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Sample records for canister overpack mco

  1. Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCO is designed to facilitate the removal, processing and storage of the spent nuclear fuel currently stored in the East and West K-Basins. The MCO is a stainless steel canister approximately 24 inches in diameter and 166 inches long with cover cap installed. The shell and the collar which is welded to the shell are fabricated from 304/304L dual certified stainless steel for the shell and F304/F304L dual certified for the collar. The shell has a nominal thickness of 1/2 inch. The top closure consists of a shield plug with four processing ports and a locking ring with jacking bolts to pre-load a metal seal under the shield plug. The fuel is placed in one of four types of baskets, excluding the SPR fuel baskets, in the fuel retention basin. Each basket is then loaded into the MCO which is inside the transfer cask. Once all of the baskets are loaded into the MCO, the shield plug with a process tube is placed into the open end of the MCO. This shield plug provides shielding for workers when the transfer cask, containing the MCO, is lifted from the pool. After being removed from the pool, the locking ring is installed and the jacking bolts are tightened to pre-load the metal main closure seal. The cask is then sealed and the MCO taken to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility for bulk water removal and vacuum drying through the process ports. Covers for the process ports may be installed or removed as needed per operating procedures. The MCO is then transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), in the closed transfer cask. At the CSB, the MCO is then removed from the cask and becomes one of two MCOs stacked in a storage tube. MCOs will have a cover cap welded over the shield plug providing a complete welded closure. A number of MCOs may be stored with just the mechanical seal to allow monitoring of the MCO pressure, temperature, and gas composition

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-09-08

    The purpose of this calculation document is to develop the bases for the material balances of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Level 1 Process Flow Diagram (PFD). The attached mass balances support revision two of the PFD for the MCO and provide future reference.

  3. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Design Report [SEC 1 Thru 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GOLDMANN, L.H.

    2000-02-29

    The MCO is designed to facilitate the removal, processing and storage of the spent nuclear fuel currently stored in the East and West K-Basins. The MCO is a stainless steel canister approximately 24 inches in diameter and 166 inches long with cover cap installed. The shell and the collar which is welded to the shell are fabricated from 304/304L dual certified stainless steel for the shell and F304/F304L dual certified for the collar. The shell has a nominal thickness of 1/2 inch. The top closure consists of a shield plug with four processing ports and a locking ring with jacking bolts to pre-load a metal seal under the shield plug. The fuel is placed in one of four types of baskets, excluding the SPR fuel baskets, in the fuel retention basin. Each basket is then loaded into the MCO which is inside the transfer cask. Once all of the baskets are loaded into the MCO, the shield plug with a process tube is placed into the open end of the MCO. This shield plug provides shielding for workers when the transfer cask, containing the MCO, is lifted from the pool. After being removed from the pool, the locking ring is installed and the jacking bolts are tightened to pre-load the metal main closure seal. The cask is then sealed and the MCO taken to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility for bulk water removal and vacuum drying through the process ports. Covers for the process ports may be installed or removed as needed per operating procedures. The MCO is then transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), in the closed transfer cask. At the CSB, the MCO is then removed from the cask and becomes one of two MCOs stacked in a storage tube. MCOs will have a cover cap welded over the shield plug providing a complete welded closure. A number of MCOs may be stored with just the mechanical seal to allow monitoring of the MCO pressure, temperature, and gas composition.

  4. Analysis for Eccentric Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Drops at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) (CSB-S-0073)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLLENBECK, R.G.

    2000-05-08

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Canister Storage Building (CSB) is the interim storage facility for the K-Basin SNF at the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The SNF is packaged in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs are placed inside transport casks, then delivered to the service station inside the CSB. At the service station, the MCO handling machine (MHM) moves the MCO from the cask to a storage tube or one of two sample/weld stations. There are 220 standard storage tubes and six overpack storage tubes in a below grade reinforced concrete vault. Each storage tube can hold two MCOs.

  5. SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) PROJECT CANISTER STORAGE BUILDING (CSB) MULTI CANISTER OVERPACK (MCO) SAMPLING SYSTEM VALIDATION (OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLACK, D.M.; KLEM, M.J.

