cannabis pathway to non-affective psychosis may reflect less neurobiological vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else-Marie eLøberg

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of cannabis use reported in non-affective psychosis. Early prospective longitudinal studies conclude that cannabis use is a risk factor for psychosis, and neurochemical studies on cannabis have suggested potential mechanisms for this effect. Recent advances in the field of neuroscience and genetics may have important implications for our understanding of this relationship. Importantly, we need to better understand the vulnerability x cannabis interaction to shed light on the mediators of cannabis as a risk factor for psychosis. Thus, the present study reviews recent literature on several variables relevant for understanding the relationship between cannabis and psychosis, including age of onset, cognition, brain functioning, family history, genetics and neurological soft signs (NSS in non-affective psychosis. Compared with non-using non-affective psychosis, the present review shows that there seem to be fewer stable cognitive deficits in patients with cannabis use and psychosis, in addition to fewer NSS and possibly more normalized brain functioning, indicating less neurobiological vulnerability for psychosis. There are, however, some familiar and genetic vulnerabilities present in the cannabis psychosis group which may influence the cannabis pathway to psychosis by increasing sensitivity to cannabis. Furthermore, an earlier age of onset suggests a different pathway to psychosis in the cannabis-using patients. Two alternative vulnerability models are presented to integrate these seemingly paradoxical findings.

  1. Emotional experiences predict the conversion of individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome to psychosis: A six-month follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa Zhan Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the conversion rate in individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS and potential predictor for transition in China. Sixty-three participants were identified as APS were followed up six months later. The results showed that 17% of individuals with APS converted to psychosis. The converters exhibited poorer emotional experience and expression than the non-converters at baseline. A further binary logistic regression analysis showed that emotional experience could predict the transition (Wald = 4.18, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 1.04~6.82. The current study suggested an important role of emotional processing in the prediction of the development of full-blown psychosis.

  2. Primary psychosis with comorbid drug abuse and drug-induced psychosis: Diagnostic and clinical evolution at follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, M C; Di Pace, C; Reggiori, A; Paletta, S; Colasanti, A

    2017-10-01

    The study reports a follow-up assessment of 48 patients with concomitant drug abuse at the first admission for psychosis. We focused on the diagnostic distinction between primary psychosis with concomitant drug abuse and drug induced psychosis, to observe whether the diagnoses are stable over time and whether the clinical course significantly differs. The study examined 25 primary psychotic disorder with comorbid drug abuse and 23 drug-induced psychotic disorder patients. Diagnostic and psychopathological assessments were made at baseline and at follow-up. Mean follow-up period was 4.96 years. Patients with comorbid Drug Abuse exhibited higher scores in the item Unusual Content of Thought at baseline than drug-induced psychotic disorder patients: 5.48 vs 4.39 while the two patients groups did not differ in any of the BPRS items evaluated at follow-up. The primary psychosis with comorbid drug abuse and the substance induced psychosis groups were similar regarding diagnostic stability, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia at follow-up occurred similarly. There was no evidence that Drug Induced psychotic patients' symptoms tend to improve more after cessation of drug abuse. An earlier age of onset was found in primary psychotic patients, particularly for patients diagnosed as affected by schizophrenia at follow up. These results might reflect the uncertainty of the distinction between Primary and Drug Induced Psychosis and the difficulties in applying the DSM IV-TR criteria for diagnosing comorbid drug use disorders and psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Attention in schizophrenia and in epileptic psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C.J Kairalla

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive behavior of human beings is usually supported by rapid monitoring of outstanding events in the environment. Some investigators have suggested that a primary attention deficit might trigger symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, researchers have long discussed the relationship between schizophrenia and the schizophrenia-like psychosis of epilepsy (SLPE. On the basis of these considerations, the objective of the present study was to investigate attention performance of patients with both disorders. Patient age was 18 to 60 years, and all patients had received formal schooling for at least four years. Patients were excluded if they had any systemic disease with neurologic or psychiatric comorbidity, or a history of brain surgery. The computer-assisted TAVIS-2R test was applied to all patients and to a control group to evaluate and discriminate between selective, alternating and sustained attention. The TAVIS-2R test is divided into three parts: one for selective attention (5 min, the second for alternating attention (5 min, and the third for the evaluation of vigilance or sustained attention (10 min. The same computer software was used for statistical analysis of reaction time, omission errors, and commission errors. The sample consisted of 36 patients with schizophrenia, 28 with interictal SLPE, and 47 healthy controls. The results of the selective attention tests for both patient groups were significantly lower than that for controls. The patients with schizophrenia and SLPE performed differently in the alternating and sustained attention tests: patients with SLPE had alternating attention deficits, whereas patients with schizophrenia showed deficits in sustained attention. These quantitative results confirmed the qualitative clinical observations for both patient groups, that is, that patients with schizophrenia had difficulties in focusing attention, whereas those with epilepsy showed perseveration in attention focus.

  4. Disrupted Working Memory Circuitry in Adolescent Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Eckfeld

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with schizophrenia (SZ consistently show deficits in spatial working memory (WM and associated atypical patterns of neural activity within key WM regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC and parietal cortices. However, little research has focused on adolescent psychosis (AP and potential age-associated disruptions of WM circuitry that may occur in youth with this severe form of illness. Here we utilized each subject’s individual spatial WM capacity to investigate task-based neural dysfunction in 17 patients with AP (16.58 ± 2.60 years old as compared to 17 typically developing, demographically comparable adolescents (18.07 ± 3.26 years old. AP patients showed lower behavioral performance at higher WM loads and lower overall WM capacity compared to healthy controls. Whole-brain activation analyses revealed greater bilateral precentral and right postcentral activity in controls relative to AP patients, when controlling for individual WM capacity. Seed-based psychophysiological interaction (PPI analyses revealed significantly greater co-activation between the left dlPFC and left frontal pole in controls relative to AP patients. Significant group-by-age interactions were observed in both whole-brain and PPI analyses, with AP patients showing atypically greater neural activity and stronger coupling between WM task activated brain regions as a function of increasing age. Additionally, AP patients demonstrated positive relationships between right dlPFC neural activity and task performance, but unlike healthy controls, failed to show associations between neural activity and out-of-scanner neurocognitive performance. Collectively, these findings are consistent with atypical WM-related functioning and disrupted developmental processes in youth with AP.

  5. Treating a physician patient with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Jacob L; Crow, Fredrick F; Gutheil, Thomas G; Sanchez, Luis T; Suzuki, Joji

    2012-06-01

    The authors present a case of a psychotic female patient who is a former graduate of a locally prestigious medical school and has subsequently been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The patient entered treatment in an outpatient clinic following discharge from her 11th hospitalization. This hospitalization was initiated after the patient's physician friend had called the police and notified them that the patient was significantly disorganized to warrant further evaluation. Treatment was characterized by significant transference and counter-transference reactions amongst her clinicians - both treatment-promoting and treatment-interfering - based on her status as a physician. The problem of insight was a significant hurdle in the treatment of the patient as her medical knowledge of mental illness was substantially greater than her insight into her own mental illness. Throughout treatment, a number of medical-legal and ethical issues arose. Initially, the question was raised as to the legality of the actions by the patient's friend-having made a clinical assessment without having a clinical role in the patient's care. As the patient's clinical status improved and she sought to re-enter the medical field as a resident, new medical legal issues surfaced. What were the roles of the patient's treaters in maintaining confidentiality and simultaneously ensuring the safety of patients that the psychotic physician might care for? This case highlights the universality of psychiatric vulnerability. Insight in psychosis as well as the transference and counter-transference issues involved in caring for a psychotic physician are discussed. Additionally, a thorough medical-legal discussion addresses the various complexities of caring for a psychotic physician. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Social anxiety in first-episode psychosis: the role of childhood trauma and adult attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Birchwood, Max

    2014-07-01

    Social anxiety is among the most prevalent affective disturbances among people with psychosis. The developmental pathways associated with its emergence in psychosis, however, remain unclear. The aim of this study is to identify the developmental risk factors associated with social anxiety disorder in first-episode psychosis and to investigate whether social anxiety in psychosis and non-psychosis is associated with similar or different adult attachment styles. This is a cross-sectional study. A sample of individuals with social anxiety disorder (with or without psychosis) was compared with a sample with psychosis only and healthy controls on childhood trauma, dysfunctional parenting and adult attachment. Childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting (pchildhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting between socially anxious people with and without psychosis. Higher levels of insecure adult attachment (x(2)1=38.5, pChildhood adversities were not associated with insecure adult attachment in people with social anxiety (with or without psychosis). Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study we cannot infer causal relationships between early risk factors, including childhood trauma and dysfunctional parenting, and social anxiety. Also, the use of self-report measures of attachment could be subject to biases. Shared developmental risk factors are implicated in the emergence of affective disorders in psychosis and non-psychosis. Social anxiety in psychosis is associated with insecurity in adult attachments which does not arise a result of adverse developmental pathways. Understanding the bio-psycho-social risk factors for affective dysregulation in psychosis could inform psychological interventions about the role of developmental anomaly and trauma in the emergence of affective dysregulation in psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Social class at birth and risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Brian; Fanning, Felicity; Lyne, John; Renwick, Laoise; Madigan, Kevin; Kinsella, Anthony; Lane, Abbie; Turner, Niall; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Clarke, Mary

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with psychotic disorders are represented more in the lower social classes, yet there is conflicting evidence to whether these individuals drift into the lower social classes or whether lower social class is a risk factor for developing psychosis. The aim of this study was to examine whether the social class at birth is a risk factor for developing psychosis. We included individuals with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) whose social class at birth was determined from birth records. We employed a case-control study design and also compared the distribution of the social classes at birth of the cases to that of the general population. A total of 380 individuals with an FEP and 760 controls were included in the case-control study. The odds ratio for developing an FEP associated with social class (low vs high) was .62 (95% confidence interval (CI): .46-.85, p social class at birth have a reduced risk of psychosis. Individuals born between 1961 and 1980 with an FEP were more likely to be from a higher social class at birth compared to the general population (60.8% vs 36.7%, χ(2) = 60.85, df = 1, p social class at birth is associated with a greater risk for developing a psychotic disorder; however, this effect may show temporal variation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. A case report of isotretinoin-induced manic psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha M Lucca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotretinoin, an oral vitamin A derivative, used to treat severe treatment-resistant acne. Psychiatric side effects of isotretinoin particularly depression and suicidal thoughts have been well documented. We report a case of isotretinoin-induced manic psychosis in a young female without a family history and history of mental illness.

  9. Attachment, neurobiology, and mentalizing along the psychosis continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Debbané

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to the psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioural studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis.

  10. Obesity, dyslipidemia and brain age in first-episode psychosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolenic, M.; Franke, K.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Matějka, M.; Čapková, J.; Pausova, Z.; Uher, R.; Alda, M.; Španiel, F.; Hájek, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 99, April (2018), s. 151-158 ISSN 0022-3956 Grant - others:GA MZd(CZ) NV16-32791A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1611 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : BrainAGE score * Dyslipidemia * First-episode psychosis * Obesity * Overweight * Schizophrenia Impact factor: 4.183, year: 2016

  11. Attachment, Neurobiology, and Mentalizing along the Psychosis Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbané, Martin; Salaminios, George; Luyten, Patrick; Badoud, Deborah; Armando, Marco; Solida Tozzi, Alessandra; Fonagy, Peter; Brent, Benjamin K

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA) axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioral studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis.

  12. Neural correlates of insight in dreaming and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dresler, M.; Wehrle, R.; Spoormaker, V.I.; Steiger, A.; Holsboer, F.; Czisch, M.; Hobson, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that dreaming can serve as a model for psychosis has a long and honourable tradition, however it is notoriously speculative. Here we demonstrate that recent research on the phenomenon of lucid dreaming sheds new light on the debate. Lucid dreaming is a rare state of sleep in which the

  13. A Case of Epilepsy and Psychosis in the Seventeenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ovsiew

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventeenth-century painter left an account of his seizures, trances and visions; in 1923 Freud commented on this “demonological neurosis” without discussing the seizures. Attention is drawn to the concurrence of epilepsy and psychosis in this early autobiographical source.

  14. Using Digital Media Advertising in Early Psychosis Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L; Garrett, Chantel; Baumel, Amit; Scovel, Maria; Rizvi, Asra F; Muscat, Whitney; Kane, John M

    2017-11-01

    Identifying and engaging youth with early-stage psychotic disorders in order to facilitate timely treatment initiation remains a major public health challenge. Although advertisers routinely use the Internet to directly target consumers, limited efforts have focused on applying available technology to proactively encourage help-seeking in the mental health community. This study explores how one might take advantage of Google AdWords in order to reach prospective patients with early psychosis. A landing page was developed with the primary goal of encouraging help-seeking individuals in New York City to contact their local early psychosis intervention clinic. In order to provide the best opportunity to reach the intended audience, Google AdWords was utilized to link more than 2,000 selected search terms to strategically placed landing page advertisements. The campaign ran for 14 weeks between April 11 and July 18, 2016 and had a total budget of $1,427. The ads appeared 191,313 times and were clicked on 4,350 times, at a per-click cost of $.33. Many users took additional help-seeking steps, including obtaining psychosis-specific information/education (44%), completing a psychosis self-screener (15%), and contacting the local early treatment program (1%). Digital ads appear to be a reasonable and cost-effective method to reach individuals who are searching for behavioral health information online. More research is needed to better understand the many complex steps between online search inquiries and making first clinical contact.

  15. Shortened duration of untreated first episode of psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tor Ketil; McGlashan, T H; Johannessen, Jan Olav

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined whether duration of untreated psychosis can be shortened in patients with first episodes of DSM-IV schizophrenia spectrum disorders and whether shorted duration alters patient appearance at treatment. METHOD: Two study groups were ascertained in the same Norwegian h...

  16. The impact of psychosis on social inclusion and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killaspy, Helen; White, Sarah; Lalvani, Nabeela; Berg, Rachel; Thachil, Ajoy; Kallumpuram, Sen; Nasiruddin, Omar; Wright, Christine; Mezey, Gill

    2014-03-01

    People with mental health problems are known to be socially excluded but the contribution of pre-morbid characteristics, symptoms and needs, and the impact on quality of life is unknown. To investigate change in social inclusion after the development of a psychotic Illness and factors associated with this. A cross-sectional community survey of people with psychosis was carried out in three areas of London. Five domains of social inclusion (social integration, consumption, access to services, productivity, political engagement) were assessed prior to the onset of illness and currently using the Social Inclusion Questionnaire User Experience. Quality of life, symptoms and needs were also assessed using standardized measures. Factors associated with change in social inclusion were investigated using multiple regression. Productivity and social integration among the 67 participants reduced after the onset of psychosis. Older age at onset and longer duration of illness were associated with greater reduction in productivity. Less reduction in social integration was associated with greater quality of life. Participants reported barriers to social inclusion that were directly related to symptoms of their illness, low confidence and poor self-esteem. A greater focus on interventions that can facilitate the occupation and the social networks of people with psychosis is required. Interventions that tackle 'self-stigma' may also prove useful in mitigating the social exclusion experienced by people with psychosis.

  17. Positive and negative caregiver experiences in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Harder, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    influenced their reports of both positive and negative caregiving experiences. Design A prospective consecutive cross-sectional study. Methods Forty caregivers of patients with first-episode psychosis were interviewed using semi-structured interview and questionnaires. Results Greater levels of distress...

  18. Toxic cannabis psychosis is a valid entity | Solomons | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cannabinoids were present in 29% of patients, and 31% were discharged with a diagnosis of toxic psychosis (dagga). Clinical and demographic material was gathered for all patients and no consistent differences were found between dagga-posItlve and dagga-negative patients or toxic dagga psychotic patients and ...

  19. The Nature of Puerperal Psychosis at Muhimbili National Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty six in-patients suffering from puerperal psychosis within six weeks after childbirth were prospectively investigated in Muhimbili National Hospital during two years. Formal psychiatric history, mental status evaluation, research and diagnostic criteria including ICD 10 and clinical progression were employed for ...

  20. First-episode psychosis: An update | Chiliza | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in the subject of first-episode psychosis has increased considerably in the last two decades. At present, a number of centres around the world focus on early identification and intervention in people with psychotic disorders. Researchers have focused particularly on people who are possibly experiencing the ...

  1. Attachment, Neurobiology, and Mentalizing along the Psychosis Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbané, Martin; Salaminios, George; Luyten, Patrick; Badoud, Deborah; Armando, Marco; Solida Tozzi, Alessandra; Fonagy, Peter; Brent, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we outline the evidence linking attachment adversity to psychosis, from the premorbid stages of the disorder to its clinical forms. To better understand the neurobiological mechanisms through which insecure attachment may contribute to psychosis, we identify at least five neurobiological pathways linking attachment to risk for developing psychosis. Besides its well documented influence on the hypothalamic-pituary-adrenal (HPA) axis, insecure attachment may also contribute to neurodevelopmental risk through the dopaminergic and oxytonergic systems, as well as bear influence on neuroinflammation and oxidative stress responses. We further consider the neuroscientific and behavioral studies that underpin mentalization as a suite of processes potentially moderating the risk to transition to psychotic disorders. In particular, mentalization may help the individual compensate for endophenotypical impairments in the integration of sensory and metacognitive information. We propose a model where embodied mentalization would lie at the core of a protective, resilience response mitigating the adverse and potentially pathological influence of the neurodevelopmental cascade of risk for psychosis. PMID:27597820

  2. Persistent Psychosis Occurring in a Patient Receiving Cycloserine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of cycloserineinduced psychosis persisting after discontinuation of the drug in the treatment of multidrug resistant tuberculosis in a 26 year old male who was been managed in the hospital for multidrug resistant tuberculosis on daily doses of Cycloserine 500mg, Pyrazinamide 1.2g, Proteonamide 500mg, Kanamy c ...

  3. Myxedema Psychosis in a Patient With Undiagnosed Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroson, Matthew M; Patel, Nirav; Akker, Eleonora

    2017-01-01

    Myxedema psychosis is uncommon in patients with primary hypothyroidism. Most often, this disease state can be found in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis or after total thyroidectomy. Chronic hypothyroidism can lead to an insidious onset of psychiatric symptoms in patients, such as dementia, delirium, psychosis, hallucinations, and coma. A 31-year-old man with an unremarkable medical history was brought to the psychiatric emergency department for new-onset aggression, paranoid behavior, and hallucinations for 4 days. Initial test results showed a thyroid-stimulating hormone level of 306.0 mIU/L and a free thyroxin level of 0.24 ng/dL. No other clinical or laboratory abnormalities were found. A diagnosis of myxedema psychosis was established, and the patient was treated with tapering doses of intravenous hydrocortisone and 0.1 mg of intravenous levothyroxine daily. On hospital day 3, his mental status began to improve, and he was discharged on day 4. Myxedema psychosis is rarely the initial presenting symptom of hypothyroidism, especially in the absence of other abnormal clinical or laboratory findings.

  4. The arcuate fasciculus network and verbal deficits in psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenney Joanne P.M.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Verbal learning (VL and fluency (VF are prominent cognitive deficits in psychosis, of which the precise neuroanatomical contributions are not fully understood. We investigated the arcuate fasciculus (AF and its associated cortical regions to identify structural abnormalities contributing to these verbal impairments in early stages of psychotic illness.

  5. Trauma and the psychosis spectrum: A review of symptom specificity and explanatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lauren E.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Ellman, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic life events have been robustly associated with various psychosis outcomes, including increased risk of psychotic disorders, the prodrome of psychosis, and dimensional measures of psychotic symptoms, such as attenuated positive psychotic symptoms. However, trauma exposure has been linked to various mental disorders; therefore, the specificity of trauma exposure to psychosis remains unclear. This review focuses on two understudied areas of the trauma and psychosis literature: 1) the specificity between trauma and psychosis in relation to other disorders that often result post-trauma, and 2) proposed mechanisms that uniquely link trauma to psychosis. We begin by discussing the underlying connection between trauma exposure and the entire psychosis spectrum with a focus on the influence of trauma type and specific psychotic symptoms. We then consider how the principles of multifinality and equifinality can be useful in elucidating the trauma-psychosis relationship versus the trauma-other disorder relationship. Next, we discuss several cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms that might uniquely account for the association between trauma and psychosis, as well as the role of gender. Lastly, we review important methodological issues that complicate the research on trauma and psychosis, ending with clinical implications for the field. PMID:27632064

  6. Basic disturbances of information processing in psychosis prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodatsch, Mitja; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Müller, Ralf; Ruhrmann, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The basic symptoms (BS) approach provides a valid instrument in predicting psychosis onset and represents moreover a significant heuristic framework for research. The term "basic symptoms" denotes subtle changes of cognition and perception in the earliest and prodromal stages of psychosis development. BS are thought to correspond to disturbances of neural information processing. Following the heuristic implications of the BS approach, the present paper aims at exploring disturbances of information processing, revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electro-encephalographic as characteristics of the at-risk state of psychosis. Furthermore, since high-risk studies employing ultra-high-risk criteria revealed non-conversion rates commonly exceeding 50%, thus warranting approaches that increase specificity, the potential contribution of neural information processing disturbances to psychosis prediction is reviewed. In summary, the at-risk state seems to be associated with information processing disturbances. Moreover, fMRI investigations suggested that disturbances of language processing domains might be a characteristic of the prodromal state. Neurophysiological studies revealed that disturbances of sensory processing may assist psychosis prediction in allowing for a quantification of risk in terms of magnitude and time. The latter finding represents a significant advancement since an estimation of the time to event has not yet been achieved by clinical approaches. Some evidence suggests a close relationship between self-experienced BS and neural information processing. With regard to future research, the relationship between neural information processing disturbances and different clinical risk concepts warrants further investigations. Thereby, a possible time sequence in the prodromal phase might be of particular interest.

  7. Markers of neurodevelopmental impairments in early-onset psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petruzzelli MG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maria Giuseppina Petruzzelli,1 Lucia Margari,1 Francesco Craig,1 Maria Gloria Campa,1 Domenico Martinelli,2 Adriana Pastore,3 Marta Simone,1 Francesco Margari3 1Child and Adolescence Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organs, University “Aldo Moro” of Bari, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences; University of Foggia, Foggia, 3Psychiatry Unit, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Sense Organ, University “Aldo Moro” of Bari, Bari, Italy Background: The aim of this study was to assess the association between the clinical and neurobiological markers of neurodevelopmental impairments and early-onset schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. Methods: A sample of 36 patients with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum psychosis was compared to a control sample of 36 patients with migraine. We assessed early childhood neurodevelopmental milestones using a modified version of the General Developmental Scale, general intellectual ability using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–Revised or Leiter International Performance Scale–Revised for patients with speech and language abnormalities, and neurological soft signs with specific regard to subtle motor impairment. Results: Subjects with early-onset psychosis had a higher rate of impaired social development (P=0.001, learning difficulties (P=0.04, enuresis (P=0.0008, a lower intelligence quotient (P<0.001, and subtle motor impairments (P=0.005 than control subjects. Conclusion: We suggest that neurodevelopment in early-onset psychosis is characterized by a global impairment of functional and adaptive skills that manifests from early childhood, rather than a delay or limitation in language and motor development. The current evidence is based on a small sample and should be investigated in larger samples in future research. Keywords: early-onset psychosis, early-onset schizophrenia, neurodevelopment, social cognition

  8. Social networks, support and early psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer-Anderson, C; Morgan, C

    2013-06-01

    Background. There is strong evidence that those with a long-standing psychotic disorder have fewer social contacts and less social support than comparison groups. There is less research on the extent of social contacts and support prior to or at the onset of psychosis. In the light of recent evidence implicating a range of social experiences and contexts at the onset of psychosis, it is relevant to establish whether social networks and support diminished before or at the time of onset and whether the absence of such supports might contribute to risk, either directly or indirectly. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review of this literature to establish what is currently known about the relationship between social networks, support and early psychosis. Methods. We identified all studies investigating social networks and support in first episode psychosis samples and in general population samples with measures of psychotic experiences or schizotype by conducting systematic searches of electronic databases using pre-defined search terms and criteria. Findings were synthesized using non-quantitative approaches. Results. Thirty-eight papers were identified that met inclusion criteria. There was marked methodological heterogeneity, which limits the capacity to draw direct comparisons. Nonetheless, the existing literature suggests social networks (particularly close friends) and support diminished both among first episode samples and among non-clinical samples reporting psychotic experiences or with schizotype traits, compared with varying comparison groups. These differences may be more marked for men and for those from minority ethnic populations. Conclusions. Tentatively, reduced social networks and support appear to pre-date onset of psychotic disorder. However, the substantial methodological heterogeneity among the existing studies makes comparisons difficult and suggests a need for more robust and comparable studies on networks, support and early psychosis.

  9. Psychosis in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gossink FT

    2017-04-01

    , hallucinatory behavior, and suspiciousness were present in one-fifth of bvFTD patients, whereas negative psychotic symptoms such as social and emotional withdrawal, blunted affect, and formal thought disorders were more frequently present. This suggests that negative psychotic symptoms and formal thought disorders have an important role in the psychiatric misdiagnosis in bvFTD; misdiagnosis in bvFTD might be reduced by systematically exploring the broad spectrum of psychiatric symptoms. Keywords: frontotemporal dementia, psychosis, schizophrenia, formal thought disorders 

  10. The Psychosis Recent Onset GRoningen Survey (PROGR-S) : Defining Dimensions and Improving Outcomes in Early Psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liemburg, Edith J.; Castelein, Stynke; van Es, Frank; Scholte-Stalenhoef, Anne Neeltje; van de Willige, Gerard; Smid, Henderikus; Visser, Ellen; Knegtering, Henderikus; Bruggeman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Psychotic disorders are among the most complex medical conditions. Longitudinal cohort studies may offer further insight into determinants of functional outcome after a psychotic episode. This paper describes the Psychosis Recent Onset in GRoningen Survey (PROGR-S) that currently contains data on

  11. The association between pre-morbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis and outcome in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P; Petersen, L; Thorup, A

    2008-01-01

    The association between the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and outcome of schizophrenia may be confounded by other factors such as poor pre-morbid adjustment. The aim of the present study was to examine the independent contributions of DUP and of pre-morbid adjustment to the clinical...

  12. Prediction of psychosis in adolescents and young adults at high risk: results from the prospective European prediction of psychosis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhrmann, Stephan; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Salokangas, Raimo K. R.; Heinimaa, Markus; Linszen, Don; Dingemans, Peter; Birchwood, Max; Patterson, Paul; Juckel, Georg; Heinz, Andreas; Morrison, Anthony; Lewis, Shôn; von Reventlow, Heinrich Graf; Klosterkötter, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Indicated prevention is currently regarded as the most promising strategy to attenuate, delay, or even avert psychosis. Existing criteria need improvement in terms of specificity and individual risk assessment to allow for better targeted and earlier interventions. To develop a differential

  13. Diagnostic and Prognostic Significance of DSM-5 Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in Services for Individuals at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; De Micheli, Andrea; Cappucciati, Marco; Rutigliano, Grazia; Davies, Cathy; Ramella-Cravaro, Valentina; Oliver, Dominic; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Rocchetti, Matteo; Gavaghan, Lauren; Patel, Rashmi; McGuire, Philip

    2018-02-15

    The diagnostic and prognostic significance of the DSM-5-defined Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (DSM-5-APS) in individuals undergoing an ultra high risk (UHR) clinical assessment for suspicion of psychosis risk is unknown. Prospective cohort study including all consecutive help-seeking individuals undergoing both a DSM-5-APS and a Comprehensive Assessment of At Risk Mental States (CAARMS 12/2006) assessment for psychosis risk at the Outreach and Support in South London (OASIS) UHR service (March 2013-April 2014). The diagnostic significance of DSM-5-APS was assessed with percent overall agreement, prevalence bias adjusted kappa, Bowker's test, Stuart-Maxwell test, residual analysis; the prognostic significance with Cox regression, Kaplan-Meier failure function, time-dependent area under the curve (AUC) and net benefits analysis. The impact of specific revisions of the DSM-5-APS was further tested. In 203 help-seeking individuals undergoing UHR assessment, the agreement between the DSM-5-APS and the CAARMS 12/2006 was only moderate (kappa 0.59). Among 142 nonpsychotic cases, those meeting DSM-5-APS criteria had a 5-fold probability (HR = 5.379) of developing psychosis compared to those not meeting DSM-5-APS criteria, with a 21-month cumulative risk of psychosis of 28.17% vs 6.49%, respectively. The DSM-5-APS prognostic accuracy was acceptable (AUC 0.76 at 24 months) and similar to the CAARMS 12/2006. The DSM-5-APS designation may be clinically useful to guide the provision of indicated interventions within a 7%-35% (2-year) range of psychosis risk. The removal of the criterion E or C of the DSM-5-APS may improve its prognostic performance and transdiagnostic value. The DSM-5-APS designation may be clinically useful in individuals accessing clinical services for psychosis prevention. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. [Cognitive deficits in first episode psychosis patients and people at risk for psychosis: from diagnosis to treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecardeur, L; Meunier-Cussac, S; Dollfus, S

    2013-05-01

    Up to now, studies have not demonstrated significant efficacy of antipsychotics on cognitive impairments in patients with psychotic disorders. These cognitive deficits are of particular interest since they traditionally start early before the diagnosis of psychosis. They are observed during premorbid and prodromal stages, and during the first episode of psychosis. Moreover, cognitive impairments may be detected without any psychotic symptoms (such as positive symptoms) suggesting their development independently of the psychotic symptoms. Cognitive disturbances consist of impairments of episodic and working memories, intellectual functioning, executive functions (planning, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility), selective and sustained attentions and social cognition (emotion, recognition, theory of mind). The altered cognitive functions observed in schizophrenia are the same as in earlier stages but at a lower level of severity. Data suggest that cognitive deficits can be considered as vulnerability markers of psychosis since they have been described in healthy relatives of psychotic patients with high genetic risk. Cognitive deficits might also be considered as predictive of the occurrence of the disease after the first episode of psychosis. Indeed, retrospective studies suggest cognitive impairments in patients with schizophrenia during premorbid and prodromal phases but not in bipolar patients. Cognitive assessment might be of particular interest in people at risk for psychosis, in order to differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Cognitive functioning impairs until the diagnosis of first episode psychosis, even though cognitive profiles are quite heterogeneous in these patients. Once the diagnosis of schizophrenia is considered, cognitive deficits may be stable, although the literature is still controversial. Several factors such as symptoms and gender can contribute in diversifying the cognitive profiles. Moreover, age of onset might worsen the prognosis because of

  15. Psychosis in epilepsy patients and other chronic medically ill patients and the role of cerebral pathology in the onset of psychosis: A clinical epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Adèr, H.J.; Boenink, A.; Linszen, D.; van Dyck, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background In a 3-year epidemiological survey (N = 2623) prevalence of psychosis in epilepsy patients as compared with other chronic medically ill patients is assessed. Aim To explore the role of cerebral pathology as compared to the role of chronic burden of disease in the onset of psychosis.

  16. Psychosis in epilepsy patients and other chronic medically ill patients and the role of cerebral pathology in the onset of psychosis: A clinical epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Ader, H.J.; Boenink, A.D.; Linszen, D.; van Dyck, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In a 3-year epidemiological survey (N = 2623) prevalence of psychosis in epilepsy patients as compared with other chronic medically ill patients is assessed. Aim: To explore the role of cerebral pathology as compared to the role of chronic burden of disease in the onset of psychosis.

  17. Psychosis in epilepsy patients and other chronic medically ill patients and the role of cerebral pathology in the onset of psychosis: a clinical epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, C. M.; Aldenkamp, A. P.; Adèr, H. J.; Boenink, A.; Linszen, D.; van Dyck, R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a 3-year epidemiological survey (N=2623) prevalence of psychosis in epilepsy patients as compared with other chronic medically ill patients is assessed. AIM: To explore the role of cerebral pathology as compared to the role of chronic burden of disease in the onset of psychosis.

  18. Transient psychosis due to painless thyroiditis in a patient with anxiety disorder: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Nobuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There are few reports on thyrotoxic psychosis caused by diseases other than Graves' disease or toxic nodular goiter. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was treated for anxiety disorder in our clinic for 10 years. She had five episodes of transient psychosis during the first five years. When she developed psychosis without neck pain 10 years after her first visit, a laboratory reexamination revealed that she had subclinical hyperthyroidism, and tested positive for antithyroid autoantibodies, negative for thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody and had decreased radioactive iodine uptake. She was diagnosed as having painless thyroiditis. The hyperthyroidism disappeared within a month, and the psychosis lasted for three months. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of psychosis due to painless thyroiditis-induced hyperthyroidism. Physical symptoms of painless thyroiditis are often so mild that careful differential diagnosis is necessary in the cases of transient psychosis.

  19. Risk for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy: population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Xu, Huylan; Laursen, Thomas Munk

    2005-01-01

    .20) in people with a history of epilepsy. The effect of epilepsy was the same in men and in women and increased with age. Family history of psychosis and a family history of epilepsy were significant risk factors for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis, and the effect of epilepsy, both in cases......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether age at onset of epilepsy, type of epilepsy, family history of psychosis, or family history of epilepsy affect the risk of schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy. DESIGN: Comparison of population based data. SETTING: Danish...... and families, was greater among people with no family history of psychosis. In addition, the increased risk for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis did not differ by type of epilepsy but increased with increasing number of admissions to hospital and, particularly, was significantly greater for people...

  20. Implementing cognitive therapies into routine psychosis care: organisational foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Frances; Whiteford, Harvey; Ashkanasy, Neal M; Harvey, Carol; Crompton, David; Newman, Ellie

    2015-08-05

    Treatment outcomes for people diagnosed with psychosis remain suboptimal due in part to the limited systematic application of evidence based practice (Adm Policy Ment Health, 36: 1-7, 2009) [1]. The Implementation science literature identifies a number of factors organisationally that need to be considered when planning to introduce a particular EBP. Profiling these organisational characteristics at baseline, prior to commencement of service reform can determine the focus of a subsequent implementation plan. This study examined the organisational baseline factors existing in two services promoting the routine use of cognitive interventions for psychosis. One of the services studied has since undertaken organisational structural reform to facilitate the greater uptake of Evidence Based Practice (EBP). The results of this study were used to design an implementation strategy to make cognitive therapies a part of routine psychosis care. One hundred-and-six mental health staff from two metropolitan mental health services in Australia was surveyed to ascertain their attitudes, competencies and interest in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) and Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT). In addition perceptions of organisational values were profiled using the Organisational Culture Profile (OCP). Fifty five participants were excluded because they completed less than 50% of the survey. The final sample consisted of 51 participants. 48.1% of surveys were completed. Over 50% of staff were interested in CBTp and CRT approaches to psychosis. Staff were aware of existing CBTp and CRT programs but these were not uniformly available throughout the services. Fourteen percent of staff identified as CBT therapist and 35% were trained CRT facilitators. Only 12% of staff were receiving therapy specific supervision. The Organisational Culture Profile (OCP) at baseline revealed highest scores amongst leadership, planning, and humanistic workplace domains, with communication

  1. Psychosis and help-seeking behavior in rural KwaZulu Natal: unearthing local insights

    OpenAIRE

    Labys, Charlotte A.; Susser, Ezra; Burns, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Growing interest in strategies regarding early intervention for psychosis has led to a parallel interest in understanding help-seeking behavior, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Nevertheless, few LMIC studies have examined individuals with psychosis in non-urban, non-hospital settings. Using the perspective of formal and informal community service providers, we aimed to uncover descriptions of people with psychosis in a rural South African community and illum...

  2. Cannabis and Neuropsychiatry, 2: The Longitudinal Risk of Psychosis as an Adverse Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-06-01

    Psychosis is one of the most serious among the adverse effects associated with cannabis use. The association between cannabis use and psychosis has been variously explored in a series of recent meta-analyses. The results of these meta-analyses show that persons who develop psychosis experience onset of psychosis about 2-3 years earlier if they are cannabis users; this effect is not observed with alcohol or other substance use. Higher levels of cannabis use are associated with greater risk of psychosis. Current cannabis abuse or dependence (but not past use or lower levels of current use) increases the risk of transition into psychosis in persons at ultrahigh risk of psychosis. About a third of patients with first-episode psychosis are cannabis users, and, at follow-up, about half of these users are found to continue their cannabis use. Continued cannabis use (in those who are treated after developing psychosis) is associated with higher risk of relapse into psychosis, and discontinuation of cannabis use reduces the risk of relapse to that in cannabis nonusers. Finally, persons with psychosis who continue to use cannabis have more severe positive symptoms and poorer levels of functioning. Because experimental studies in humans show that cannabinoids and cannabis can induce psychotic symptoms, it is reasonable to assume that the epidemiologic data indicate a causal effect of cannabis in anticipating, triggering, or exacerbating psychosis in vulnerable individuals and in worsening the course and outcome of the illness in those who continue to use the substance. Given the public health implications of these findings, the trend to legalize medical marijuana must be viewed with concern, and efforts are necessary to educate patients and the public about the serious mental and physical health risks associated with cannabis use and abuse. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Art therapy for people with psychosis:a narrative review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Attard, Angelica; Larkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy enables individuals to use art to creatively express themselves and communicate differently with themselves, others, and their reality. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for psychosis and schizophrenia suggest that arts therapies, which include art therapy, are considered to improve negative symptoms of psychosis. We examined the effectiveness of art therapy for people with psychosis and explored whether art therapy is a meaningful and acceptable...

  4. Neurological signs and cognitive performance distinguish between adolescents with and without psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B; Rojas, Donald C; Kleman, Michelle Ramos; Asherin, Ryan; Reite, Martin L

    2007-01-01

    Neurological and cognitive aspects of adolescent psychotic disorders are understudied. The authors assessed 19 adolescents with psychosis and 16 healthy comparison subjects using the Neurological Evaluation Scale (NES) and age-appropriate Wechsler intelligence quotient (IQ) scales. NES scores were highest and IQ scores were lowest among subjects with psychosis. Subjects with psychosis did not demonstrate age-related decreases in NES score. The combination of NES and IQ scores predicted both the presence of psychosis and psychiatric diagnosis. There were no relationships between medication status and either NES or IQ scores. These results support a broadly conceived neurodevelopmental formulation of adolescent psychotic disorders.

  5. Clinical presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents: Is there an age effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolsi, Michele; Lin, Ashleigh; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Pontillo, Maria; Mazzone, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Armando, Marco

    2017-06-01

    There is limited research on clinical features related to age of presentation of the Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents (CAD). Based on findings in CAD with psychosis, we hypothesized that an older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome would be associated with less severe symptoms and better psychosocial functioning than presentation in childhood or younger adolescence. Ninety-four CAD (age 9-18) meeting Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome criteria participated in the study. The sample was divided and compared according to the age of presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (9-14 vs 15-18 years). The predictive value of age of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome presentation was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-curve calculations. The two Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome groups were homogeneous in terms of gender distribution, IQ scores and comorbid diagnoses. Older Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome patients showed better functioning and lower depressive scores. ROC curves revealed that severity of functional impairment was best predicted using an age of presentation cut-off of 14.9 years for social functioning and 15.9 years for role functioning. This study partially confirmed our hypothesis; older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome was associated with less functional impairment, but age was not associated with psychotic symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects on referral patterns of reducing intensive informational campaigns about first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joa, Inge; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Auestad, Bjørn

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess referral patterns and duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) following the partial dismantling of intensive, information campaigns (IC) to help detect first-episode, non-affective psychosis via early detection teams in the TIPS study.......The primary aim of this study was to assess referral patterns and duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) following the partial dismantling of intensive, information campaigns (IC) to help detect first-episode, non-affective psychosis via early detection teams in the TIPS study....

  7. Psychosis and the dynamics of the psychotherapy process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment of the 's......The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment......-subjective process, a therapeutic relationship is disrupted and a therapeutic alliance is not assured. Therapists have to pay particular attention to the empathic aspects of the interaction as they attempt to integrate affects to restore meaning to the inner life of the patient. The psychodynamics of this process...

  8. Structural brain abnormalities in early onset first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Baaré, William Frans Christian; Raabjerg Christensen, A M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain morphometry in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis offer a unique opportunity for pathogenetic investigations. METHODS: We compared high-resolution 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain in 29 patients (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder...... that schizophrenia patients (n = 15) had significantly larger lateral ventricles as compared to controls. Duration and dose of antipsychotics correlated negatively with global gray matter volume in minimally medicated patients (n = 18). CONCLUSION: Findings of white matter changes and enlarged lateral ventricles...... already at illness onset in young schizophrenia spectrum patients, suggests aberrant neurodevelopmental processes in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Gray matter volume changes, however, appear not to be a key feature in early onset first-episode psychosis....

  9. Early detection strategies for untreated first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Jan Olav; McGlashan, T H; Larsen, Tor Ketil

    2001-01-01

    -year inclusion period (1997-2000) are described. It includes targeted information towards the general public, health professionals and schools, and ED teams to recruit appropriate patients into treatment as soon as possible. This plus easy access to psychiatric services via ED teams systematically changed......Some studies in first-episode schizophrenia correlate shorter duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) with better prognosis, suggesting that timing of treatment may be important. A three-site prospective clinical trial in Norway and Denmark is underway to investigate the effect of the timing......-episode cases. The study ultimately will compare early detected with usual detected patients. This paper describes the study's major independent intervention variable, i.e. a comprehensive education and detection system to change DUP in first onset psychosis. System variables and first results from the four...