    2003-11-17

    Approximately 400 Multi-canister overpacks (MCO) containing spent nuclear fuel are to be interim stored at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Several MCOs (monitored MCOs) are designated to be gas sampled periodically at the CSB sampling/weld station (Bader 2002a). The monitoring program includes pressure, temperature and gas composition measurements of monitored MCOs during their first two years of interim storage at the CSB. The MCO sample cart (CART-001) is used at the sampling/weld station to measure the monitored MCO gas temperature and pressure, obtain gas samples for laboratory analysis and refill the monitored MCO with high purity helium as needed. The sample cart and support equipment were functionally and operationally tested and validated before sampling of the first monitored MCO (H-036). This report documents the results of validation testing using training MCO (TR-003) at the CSB. Another report (Bader 2002b) documents the sample results from gas sampling of the first monitored MCO (H-036). Validation testing of the MCO gas sampling system showed the equipment and procedure as originally constituted will satisfactorily sample the first monitored MCO. Subsequent system and procedural improvements will provide increased flexibility and reliability for future MCO gas sampling. The physical operation of the sampling equipment during testing provided evidence that theoretical correlation factors for extrapolating MCO gas composition from sample results are unnecessarily conservative. Empirically derived correlation factors showed adequate conservatism and support use of the sample system for ongoing monitored MCO sampling.

  6. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Topical Report [SEC 1 THRU 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LORENZ, B.D.

    2000-05-11

    In February 1995, the US Department of Energy (DOE) approved the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project's ''Path Forward'' recommendation for resolution of the safety and environmental concerns associated with the deteriorating SNF stored in the Hanford Site's K Basins (Hansen 1995). The recommendation included an aggressive series of projects to design, construct, and operate systems and facilitates to permit the safe retrieval, packaging, transport, conditions, and interim storage of the K Basins' SNF. The facilities are the Cold VAcuum Drying Facility (CVDF) in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site and the Canister Storage building (CSB) in the 200 East Area. The K Basins' SNF is to be cleaned, repackaged in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs), removed from the K Basins, and transported to the CVDF for initial drying. The MCOs would then be moved to the CSB and weld sealed (Loscoe 1996) for interim storage (about 40 years). One of the major tasks associated with the initial Path Forward activities is the development and maintenance of the safety documentation. In addition to meeting the construction needs for new structures, the safety documentation for each must be generated.

  7. Analysis for Eccentric Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Drops at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) (CSB-S-0073)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLLENBECK, R.G.

    2000-06-07

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the potential for damage to the multi-canister overpack (MCO) during impact from an eccentric accidental drop onto the standard storage tube, overpack storage tube, service station or sampling/weld station. Damage to the storage tube and sample/weld station is beyond the scope of this report. The results of this analysis are required to show the following: (1) If a breach resulting in unacceptable release of contamination could occur in the MCO. (2) If the dropped MCO could become stuck in the storage tube after the drop. (3) Maximum deceleration of the spent nuclear fuel baskets. The model appropriate for the standard storage tubes with the smaller gap is the basis for the analysis and results reported herein in this SNF-5204, revision 2 report. Revision 1 of this report is based on a model that includes the larger gap appropriate for the overpack tubes.

  8. Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s)

  9. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Combustible Gas Management Leak Test Acceptance Criteria (OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    2000-10-10

    The purpose of this document is to support the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's combustible gas management strategy while avoiding the need to impose any requirements for oxygen free atmospheres within storage tubes that contain multi-canister overpacks (MCO). In order to avoid inerting requirements it is necessary to establish and confirm leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs that are adequte to ensure that, in the unlikely event the leak test results for any MCO were to approach either of those criteria, it could still be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the SNF Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCOs or within their surroundings. To support that strategy, this document: (1) establishes combustible gas management functions and minimum functional requirements for the MCO's mechanical seals and closure weld(s); (2) establishes a maximum practical value for the minimum required initial MCO inert backfill gas pressure; and (3) based on items 1 and 2, establishes and confirms leak test acceptance criteria for the MCO's mechanical seal and final closure weld(s).

  10. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Trolley Seismic Uplift Constraint Design Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-03-09

    The MCO Handling Machine (MHM) trolley moves along the top of the MHM bridge girders on east-west oriented rails. To prevent trolley wheel uplift during a seismic event, passive uplift constraints are provided as shown in Figure 1-1. North-south trolley wheel movement is prevented by flanges on the trolley wheels. When the MHM is positioned over a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) storage tube, east-west seismic restraints are activated to prevent trolley movement during MCO handling. The active seismic constraints consist of a plunger, which is inserted into slots positioned along the tracks as shown in Figure 1-1. When the MHM trolley is moving between storage tube positions, the active seismic restraints are not engaged. The MHM has been designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis (Reference 3) reported seismic uplift restraint loading and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed with the east-west seismic restraints activated and the uplift restraints experiencing only vertical loading. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the east-west trolley restraints are not engaged. For this case, the associated trolley movements would result in east-west lateral loads on the uplift constraints due to friction, as shown in Figure 1-2. During preliminary evaluations, questions were raised as to whether the EDERER calculations considered the latest ALSTHOM seismic analysis loads (See NCR No. 00-SNFP-0008, Reference 5). Further evaluation led to the conclusion that the EDERER calculations used appropriate vertical loading, but the uplift restraints would need to be re-analyzed and modified to account for lateral loading. The disposition of NCR 00-SNFP-0008 will track the redesign and modification effort. The purpose of this calculation is to establish bounding seismic

  11. Analysis for Eccentric Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Drops at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) (CSB-S-0073)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TU, K.C.

    1999-10-08

    Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will be routinely handled at the Canister Storage Building (CSB) during fuel movement operations in the SNF Project. This analysis was performed to investigate the potential for damage from an eccentric accidental drop onto the standard storage tube, overpack tube, service station, or sample/weld station. Appendix D was added to the FDNW document to include the peer Review Comment Record & transmittal record.

  12. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Independent Review of Seismic Structural Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-09-22

    The following separate reports and correspondence pertains to the independent review of the seismic analysis. The original analysis was performed by GEC-Alsthom Engineering Systems Limited (GEC-ESL) under subcontract to Foster-Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWEC) who was the prime integration contractor to the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). The original analysis was performed to the Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) response spectra using 5% damping as required in specification, HNF-S-0468 for the 90% Design Report in June 1997. The independent review was performed by Fluor-Daniel (Irvine) under a separate task from their scope as Architect-Engineer of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in 1997. The comments were issued in April 1998. Later in 1997, the response spectra of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) was revised according to a new soil-structure interaction analysis and accordingly revised the response spectra for the MHM and utilized 7% damping in accordance with American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) NOG-1, ''Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Multiple Girder).'' The analysis was re-performed to check critical areas but because manufacturing was underway, designs were not altered unless necessary. FWEC responded to SNF Project correspondence on the review comments in two separate letters enclosed. The dispositions were reviewed and accepted. Attached are supplier source surveillance reports on the procedures and process by the engineering group performing the analysis and structural design. All calculation and analysis results are contained in the MHM Final Design Report which is part of the Vendor Information File 50100. Subsequent to the MHM supplier engineering analysis, there was a separate analyses for nuclear safety accident concerns that used the electronic input data files provided by FWEC/GEC-ESL and are contained in

  13. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-05-15

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

  14. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded SNF Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-06

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary.

  15. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Spencer D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  16. Multi-canister overpack design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revision 2 incorporates changes to reflect a 150 psig pressure rating for the mechanically closed MCO and 450 psig pressure rating with the cover cap welded in place, per the MCO Performance Specification, HNF-S-0426, Rev. 5

  17. Multi-canister overpack design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMITH, K.E.

    1999-05-12

    Revision 2 incorporates changes to reflect a 150 psig pressure rating for the mechanically closed MCO and 450 psig pressure rating with the cover cap welded in place, per the MCO Performance Specification, HNF-S-0426, Rev. 5 .