  10. Ethnic variations in pathways into early intervention services for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Sharif; Fisher, Helen L; Joyce, John; Major, Barnaby; Hobbs, Lorna; Soni, Sujata; Chisholm, Brock; Rahaman, Nikola; Papada, Peggy; Lawrence, Jo; Bloy, Sally; Marlowe, Karl; Aitchison, Katherine J; Power, Paddy; Johnson, Sonia

    2013-04-01

    Ethnic variations have previously been identified in the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) and pathways into psychiatric services. These have not been examined in the context of early intervention services, which may alter these trajectories. To explore ethnic differences in the nature and duration of pathways into early intervention services. In a naturalistic cohort study, data were collected for 1024 individuals with psychotic disorders accepted for case management by eight London early intervention services. Duration of untreated psychosis was prolonged in the White British group compared with most other ethnic groups. White British individuals were more likely to make contact with their general practitioner and less likely to be seen within emergency medical services. All Black patient groups were more likely than their White British counterparts to experience involvement of criminal justice agencies. Variations continue to exist in how and when individuals from different ethnic groups access early intervention services. These may account for disparities in DUP.

  11. Early detection of psychosis: finding those at clinical high risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Jean; Epstein, Irvin; Reynolds, Andrea; Furimsky, Ivana; Rudy, Laura; Mancini, Barbara; McMillan, Simone; Kirsopp, Diane; Zipursky, Robert B

    2008-08-01

    In early detection work, recruiting individuals who meet the prodromal criteria is difficult. The aim of this paper was to describe the development of a research clinic for individuals who appear to be at risk of developing a psychosis and the process for educating the community and obtaining referrals. The outcome of all referrals to the clinic over a 4-year period was examined. Following an ongoing education campaign that was over inclusive in order to aid recruitment, approximately 27% of all referrals met the criteria for being at clinical high risk of psychosis. We are seeing only a small proportion of those in the community who eventually go on to develop a psychotic illness. This raises two important issues, namely how to remedy the situation, and second, the impact of this on current research in terms of sampling bias and generalizability of research findings. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Are working memory deficits in bipolar disorder markers for psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel N; Randall, Carol; Bello, Danielle; Armstrong, Christina; Frantom, Linda; Cross, Chad; Kinney, Jefferson

    2010-03-01

    Working memory deficits have been identified in bipolar disorder, but there is evidence suggesting that these deficits may be markers for psychosis rather than affective disorder. The current study examined this issue by comparing two groups of individuals with bipolar disorder, one with psychotic features and one without psychotic features, with a group of normal controls. Working memory was conceptualized as a multicomponent system that includes auditory and visuospatial short-term stores, executive control processes, and an episodic buffer that allows for communication between short- and long-term memory stores (Baddeley & Logie, 1999). Results indicated that only executive control processes significantly differentiated the psychotic and nonpsychotic bipolar groups, although visuospatial working memory differentiated both bipolar groups from controls. The results support the idea that some aspects of working memory performance are markers for psychosis, while others may be more general markers for bipolar disorders. Copyright 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Homicide and Associated Steroid Acute Psychosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Airagnes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an old man treated with methylprednisolone for chronic lymphoid leukemia. After two months of treatment, he declared an acute steroid psychosis and beat his wife to death. Steroids were stopped and the psychotic symptoms subsided, but his condition declined very quickly. The clinical course was complicated by a major depressive disorder with suicidal ideas, due to the steroid stoppage, the leukemia progressed, and by a sudden onset of a fatal pulmonary embolism. This clinical case highlights the importance of early detection of steroid psychosis and proposes, should treatment not be stopped, a strategy of dose reduction combined with a mood stabilizer or antipsychotic treatment. In addition have been revised the risks of the adverse psychiatric effects of steroids.

  14. Logical Attractors: a Boolean Approach to the Dynamics of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Z.; Hoffmann, H.

    A Boolean modeling approach to attractors in the dynamics of psychosis is presented: Kinetic Logic, originating from R. Thomas, describes systems on an intermediate level between a purely verbal, qualitative description and a description using nonlinear differential equations. With this method we may model impact, feedback and temporal evolution, as well as analyze the resulting attractors. In our previous research the method has been applied to general and more specific questions in the dynamics of psychotic disorders. In this paper a model is introduced that describes different dynamical patterns of chronic psychosis in the context of vocational rehabilitation. It also shows to be useful in formulating and exploring possible treatment strategies. Finally, some of the limitations and benefits of Kinetic Logic as a modeling tool for psychology and psychiatry are discussed.

  15. Dopamine, fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandash, Orwa; Pantelis, Christos; Fornito, Alex

    2017-02-01

    A series of parallel, integrated circuits link distinct regions of prefrontal cortex with specific nuclei of the striatum and thalamus. Dysfunction of these fronto-striato-thalamic systems is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of psychosis. In this review, we examine evidence from human and animal investigations that dysfunction of a specific dorsal fronto-striato-thalamic circuit, linking the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal (associative) striatum, and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, is apparent across different stages of psychosis, including prior to the onset of a first episode, suggesting that it represents a candidate risk biomarker. We consider how abnormalities at distinct points in the circuit may give rise to the pattern of findings seen in patient populations, and how these changes relate to disruptions in dopamine, glutamate and GABA signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Empathy in individuals clinically at risk for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derntl, B.; Michel, T. M.; Prempeh, P.

    2015-01-01

    no significant deficit in the CHR group. Functional data analysis revealed hyperactivation in a frontotemporoparietal network including the amygdala in the CHR group compared with the other two groups. Conclusions Despite normal behavioural performance, the CHR group activated the neural empathy network...... differently and specifically showed hyperactivation in regions critical for emotion processing. This could suggest a compensatory mechanism reflecting emotional hypersensitivity or dysfunctional emotion regulation. Further investigations should clarify the role of these neural alterations for development...... high risk for psychosis. Method Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured 15 individuals at clinical high risk of psychosis (CHR group) and compared their empathy performance with 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients with schizophrenia. Results Behavioural data analysis indicated...

  17. Glucocorticosteroids associated with a decreased risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, Wijnand; Smeets, Hugo; de Wit, Niek J; Kahn, René S; Grobbee, Diederick E; Burger, Huibert

    2009-06-01

    The hypothesis that chronic inflammation may play a role in psychosis receives increasing attention. In this study, we aim to investigate whether the use of steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with a decreased risk of psychosis.A longitudinal nested case-control study was performed investigating the association of glucocorticosteroid (GCS) consumption with a new diagnosis of a psychotic disorder. Significantly reduced odds ratios of 0.52 (95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.75) were found for GCS in men only (odds ratio in women, 0.84 [95% confidence interval, 0.590-1.20]). Similar risk reductions were present for the inhaled and systemic GCSs. A dose-response relationship was present. Our finding of an inverse relation between GCS consumption and new psychotic episodes may promote further research into inflammation in schizophrenia.

  18. The association of lifetime insight and cognition in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Zarzuela, Amalia; Peralta, Victor; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2015-03-01

    Poor insight has been related to poor course in psychosis. However, the role of cognition in insight remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of cognition and lifetime psychopathological dimensions on insight in psychosis. We followed up 42 patients with psychotic disorders over 10years. Lifetime psychopathological dimensions and cognitive performance were assessed. Patients were divided into two groups by lifetime patterns of insight and compared with 42 healthy volunteers. Lower IQ and poorer social cognition were associated with higher risks of poorer lifetime insight of feeling ill and global insight respectively. Lifetime negative symptoms were associated with a higher risk of poorer lifetime insight into symptoms. Lifetime lack of insight is independent of cognitive impairment in specific domains, except for social cognition. Higher IQ may contribute to better lifetime awareness of illness, while better ability to manage emotions is involved in lifetime global insight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Caring for an intimate stranger: parenting a child with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmi, E; Bellali, T; Papazoglou, I; Karamitri, I; Papadatou, D

    2017-05-01

    The care of an adult son or daughter with psychosis is filled with overwhelming demands caused by the symptomatology and illness exacerbations. Parents display disenfranchised grief over multiple losses and report increased levels of emotional burden. Most studies use quantitative methods and rely on pre-existing theoretical frameworks to investigate, through psychometric measures, the effects of being a carer. Meaning attributions to the disorder, and changes in parent-child relations over time, are poorly understood. This hermeneutic phenomenological study illuminates the subjective experience of parenting a son or daughter with psychosis, as it is lived and described by parents of young adults with psychosis. Findings suggest that the parents' perceptions of their child changes over the course of the disorder, leading to a redefinition of the parent-child relationship, causing alternations in attachment. Findings illuminate the parents' profound guilt over having contributed or not prevented the disorder, over not being 'good' parents and feeling ambivalent towards an 'intimate stranger.' Guilt is compensated by absolute dedication to the son or daughter's care, at the expense of their own well-being. Interventions for parents must be available as soon as possible, both during hospitalization and after discharge. Professionals should provide a therapeutic space, where parents could express intimate thoughts and feelings, address guilt, fear and resentment issues, be assisted in their parenting role as well as in the reconstruction of a sense of self and self-esteem. Professionals are invited to facilitate illness acceptance, provide accurate information, assist parents to redefine their relationship to the child and facilitate the integration of the traumatic experience into their personal and family narrative. Professionals must develop in depth awareness of their biases and attitudes, have an ongoing training on how to respond to the parents' needs, facilitate

  20. Suicidal behavior and mortality in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Madsen, Trine; Fedyszyn, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    is particularly high during the first year of the initial contact with mental health services, being almost twice as high as in the later course of the illness. The most consistently reported risk factor for suicide among people with psychotic disorders is a history of attempted suicide and depression. Suicide......Suicide is a serious public health problem, with more than 800,000 deaths taking place worldwide each year. Mental disorders are associated with increased risk of suicide. In schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, the lifetime risk of suicide death is estimated to be 5.6%. The risk...... risk in psychosis in Denmark decreased over time, most likely because of improved quality of inpatient and outpatient services. There is a high proportion of young people with first-episode psychosis who attempted suicide before their first contact with mental health services. This finding suggests...

  1. Conceptualizing the therapist's role in therapy in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilks, Sarah; Tasker, Fiona; Wren, Bernadette

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on a subset of findings from a wider ranging grounded theory analysis of therapy and recovery processes in psychosis. It describes therapist activities involved in maintaining an observational perspective during therapy and the links between these and other therapist activities. Grounded theory was used to examine the qualitative data collected. An initial sample of 19 taped therapy sessions and 23 interviews with psychologists and their clients was collected. This sample was extended through the collection of three further interviews with psychoanalytically aware psychologists. The data were analysed using grounded theory. A grounded theory model of therapy processes in psychosis was developed that conceptualized therapist actions as providing an observational scaffold to support the client's efforts in moving to new perspectives on their situation. Consistent with the understanding of the core therapy activity as a dialogical process, this set of therapist actions was understood as occurring alongside other therapist activities involved in managing emotion and building a relationship in therapy. The central activity of therapy in psychosis was understood as a dialogical process continuously negotiated between therapist and client in conversation and was conceptually summarized in the grounded theory as 'building bridges to observational perspectives'. However, the active and strategic efforts of psychologists to sustain the dialogue implied a particular assumption of responsibility for maintaining this process. In particular, therapists appeared to be 'working to maintain observational perspectives', 'managing emotion', and 'doing relationship' during the therapy conversation as part of the joint effort with clients to build bridges to new observational perspectives on distress and psychosis. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Fetishistic Transvestism in a Patient with Mental Retardation and Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Velayudhan, Rajmohan; Khaleel, Asfia; Sankar, Nideesh; Kumar, Manoj; Kazhungil, Firoz; Raghuram, Thazhe Mangool

    2014-01-01

    Fetishistic transvestism is a disorder of sexual preference associated with fantasies and sexual urges to dress in opposite gender clothing as a means of arousal and as an adjunct to masturbation and coitus. The disorder has been reported in people with learning disabilities. The disorder has been reported in a young male with dull normal intelligence. Transvestism though has been described in schizophrenia and psychosis and fetishism has been described in the course of simple schizophrenia, ...

  3. Biomarkers of brain function in psychosis and their genetic basis

    OpenAIRE

    Ranlund, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, are amongst the most severe and enduring mental illnesses. Recent research has identified several genetic variants associated with an increased risk of developing psychosis; however, it remains largely unknown how these lead to the illness. This is where endophenotypes – heritable traits associated with the illness and observed in unaffected family members of patients – could be valuable. Endophenotypes are linked to the genet...

  4. Treatment outcomes of acute bipolar depressive episode with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieraro, Marco Antonio; Dufour, Steven; Sylvia, Louisa G; Gao, Keming; Ketter, Terence A; Bobo, William V; Walsh, Samantha; Janos, Jessica; Tohen, Mauricio; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; McElroy, Susan L; Shelton, Richard C; Bowden, Charles L; Deckersbach, Thilo; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2018-05-01

    The impact of psychosis on the treatment of bipolar depression is remarkably understudied. The primary aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes of bipolar depressed individuals with and without psychosis. The secondary aim was to compare the effect of lithium and quetiapine, each with adjunctive personalized treatments (APTs), in the psychotic subgroup. We assessed participants with DSM-IV bipolar depression included in a comparative effectiveness study of lithium and quetiapine with APTs (the Bipolar CHOICE study). Severity was assessed by the Bipolar Inventory of Symptoms Scale (BISS) and by the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity-Bipolar Version (CGI-S-BP). Mixed models were used to assess the course of symptom change, and Cox regression survival analysis was used to assess the time to remission. Psychotic features were present in 10.6% (n = 32) of the depressed participants (n = 303). Those with psychotic features had higher scores on the BISS before (75.2 ± 17.6 vs. 54.9 ± 16.3; P Bipolar depressive episodes with psychotic features are more severe, and compared to nonpsychotic depressions, present a similar course of improvement. Given the small number of participants presenting psychosis, the lack of statistically significant difference between lithium- and quetiapine-based treatment of psychotic bipolar depressive episodes needs replication in a larger sample. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Negative symptoms in first episode non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Ashok K; Takhar, Jatinder J; Norman, Ross M G; Manchanda, Rahul; Cortese, Leonard; Haricharan, Raj; Verdi, Mary; Ahmed, Rashid

    2002-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of negative symptoms and to examine secondary sources of influence on negative symptoms and the role of specific negative symptoms in delay associated with seeking treatment in first episode non-affective psychosis. One hundred and ten patients who met Diagnostic Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) criteria for a first episode of schizophrenia spectrum psychoses were rated for assessment of negative, positive, depressive and extrapyramidal symptoms, the premorbid adjustment scale and assessment of demographic and clinical characteristics including duration of untreated psychosis (DUP). Alogia/flat affect and avolition/anhedonia were strongly influenced by parkinsonian and depressive symptoms, respectively. A substantial proportion (26.8%) of patients showed at a least moderate level of negative symptoms not confounded by depression and Parkinsonism. DUP was related only to avolition/anhedonia while flat affect/alogia was related to male gender, diagnosis of schizophrenia, age of onset and the length of the prodrome. Negative symptoms that are independent of the influence of positive symptoms, depression and extra pyramidal symptoms (EPS) are present in a substantial proportion of first episode psychosis patients and delay in seeking treatment is associated mainly with avolition and anhedonia.

  6. A descriptive review of qualitative studies in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Katherine M; Stasiulis, Elaine; Volpe, Tiziana; Gladstone, Brenda

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a descriptive review of published qualitative research studies on first episode psychosis (FEP). A review was undertaken to describe the findings of qualitative studies in early psychosis. Keyword searches in Medline, CINAHL, ASSIA, PsychINFO databases, as well as manual searches of other relevant journals and reference lists of primary papers, were conducted. Thirty-one qualitative papers (representing 27 discrete studies) were identified. The majority reported research concerning young people based in community settings. The research studies were organized according to the following generic social processes: (i) achieving identity; (ii) acquiring perspectives; (iii) doing activity; and, (iv) experiencing relationships. The papers reviewed are based on first-person accounts obtained from individuals who have experienced FEP, their family members and service providers. This descriptive review contributes to our understanding of the complex social processes of achieving identity, acquiring perspectives, doing activities and developing relationships as experienced by young people and the significant others in their world. The cumulative findings highlight the contextually rich and detailed information made possible through qualitative studies of FEP. They begin to account for the active engagement of individuals affected by psychosis in making sense of their experience and suggest that this experience should be understood from within young people's own framework of meaning.

  7. Post-stroke psychosis: how long should we treat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Céu Ferreira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe a rare case of a patient who developed psychotic symptoms after a right stroke that disappeared with antipsychotic treatment, but appears to need low-dose maintenance antipsychotic therapy. Case description: A 65-year-old man presented at the psychiatric emergency service with a history of persistent delusional jealousy, visual illusions and agitation with onset about 1 month after a right posterior cerebral artery ischemic stroke. These symptoms only disappeared with therapeutic dosages of an antipsychotic drug (3 mg/day of risperidone. At 2-year follow-up, he no longer had delusional activity and the antipsychotic treatment was gradually discontinued over the following year. However, 1 week after full cessation, the patient once more became agitated and suspicious and was put back on risperidone at 0.25 mg/day, resulting in rapid clinical remission. One year after the return to low-dose risperidone, the patient's psychopathology is still under control and he is free from psychotic symptoms. Comments: Psychosis is a relatively rare complication after stroke. To our knowledge, no cases of post-stroke psychosis that apparently require continuous low-dose antipsychotic treatment have been reported to date. Our case suggests that low-dose maintenance antipsychotic therapy may be needed for certain patients with post-stroke psychosis, especially for those with risk factors and non-acute onset.

  8. Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Gorczynski, Paul; De Hert, Marc; Probst, Michel; Naisiga, Annetie; Basangwa, David; Mugisha, James

    2018-04-01

    Despite the recognition of the importance of exercise self-efficacy in exercise adoption and maintenance, previous investigations on exercise self-efficacy in people with psychosis is scarce. The present study aimed to (1) explore if exercise self-efficacy differed between stages of behavior change in Ugandan outpatients with psychosis, and (2) assess sociodemographic, clinical and motivational correlates of exercise self-efficacy. In total, 48 patients (24 women) completed the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, the Brief Symptoms Inventory-18 (BSI-18), and questions pertaining to intrinsic motivation in the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. Additionally, participants were asked about their exercise behavior in the past 7 days and screened for cardio-metabolic risk factors. Higher ESES-scores were observed in those in the maintenance (n = 17) versus those in the pre-action stage (n = 17) of behavior change. Higher ESES-scores were also significantly associated with lower BSI-18 somatization and higher intrinsic motivation scores. Our data indicated that health care professionals should assist patients with psychosis in interpreting physiological states during exercise. Future research should explore whether bolstering such sources of information might directly or indirectly effect exercise self-efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 10 year course of IQ in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barder, Helene Eidsmo; Sundet, Kjetil; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of patients suffering from schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSDs) exhibit a general intellectual impairment at illness onset, but the subsequent intellectual course remains unclear. Relationships between accumulated time in psychosis and long-term intellectual functionin...... performance on test of immediate verbal recall/working memory (WAIS-R Digit Span). This indicates a relationship between accumulated duration of psychosis and long-term intellectual course, irrespective of diagnostic category, in a significant subgroup of patients.......A substantial proportion of patients suffering from schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSDs) exhibit a general intellectual impairment at illness onset, but the subsequent intellectual course remains unclear. Relationships between accumulated time in psychosis and long-term intellectual functioning...... categories were defined: core versus non-core SSDs. No significant change in IQ was found for the total sample. Intellectual course was not related to DUP or stringency of diagnostic category. However, a subgroup with long DAT demonstrated a significant intellectual decline, mainly associated with a weaker...

  10. CLINICAL RESEARCH ON ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF DEPRESSIVE PSYCHOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符文彬

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the therapeutic effect of acupuncture in the treatment of depressive psychosis.Methods:A total of 62 cases of depressive psychosis patients were randomly divided into treatment group(n=32) and control group(n=30).Acupoints used in treatment group were bilateral Hegu (LI 4),bilateral Taichong (LR 3),Baihui (GV 20) and Yintang (EX-HN 3).Patients of control group were asked to take Fluoxertine hydrochioride 20mg/d.The therapeutic effect was assessed using Hamilton's depression (HAMD) scales.Results:After 8 weeks' treatment,in treatment and control groups,4 and 3 cases were cured,8 and 6experienced marked improvement,14 and 14 had improvement,6 and 7 had no effect,with the effective rates being 81.25% and 76.66% separately,and no significant difference was found between two groups in HAMD scales (P>0.05).Conclusion:Acupuncture therapy is an effective method for treatment of depressive psychosis.

  11. Insight in Psychosis: An Indicator of Severity of Psychosis, an Explanatory Model of Illness, and a Coping Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies related to insight, explanatory models (EMs) of illness and their relationship to outcome of psychosis are reviewed. The traditional argument that insight predicts outcome in psychosis is not supported by recent longitudinal data, which has been analyzed using multivariable statistics that adjust for severity and quality of illness. While all cognition will have a neurobiological representation, if “insight” is related to the primary psychotic process, then insight cannot be seen as an independent predictor of outcome but a part of the progression of illness. The evidence suggests insight, like all EMs, is belief which interacts with the trajectory of the person's illness and the local culture to produce a unique understanding of the illness for the particular individual and his/her family. PMID:27335513

  12. Relation between premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis and close interpersonal trauma in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Simonsen, Erik

    2018-01-01

    Trauma Survey at their 5 years follow-up interview. RESULTS: Half of the patients reported that they had experienced interpersonal trauma and one-third reported having experienced close interpersonal trauma before the age of 18. Women reported more sexual abuse, physical attacks and emotional...... different types of trauma, in particular close interpersonal traumas experienced before the age of 18, premorbid factors and baseline clinical characteristics in a sample of first-episode psychosis patients. METHODS: A total of 191 patients from the 'TIPS' cohort completed assessment with the Brief Betrayal...... and physical maltreatment than men. There were significant associations between early interpersonal trauma and premorbid adjustment and duration of untreated psychosis, but no significant associations with length of education, comorbid substance use or baseline clinical symptomatology. CONCLUSIONS: Close...

  13. Aggression as an independent entity even in psychosis- the role of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Deuri, Sailendra Kumar; Sarmah, Anil; Pathak, Kangkan; Baruah, Aparajeeta; Sengupta, Soumik; Mehta, Sumit; Avinash, Priya Ranjan; Kalita, Kamal Narayan; Hazarika, Jyoti

    2016-03-15

    Aggression is very common in psychosis (prevalence ranging from 34% to 70%) and is often the main or first symptom for which the patient receives medical attention. Studies have associated alteration in cytokine profiles among healthy persons with aggressive traits. We hypothesise that even among those with psychosis, aggression is an independent entity, irrespective of psychotic state and is associated with cytokine alterations. To our knowledge, this is the first study attempting to look at the inflammatory cytokines in aggressive psychotic patients. Study included 80 participants divided into four groups viz. aggressive diseased, non aggressive diseased, aggressive non diseased and non aggressive non diseased depending upon presence or absence of aggression and psychosis. Interferon gamma(IFN-G), Interleukin 10(IL10) plasma concentrations and their ratio were measured using ELISA based assay kits read at absorbance of 450 nm wavelength using Double beam spectrophotometer. The four groups were compared on measures of aggression, psychosis, Interferon Gamma levels, Interleukin 10 levels, Proinflammatory: Antiinflammatory cytokine ratio using standard statistical instruments. In patients with psychosis, the cytokines IFN-G and IL10 were significantly lower compared to those without. The cytokines IFN-G and IL10 are both significantly associated both with aggression and psychosis. IL10, but not IFN-G is associated with aggression in absence of psychosis. The proinflammatory: antiinflammatory cytokine ratio, is more significantly associated with aggression, irrespective of psychosis. In fact, there is no significant relationship between the above ratio and psychosis. Strong correlation exists between the proinflammatory: antiinflammatory cytokine ratio and aggression scores, even after controlling for severity of psychosis. It may be concluded from this study that in spite of a high prevalence of aggression in patients of psychosis, it is more likely to be an

  14. Reward Learning, Neurocognition, Social Cognition, and Symptomatology in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Whitton, Alexis E; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Norris, Lesley A; Ongur, Dost; Hall, Mei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychosis spectrum disorders exhibit deficits in social and neurocognition, as well as hallmark abnormalities in motivation and reward processing. Aspects of reward processing may overlap behaviorally and neurobiologically with some elements of cognitive functioning, and abnormalities in these processes may share partially overlapping etiologies in patients. However, whether reward processing and cognition are associated across the psychoses and linked to state and trait clinical symptomatology is unclear. The present study examined associations between cognitive functioning, reward learning, and clinical symptomatology in a cross-diagnostic sample. Patients with schizophrenia (SZ; n = 37), bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BD; n = 42), and healthy controls (n = 29) were assessed for clinical symptoms (patients only), neurocognitive functioning using the MATRICS Battery (MCCB) and reward learning using the probabilistic reward task (PRT). Groups were compared on neurocognition and PRT response bias, and associations between PRT response bias and neurocognition or clinical symptoms were examined controlling for demographic variables and PRT task difficulty (discriminability). Patients with SZ performed worse than controls on most measures of neurocognition; patients with BD exhibited deficits in some domains between the level of patients with SZ and controls. The SZ - but not BD - group exhibited deficits in social cognition compared to controls. Patients and controls did not differ on PRT response bias, but did differ on PRT discriminability. Better response bias across the sample was associated with poorer social cognition, but not neurocognition; conversely, discriminability was associated with neurocognition but not social cognition. Symptoms of psychosis, particularly negative symptoms, were associated with poorer response bias across patient groups. Reward learning was associated with symptoms of psychosis - in particular negative

  15. White noise speech illusion and psychosis expression: An experimental investigation of psychosis liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Lotta-Katrin; Guloksuz, Sinan; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Decoster, Jeroen; van Winkel, Ruud; Collip, Dina; Delespaul, Philippe; De Hert, Marc; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; Jacobs, Nele; Wichers, Marieke; Simons, Claudia J P; Rutten, Bart P F; van Os, Jim

    2017-01-01

    An association between white noise speech illusion and psychotic symptoms has been reported in patients and their relatives. This supports the theory that bottom-up and top-down perceptual processes are involved in the mechanisms underlying perceptual abnormalities. However, findings in nonclinical populations have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine the association between white noise speech illusion and subclinical expression of psychotic symptoms in a nonclinical sample. Findings were compared to previous results to investigate potential methodology dependent differences. In a general population adolescent and young adult twin sample (n = 704), the association between white noise speech illusion and subclinical psychotic experiences, using the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R) and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), was analyzed using multilevel logistic regression analyses. Perception of any white noise speech illusion was not associated with either positive or negative schizotypy in the general population twin sample, using the method by Galdos et al. (2011) (positive: ORadjusted: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.6-1.12, p = 0.217; negative: ORadjusted: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.56-1.02, p = 0.065) and the method by Catalan et al. (2014) (positive: ORadjusted: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79-1.57, p = 0.557). No association was found between CAPE scores and speech illusion (ORadjusted: 1.25, 95% CI: 0.88-1.79, p = 0.220). For the Catalan et al. (2014) but not the Galdos et al. (2011) method, a negative association was apparent between positive schizotypy and speech illusion with positive or negative affective valence (ORadjusted: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24-0.81, p = 0.008). Contrary to findings in clinical populations, white noise speech illusion may not be associated with psychosis proneness in nonclinical populations.

  16. What is a psychosis and where is it located?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2008-06-01

    Kraepelin's dichotomy, manic-depressive insanity and dementia praecox, are contrasting and true endogenous disease entities which affect excitability, the fundamental property of the CNS. Kraepelin wanted to establish a valid classification and hit the extremes in brain structure and function at a time when we had no knowledge of brain dysfunction in "functional" psychoses. The aetiology is now known: the psychoses are part of human growth and maturation and might be classified according to their brain dysfunction, which is exactly what Kraepelin wanted. However, presumably to reduce the stigma attached to the word "psychosis", there is currently a strong initiative to eliminate the concept. But knowledge of what is happening in the brain in a psychosis might be more helpful in reducing stigma. It is suggested that psychosis is due to an affection of the supplementary motor area (SMA), located at the centre of the Medial Frontal Lobe network. The SMA is one of the rare universally connected areas of the brain, as should be the case for such a key structure that makes decisions as to the right moment for action. This important network, which partly has continuous neurogenesis, has sufficiently widespread connections. The SMA, a premotor area located on the medial side of the frontal lobes, is one of the last regions to reach a concurrence of synaptogenesis. An affection of the SMA, a deficient or abolished Delayed Response Task, seriously disturbs our relation and adaptation to the surroundings. We usually master the Delayed Response Task around the age of 7 months, a time at which the second CNS regressive event takes place, which proceeds from the posterior to the anterior of the brain. In very late maturation, a persistent affection of the SMA might occur. We experience a chronic psychosis: infantile autism (IA), a chronic inability to act consciously, which contrasts with the episodic SMA affection post-puberty, when excitation is reduced due to excessive

  17. Is Adolescent-Onset First-Episode Psychosis Different from Adult Onset?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballageer, Trevor; Malla, Ashok; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether first-episode psychosis patients with onset during adolescence (ages 15-18) differ significantly from those with young-adult onset (ages 19-30). Method: Consecutive patients presenting with first-episode psychosis (N = 242) were assessed for demographic and illness characteristics such as duration of untreated…

  18. Cumulative social disadvantage, ethnicity and first-episode psychosis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C; Kirkbride, J; Hutchinson, G; Craig, T; Morgan, K; Dazzan, P; Boydell, J; Doody, G A; Jones, P B; Murray, R M; Leff, J; Fearon, P

    2008-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported high rates of psychosis in the Black Caribbean population in the UK. Recent speculation about the reasons for these high rates has focused on social factors. However, there have been few empirical studies. We sought to compare the prevalence of specific indicators of social disadvantage and isolation, and variations by ethnicity, in subjects with a first episode of psychosis and a series of healthy controls. All cases with a first episode of psychosis who made contact with psychiatric services in defined catchment areas in London and Nottingham, UK and a series of community controls were recruited over a 3-year period. Data relating to clinical and social variables were collected from cases and controls. On all indicators, cases were more socially disadvantaged and isolated than controls, after controlling for potential confounders. These associations held when the sample was restricted to those with an affective diagnosis and to those with a short prodrome and short duration of untreated psychosis. There was a clear linear relationship between concentrated disadvantage and odds of psychosis. Similar patterns were evident in the two main ethnic groups, White British and Black Caribbean. However, indicators of social disadvantage and isolation were more common in Black Caribbean subjects than White British subjects. We found strong associations between indicators of disadvantage and psychosis. If these variables index exposure to factors that increase risk of psychosis, their greater prevalence in the Black Caribbean population may contribute to the reported high rates of psychosis in this population.

  19. Clinicopathological correlation of psychosis and brain vascular changes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Hao, Ying; Chia, Pei Shi; Tan, Eng-King; Hameed, Shahul

    2016-02-12

    Psychosis is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, studies on neuropathology in vascular etiology contributing to psychosis in AD is lacking to date. The aim of this study was to investigate neuropathological vascular related changes in Alzheimer's disease with psychosis. Data of patients with AD from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center between 2005 to September 2013 was accessed and reviewed. Presence of psychosis was determined based on Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire taken from the last visit within one year prior to death, and patients were divided into psychosis positive and negative group. Comparison of clinical details and neuropathological vascular changes between the groups was performed using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Chi-square/ Fisher's exact test. Significant variables were further included in a multivariate logistic model. Overall, 145 patients was included. Of these, 50 patients were psychosis positive. Presence of one or more cortical microinfarcts and moderate to severe arteriosclerosis was found to be positively associated with psychosis. Our results suggest vascular changes correlate with psychosis in Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Epilepsy and non-organic non-affective psychosis. National epidemiologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredkjaer, S R; Mortensen, P B; Parnas, Josef

    1998-01-01

    : The incidences of the spectrum of non-organic non-affective psychosis, non-affective psychosis and schizophrenia were significantly increased both for men and women, even after exclusion of people diagnosed as suffering from a learning disability or substance misuse. CONCLUSION: This study supports the notion...

  1. Adult attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms and psychosis: Epidemiological evidence from a population survey in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwaha, Steven; Thompson, Andrew; Bebbington, Paul; Singh, Swaran P; Freeman, Daniel; Winsper, Catherine; Broome, Matthew R

    2015-09-30

    Despite both having some shared features, evidence linking psychosis and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is sparse and inconsistent. Hypotheses tested were (1) adult ADHD symptoms are associated with auditory hallucinations, paranoid ideation and psychosis (2) links between ADHD symptoms and psychosis are mediated by prescribed ADHD medications, use of illicit drugs, and dysphoric mood. The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 (N=7403) provided data for regression and multiple mediation analyses. ADHD symptoms were coded from the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS). Higher ASRS total score was significantly associated with psychosis, paranoid ideation and auditory hallucinations despite controlling for socio-demographic variables, verbal IQ, autism spectrum disorder traits, childhood conduct problems, hypomanic and dysphoric mood. An ASRS score indicating probable ADHD diagnosis was also significantly associated with psychosis. The link between higher ADHD symptoms and psychosis, paranoia and auditory hallucinations was significantly mediated by dysphoric mood, but not by use of amphetamine, cocaine or cannabis. In conclusion, higher levels of adult ADHD symptoms and psychosis are linked and dysphoric mood may form part of the mechanism. Our analyses contradict the traditional clinical view that the main explanation for people with ADHD symptoms developing psychosis is illicit drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A polygenic risk score analysis of psychosis endophenotypes across brain functional, structural, and cognitive domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranlund, Siri; Calafato, Stella; Thygesen, Johan H.; Lin, Kuang; Cahn, Wiepke; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; de Zwarte, Sonja M.C.; Díez, Álvaro; Di Forti, Marta; Iyegbe, Conrad; Jablensky, Assen; Jones, Rebecca; Hall, Mei Hua; Kahn, Rene; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kravariti, Eugenia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Picchioni, Marco M; Prata, Diana P.; Rujescu, Dan; Schulze, Katja; Shaikh, Madiha; Toulopoulou, Timothea; van Haren, Neeltje; van Os, Jim; Vassos, Evangelos; Walshe, Muriel; Lewis, Cathryn M; Murray, Robin M.; Powell, John F.; Bramon, Elvira

    This large multi-center study investigates the relationships between genetic risk for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and multi-modal endophenotypes for psychosis. The sample included 4,242 individuals; 1,087 patients with psychosis, 822 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients, and 2,333

  3. The adverse health effects of synthetic cannabinoids with emphasis on psychosis-like effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Jan; Brunt, Tibor; van den Brink, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of psychosis in vulnerable individuals. Cannabis containing high levels of the partial cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) agonist tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is associated with the induction of psychosis in susceptible subjects and with the

  4. Cannabis use and age at onset of symptoms in subjects at clinical high risk for psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragt, S.; Nieman, D. H.; Schultze-Lutter, F.; van der Meer, F.; Becker, H.; de Haan, L.; Dingemans, P. M.; Birchwood, M.; Patterson, P.; Salokangas, R. K. R.; Heinimaa, M.; Heinz, A.; Juckel, G.; Graf von Reventlow, H.; French, P.; Stevens, H.; Ruhrmann, S.; Klosterkötter, J.; Linszen, D. H.; McGorry, Patrick D.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Knapp, Martin; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Klaassen, Rianne; Picker, Heinz; Neumann, Meike; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; Pukrop, Ralf; Svirskis, Tanja; Huttunen, Jukka; Laine, Tiina; Ilonen, Tuula; Ristkari, Terja; Hietala, Jarmo; Skeate, Amanda; Gudlowski, Yehonala; Ozgürdal, Seza; Witthaus, Henning; Lewis, Shôn; Morrisson, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Numerous studies have found a robust association between cannabis use and the onset of psychosis. Nevertheless, the relationship between cannabis use and the onset of early ( or, in retrospect, prodromal) symptoms of psychosis remains unclear. The study focused on investigating the

  5. The Strauss and Carpenter Prognostic Scale in subjects clinically at high risk of psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieman, D. H.; Velthorst, E.; Becker, H. E.; de Haan, L.; Dingemans, P. M.; Linszen, D. H.; Birchwood, M.; Patterson, P.; Salokangas, R. K. R.; Heinimaa, M.; Heinz, A.; Juckel, G.; von Reventlow, H. G.; Morrison, A.; Schultze-Lutter, F.; Klosterkötter, J.; Ruhrmann, S.; McGorry, Patrick D.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Knapp, Martin; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Klaassen, Rianne; Picker, Heinz; Neumann, Meike; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; Pukrop, Ralf; Svirskis, Tanja; Huttunen, Jukka; Laine, Tiina; Ilonen, Tuula; Ristkari, Terja; Hietala, Jarmo; Skeate, Amanda; Gudlowski, Yehonala; Ozgürdal, Seza; French, Paul; Stevens, Helen

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of the Strauss and Carpenter Prognostic Scale (SCPS) for transition to a first psychotic episode in subjects clinically at high risk (CHR) of psychosis. Two hundred and forty-four CHR subjects participating in the European Prediction of Psychosis Study were

  6. A meta-analysis of social skills training and related interventions for psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, David T.; McGlanaghy, Edel; Cuijpers, Pim; Van Der Gaag, Mark; Karyotaki, Eirini; MacBeth, Angus

    2018-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that social skills training (SST) is an efficacious intervention for negative symptoms in psychosis, whereas evidence of efficacy in other psychosis symptom domains is limited. The current article reports a comprehensive meta-analytic review of the evidence for SST across

  7. Virtual reality experiments linking social environment and psychosis: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, W.; Brinkman, W.P.; Dorrestijn, E.; van der Gaag, M.

    2014-01-01

    Initial studies with healthy subjects and individuals with high risk for psychosis have suggested that virtual reality (VR) environments may be used to investigate social and psychological mechanisms of psychosis. One small study reported that VR can safely be used in individuals with current

  8. Trauma-focused treatment in PTSD patients with psychosis : symptom exacerbation, adverse events, and revictimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, D.P.G.; de Bont, P.A.J.M.; van der Vleugel, B.M.; de Roos, C.; de Jongh, A.; van Minnen, A.; van der Gaag, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Most clinicians refrain from trauma treatment for patients with psychosis because they fear symptom exacerbation and relapse. This study examined the negative side effects of trauma-focused (TF) treatment in patients with psychosis and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods:

  9. Integrated treatment of first-episode psychosis: effect of treatment on family burden: OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Pia; Petersen, Lone; Thorup, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The families of patients with first-episode psychosis often play a major role in care and often experience lack of support.......The families of patients with first-episode psychosis often play a major role in care and often experience lack of support....

  10. Altered medial temporal activation related to local glutamate levels in subjects with prodromal signs of psychosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Valli, I; Stone, J; Mechelli, A; Bhattacharyya, S; Raffin, M; Allen, P; Fusar-Poli, P; Lythgoe, D; O'Gorman, R; Seal, M; McGuire, P

    2011-01-01

    In individuals at high risk of psychosis, medial temporal dysfunction seemed related to a loss of the normal relationship with local glutamate levels. This study provides the first evidence that links medial temporal dysfunction with the central glutamate system in humans and is consistent with evidence that drugs that modulate glutamatergic transmission might be useful in the treatment of psychosis.

  11. Rates and Predictors of Conversion to Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Following Substance-Induced Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starzer, Marie Stefanie Kejser; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    . Self-harm after a substance-induced psychosis was significantly linked to a higher risk of converting to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Half the cases of conversion to schizophrenia occurred within 3.1 years after a substance-induced psychosis, and half the cases of conversion to bipolar...

  12. Psychosis as a Risk Factor for Violence to Others: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Kevin S.; Guy, Laura S.; Hart, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    The potential association between psychosis and violence to others has long been debated. Past research findings are mixed and appear to depend on numerous potential moderators. As such, the authors conducted a quantitative review (meta-analysis) of research on the association between psychosis and violence. A total of 885 effect sizes (odds…

  13. Shared and Nonshared Symptoms in Youth-Onset Psychosis and ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatekin, Canan; White, Tonya; Bingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We compared ratings of behavior and attention problems between youth-onset psychosis and ADHD, two disorders in which attentional impairments play a key role, and examined the effect of psychostimulant use on age of onset in psychosis. Method: Parent and teacher ratings of behavioral problems and ADHD symptoms were collected using the…

  14. A 12 year chart review of childhood and adolescent onset psychosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To review the profile of children and adolescents presenting with psychosis at a specialist mental health facility, and to compare childhood with adolescent onset psychosis. Method: Hospital records of all children and adolescents over a 12-year period (1999–2010) were perused to identify those falling under the ...

  15. Perspectives and Practices of Xhosa-Speaking African Traditional Healers when Managing Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mzimkulu, Kanyiswa G.; Simbayi, Leickness C.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate perspectives and practices of Xhosa-speaking African traditional healers, known as "amagqirha", in managing psychosis. Four traditional healers, 3 male and one female, were chosen to take part in the study through their association with psychosis patients undergoing treatment at a South African…

  16. Two-Year Diagnostic Stability in Early-Onset First-Episode Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Immaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Graell, Montserrat; Moreno, Dolores; Otero, Soraya; Arango, Celso

    2011-01-01

    Background: Only one study has used a prospective method to analyze the diagnostic stability of first psychotic episodes in children and adolescents. The Child and Adolescent First-Episode Psychosis Study (CAFEPS) is a 2-year, prospective longitudinal study of early-onset first episodes of psychosis (EO-FEP). Aim: To describe diagnostic stability…

  17. "La CLAve" to Increase Psychosis Literacy of Spanish-Speaking Community Residents and Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven R.; Lara, Ma. Del Carmen; Kopelowicz, Alex; Solano, Susana; Foncerrada, Hector; Aguilera, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed and tested a 35-min psychoeducational program with the goal of increasing Spanish-speaking persons' literacy of psychosis. The program uses popular cultural icons derived from music, art, and videos, as well as a mnemonic device--La CLAve (The Clue)--to increase (a) knowledge of psychosis, (b) efficacy beliefs that one can…

  18. Processing Speed and Neurodevelopment in Adolescent-Onset Psychosis: Cognitive Slowing Predicts Social Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Peter; Niendam, Tara A.; Jalbrzikowkski, Maria; Park, Chan Y.; Daley, Melita; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Onset of psychosis may be associated with abnormal adolescent neurodevelopment. Here we examined the neurocognitive profile of first-episode, adolescent onset psychosis (AOP) as compared to typically developing adolescents, and asked whether neurocognitive performance varied differentially as a function of age in the cases compared with controls.…

  19. Trauma and psychosis: The mediating role of self-concept clarity and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gavin John; Reid, Graeme; Preston, Phil; Palmier-Claus, Jasper; Sellwood, William

    2015-08-30

    Childhood trauma (CT) and psychosis may be associated. Drawing on the dissociation and social psychological literature, the current study examined the mediating role of structural aspects of self in explaining the relationship between childhood trauma and psychosis. Twenty-nine individuals with psychosis were compared with 31 healthy volunteers regarding childhood trauma, dissociation and self-concept clarity (SCC). High rates of maltreatment were found in the psychosis sample. Additionally, clinical participants reported more dissociation and less self-concept clarity. Mediational analyses were carried out on pooled data from across both clinical and non-clinical samples. These suggested that the influence of physical neglect in increasing the likelihood of experiencing psychosis was explicable through the effects of increased dissociation. Self-concept clarity mediated the relationship between psychosis and total childhood trauma, emotional abuse, physical abuse, emotional and physical neglect. Furthermore, dissociation and self-concept clarity were strongly correlated providing evidence that they may form a unitary underlying concept of 'self-concept integration'. The study provides further evidence of the link between childhood trauma and psychosis. Self-concept integration may be adversely affected by negative childhood experiences, which increases psychosis risk. Methodological limitations, clinical implications and suggestions for future research are considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On Human Symbiosis and the Vicissitudes of Individuation. Infantile Psychosis, Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Margaret S.

    The concepts of symbiosis and separation-individuation are explained, and the symbiosis theory of infantile psychosis is presented. Diagnostic considerations and clinical cases of child psychosis are reviewed; prototypes of mother-child interaction are described; and therapy is discussed. A summary of the symbiosis theory and a bibliography of…

  1. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk......% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p... of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis. METHOD: Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical...

  2. Psychophysiological deficits in young adolescents with psychosis or ADHD: Preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydkjær, Jacob; Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    add valuable information on how to differentiate premature stages of early onset psychosis from ADHD. Aim: To characterize psychophysiological deficits in young adolescents with psychosis or ADHD and compare the profiles of impariments between the two groups. Materials and methods: A cohort of young...... and low intensity prepulse trials, Mismatch Negativity (MMN), Selective Attention (SA) and P50. Results: Preliminary analyses of 18 patients with psychosis and 12 patients with ADHD showed significantly less PPI in the higher intensity prepulse trials in the psychosis group than in the ADHD group....... No significant group difference was found in the lower intensity prepulse trials. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate lower levels of PPI in adolescents with early onset psychosis than in young patients with ADHD. If these results hold in the final analyses then this knowledge may contribute to better...

  3. Career Decision-Making Processes of Young Adults With First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boychuk, Christa; Lysaght, Rosemary; Stuart, Heather

    2018-05-01

    The first episode of psychosis often emerges during young adulthood, when individuals are pursuing important educational and career goals that can become derailed because of the development of major impairments. Past research has neglected the developmental nature of employment and education decisions that young adults with first-episode psychosis make within the context of their lives. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to advance a model of the career decision-making processes of young adults with first-episode psychosis, and the influences that affect their career decision-making. The career decision-making of young adults with first-episode psychosis emerged as a multistaged, iterative process that unfolded over three phases of illness, and was affected by several internal and environmental influences. These findings suggest the phase of illness and career decision-making stage should be considered in future vocational programming for young adults with first-episode psychosis.

  4. Interaction between childhood adversity and functional polymorphisms in the dopamine pathway on first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Antonella; Iyegbe, Conrad; Yiend, Jenny; Dazzan, Paola; David, Anthony S; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Colizzi, Marco; Murray, Robin M; Di Forti, Marta; Fisher, Helen L

    2018-04-10

    There is consistent evidence of a cumulative relationship between childhood adversity and psychosis, with number of adversities experienced increasing the probability of psychosis onset. It is possible that genetic factors moderate the association between childhood adversity and psychosis, potentially by influencing how an individual reacts biologically and/or psychologically following exposure to adversity, in such a way as to set them off on the path to psychosis. However, identifying the specific genetic variants involved and how they interact with childhood adversity remains challenging. We examined whether the association between cumulative exposure to childhood adversity and development of psychotic disorder was moderated by the COMT Val 158 Met, AKT1 rs2494732 or DRD2 rs1076560 polymorphisms, known to affect dopamine levels. Participants were 285 first-presentation psychosis cases and 256 geographically-matched controls drawn from the Genetics and Psychosis (GAP) study. Childhood adversity was assessed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire (CECA.Q) and blood- and cheek-derived genotype data were collected. Our findings revealed no main effect of COMT Val 158 Met, AKT1 rs2494732 and DRD2 rs1076560 polymorphisms on psychosis case status or reports of childhood adversity. Individuals reporting a history of multiple adversities were more likely to be psychosis patients than controls, regardless of their genetic risk. There was no evidence of candidate genotype by childhood adversity interactions in relation to psychosis onset. These findings did not provide evidence of a possible role of COMT Val 158 Met, AKT1 rs2494732 or DRD2 rs1076560 genotypes in modifying the association between childhood adversity and onset of psychosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aggression as an independent entity even in psychosis - The role of cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Sengupta, Soumik; Pathak, Kangkan; Sah, Divyashree; Mehta, Sumit; Avinash, Priya Ranjan; Baruah, Aparajeeta; Deuri, Sailendra Kumar; Sarmah, Anil; Gogoi, Vijay; Kalita, Kamal Narayan; Hazarika, Jyoti

    2018-01-01

    Aggression is a common entity in psychiatric disorders, particularly psychotic disorders. Glucocorticoid hypofunction has been linked to abnormal forms of aggressive behavior in various studies in a 'possibly causal' role. We hypothesise that aggression, even among those having psychosis is associated with glucocorticoid alterations similar to those who are aggressive but not psychotic. To our knowledge, this is the first study attempting to look at the cortisol functioning in relation to both aggression and psychosis. The present study included 80 participants divided into four groups depending upon presence or absence of aggression and psychosis. Morning cortisol, afternoon cortisol and their variability were measured using ELISA. The groups were compared on measures of aggression, psychosis, morning cortisol, afternoon cortisol and their variability using standard statistical instruments. The present study found lower levels of morning cortisol, afternoon cortisol and cortisol variability among the aggressive group (vs. non aggressive group) and among the diseased group (vs. non diseased group). The differences were most marked for cortisol variability which was related to both aggression and psychosis independently. There were statistically significant correlation between cortisol variability and aggression, which was retained even after controlling for psychosis. There was no significant correlation of cortisol variability with psychosis severity (after controlling for aggression score) or with age, gender or duration of psychosis. We conclude that aggression, even among patients with psychosis, is an independent entity characterized by lower levels of morning cortisol and cortisol variability. The etio-pathology may lie in some altered neuro-immune parameters executed by cortisol and psychosis as trigger. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reproducibility of Cognitive Profiles in Psychosis Using Cluster Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Kathryn E; Baker, Justin T; McCarthy, Julie M; Norris, Lesley A; Öngür, Dost

    2018-04-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a core symptom dimension that cuts across the psychoses. Recent findings support classification of patients along the cognitive dimension using cluster analysis; however, data-derived groupings may be highly determined by sampling characteristics and the measures used to derive the clusters, and so their interpretability must be established. We examined cognitive clusters in a cross-diagnostic sample of patients with psychosis and associations with clinical and functional outcomes. We then compared our findings to a previous report of cognitive clusters in a separate sample using a different cognitive battery. Participants with affective or non-affective psychosis (n=120) and healthy controls (n=31) were administered the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery, and clinical and community functioning assessments. Cluster analyses were performed on cognitive variables, and clusters were compared on demographic, cognitive, and clinical measures. Results were compared to findings from our previous report. A four-cluster solution provided a good fit to the data; profiles included a neuropsychologically normal cluster, a globally impaired cluster, and two clusters of mixed profiles. Cognitive burden was associated with symptom severity and poorer community functioning. The patterns of cognitive performance by cluster were highly consistent with our previous findings. We found evidence of four cognitive subgroups of patients with psychosis, with cognitive profiles that map closely to those produced in our previous work. Clusters were associated with clinical and community variables and a measure of premorbid functioning, suggesting that they reflect meaningful groupings: replicable, and related to clinical presentation and functional outcomes. (JINS, 2018, 24, 382-390).

  7. Neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome in bipolar disorder with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueda S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Satoshi Ueda,1 Takeshi Sakayori,1 Ataru Omori,2 Hajime Fukuta,3 Takashi Kobayashi,3 Kousuke Ishizaka,1 Tomoyuki Saijo,4 Yoshiro Okubo1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Tamachuo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 3Kurumegaoka Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 4Saijo Clinic, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Neuroleptics can induce not only physical adverse effects but also mental effects that produce deficit status in thought, affect, cognition, and behavior. This condition is known as neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS, which includes apathy, lack of initiative, anhedonia, indifference, blunted affect, and reduced insight into disease. Although this old concept now appears almost forgotten, neuroleptics, whether typical or atypical, can make depression or bipolar disorder resemble other more refractory conditions, readily leading to mistaken diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. The authors describe three cases of NIDS superimposed on depressive phase in bipolar disorder with psychosis, where the attending psychiatrist’s failure to recognize NIDS prevented patients from receiving effective treatment and achieving remission. All cases achieved remission after reduction of neuroleptics and intensive therapy, including electroconvulsive therapy, for bipolar depression. The concept of NIDS was originally introduced for schizophrenia, and it has rarely been highlighted in other diseases. In recent years, however, atypical antipsychotics are being more often administered to patients with bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists, therefore, should also remember and exercise caution regarding NIDS in the pharmacotherapy of bipolar disorder with and without psychosis. The authors believe that the concept of NIDS needs to be reappraised in current psychiatry. Keywords: neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS, bipolar disorder, psychosis, atypical antipsychotics, electroconvulsive therapy

  8. Typology of people with first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Zheng, Huili; Soh, Pauline; Poon, Lye Yin; Vaingankar, Janhavi A; Chong, Siow Ann; Verma, Swapna

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the current study was to create a typology of patients with first-episode psychosis based on sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, service use and outcomes using cluster analysis. Data from all respondents who were accepted into the Early Psychosis Intervention Programme (EPIP), Singapore from 2007 to 2011 were analysed. A two-step clustering method was carried out to classify the patients into distinct clusters. Two clusters were identified. Cluster 1 comprised largely of younger people with mean age of 25.5 (6.0) years at treatment contact, who were predominantly male (55.3%), single (98.3%) and living with parents (86.3%). Cluster 1 had a higher proportion of people diagnosed with the schizophrenia spectrum disorder (71.4%) and with a positive family history of psychiatric illness. Patients in cluster 2 were generally older with a mean age of 33.6 (4.7) years and the majority were women (74.2%). Cluster 1 had people with higher Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores at baseline as compared with cluster 2. After a 1-year follow up, their scores were still poorer than their counterparts in cluster 2, especially for PANSS negative score. The functioning level of people in cluster 1 showed less improvement than the people in cluster 2 after a year of treatment. There is a compelling need to develop new therapies and intensively treat young people presenting with psychosis as this group tends to have poorer outcomes even after 1 year of treatment. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Parental communication and psychosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Paulo; Varese, Filippo; Sellwood, William; Bentall, Richard P

    2014-07-01

    Parental communication deviance (CD) has long been suggested as a potential risk factor for the development of psychosis and thought disorder in genetically sensitive offspring. However, the findings of the studies on the prevalence of CD in parents of psychotic patients have never been submitted to quantitative synthesis. PsycINFO was searched from January 1959 to January 2012 for studies on the prevalence of CD in parents of psychotic patients. This search was supplemented with the results from a much larger systematic search (PsycINFO, PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science) on childhood trauma and psychosis. A total of 20 retrieved studies (n = 1753 parents) yielded a pooled g of large magnitude (0.97; 95% CI [0.76; 1.18]) with a significant amount of heterogeneity (Q = 33.63; P = .014; I (2) = 46.47). Subgroup and sensitivity analysis of methodological features (study's design, comparison group, diagnostic criteria, CD rating method, inter-rater reliability not reported, year of publication, and verbosity) and demographic characteristics (level of education or offspring's age) revealed that pooled effect size was stable and unlikely to have been affected by these features. CD is highly prevalent in parents of psychotic offspring. This is discussed in the broader context of adoption and longitudinal studies that have reported a G × E interaction in the development of psychosis and thought disorder. A potential developmental mechanism is suggested to explain how CD may affect the developing offspring. The importance of further studies on CD and its potential value as a clinical concept are discussed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Prediction error, ketamine and psychosis: An updated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Philip R; Honey, Garry D; Fletcher, Paul C

    2016-11-01

    In 2007, we proposed an explanation of delusion formation as aberrant prediction error-driven associative learning. Further, we argued that the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine provided a good model for this process. Subsequently, we validated the model in patients with psychosis, relating aberrant prediction error signals to delusion severity. During the ensuing period, we have developed these ideas, drawing on the simple principle that brains build a model of the world and refine it by minimising prediction errors, as well as using it to guide perceptual inferences. While previously we focused on the prediction error signal per se, an updated view takes into account its precision, as well as the precision of prior expectations. With this expanded perspective, we see several possible routes to psychotic symptoms - which may explain the heterogeneity of psychotic illness, as well as the fact that other drugs, with different pharmacological actions, can produce psychotomimetic effects. In this article, we review the basic principles of this model and highlight specific ways in which prediction errors can be perturbed, in particular considering the reliability and uncertainty of predictions. The expanded model explains hallucinations as perturbations of the uncertainty mediated balance between expectation and prediction error. Here, expectations dominate and create perceptions by suppressing or ignoring actual inputs. Negative symptoms may arise due to poor reliability of predictions in service of action. By mapping from biology to belief and perception, the account proffers new explanations of psychosis. However, challenges remain. We attempt to address some of these concerns and suggest future directions, incorporating other symptoms into the model, building towards better understanding of psychosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Social networks of patients with psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Claudia; Volpe, Umberto; Matanov, Aleksandra; Priebe, Stefan; Giacco, Domenico

    2015-10-12

    Social networks are important for mental health outcomes as they can mobilise resources and help individuals to cope with social stressors. Individuals with psychosis may have specific difficulties in establishing and maintaining social relationships which impacts on their well-being and quality of life. There has been a growing interest in developing social network interventions for patients with psychotic disorders. A systematic literature review was conducted to investigate the size of social networks of patients with psychotic disorders, as well as their friendship networks. A systematic electronic search was carried out in MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsychINFO databases using a combination of search terms relating to 'social network', 'friendship' and 'psychotic disorder'. The search identified 23 relevant papers. Out of them, 20 reported patient social network size. Four papers reported the mean number of friends in addition to whole network size, while three further papers focused exclusively on the number of friends. Findings varied substantially across the studies, with a weighted mean size of 11.7 individuals for whole social networks and 3.4 individuals for friendship networks. On average, 43.1 % of the whole social network was composed of family members, while friends accounted for 26.5 %. Studies assessing whole social network size and friendship networks of people with psychosis are difficult to compare as different concepts and methods of assessment were applied. The extent of the overlap between different social roles assessed in the networks was not always clear. Greater conceptual and methodological clarity is needed in order to help the development of effective strategies to increase social resources of patients with psychosis.

  12. Evaluation of bullying in persons with different risk for psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emerging research suggests that being exposed to bullying during childhood can increase the risk of psychotic experiences in adulthood. Aggressive peer relations among adolescents are more frequent in boys, both for being victims or perpetrators. Aim: To evaluate whether bullying was more prevalent among Serbian clinical population of patients with psychosis in comparison to their healthy siblings and controls, and to analyze gender differences regarding bullying. Material and methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated schizophrenia spectrum patients (n = 52, age = 29.3 ± 5.9 yrs, in remission, illness duration <10 yrs, their healthy siblings (n = 55, age = 28.6 ± 6.8 yrs and controls (n=50, age=25.3±1.5 yrs. The subjects fulfilled the bullying questionnaire, five item self-rating scale. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney nonparametric test were used to analyze the data. Results: Compared to their healthy siblings, the patients were more likely to report that they were bullied (patients: 7.0 ± 3.5, siblings: 5.2 ± 2.0, p = 0.000, but patients also bullied others more (patients: 1.4 ± 0.8, siblings: 1.1 ± 0.4, p = 0.02. Comparing the group of patients and controls, we did not find statistically significant difference in any category. The male gender brings higher risk of being physically bullied which has been proven for all examined groups (patients- p = 0.03, controls and siblings- p = 0.00. Conclusion: Aggressive peer relations possibly contribute to the evolution of psychosis, as they were more prevalent in patients in comparison to their healthy siblings, particularly in males. Improved prevention of bullying and use of treatments against its psychological consequences might be one of the possible methods to ameliorate the course of psychosis.

  13. Cognitive and functional deficits in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia as a function of the presence and history of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Christopher R; Best, Michael W; Depp, Colin; Mausbach, Brent T; Patterson, Thomas L; Pulver, Ann E; Harvey, Philip D

    2018-05-18

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder overlap considerably. Schizophrenia is a primary psychotic disorder, whereas approximately half of people with bipolar disorder will experience psychosis. In this study, we examined the extent to which cognitive and functional impairments are related to the presence and history of psychosis across the two disorders. A total of 633 participants with bipolar disorder I, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder were recruited for a study on the genetics of cognition and functioning in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Participants were classified into five groups: bipolar disorder with current psychosis (N = 30), bipolar disorder with a history of psychosis (N = 162), bipolar disorder with no history of psychosis (N = 92), schizophrenia with current psychosis (N = 245), and schizophrenia with past psychosis (N = 104). Cognitive profiles of all groups were similar in pattern; however, both current psychosis (P bipolar disorder and schizophrenia experienced similar impairments in real-world functioning if they were experiencing current psychosis (P = .32). The presence of active psychosis is an important cross-diagnostic factor in cognition and functioning in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Characterization and treatment of cognition and functional deficits in bipolar disorder should consider the effects of both current and history of psychosis. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Subjective quality of life in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardsjord, Erlend Strand; Romm, Kristin Lie; Friis, Svein

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Subjective quality of life (S-QoL) is an important outcome measure in first episode psychosis (FEP). The aims of this study were to describe S-QoL-development the first 10-years in FEP patients and to identify predictors of this development. METHODS: A representative sample of 272...... patients with a first episode psychotic disorder was included from 1997 through 2000. At 10year follow-up 186 patients participated. QoL was measured by the Lehman's Quality of Life Interview. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to investigate longitudinal effects of baseline psychiatric symptoms...

  15. Did Christianity lead to schizophrenia? Psychosis, psychology and self reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-06-01

    Both geographically and historically, schizophrenia may have emerged from a psychosis that was more florid, affective, labile, shorter lived and with a better prognosis. It is conjectured that this has occurred with a reflexive self-consciousness in Western and globalising societies, a development whose roots lie in Christianity. Every theology also presents a psychology. Six novel aspects of Christianity may be significant for the emergence of schizophrenia-an omniscient deity, a decontexualised self, ambiguous agency, a downplaying of immediate sensory data, and a scrutiny of the self and its reconstitution in conversion.

  16. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine and Recurrent Episodes of Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaBianca, Sonja; Jensen, Rigmor; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare autosomal dominant form of migraine with motor aura. We present a case report of a father and son with very similar attacks of hemiplegic migraine and recurrent episodes of accompanying psychoses. Previously, such episodes led to hospitalization...... and extended clinical examinations, which further worsened the psychoses. Since the episodes were recognized as related to the hemiplegic migraine, a treatment strategy combining sleep and sedation was initiated and progression onto psychosis was almost completely avoided in both father and son. Genetic...

  17. The Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Autoimmune Diseases and Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore......, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been...

  18. The Psychosis Recent Onset GRoningen Survey (PROGR-S: defining dimensions and improving outcomes in early psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith J Liemburg

    Full Text Available Psychotic disorders are among the most complex medical conditions. Longitudinal cohort studies may offer further insight into determinants of functional outcome after a psychotic episode. This paper describes the Psychosis Recent Onset in GRoningen Survey (PROGR-S that currently contains data on 1076 early-episode patients with psychosis, including symptoms, personality, cognition, life events and other outcome determinants. Our goal in this report is to give an overview of PROGR-S, as a point of reference for future publications on the effect of cognition, personality and psychosocial functioning on outcomes. PROGR-S contains an extensive, diagnostic battery including anamnesis, biography, socio-demographic characteristics, clinical status, drug use, neuropsychological assessment, personality questionnaires, and physical status tests. Extensive follow-up data is available on psychopathology, physical condition, medication use, and care consumption. Sample characteristics were determined and related to existing literature. PROGR-S (period 1997-2009, n = 718 included the majority of the expected referrals in the catchment area. The average age was 27 (SD = 8.6 and two-thirds were male. The average IQ was lower than that in the healthy control group. The majority had been diagnosed with a psychotic spectrum disorder. A substantial number of the patients had depressive symptoms (479/718, 78% and current cannabis or alcohol use (465/718, 75%. The level of community functioning was moderate, i.e. most patients were not in a relationship and were unemployed. The PROGR-S database contains a valuable cohort to study a range of aspects related to symptomatic and functional outcomes of recent onset psychosis, which may play a role in the treatment of this complex and disabling disorder. Results reported here show interesting starting points for future research. Thus, we aim to investigate long-term outcomes on the basis of cognition, personality, negative

  19. Duration of Untreated Psychosis in Chinese and Mauritian: Impact of Clinical Characteristics and Patients' and Families' Perspectives on Psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prishni Devi Thakoor

    Full Text Available Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP is a potentially modifiable prognostic factor of course and prognosis of psychiatric disorders. Few studies have demonstrated that different cultural backgrounds or perspectives on psychosis may be important factors to the DUP. This study attempted to explore whether the DUP was different in Chinese and Mauritians and to clarify potential influencing factors to a long DUP (>3 months.200 patients from China and 100 patients from Mauritius were enrolled in the study. Their respective family members were also recruited. Demographic and clinical characteristics were collected, and the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI scale was adapted to measure the stigma in all subjects. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to find the potential influencing factors to the long DUP.35.3% of the enrolled patients had a long DUP. No significant difference was found in frequency of long DUP between the two countries. Chinese patients had relatively less perceptions of stigma. Furthermore, Chinese patients with a long DUP had more perception of breakup due to mental illness (OR = 2.22, p = 0.04 and more families' perception of the patient being disinherited due to mental illness (OR = 6.47, p = 0.01. Mauritian patients with a long DUP were less likely to have high monthly income (OR = 0.12, p<0.01, while they had less patients' awareness of mental illness (OR = 0.31, p<0.05 and less families' awareness of mental illness (OR = 0.14, p<0.01.The results of this study underlined the importance of DUP in economic conditions, racial and sociocultural factors, and public awareness on psychosis in developing countries.

  20. Determinants of duration of untreated psychosis among first-episode psychosis patients in Denmark: A nationwide register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, Lene Halling; Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Jansen, Jens Einar; Simonsen, Erik

    2018-02-01

    Information on determinants of duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is still needed to inform campaigns targeting people with first episode psychosis (FEP). This nation-wide study analysed the association between demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, and geographic area), premorbid and illness-related factors (global functional level, substance misuse, and contact to police), healthcare factors (referral source and first FEP contact) and DUP. The study population of 1266 patients aged 15-25years diagnosed with FEP (ICD10 F20.0-F20.99) was drawn from the Danish National Indicator Project during 2009-2011. The study population was combined with data from national administrative registers. A multinomial regression model was estimated to analyse the impact of demographic, premorbid and illness-related, and healthcare factors on DUP. One third of the population had a DUP below 6months. DUP longer than 12months was associated with older age at onset, being female, having cannabis misuse, and living in peripheral municipalities. Being charged by the criminal authorities during one year before FEP was associated with a DUP over 6months. DUP is related to a number of demographic, premorbid and healthcare factors. These findings suggest that future information campaigns should focus on increasing the awareness of early signs of psychosis not only among mental health professionals but also other professionals in contact with adolescents such as the police. It may also be useful to consider how to target information campaigns towards persons living in peripheral areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Childhood trauma, psychosis liability and social stress reactivity: a virtual reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, W; Counotte, J; Pot-Kolder, R; van Os, J; van der Gaag, M

    2016-12-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with higher risk for mental disorders, including psychosis. Heightened sensitivity to social stress may be a mechanism. This virtual reality study tested the effect of childhood trauma on level of paranoid ideations and distress in response to social stress, in interaction with psychosis liability and level of social stress exposure. Seventy-five individuals with higher psychosis liability (55 with recent onset psychotic disorder and 20 at ultra-high risk for psychosis) and 95 individuals with lower psychosis liability (42 siblings and 53 controls) were exposed to a virtual café in five experiments with 0-3 social stressors (crowded, other ethnicity and hostility). Paranoid ideation was measured after each experiment. Subjective distress was self-rated before and after experiments. Multilevel random regression analyses were used to test main effects of childhood trauma and interaction effects. Childhood trauma was more prevalent in individuals with higher psychosis liability, and was associated with higher level of (subclinical) psychotic and affective symptoms. Individuals with a history of childhood trauma responded with more subjective distress to virtual social stress exposures. The effects of childhood trauma on paranoia and subjective distress were significantly stronger when the number of virtual environmental stressors increased. Higher psychosis liability increased the effect of childhood trauma on peak subjective distress and stress reactivity during experiments. Childhood trauma is associated with heightened social stress sensitivity and may contribute to psychotic and affective dysregulation later in life, through a sensitized paranoid and stress response to social stressors.

  2. Psychotic-like experiences in the general population: characterizing a high-risk group for psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelleher, I

    2011-01-01

    Recent research shows that psychotic symptoms, or psychotic-like experiences (PLEs), are reported not only by psychosis patients but also by healthy members of the general population. Healthy individuals who report these symptoms are considered to represent a non-clinical psychosis phenotype, and have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. Converging research now shows that this non-clinical psychosis phenotype is familial, heritable and covaries with familial schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. A review of the research also shows that the non-clinical phenotype is associated extensively with schizophrenia-related risk factors, including social, environmental, substance use, obstetric, developmental, anatomical, motor, cognitive, linguistic, intellectual and psychopathological risk factors. The criterion and construct validity of the non-clinical psychosis phenotype with schizophrenia demonstrates that it is a valid population in which to study the aetiology of psychosis. Furthermore, it suggests shared genetic variation between the clinical and non-clinical phenotypes. Much remains to be learned about psychosis by broadening the scope of research to include the non-clinical psychosis phenotype.

  3. Automated analysis of free speech predicts psychosis onset in high-risk youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Gillinder; Carrillo, Facundo; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Slezak, Diego Fernández; Sigman, Mariano; Mota, Natália B; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Javitt, Daniel C; Copelli, Mauro; Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Psychiatry lacks the objective clinical tests routinely used in other specializations. Novel computerized methods to characterize complex behaviors such as speech could be used to identify and predict psychiatric illness in individuals. AIMS: In this proof-of-principle study, our aim was to test automated speech analyses combined with Machine Learning to predict later psychosis onset in youths at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods: Thirty-four CHR youths (11 females) had baseline interviews and were assessed quarterly for up to 2.5 years; five transitioned to psychosis. Using automated analysis, transcripts of interviews were evaluated for semantic and syntactic features predicting later psychosis onset. Speech features were fed into a convex hull classification algorithm with leave-one-subject-out cross-validation to assess their predictive value for psychosis outcome. The canonical correlation between the speech features and prodromal symptom ratings was computed. Results: Derived speech features included a Latent Semantic Analysis measure of semantic coherence and two syntactic markers of speech complexity: maximum phrase length and use of determiners (e.g., which). These speech features predicted later psychosis development with 100% accuracy, outperforming classification from clinical interviews. Speech features were significantly correlated with prodromal symptoms. Conclusions: Findings support the utility of automated speech analysis to measure subtle, clinically relevant mental state changes in emergent psychosis. Recent developments in computer science, including natural language processing, could provide the foundation for future development of objective clinical tests for psychiatry. PMID:27336038

  4. Impact of substance use on the onset and course of early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoux, Hélène; Tournier, Marie; Cougnard, Audrey

    2005-11-01

    The strong comorbidity between psychosis and substance use is already identifiable in early psychosis, raising the question of the direction of the association between substance use and psychosis onset. It has long been considered that this association was explained by the self-medication hypothesis. This hypothesis has been recently challenged by several prospective studies carried out in population-based samples, showing a dose-response relationship between cannabis exposure and risk of psychosis. This association was independent from potential confounding factors such as exposure to other drugs and pre-existence of psychotic symptoms. As a large percentage of subjects from the general population is now exposed to this drug, even a small increase in the risk of adverse effects may have significant deleterious consequences for the health of the population. Hence, reducing exposure to cannabis may contribute to prevention of some incident cases of psychosis. Regarding prognosis, persistent substance misuse after the onset of psychosis has a deleterious impact on clinical outcome. Therapeutic programs for subjects with dual diagnosis should be implemented early in the course of psychosis to maximise their impact on the course of illness.

  5. High psychosis liability is associated with altered autonomic balance during exposure to Virtual Reality social stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counotte, Jacqueline; Pot-Kolder, Roos; van Roon, Arie M; Hoskam, Olivier; van der Gaag, Mark; Veling, Wim

    2017-06-01

    Social stressors are associated with an increased risk of psychosis. Stress sensitisation is thought to be an underlying mechanism and may be reflected in an altered autonomic stress response. Using an experimental Virtual Reality design, the autonomic stress response to social stressors was examined in participants with different liability to psychosis. Fifty-five patients with recent onset psychotic disorder, 20 patients at ultra-high risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of patients with psychosis and 53 controls were exposed to social stressors (crowdedness, ethnic minority status and hostility) in a Virtual Reality environment. Heart rate variability parameters and skin conductance levels were measured at baseline and during Virtual Reality experiments. High psychosis liability groups had significantly increased heart rate and decreased heart rate variability compared to low liability groups both at baseline and during Virtual Reality experiments. Both low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) power were reduced, while the LF/HF ratio was similar between groups. The number of virtual social stressors significantly affected heart rate, HF, LF/HF and skin conductance level. There was no interaction between psychosis liability and amount of virtual social stress. High liability to psychosis is associated with decreased parasympathetic activity in virtual social environments, which reflects generally high levels of arousal, rather than increased autonomic reactivity to social stressors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychosis, Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Health Service Use in South Australia: Findings from the Second Australian National Survey of Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun eSweeney

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The association between mental illness and poor physical health and socioeconomic outcomes has been well established. In the twenty-first century, the challenge of how mental illnesses such as psychosis are managed in the provision of public health services remains complex. Developing effective clinical mental health support and interventions for individuals requires a coordinated and robust mental health system supported by social as well as health policy that places a priority on addressing socioeconomic disadvantage in mental health cohorts. This paper thus examines the complex relationship between socioeconomic disadvantage, family/social supports, physical health and health service utilisation in a community sample of 402 participants diagnosed with psychosis. The paper utilises quantitative data collected from the 2010 Survey of High Impact Psychosis research project conducted in a socioeconomically disadvantaged region of Adelaide, South Australia. Participants (42% female provided information about socio-economic status, education, employment, physical health, contact with family and friends, and health service utilisation. The paper highlights that socio-economic disadvantage is related to increased self-reported use of emergency departments, decreased use of general practitioners for mental health reasons, higher body mass index, less family contact and less social support. In particular, the paper explores the multifaceted relationship between socioeconomic disadvantage and poor health confronting individuals with psychosis, highlighting the complex link between socioeconomic disadvantage and poor health. It emphasizes that mental health service usage for those with higher levels of socioeconomic disadvantage differs from those experiencing lower levels of socioeconomic disadvantage. The paper also stresses that the development of health policy and practice that seeks to redress the socioeconomic and health inequalities created by

  7. Vulnerability of an epileptic case to psychosis: sodium valproate with lamotrigine, forced normalization, postictal psychosis or all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, A B; Seferoglu, M; Taskapilioglu, O; Bora, I

    2012-10-01

    Patients with epilepsy can be considered to be at high risk for developing psychotic disorders. Furthermore, there is association between seizure freedom or the disappearance of the interictal epileptiform events from the EEG record and the occurrence of psychotic symptoms. Also, several newer antiepileptic drugs have been reported to induce psychotic symptoms. We present a patient with epilepsy who developed psychotic symptoms under the treatment of valproic acid (VPA) and lamotrigine (LTG) combination. The mechanism underlying the association between LTG, seizure control and development of psychosis are discussed in the light of the literature.

  8. Examining gender difference in adult-onset psychosis in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Christy L-M; Leung, Chung-Ming; Chang, Wing-Chung; Chan, Sherry K-W; Lee, Edwin H-M; Chen, Eric Y-H

    2016-08-01

    Gender-specific treatment strategies for psychosis have been suggested in recent years. Data on gender difference were largely consistent regarding premorbid functioning, age of onset and negative symptoms; however, results regarding neurocognitive function and duration of untreated psychosis were mixed and inconclusive. In this study, we aimed at a thorough examination on the gender differences in 360 Chinese patients with first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. From June 2009 to August 2011, participants were consecutively recruited from a population-based territory-wide study of early psychosis targeting first-episode psychosis in Hong Kong. Comprehensive data on basic demographics, premorbid functioning and schizoid and schizotypal traits, clinical, functioning, medication side effects and a battery of neurocognitive measures were collected upon entry into the service. In 360 patients with first-episode psychosis aged between 26 and 55 years, 43.6% (n = 157) were male and 56.4% (n = 203) were female. Males had poorer premorbid functioning and adjustment, earlier age of onset, more negative symptoms and poorer functioning in terms of work productivity, independent living and immediate social network relationships at presentation of first-episode psychosis. Interestingly, our data indicate that males tend to be more educated, and also characterized by higher IQ, better neurocognitive performance on visual domain compared with females. Duration of untreated psychosis was not different between the two genders. Data from this homogeneous cohort of Chinese populations enabled tailored and culturally sensitive recommendation on gender-specific treatment strategies, hence improving patients' care and facilitate better diagnostic and interventional decisions for patients with psychosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Language disturbance and functioning in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Eric; Segurado, Ricardo; Renwick, Laoise; McClenaghan, Aisling; Sexton, Sarah; Frawley, Timothy; Chan, Carol K; Bonar, Maurice; Clarke, Mary

    2016-01-30

    Language disturbance has a central role in the presentation of psychotic disorders however its relationship with functioning requires further clarification, particularly in first episode psychosis (FEP). Both language disturbance and functioning can be evaluated with clinician-rated and performance-based measures. We aimed to investigate the concurrent association between clinician-rated and performance-based measures of language disturbance and functioning in FEP. We assessed 108 individuals presenting to an Early Intervention in Psychosis Service in Ireland. Formal thought disorder (FTD) dimensions and bizarre idiosyncratic thinking (BIT) were rated with structured assessment tools. Functioning was evaluated with a performance-based instrument, a clinician-rated measure and indicators of real-world functioning. The disorganisation dimension of FTD was significantly associated with clinician-rated measures of occupational and social functioning (Beta=-0.19, P<0.05 and Beta=-0.31, P<0.01, respectively). BIT was significantly associated with the performance-based measure of functioning (Beta=-0.22, P<0.05). Language disturbance was of less value in predicting real-world measures of functioning. Clinician-rated and performance-based assessments of language disturbance are complementary and each has differential associations with functioning. Communication disorders should be considered as a potential target for intervention in FEP, although further evaluation of the longitudinal relationship between language disturbance and functioning should be undertaken. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk of psychosis in refugees: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, J; Kluge, U; Heinz, A

    2017-06-13

    Conflicts and precarious living conditions resulted in the arrival of large numbers of refugees in Europe and especially in Germany. Evidence suggests that immigrant populations are at elevated risk of psychotic disorders. Considering the traumatic pre- and post-migratory adversities refugees may have encountered, people granted refugee status may even be more susceptible to psychosis than non-refugee migrants. The aim of this literature review is to summarise and interpret recent research on the incidence or prevalence of psychotic disorders in refugees, additionally focusing on the aspects of gender and Middle Eastern provenance. A systematic search in PubMed was performed in the time from 20 to 28 May 2016. Relevant literature was limited to articles describing cohort studies conducted in Western industrialised countries. Articles published between 1 June 2006 and 28 May 2016 were analysed. Content relating to psychotic disorders in refugees was reviewed and summarised. The selected studies showed an increased risk of psychotic disorders in refugees compared with both the indigenous population and non-refugee. migrants. The elevated risk was more pronounced in refugee men. A particularly high risk in refugees of Middle Eastern origin could not be inferred. The higher susceptibility to psychotic disorders in refugees emphasises the need for the development and implementation of adequate prevention strategies. Clinicians and people working in a refugee setting should be aware of early signs and symptoms of psychosis. Further research is required to evaluate post-migratory experiences and investigate the population of refugees affected by the current humanitarian crisis.

  11. Patient satisfaction with treatment in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Ulrik Helt; Simonsen, Erik; Røssberg, Jan Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine first-episode psychotic patients' satisfaction with elements of a comprehensive 2-year treatment program. Subjects and method: The TIPS (Early Treatment and Intervention in Psychosis) project provided a 2-year treatment program consisting of milieu therapy (inpatient), individ......Purpose: To examine first-episode psychotic patients' satisfaction with elements of a comprehensive 2-year treatment program. Subjects and method: The TIPS (Early Treatment and Intervention in Psychosis) project provided a 2-year treatment program consisting of milieu therapy (inpatient......), individual psychotherapy, family intervention and medication. Of 140 patients at baseline, 112 were included at 2-year follow-up. Eighty-four participants were interviewed using a questionnaire eliciting levels of satisfaction with different treatment elements at two of the four sites. Results: Participants...... and non-participants did not differ on demographic or clinical data at baseline. Of those participating, 75% were satisfied with treatment in general. Individual and milieu therapy received higher rating than medication or family intervention. No predictors of general satisfaction with treatment were...

  12. Insight and illness perception in Mexican patients with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-de-Regil, Lizzette

    2015-03-01

    Insight and illness perception are two concepts of interest in the study of factors related to clinical outcome in patients with psychosis. Insight implies a risk of emotional distress for the patient. Illness perceptions, regardless of their accuracy, might be favorable or not to illness. Literature provides evidence of significant correlates of these factors with clinical outcome, but they are rarely included in a single study. 1) assessing insight and illness perception in a sample of Mexican patients who have experienced psychosis and, 2) analyzing how insight and illness perception relate to each other and how they relate to clinical status (i.e., positive, negative, and general psychopathology, depression, and anxiety). Sixty-one participants (55.7% females) were recruited from a public psychiatric hospital; insight and illness perceptions were assessed with the SUMD and the Brief-IPQ, respectively. Clinical status was assessed with the PANSS, CDS and BAI scales. Participants showed good insight, favorable illness perceptions for the cognitive and comprehension dimensions, but unfavorable for the emotional dimension. Clinical status of sample was characterized by mild symptoms. Poor insight related to positive symptoms and general psychopathology. Cognitive and emotional perceptions of illness were significantly associated to most clinical status parameters, whereas comprehension showed no significant results. The study not only replicates the significant association on insight and illness perception with clinical outcome, but shows how their patterns of interactions are different, reinforcing the idea that they are two distinct factors worthy of being habitually acknowledged in research and clinical practice.