  18. Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project evaluation of multi-canister overpack venting and monitoring options during staging of K basins fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This engineering study recommends whether multi-canister overpacks containing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford K Basins should be staged in vented or a sealed, but ventable, condition during staging at the Canister Storage Building prior to hot vacuum conditioning and interim storage. The integrally related issues of MCO monitoring, end point criteria, and assessing the practicality of avoiding venting and Hot Vacuum Conditioning for a portion of the spent fuel are also considered

  19. Feasibility of direct reactivity measurement in multi-canister overpacks at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proposed method for measuring the chemical reaction rate (power) of breached N-Reactor fuel elements with water in a Multi-canister overpack (MCO) based on hydrogen release rate is evaluated. The reaction rate is measured at 50 C in an oxygen free water by applying a vacuum to boil the water and adding a low, measured flow of helium. The ratio of helium to hydrogen is used to infer the reaction rate. A test duration of less than 8 hours was found to provide sufficient accuracy for confidence in the measurement results. A more rigorous treatment of system measurement accuracy, which may yield shorter test durations, should be performed if this reactivity measurement is to be employed

  20. Thermal assessment of Shippingport pressurized water reactor blanket fuel assemblies within a multi-canister overpack within the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-09

    A series of analyses were performed to assess the thermal performance characteristics of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies as loaded within a Multi-Canister Overpack within the Canister Storage Building. A two-dimensional finite element was developed, with enough detail to model the individual fuel plates: including the fuel wafers, cladding, and flow channels.

  1. MCO loading and cask loadout technical manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PRAGA, A.N.

    1998-10-01

    A compilation of the technical basis for loading a multi-canister overpack (MCO) with spent nuclear fuel and then placing the MCO into a cask for shipment to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The technical basis includes a description of the process, process technology that forms the basis for loading alternatives, process control considerations, safety considerations, equipment description, and a brief facility structure description.

  2. Multi-canister overpack project -- verification and validation, MCNP 4A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, L.H.

    1997-11-10

    This supporting document contains the software verification and validation (V and V) package used for Phase 2 design of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack. V and V packages for both ANSYS and MCNP are included. Description of Verification Run(s): This software requires that it be compiled specifically for the machine it is to be used on. Therefore to facilitate ease in the verification process the software automatically runs 25 sample problems to ensure proper installation and compilation. Once the runs are completed the software checks for verification by performing a file comparison on the new output file and the old output file. Any differences between any of the files will cause a verification error. Due to the manner in which the verification is completed a verification error does not necessarily indicate a problem. This indicates that a closer look at the output files is needed to determine the cause of the error.

  3. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded spent nuclear fuel Multi -Canister Overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary

  4. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) multicanister overpack cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, W.S.

    1997-07-14

    This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) documents the safety of shipments of irradiated fuel elements in the MUlticanister Overpack (MCO) and MCO Cask for a highway route controlled quantity, Type B fissile package. This SARP evaluates the package during transfers of (1) water-filled MCOs from the K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and (2) sealed and cold vacuum dried MCOs from the CVDF in the 100 K Area to the Canister Storage Building in the 200 East Area.

  5. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) multicanister overpack cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) documents the safety of shipments of irradiated fuel elements in the MUlticanister Overpack (MCO) and MCO Cask for a highway route controlled quantity, Type B fissile package. This SARP evaluates the package during transfers of (1) water-filled MCOs from the K Basins to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and (2) sealed and cold vacuum dried MCOs from the CVDF in the 100 K Area to the Canister Storage Building in the 200 East Area

  6. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask and MCO Helium Purge System Design Review Completion Report Project A.5 and A.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARD, K.E.

    2000-04-19

    This report documents the results of the design verification performed on the Cask and Multiple Canister Over-pack (MCO) Helium Purge System. The helium purge system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cask Loadout System (CLS) at 100K area. The design verification employed the ''Independent Review Method'' in accordance with Administrative Procedure (AP) EN-6-027-01.

  8. Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister (SSFC) Design Report Project W-518

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-01-27

    The SSFC Design Report Describes A spent fuel canister for Shippingport Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies. The design of the SSFC is a minor modification of the MCO. The modification is limited to the Shield Plug which remains unchanged with regard to interfaces with the canister shell. The performance characteristics remain those for the MCO, which bounds the payload of the SSFC.

  9. Multicanister overpack topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, B.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-25

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel MCO is a single-use container that consists of a cylindrical shell, five to six fuel baskets, a shield plug, and features necessary for maintaining the structural integrity of the MCO while providing criticality control and fuel processing capability.

  10. Dynamic Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks - 13638

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Cho, Sang-Soon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage which is prevailingly used in US. A concrete cask usually consists of metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel and concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Missile impact against a concrete overpack involves two damage modes, local damage and global damage. Local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. In many cases, those two damage modes are evaluated separately. In this research, a series of numerical simulations are performed using finite element analysis to evaluate the global damage of concrete overpack as well as its local damage under high speed missile impact. We consider two types of concrete overpack, one with steel in-cased concrete without reinforcement and the other with partially-confined reinforced concrete. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results and it is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this analysis and the results are highly dependent on the choice of failure parameters. (authors)

  11. Design Verification Report Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAZINET, G.D.

    2000-11-03

    The Sub-project W379, ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building (CSB),'' was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project. The primary mission of the CSB is to safely store spent nuclear fuel removed from the K Basins in dry storage until such time that it can be transferred to the national geological repository at Yucca Mountain Nevada. This sub-project was initiated in late 1994 by a series of studies and conceptual designs. These studies determined that the partially constructed storage building, originally built as part of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project, could be redesigned to safely store the spent nuclear fuel. The scope of the CSB facility initially included a receiving station, a hot conditioning system, a storage vault, and a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). Because of evolution of the project technical strategy, the hot conditioning system was deleted from the scope and MCO welding and sampling stations were added in its place. This report outlines the methods, procedures, and outputs developed by Project W379 to verify that the provided Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs): satisfy the design requirements and acceptance criteria; perform their intended function; ensure that failure modes and hazards have been addressed in the design; and ensure that the SSCs as installed will not adversely impact other SSCs. The original version of this document was prepared by Vista Engineering for the SNF Project. The purpose of this revision is to document completion of verification actions that were pending at the time the initial report was prepared. Verification activities for the installed and operational SSCs have been completed. Verification of future additions to the CSB related to the canister cover cap and welding fixture system and MCO Internal Gas Sampling equipment will be completed as appropriate for those components. The open items related to verification of those

  12. Evaluation of Impact Resistance of Concrete Overpack of Storage Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Ki-Young; Jeon, Je-Eon; Seo, Ki-Seog [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The concrete overpack of the cask provides radiation shielding as well as physical protection for inner canister against external mechanical shock. When the overpack undergoes a severe missile impact which might be caused by tornado or aircraft crash, it should sustain minimal level of structural integrity so that the radiation shielding and the retrievability of canister are maintained. Empirical formulas have been developed for the evaluation of concrete damage but those formulas can be used only for local damage evaluation and not for global damage evaluation. In this research, a series of numerical simulations and tests have been performed to evaluate the damage of two types of concrete overpack segment models under high speed missile impact. It is shown that appropriate modeling of material failure is crucial in this kind of analyses and finding the correct failure parameters may not be straightforward. When comparing the simulation results with the test results, it is shown that neither setting, case 1 and 2 provides results with consistent agreement with test results. That is, case 1 setting is more close to reality in Type 1 model analysis, but for Type 2, case 2 setting provides more close results to the reality. In both the case, not enough deformation is predicted by simulation compared to the tests. Weak failure and eroding criteria give larger penetration depth with insufficient overall damage due to energy loss with element erosion.

  13. Impact Analyses and Tests of Concrete Overpacks of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concrete cask is an option for spent nuclear fuel interim storage. A concrete cask usually consists of a metallic canister which confines the spent nuclear fuel assemblies and a concrete overpack. When the overpack undergoes a missile impact, which might be caused by a tornado or an aircraft crash, it should sustain an acceptable level of structural integrity so that its radiation shielding capability and the retrievability of the canister are maintained. A missile impact against a concrete overpack produces two damage modes, local damage and global damage. In conventional approaches, those two damage modes are decoupled and evaluated separately. The local damage of concrete is usually evaluated by empirical formulas, while the global damage is evaluated by finite element analysis. However, this decoupled approach may lead to a very conservative estimation of both damages. In this research, finite element analysis with material failure models and element erosion is applied to the evaluation of local and global damage of concrete overpacks under high speed missile impacts. Two types of concrete overpacks with different configurations are considered. The numerical simulation results are compared with test results, and it is shown that the finite element analysis predicts both local and global damage qualitatively well, but the quantitative accuracy of the results are highly dependent on the fine-tuning of material and failure parameters