  13. Dextromethorphan in Cough Syrup: The Poor Man's Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinak, Bridgette; Bolis, Ramy A; Black, Jeffrey Ryne; Fargason, Rachel E; Birur, Badari

    2017-09-15

    Dextromethorphan (3-methoxy-N-methylmorphinan), also known as "DXM" and "the poor man's PCP," is a synthetically produced drug that is available in more than 140 over-the-counter cough and cold preparations. Dextromethorphan (DXM) has overtaken codeine as the most widely used cough suppressant due to its availability, efficacy, and safety profile at directed doses. However, DXM is subject to abuse. When consumed at inappropriately high doses (over 1500 mg/day), DXM can induce a state of psychosis characterized by Phencyclidine (PCP)-like psychological symptoms, including delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia. We report a noteworthy case of severe dextromethorphan use disorder with dextromethorphan-induced psychotic disorder in a 40-year-old Caucasian female, whose symptoms remitted only following treatment with a combination of an antipsychotic and mood stabilizer. While some states have begun to limit the quantity of DXM sold or restrict sales to individuals over 18-years of age, there is currently no federal ban or restriction on DXM. Abuse of DXM, a readily available and typically inexpensive agent that is not detected on a standard urine drug screen, may be an under-recognized cause of substance-induced psychosis. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of the potential psychiatric sequelae of recreational DXM use.

  14. Dextromethorphan in Cough Syrup: The Poor Man’s Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinak, Bridgette; Bolis, Ramy A.; Black, Jeffrey Ryne; Fargason, Rachel E.; Birur, Badari

    2017-01-01

    Dextromethorphan (3-methoxy-N-methylmorphinan), also known as “DXM” and “the poor man’s PCP,” is a synthetically produced drug that is available in more than 140 over-the-counter cough and cold preparations. Dextromethorphan (DXM) has overtaken codeine as the most widely used cough suppressant due to its availability, efficacy, and safety profile at directed doses. However, DXM is subject to abuse. When consumed at inappropriately high doses (over 1500 mg/day), DXM can induce a state of psychosis characterized by Phencyclidine (PCP)-like psychological symptoms, including delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia. We report a noteworthy case of severe dextromethorphan use disorder with dextromethorphan-induced psychotic disorder in a 40-year-old Caucasian female, whose symptoms remitted only following treatment with a combination of an antipsychotic and mood stabilizer. While some states have begun to limit the quantity of DXM sold or restrict sales to individuals over 18-years of age, there is currently no federal ban or restriction on DXM. Abuse of DXM, a readily available and typically inexpensive agent that is not detected on a standard urine drug screen, may be an under-recognized cause of substance-induced psychosis. It is imperative that clinicians are aware of the potential psychiatric sequelae of recreational DXM use. PMID:28936010

  15. Childhood adversities and clinical symptomatology in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Maija; Mäntylä, Teemu; Rikandi, Eva; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Morales-Muñoz, Isabel; Kieseppä, Tuula; Mantere, Outi; Suvisaari, Jaana

    2017-12-01

    In addition to severe traumatic experiences, milder, more common childhood adversities reflecting psychosocial burden may also be common in people with psychotic disorders and have an effect on symptomatology and functioning. We explored eleven negative childhood experiences and their influence on clinical symptoms among young adults with first-episode psychosis (FEP, n = 75) and matched population controls (n = 51). Individuals with FEP reported more adversities than controls. Specifically serious conflicts within the family, bullying at school, maternal mental health problems, and one's own and parents' serious illness during childhood were experienced by the patients more often than by controls. In the FEP group, the severity of adversity was associated with increased anxiety, manic, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, but not with the severity of positive psychotic symptoms. Adversity produced a more pronounced effect on symptoms in male patients than in female patients. To conclude, in line with earlier studies of more chronic psychosis, a majority of the participants with FEP reported exposure to childhood adversities, with the FEP group reporting more adversities than controls. High levels of mood and anxiety symptoms in patients with FEP may be related to cumulative exposure to childhood adversities. This should be taken into account in the treatment for FEP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. How should we intervene in psychosis risk syndromes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jijun WANG; Kaida JIANG; Tianhong ZHANG; Huijun LI; Kristen WOODBERRY; Larry SEIDMAN

    2013-01-01

    Research diagnostic instruments such as the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) are now able to reliably identify individuals with different types of psychosis risk syndromes (PRS). About one-third of individuals with PRS convert to a diagnosable psychotic disorder within three years of the initial assessment. Currently available randomized controlled trials of interventions aimed at reducing the rate of psychotic conversion of PRS are promising, but they are too small and too short in duration to provide definitive conclusions about effectiveness. Given the high level of false positives (i.e., most individuals with PRS do not progress to frank psychosis) and the lack of definitive evidence about effectiveness, we recommend a staged approach to intervention in PRS that only uses antipsychotic medication after other, more benign approaches have been tried. At present the best approach appears to be to develop high-quality casemanagement systems for individuals with PRS that provide close follow-up, psychoeducation and psychosocial support to patients and family members, and, possibly, psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatments (with antipsychotic medications or neuroprotective agents). The effectiveness of these proposed interventions needs to be tested in large randomized controlled trials that follow up subjects for at least three years.

  17. Intervention in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis: a review and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGorry, Patrick D; Nelson, Barnaby; Amminger, G Paul

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Over the last 15 years, a focus on early intervention in psychotic disorders has emerged. Initially, the early psychosis movement focused on timely recognition and phase-specific treatment of first-episode psychosis. However, early psychosis researchers suspected that pushing the point...... of intervention even further back to the prodromal phase of psychotic disorders may result in even better outcomes. This article reviews intervention research in the ultra-high-risk phase of psychotic disorders. DATA SOURCES: A literature search of intervention trials with ultra-high-risk cohorts published after...

  18. Parental History of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients with Nonaffective Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Miller, Brian; Bernardo, Miguel; Donner, Thomas; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We attempted to replicate two previous studies which found an increased risk of diabetes in the relatives of schizophrenia probands. Methods N=34 patients with newly-diagnosed nonaffective psychosis and N=52 non-psychiatric controls were interviewed for parental history of Type 2 diabetes. Results In a logistic regression model that included multiple potential confounders, psychosis was a significant predictor of Type 2 diabetes in either parent (p<0.04). Discussion We found an increased prevalence of Type 2 diabetes in the parents of nonaffective psychosis subjects. This association may be due to shared environmental or genetic risk factors, or both. PMID:18031995

  19. Metacognitive mastery in persons with first-episode psychosis and their caregivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Jens Einar; Lysaker, Paul H.; Trauelsen, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    While metacognitive mastery seems to be closely linked to general functioning in persons with psychosis, little is known of metacognitive capacity of family members, who often play an important role in recovery and often report high levels of distress. We gathered assessments of metacognitive...... mastery from persons with first-episode psychosis and their mothers. We found that relatively higher overall mean mastery levels among the dyads, was related to less negative caregiver experiences, and less caregiver criticism. Greater levels of mastery were related to decreased duration of untreated...... psychosis. Clinical implications in terms of family intervention programmes repertoire are discussed....

  20. Functional deterioration from the premorbid period to 2 years after the first episode of psychosis in early-onset psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Fraguas, David; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; Espliego, Ana; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; González-Pinto, Ana; de la Serna, Elena; Payá, Beatriz; Graell, Montserrat; Arango, Celso; Parellada, Mara

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze changes in functional adjustment from childhood to 2 years after the first episode of psychosis (FEP) in patients with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) and affective psychoses (AFP) and a good or intermediate level of premorbid adjustment. We followed 106 adolescents (aged 12-17 years) with FEP for 2 years after recruitment. Premorbid adjustment in childhood was assessed in 98 patients with the childhood subscale of the Cannon-Spoor Premorbid Adjustment Scale (c-PAS). Global functioning was assessed 2 years after the FEP with the Children's Global Assessment Scale (c-GAS) or the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), as appropriate. Functional deterioration was defined as a downward shift in the level of functional adjustment from childhood to 2 years after the FEP. In patients with good or intermediate premorbid adjustment, functional deterioration was observed in 28.2 % (26.5 % of the AFP group, 29.4 % of the SSD group). Longer duration of untreated psychosis (Beta = 0.01; P = 0.01) and higher symptom severity at the FEP, as measured with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (Beta = 1.12; P = 0.02), significantly predicted the presence of functional deterioration, accounting for 21.4 % of the variance. Irrespective of diagnosis (SSD or AFP), almost one-third of adolescents with FEP and good or intermediate premorbid adjustment showed functional deterioration from the premorbid period to 2 years after the FEP.

  1. Imipenem-cilastatin-induced psychosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, Jacob; George, Gemy Maria

    2016-04-27

    Elderly patients, in particular, have been reported to develop psychiatric side effects from antibiotics. Clarithromycin, quinolones, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, isoniazid, penicillin, and cephalosporins have been reported to cause psychosis. This case report bridges a void in the medical literature with regards to the psychiatric adverse effects of imipenem-cilastatin. A 64-year-old Hispanic man in septic shock due to urinary tract infection was initiated on imipenem-cilastatin and mechanically ventilated, following admission to hospital. His mentation was normal for 72 hours after extubation and discontinuation of sedatives and opioids, following which he was noted to be in acute psychosis. Our patient's imipenem-cilastatin dose had been increased 24 hours prior to his violent visual and auditory hallucinations because his renal function had improved. The physical examination and laboratory tests did not reveal evidence of a new central nervous infection or endocrinopathy. His mentation improved after his antibiotic was switched to ceftriaxone, based on culture and sensitivity testing. Similar psychiatric symptoms developed 2 months later when he was treated with imipenem for a recurrent urinary tract infection. His symptoms again resolved with modification of his antibiotic regimen. Endocrine dysfunctions (thyroid, adrenal, and pituitary disorders) and toxic ingestions are medical disorders known to cause brief psychotic episodes. Fluoroquinolones, penicillins, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are common antibiotics associated with this rare adverse effect. Several pharmacokinetic hypotheses have been proposed for this adverse effect: (1) N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunctioning, (2) sequential blockade of folic acid production, (3) inhibition of prostaglandin E2 and proinflammatory cytokine production, (4) increased central dopamine turnover, and (5) accumulation of toxic levels of the drug. Pre-existing psychopathology, relevant comorbidities, slow

  2. Haloperidol for long-term aggression in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushu, Abha; Powney, Melanie J

    2016-11-27

    Psychotic disorders can lead some people to become agitated. Characterised by restlessness, excitability and irritability, this can result in verbal and physically aggressive behaviour - and both can be prolonged. Aggression within the psychiatric setting imposes a significant challenge to clinicians and risk to service users; it is a frequent cause for admission to inpatient facilities. If people continue to be aggressive it can lengthen hospitalisation. Haloperidol is used to treat people with long-term aggression. To examine whether haloperidol alone, administered orally, intramuscularly or intravenously, is an effective treatment for long-term/persistent aggression in psychosis. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2011 and April 2015). We included randomised controlled trials (RCT) or double blind trials (implying randomisation) with useable data comparing haloperidol with another drug or placebo for people with psychosis and long-term/persistent aggression. One review author (AK) extracted data. For dichotomous data, one review author (AK) calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a fixed-effect model. One review author (AK) assessed risk of bias for included studies and created a 'Summary of findings' table using GRADE. We have no good-quality evidence of the absolute effectiveness of haloperidol for people with long-term aggression. One study randomising 110 chronically aggressive people to three different antipsychotic drugs met the inclusion criteria. When haloperidol was compared with olanzapine or clozapine, skewed data (n=83) at high risk of bias suggested some advantage in terms of scale scores of unclear clinical meaning for olanzapine/clozapine for 'total aggression'. Data were available for only one other outcome, leaving the study early. When compared with other antipsychotic drugs, people allocated to haloperidol were no more likely to leave the study

  3. Positive emotions from social company in women with persisting subclinical psychosis : lessons from daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collip, D.; Wigman, J. T. W.; Van Os, J.; Oorschot, M.; Jacobs, N.; Derom, C.; Thiery, E.; Peeters, F.; Wichers, M.; Myin-Germeys, I.

    ObjectiveAltered social reward functioning is associated with psychosis irrespective of stage and severity. Examining the role of social reward functioning prospectively in relation to psychotic experiences before these become persistent and potentially disabling can aid in elucidating social

  4. Early-onset psychosis in an adolescent with DiGeorge syndrome: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-21

    Feb 21, 2018 ... Authors: Keneilwe Molebatsi1. Anthony A. Olashore1. Affiliations: 1Department of ... psychosis, particularly schizophrenia, is the most disturbing feature, accounting for a 30-fold increase .... Authors' contributions. K.M. and ...

  5. Illicit drug use and violence in acute psychosis among acute adult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Illicit drug use, violence, acute psychosis, psychiatric hospital. ... violence and substance abuse. Methods ... and identifiable data were anonymized and/or stored in .... only a handful had urine tests done at the referral centres.

  6. Religious construction of a first episode of psychosis in urban Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redko, Cristina

    2003-12-01

    Religion plays an important role in the lives of people with psychosis. Based on fieldwork with 21 families living in poor neighborhoods of São Paulo, Brazil, this article examines how youth suffering a first episode of psychosis resort to religion for help (including, Catholicism, Pentecostalism, Candomblé, and Umbanda) and how this frames their experience of psychosis and that of their family members. For young people, the personal articulation of religious idioms and signifiers served to communicate, elaborate and transform their experience of psychosis. Family members resorted to religion as a source of healing, complementary to psychiatric treatment, as well as for personal relief and comfort. For youth, involvement with religion worked in both 'progressive' and 'regressive' ways, to improve and, at times, to diminish functioning and well-being.

  7. Towards an Integrated View of Early Molecular Changes Underlying Vulnerability to Social Stress in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Henry; Hafizi, Sina; Mizrahi, Romina

    2017-01-01

    Psychotic disorders are heterogeneous and complex, involving many putative causal factors interacting along the course of disease development. Many of the factors implicated in the pathogenesis of psychosis also appear to be involved in disease onset and subsequent neuroprogression. Herein, we highlight the pertinent literature implicating inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of psychosis, and the potential contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). We also emphasize the role of peripubertal social stress in psychosis, and the ways in which hippocampal dysfunction can mediate dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and cortisol release. Finally, we propose a model wherein inflammation and oxidative stress act as a first hit, producing altered parvalbumin interneuron development, NMDAR hypofunction, microglial priming, and sensitivity to a second hit of peripubertal social stress. With a greater understanding of how these factors interact, it may be possible to detect, prevent, and treat psychosis more effectively. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Neurocognitive functioning before and after the first psychotic episode: does psychosis result in cognitive deterioration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, H. E.; Nieman, D. H.; Wiltink, S.; Dingemans, P. M.; van de Fliert, J. R.; Velthorst, E.; de Haan, L.; van Amelsvoort, T. A.; Linszen, D. H.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is considered to be a core characteristic of schizophrenia. The relationship between psychosis and cognitive deterioration, however, remains unclear. This longitudinal study investigated the neuropsychological functioning of patients before and after their first psychotic

  9. Childhood dyspraxia predicts adult-onset nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Mittal, Vijay; Kline, Emily

    2015-01-01

    abnormalities spanning functionally distinct brain networks) specifically predict adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders are consistent with a theory of abnormal connectivity, and they highlight a marked early-stage vulnerability in the pathophysiology of nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders.......Several neurological variables have been investigated as premorbid biomarkers of vulnerability for schizophrenia and other related disorders. The current study examined whether childhood dyspraxia predicted later adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders. From a standardized neurological...... showed higher scores on the dyspraxia scale predict nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders relative to other psychiatric disorders and no mental illness outcomes, even after controlling for genetic risk, χ2 (4, 244) = 18.61, p

  10. Variation in duration of untreated psychosis in an 18-year perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Joa, Inge; Barder, Helene

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The Scandinavian TIPS project engineered an early detection of psychosis programme that sought to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) through early detection teams and extensive information campaigns since 1997. In 1997-2000, DUP was reduced from 26 to 4.5 weeks median. The prog......AIM: The Scandinavian TIPS project engineered an early detection of psychosis programme that sought to reduce the duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) through early detection teams and extensive information campaigns since 1997. In 1997-2000, DUP was reduced from 26 to 4.5 weeks median....... The programme was continued beyond the initial project in modified forms for over 13 years. The aim of this study was to track the vicissitudes of DUP over an 18-year period (1993-2010) with differing early detection efforts in a defined catchment area. METHOD: The DUP of all patients meeting criteria for first...

  11. Female Sexual Victimization Predicts Psychosis: A Case-Control Study Based on the Danish Registry System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, A.; Shevlin, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Objective: An increasing research literature has identified a statistical association between trauma exposure and psychosis. Methodological limitations, primarily relating to failures to establish the temporal ordering of events and relying on retrospective self-reports, have made the argument fo...

  12. Insight change in psychosis: Relationship with neurocognition, social cognition, clinical symptoms and phase of illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Quee (P.); L. van der Meer (Lisette); L. Krabbendam (Lydia); L. de Haan (Lieuwe); W. Cahn (Wiepke); D. Wiersma (Durk); N.J.M. van Beveren (Nico); G.H.M. Pijnenborg (G. H M); C.L. Mulder (Niels); R. Bruggeman (Richard); A. Aleman (André)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Impaired insight is an important and prevalent symptom of psychosis. It remains unclear whether cognitive disturbances hamper improvements in insight. We investigated the neurocognitive, social cognitive, and clinical correlates of changes in insight. Method: One hundred and

  13. A balanced translocation disrupting BCL2L10 and PNLDC1 segregates with affective psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Bouwkamp (Christian); A.J.A. Kievit (Anneke J.A.); S. Olgiati (Simone); G.J. Breedveld (Guido); M.P.H. Coesmans (Michiel); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); S.A. Kushner (Steven)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAffective psychoses are a group of severe psychiatric disorders, including schizoaffective disorder and bipolar I disorder, together affecting ∼1% of the population. Despite their high heritability, the molecular genetics and neurobiology of affective psychosis remain largely elusive.

  14. Comparative study of publications performed on psychosis in the Spanish psychology and psychiatry journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, L; Buela-Casal, G

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the article production on psychosis from the main spanish journals of psychology and psychiatry, as well as to make comparisons among them. 16 journals of psychology and 5 of psychiatry were selected and a period of revision of four years settled down (2003-2006). The sample was constituted by 183 articles. For the comparison of the journals four index were used: proportion of articles on psychosis in relation to the total of generated articles; used type of methodology; used type of sample; and aspect of the psychosis in whose investigation it is centered. The results show that little is investigated, that most of the studies is theoretical or ex- post facto, that more the frequently studied subjects are those with psychosis and that the taken care of aspects more are related to the etiology and the treatment of the disease.

  15. Revisiting an old foe: The face of psychosis in neurosyphilis | Moolla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A delusional, agitated middle-aged man presented to hospital with a tenacious psychotic episode. Upon appropriate therapy for neurosyphilis, dramatic resolution of this brief episode ensued, prompting a literature review of psychosis associated with neurosyphilis.

  16. Prospective cohort study of cannabis use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms in young people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henquet, C.J.; Krabbendam, L.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Kaplan, C.; Lieb, R.; Wittchen, H.U.; Os, J. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relation between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms in individuals with above average predisposition for psychosis who first used cannabis during adolescence. DESIGN: Analysis of prospective data from a population based sample. Assessment of substance use,

  17. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Psychosis in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niarchou, Maria; Calkins, Monica E; Moore, Tyler M; Tang, Sunny X; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E

    2017-10-10

    22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with increased risk for schizophrenia in adulthood while Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent diagnosis in childhood. Inattention symptoms are pronounced in 22q11.2DS and given that attentional impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia, inattention symptoms may reflect underlying ADHD, psychosis, or both. We investigate whether inattention is associated with psychosis in 22q11.2DS and in other groups at risk for psychosis but without the deletion (ND) (idiopathic clinical risk and first degree family members of individuals with schizophrenia). One hundred thirty-seven individuals with 22q11.2DS (mean age: 14.0), 84 ND individuals with subthreshold psychosis (mean age: 16.9) and 31 ND individuals with family history of psychosis (mean age: 17.0) were included in the study. Psychopathology was assessed using research diagnostic assessments. ADHD total symptoms were associated with overall levels of subthreshold psychosis symptoms in 22q11.2DS (β = .8, P = .04). Inattention symptoms were specifically associated with positive (β = .5, P = .004), negative (β = .5, P = .03), and disorganized (β = .5, P hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms were associated with disorganized symptoms (β = .5, P = .01). The prevalence of ADHD inattention symptoms was higher in 22q11.2DS with subthreshold psychosis compared to ND individuals with subthreshold psychosis (P < .001), even when adjusting for cognitive impairment and overall psychopathology. The pattern was similar when comparing individuals with 22q11.2DS and ND individuals with family history of psychosis. This is the first study to examine the associations between ADHD symptoms and psychosis in 22q11.2DS. Our findings support a potentially important role of ADHD inattention symptoms in psychosis in 22q11.2DS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights

  18. Psychometric evaluation of the Danish and Swedish Satisfaction with Life Scale in first episode psychosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochwälder, Jacek; Mattsson, Maria; Holmqvist, Ragnhild

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To psychometrically evaluate the Satisfaction with Life Scale in two cohorts of first-episode psychosis patients in the Danish National Schizophrenia Project and in the Swedish Parachute Project. METHOD: Four properties of the Satisfaction with Life Scale were examined in the Danish cohort....... The dimensions were confirmed in the Swedish sample. CONCLUSION: The Satisfaction with Life Scale shows satisfactory psychometric properties and seems valid and useful among first-episode psychosis patients....

  19. Quadrigeminal plate lipoma presenting with Psychosis: A case ‎report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A young patient who presented with headache followed by positive and negative symptoms of psychosis and mutism was sent for the MRI of brain. MRI revealed a lipoma in the quardrigeminal area. We hypothesized that the neuro-vascular encasement of structures located at the upper dorsal midbrain by the lipoma caused the symptoms. A review of the current literature of quadrigeminal lipoma cases with presenting symptoms is provided. Lipoma in quardrigeminal area could give rise to symptoms of psychosis.

  20. Rates and Predictors of Conversion to Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Following Substance-Induced Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzer, Marie Stefanie Kejser; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2018-04-01

    The authors investigated the rates of conversion to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder after a substance-induced psychosis, as well as risk factors for conversion. All patient information was extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Psychiatric Central Research Register. The study population included all persons who received a diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis between 1994 and 2014 (N=6,788); patients were followed until first occurrence of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder or until death, emigration, or August 2014. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain cumulative probabilities for the conversion from a substance-induced psychosis to schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for all covariates. Overall, 32.2% (95% CI=29.7-34.9) of patients with a substance-induced psychosis converted to either bipolar or schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The highest conversion rate was found for cannabis-induced psychosis, with 47.4% (95% CI=42.7-52.3) converting to either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Young age was associated with a higher risk of converting to schizophrenia. Self-harm after a substance-induced psychosis was significantly linked to a higher risk of converting to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Half the cases of conversion to schizophrenia occurred within 3.1 years after a substance-induced psychosis, and half the cases of conversion to bipolar disorder occurred within 4.4 years. Substance-induced psychosis is strongly associated with the development of severe mental illness, and a long follow-up period is needed to identify the majority of cases.

  1. Love and psychosis. Why we are going crazy with the love?

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Prot-Klinger

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses about the relationship between romantic love and psychosis. Argues that romantic love is often the cause of psychotic decompensation. That phenomenon may be associated with the structure of personality and pattern of attachment of people with experience of psychosis. Anthropological studies show how the phase of falling in love through recreating the mother-child relationship can become threatening for people with psychotic personality structure. Researchers affiliat...

  2. SU119. Internalized Stigma in Adults With Early-Phase vs Prolonged Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Ruth; Vohs, Jenifer; Luther, Lauren; Yanos, Philip; Leonhardt, Bethany; Lysaker, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: While internalized stigma is associated with negative outcomes among those with prolonged psychosis, surprisingly little work has focused on when in the course of one’s illness stigma is internalized and the impact of internalization on symptoms or quality of life over the course of the illness. Therefore, this study investigated whether (1) internalized stigma is greater among those later in the course of psychosis and (2) whether internalized stigma has a stronger negative relationship with quality of life or symptoms among those with prolonged compared to early-phase psychosis. Methods: Individuals with early-phase (n = 40) and prolonged psychosis (n = 71) who were receiving outpatient services at an early-intervention clinic and a VA medical center, respectively, completed self-report measures of internalized stigma and interview-rated measures of symptoms and quality of life. Results: Controlling for education, race, and sex differences, internalized stigma was significantly greater among those with prolonged compared to early-phase psychosis. Internalized stigma was negatively related to quality of life and positively related to symptoms in both groups. Furthermore, the magnitude of the relationship between cognitive symptoms and internalized stigma was significantly greater among those with early-phase psychosis. Stereotype endorsement, discrimination experiences, and social withdrawal also deferentially related to symptoms and quality of life across the 2 samples. Conclusion: Findings suggest that internalized stigma is an important variable to incorporate into models of early psychosis. Further, internalized stigma may be a possible treatment target among those in their early phase of psychosis.

  3. Korsakoff's psychosis due to massive beer intake provoked by diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, R W; Blankenship, D C; Viti, A; Albrink, M J

    1988-05-01

    Posttraumatic diabetes insipidus, acute pancreatitis, and Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis in a 33-year-old white male alcohol abuser resulted in near-fatal cardiovascular collapse. The Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's psychosis resulted from drinking massive quantities of beer to satisfy the thirst induced by diabetes insipidus. Although the diabetes insipidus was controlled with vasopressin, and the need for vasopressin resolved two months after diagnosis, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome had not resolved by six months.

  4. Isolated psychosis during exposure to very high and extreme altitude - characterisation of a new medical entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüfner, Katharina; Brugger, Hermann; Kuster, Eva; Dünsser, Franziska; Stawinoga, Agnieszka E; Turner, Rachel; Tomazin, Iztok; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2017-12-05

    Psychotic episodes during exposure to very high or extreme altitude have been frequently reported in mountain literature, but not systematically analysed and acknowledged as a distinct clinical entity. Episodes reported above 3500 m altitude with possible psychosis were collected from the lay literature and provide the basis for this observational study. Dimensional criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders were used for psychosis, and the Lake Louise Scoring criteria for acute mountain sickness and high-altitude cerebral oedema (HACE). Eighty-three of the episodes collected underwent a cluster analysis to identify similar groups. Ratings were done by two independent, trained researchers (κ values 0.6-1). Findings Cluster 1 included 51% (42/83) episodes without psychosis; cluster 2 22% (18/83) cases with psychosis, plus symptoms of HACE or mental status change from other origins; and cluster 3 28% (23/83) episodes with isolated psychosis. Possible risk factors of psychosis and associated somatic symptoms were analysed between the three clusters and revealed differences regarding the factors 'starvation' (χ2 test, p = 0.002), 'frostbite' (p = 0.024) and 'supplemental oxygen' (p = 0.046). Episodes with psychosis were reversible but associated with near accidents and accidents (p = 0.007, odds ratio 4.44). Episodes of psychosis during exposure to high altitude are frequently reported, but have not been specifically examined or assigned to medical diagnoses. In addition to the risk of suffering from somatic mountain illnesses, climbers and workers at high altitude should be aware of the potential occurrence of psychotic episodes, the associated risks and respective coping strategies.

  5. Deficits in Neurite Density Underlie White Matter Structure Abnormalities in First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Charlotte L; Davies, Geoff; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Gabel, Matt C; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Seth, Anil K; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Medford, Nick; Critchley, Hugo D

    2017-11-15

    Structural abnormalities across multiple white matter tracts are recognized in people with early psychosis, consistent with dysconnectivity as a neuropathological account of symptom expression. We applied advanced neuroimaging techniques to characterize microstructural white matter abnormalities for a deeper understanding of the developmental etiology of psychosis. Thirty-five first-episode psychosis patients, and 19 healthy controls, participated in a quantitative neuroimaging study using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, a multishell diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique that distinguishes white matter fiber arrangement and geometry from changes in neurite density. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity images were also derived. Tract-based spatial statistics compared white matter structure between patients and control subjects and tested associations with age, symptom severity, and medication. Patients with first-episode psychosis had lower regional FA in multiple commissural, corticospinal, and association tracts. These abnormalities predominantly colocalized with regions of reduced neurite density, rather than aberrant fiber bundle arrangement (orientation dispersion index). There was no direct relationship with active symptoms. FA decreased and orientation dispersion index increased with age in patients, but not control subjects, suggesting accelerated effects of white matter geometry change. Deficits in neurite density appear fundamental to abnormalities in white matter integrity in early psychosis. In the first application of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging in psychosis, we found that processes compromising axonal fiber number, density, and myelination, rather than processes leading to spatial disruption of fiber organization, are implicated in the etiology of psychosis. This accords with a neurodevelopmental origin of aberrant brain-wide structural connectivity predisposing individuals to

  6. Progressive gray matter reduction of the superior temporal gyrus during transition to psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Wood, Stephen J; Yung, Alison R; Soulsby, Bridget; McGorry, Patrick D; Suzuki, Michio; Kawasaki, Yasuhiro; Phillips, Lisa J; Velakoulis, Dennis; Pantelis, Christos

    2009-04-01

    Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown progressive gray matter reduction in the superior temporal gyrus during the earliest phases of schizophrenia. It is unknown whether these progressive processes predate the onset of psychosis. To examine gray matter reduction of the superior temporal gyrus over time in individuals at risk for psychosis and in patients with first-episode psychosis. Cross-sectional and longitudinal comparisons. Personal Assessment and Crisis Evaluation Clinic and Early Psychosis Preventions and Intervention Centre. Thirty-five ultrahigh-risk individuals (of whom 12 later developed psychosis [UHRP] and 23 did not [UHRNP]), 23 patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP), and 22 control subjects recruited from the community. Volumes of superior temporal subregions (planum polare, Heschl gyrus, planum temporale, and rostral and caudal regions) were measured at baseline and follow-up (mean, 1.8 years) and were compared across groups. In cross-sectional comparisons, only the FEP group had significantly smaller planum temporale and caudal superior temporal gyrus than other groups at baseline, whereas male UHRP subjects also had a smaller planum temporale than controls at follow-up. In longitudinal comparison, UHRP and FEP patients showed significant gray matter reduction (approximately 2%-6% per year) in the planum polare, planum temporale, and caudal region compared with controls and/or UHRNP subjects. The FEP patients also exhibited progressive gray matter loss in the left Heschl gyrus (3.0% per year) and rostral region (3.8% per year), which were correlated with the severity of delusions at follow-up. A progressive process in the superior temporal gyrus precedes the first expression of florid psychosis. These findings have important implications for underlying neurobiologic features of emerging psychotic disorders and emphasize the importance of early intervention during or before the first episode of psychosis.

  7. Predictors of type 2 diabetes in a nationally representative sample of adults with psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; McGrath, John J; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2014-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs such as clozapine and olanzapine are associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, but relatively little is known about the relationship between risk factors for type 2 diabetes established in the general population and type 2 diabetes in people with psychosis. We estimated the prevalence of established risk factors and their association with type 2 diabetes in a nationally representative sample of people with an ICD-10 psychosis (N=1642) who gave a fasting blood ...

  8. Substance use and regional gray matter volume in individuals at high risk of psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, James; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Barker, Gareth J; McGuire, Philip K; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with an at risk mental state (ARMS) are at greatly increased risk of developing a psychotic illness. Risk of transition to psychosis is associated with regionally reduced cortical gray matter volume. There has been considerable interest in the interaction between psychosis risk and substance use. In this study we investigate the relationship between alcohol, cannabis and nicotine use with gray matter volume in ARMS subjects and healthy volunteers. Twenty seven ARMS subjects and 27...

  9. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar; Nielsen, Hanne-Grethe Lyse; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Trier, Christopher Høier; Haahr, Ulrik H; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis. Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p<0.01). The risk of psychosis increased two and a half times for each additional adversity. All associations between specific adversities and psychosis decreased when they were adjusted for other adversities. Our findings suggest that there is a large shared effect of adversities on the risk of psychosis. Contrary to the call for further research into specific adversities, we suggest a search for mechanisms in the shared effects of traumatization. Clinical implications are thorough assessment of adversities and their possible effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuropsychological Impairment in Prodromal, First-Episode, and Chronic Psychosis: Assessing RBANS Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William S.; Woodberry, Kristen A.; Seidman, Larry J.; Tang, YingYing; Guo, Qian; Zhuo, KaiMing; Qian, ZhenYing; Cui, HuiRu; Zhu, YiKang; Jiang, LiJuan; Chow, Annabelle; Tang, YunXiang; Li, ChunBo; Jiang, KaiDa; Yi, ZhengHui; Xiao, ZePing; Wang, JiJun

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits are observed throughout all developmental phases of psychosis. However, prior studies have usually focused on a limited illness period and used a wide variety of cognitive instruments. Therefore, it has been difficult to characterize or highlight cognitive functioning in different stages of psychosis. Method We administered the RBANS (Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status) tests to 4 participant subgroups, including healthy volunteers (controls, HC, n = 28), subjects at high risk for clinical psychosis (prodrome, CHR, n = 27), first-episode schizophrenia patients (FE-Sz, n = 26), and mid-term and long-term chronic schizophrenia patients (Ch-Sz, n =147). Comparison, correlation, and regression analyses of RBANS index scores were assessed among groups. We examined clinical outcomes over 2 years between the CHR and HC subjects, and RBANS domains were used as possible predictors for conversion to psychosis. Results Performance on all RBANS domains was significantly impaired during a post-onset stage of psychosis (FE-Sz and Ch-Sz), and RBANS scores declined along with disease progression. Regression analyses showed that for CHR and HC subjects, baseline impairment in delayed memory (DM) significantly predicted conversion to psychosis. Additionally, partial correlations showed that for FE-Sz and Ch-Sz subjects, DM was the only correlate with a later stage of psychosis. Conclusions Cognitive deficits broadly emerged, and diminished functioning followed along with disease progression. Impairment in DM is perhaps one domain that helps us understand the development of psychosis. A critical need is to monitor and treat memory functioning for psychotic patients throughout all phases of the disease. PMID:25973925

  11. The relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hill, M

    2012-04-01

    Impaired insight is commonly seen in psychosis and some studies have proposed that is a biologically based deficit. Support for this view comes from the excess of neurological soft signs (NSS) observed in patients with psychoses and their neural correlates which demonstrate a degree of overlap with the regions of interest implicated in neuroimaging studies of insight. The aim was to examine the relationship between NSS and insight in a sample of 241 first-episode psychosis patients.

  12. Ten year neurocognitive trajectories in first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Barder, Helene E.; Sundet, Kjetil

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Neurocognitive impairment is commonly reported at onset of psychotic disorders. However, the long-term neurocognitive course remains largely uninvestigated in first episode psychosis (FEP) and the relationship to clinically significant subgroups even more so. We report 10 year...... years) were followed-up neurocognitively over five assessments spanning 10 years. The test battery was divided into four neurocognitive indices; Executive Function, Verbal Learning, Motor Speed, and Verbal Fluency. The sample was grouped into those relapsing or not within the first, second and fifth...... year. Results: The four neurocognitive indices showed overall stability over the 10 year period. Significant relapse by index interactions were found for all indices except Executive Function. Follow-up analyses identified a larger significant decrease over time for the encoding measure within Verbal...

  13. Virtual Environments Using Video Capture for Social Phobia with Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard; Clarke, Timothy; Turner, Ruth; Fowler, David

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A novel virtual environment (VE) system was developed and used as an adjunct to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with six socially anxious patients recovering from psychosis. The novel aspect of the VE system is that it uses video capture so the patients can see a life-size projection of themselves interacting with a specially scripted and digitally edited filmed environment played in real time on a screen in front of them. Within-session process outcomes (subjective units of distress and belief ratings on individual behavioral experiments), as well as patient feedback, generated the hypothesis that this type of virtual environment can potentially add value to CBT by helping patients understand the role of avoidance and safety behaviors in the maintenance of social anxiety and paranoia and by boosting their confidence to carry out “real-life” behavioral experiments. PMID:23659722

  14. Disclosure of Diagnosis in Early Recognition of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessing, Andreas; Studer, Anna; Gross, Amelie; Gruss, L Forest; Schneider, Roland; Dammann, Gerhard

    2017-10-01

    There is a debate concerning risks and benefits of early intervention in psychosis, especially concerning diagnosis disclosure. The present study reports preliminary findings on self-reported locus of control and psychological distress after the disclosure of diagnosis in an early recognition center. We compared the ratings of the locus of control and psychological distress before and after communication of diagnosis. The study included individuals with an at-risk mental state (ARMS) (n = 10), schizophrenia (n = 9), and other psychiatric disorders (n = 11). Results indicate greater endorsement of the internal locus of control in individuals with ARMS after communication of diagnosis in contrast to the other groups. Our results suggest that disclosure of diagnosis in an early recognition center leads to a reduction of psychological distress and increased feelings of control over one's health. Persons with ARMS seem to particularly benefit from disclosure of diagnosis as part of early intervention.

  15. Psychosis, agnosia, and confabulation: an alternative two-factor account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Theories of delusions which rely on a combination of abnormal experience and defective belief evaluation and/ or cognitive bias are the subject of an emerging consensus. This paper challenges the validity of these theories and constructs a two factor alternative. The paper starts by identifying the difficulty the current theories have explaining the complex delusions of schizophrenia and then, by considering, first, the aetiology of somatopsychotic symptoms, and second, the literature on the relationship between confabulation and allopsychotic symptoms, demonstrates that the natural solution is to retain the experiential factor whilst replacing the second factor with confabulation. The paper is then able to demonstrate that the resultant two-factory theory can clarify recent work on the aetiological role of autonoetic agnosia and on the relationships between confabulation, delusion, and thought disorder. The theory supersedes currently available theories in terms of its simplicity, fruitfulness, scope and conservatism and represents an advance in the search for unified theory of psychosis.

  16. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coentre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires’ disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms.

  17. Childhood trauma and psychosis: Evidence, pathways, and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larkin W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a growing body of research examining environmental factors in the etiology of psychosis. Much recent interest has focused on the relationship between childhood trauma and the risk of developing psychotic experiences later in life. Numerous studies of psychiatric patients where the majority are diagnosed psychotic indicate that the prevalence of traumatic experiences in this group is high. This body of research now includes many large-scale population-based studies controlling for possible mediating variables, which together provide persuasive evidence of a dose-response association and are indicative of a causal relationship. Several psychological and biological models have been proposed which offer credible accounts of the processes by which trauma may increase risk of psychotic experience. Clinically it is imperative to routinely enquire about traumatic experiences, to respond appropriately and to offer psychosocial treatments to those who report traumatic life events in the context of psychotic experiences.

  18. Gender differences in the association between childhood physical and sexual abuse, social support and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Fisher, Helen L; Fearon, Paul; Hutchinson, Gerard; Morgan, Kevin; Dazzan, Paola; Boydell, Jane; Doody, Gillian A; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Robin M; Craig, Thomas K; Morgan, Craig

    2015-10-01

    Childhood adversity (variously defined) is a robust risk factor for psychosis, yet the mitigating effects of social support in adulthood have not yet been explored. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between childhood sexual and physical abuse and adult psychosis, and gender differences in levels of perceived social support. A sample of 202 individuals presenting for the first time to mental health services with psychosis and 266 population-based controls from south-east London and Nottingham, UK, was utilised. The Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire was used to elicit retrospective reports of exposure to childhood adversity, and the Significant Others Questionnaire was completed to collect information on the current size of social networks and perceptions of emotional and practical support. There was evidence of an interaction between severe physical abuse and levels of support (namely, number of significant others; likelihood ratio test χ(2) = 3.90, p = 0.048). When stratified by gender, there were no clear associations between childhood physical or sexual abuse, current social support and odds of psychosis in men. In contrast, for women, the highest odds of psychosis were generally found in those who reported severe abuse and low levels of social support in adulthood. However, tests for interaction by gender did not reach conventional levels of statistical significance. These findings highlight the importance of investigating the potential benefits of social support as a buffer against the development of adult psychosis amongst those, particularly women, with a history of early life stress.

  19. Vocational interests and career indecision among psychosis-prone college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreh, A M; Schullen, C

    1998-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between scores on scales that purport to measure psychosis-proneness and scores on vocational interests, identity, and differentiation scales in a sample of 233 college students who completed the Perceptual Aberration and Magical Ideation scales, the Strong Campbell Interest Inventory, and the Career Decision Scale. The present findings are consistent with prior work indicating a sex-related association of scores on measures of psychosis-proneness and vocational interests. A positive correlation between scores on vocational indecision and measures of psychosis-proneness was also found, suggesting that both men and women who score high on psychosis-proneness find it difficult to formulate long-term career goals. Finally, there was no significant correlation between scores on measures of psychosis-proneness and Holland's Vocational Differentiation Index. Present results are discussed in light of previously reported sex differences among psychosis-prone adults and diagnosed schizophrenics. The implications of the findings for vocational counselors are also addressed.

  20. Cognitive alexithymia is associated with the degree of risk for psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorien van der Velde

    Full Text Available Alexithymia is a personality construct denoting emotion processing problems. It has been suggested to encompass two dimensions: a cognitive and affective dimension. The cognitive dimension is characterized by difficulties in identifying, verbalizing and analyzing emotions, while the affective dimension reflects the level of emotional arousal and imagination. Alexithymia has been previously proposed as a risk factor for developing psychosis. More specifically, the two alexithymia dimensions might be differentially related to the vulnerability for psychosis. Therefore, we examined the two dimensions of alexithymia, measured with the BVAQ in 94 siblings of patients with schizophrenia, 52 subjects at ultra-high risk (UHR for developing psychosis, 38 patients with schizophrenia and 109 healthy controls. The results revealed that siblings and patients had higher levels of cognitive alexithymia compared to controls. In addition, subjects at UHR for psychosis had even higher levels of cognitive alexithymia compared to the siblings. The levels of affective alexithymia in siblings and patients were equal to controls. However, UHR individuals had significantly lower levels of affective alexithymia (i.e. higher levels of emotional arousal and fantasizing compared to controls. Alexithymia was further related to subclinical levels of negative and depressive symptoms. These findings indicate that alexithymia varies parametrically with the degree of risk for psychosis. More specifically, a type-II alexithymia pattern, with high levels of cognitive alexithymia and normal or low levels of affective alexithymia, might be a vulnerability factor for psychosis.

  1. Non literal language comprehension in a large sample of first episode psychosis patients in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlini, Cinzia; Bellani, Marcella; Finos, Livio; Lasalvia, Antonio; Bonetto, Chiara; Scocco, Paolo; D'Agostino, Armando; Torresani, Stefano; Imbesi, Massimiliano; Bellini, Francesca; Konze, Angela; Veronese, Angela; Ruggeri, Mirella; Brambilla, Paolo

    2017-11-10

    To date no data still exist on the comprehension of figurative language in the early phases of psychosis. The aim of this study is to investigate for the first time the comprehension of metaphors and idioms at the onset of the illness. Two-hundred-twenty eight (228) first episode psychosis (FEP) patients (168 NAP, non-affective psychosis; 60 AP, affective psychosis) and 70 healthy controls (HC) were assessed. Groups were contrasted on: a) type of stimulus (metaphors vs idioms) and b) type of response (OPEN = spontaneous explanations vs CLOSED = multiple choice answer). Moreover, a machine learning (ML) approach was adopted to classifying participants. Both NAP and AP had a poorer performance on OPEN metaphors and idioms compared to HC, with worse results on spontaneous interpretation of idioms than metaphors. No differences were observed between NAP and AP in CLOSED tasks. The ML approach points at CLOSED idioms as the best discriminating variable, more relevant than the set of pre-frontal and IQ scores. Deficits in non-figurative language may represent a core feature of psychosis. The possibility to identify linguistic features discriminating FEP may support the early recognition of patients at risk to develop psychosis, guiding provision of personalized and timely interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Friends interventions in psychosis: a narrative review and call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, Chris; Ellett, Lyn; Brand, Rachel; Lobban, Fiona

    2015-08-01

    To highlight the importance of friendships to young people with psychosis, and the need for clinical interventions to help maintain peer relationships during illness. To structure a research agenda for developing evidence-based interventions with friends. An argument is developed through a narrative review of (i) the proven efficacy of family interventions, and (by comparison) a relative absence of friend-based interventions; (ii) the particular primacy of friendships and dating for young people, and typical effects of exclusion; and (iii) reduced friendship networks and dating experiences in psychosis, in pre-, during and post-psychosis phases, also links between exclusion and psychosis. We put forward a model of how poor friendships can potentially be a causal and/or maintenance factor for psychotic symptoms. Given this model, our thesis is that interventions aiming to maintain social networks can be hugely beneficial clinically for young people with psychosis. We give a case study to show how such an intervention can work. We call for 'friends interventions' for young people with psychosis to be developed, where professionals directly work with a young person's authentic social group to support key friendships and maintain social continuity. An agenda for future research is presented that will develop and test theoretically driven interventions. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Theory of mind and neurocognition in early psychosis: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Robyn; Connors, Michael H; Still, Megan; Ward, Philip B; Catts, Stanley

    2014-12-04

    People with chronic psychosis often display theory of mind impairments that are not fully accounted for by other, more general neurocognitive deficits. In these patients, both theory of mind and neurocognitive deficits contribute to poor functioning, independently of psychotic symptoms. In young people with recent-onset psychosis, however, it is unclear the extent to which theory of mind impairment is independent of neurocognitive deficits. The primary aim of this study was to examine the evidence for specific theory of mind impairments in early psychosis. A secondary aim was to explore the relations between theory of mind, neurocognition, symptom severity, and functional outcomes. Twenty-three patients who were within two years of their first psychotic episode and 19 healthy controls completed theory of mind and neurocognitive batteries. Social functioning, quality of life, and symptom severity were also assessed in patients. Patients demonstrated deficits in tasks assessing theory of mind and neurocognition relative to controls. Patients' deficits in theory of mind were evident even after adjusting for their deficits in neurocognition. Neither theory of mind nor neurocognition predicted social functioning or quality of life in this early psychosis sample. Severity of negative symptoms, however, was a significant predictor of both outcomes. While a specific theory of mind impairment was evident in this early psychosis sample, severity of negative symptoms emerged as the best predictor of poor functional outcome. Further early psychosis research is needed to examine the longitudinal progression of theory of mind impairments - independent of neurocognitive deficits - and their impact on psychosocial function.

  4. [Dual diagnosis psychosis and substance use disorders: theoretical foundations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2008-07-01

    Dual Diagnosis (DD) patients with psychosis and substance use disorders (SUD) represent a large core group among patients with schizophrenia. Cannabis use disorders are most prevalent among DD patients, particularly in adolescent and young adult populations. There are different models to explain the high rates of comorbidity between psychosis and SUD. Currently, evidence is best for the model of cannabis use being a component cause of psychosis in individuals who are highly vulnerable to psychosis. There is also some evidence for the model of common vulnerability factors for psychosis and SUD. DD patients are difficult to treat as they comply poorly, their long-term outcomes are unfavourable and they suffer frequent psychotic relapses and hospitalisations. Successful treatment models integrate traditional psychiatric therapy for psychosis and therapy for addiction in one setting, modifying and adjusting the two components to the special needs of the DD patients. Integrated programmes focus mostly on long-term outpatient treatment and offer pharmacotherapy, motivational enhancement, psychoeducation, cognitive-behavioural therapy and family interventions. Current clinical research demonstrates that integrated treatment programmes can achieve significant improvements with regard to the social adjustment of, as well as decreased substance use by DD patients.

  5. Theory of mind in a first-episode psychosis population using the Hinting Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Maija; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Heiskanen, Inkeri; Voutilainen, Greta; Pulkkinen, Ulla; Mehtälä, Tuukka; Jokela, Markus; Kieseppä, Tuula; Suvisaari, Jaana; Therman, Sebastian

    2018-05-01

    Deficiencies in theory of mind (ToM) are common in psychosis and may largely explain impaired social functioning. Currently, it is unclear whether impairments in ToM are explained by the more general cognitive deficits related to psychosis or whether ToM is impaired in psychosis independently of other cognitive deficits. This study examined ToM using the Hinting Task in young adults (n = 66) with first-episode psychosis and matched controls (n = 62). The participants were administered a broad neuropsychological assessment. Participants with psychosis performed worse than controls on the Hinting Task. However, 75% of the variance between the groups was explained by general cognitive deficits, especially impaired processing speed and episodic memory. Hinting Task performance of the best functioning patient group did not differ from that of the control group. When the psychosis group was divided according to diagnosis, the Hinting Task difference between individuals with schizophrenia and controls remained significant even when general cognitive performance was controlled for, suggesting specific verbal ToM deficits in schizophrenia. In contrast, those with other psychotic disorders did not differ from controls. Our results suggest that ToM deficits can be seen in early phases of psychotic disorders, schizophrenia in particular, and are partly independent of other cognitive functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. PTSD symptoms associated with the experiences of psychosis and hospitalisation: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Katherine; Ford, Sarah; Jellicoe-Jones, Lorna; Haddock, Gillian

    2013-06-01

    There is evidence of high rates of PTSD in people with psychosis, but the influence that symptoms or hospitalisation have on PTSD in individuals with psychosis is less clear. This paper reviewed studies investigating the prevalence of PTSD induced as a result of the experience of psychosis and hospitalisation and factors that might influence its development. The review included 24 studies, published between 1980 and 2011. Studies showed high levels of PTSD resulting from the trauma of symptoms and/or hospitalisation, with prevalence rates for actual PTSD resulting from these traumas varying from 11% to 67%. In line with studies of PTSD related to other traumatic events, there were inconsistent associations between PTSD and severity of positive and negative symptoms, but there were consistent associations between affective symptoms and PTSD. There were also inconsistent associations between hospital experiences and PTSD. Consistent with the general PTSD literature, there was some evidence that psychosis-related PTSD was associated with trauma history. There was also some emerging evidence that psychological variables, such as appraisals and coping style may influence psychosis-related PTSD. The review highlights the need for further research into psychological mechanisms that could increase vulnerability to psychosis-related PTSD and treatment approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Semi-structured Interview Measure of Stigma (SIMS) in psychosis: Assessment of psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lisa; Burke, Eilish; Byrne, Rory; Enache, Gabriela; Morrison, Anthony P

    2016-10-01

    Stigma is a significant difficulty for people who experience psychosis. To date, there have been no outcome measures developed to examine stigma exclusively in people with psychosis. The aim of this study was develop and validate a semi-structured interview measure of stigma (SIMS) in psychosis. The SIMS is an eleven item measure of stigma developed in consultation with service users who have experienced psychosis. 79 participants with experience of psychosis were recruited for the purposes of this study. They were administered the SIMS alongside a battery of other relevant outcome measures to examine reliability and validity. A one-factor solution was identified for the SIMS which encompassed all ten rateable items. The measure met all reliability and validity criteria and illustrated good internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, test retest reliability, criterion validity, construct validity, sensitivity to change and had no floor or ceiling effects. The SIMS is a reliable and valid measure of stigma in psychosis. It may be more engaging and acceptable than other stigma measures due to its semi-structured interview format. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Core schemas across the continuum of psychosis: a comparison of clinical and non-clinical groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Hannah E; Stewart, Suzanne L K; Dunn, Graham; Parker, Sophie; Fowler, David; Morrison, Anthony P

    2014-11-01

    Research suggests that core schemas are important in both the development and maintenance of psychosis. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare core schemas in four groups along the continuum of psychosis and examine the relationships between schemas and positive psychotic symptomatology. A measure of core schemas was distributed to 20 individuals experiencing first-episode psychosis (FEP), 113 individuals with "at risk mental states" (ARMS), 28 participants forming a help-seeking clinical group (HSC), and 30 non-help-seeking individuals who endorse some psychotic-like experiences (NH). The clinical groups scored significantly higher than the NH group for negative beliefs about self and about others. No significant effects of group on positive beliefs about others were found. For positive beliefs about the self, the NH group scored significantly higher than the clinical groups. Furthermore, negative beliefs about self and others were related to positive psychotic symptomatology and to distress related to those experiences. Negative evaluations of the self and others appear to be characteristic of the appraisals of people seeking help for psychosis and psychosis-like experiences. The results support the literature that suggests that self-esteem should be a target for intervention. Future research would benefit from including comparison groups of people experiencing chronic psychosis and people who do not have any psychotic-like experiences.

  9. Birth weight and obstetric complications determine age at onset in first episode of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Abadal, E; Ochoa, S; Barajas, A; Baños, I; Dolz, M; Sanchez, B; Del Cacho, N; Carlson, J; Huerta-Ramos, E; Usall, J

    2015-06-01

    Earlier age at onset of psychosis (AOP) has been associated with poor social adjustment and clinical outcome. Genetic and environmental factors such as obstetric complications, parental history of psychosis, advanced paternal age at time of birth, low birth weight and gestational age, and use of drugs have been described as bringing AOP forward. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between AOP and these factors in a sample of first episode of psychosis (FEP) patients. Clinical and sociodemographic data, age at FEP, age of parents at birth, parental history of psychosis, drug-use habits of the mother during pregnancy and of the patient before psychotic onset, and Lewis and Murray obstetric complication scale were obtained from 90 patients with FEP. Statistical analysis was performed by means of Pearson correlations, Chi-square tests, Student T-test analyses and a linear regression model using SPSS version 22. Pre-eclampsia, need for incubator at birth, use of forceps, parental history of psychosis, and low birth weight were associated with an earlier AOP. Use of forceps and birth weight are the variables which best predict AOP in FEP. Stimulant drugs, which were mostly used together with cannabis and cocaine, were the only substances associated with an earlier AOP. Our findings are consistent with previous study results and underline the role of the prenatal period in the development of psychosis and the importance of careful monitoring of pregnancy and delivery, especially in cases with familial history. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychosis-proneness and the rubber hand illusion of body ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germine, Laura; Benson, Taylor Leigh; Cohen, Francesca; Hooker, Christine I'lee

    2013-05-15

    Psychosis and psychosis-proneness are associated with abnormalities in subjective experience of the self, including distortions in bodily experience that are difficult to study experimentally due to lack of structured methods. In 55 healthy adults, we assessed the relationship between self-reported psychosis-like characteristics and susceptibility to the rubber hand illusion of body ownership. In this illusion, a participant sees a rubber hand being stroked by a brush at the same time that they feel a brush stroking their own hand. In some individuals, this creates the bodily sense that the rubber hand is their own hand. Individual differences in positive (but not negative) psychosis-like characteristics predicted differences in susceptibility to experiencing the rubber hand illusion. This relationship was specific to the subjective experience of rubber hand ownership, and not other unusual experiences or sensations, and absent when a small delay was introduced between seeing and feeling the brush stroke. This indicates that individual differences in susceptibility are related to visual-tactile integration and cannot be explained by differences in the tendency to endorse unusual experiences. Our findings suggest that susceptibility to body representation distortion by sensory information may be related or contribute to the development of psychosis and positive psychosis-like characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of childhood trauma on diagnosis and substance use in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassi, S; Tosato, S; Mondelli, V; Faravelli, C; Lasalvia, A; Fioravanti, G; Bonetto, C; Fioritti, A; Cremonese, C; Lo Parrino, R; De Santi, K; Meneghelli, A; Torresani, S; De Girolamo, G; Semrov, E; Pratelli, M; Cristofalo, D; Ruggeri, M

    2017-09-01

    Background Childhood trauma has been significantly associated with first-episode psychosis, affective dysfunction and substance use. Aims To test whether people with first-episode psychosis who had experienced childhood trauma, when compared with those who had not, showed a higher rate of affective psychosis and an increased lifetime rate of substance use. Method The sample comprised 345 participants with first-episode psychosis (58% male, mean age 29.8 years, s.d. = 9.7). Results Severe sexual abuse was significantly associated with a diagnosis of affective psychosis (χ 2 = 4.9, P = 0.04) and with higher rates of lifetime use of cannabis (68% v 41%; P = 0.02) and heroin (20% v 5%; P = 0.02). Severe physical abuse was associated with increased lifetime use of heroin (15% v 5%; P = 0.03) and cocaine (32% v 17%; P = 0.05). Conclusions Patients with first-episode psychosis exposed to childhood trauma appear to constitute a distinctive subgroup in terms of diagnosis and lifetime substance use. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  12. Childhood trauma and hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Katrina; Barrett, Suzanne; Shannon, Ciaran; Campbell, Clodagh; Watson, David; Rushe, Teresa; Shevlin, Mark; Bai, Feng; Cooper, Stephen; Mulholland, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    A history of childhood trauma is common in individuals who later develop psychosis. Similar neuroanatomical abnormalities are observed in people who have been exposed to childhood trauma and people with psychosis. However, the relationship between childhood trauma and such abnormalities in psychosis has not been investigated. This study aimed to explore the association between the experience of childhood trauma and hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in a first-episode psychosis (FEP) population. The study employed an observational retrospective design. Twenty-one individuals, who had previously undergone magnetic resonance imaging procedures as part of the longitudinal Northern Ireland First-Episode Psychosis Study, completed measures assessing traumatic experiences and were included in the analysis. Data were subject to correlation analyses (r and r (pb)). Potential confounding variables (age at FEP and delay to scan from recruitment) were selected a priori for inclusion in multiple regression analyses. There was a high prevalence of lifetime (95%) and childhood (76%) trauma in the sample. The experience of childhood trauma was a significant predictor of left hippocampal volume, although age at FEP also significantly contributed to this model. There was no significant association between predictor variables and right hippocampal volume. The experience of childhood trauma was a significant predictor of right and total amygdalar volumes and the hippocampal/amygdalar complex volume as a whole. The findings indicate that childhood trauma is associated with neuroanatomical measures in FEP. Future research controlling for childhood traumatic experiences may contribute to explaining brain morphology in people with psychosis.

  13. Holding on to false beliefs: The bias against disconfirmatory evidence over the course of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenacher, Sarah; Zink, Mathias

    2017-09-01

    The ability to integrate evidence into a reasoning process is crucial in order to react to changing information, e.g. to adapt one's beliefs according to new evidence or to generate new beliefs when facing better alternatives. Evidence integration ability is thus associated with belief flexibility. A specific bias of evidence integration, a bias against disconfirmatory evidence (BADE), can be found in patients with schizophrenia and has been linked to delusion development and maintenance. Knowledge about whether the BADE occurs already in risk constellations of psychosis can clarify its role in the pathogenesis of psychosis. This article reviews the current literature on BADE. Many studies demonstrate BADE over the course of illness, ranging from healthy controls with subclinical properties of schizotypy, over patients with at-risk mental states (ARMS) and patients with a first episode of psychosis to patients with chronic schizophrenia. These data allow a comparison of competences and deficits over the course of illness. Underlying mechanisms of BADE are discussed, including interrelations with neurocognitive performance and dopaminergic processes. The BADE could be found in different phases of psychosis development and can be regarded as a cognitive marker of the beginning psychotic state. The presented findings are derived from independent cross-sectional studies. So far, no comprehensive longitudinal assessment has been published. Treatments of metacognitive deficits in general and as early as in the ARMS might interfere with the cognitive pathogenesis of psychosis, and thereby ameliorate, postpone or even prevent the transition to psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Thyroid storm presenting as psychosis: masked by diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafia Memon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While extremely uncommon, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA and thyroid storm (TS are endocrine emergencies that can coexist. We describe a case with a confounding clinical presentation that identifies these two emergencies within the setting of sepsis and influenza. Case: A 69-year-old diabetic female was found by the paramedic staff to be disoriented. She demonstrated tachycardia and had a foul-smelling abdominal wound. Laboratory evaluation revealed DKA, leukocytosis, influenza B, and urinary tract infection. After appropriate management in the intensive care unit, the DKA resolved the following morning. However, the patient developed a fever, and her psychosis became more pronounced. Extensive analysis was performed but did not explain her mental status. The patient was found to have thyroid stimulating hormone of 0.06 mIU/mL, free T4 (thyroxine of 2.38 ng/dL, and total T3 (triiodothyronine of 72 ng/dL. Based on the Burch and Wartofsky criteria (score of 65, TS was diagnosed. Based on more recent diagnostic criteria suggested by Akamizu et al., the patient met criteria for TS grade 1. Within several hours of initiating treatment, the patient's mental state and tachycardia improved, and her psychosis resolved by the third day. Conclusion: This case highlights the importance of recognizing the clinical diagnosis of TS, as the magnitude of thyroid hormone derangements may not correlate with clinical severity. While rare, DKA and TS can simultaneously occur and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality if not promptly recognized and treated.

  15. Emotion perception and overconfidence in errors under stress in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köther, Ulf; Lincoln, Tania M; Moritz, Steffen

    2018-03-21

    Vulnerability stress models are well-accepted in psychosis research, but the mechanisms that link stress to psychotic symptoms remain vague. Little is known about how social cognition and overconfidence in errors, two putative mechanisms for the pathogenesis of delusions, relate to stress. Using a repeated measures design, we tested four groups (N=120) with different liability to psychosis (schizophrenia patients [n=35], first-degree relatives [n=24], participants with attenuated positive symptoms [n=19] and healthy controls [n=28]) and depression patients (n=14) as a clinical control group under three randomized experimental conditions (no stress, noise and social stress). Parallel versions of the Emotion Perception and Confidence Task, which taps both emotion perception and confidence, were used in each condition. We recorded subjective stress, heart rate, skin conductance level and salivary cortisol to assess the stress response across different dimensions. Independent of the stress condition, patients with schizophrenia showed poorer emotion perception performance and higher confidence in emotion perception errors than participants with attenuated positive symptoms and healthy controls. However, they did not differ from patients with depression or first-degree relatives. Stress did not influence emotion perception or the extent of high-confident errors, but patients with schizophrenia showed an increase in high-confident emotion perception errors conditional on higher arousal. A possible clinical implication of our findings is the necessity to provide stress management programs that aim to reduce arousal. Moreover, patients with schizophrenia might benefit from interventions that help them to reduce overconfidence in their social cognition judgements in times in which they feel being under pressure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and psychosis: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every-Palmer, Susanna

    2011-09-01

    Aroma, Spice, K2 and Dream are examples of a class of new and increasingly popular recreational drugs. Ostensibly branded "herbal incense", they have been intentionally adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018 in order to confer on them cannabimimetic psychoactive properties while circumventing drug legislation. JWH-018 is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist. Little is known about its pharmacology and toxicology in humans. This is the first research considering the effects of JWH-018 on a psychiatric population and exploring the relationship between JWH-018 and psychotic symptoms. This paper presents the results of semi-structured interviews regarding the use and effects of JWH-018 in 15 patients with serious mental illness in a New Zealand forensic and rehabilitative service. All 15 subjects were familiar with a locally available JWH-018 containing product called "Aroma" and 86% reported having used it. They credited the product's potent psychoactivity, legality, ready availability and non-detection in drug testing as reasons for its popularity, with most reporting it had replaced cannabis as their drug of choice. Most patients had assumed the product was "natural" and "safe". Anxiety and psychotic symptoms were common after use, with 69% of users experiencing or exhibiting symptoms consistent with psychotic relapse after smoking JWH-018. Although psychological side effects were common, no one reported becoming physically unwell after using JWH-018. Three subjects described developing some tolerance to the product, but no one reported withdrawal symptoms. It seems likely that JWH-018 can precipitate psychosis in vulnerable individuals. People with risk factors for psychosis should be counseled against using synthetic cannabinoids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cannabis use and first-episode psychosis:relationship with manic and psychotic symptoms, and with age at presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, J. M.; Fisher, H L; Major, B; Chisholm, B; Woolley, J; Lawrence, J; Rahaman, N; Joyce, J; Hinton, M.; Johnson, S; Young, A H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cannabis use has been reported to be associated with an earlier onset of symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis, and a worse outcome in those who continue to take cannabis. In general, studies have concentrated on symptoms of psychosis rather than mania. In this study, using a longitudinal design in a large naturalistic cohort of patients with first-episode psychosis, we investigated the relationship between cannabis use, age of presentation to services, daily functioni...

  18. Feasibility of a psychosis information intervention to improve mental health literacy for professional groups in contact with young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Marie; O'Keeffe, Donal; Frawley, Timothy; Madigan, Kevin; Fanning, Felicity; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Roche, Eric; Kelly, Aine; Turner, Niall; Horenstein, Arielle; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; Clarke, Mary

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a psychosis information intervention for professionals in contact with young people in Ireland. A quasi-experimental pre- and post-intervention design was used. One thousand and thirty-two professionals received an information intervention designed to improve mental health literacy (MHL) and confidence in providing help to people with psychosis. Seven hundred and fifty-five participants completed the Psychosis Information and Confidence Questionnaire pre- and post-intervention. The information intervention significantly improved participants': (1) knowledge of psychosis; (2) ability to recognize signs and symptoms of psychosis; (3) awareness of how to access services; and (4) confidence in providing help to people experiencing psychosis. Findings provide promising support for the intervention's feasibility and acceptability. The intervention enhanced MHL regarding psychosis among professionals in contact with young people. Further research assessing if such improvements translate to the facilitation of appropriate help seeking, the enhanced early detection of psychosis and a reduction of the duration of untreated psychosis is required. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Sex differences in cognitive functioning in at-risk mental state for psychosis, first episode psychosis and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittig, S; Studerus, E; Papmeyer, M; Uttinger, M; Koranyi, S; Ramyead, A; Riecher-Rössler, A

    2015-02-01

    Several sex differences in schizophrenia have been reported including differences in cognitive functioning. Studies with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls (HC) indicate that the sex advantage for women in verbal domains is also present in schizophrenia patients. However, findings have been inconsistent. No study focused on sex-related cognitive performance differences in at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) individuals yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate sex differences in cognitive functioning in ARMS, first episode psychosis (FEP) and HC subjects. We expected a better verbal learning and memory performance of women in all groups. The neuropsychological data analysed in this study were collected within the prospective Früherkennung von Psychosen (FePsy) study. In total, 118 ARMS, 88 FEP individuals and 86 HC completed a cognitive test battery covering the domains of executive functions, attention, working memory, verbal learning and memory, IQ and speed of processing. Women performed better in verbal learning and memory regardless of diagnostic group. By contrast, men as compared to women showed a shorter reaction time during the working memory task across all groups. The results provide evidence that women generally perform better in verbal learning and memory, independent of diagnostic group (ARMS, FEP, HC). The finding of a shorter reaction time for men in the working memory task could indicate that men have a superior working memory performance since they responded faster during the target trials, while maintaining a comparable overall working memory performance level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Modern representations about differential diagnosis of schizophrenia-like psychosis disorders due to psychoactive substance use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Chugunov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years in the world there is a tendency of quantity of persons who use drugs increase. Free availability of drugs of different groups for population is the main cause. Another trend associated with the consumption of drugs. All these factors led to the increased frequency of psychosis occurrence among consumers of psychoactive substances. In structure of such psychosis there are a variety of symptoms and syndromes. And since the number of drug users is quite broad in its structure - there are also persons with mental illness. This gives number of diagnostic difficulties. In this regard, the aim of the study was to trace the modern ideas of differential diagnosis of schizophrenia-like psychosis disorders due to the drug use. Materials and methods of research. In this work the content analysis of the modern representations of differential diagnosis of schizophrenia-like psychosis disorders as a result of the use of psychoactive substances was made. The problem of determination of primary and secondary nature of drug addiction in patients with psychotic disorders was indicated. Etiology and psychopathogenesis hypotheses of the addiction from psychoactive substances in the context of their correlation with endogenous mental pathology were defined. In the literature there is no clear diagnostic criteria that would allow distinguishing psychosis due to the use of drugs and endogenous psychosis, which is combined with the admission medicines. However, the attention of clinicians should be concentrated on the premorbid condition: the presence of hereditary family history, pathological behavior in childhood and adolescence. It was found that the majority of substances may cause one or more syndromes - delirium, dementia, and amnestic syndrome, delusional syndrome, hallucinatory syndrome, depressive syndrome, anxiety, and personality disorder, such disorders as schizophrenia-like psychosis disorders are not rare. Special attention was paid to the

  1. Psychosis associated with acute recreational drug toxicity: a European case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallersnes, Odd Martin; Dines, Alison M; Wood, David M; Yates, Christopher; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Hovda, Knut Erik; Giraudon, Isabelle; Dargan, Paul I

    2016-08-18

    Psychosis can be associated with acute recreational drug and novel psychoactive substance (NPS) toxicity. However, there is limited data available on how common this is and which drugs are most frequently implicated. We describe a European case series of psychosis associated with acute recreational drug toxicity, and estimate the frequency of psychosis for different recreational drugs. The European Drug Emergencies Network (Euro-DEN) collects data on presentations to Emergency Departments (EDs) with acute recreational drug and NPS toxicity at 16 centres in ten countries. Euro-DEN data from October 2013 through September 2014 was retrospectively searched, and cases with psychosis were included. The proportion of cases with psychosis per drug was calculated in the searched Euro-DEN dataset. Psychosis was present in 348 (6.3 %) of 5529 cases. The median (interquartile range) age was 29 (24-38) years, 276 (79.3 %) were male and 114 (32.8 %) were admitted to psychiatric ward. The drugs most commonly reported were cannabis in 90 (25.9 %) cases, amphetamine in 87 (25.0 %) and cocaine in 56 (16.1 %). More than one drug was taken in 189 (54.3 %) cases. Psychosis was frequent in those ED presentations involving tryptamines (4/7; 57.1 %), methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) (6/22; 27.3 %), methylphenidate (6/26; 23.1 %), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) (18/86; 20.9 %), psilocybe mushrooms (3/16; 18.8 %), synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists (4/26; 15.4 %) and amphetamine (87/593; 14.7 %), but less common in those involving mephedrone (14/245; 5.7 %), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) (20/461; 4.3 %) and methedrone (3/92; 3.3 %). Amphetamine was the most frequent drug associated with psychosis when only one agent was reported, with psychosis occurring in 32.4 % of these presentations. The frequency of psychosis in acute recreational drug toxicity varies considerably between drugs, but is a major problem in amphetamine poisoning. In rapidly changing drug markets and

  2. Duration of untreated psychosis in adolescents: ethnic differences and clinical profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria-de-Gracia; Fisher, Helen L; Major, Barnaby; Chisholm, Brock; Rahaman, Nikola; Joyce, John; Woolley, James; Lawrence, Jo; Hinton, Mark; Marlowe, Karl; Aitchison, Katherine; Johnson, Sonia; Hodes, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    Duration of Untreated Psychosis (DUP) is an important measure associated with outcome of psychosis. This first study in the UK compared DUP between adolescent and adult-onset individuals and explored whether the adolescent-onset group showed variations in DUP that could be accounted for by sociodemographic and selected risk factors. This naturalistic cohort study included 940 new first-episode psychosis cases aged 14-35years (136 adolescent-onset versus 804 adult-onset psychotic individuals) referred to nine Early Intervention Services for Psychosis in London (2003-2009). Sociodemographic characteristics, age of onset, family history of mental illness, duration of untreated psychosis, suicidality and substance use information were collected at entry to the services. Adolescents presented with significantly greater median DUP (179days) than adults (81days, p=0.005). Large differences in DUP were found amongst adolescent ethnic groups (median DUP: White: 454days; Black: 103days; Asian and mixed: 28.5days). In addition, younger age of onset and higher lifetime cannabis use were associated with longer treatment delay amongst adolescents. This study of DUP in adolescent-onset psychosis found it to be approximately twice the length of DUP amongst adults. For the adolescent White sub-group, DUP was far greater than the UK Department of Health target (<3months). Both the high rates of lifetime cannabis use and the lower age of onset might explain the long DUP in this ethnic group. Physicians need to be particularly vigilant about identifying and managing early psychosis in adolescents. © 2013.

  3. Ethnic identity, perceptions of disadvantage, and psychosis: findings from the ÆSOP study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Many studies have shown that rates of psychosis are elevated in the Black and minority ethnic (BME) population in the UK. One important, but relatively less researched explanation of these high rates may be social adversity associated with acculturation processes. Strong identification with an ethnic minority group subjected to social disadvantage may exert adverse effects on individuals from BME groups. Using data from a large epidemiological case-control study of first-episode psychosis, we aimed to investigate whether strong ethnic identification is a factor contributing to the excess of psychosis in BME groups compared with the White British, after adjustment for perceptions of disadvantage. All cases with a first episode of psychosis presenting to specialist mental health services within tightly defined catchment areas in London and Nottingham, UK, and geographically matched community controls were included in the study. Data were collected on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, perceptions of disadvantage, and identification with one\\'s own ethnic group. Analysis was performed on data from 139 cases and 234 controls. There was evidence that, as levels of ethnic identification increased, the odds of psychosis increased in the BME but not in the White British group, independent of potential confounders. However, the association between strong ethnic identity and psychosis in BME individuals was attenuated and non-significant when controlled for perceived disadvantage. Strong identification with an ethnic minority group may be a potential contributory factor of the high rates of psychosis in the BME population, the effects of which may be explained by perceptions of disadvantage.

  4. Understanding the experience of "burnout" in first-episode psychosis carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Juliana; Sirykaite, Sandra; Schulz, Joerg; Man, Emma; James, Gareth; Afsharzadegan, Roya; Khan, Sanna; Harvey, Raythe; Souray, Jonathan; Raune, David

    2018-05-01

    The first onset of psychosis can exert a significant negative impact on the functioning and positive wellbeing of family carers. Carer reports of "burnout" have recently been recorded in early psychosis carers, though the literature is scarce detailing our understanding of how burnout relates to the primary experience of caregiving. The current study investigated reports of burnout and its relationship with beliefs about caregiving and wellbeing in a large group of early psychosis carers who were routinely assessed within an early intervention team. Using a cross-sectional design, 169 early psychosis carers completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory alongside measures of caregiving experiences, affect and wellbeing. The mean illness length for patients with psychosis was 18 months. Their mean age was 24.4 years and most was male (65%). The majority of carer participants were parental caregivers and living with their relative with psychosis. Across the three key burnout dimensions, 58% of the sample reported high levels of emotional exhaustion; 31% endorsed high levels of depersonalization; and 43% reported low levels personal accomplishment. The most severe level of burnout, reflecting elevated rates across all three dimensions, was observed in 16% of the sample. Carer burnout was positively associated with negative caregiving experiences (i.e. burden), poor affect, and reduced levels of positive wellbeing and perception of being in good health. Reports by early psychosis carers of exhaustion, feeling inadequate and expressing negativity towards the relative they care for is not uncommon and are closely associated with their overall negative appraisals of caregiving. The results underscore the importance of developing targeted interventions during the early phase, which are designed to reduce the development and entrenchment of burnout responses in carers, but to also mitigate its negative sequelae. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The phenomenology of the psychotic break and Huxley's trip: substance use and the onset of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Barnaby; Sass, Louis A

    2008-01-01

    While considerable research attention has been devoted to the causal relationship between substance use and psychosis, the phenomenology of the association between the two has largely been ignored. This is a significant shortcoming, because it blinds researchers to the possibility that there may be elements of the subjective experience of substance use and psychosis that contribute to their apparent relationship in empirical studies. The current paper examines the phenomenology of the onset of psychosis and the phenomenology of substance intoxication through consideration of two texts: Sass's account of the phenomenology of psychosis onset and Huxley's account of the experience of hallucinogenic intoxication. Sass's account of psychosis onset includes four components: Unreality, Fragmentation, Mere Being, and Apophany. The analysis reveals significant parallels - and also some differences - between this account and the phenomenology of substance intoxication. We discuss the implications of this for the causal relationship between psychosis and substance use and suggest several ways of understanding the overlapping phenomenologies. This includes the suggestion of a shared factor, perhaps best described as psychotic-like experience, which seems to involve a breakdown of the sign-referent relationship and relationship with the common-sense, practical world. However, in the onset of psychosis, this breakdown is primarily experienced as a sense of alienation from self and world, whereas in the hallucinogenic state a sense of mystical union and revelation seems predominant. Further research may extend this analysis by looking at experiences with other drugs, particularly cannabis, and by examining the phenomenology of psychotic disorder beyond the first episode. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Autoantibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel and glutamic acid decarboxylase in psychosis: A systematic review, meta-analysis, and case series.

    OpenAIRE

    Grain, Rosemary; Lally, John; Stubbs, Brendon; Malik, Steffi; LeMince, Anne; Nicholson, Timothy R; Murray, Robin M; Gaughran, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies to the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) have been reported in some cases of psychosis. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate their prevalence in people with psychosis and report a case series of VGKC-complex antibodies in refractory psychosis. Only five studies presenting prevalence rates of VGKC seropositivity in psychosis were identified, in addition to our case series, with an overall prevale...

  7. Autoantibodies against voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in psychosis: A systematic review, meta-analysis and case series.

    OpenAIRE

    Lally*, John; Grain*, Rosemary; Stubbs, Brendon; Malik, Steffi; LeMince, Anne; Nicholson, Timothy RJ; Murray, Robin MacGregor; Gaughran, Fiona Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies to the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) have been reported in some cases of psychosis. We conducted the first systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate their prevalence in people with psychosis and report a case series of VGKC-complex antibodies in refractory psychosis. Only five studies presenting prevalence rates of VGKC seropositivity in psychosis were identified, in addition to our case series, with an overall prevale...

  8. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms in first episode psychosis and in subjects at ultra high risk for developing psychosis; onset and relationship to psychotic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, Bouke; Lankreijer, Kay; Linszen, Don H.; de Haan, Lieuwe

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and obsessive compulsive disorder in patients with schizophrenia or related disorders or subjects at ultra high risk for development of psychosis. Secondly, to determine the time of occurrence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms

  9. Are young people hospitalised with psychosis interested in psychological therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, Deborah; Jakes, Simon; Kelly, Siobhan; Rhodes, John

    2015-01-01

    Psychotic clients may be difficult to engage in psychological therapy, and many potential participants decline to participate in controlled trials of cognitive behavioural therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate psychotic patients' perspectives regarding therapy. The design was qualitative and used thematic analysis to investigate emerging themes. Methods A total of 46 inpatients with psychosis were interviewed about their views on therapy. Interview summaries were submitted to thematic analysis. A total of 41% of participants were rated as interested, 36% were rated as not interested and 23% appeared ambivalent, or their interest in therapy was unable to be assessed. Themes related to interest in therapy included the desire to build skills, to address (usually non-psychotic) symptoms and for a therapeutic relationship. Themes related to not wanting therapy included a denial of psychological problems, distrust in the healthcare system and psychologists and low perceived efficacy in therapy. A large minority of psychotic patients may be interested in therapy, although mostly not to address psychotic symptoms. Future research on pre-treatment approaches to disconfirm negative perceptions and increase interest in therapy is warranted. The reasons why some patients with psychosis are not interested in receiving psychological therapy may relate to past negative experiences with psychologists, negative perceptions of psychologists as a group and low perceived efficacy of therapy. These barriers may be addressed through interactions with psychotic patients during an admission to a hospital that disconfirms these perceptions and provides a positive alternative experience with a psychologist. Patients who are hospitalized with psychosis may be interested in receiving psychological therapy; however, the reason for this likely will not be to address psychotic symptoms. Rather, the therapist should be willing to work with the patient on a range of other presenting

  10. Current cannabis use and age of psychosis onset: a gender-mediated relationship? Results from an 8-year FEP incidence study in Bologna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Fabio; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Paparelli, Alessandra; Marcacci, Thomas; Braca, Mauro; Menchetti, Marco; Michetti, Rossella; Berardi, Domenico; Tarricone, Ilaria

    2013-11-30

    This study examined the relationship between gender, illicit drug use and age of onset of psychosis. We analysed data from an epidemiologically based cohort of 160 subjects with first-episode psychosis from community mental health centers. Cannabis was associated with an earlier onset of psychosis compared to other drugs, especially among women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurocognitive predictors of transition to psychosis: medium- to long-term findings from a sample at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A; Yung, A R; Nelson, B; Brewer, W J; Riley, R; Simmons, M; Pantelis, C; Wood, S J

    2013-11-01

    Individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis show reduced neurocognitive performance across domains but it is unclear which reductions are associated with transition to frank psychosis. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in baseline neurocognitive performance between UHR participants with (UHR-P) and without transition to psychosis (UHR-NP) and a healthy control (HC) group and examine neurocognitive predictors of transition over the medium to long term. A sample of 325 UHR participants recruited consecutively from the Personal Assessment and Crisis Evaluation (PACE) Clinic in Melbourne and 66 HCs completed a neurocognitive assessment at baseline. The UHR group was followed up between 2.39 and 14.86 (median = 6.45) years later. Cox regression was used to investigate candidate neurocognitive predictors of psychosis onset. The UHR group performed more poorly than the HC group across a range of neurocognitive domains but only performance on digit symbol coding and picture completion differed between the groups. The risk of transition was only significantly associated with poorer performance on visual reproduction [hazard ratio (HR) 0.919, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.876-0.965, p = 0.001] and matrix reasoning (HR 0.938, 95% CI 0.883-0.996, p = 0.037). These remained significant even after controlling for psychopathology at baseline. This study is the longest follow-up of an UHR sample to date. UHR status was associated with poorer neurocognitive performance compared to HCs on some tasks. Cognition at identification as UHR was not a strong predictor of risk for transition to psychosis. The results suggests the need to include more experimental paradigms that isolate discrete cognitive processes to better understand neurocognition at this early stage of illness.

  12. Attenuated psychotic and basic symptom characteristics in adolescents with ultra-high risk criteria for psychosis, other non-psychotic psychiatric disorders and early-onset psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cascio, Nella; Saba, Riccardo; Hauser, Marta; Vernal, Ditte Lammers; Al-Jadiri, Aseel; Borenstein, Yehonatan; Sheridan, Eva M; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano; Fiori Nastro, Paolo; Girardi, Paolo; Gebhardt, Eva; Kane, John M; Auther, Andrea; Carrión, Ricardo E; Cornblatt, Barbara A; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Correll, Christoph U

    2016-10-01

    While attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) and basic symptoms (BS) are the main current predictors of psychosis in adults, studies in adolescents are scarce. Thus, we (1) described the prevalence and severity of positive, negative, disorganization, general, and basic symptoms in adolescent patients at ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR), with other non-psychotic psychiatric disorders (PC) and with early-onset psychosis (EOP); and (2) investigated BS criteria in relation to UHR criteria. Sixty-nine 12-18-year-old adolescents (15.3 ± 1.7 years, female = 58.0 %, UHR = 22, PC = 27, EOP = 20) were assessed with the structured interview for prodromal syndromes (SIPS) and the schizophrenia proneness instrument-child and youth version (SPI-CY). Despite similar current and past 12-month global functioning, both UHR and EOP had significantly higher SIPS total and subscale scores compared to PC, with moderate-large effect sizes. Expectedly, UHR had significantly lower SIPS positive symptom scores than EOP, but similar SIPS negative, disorganized, and general symptom scores. Compared to PC, both EOP and UHR had more severe basic thought and perception disturbances, and significantly more often met cognitive disturbances criteria (EOP = 50.0 %, UHR = 40.9 %, PC = 14.8 %). Compared to UHR, both EOP and PC significantly less often met cognitive-perceptive BS criteria (EOP = 35.0 %, UHR = 68.2 %, PC = 25.9 %). BS were significantly more prevalent in both EOP and UHR than PC, and UHR were similar to EOP in symptom domains. Given the uncertain outcome of adolescents at clinical high-risk of psychosis, future research is needed to determine whether the combined assessment of early subjective disturbances with observable APS can improve the accuracy of psychosis prediction.

  13. How does social functioning in the early stages of psychosis relate to depression and social anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudleigh, Catherine; Naismith, Sharon L; Blaszczynski, Alex; Hermens, Daniel F; Hodge, M Antoinette Redoblado; Hickie, Ian B

    2011-08-01

    The study aims to compare social functioning in young people considered to be at risk of psychosis with those meeting criteria for first episode psychosis (FEP) and controls, and to determine the association between social functioning and positive and negative symptoms, depressive symptoms, and social anxiety. This study examined social functioning in 20 individuals at risk of psychosis, 20 FEP patients and 20 healthy controls. Social functioning was measured using the Social Functioning Scale and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale. Psychiatric variables were also measured using the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Brief Social Phobia Scale, and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale. At-risk individuals had comparable social deficits to the FEP group, and both patient groups had significantly poorer social functioning than controls. Importantly, social functioning was most strongly associated with depressive and social anxiety symptoms and to a lesser extent with positive symptoms. However, negative symptoms did not appear to relate to social functioning. Social functioning impairments precede the onset of full-threshold psychosis and may therefore be a significant marker for the illness. Additionally, associated psychiatric symptoms such as depression and social anxiety may provide an avenue for early interventions of social functioning deficits in psychosis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Impact of neurocognition on social and role functioning in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Ricardo E; Goldberg, Terry E; McLaughlin, Danielle; Auther, Andrea M; Correll, Christoph U; Cornblatt, Barbara A

    2011-08-01

    Cognitive deficits have been well documented in schizophrenia and have been shown to impair quality of life and to compromise everyday functioning. Recent studies of adolescents and young adults at high risk for developing psychosis show that neurocognitive impairments are detectable before the onset of psychotic symptoms. However, it remains unclear how cognitive impairments affect functioning before the onset of psychosis. The authors assessed cognitive impairment in adolescents at clinical high risk for psychosis and examined its impact on social and role functioning. A sample of 127 treatment-seeking patients at clinical high risk for psychosis and a group of 80 healthy comparison subjects were identified and recruited for research in the Recognition and Prevention Program. At baseline, participants were assessed with a comprehensive neurocognitive battery as well as measures of social and role functioning. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, clinical high-risk patients showed significant impairments in the domains of processing speed, verbal memory, executive function, working memory, visuospatial processing, motor speed, sustained attention, and language. Clinical high-risk patients also displayed impaired social and role functioning at baseline. Among patients with attenuated positive symptoms, processing speed was related to social and role functioning at baseline. These findings demonstrate that cognitive and functional impairments are detectable in patients at clinical high risk for psychosis before the onset of psychotic illness and that processing speed appears to be an important cognitive predictor of poor functioning.

  15. PROP1 gene mutations in a 36-year-old female presenting with psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Tshristi; Jha, Kunal Kishor; Saluja, Harpreet

    2017-01-01

    Summary Combined pituitary hormonal deficiency (CPHD) is a rare disease that results from mutations in genes coding for transcription factors that regulate the differentiation of pituitary cells. PROP1 gene mutations are one of the etiological diagnoses of congenital panhypopituitarism, however symptoms vary depending on phenotypic expression. We present a case of psychosis in a 36-year-old female with congenital panhypopituitarism who presented with paranoia, flat affect and ideas of reference without a delirious mental state, which resolved with hormone replacement and antipsychotics. Further evaluation revealed that she had a homozygous mutation of PROP1 gene. In summary, compliance with hormonal therapy for patients with hypopituitarism appears to be effective for the prevention and treatment of acute psychosis symptoms. Learning points: Patients with PROP1 gene mutation may present with psychosis with no impairment in orientation and memory. There is currently inadequate literature on this topic, and further study on the possible mechanisms of psychosis as a result of endocrine disturbance is required. Compliance with hormonal therapy for patients with hypopituitarism appears to be effective for prevention and treatment of acute psychosis symptoms. PMID:28458894

  16. Association between olfactory identification and parkinsonism in patients with non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Julia H; van Harten, Peter; Meijer, Carin J; Koeter, Maarten W; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; de Haan, L

    2016-10-01

    Olfactory identification deficits (OIDs) are seen in schizophrenia patients and individuals at increased risk for psychosis but its pathophysiology remains unclear. Although dopaminergic imbalance is known to lie at the core of schizophrenia symptomatology, its role in the development of OIDs has not been elucidated yet. This study investigated the association between OIDs and symptoms of parkinsonism as a derivative of dopaminergic functioning. In 320 patients diagnosed with non-affective psychosis, olfactory identification performance was assessed by means of the Sniffin' Sticks task. Level of parkinsonian symptoms was assessed by means of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III). By means of multiple linear regression with bootstrapping, the association between UPDRS and Sniffin' Sticks score was investigated while correcting for potential confounders. A Bonferroni corrected P-value of 0.007 was used. Higher UPDRS scores significantly predicted worse olfactory identification in patients with non-affective psychosis with an unadjusted b = -0.07 (95% CI -0.10 to -0.04) and an adjusted b = -0.04 (95% CI -0.07 to -0.01). Results provide preliminary evidence that the same vulnerability may underlie the development of parkinsonism and OIDs in patients with non-affective psychosis. Further investigation should evaluate the clinical value of OIDs as a marker of dopaminergic vulnerability that may predict psychosis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. BDNF-Deficient Mice Show Reduced Psychosis-Related Behaviors Following Chronic Methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Elizabeth E; Halberstadt, Adam L; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    One of the most devastating consequences of methamphetamine abuse is increased risk of psychosis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been implicated in both psychosis and neuronal responses to methamphetamine. We therefore examined persistent psychosis-like behavioral effects of methamphetamine in brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice. Mice were chronically treated with methamphetamine from 6 to 9 weeks of age, and locomotor hyperactivity to an acute D-amphetamine challenge was tested in photocell cages after a 2-week withdrawal period. Methamphetamine-treated wild-type mice, but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice, showed locomotor sensitization to acute 3mg/kg D-amphetamine. Qualitative analysis of exploration revealed tolerance to D-amphetamine effects on entropy in methamphetamine-treated brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice, but not wild-type mice. Chronic methamphetamine exposure induces contrasting profiles of behavioral changes in wild-type and brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice, with attenuation of behaviors relevant to psychosis in methamphetamine-treated brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice. This suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor signalling changes may contribute to development of psychosis in methamphetamine users. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  18. Environmental Social Stress, Paranoia and Psychosis Liability: A Virtual Reality Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Wim; Pot-Kolder, Roos; Counotte, Jacqueline; van Os, Jim; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The impact of social environments on mental states is difficult to assess, limiting the understanding of which aspects of the social environment contribute to the onset of psychotic symptoms and how individual characteristics moderate this outcome. This study aimed to test sensitivity to environmental social stress as a mechanism of psychosis using Virtual Reality (VR) experiments. Fifty-five patients with recent onset psychotic disorder, 20 patients at ultra high risk for psychosis, 42 siblings of patients with psychosis, and 53 controls walked 5 times in a virtual bar with different levels of environmental social stress. Virtual social stressors were population density, ethnic density and hostility. Paranoia about virtual humans and subjective distress in response to virtual social stress exposures were measured with State Social Paranoia Scale (SSPS) and self-rated momentary subjective distress (SUD), respectively. Pre-existing (subclinical) symptoms were assessed with the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE), Green Paranoid Thoughts Scale (GPTS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). Paranoia and subjective distress increased with degree of social stress in the environment. Psychosis liability and pre-existing symptoms, in particular negative affect, positively impacted the level of paranoia and distress in response to social stress. These results provide experimental evidence that heightened sensitivity to environmental social stress may play an important role in the onset and course of psychosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Integrated Specialized Early-Course Psychosis Treatment Services - University Psychiatric Hospital Vrapce Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, DraŽenka; Čulo, Ilaria; Silić, Ante; Kos, Suzana; Savić, Aleksandar

    2018-06-01

    First episode of psychosis presents a critical period in terms of numerous associated risks, but also possibilities for effective therapeutic interventions. There is a continued focus on early interventions in prodromal states and early course of frank psychosis, aimed at ensuring faster remission, reducing relapses, achieving better long-term functioning, and preventing adverse outcomes linked to untreated psychosis and chronic psychotic disorders. A number of different specialized treatment models and services exist trying to close knowledge gaps and provide clinical interventions to first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients, but there is still no generally accepted standard of care informing our every-day practice. FEP and early-course psychosis specialized treatment model developed in 2004 in University Psychiatric Hospital Vrapce rests on integration of care across different organization units and clinical presentation acuity levels and patient needs (intensive care, FEP inpatient unit, FEP outpatient services including day hospital). Such integration of FEP services allows for flexible entry point on multiple levels, earlier structuring of therapeutic alliance for those requiring inpatient care, reduction of risks associated with FEP, quicker formation of long-term treatment plans, reduction of delay in accessing specialized services, and a more coordinated diagnostic process and recruitment of FEP patient population. Detailed evaluations of outcomes and comparisons with different treatment models are necessary in order to assess strengths and weaknesses of each specific model and inform modifications to current practice models.

  20. Changing trends in hospitalization rates associated with psychosis: Spain, 1980-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel-Herrero, Alvaro; Amate, J M; Saz-Parkinson, Z; Gómez-Beneyto, M

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the prevalence of hospitalization attributable to psychosis in Spain over the last three decades. Longitudinal analysis (1980-2009) of age-adjusted hospital discharges rates associated with psychosis (ICD9 290-8) in all Spanish hospitals. Spanish Hospital Morbidity Survey. The hospitalization rate associated with psychotic episodes had been gradually increasing since 1980 until 2004; an abrupt turnaround observed in 2004 marks the beginning of a steady decline in the rate. The turning point described is not observed for each of the psychotic diagnoses separately analyzed. However, it is clearly seen when data are grouped in diagnosis-related groups (organic-psychosis, functional psychosis and substance-induced psychosis) since the time course of the diseases within the major diagnostic groups are interrelated as evidenced by shared turning points which collectively display a common time course pattern. Main hospital indicators and antipsychotic drug prescriptions were analyzed for any possible turning point in mid-2000s. Psychiatric hospital beds and length of stays remained stable by 2004; the hospitalizations associated with non-psychotic psychiatric pathologies show no turning point in 2004. However, an abrupt change on antipsychotic drug prescriptions is precisely observed in 2004. After decades of linear growth, hospitalizations for psychotic patients begin to decline in 2004, coinciding with the start of last generation atypical antipsychotic drug consumption in Spain. Some of the psychotic diagnostic rates evolve in an interrelated manner which calls into question the diagnosis and nosological boundaries between some of these pathologies.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA sequence data reveals association of haplogroup U with psychosis in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark A; Ryu, Euijung; Nassan, Malik; Jenkins, Gregory D; Andreazza, Ana C; Evans, Jared M; McElroy, Susan L; Oglesbee, Devin; Highsmith, W Edward; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2017-01-01

    Converging genetic, postmortem gene-expression, cellular, and neuroimaging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder. This study was conducted to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are associated with sub-phenotypes of bipolar disorder. MtDNA from 224 patients with Bipolar I disorder (BPI) was sequenced, and association of sequence variations with 3 sub-phenotypes (psychosis, rapid cycling, and adolescent illness onset) was evaluated. Gene-level tests were performed to evaluate overall burden of minor alleles for each phenotype. The haplogroup U was associated with a higher risk of psychosis. Secondary analyses of SNVs provided nominal evidence for association of psychosis with variants in the tRNA, ND4 and ND5 genes. The association of psychosis with ND4 (gene that encodes NADH dehydrogenase 4) was further supported by gene-level analysis. Preliminary analysis of mtDNA sequence data suggests a higher risk of psychosis with the U haplogroup and variation in the ND4 gene implicated in electron transport chain energy regulation. Further investigation of the functional consequences of this mtDNA variation is encouraged. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Perinatal psychosis in mothers with a history of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighton, Chloe E; Inglis, Angela J; Carrion, Prescilla B; Hippman, Catriona L; Morris, Emily M; Andrighetti, Heather J; Batallones, Rolan; Honer, William G; Austin, Jehannine C

    2016-04-01

    While women with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) have higher chances for postpartum depressive and manic episodes, little is known about their chance for postpartum psychosis (PPP). We prospectively assessed the frequency of perinatal psychotic symptoms among primiparous women with a history of MDD only (structured clinical interview was used to exclude women with pre-existing histories of mania or psychosis) and explored whether sex of the baby influenced these symptoms.The presence of symptoms of psychosis was defined using previously established cutoff scores on five key items from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), which was administered during pregnancy, at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postpartum.Fourteen of 60 women (23%) scored above threshold for psychosis at one or more time points, with 6 experiencing postpartum onset. There was a non-significant trend (p = 0.073) towards higher frequency of these symptoms among mothers of girls.If controlled studies using diagnostic interviews confirm that psychotic symptoms are relatively common among women with MDD, monitoring for psychosis during the perinatal period may be indicated in this population. The potential effect of sex of the baby on mothers' chance for PPP requires further study.

  3. Systematic Review of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Birchwood, Max; Tait, Lynda

    2017-04-25

    Social anxiety is highly prevalent among people with psychosis and linked with significant social disability and poorer prognosis. Although cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) has shown to be effective for the treatment of social anxiety in non-psychotic populations, there is a lack of evidence on the clinical effectiveness of CBT for the treatment of social anxiety when this is co-morbid in psychosis. A systematic review to summarise and critically appraise the literature on the effectiveness of CBT interventions for the treatment of social anxiety in psychosis. Two studies were included in the review assessing the effectiveness of group CBT for social anxiety in schizophrenia, both of poor methodological quality. Preliminary findings suggest that group-based CBT is effective in treating symptoms of social anxiety, depression and associated distress in people with schizophrenia. The evidence-base is not robust enough to provide clear implications for practice about the effectiveness of CBT for the treatment of social anxiety in psychosis. Future research should focus on methodologically rigorous randomised controlled trials with embedded process evaluation to assess the effectiveness of CBT interventions in targeting symptoms of social anxiety in psychosis and identify mechanisms of change.

  4. Do urban environments increase the risk of anxiety, depression and psychosis? An epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Murray, Aja; Booth, Tom

    2013-09-25

    The present study aimed to investigate whether there is an association between type of living environment (urban versus rural) and anxiety, depression and psychosis in the Scottish population. Data were obtained from the Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics database on Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation and urban-rural classifications for 6505 data zones across Scotland. Multiple regression was used to test the association between prescriptions for psychotropic medication for anxiety, depression and psychosis, and type of living environment according to urban-rural classification, controlling for a range of socio-economic factors. Urban-rural classification significantly predicted poorer mental health both before (β=-.29) and after (β=-.20) controlling for a large number of socio-economic variables, with more urban areas having higher rates of prescription for psychotropic medication for anxiety, depression and psychosis. The current study focussed on macro-level variables and did not include individual level data. As such, the study did not include data on individual diagnoses, but instead used drug prescriptions for anxiety, depression and psychosis as a proxy for level of affective disorders within data zones. More urban living environments in Scotland are associated with higher rates of prescription for psychotropic medication for anxiety, depression and psychosis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered medial temporal activation related to local glutamate levels in subjects with prodromal signs of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Isabel; Stone, James; Mechelli, Andrea; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Lythgoe, David; O'Gorman, Ruth; Seal, Marc; McGuire, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Both medial temporal cortical dysfunction and perturbed glutamatergic neurotransmission are regarded as fundamental pathophysiological features of psychosis. However, although animal models of psychosis suggest that these two abnormalities are interrelated, their relationship in humans has yet to be investigated. We used a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the relationship between medial temporal activation during an episodic memory task and local glutamate levels in 22 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 14 healthy volunteers. We observed a significant between-group difference in the coupling of medial temporal activation with local glutamate levels. In control subjects, medial temporal activation during episodic encoding was positively associated with medial temporal glutamate. However, in the clinical population, medial temporal activation was reduced, and the relationship with glutamate was absent. In individuals at high risk of psychosis, medial temporal dysfunction seemed related to a loss of the normal relationship with local glutamate levels. This study provides the first evidence that links medial temporal dysfunction with the central glutamate system in humans and is consistent with evidence that drugs that modulate glutamatergic transmission might be useful in the treatment of psychosis. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Art therapy for people with psychosis: a narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Angelica; Larkin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Art therapy enables individuals to use art to creatively express themselves and communicate differently with themselves, others, and their reality. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for psychosis and schizophrenia suggest that arts therapies, which include art therapy, are considered to improve negative symptoms of psychosis. We examined the effectiveness of art therapy for people with psychosis and explored whether art therapy is a meaningful and acceptable intervention in this Review. Seven electronic databases were searched for empirical papers that concerned the use of art therapy for adults with psychosis that were published from 2007 onwards. The search identified 18 papers. High-quality quantitative articles provided inconclusive evidence for the effectiveness of art therapy in adults with psychosis. However, high-quality qualitative articles indicated that therapists and clients considered art therapy to be a beneficial, meaningful, and acceptable intervention, although this conclusion was based on a small number of studies. In this Review, we discuss the theoretical, clinical, and methodological issues in light of the development of more robust research, which is needed to corroborate individuals' experiences and guide evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Moderating effects of positive symptoms of psychosis in suicidal ideation among adults diagnosed with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheimer, Lindsay A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Suicide is among the leading causes of death for adults diagnosed with schizophrenia, with risk estimates being over eight folds greater than the general population. While the majority of research to date focuses on the role of symptoms of depression in suicide risk, there is a lack of consensus and understanding of the relationship between positive symptoms of psychosis and both suicidal ideation and attempt. The current study examined pathways of influence between symptoms of depression, positive symptoms of psychosis (i.e. hallucinations and delusions), hopelessness, and suicidal ideation among a population of adults diagnosed with schizophrenia. Methods Data were obtained from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE; n = 1460) at baseline. Suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and symptoms of depression were measured by the Calgary Depression Scale (CDRS) and hallucinations and delusions by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Data were analyzed with Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) using Mplus 7. Results Symptoms of depression, positive symptoms of psychosis, and hopelessness independently predicted suicidal ideation. Hopelessness significantly mediated the relationship between symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation. Lastly, positive symptoms of psychosis were found to moderate the relationship between symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation. Conclusions The current study provides evidence for the role that positive symptoms of psychosis (specifically hallucinations and delusions) play in suicidal ideation, pointing towards the implication that beyond symptoms of depression, positive symptoms must be evaluated for and treated. PMID:27450776

  8. Associations between nonauditory hallucinations, dissociation, and childhood adversity in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longden, Eleanor; House, Allan O; Waterman, Mitch G

    2016-01-01

    Although repeated associations have been found between adversity exposure (particularly exposure to childhood sexual abuse), dissociation, and auditory hallucinations in the context of psychosis, there is little comparable research examining hallucinations in other modalities. This study aimed to determine whether cumulative adversity exposure influences the likelihood of experiencing visual, tactile, olfactory, and gustatory hallucinations among psychosis patients and whether measures of dissociation are significantly associated with nonauditory hallucinations when exposure to childhood adversity and psychological distress are adjusted for. Self-report measures and a retrospective case-control design were applied to assess nonauditory hallucinations, dissociation, psychological distress, and childhood adversity exposure in a sample of first-episode psychosis patients reporting nonauditory hallucinations (n = 36) and controls from the same clinical population without nonauditory hallucinations (n = 31). Case participants reported higher levels of dissociation, psychological distress, and exposure to childhood rape than the control group. Dissociation remained significantly associated with nonauditory hallucinations when we adjusted for childhood sexual abuse, other types of childhood adversity, and a combined measure of emotional distress. Indication of a dose-response relationship was detected, in that total number of adversities was significantly associated with reporting more than one modality of nonauditory hallucination. Observed associations between auditory hallucinations and dissociation in psychosis may extend to other hallucination modalities. It is suggested that more research attention be paid to the etiology and impact of nonauditory hallucinations in psychosis samples.

  9. Childhood trauma and cognitive function in first-episode affective and non-affective psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, Monica; Dazzan, Paola; Fisher, Helen L; Morgan, Craig; Morgan, Kevin; Reichenberg, Abraham; Zanelli, Jolanta; Fearon, Paul; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Robin M; Pariante, Carmine M

    2011-06-01

    A history of childhood trauma is reportedly more prevalent in people suffering from psychosis than in the general population. Childhood trauma has also been linked to cognitive abnormalities in adulthood, and cognitive abnormalities, in turn, are one of the key clinical features of psychosis. Therefore, this study investigated whether there was a relationship between childhood trauma and cognitive function in patients with first-episode psychosis. The potential impact of diagnosis (schizophrenia or affective psychosis) and gender on this association was also examined. Data were available for 138 first-episode psychosis patients and 138 geographically-matched controls recruited from a catchment area based organisation. History of childhood trauma was obtained using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Cognitive function was assessed through a comprehensive and standardised neuropsychological test battery. A history of childhood trauma was associated with worse cognitive performances, predominantly in affective psychoses, and in male patients. No association between a history of childhood trauma and cognition was found amongst female patients, or female controls. The results need replication, but underline the necessity of investigating biological and psychosocial mechanisms underlying these subjects' sensitivity to the negative effect of childhood stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Visual Hallucinations in First-Episode Psychosis: Association with Childhood Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solesvik, Martine; Joa, Inge; Larsen, Tor Ketil; Langeveld, Johannes; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Bjørnestad, Jone; Anda, Liss Gøril; Gisselgård, Jens; Hegelstad, Wenche Ten Velden; Brønnick, Kolbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Hallucinations are a core diagnostic criterion for psychotic disorders and have been investigated with regard to its association with childhood trauma in first-episode psychosis samples. Research has largely focused on auditory hallucinations, while specific investigations of visual hallucinations in first-episode psychosis remain scarce. The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of visual hallucinations, and to explore the association between visual hallucination and childhood trauma in a first-episode psychosis sample. Subjects were included from TIPS-2, a first episode psychosis study in south Rogaland, Norway. Based on the medical journal descriptions of the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), a separate score for visual and auditory hallucinations was created (N = 204). Patients were grouped according to hallucination severity (none, mild, and psychotic hallucinations) and multinomial logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with visual hallucination group. Visual hallucinations of a psychotic nature were reported by 26.5% of patients. The experience of childhood interpersonal trauma increased the likelihood of having psychotic visual hallucinations. Visual hallucinations are common in first-episode psychosis, and are related to childhood interpersonal trauma.

  11. Mapping structural covariance networks of facial emotion recognition in early psychosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchy, Lisa; Barbato, Mariapaola; Makowski, Carolina; Bray, Signe; MacMaster, Frank P; Deighton, Stephanie; Addington, Jean

    2017-11-01

    People with psychosis show deficits recognizing facial emotions and disrupted activation in the underlying neural circuitry. We evaluated associations between facial emotion recognition and cortical thickness using a correlation-based approach to map structural covariance networks across the brain. Fifteen people with an early psychosis provided magnetic resonance scans and completed the Penn Emotion Recognition and Differentiation tasks. Fifteen historical controls provided magnetic resonance scans. Cortical thickness was computed using CIVET and analyzed with linear models. Seed-based structural covariance analysis was done using the mapping anatomical correlations across the cerebral cortex methodology. To map structural covariance networks involved in facial emotion recognition, the right somatosensory cortex and bilateral fusiform face areas were selected as seeds. Statistics were run in SurfStat. Findings showed increased cortical covariance between the right fusiform face region seed and right orbitofrontal cortex in controls than early psychosis subjects. Facial emotion recognition scores were not significantly associated with thickness in any region. A negative effect of Penn Differentiation scores on cortical covariance was seen between the left fusiform face area seed and right superior parietal lobule in early psychosis subjects. Results suggest that facial emotion recognition ability is related to covariance in a temporal-parietal network in early psychosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Differences in the symptom profile of methamphetamine-related psychosis and primary psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKetin, Rebecca; Baker, Amanda L; Dawe, Sharon; Voce, Alexandra; Lubman, Dan I

    2017-05-01

    We examined the lifetime experience of hallucinations and delusions associated with transient methamphetamine-related psychosis (MAP), persistent MAP and primary psychosis among a cohort of dependent methamphetamine users. Participants were classified as having (a) no current psychotic symptoms, (n=110); (b) psychotic symptoms only when using methamphetamine (transient MAP, n=85); (c) psychotic symptoms both when using methamphetamine and when abstaining from methamphetamine (persistent MAP, n=37), or (d) meeting DSM-IV criteria for lifetime schizophrenia or mania (primary psychosis, n=52). Current psychotic symptoms were classified as a score of 4 or more on any of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale items of suspiciousness, hallucinations or unusual thought content in the past month. Lifetime psychotic diagnoses and symptoms were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Transient MAP was associated with persecutory delusions and tactile hallucinations (compared to the no symptom group). Persistent MAP was additionally associated with delusions of reference, thought interference and complex auditory, visual, olfactory and tactile hallucinations, while primary psychosis was also associated with delusions of thought projection, erotomania and passivity. The presence of non-persecutory delusions and hallucinations across various modalities is a marker for persistent MAP or primary psychosis in people who use methamphetamine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Revisiting the Basic Symptom Concept: Towards Translating Risk Symptoms for Psychosis into Neurobiological Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke eSchultze-Lutter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In its initial formulation, the concept of basic symptoms (BSs integrated findings on the early symptomatic course of schizophrenia and first in vivo evidence of accompanying brain aberrations. It argued that the subtle subclinical disturbances in mental processes described as BSs were the most direct self-experienced expression of the underlying neurobiological aberrations of the disease. Other characteristic symptoms of psychosis (e.g., delusions, hallucinations were conceptualized as secondary phenomena, resulting from dysfunctional beliefs and suboptimal coping styles with emerging BSs and/or concomitant stressors. While BSs can occur in many mental disorders, in particular affective disorders, a subset of perceptive and cognitive BSs appear to be specific to psychosis and are currently employed in two alternative risk criteria. However, despite their clinical recognition in the early detection of psychosis, neurobiological research on the aetiopathology of psychosis with neuroimaging methods has only just begun to consider the neural correlate of BSs. This perspective paper reviews the emerging evidence of an association between BSs and aberrant brain activation, connectivity patterns, and metabolism, and outlines promising routes for the use of BSs in aetiopathological research on psychosis.

  14. Diagnostic validity of the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI): a self-report screen for ultrahigh risk and acute psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, Maurice A. J.; Dingemans, Peter M. A. J.; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Becker, Hiske E.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Linszen, Don

    2010-01-01

    Providers of mental health services need tools to screen for acute psychosis and ultrahigh risk (UHR) for transition to psychosis in help-seeking individuals. In this study, the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI) was examined as a screening tool and for its ability to correctly predict

  15. Diagnostic Validity of the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI): A Self-Report Screen for Ultrahigh Risk and Acute Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Maurice A. J.; Dingemans, Peter M. A. J.; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Becker, Hiske E.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Linszen, Don

    2010-01-01

    Providers of mental health services need tools to screen for acute psychosis and ultrahigh risk (UHR) for transition to psychosis in help-seeking individuals. In this study, the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI) was examined as a screening tool and for its ability to correctly predict diagnostic group membership (e.g., help seeking, mild…

  16. Metabolic hyperfrontality and psychopathology in the ketamine model of psychosis using positron emission tomography (PET) and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollenweider, FX; Leenders, KL; Scharfetter, C; Antonini, A; Maguire, P; Missimer, J; Angst, J

    To date, the ketamine/PCP model of psychosis has been proposed to be one of the best pharmacological models to mimic schizophrenic psychosis in healthy volunteers, since ketamine can induce both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. At subanesthetic doses, ketamine has been reported to

  17. Thought Disorder and Communication Deviance as Predictors of Outcome in Youth at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Carrie E.; Wu, Keng Nei; Caplan, Rochelle; Cannon, Tyrone D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Given the fundamental role of thought disorder in schizophrenia, subtle communication disturbance may be a valuable predictor of subsequent development of psychosis. Here we examined the contribution of thought and communication disturbance to the prediction of outcome in adolescents identified as putatively prodromal for psychosis.…

  18. Psychosocial functioning in first-episode psychosis and associations with neurocognition, social cognition, psychotic and affective symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouten, Luyken H.; Veling, Wim; Laan, Winfried; van der Helm, Mischa; van der Gaag, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Most studies on the determinants of psychosocial functioning in first-episode psychosis used few predictors. This study examines the effects of multiple cognitive domains and multiple symptoms on psychosocial functioning. Methods: A total of 162 patients with a first-episode psychosis were

  19. Baseline profiles of adolescent vs. adult-onset first-episode psychosis in an early detection program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joa, I; Johannessen, Jan Olav; Langeveld, J

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Psychotic disorders often start in adolescence. We aim to investigate premorbid and baseline differences characterizing patients with an onset of psychosis in adolescence versus adulthood. METHOD: We compare first-episode, DSM-IV non-affective psychosis with onset before (n = 43) and a...... the description of what used to be labeled process (versus reactive) schizophrenia....

  20. A Collective Case Study of the Idiosyncratic Language of Formal Thought Disorder in Cases of Disorganized Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Amanda R.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on a meaningful understanding of idiosyncratic language in psychosis. The psychotic neologisms examined in this dissertation challenge the listener's accurate understanding. Idiosyncratic aspects of speech in psychosis are largely researched from a diagnostic perspective in the literature. This study asks how individuals…

  1. Exploring the role, needs and challenges of relatives of mothers with HIV or HIV and psychosis: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, Ruan; Derks, Olivia K.; Sterkenburg, Paula S.; Schuengel, Carlo; van Rensburg, Esme

    2016-01-01

    This study explored types and nature of supports by relatives of mothers living with HIV and psychosis in comparison to mothers with HIV only. Interview data on their experiences of their roles, needs and challenges were collected from 33 relatives on mothers with HIV and psychosis (n=12,

  2. Overconfidence in psychosis: The foundation of delusional conviction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Balzan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of recent studies have identified an “overconfidence effect” in psychosis, whereby people with schizophrenia are overconfident in errors while simultaneously slightly underconfident when accurate. This effect may have implications for why delusions, which are based on inaccurate inferences, perceptions and judgements, are typically held with high conviction. Given the importance the overconfidence effect may have in accounting for delusional conviction, the current narrative review aims to summarise and critique the recent evidence for the effect within schizophrenia. People with schizophrenia were consistently found to be overconfident in errors and slightly underconfident in correct appraisals, and this effect appears not to be an artefact of poor task performance. While the overconfidence effect has been linked to delusion-proneness in the general population, there was less direct evidence linking overconfidence to delusional symptoms in clinical populations. Future studies need to adopt longitudinal designs and include additional measures of overconfidence to investigate this association more appropriately, and to also investigate possible mediators of this postulated relationship, such as dopaminergic activity.

  3. Facial emotion identification in early-onset psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkl, Sophie J; Lah, Suncica; Starling, Jean; Hainsworth, Cassandra; Harris, Anthony W F; Williams, Leanne M

    2014-12-01

    Facial emotion identification (FEI) deficits are common in patients with chronic schizophrenia and are strongly related to impaired functioning. The objectives of this study were to determine whether FEI deficits are present and emotion specific in people experiencing early-onset psychosis (EOP), and related to current clinical symptoms and functioning. Patients with EOP (n=34, mean age=14.11, 53% female) and healthy controls (HC, n=42, mean age 13.80, 51% female) completed a task of FEI that measured accuracy, error pattern and response time. Relative to HC, patients with EOP (i) had lower accuracy for identifying facial expressions of emotions, especially fear, anger and disgust, (ii) were more likely to misattribute other emotional expressions as fear or disgust, and (iii) were slower at accurately identifying all facial expressions. FEI accuracy was not related to clinical symptoms or current functioning. Deficits in FEI (especially for fear, anger and disgust) are evident in EOP. Our findings suggest that while emotion identification deficits may reflect a trait susceptibility marker, functional deficits may represent a sequelae of illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Graph analysis of dream reports is especially informative about psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Natália B; Furtado, Raimundo; Maia, Pedro P C; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2014-01-15

    Early psychiatry investigated dreams to understand psychopathologies. Contemporary psychiatry, which neglects dreams, has been criticized for lack of objectivity. In search of quantitative insight into the structure of psychotic speech, we investigated speech graph attributes (SGA) in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I, and non-psychotic controls as they reported waking and dream contents. Schizophrenic subjects spoke with reduced connectivity, in tight correlation with negative and cognitive symptoms measured by standard psychometric scales. Bipolar and control subjects were undistinguishable by waking reports, but in dream reports bipolar subjects showed significantly less connectivity. Dream-related SGA outperformed psychometric scores or waking-related data for group sorting. Altogether, the results indicate that online and offline processing, the two most fundamental modes of brain operation, produce nearly opposite effects on recollections: While dreaming exposes differences in the mnemonic records across individuals, waking dampens distinctions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of the differential diagnosis of psychosis based on the analysis of dream graphs, pointing to a fast, low-cost and language-invariant tool for psychiatric diagnosis and the objective search for biomarkers. The Freudian notion that "dreams are the royal road to the unconscious" is clinically useful, after all.

  5. Aberrant cerebellar connectivity in bipolar disorder with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Ann K; Roh, Youkyung S; Ravichandran, Caitlin T; Baker, Justin T; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M

    2017-07-01

    The cerebellum, which modulates affect and cognition in addition to motor functions, may contribute substantially to the pathophysiology of mood and psychotic disorders, such as bipolar disorder. A growing literature points to cerebellar abnormalities in bipolar disorder. However, no studies have investigated the topographic representations of resting state cerebellar networks in bipolar disorder, specifically their functional connectivity to cerebral cortical networks. Using a well-defined cerebral cortical parcellation scheme as functional connectivity seeds, we compared ten cerebellar resting state networks in 49 patients with bipolar disorder and a lifetime history of psychotic features and 55 healthy control participants matched for age, sex, and image signal-to-noise ratio. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed reduced cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity in somatomotor A, ventral attention, salience, and frontoparietal control A and B networks relative to healthy control participants. These findings were not significantly correlated with current symptoms. Patients with psychotic bipolar disorder showed evidence of cerebro-cerebellar dysconnectivity in selective networks. These disease-related changes were substantial and not explained by medication exposure or substance use. Therefore, they may be mechanistically relevant to the underlying susceptibility to mood dysregulation and psychosis. Cerebellar mechanisms deserve further exploration in psychiatric conditions, and this study's findings may have value in guiding future studies on pathophysiology and treatment of mood and psychotic disorders, in particular.

  6. Recovery in psychosis: a Delphi study with experts by experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Heather; Morrison, Anthony P

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to establish consensus about the meaning of recovery among individuals with experience of psychosis. A Delphi approach was utilized to allow a large sample of service users to be anonymously consulted about their views on recovery. Service users were invited to take part in a 3-stage consultation process. A total of 381 participants gave their views on recovery in the main stage of this study, with 100 of these taking part in the final review stage. The final list of statements about recovery included 94 items, which were rated as essential or important by >80% of respondents. These statements covered items which define recovery, factors which help recovery, factors which hinder recovery, and factors which show that someone is recovering. As far as we are aware, it is the first study to identify areas of consensus in relation to definitions of recovery from a service user perspective, which are typically reported to be an idiosyncratic process. Implications and recommendations for clinical practice and future research are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Haloperidol plus promethazine for psychosis-induced aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huf, Gisele; Alexander, Jacob; Gandhi, Pinky; Allen, Michael H

    2016-11-25

    Health services often manage agitated or violent people, and such behaviour is particularly prevalent in emergency psychiatric services (10%). The drugs used in such situations should ensure that the person becomes calm swiftly and safely. To examine whether haloperidol plus promethazine is an effective treatment for psychosis-induced aggression. On 6 May 2015 we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register of Trials, which is compiled by systematic searches of major resources (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, BIOSIS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, and registries of clinical trials) and their monthly updates, handsearches, grey literature, and conference proceedings. All randomised clinical trials with useable data focusing on haloperidol plus promethazine for psychosis-induced aggression. We independently extracted data. For binary outcomes, we calculated risk ratio (RR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI), on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we estimated the mean difference (MD) between groups and its 95% CI. We employed a fixed-effect model for analyses. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and created 'Summary of findings' tables using GRADE. We found two new randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from the 2015 update searching. The review now includes six studies, randomising 1367 participants and presenting data relevant to six comparisons.When haloperidol plus promethazine was compared with haloperidol alone for psychosis-induced aggression for the outcome not tranquil or asleep at 30 minutes, the combination treatment was clearly more effective (n=316, 1 RCT, RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.87, high-quality evidence). There were 10 occurrences of acute dystonia in the haloperidol alone arm and none in the combination group. The trial was stopped early as haloperidol alone was considered to be too toxic.When haloperidol plus promethazine was compared with olanzapine, high-quality data showed both approaches to be tranquillising. It was

  8. Clinical correlates of vitamin D deficiency in established psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, J; Gardner-Sood, P; Firdosi, M; Iyegbe, C; Stubbs, B; Greenwood, K; Murray, R; Smith, S; Howes, O; Gaughran, F

    2016-03-22

    Suboptimal vitamin D levels have been identified in populations with psychotic disorders. We sought to explore the relationship between vitamin D deficiency, clinical characteristics and cardiovascular disease risk factors among people with established psychosis. Vitamin D levels were measured in 324 community dwelling individuals in England with established psychotic disorders, along with measures of mental health, cardiovascular risk and lifestyle choices. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels below 10 ng/ml (equivalent to Vitamin D as above 30 ng/ml (>50 nmol/L). The mean 25-OHD serum level was 12.4 (SD 7.3) ng/ml, (range 4.0-51.7 ng/ml). Forty nine percent (n = 158) were vitamin D deficient, with only 14 % (n = 45) meeting criteria for sufficiency. Accounting for age, gender, ethnicity and season of sampling, serum 25-OHD levels were negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.220, p vitamin D deficiency. Lower vitamin D levels are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk factors and in particular metabolic syndrome. Further research is needed to define appropriate protocols for vitamin D testing and supplementation in practice to see if this can improve cardiovascular disease risk. ISRCTN number is ISRCTN58667926 Date of registration: 23/04/2010.

  9. Depression, psychosis, and dementia: impact on the family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellgring, J H

    1999-01-01

    Similar to the setting of other chronic, debilitating diseases, considerable psychoeducational support of the patient's family and other caregivers represents an often-overlooked component of appropriately thorough care. Nearly three of four persons caring for an individual with PD report psychological stress and anxiety, which are exacerbated by concerns about progression of the disease. Counseling for PD caregivers can be dispensed particularly effectively through individual psychological counseling as well as PD support and community self-help groups that assist caregivers in sharing concerns and promote a sense they are understood by others. Through such measures, which may be delivered effectively by nurse practitioners, PD caregivers can develop effective coping strategies for disease related stressors. Empirical results show the most common stressors are: anxiety, concern about the future, impatience or intolerance, loss of autonomy, sleep disturbances, diminished time and opportunity for recreation and social contact, and anger. These sequelae often ensue when the PD patient evidences depression, advanced dementia, or psychosis, each of which can severely constrain communication. Caregivers often must also contend with two other adverse psychological phenomena: cognitive dissonance surrounding placement of the patient in a nursing home and learned helplessness, which may predispose to depressive states. Other often unmet needs of the "hidden victims" of PD include compromised immune function, social stigmata, and financial difficulties. Respite care may be useful in reducing the stress associated with these and other problems frequently affecting caregivers.

  10. Sustained and selective attention deficits as vulnerability markers to psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulet, B; Valero, J; Gutiérrez-Zotes, A; Montserrat, C; Cortés, M J; Jariod, M; Martorell, L; Vilella, E; Labad, A

    2007-04-01

    The first descriptions of schizophrenia emphasized attention problems patients with schizophrenia have but recent results evidence that other psychotic disorders share them. We compared the performance in sustained and selective attention between psychotic patients (P), their healthy first degree relatives (R) and healthy volunteers (C) to prove whether these alterations could be an endophenotype of vulnerability to psychosis. We also compared the performance of schizophrenic patients (SZP) and that of patients with other functional psychoses (OP) in order to prove whether these alterations are specific of any psychotic disorder. Seventy-six P, 70 R and 39 C were included in the study. A selective attention index, comprising TMT A and B and Stroop Test, and a sustained attention index comprising the Continuous Performance Test were calculated. We conducted an univariant general linear model to compare three group performances in these indexes, with age, sex and years of education as a covariables. We found significant differences between the indexes when we compared P, R and C. No differences in performance were found between SZP and OP. Our data showed that sustained and selective attention alterations could be a vulnerability factor to psychotic disorders in general, but they were not specific of schizophrenia.

  11. Graph analysis of dream reports is especially informative about psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Natália B.; Furtado, Raimundo; Maia, Pedro P. C.; Copelli, Mauro; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2014-01-01

    Early psychiatry investigated dreams to understand psychopathologies. Contemporary psychiatry, which neglects dreams, has been criticized for lack of objectivity. In search of quantitative insight into the structure of psychotic speech, we investigated speech graph attributes (SGA) in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I, and non-psychotic controls as they reported waking and dream contents. Schizophrenic subjects spoke with reduced connectivity, in tight correlation with negative and cognitive symptoms measured by standard psychometric scales. Bipolar and control subjects were undistinguishable by waking reports, but in dream reports bipolar subjects showed significantly less connectivity. Dream-related SGA outperformed psychometric scores or waking-related data for group sorting. Altogether, the results indicate that online and offline processing, the two most fundamental modes of brain operation, produce nearly opposite effects on recollections: While dreaming exposes differences in the mnemonic records across individuals, waking dampens distinctions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of the differential diagnosis of psychosis based on the analysis of dream graphs, pointing to a fast, low-cost and language-invariant tool for psychiatric diagnosis and the objective search for biomarkers. The Freudian notion that ``dreams are the royal road to the unconscious'' is clinically useful, after all.

  12. Worsening psychosis induced by varenicline in a hospitalized psychiatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaula, Bethany A; Thomas, Michele D

    2009-07-01

    Varenicline is a novel treatment for smoking cessation; however, the agent has not been well studied in a population with severe mental illness. Varenicline can reportedly cause neuropsychiatric adverse effects, some resulting in hospitalizations and/or suicides. We describe a case of clinician-observed, worsening psychotic symptoms in a patient with chronic mental illness who was receiving varenicline. A 45-year-old woman with bipolar disorder, mixed type with psychotic features, was admitted to a psychiatric hospital due to acute decompensation after she discontinued her drug therapy. Because of the facility's smoke-free policy, the patient was not permitted to smoke cigarettes during her hospitalization. Over the next several weeks, her condition was stabilized with psychotropic drugs. Her symptoms improved, and plans were made for her discharge. Varenicline was prescribed to manage her nicotine cravings. After 2 days of treatment, staff members noted worsening of the patient's psychotic symptoms and agitation. Varenicline was discontinued, the patient's mental status returned to baseline, and she was subsequently discharged. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's worsening psychosis and her varenicline therapy. This case report provides valuable support of previously published cases that demonstrate the risk of exacerbation of psychotic symptoms with varenicline use in patients with severe mental illness. With proper assessment and management of varenicline-induced neuropsychiatric effects, health care professionals can provide an important role in helping to prevent and manage worsening psychiatric symptoms.

  13. Insight and suicidality in psychosis: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massons, Carmen; Lopez-Morinigo, Javier-David; Pousa, Esther; Ruiz, Ada; Ochoa, Susana; Usall, Judith; Nieto, Lourdes; Cobo, Jesus; David, Anthony S; Dutta, Rina

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to test whether specific insight dimensions are associated with suicidality in patients with psychotic disorders. 143 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were recruited. Suicidality was assessed by item 8 of the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). Insight was measured by the Scale of Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD) and the Markova and Berrios Insight Scale. Bivariate analyses and multivariable logistic regression models were conducted. Those subjects aware of having a mental illness and its social consequences had higher scores on suicidality than those with poor insight. Awareness of the need for treatment was not linked with suicidality. The Markova and Berrios Insight scale total score and two specific domains (awareness of "disturbed thinking and loss of control over the situation" and "having a vague feeling that something is wrong") were related to suicidality. However, no insight dimensions survived the multivariable regression model, which found depression and previous suicidal behaviour to predict suicidality. Suicidality in psychosis was linked with some insight dimensions: awareness of mental illness and awareness of social consequences, but not compliance. Depression and previous suicidal behaviour mediated the associations with insight; thus, predicting suicidality. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. COMT-by-Sex Interaction Effect on Psychosis Proneness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta de Castro-Catala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizotypy phenotypes in the general population share etiopathogenic mechanisms and risk factors with schizophrenia, supporting the notion of psychosis as a continuum ranging from nonclinical to clinical deviance. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is a candidate susceptibility gene for schizophrenia that is involved in the regulation of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. Several recent studies have reported a sex difference in the impact of COMT genotype on psychiatric and cognitive phenotypes and personality traits. The present study investigated the association of COMT Val158Met (rs4680 with psychometric positive and negative schizotypy and psychotic experiences in a sample of 808 nonclinical young adults. The main finding was that sex moderates the association of COMT genotype with the negative dimension of both schizotypy and psychotic experiences. Male subjects carrying the Val allele tended to score higher on the negative dimension of both trait and symptom-like measures. The results from the present study are consistent with recent work suggesting an association between negative schizotypy and diminished prefrontal dopamine availability. They support the idea that a biological differentiation underlies the positive and negative schizotypy dimensions. Additionally, these findings contribute to the growing literature on sex-specific effects of COMT on the predisposition to psychiatric disorders and personality traits.

  15. Childhood pegboard task predicts adult-onset psychosis-spectrum disorder among a genetic high-risk sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakhshan, Pamela; Sørensen, Holger Jelling; DeVylder, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Motor abnormalities have been established as a core aspect of psychosis-spectrum disorders, with numerous studies identifying deficits prior to clinical symptom presentation. Additional research is needed to pinpoint standardized motor assessments associated with psychosis-spectrum disorders prior...... to illness onset to enhance prediction and understanding of etiology. With a long history of findings among people with diagnosable psychosis-spectrum disorders, but little research conducted during the premorbid phase, pegboard tasks are a viable and understudied measure of premorbid for psychosis motor......-spectrum disorder (n=33) were less likely to successfully complete the task within time limit relative to controls (χ(2)(2, N=244)=6.94, p=0.03, ϕ=0.17). Additionally, children who eventually developed a psychosis-spectrum disorder took significantly longer to complete the task relative to controls (χ(2)(2, N=244...

  16. Occupation and first episode psychosis in Northern Italy: better outcomes for migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarricone, Ilaria; Morgan, Craig; Boydell, Jane; Panigada, Serena; Morigi, Raffaele; Braca, Mauro; Sutti, Enrico; Boldri, Pierluigi; Di Forti, Marta; Murray, Robin M; Berardi, Domenico

    2017-12-01

    Many studies show that migrants have a higher incidence of psychosis compared to natives, but the influence of migration on psychosis outcomes is little investigated. We aimed to evaluate the occupational outcomes of a first episode psychosis (FEP) sample in Bologna (Northern Italy). An incidence cohort of FEP patients presenting at the Bologna West Community Mental Health Centers between 2002 and 2009 was assessed at the baseline and at 12th month follow-up. Return to school or work was used as occupational outcome. Most of the patients (82.8%) were still in contact at 12 months. Migrants showed significantly higher rate of return to work compared to natives (adjusted OR 4.45, 95% CI 1.55-12.76). First generation migrants had better occupational outcomes. Further cross-cultural studies are needed to further explain these findings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Postictal psychosis and its electrophysiological correlates in invasive EEG: a case report study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, Robert; Brázdil, Milan; Rektor, Ivan

    2012-04-01

    We identified two patients with medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, from whom intracranial EEG recordings were obtained at the time of postictal psychosis. Both patients had mesial temporal epilepsy associated with hippocampal sclerosis. In both patients, the postictal psychosis was associated with a continual "epileptiform" EEG pattern that differed from their interictal and ictal EEG findings (rhythmical slow wave and "abortive" spike-slow wave complex activity in the right hippocampus and lateral temporal cortex in case 1 and a periodic pattern of triphasic waves in the contacts recording activity from the left anterior cingulate gyrus). Some cases of postictal psychosis might be caused by the transient impairment of several limbic system structures due to the "continual epileptiform discharge" in some brain regions. Case 2 is the first report of a patient with TLE in whom psychotic symptoms were associated with the epileptiform impairment of the anterior cingulate gyrus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mismatch negativity and P3a amplitude in young adolescents with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydkjær, J.; Møllegaard Jepsen, J. R.; Pagsberg, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Deficient mismatch negativity (MMN) has been proposed as a candidate biomarker in schizophrenia and may therefore be potentially useful in early identification and intervention in early onset psychosis. In this study we explored whether deficits in the automatic orienting and reorienting...... responses, measured as MMN and P3a amplitude, are present in young adolescents with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and whether findings are specific to psychosis compared to young adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method MMN and P3a amplitude were assessed in young adolescents...... (age 12-17 years) with either FEP (N = 27) or ADHD (N = 28) and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (N = 43). The MMN paradigm consisted of a four-tone auditory oddball task with deviant stimuli based on frequency, duration and their combination. Results Significantly less MMN was found...

  19. Siblings of individuals with first-episode psychosis: understanding their experiences and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Moone, Nicki; Harris, Paul

    2008-06-01

    The growth of early intervention in psychosis services (EIPS) has prompted needed research to provide a robust evidence base to underpin practice. The typical service model embraces key psychosocial interventions, including family interventions. A literature review revealed a number of relevant studies that recognized the role of siblings in families affected by severe mental illness or mental impairment, but little was found about the impact of first-episode psychosis on siblings. To address this apparent oversight, we conducted a study to gain an understanding of sibling experiences. Ten siblings (ages 16 to 30) with a brother or sister diagnosed with first-episode psychosis took part in individual semi-structured interviews. The key findings were grouped in regard to emotional impact, relationships in the family, and siblings' roles and coping patterns. The study also revealed that families are able to identify positive gains out of a fundamentally negative experience.

  20. Synthetic Cannabinoids-Further Evidence Supporting the Relationship Between Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore, Liana

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of synthetic mind-altering compounds, also known as "new psychoactive substances," is increasing globally at an alarming rate. Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are among the most commonly used new psychoactive substances. They are usually purchased as marijuana-like drugs, marketed as herbal blends and perceived as risk-free by inexperienced users. Yet, contrary to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, SCs may lead to severe health consequences, including anxiety, tachycardia, hallucinations, violent behavior, and psychosis. This review focuses on the latest (2010-2015) evidence of psychotic symptoms induced by ingestion of products containing SCs. Reports suggesting that SCs may either exacerbate previously stable psychotic symptoms (in vulnerable individuals) or trigger new-onset psychosis (in individuals with no previous history of psychosis) are reviewed. Pharmacology and toxicology of these compounds are discussed, with particular reference to their psychoactive effects. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PRODROMAL PHASE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF EARLY ONSET SCHIZOPHRENIC PSYCHOSIS - CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Kostić

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia and other mental disorders are often preceded by prodromal changes in behavior that can last from several days to several years, indicating the beginning of psychosis. If the disease starts at an earlier age, especially in adolescence, the prodromal phase is more non-specific and difficult to detect. There is a large number of operational instruments used for clinical assessment and quantification of prodromal symptoms and "at risk mental state", as well as the predictive potential for psychosis. This paper describes the prodromal phase in the development of early onset schizophrenic psychosis, with the emphasis on gradual, several-month psychopathological accumulation and evolution of nonspecific and subclinical, prodromal symptoms to florid schizophrenic symptoms.

  2. Interaction between parental psychosis and risk factors during pregnancy and birth for schizophrenia - the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, E; Miettunen, J; Koivumaa-Honkanen, H; Mäki, P; Isohanni, M; Jääskeläinen, E

    2013-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate the association between parental psychosis and potential risk factors for schizophrenia and their interaction. We evaluated whether the factors during pregnancy and birth have a different effect among subjects with and without a history of parental psychosis and whether parental psychosis may even explain their effects on the risk of schizophrenia. The sample comprised 10,526 individuals from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort. A total of 150 (1.4%) cohort members had schizophrenia by the age of 44 years, of them 18 (12.0%) had a parent with a history of psychosis. In non-psychotic cohort members, this figure was 495 (4.8%). In the parental psychosis group, significant early biological risk factors for schizophrenia included high birth weight (hazard ratio, HR 11.4; 95% confidence interval 3.3-39.7) and length (HR 4.1; 1.3-12.5), high birth weight in relation to gestational age (HR 3.2; 1.1-9.0), and high maternal age (HR 2.6.; 1.0-6.7). High birth weight and length and high maternal education had a significant interaction with parental psychosis. The presence of any biological risk factor increased the risk of schizophrenia significantly only among the parental psychosis group (HR 4.0; 1.5-10.5), whereas the presence of any psychosocial risk factor had no interaction with parental psychosis. Parental psychosis can act as an effect modifier on early risk factors for schizophrenia. Evaluation of the mechanisms behind the risk factors should, therefore, include consideration of the parental history of psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction between parental psychosis and early motor development and the risk of schizophrenia in a general population birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, E; Marttila, A; Marttila, R; Jones, P B; Murray, G K; Moilanen, K; Koivumaa-Honkanen, H; Mäki, P; Isohanni, M; Jääskeläinen, E; Miettunen, J

    2015-09-01

    Delayed motor development in infancy and family history of psychosis are both associated with increased risk of schizophrenia, but their interaction is largely unstudied. To investigate the association of the age of achieving motor milestones and parental psychosis and their interaction in respect to risk of schizophrenia. We used data from the general population-based prospective Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n=10,283). Developmental information of the cohort members was gathered during regular visits to Finnish child welfare clinics. Several registers were used to determine the diagnosis of schizophrenia among the cohort members and psychosis among the parents. Altogether 152 (1.5%) individuals had schizophrenia by the age of 46 years, with 23 (15.1%) of them having a parent with psychosis. Cox regression analysis was used in analyses. Parental psychosis was associated (Prisk for schizophrenia was increased if holding the head up (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.46; degrees of freedom [df]=1; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-5.66) and touching the thumb with the index finger (HR: 1.84; df=1; 95% CI: 1.11-3.06) was later. In the group without parental psychosis, a delay in the following milestones increased the risk of schizophrenia: standing without support and walking without support. Parental psychosis had an interaction with delayed touching thumb with index finger (HR: 1.87; df=1; 95% CI: 1.08-3.25) when risk of schizophrenia was investigated. Parental psychosis was associated with achieving motor milestones later in infancy, particularly the milestones that appear early in a child's life. Parental psychosis and touching the thumb with the index finger had a significant interaction on risk of schizophrenia. Genetic risk for psychosis may interact with delayed development to raise future risk of schizophrenia, or delayed development may be a marker of other risk processes that interact with genetic liability to cause later schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015

  4. Globally Efficient Brain Organization and Treatment Response in Psychosis: A Connectomic Study of Gyrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyappan, Lena; Marques, Tiago Reis; Taylor, Heather; Mondelli, Valeria; Reinders, A A T Simone; Bonaccorso, Stefania; Giordano, Annalisa; DiForti, Marta; Simmons, Andrew; David, Anthony S; Pariante, Carmine M; Murray, Robin M; Dazzan, Paola

    2016-11-01

    Converging evidence suggests that patients with first-episode psychosis who show a poor treatment response may have a higher degree of neurodevelopmental abnormalities than good Responders. Characterizing the disturbances in the relationship among brain regions (covariance) can provide more information on neurodevelopmental integrity than searching for localized changes in the brain. Graph-based connectomic approach can measure structural covariance thus providing information on the maturational processes. We quantified the structural covariance of cortical folding using graph theory in first-episode psychosis, to investigate if this systems-level approach would improve our understanding of the biological determinants of outcome in psychosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging data were acquired in 80 first-episode psychosis patients and 46 healthy controls. Response to treatment was assessed after 12 weeks of naturalistic follow-up. Gyrification-based connectomes were constructed to study the maturational organization of cortical folding. Nonresponders showed a reduction in the distributed relationship among brain regions (high segregation, poor integration) when compared to Responders and controls, indicating a higher burden of aberrant neurodevelopment. They also showed reduced centrality of key regions (left insula and anterior cingulate cortex) indicating a marked reconfiguration of gyrification. Nonresponders showed a vulnerable pattern of covariance that disintegrated when simulated lesions removed high-degree hubs, indicating an abnormal dependence on highly central hub regions in Nonresponders. These findings suggest that a perturbed maturational relationship among brain regions underlies poor treatment response in first-episode psychosis. The information obtained from gyrification-based connectomes can be harnessed for prospectively predicting treatment response and prognosis in psychosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  5. Cardiometabolic risk indicators that distinguish adults with psychosis from the general population, by age and gender.

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    Debra L Foley

    Full Text Available Individuals with psychosis are more likely than the general community to develop obesity and to die prematurely from heart disease. Interventions to improve cardiovascular outcomes are best targeted at the earliest indicators of risk, at the age they first emerge. We investigated which cardiometabolic risk indicators distinguished those with psychosis from the general population, by age by gender, and whether obesity explained the pattern of observed differences. Data was analyzed from an epidemiologically representative sample of 1,642 Australians with psychosis aged 18-64 years and a national comparator sample of 8,866 controls aged 25-64 years from the general population. Cubic b-splines were used to compare cross sectional age trends by gender for mean waist circumference, body mass index [BMI], blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and total cholesterol in our psychosis and control samples. At age 25 individuals with psychosis had a significantly higher mean BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose [women only], and diastolic blood pressure and significantly lower HDL-cholesterol than controls. With the exception of triglycerides at age 60+ in men, and glucose in women at various ages, these differences were present at every age. Differences in BMI and waist circumference between samples, although dramatic, could not explain all differences in diastolic blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol or triglycerides but did explain differences in glucose. Psychosis has the hallmarks of insulin resistance by at least age 25. The entire syndrome, not just weight, should be a focus of intervention to reduce mortality from cardiovascular disease.

  6. Multivariate analyses of CT findings in typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

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    Hayashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Toyonobu; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the brain morphological differences between typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, the brain CTs of 41 patients with typical schizophrenia, 27 patients with atypical psychosis (ATP), and 20 controls were examined. The schizophrenics had larger values for 9 CT indices, i.e., interhemispheric fissure (IHF) index, VBR, 2 lateral ventricles (L-V) and 3rd venricle (III-V) indices, and 4 sylvian fissure (SF) indices, while the values of ATP patients for 3 SF indices were greater than for the controls. Moreover, the schizophrenics had greater III-V and L-V indices than the ATP patients. The correlation matrix of CT indices indicates that the III-V index correlated well with the other CT indices, whereas the VBR, IHF and right SF indices did not. Therefore, it was speculated that there might be 3 subgroups, each of which has a main focus of alteration in the above-mentioned regions. Therefore, all the cases were divided by means of a cluster analysis into 5 groups. Group I, which contained mainly normal controls, and Group II, which consisted mainly of atypical psychosis patients, had no abnormal CT findings. Group III, which comprised mainly ATP pateints and paranoid type schizophrenics, had right SF enlargement. Group IV, which showed significant IHF enlargement, and the residue group, which had larger VBR and significant left SF enlargement, consisted mostly of schizophrenics. Thus, our results suggest that the classification by CT data corresponds on the whole to our clinical diagnosis, according to which schizophrenic psychosis is divided into typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, and that each of the two psychosis groups may be further classified into distinct subgroups. (author)

  7. Long term functioning in early onset psychosis: Two years prospective follow-up study

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    Taha Ghada RA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There were few studies on the outcome of schizophrenia in developing countries. Whether the outcome is similar to or different from developed world is still a point for research. The main aim of the current study was to know if patients with early onset non affective psychosis can behave and function properly after few years from start of the illness or not. Other aims included investigation of possible predictors and associated factors with remission and outcome. Method The study prospectively investigated a group of 56 patients with onset of psychosis during childhood or adolescence. Diagnosis made according to DSM-IV criteria and included; schizophrenia, psychotic disorder not otherwise specified and acute psychosis. Severity of psychosis was measured by PANSS. Measures of the outcome included; remission criteria of Andreasen et al 2005, the children's global assessment scale and educational level. Results Analysis of data was done for only 37 patients. Thirty patients diagnosed as schizophrenia and 7 with Psychotic disorder not otherwise specified. Mean duration of follow up was 38.4 +/- 16.9 months. At the end of the study, 6 patients (16.2% had one episode, 23(62.1% had multiple episodes and 8 (21.6% continuous course. Nineteen patients (51.4% achieved full remission, and only 11(29.7% achieved their average educational level for their age. Twenty seven percent of the sample had good outcome and 24.3% had poor outcome. Factors associated with non remission and poor outcome included gradual onset, low IQ, poor premorbid adjustment, negative symptoms at onset of the illness and poor adherence to drugs. Moreover, there was tendency of negative symptoms at illness start to predict poor outcome. Conclusion Some patients with early onset non affective psychosis can behave and function properly after few years from the start of the illness. Although remission is a difficult target in childhood psychosis, it is still achievable.

  8. Multivariate analyses of CT findings in typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

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    Hayashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Toyonobu; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takeo (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    In order to investigate the brain morphological differences between typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, the brain CTs of 41 patients with typical schizophrenia, 27 patients with atypical psychosis (ATP), and 20 controls were examined. The schizophrenics had larger values for 9 CT indices, i.e., interhemispheric fissure (IHF) index, VBR, 2 lateral ventricles (L-V) and 3rd venricle (III-V) indices, and 4 sylvian fissure (SF) indices, while the values of ATP patients for 3 SF indices were greater than for the controls. Moreover, the schizophrenics had greater III-V and L-V indices than the ATP patients. The correlation matrix of CT indices indicates that the III-V index correlated well with the other CT indices, whereas the VBR, IHF and right SF indices did not. Therefore, it was speculated that there might be 3 subgroups, each of which has a main focus of alteration in the above-mentioned regions. Therefore, all the cases were divided by means of a cluster analysis into 5 groups. Group I, which contained mainly normal controls, and Group II, which consisted mainly of atypical psychosis patients, had no abnormal CT findings. Group III, which comprised mainly ATP pateints and paranoid type schizophrenics, had right SF enlargement. Group IV, which showed significant IHF enlargement, and the residue group, which had larger VBR and significant left SF enlargement, consisted mostly of schizophrenics. Thus, our results suggest that the classification by CT data corresponds on the whole to our clinical diagnosis, according to which schizophrenic psychosis is divided into typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, and that each of the two psychosis groups may be further classified into distinct subgroups. (author).

  9. Meta-analysis of the Association Between the Level of Cannabis Use and Risk of Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Arianna; Di Forti, Marta; Lewis, Cathryn M; Murray, Robin M; Vassos, Evangelos

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis use has been reported to induce long-lasting psychotic disorders and a dose-response relationship has been observed. We performed a systematic review of studies that investigate the association between the degree of cannabis consumption and psychosis and a meta-analysis to quantify the magnitude of effect. Published studies were identified through search of electronic databases, supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies. Studies were considered if they provided data on cannabis consumption prior to the onset of psychosis using a dose criterion (frequency/amount used) and reported psychosis-related outcomes. We performed random effects meta-analysis of individual data points generated with a simulation method from the summary data of the original studies. From 571 references, 18 studies fulfilled inclusion criteria for the systematic review and 10 were inserted in the meta-analysis, enrolling a total of 66 816 individuals. Higher levels of cannabis use were associated with increased risk for psychosis in all the included studies. A logistic regression model gave an OR of 3.90 (95% CI 2.84 to 5.34) for the risk of schizophrenia and other psychosis-related outcomes among the heaviest cannabis users compared to the nonusers. Current evidence shows that high levels of cannabis use increase the risk of psychotic outcomes and confirms a dose-response relationship between the level of use and the risk for psychosis. Although a causal link cannot be unequivocally established, there is sufficient evidence to justify harm reduction prevention programs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The risk and associated factors of methamphetamine psychosis in methamphetamine-dependent patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Said, Mas Ayu; Habil, Mohd Hussain; Rashid, Rusdi; Siddiq, Amer; Guan, Ng Chong; Midin, Marhani; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Sidi, Hatta; Das, Srijit

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk of lifetime and current methamphetamine-induced psychosis in patients with methamphetamine dependence. The association between psychiatric co-morbidity and methamphetamine-induced psychosis was also studied. This was a cross-sectional study conducted concurrently at a teaching hospital and a drug rehabilitation center in Malaysia. Patients with the diagnosis of methamphetamine based on DSM-IV were interviewed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) for methamphetamine-induced psychosis and other Axis I psychiatric disorders. The information on sociodemographic background and drug use history was obtained from interview or medical records. Of 292 subjects, 47.9% of the subjects had a past history of psychotic symptoms and 13.0% of the patients were having current psychotic symptoms. Co-morbid major depressive disorder (OR=7.18, 95 CI=2.612-19.708), bipolar disorder (OR=13.807, 95 CI=5.194-36.706), antisocial personality disorder (OR=12.619, 95 CI=6.702-23.759) and heavy methamphetamine uses were significantly associated with lifetime methamphetamine-induced psychosis after adjusted for other factors. Major depressive disorder (OR=2.870, CI=1.154-7.142) and antisocial personality disorder (OR=3.299, 95 CI=1.375-7.914) were the only factors associated with current psychosis. There was a high risk of psychosis in patients with methamphetamine dependence. It was associated with co-morbid affective disorder, antisocial personality, and heavy methamphetamine use. It is recommended that all cases of methamphetamine dependence should be screened for psychotic symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of reclassification of cannabis on hospital admissions for cannabis psychosis: a time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Ian; Lloyd, Charlie; Hewitt, Catherine; Godfrey, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The UK Misuse of Drugs Act (1971) divided controlled drugs into three groups A, B and C, with descending criminal sanctions attached to each class. Cannabis was originally assigned by the Act to Group B but in 2004, it was transferred to the lowest risk group, Group C. Then in 2009, on the basis of increasing concerns about a link between high strength cannabis and schizophrenia, it was moved back to Group B. The aim of this study is to test the assumption that changes in classification lead to changes in levels of psychosis. In particular, it explores whether the two changes in 2004 and 2009 were associated with changes in the numbers of people admitted for cannabis psychosis. An interrupted time series was used to investigate the relationship between the two changes in cannabis classification and their impact on hospital admissions for cannabis psychosis. Reflecting the two policy changes, two interruptions to the time series were made. Hospital Episode Statistics admissions data was analysed covering the period 1999 through to 2010. There was a significantly increasing trend in cannabis psychosis admissions from 1999 to 2004. However, following the reclassification of cannabis from B to C in 2004, there was a significant change in the trend such that cannabis psychosis admissions declined to 2009. Following the second reclassification of cannabis back to class B in 2009, there was a significant change to increasing admissions. This study shows a statistical association between the reclassification of cannabis and hospital admissions for cannabis psychosis in the opposite direction to that predicted by the presumed relationship between the two. However, the reasons for this statistical association are unclear. It is unlikely to be due to changes in cannabis use over this period. Other possible explanations include changes in policing and systemic changes in mental health services unrelated to classification decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  12. Impact of childhood adversities on specific symptom dimensions in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajnakina, O; Trotta, A; Oakley-Hannibal, E; Di Forti, M; Stilo, S A; Kolliakou, A; Gardner-Sood, P; Gaughran, F; David, A S; Dazzan, P; Pariante, C; Mondelli, V; Morgan, C; Vassos, E; Murray, R M; Fisher, H L

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between childhood adversity (CA) and psychotic disorder is well documented. As the adequacy of the current categorical diagnosis of psychosis is being increasingly questioned, we explored independent associations between different types of CA and specific psychotic symptom dimensions in a well-characterized sample of first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients. This study involved 236 FEP cases aged 18-65 years who presented for the first time to psychiatric services in South London, UK. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate the statistical fit of the Wallwork/Fortgang five-factor model of psychosis. CA prior to 17 years of age (physical abuse, sexual abuse, parental separation, parental death, and being taken into care) was retrospectively assessed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Childhood sexual abuse [β = 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.40-1.52], childhood physical abuse (β = 0.48, 95% CI 0.03-0.93) and parental separation (β = 0.60, 95% CI 0.10-1.11) showed significant associations with the positive dimension; while being taken into care was associated with the excited dimension (β = 0.36, 95% CI 0.08-0.65), independent of the other types of CA. No significant associations were found between parental death and any of the symptom dimensions. A degree of specificity was found in the relationships between different types of CA and psychosis symptom dimensions in adulthood, suggesting that distinct pathways may be involved in the CA-psychosis association. These potentially different routes to developing psychosis merit further empirical and theoretical exploration.

  13. A pilot study of cognitive insight and structural covariance in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Corin; Buchy, Lisa; Barbato, Mariapaola; Makowski, Carolina; MacMaster, Frank P; Bray, Signe; Deighton, Stephanie; Addington, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive insight is described as a balance between one's self-reflectiveness (recognition and correction of dysfunctional reasoning), and self-certainty (overconfidence). Neuroimaging studies have linked the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) to cognitive insight in people with psychosis. However, the relationship between cognitive insight and structural connectivity between the VLPFC and other brain areas is unknown. Here, we investigated the modulation of cognitive insight on structural covariance networks involving the VLPFC in a first-episode psychosis sample. Fifteen patients with a first-episode psychosis provided magnetic resonance (MR) scans and completed the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS). MR scans were also available for 15 historical controls. Seed-based analysis of structural covariance was conducted using the Mapping Anatomical Correlations Across the Cerebral Cortex (MACACC) methodology, whereby Pearson correlation coefficients were extracted between seed regions in left and right VLPFC and cortical thickness across the brain. Structural covariance maps between groups were compared at each vertex. In first-episode subjects, we evaluated the modulation of BCIS scores on cortical covariance between VLPFC and every other vertex. Findings showed no significant group difference between first-episode psychosis subjects and controls in thickness covariance seeded from left or right VLPFC. However, in first-episode psychosis subjects, a positive association with self-certainty was found in networks seeded from both left and right VLPFC with thickness in medial frontal cortex and right pars triangularis. No significant associations were found for self-reflectiveness. These results suggest that self-certainty, but not self-reflectiveness, positively modulated cortical covariance in a frontal network in patients with a first-episode psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Network Approach to Psychosis: Pathways Between Childhood Trauma and Psychotic Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isvoranu, Adela-Maria; van Borkulo, Claudia D; Boyette, Lindy-Lou; Wigman, Johanna T W; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Borsboom, Denny

    2017-01-01

    Childhood trauma (CT) has been identified as a potential risk factor for the onset of psychotic disorders. However, to date, there is limited consensus with respect to which symptoms may ensue after exposure to trauma in early life, and whether specific pathways may account for these associations. The aim of the present study was to use the novel network approach to investigate how different types of traumatic childhood experiences relate to specific symptoms of psychotic disorders and to identify pathways that may be involved in the relationship between CT and psychosis. We used data of patients diagnosed with a psychotic disorder (n = 552) from the longitudinal observational study Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis Project and included the 5 scales of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form and all original symptom dimensions of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Our results show that all 5 types of CT and positive and negative symptoms of psychosis are connected through symptoms of general psychopathology. These findings are in line with the theory of an affective pathway to psychosis after exposure to CT, with anxiety as a main connective component, but they also point to several additional connective paths between trauma and psychosis: eg, through poor impulse control (connecting abuse to grandiosity, excitement, and hostility) and motor retardation (connecting neglect to most negative symptoms). The results of the current study suggest that multiple paths may exist between trauma and psychosis and may also be useful in mapping potential transdiagnostic processes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Early Psychosis Screener (EPS): Quantitative validation against the SIPS using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodey, B B; Girgis, R R; Favorov, O V; Addington, J; Perkins, D O; Bearden, C E; Woods, S W; Walker, E F; Cornblatt, B A; Brucato, G; Walsh, B; Elkin, K A; Brodey, I S

    2018-01-18

    Machine learning techniques were used to identify highly informative early psychosis self-report items and to validate an early psychosis screener (EPS) against the Structured Interview for Psychosis-risk Syndromes (SIPS). The Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief Version (PQ-B) and 148 additional items were administered to 229 individuals being screened with the SIPS at 7 North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study sites and at Columbia University. Fifty individuals were found to have SIPS scores of 0, 1, or 2, making them clinically low risk (CLR) controls; 144 were classified as clinically high risk (CHR) (SIPS 3-5) and 35 were found to have first episode psychosis (FEP) (SIPS 6). Spectral clustering analysis, performed on 124 of the items, yielded two cohesive item groups, the first mostly related to psychosis and mania, the second mostly related to depression, anxiety, and social and general work/school functioning. Items within each group were sorted according to their usefulness in distinguishing between CLR and CHR individuals using the Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance procedure. A receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) analysis indicated that maximal differentiation of CLR and CHR participants was achieved with a 26-item solution (AUC=0.899±0.001). The EPS-26 outperformed the PQ-B (AUC=0.834±0.001). For screening purposes, the self-report EPS-26 appeared to differentiate individuals who are either CLR or CHR approximately as well as the clinician-administered SIPS. The EPS-26 may prove useful as a self-report screener and may lead to a decrease in the duration of untreated psychosis. A validation of the EPS-26 against actual conversion is underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychosis and concurrent impulse control disorder in Parkinson's disease: A review based on a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Bruno Fukelmann; Gonçalves, Marcia Rubia; Cury, Rubens Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Psychosis, impulse control disorders (e.g., pathological gambling and hypersexuality) and repetitive behaviors such as punding are known psychiatric complications of Parkinson's disease (PD). Impulsive, compulsive and repetitive behaviors are strongly associated with dopamine-replacement therapy. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with PD and a myriad of psychiatric symptoms. Concurrent psychosis, punding and pathological gambling developed more than six years after the introduction of pramipexole and ceased shortly after the addition of quetiapine and discontinuation of pramipexole. This report emphasizes the importance of monitoring for a wide array of psychiatric symptoms in patients on dopamine replacement therapy.

  17. Psychosis and concurrent impulse control disorder in Parkinson's disease: A review based on a case report

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    Bruno Fukelmann Guedes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Psychosis, impulse control disorders (e.g., pathological gambling and hypersexuality and repetitive behaviors such as punding are known psychiatric complications of Parkinson's disease (PD. Impulsive, compulsive and repetitive behaviors are strongly associated with dopamine-replacement therapy. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with PD and a myriad of psychiatric symptoms. Concurrent psychosis, punding and pathological gambling developed more than six years after the introduction of pramipexole and ceased shortly after the addition of quetiapine and discontinuation of pramipexole. This report emphasizes the importance of monitoring for a wide array of psychiatric symptoms in patients on dopamine replacement therapy.

  18. Social Cognition in Individuals at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis: A Meta-Analysis.

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    R J M van Donkersgoed

    Full Text Available Treatment in the ultra-high risk stage for a psychotic episode is critical to the course of symptoms. Markers for the development of psychosis have been studied, to optimize the detection of people at risk of psychosis. One possible marker for the transition to psychosis is social cognition. To estimate effect sizes for social cognition based on a quantitative integration of the published evidence, we conducted a meta-analysis of social cognitive performance in people at ultra high risk (UHR.A literature search (1970-July 2015 was performed in PubMed, PsychINFO, Medline, Embase, and ISI Web of Science, using the search terms 'social cognition', 'theory of mind', 'emotion recognition', 'attributional style', 'social knowledge', 'social perception', 'empathy', 'at risk mental state', 'clinical high risk', 'psychosis prodrome', and 'ultra high risk'. The pooled effect size (Cohen's D and the effect sizes for each domain of social cognition were calculated. A random effects model with 95% confidence intervals was used.Seventeen studies were included in the analysis. The overall significant effect was of medium magnitude (d = 0.52, 95% Cl = 0.38-0.65. No moderator effects were found for age, gender and sample size. Sub-analyses demonstrated that individuals in the UHR phase show significant moderate deficits in affect recognition and affect discrimination in faces as well as in voices and in verbal Theory of Mind (TOM. Due to an insufficient amount of studies, we did not calculate an effect size for attributional bias and social perception/ knowledge. A majority of studies did not find a correlation between social cognition deficits and transition to psychosis, which may suggest that social cognition in general is not a useful marker for the development of psychosis. However some studies suggest the possible predictive value of verbal TOM and the recognition of specific emotions in faces for the transition into psychosis. More research is needed on

  19. Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Svein; Melle, Ingrid; Johannessen, Jan Olav

    2016-01-01

    , five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores ≥4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years......, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses. RESULTS: Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow...

  20. The role of melatonin in post-partum psychosis and depression associated with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George

    2010-11-01

    Recent data has highlighted the association of a bipolar disorder (BD) with an increased risk of post-partum psychosis and depression. It is suggested that genetic- and environmental-induced decrease in the levels of melatonin in BD contributes to post-partum disorders. Melatonin may also have some efficacy in the treatment of BD, especially in decreasing the side-effects associated with lithium and the neuroleptics. It is proposed that the optimization of melatonin levels, perhaps in conjunction with optimized vitamin D3 level, would decrease post-partum psychosis and depression associated with BD.

  1. Social Cognition in Individuals at Ultra-High Risk for Psychosis: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Donkersgoed, R. J. M.; Wunderink, L.; Nieboer, R.; Aleman, A.; Pijnenborg, G. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Treatment in the ultra-high risk stage for a psychotic episode is critical to the course of symptoms. Markers for the development of psychosis have been studied, to optimize the detection of people at risk of psychosis. One possible marker for the transition to psychosis is social cognition. To estimate effect sizes for social cognition based on a quantitative integration of the published evidence, we conducted a meta-analysis of social cognitive performance in people at ultra high risk (UHR). Methods A literature search (1970-July 2015) was performed in PubMed, PsychINFO, Medline, Embase, and ISI Web of Science, using the search terms ‘social cognition’, ‘theory of mind’, ‘emotion recognition’, ‘attributional style’, ‘social knowledge’, ‘social perception’, ‘empathy’, ‘at risk mental state’, ‘clinical high risk’, ‘psychosis prodrome’, and ‘ultra high risk’. The pooled effect size (Cohen’s D) and the effect sizes for each domain of social cognition were calculated. A random effects model with 95% confidence intervals was used. Results Seventeen studies were included in the analysis. The overall significant effect was of medium magnitude (d = 0.52, 95% Cl = 0.38–0.65). No moderator effects were found for age, gender and sample size. Sub-analyses demonstrated that individuals in the UHR phase show significant moderate deficits in affect recognition and affect discrimination in faces as well as in voices and in verbal Theory of Mind (TOM). Due to an insufficient amount of studies, we did not calculate an effect size for attributional bias and social perception/ knowledge. A majority of studies did not find a correlation between social cognition deficits and transition to psychosis, which may suggest that social cognition in general is not a useful marker for the development of psychosis. However some studies suggest the possible predictive value of verbal TOM and the recognition of specific emotions in faces

  2. Mood as a mediator of the link between child sexual abuse and psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwaha, S; Bebbington, P

    2015-04-01

    The significance of affective changes in psychosis is increasingly acknowledged, as is the role of early traumatic events. In a previous paper, using data from the English Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 (APMS2007), strong associations between child sexual abuse (CSA) and psychosis were demonstrated, with some evidence of mediation by affect. In the current paper, we subjected the same dataset to formal tests of mediation. For CSA involving sexual intercourse, 38.5% of the link was mediated, 30.0% by depression and 8.5% by anxiety. For all forms of contact abuse, 38.2% was mediated, 29.1% by depression and 9.1% by anxiety.

  3. Is there evidence that social class at birth increases risk of psychosis? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Wingfai

    2014-12-01

    In the 1950s, researchers showed an association between low socio-economic status (SES) and psychosis. Two competing theories social causation and social drift were proposed to explain the findings. In the intervening years, contrasting evidence emerged as some studies showed no association between SES and schizophrenia. At present, the nature of the relationship is still unclear; currently, there are no reviews in the literature examining the association between social class at birth and psychosis. To search the literature to clarify the relationship between social class at birth, measured by paternal occupation at birth, and the risk of adult-onset psychosis. A systematic search of the literature using a combination of keywords in Group 1 together with the keywords in Group 2 was performed in October 2012 in the following online databases: (a) MEDLINE (1946-2012), (b) PubMed, (c) Embase (1980-2012), (d) PsycINFO (1806-2012) and (e) Web of Science (1899-2012). Reference lists were also hand searched. The search provided 3,240 studies; following screening of the titles and abstracts by inclusion and exclusion criteria and quality assessment of the full text, 14 studies were identified to be appropriate for the review. The keywords used for the search were as follows: Group 1 - social class, social status, socioeconomic, socio-economic, SES; Group 2 - psychosis, psychoses, schizophrenia. Seven studies showed an association between low SES and psychosis. Four studies showed no association, and three studies showed an association with high SES. There is not enough evidence to support the association between social class and psychosis. While some findings showed an association between low social class and psychosis, there were a number of conflicting studies showing no association or a link with higher social class. Interestingly, the results followed a temporal pattern, as all the studies conducted after 2001 supported an association between low SES at birth and

  4. Narrative insight in psychosis: The relationship with spiritual and religious explanatory frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Michael R; Thompson, Andrew R; Cockshutt, Graham; Rowse, Georgina

    2018-03-25

    When considering psychosis, the concept of narrative insight has been offered as an alternative to clinical insight in determining individuals' responses to their difficulties, as it allows for a more holistic and person-centred framework to be embraced within professional practice. This study aims to explore the validity of the narrative insight construct within a group of people who have experienced psychosis. Inductive qualitative methods were used to explore how eight participants utilized spiritual or religious explanatory frameworks for their experiences of psychosis and to consider these in relation to the construct of narrative insight. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with individuals who identified themselves as interested in spiritual or religious ideas and whose self-reported experiences which were identified as akin to psychosis by experienced academic clinicians. Transcriptions from these interviews were subject to interpretative phenomenological analysis within a broader research question; a selection of themes and data from the resultant phenomenological structure are explored here for their relevance to narrative insight. Participants discussed spiritual and biological explanations for their experiences and were able to hold alternative potential explanations alongside each other. They were reflective regarding the origins of their explanations and would describe a process of testing and proof in relation to them. These findings suggest that the narrative insight construct has the potential to be a valid approach to understanding experiences of psychosis, and challenge the dominance of the clinical insight construct within clinical practice. Clinicians should value the explanatory framework for experiences which are provided by individuals experiencing psychosis, and encourage them to develop a framework which is coherent to their own world view rather than predominantly pursuing a biomedical explanation. Assessments of psychosis should

  5. Manic-Like Psychosis Associated with Elevated Trough Tacrolimus Blood Concentrations 17 Years after Kidney Transplant

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    Giuseppe Bersani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several neurological side effects induced by tacrolimus are described in the scientific literature, ranging from mild neurological symptoms to delirium and psychosis. We report the case of a 46-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history who suddenly manifested manic-like psychosis associated with elevated trough tacrolimus blood concentrations 17 years after kidney transplant. The use of antipsychotics may improve the severity of symptoms; but in order to obtain a complete remission, the reduction in the dose of tacrolimus, or its replacement with alternative immunosuppressant therapies, is recommended.

  6. Mefloquine use, psychosis, and violence: a retinoid toxicity hypothesis.

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    Mawson, Anthony

    2013-07-15

    Mefloquine use has been linked to severe gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric adverse effects, including cognitive disturbances, anxiety, depression, psychosis, and violence. The adverse effects of the drug are thought to result from the secondary consequences of hepatocellular injury; in fact, mefloquine is known to cause a transient, anicteric chemical hepatitis. However, the mechanism of mefloquine-associated liver damage and the associated neuropsychiatric and behavioral effects of the drug are not well understood. Mefloquine and other 8-amino-quinolines are the only antimalarial drugs that target the liver-stage malaria parasites, which selectively absorb vitamin A from the host. Vitamin A is also stored mainly in the liver, in potentially poisonous concentrations. These observations suggest that both the therapeutic effectiveness of mefloquine and its adverse effects are related to the ability of the 8-aminoquinolines to alter the metabolism of retinoids (vitamin A and its congeners). Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that mefloquine neurotoxicity and other adverse effects reflect an endogenous form of hypervitaminosis A due to a process involving: mefloquine-induced dehydrogenase inhibition; the accumulation of retinoids in the liver; retinoid-induced hepatocellular damage; the spillage of stored retinoids into the circulation; and the transport of these compounds to the gut and brain in toxic concentrations. The retinoid hypothesis could be tested clinically by comparing cases of mefloquine toxicity and untreated controls in terms of retinoid profiles (retinol, retinyl esters, percent retinyl esters, and retinoic acid). Subject to such tests, retinoid profiling could provide an indicator for assessing mefloquine-associated adverse effects.

  7. Explicit and implicit reinforcement learning across the psychosis spectrum.

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    Barch, Deanna M; Carter, Cameron S; Gold, James M; Johnson, Sheri L; Kring, Ann M; MacDonald, Angus W; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Ragland, J Daniel; Silverstein, Steven M; Strauss, Milton E

    2017-07-01

    Motivational and hedonic impairments are core features of a variety of types of psychopathology. An important aspect of motivational function is reinforcement learning (RL), including implicit (i.e., outside of conscious awareness) and explicit (i.e., including explicit representations about potential reward associations) learning, as well as both positive reinforcement (learning about actions that lead to reward) and punishment (learning to avoid actions that lead to loss). Here we present data from paradigms designed to assess both positive and negative components of both implicit and explicit RL, examine performance on each of these tasks among individuals with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder with psychosis, and examine their relative relationships to specific symptom domains transdiagnostically. None of the diagnostic groups differed significantly from controls on the implicit RL tasks in either bias toward a rewarded response or bias away from a punished response. However, on the explicit RL task, both the individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder performed significantly worse than controls, but the individuals with bipolar did not. Worse performance on the explicit RL task, but not the implicit RL task, was related to worse motivation and pleasure symptoms across all diagnostic categories. Performance on explicit RL, but not implicit RL, was related to working memory, which accounted for some of the diagnostic group differences. However, working memory did not account for the relationship of explicit RL to motivation and pleasure symptoms. These findings suggest transdiagnostic relationships across the spectrum of psychotic disorders between motivation and pleasure impairments and explicit RL. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Computerized tomography findings on schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

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    Hayashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Toyonobu; Kito, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takeo

    1988-01-01

    The brain CTs of 54 endogenous psychotics (27 males, 27 females) who were less than 40 years of age and were first adimitted in Aichi Medical University from 1982 to 1986, and 20 controls (10 males, 10 females) were examined. Using Mitsuda's classification, we devided all the cases into 29 schizophrenics (18 males, 11 females) and 25 atypical psychotics (9 males, 16 females). In order to investigate the differences of CT findings between the two patient groups, the 3rd ventricle index (the ratio of 3rd ventricle width to the internal diameter of the skull), Evans'ratio, lateral ventricle brain ratio (VBR), Sylvian fissure to brain ratio, 4th ventricle to cerebellum ratio were determined. Schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricles as well as Sylvian fissures when compared to controls, but atypical psychotics had not. Moreover, schizophrenics had larger 3rd and lateral ventricle than atypical psychotics. But in widths of Sylvian fissures there was no statistical significant difference between the two groups. Ventricle enlargements of schizophrenics did not correlate with duration of illness as well as age, and were not results of prior psychiatric treatment such as medication and EST. Therefore the following is suggested that, this abnormal CT findings predate the onset of schizophrenic psychoses. In atypical psychotics the changes of Sylvian fissures correlated with duration of illness, but not with age. Such observations may possibly suggest that recurrence of the illness might finally attain irreversible changes even in atypical psychotics. Finally, the heterogeneity of schizophrenia and the independence of atypical psychosis were also discussed. (author) 53 refs

  9. Ayahuasca, dimethyltryptamine, and psychosis: a systematic review of human studies.

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    Dos Santos, Rafael G; Bouso, José Carlos; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2017-04-01

    Ayahuasca is a hallucinogen brew traditionally used for ritual and therapeutic purposes in Northwestern Amazon. It is rich in the tryptamine hallucinogens dimethyltryptamine (DMT), which acts as a serotonin 5-HT 2A agonist. This mechanism of action is similar to other compounds such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin. The controlled use of LSD and psilocybin in experimental settings is associated with a low incidence of psychotic episodes, and population studies corroborate these findings. Both the controlled use of DMT in experimental settings and the use of ayahuasca in experimental and ritual settings are not usually associated with psychotic episodes, but little is known regarding ayahuasca or DMT use outside these controlled contexts. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the published case reports describing psychotic episodes associated with ayahuasca and DMT intake. We found three case series and two case reports describing psychotic episodes associated with ayahuasca intake, and three case reports describing psychotic episodes associated with DMT. Several reports describe subjects with a personal and possibly a family history of psychosis (including schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorders, psychotic mania, psychotic depression), nonpsychotic mania, or concomitant use of other drugs. However, some cases also described psychotic episodes in subjects without these previous characteristics. Overall, the incidence of such episodes appears to be rare in both the ritual and the recreational/noncontrolled settings. Performance of a psychiatric screening before administration of these drugs, and other hallucinogens, in controlled settings seems to significantly reduce the possibility of adverse reactions with psychotic symptomatology. Individuals with a personal or family history of any psychotic illness or nonpsychotic mania should avoid hallucinogen intake.

  10. Internet addiction, Hikikomori syndrome, and the prodromal phase of psychosis

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    Emmanuel eStip

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Computers, video games and technological devices are part of young people's everyday lives. Hikikomori, a Japanese word describing a condition that mainly affects adolescents or young adults who live isolated from the world, cloistered within their parents’ homes, locked in their bedrooms for days, months or even years on end, refusing to communicate even with their family, using internet profusely and only venturing out to deal with their most imperative bodily needs. Although first described in Japan, cases have been described from around the world, this is the first published report from Canada. The disorder sharescharacteristics with prodromal psychosis, negative symptoms of schizophrenia or internet addiction, which are common differential or comorbid diagnoses. Certain cases, however, are not accompanied by a mental disorder. Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice although many cases are reluctant to present. The exact place of hikikomori in psychiatric nosology has yet to be determined. We searched Medline up to 12th May, 2015 supplemented by a hand search of the bibliographies of all retrieved articles. We used the following search terms: Hikikomori OR (prolonged AND social AND withdrawal. We found 97 potential papers. Of these 42, were in Japanese, and one in Korean. However, many of these were cited by subsequent English-language papers that were included in the review. Following scrutiny of the titles and abstracts, 29 were judged to be relevant. Further research is needed to distinguish between primary and secondary hikikomori and establish whether this is a new diagnostic entity, or particular cultural or societal manifestations of established diagnoses.

  11. Attribution style as a factor in psychosis and symptom resolution.

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    Mizrahi, Romina; Addington, Jean; Remington, Gary; Kapur, Shitij

    2008-09-01

    Attribution (AT) style theory provides a framework for understanding the causal explanations that individuals give for their own behaviour and the behaviour of others. It has been suggested that patients with persecutory delusions excessively attribute hypothetical positive events to internal causes (self) and hypothetical negative events to external personal causes. Despite this, how AT associates with psychotic symptoms (not only persecutory delusions) and how it changes with the resolution of psychosis has never been investigated. We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate how AT is associated with psychopathology and a longitudinal study to examine the change of AT during the first 6 weeks of antipsychotic treatment and the relationship with psychopathology improvement. 86 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders were included in the cross-sectional study, and 17 patients in the longitudinal study. The longitudinal group were free of antipsychotic drugs at baseline and followed for 6 weeks after being started on antipsychotic medication by their psychiatrist. We used the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire (IPSAQ) as a measure of AT. Patients that tend to internalize (i.e. less self-serving bias), showed greater overall psychopathology, as measured by PANSS-Total (F(2,83)=6.59, p=0.002), with a trend toward significance for PANSS-Positive (F(2,83)=2.62 p=0.07). Longitudinally, having a low self-serving bias was associated with poorer response to antipsychotic treatment. Further, externalizing bias seems to change early on in treatment (F=9.65 df=1,15 p=0.007) and reach ceiling effects thereafter. AT is related to overall symptom severity, with internalizing style linked to higher global psychopathology. Antipsychotic treatment has little effect on AT, at least within 6 weeks of antipsychotic exposure, and only a modest effect is on EB which plateaus within 2 weeks. Finally

  12. Psychosis associated with methimazole-induced hypothyroidism: a case report

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    Priscila C. F. Lazaro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Thyroid dysfunction has often been associated with several psychiatric manifestations. Previous case reports/series suggest the possible role played by acute alteration of thyroid status in the onset of psychotic symptoms. METHODS: Case report and literature review. RESULTS: A 45-year-old woman with no psychiatric antecedents was brought to the ER with a full-blown psychotic episode, marked by paranoid delusions, which developed gradually over two months. She had been treated elsewhere for hyperthyroidism for five years with methimazole 40 mg/d, with poor compliance. One month before the beginning of the psychotic symptoms, methimazole was raised to 60 mg/d and she started taking it correctly. Five months earlier she had TSH: 0.074 uUI/ml and free T4: 1.3 ng/dl. At admission we found a diffuse thyroid goiter, TSH: 70.9 uUI/ml and free T4: 0.03 ng/dl. Brain CT was normal. We hospitalized her with the diagnosis of a psychosis secondary to hypothyroidism, suspended methimazole, and gave her levothyroxine (up to 75 µg/d and risperidone (2 mg/d. The patient had a quick remission and was discharged after 15 days. Within one month she had TSH: 0.7 uUI/ml and was completely recovered psychiatrically. She has been well since then, with risperidone in the first 8 months, and without it for 10 months now. CONCLUSION: This case report is a reminder of the necessity of checking thyroid status as part of clinical assessment of psychoses. It also supports the hypothesis that antithyroid drugs may have severe psychiatric consequences, especially when they lead to an acute change of thyroid status.

  13. Delusional disorder: molecular genetic evidence for dopamine psychosis.

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    Morimoto, Kiyoshi; Miyatake, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Takemi; Hirao, Toru; Suwaki, Hiroshi

    2002-06-01

    Since delusional disorder is characterized by mono-symptomatic paranoid symptoms, it can be a good clinical model for investigating the dopaminergic mechanism responsible for paranoid symptoms. We examined neuroleptic responses, plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and genes of the dopamine receptor (DR) and its synthesizing enzyme (tyrosine hydroxylase: TH) in patients with delusional disorder and compared them with those of schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. (1) A relatively small dose of haloperidol was more effective for delusional disorder than for schizophrenia. (2) The pretreatment level of pHVA was higher in patients with persecution-type, but not in those with jealousy-type delusional disorder, compared with age- and sex-matched controls. This increased pHVA level was decreased eight weeks after successful haloperidol treatment. (3) The genotype frequency of the DRD2 gene Ser311Cys was significantly higher in patients with persecution-type delusional disorder (21%), compared with schizophrenic patients (6%) or controls (6%). (4) Patients homozygous for the DRD3 gene Ser9Ser had higher pretreatment levels of pHVA than those heterozygous for Ser9Gly. (v) A significant positive correlation was found between the polymorphic (TCAT)(n) repeat in the first intron of the TH gene and pretreatment levels of pHVA in delusional disorder. We suggest that delusional disorder, especially the persecution-type, includes a "dopamine psychosis," and that polymorphism of the DRD2, DRD3 and/or TH gene is part of the genetic basis underlying the hyperdopaminergic state that produces paranoid symptoms. Further studies on a large sample size are required.

  14. Haloperidol for psychosis-induced aggression or agitation (rapid tranquillisation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostinelli, Edoardo G; Brooke-Powney, Melanie J; Li, Xue; Adams, Clive E

    2017-07-31

    Haloperidol used alone is recommended to help calm situations of aggression or agitation for people with psychosis. It is widely accessible and may be the only antipsychotic medication available in limited-resource areas. To examine whether haloperidol alone is an effective treatment for psychosis-induced aggression or agitation, wherein clinicians are required to intervene to prevent harm to self and others. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study-Based Register of Trials (26th May 2016). This register is compiled by systematic searches of major resources (including AMED, BIOSIS CINAHL, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and registries of clinical trials) and their monthly updates, handsearches, grey literature, and conference proceedings, with no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records into the register. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving people exhibiting aggression and/or agitation thought to be due to psychosis, allocated rapid use of haloperidol alone (by any route), compared with any other treatment. Outcomes of interest included tranquillisation or asleep by 30 minutes, repeated need for rapid tranquillisation within 24 hours, specific behaviours (threat or injury to others/self), adverse effects. We included trials meeting our selection criteria and providing useable data. We independently inspected all citations from searches, identified relevant abstracts, and independently extracted data from all included studies. For binary data we calculated risk ratio (RR), for continuous data we calculated mean difference (MD), and for cognitive outcomes we derived standardised mean difference (SMD) effect sizes, all with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and using a fixed-effect model. We assessed risk of bias for the included studies and used the GRADE approach to produce 'Summary of findings' tables which included our pre-specified main outcomes of interest. We found nine new RCTs from the

  15. Gender differences in characteristics and outcomes of smokers diagnosed with psychosis participating in a smoking cessation intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filia, Sacha L; Baker, Amanda L; Gurvich, Caroline T; Richmond, Robyn; Lewin, Terry J; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2014-03-30

    While research has identified gender differences in characteristics and outcomes of smokers in the general population, no studies have examined this among smokers with psychosis. This study aimed to explore gender differences among 298 smokers with psychosis (schizophrenia, schizoaffective and bipolar affective disorder) participating in a smoking intervention study. Results revealed a general lack of gender differences on a range of variables for smokers with psychosis including reasons for smoking/quitting, readiness and motivation to quit, use of nicotine replacement therapy, and smoking outcomes including point prevalence or continuous abstinence, and there were no significant predictors of smoking reduction status according to gender at any of the follow-up time-points. The current study did find that female smokers with psychosis were significantly more likely than males to report that they smoked to prevent weight gain. Furthermore, the females reported significantly more reasons for quitting smoking and were more likely to be driven by extrinsic motivators to quit such as immediate reinforcement and social influence, compared to the male smokers with psychosis. Clinical implications include specifically focussing on weight issues and enhancing intrinsic motivation to quit smoking for female smokers with psychosis; and strengthening reasons for quitting among males with psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anatomic abnormalities of the anterior cingulate cortex before psychosis onset: an MRI study of ultra-high-risk individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornito, Alex; Yung, Alison R; Wood, Stephen J; Phillips, Lisa J; Nelson, Barnaby; Cotton, Sue; Velakoulis, Dennis; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat

    2008-11-01

    Abnormalities of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders, but whether such changes are apparent before psychosis onset remains unclear. In this study, we characterized prepsychotic ACC abnormalities in a sample of individuals at ultra-high-risk (UHR) for psychosis. Participants underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging and were followed-up over 12-24 months to ascertain diagnostic outcomes. Baseline ACC morphometry was then compared between UHR individuals who developed psychosis (UHR-P; n = 35), those who did not (UHR-NP; n = 35), and healthy control subjects (n = 33). Relative to control subjects, UHR-P individuals displayed bilateral thinning of a rostral paralimbic ACC region that was negatively correlated with negative symptoms, whereas UHR-NP individuals displayed a relative thickening of dorsal and rostral limbic areas that was correlated with anxiety ratings. Baseline ACC differences between the two UHR groups predicted time to psychosis onset, independently of symptomatology. Subdiagnostic comparisons revealed that changes in the UHR-P group were driven by individuals subsequently diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis. These findings indicate that anatomic abnormalities of the ACC precede psychosis onset and that baseline ACC differences distinguish between UHR individuals who do and do not subsequently develop frank psychosis. They also indicate that prepsychotic changes are relatively specific to individuals who develop a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, suggesting they may represent a diagnostically specific risk marker.

  17. The association of family functioning and psychosis proneness in five countries that differ in cultural values and family structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüsten, Caroline; Lincoln, Tania M

    2017-07-01

    For decades, researchers have attributed the better prognosis of psychosis in developing countries to a host of socio-cultural factors, including family functioning. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether family functioning and its association with symptoms differ across countries. This study assessed family functioning (support, satisfaction with family relations, and criticism) and psychosis proneness in community samples from Chile (n =399), Colombia (n=486), Indonesia (n=115), Germany (n=174) and the USA (n=143). Family functioning was compared between prototypical developing countries (Chile, Columbia, Indonesia) and highly industrialized countries (Germany, USA). Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test for the moderating effect of country on the associations between family functioning and psychosis proneness. Participants from developing countries perceived more support and felt more satisfied. However, they also perceived more criticism than participants from highly industrialized countries. Criticism and family satisfaction were significantly associated with psychosis proneness. Moreover, the relationship between criticism and psychosis proneness was significantly stronger in developing countries compared to highly industrialized countries. Generally, family satisfaction and criticism appear to be more relevant to psychosis proneness than the quantity of family support. Moreover, criticism seems to be more closely related to psychosis proneness in developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Central executive network in young people with familial risk for psychosis--the Oulu Brain and Mind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukuri, Tuomas; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Nikkinen, Juha; Miettunen, Jouko; Mäki, Pirjo; Mukkala, Sari; Koivukangas, Jenni; Nordström, Tanja; Parkkisenniemi, Juha; Moilanen, Irma; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Graham K; Veijola, Juha

    2015-02-01

    The central executive network controls and manages high-level cognitive functions. Abnormal activation in the central executive network has been related to psychosis and schizophrenia but it is not established how this applies to people with familial risk for psychosis (FR). We conducted a resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) in 72 (29 males) young adults with a history of psychosis in one or both parents (FR) but without psychosis themselves, and 72 (29 males) similarly healthy control subjects without parental psychosis. Both groups in the Oulu Brain and Mind Study were drawn from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. Participants were 20-25years old. Parental psychosis was established using the Care Register for Health Care. R-fMRI data pre-processing was conducted using independent component analysis with 30 and 70 components. A dual regression technique was used to detect between-group differences in the central executive network with pcontrol subjects in the right inferior frontal gyrus, a key area of central executive network corresponding to Brodmann areas 44 and 45, known as Broca's area. The volume of the lower activation area with 30 components was 896mm(3) and with 70 components was 1151mm(3). The activity of the central executive network differed in the right inferior frontal gyrus between FR and control groups. This suggests that abnormality of the right inferior frontal gyrus may be a central part of vulnerability for psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Childhood trauma increases the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder in response to first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Sarah; Alvarez-Jimenez, Mario; Hulbert, Carol A; McGorry, Patrick D; Jackson, Henry J

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between childhood trauma, post-traumatic stress symptoms due to the experience of childhood trauma, and post-traumatic stress symptoms due to the experience of psychosis. The current study assessed childhood trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as a result of both childhood trauma and psychosis using the Impact of Events Scale - Revised, in a group of 36 people with first-episode psychosis. Reported rates of clinical level post-psychotic PTSD symptoms, childhood trauma and childhood trauma-related clinical level PTSD symptoms were 47% (95% CI 31-64%), 64% (95% CI 48-80%) and 39% (95% CI 23-55%), respectively. Reporting childhood trauma increased the risk of developing post-psychosis PTSD 27-fold (95% CI 2.96-253.80, p = 0.01). Having childhood trauma-related PTSD increased the risk of developing post-psychosis PTSD 20-fold (95% CI 3.38-123.25, p = 0.01). These risks were not explained by illness factors such as duration of untreated psychosis, age of onset or severity of psychotic symptoms. Those without post-psychotic PTSD symptoms at clinical levels were unlikely to report childhood trauma (6%; 95% CI 3-8%). These results suggest the cognitive, social and biological consequences of childhood trauma can prevent effective recovery from the trauma of acute first-episode psychosis resulting in post-psychotic PTSD. Treatment strategies for post-psychotic PTSD must address childhood trauma and related PTSD.

  20. Impaired action self-monitoring and cognitive confidence among ultra-high risk for psychosis and first-episode psychosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawęda, Ł; Li, E; Lavoie, S; Whitford, T J; Moritz, S; Nelson, B

    2018-01-01

    Self-monitoring biases and overconfidence in incorrect judgments have been suggested as playing a role in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Little is known about whether self-monitoring biases may contribute to early risk factors for psychosis. In this study, action self-monitoring (i.e., discrimination between imagined and performed actions) was investigated, along with confidence in judgments among ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis individuals and first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients. Thirty-six UHR for psychosis individuals, 25 FEP patients and 33 healthy controls (CON) participated in the study. Participants were assessed with the Action memory task. Simple actions were presented to participants verbally or non-verbally. Some actions were required to be physically performed and others were imagined. Participants were asked whether the action was presented verbally or non-verbally (action presentation type discrimination), and whether the action was performed or imagined (self-monitoring). Confidence self-ratings related to self-monitoring responses were obtained. The analysis of self-monitoring revealed that both UHR and FEP groups misattributed imagined actions as being performed (i.e., self-monitoring errors) significantly more often than the CON group. There were no differences regarding performed actions as being imagined. UHR and FEP groups made their false responses with higher confidence in their judgments than the CON group. There were no group differences regarding discrimination between the types of actions presented (verbal vs non-verbal). A specific type of self-monitoring bias (i.e., misattributing imagined actions with performed actions), accompanied by high confidence in this judgment, may be a risk factor for the subsequent development of a psychotic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of functional and clinical outcome in early-onset first-episode psychosis: the child and adolescent first episode of psychosis (CAFEPS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parellada, Mara; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Moreno, Dolores; Rapado-Castro, Marta; Otero, Soraya; de la Serna, Elena; Moreno, Carmen; Baeza, Inmaculada; Graell, Montserrat; Arango, Celso

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to study baseline clinical and biological predictors of 2-year outcome in a cohort of children and adolescents with a first episode of psychosis. Standard instruments were used to evaluate symptoms and functioning in 110 children and adolescents (mean age = 15.47 years) with first episode of psychosis at admission (between 2003 and 2005) and after 2-year follow-up. Clinical assessments included diagnostic assessment to yield DSM-IV diagnosis, developmental, premorbid, and past-year data, together with structural neuroimaging and other biological parameters (genetics and oxidative stress). Eighty-three subjects had assessments at baseline (including the Strauss-Carpenter Outcome Scale [SCOS]) and at 2-year follow-up. Association and multistep regression analyses were conducted to show correlates and predictors of primary outcome measures: functional outcome (Children's Global Assessment Scale [CGAS]), improvement (CGAS change), and primary negative symptoms (Proxy for the Deficit Syndrome Scale). The SCOS predicted 27.46% (P < .001) of the variance in CGAS score at 2 years. Baseline severity (measured by CGAS) predicted 30.9% (P < .001) of CGAS improvement after 2 years, and SCOS total score predicted an added 24.1% (P < .001). A diagnosis of nonaffective psychosis, primary negative symptoms, and less white matter at baseline predicted more primary negative symptoms at follow-up. The prediction of functional outcome was not increased by genetic, oxidative stress, or neurostructural markers. Baseline clinical assessments have a better predictive value than biological assessments for 2-year follow-up functioning of children and adolescents with a first episode of psychosis. Patients with primary negative symptoms at baseline continue to have negative symptoms 2 years later, and neurostructural markers predict these. Clinicians must still rely on clinical variables to judge the functional prognosis of early-onset first psychotic episodes

  2. Testing the Psychosis Continuum: Differential Impact of Genetic and Nongenetic Risk Factors and Comorbid Psychopathology Across the Entire Spectrum of Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binbay, Tolga; Drukker, Marjan; Elbi, Hayriye; Tanık, Feride Aksu; Özkınay, Ferda; Onay, Hüseyin; Zağlı, Nesli; van Os, Jim; Alptekin, Köksal

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of studies demonstrate high rates of subthreshold psychotic experiences, but there is considerable heterogeneity in rates due to study cohort and design factors, obscuring how prevalent psychotic experiences may or may not relate to rare psychotic disorders. In a representative general population sample (n = 4011) in Izmir, Turkey, the full spectrum of expression of psychosis was categorized across 5 groups representing (1) absence of psychosis, (2) subclinical psychotic experiences, (3) low-impact psychotic symptoms, (4) high-impact psychotic symptoms, and (5) full-blown clinical psychotic disorder and analyzed for continuity and discontinuity in relation to (1) other symptom dimensions associated with psychotic disorder and (2) proxies of genetic and nongenetic etiology. Results were tested for linear and extralinear contrasts between clinical and nonclinical and between disorder and nondisorder expression of psychosis. Demographic variables, indexing premorbid social adjustment and socioeconomic status, impacted mostly linearly; proxy variables of genetic loading (more or more severely affected relatives) impacted in a positive extralinear fashion; environmental risk factors sometimes impacted linearly (urbanicity and childhood adversity) and sometimes extralinearly (cannabis), occasioning a disproportional shift in risk at the clinical disorder end of the spectrum. Affective symptoms were associated with a disproportionally higher risk below the disorder threshold, whereas a disproportionally higher risk above the threshold was associated with psychotic symptom load, negative symptoms, disorganization, and visible signs of mental illness. Liability associated with respectively affective and nonaffective symptom domains, in interaction with environmental risks, may operate by impacting differentially over a quasi-continuous extended psychosis phenotype in the population. PMID:21525167

  3. The impact of substance use at psychosis onset on First Episode Psychosis course: results from a 1 year follow-up study in Bologna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarricone, Ilaria; Boydell, Jane; Panigada, Serena; Allegri, Fabio; Marcacci, Thomas; Minenna, Maria Gabriella; Kokona, Arnisa; Triolo, Federico; Storbini, Viviana; Michetti, Rossella; Morgan, Craig; Di Forti, Marta; Murray, Robin M; Berardi, Domenico

    2014-03-01

    Substance abuse is a well established risk factor for First-Episode Psychosis (FEP), but its influence on FEP course is less clear. Starting from our baseline observation that substance users were younger than non-users at the psychosis onset, we hypothesized that substance use at baseline could be an independent risk factor for a worse clinical course. An incidence cohort of patients with FEP collected in an 8year period (2002-2009) at the Bologna West Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) was assessed at baseline and at 12month follow-up. Drop-out, hospitalizations and service utilization were used as clinical outcomes. Most of the patients were still in contact with CMHC at 12month follow up. Substance users had a significantly higher rate of hospitalizations during the follow-up after adjusting for age, gender and other potential confounders (OR 5.84, 95% CI 2.44-13.97, p≤0.001). This study adds to previous evidence showing the independent effect of substance use on FEP course. The identification of a "potentially modifiable" environmental predictor of the course of the illness such as substance use at psychosis onset allows us to envisage the possibility of ameliorating the course of the illness by managing this factor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Rates of homicide during the first episode of psychosis and after treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielssen, Olav; Large, Matthew

    2010-07-01

    The observation that almost half of the homicides committed by people with a psychotic illness occur before initial treatment suggests an increased risk of homicide during the first episode of psychosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the rates of homicide during the first episode of psychosis and after treatment. A systematic search located 10 studies that reported details of all the homicide offenders with a psychotic illness within a known population during a specified period and reported the number of people who had received treatment prior to the offense. Meta-analysis of these studies showed that 38.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 31.1%-46.5%) of homicides occurred during the first episode of psychosis, prior to initial treatment. Homicides during first-episode psychosis occurred at a rate of 1.59 homicides per 1000 (95% CI = 1.06-2.40), equivalent to 1 in 629 presentations. The annual rate of homicide after treatment for psychosis was 0.11 homicides per 1000 patients (95% CI = 0.07-0.16), equivalent to 1 homicide in 9090 patients with schizophrenia per year. The rate ratio of homicide in the first episode of psychosis in these studies was 15.5 (95% CI = 11.0-21.7) times the annual rate of homicide after treatment for psychosis. Hence, the rate of homicide in the first episode of psychosis appears to be higher than previously recognized, whereas the annual rate of homicide by patients with schizophrenia after treatment is lower than previous estimates. Earlier treatment of first-episode psychosis might prevent some homicides.

  5. HIV/Aids and psychosis: needs, challenges and support of affected mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, R.; Sterkenburg, P.S.; van Rensburg, E; Schuengel, C.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about parenting in the context of HIV and psychosis, two co-existing conditions affecting many mothers in South Africa. In this study a mixed methods approach was used to firstly do qualitative investigation of the illness and parenting experiences of a case group of mothers living

  6. The effectiveness of peer support groups in psychosis : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; van Busschbach, J. T.; van der Gaag, M.; Stant, A. D.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a (minimally) guided peer support group (GPSG) for people with psychosis on social network, social support, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and quality of life, and to evaluate the intervention and its economic consequences. Method: In a multi-center randomized

  7. A 10-year follow-up study of violent victimization in first episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langeveld, Johannes; Bjørkly, Stål; Evensen, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Violent victimization in persons with severe mental illness has long-term adverse consequences. Little is known about the long-term prevalence of victimization in first episode psychosis, or about factors affecting victimization throughout the course of illness. To assess the prevalence of violent...

  8. Social networks and support in first episode psychosis: exploring the role of loneliness and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Oliver; Onwumere, Juliana; Kane, Fergus; Morgan, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate social support and network features in people with first episode psychosis, and to examine anxiety as a possible mediator between loneliness and a rating of paranoia. METHOD Thirty eight people with first-episode psychosis were recruited for a cross-sectional study. Self report questionnaires and structured interviews assessed symptoms, functioning, and qualitative social network and support features. A mood-induction task involved watching anxiety-inducing pictures on a computer screen. Visual analogue scales assessed changes in paranoia, anxiety and loneliness and a mediation analysis was conducted. RESULTS One third of the sample (34%) had no confidant (95% CI 18.4%, 50.0%). The average number of weekly contacts was 3.9, with 2.6 lonely days. Poor perceived social support, loneliness and the absence of a confidant were strongly associated with psychosis and depressive symptoms (.35loneliness and paranoia was mediated through anxiety (ab=.43, z=3.5; pAnxiety may be one pathway through which loneliness affects psychosis. Interventions which focus on this are indicated. PMID:23955376

  9. Social networks and support in first-episode psychosis: exploring the role of loneliness and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sündermann, Oliver; Onwumere, Juliana; Kane, Fergus; Morgan, Craig; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    To investigate social support and network features in people with first-episode psychosis, and to examine anxiety as a possible mediator between loneliness and a rating of paranoia. Thirty-eight people with first-episode psychosis were recruited for a cross-sectional study. Self-report questionnaires and structured interviews assessed symptoms, functioning, and qualitative social network and support features. A mood-induction task involved watching anxiety-inducing pictures on a computer screen. Visual analogue scales assessed changes in paranoia, anxiety and loneliness and a mediation analysis was conducted. One-third of the sample (34%) had no confidant [95% CI (18.4, 50.0%)]. The average number of weekly contacts was 3.9, with 2.6 lonely days. Poor perceived social support, loneliness and the absence of a confidant were strongly associated with psychosis and depressive symptoms (0.35 loneliness and paranoia was mediated through anxiety (ab = 0.43, z = 3.5; p Anxiety may be one pathway through which loneliness affects psychosis. Interventions which focus on this are indicated.

  10. Criminal offending and distinguishing features of offenders among persons experiencing a first episode of psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2011-02-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are at increased risk of criminal offending, particularly violent offending, as compared with the general population. Most offenders with SMI acquire convictions prior to contact with mental health services. This study examined offending among 301 individuals experiencing their first episode of psychosis.

  11. Childhood trauma, psychosis liability and social stress reactivity : a virtual reality study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, W.; Counotte, J.; Pot-Kolder, R.; van Os, J.; van der Gaag, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Childhood trauma is associated with higher risk for mental disorders, including psychosis. Heightened sensitivity to social stress may be a mechanism. This virtual reality study tested the effect of childhood trauma on level of paranoid ideations and distress in response to social

  12. I spy with my little eye - the detection of intentional contingency in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, Anne-Kathrin J; González Berdugo, Clara Isabel; Hanssen, Esther; Lemmers-Jansen, Imke; Shergill, Sukhi S; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Paranoid delusions have been associated with a tendency to over-attribute intentionality and contingency to others' actions and incidental events in individuals with chronic psychosis. However, this hyper-associative perception bias has not been investigated in the early illness stages of psychosis, during which it may play a particularly crucial role in the formation of symptoms. We used an experimental paradigm with 20 short film clips of simple animate and inanimate shapes that either moved in a contingent or non-contingent manner to investigate the perception of contingency in 38 adolescents with early psychosis and 93 healthy control adolescents. Participants rated the contingency between the shapes' movements on a scale from 0 to 10. The data were analysed with multilevel regression analyses to account for repeated measures within subjects. There were no significant differences between patients and controls; both perceived the contingency of the shapes' movements similarly across all conditions and patients' contingency perception was unrelated to their levels of paranoid delusions. Contingency perception was unimpaired in patients with early psychosis, suggesting that it might still be intact in the early illness stages. Future studies should set out to determine whether the early illness stages could offer a window for interventions that counteract the development of hyper-associative perceptions of contingency.

  13. Physical illness and lifestyle risk factors in people with their first presentation of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samele, Chiara; Patel, Maxine; Boydell, Jane; Leese, Morven; Wessely, Simon; Murray, Robin

    2007-02-01

    There is an increased prevalence of physical illness and poor lifestyle in patients with chronic schizophrenia. It is unclear whether these are present at the onset of psychosis or develop over the course of illness. We aimed to establish whether patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis have worse physical health and lifestyle than community controls without psychosis. Eighty-nine patients with new onset illness were compared to age and sex matched controls for self-reported physical illness and cardiovascular and respiratory risk factors. Patients reported more physical health complaints, mainly respiratory, compared with age and gender matched controls (odds ratio 2.85, 95% confidence interval 1.2-6.7). Patients were more likely to be cigarette smokers (1.82, 95% CI 1.0-3.3) and eat a fast food diet (1.04, 95% CI 1.0-1.1), but these differences were accounted for by patients' unemployment status. Some risk factors for physical health problems are present at the onset of psychosis, but these may be explained by unemployment.

  14. The Structure of The Extended Psychosis Phenotype in Early Adolescence-A Cross-sample Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wigman, Johanna T. W.; Vollebergh, Wilma A. M.; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Iedema, Jurjen; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.; van Os, Jim

    The extended psychosis phenotype, or the expression of nonclinical positive psychotic experiences, is already prevalent in adolescence and has a dose-response risk relationship with later psychotic disorder. In 2 large adolescent general population samples (n = 5422 and n = 2230), prevalence and

  15. Social cognition in patients at ultra-high risk for psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Louise B.; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Patients at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis show significant impairments in functioning. It is essential to determine which factors influence functioning, as it may have implications for intervention strategies. This study examined whether social cognitive abilities and clinical...

  16. Outcome of a working diagnosis of \\"psychosis\\" in relation to DSM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome of a working diagnosis of \\"psychosis\\" in relation to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria in a Kenyan in-patient cohort at Mathari hospital, Nairobi. D M Ndetei, L I Khasakhala, F A Ongecha, V Mutiso, D A Kokonya ...

  17. 123I-IMP SPECT studies in schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takuji; Suga, Hidemichi

    1993-01-01

    According to the classification of Mitsuda, 23 patients with endogenous psychosis aged 40 years or younger, presenting with hallucination and delusion, were classified as having schizophrenia (n=12) or atypical psychosis (n=11). These patients were studied by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with N-isopropyl-p-I-123-iodoamphetamine (I-123 IMP). Sixteen healthy persons served as controls. Early and delayed SPECT images were obtained 30 min and 4 hr, respectively, after intravenous injection of I-123 IMP. The group of schizophrenic patients had markedly decreased uptake of I-123 in the basal ganglia, as well as the right temporal and left occipital areas on both early and delayed images. In the group of atypical psychosis patients, however, decreased uptake of I-123 was noted in both the right basal ganglia and left occipital area on early images, but none of such findings were seen on delayed images. Regarding the uptake ratio in the frontal area on both early and delayed images, there were significant differences between the two groups. These findings have important implications for the different etiology of both disease types: not only functional disturbance in the frontal area but also irreversible changes may be involved in the occurrence of schizophrenia, and functional disturbance particularly in the right basal ganglia may be involved in the occurrence of atypical psychosis. (N.K.)

  18. Using a Narrative Film to Increase Knowledge and Interpersonal Communication About Psychosis Among Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Maria Y; Mejia, Yesenia; Mayer, Doe; Lopez, Steven R

    2016-12-01

    Narrative communication is effective in increasing public awareness while generating dialogue about varied health topics. The current study utilized narrative communication in the form of a 15-minute motivational film titled La CLAve to help Latinos recognize symptoms of psychosis and begin a discussion about serious mental illness. The study aimed to explore the participants' response to the film and whether the film led to further dialogue about psychosis. Four focus groups were conducted with 40 Spanish-speaking participants, mostly foreign-born Latinas, with a mean age of 49 years. Results indicate that participants engaged with the film as reflected in their ability to recall the storyline in detail. Reports of psychosis knowledge gains included recognition of key symptoms, such as hallucinations and disorganized speech. Participants attributed symptoms of psychosis, observed in a film character, to social stressors and other previously constructed views of mental illness. Many participants discussed the content of the film within their immediate social networks. Other findings include discussions of key barriers and facilitators to seeking mental health treatment among Latino families, such as denial and family support. Results suggest that narrative films offer a promising strategy to stimulate dialogue about serious mental illness among Latinos.

  19. Metacognition in first-episode psychosis and its association with positive and negative symptom profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Gumley, Andrew; Jansen, Jens Einar

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metacognitive abilities which include the ability to synthesize knowledge regarding mental states in self and others and use this ability to solve problems are impaired in non-affective psychosis and associated with positive and negative symptom severity. We sought ...

  20. Cognitive, Emotional, and Social Processes in Psychosis: Refining Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Persistent Positive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Elizabeth; Garety, Philippa; Fowler, David; Freeman, Daniel; Dunn, Graham; Bebbington, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Psychosis used to be thought of as essentially a biological condition unamenable to psychological interventions. However, more recent research has shown that positive symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations are on a continuum with normality and therefore might also be susceptible to adaptations of the cognitive behavioral therapies found useful for anxiety and depression. In the context of a model of cognitive, emotional, and social processes in psychosis, the latest evidence for the putative psychological mechanisms that elicit and maintain symptoms is reviewed. There is now good support for emotional processes in psychosis, for the role of cognitive processes including reasoning biases, for the central role of appraisal, and for the effects of the social environment, including stress and trauma. We have also used virtual environments to test our hypotheses. These developments have improved our understanding of symptom dimensions such as distress and conviction and also provide a rationale for interventions, which have some evidence of efficacy. Therapeutic approaches are described as follows: a collaborative therapeutic relationship, managing dysphoria, helping service users reappraise their beliefs to reduce distress, working on negative schemas, managing and reducing stressful environments if possible, compensating for reasoning biases by using disconfirmation strategies, and considering the full range of evidence in order to reduce high conviction. Theoretical ideas supported by experimental evidence can inform the development of cognitive behavior therapy for persistent positive symptoms of psychosis. PMID:16885206