  14. Design report of the disposal canister for twelve fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, H. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Salo, J.P. [Posiva Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    The report provides a summary of the design of the canister for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The canister structure consists of a cylindrical massive nodular graphite cast iron insert covered by a 50 mm thick copper overlay. The capacity of the canister is 12 assemblies of BWR or VVER 440 fuel. The canister shall be tight with a high probability for about 100 000 years. The good and long lasting tightness requires: (1) The good initial tightness that is achieved by high quality requirements and extensive quality control, (2) The good corrosion resistance, which is obtained by the overpack of oxygen free copper, and (3) Mechanical strength of the canister, that is ensured by analyses (the following loads are considered: hydrostatic pressure, even and uneven swelling pressure of bentonite, thermal effects, and elevated hydrostatic pressure during glaciation. The allowed stresses and strains are set in such a way that reasonable engineering safety factors are obtained in all assessed design base loading cases). The canister shall limit the radiation dose rate outside the canister to minimise the radiolysis of the water in the vicinity of the canister. The canister insert shall keep the fuel assemblies in a subcritical configuration even if the void in the canister is filled with water due to postulated leakage. The design basis of the canister is set, the performed analyses are summarised and the results are assessed and discussed in the report. (orig.) 35 refs.

  15. Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.A Kouts

    2006-11-22

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

  16. Recommendations for codes and standards to be used for design and fabrication of high level waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study identifies codes, standards, and regulatory requirements for developing design criteria for high-level waste (HLW) canisters for commercial operation. It has been determined that the canister should be designed as a pressure vessel without provision for any overpressure protection type devices. It is recommended that the HLW canister be designed and fabricated to the requirements of the ASME Section III Code, Division 1 rules, for Code Class 3 components. Identification of other applicable industry and regulatory guides and standards are provided in this report. Requirements for the Design Specification are found in the ASME Section III Code. It is recommended that design verification be conducted principally with prototype testing which will encompass normal and accident service conditions during all phases of the canister life. Adequacy of existing quality assurance and licensing standards for the canister was investigated. One of the recommendations derived from this study is a requirement that the canister be N stamped. In addition, acceptance standards for the HLW waste should be established and the waste qualified to those standards before the canister is sealed. A preliminary investigation of use of an overpack for the canister has been made, and it is concluded that the use of an overpack, as an integral part of overall canister design, is undesirable, both from a design and economics standpoint. However, use of shipping cask liners and overpack type containers at the Federal repository may make the canister and HLW management safer and more cost effective. There are several possible concepts for canister closure design. These concepts can be adapted to the canister with or without an overpack. A remote seal weld closure is considered to be one of the most suitable closure methods; however, mechanical seals should also be investigated

  17. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This design calculation revises and updates the previous criticality evaluation for the canister handling, transfer and staging operations to be performed in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) documented in BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 167614]. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of canisters performed in the CHF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Canister Handling Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], Sections 3.1.1.3.4.13 and 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of updating the Category 1 and 2 event sequence evaluations as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). The CHF is limited in throughput capacity to handling sealed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) canisters, defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW), naval canisters, multicanister overpacks (MCOs), vertical dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), and multipurpose canisters (MPCs) (if and when they become available) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168992], p. 1-1). It should be noted that the design and safety analyses of the naval canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the CHF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility

  18. Desludging of N Reactor fuel canisters: Analysis, Test, and data requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The N Reactor fuel is currently stored in canisters in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. In KE, the canisters have open tops; in KW, the cans have sealed lids, but are vented to release gases. Corrosion products have formed on exposed uranium metal fuel, on carbon steel basin component surfaces, and on aluminum alloy canister surfaces. Much of the corrosion product is retained on the corroding surfaces; however, large inventories of particulates have been released. Some of the corrosion product particulates form sludge on the basin floors; some particulates are retained within the canisters. The floor sludge inventories are much greater in the KE Basin than in the KW Basin because KE Basin operated longer and its water chemistry was less controlled. Another important factor is the absence of lids on the KE canisters, allowing uranium corrosion products to escape and water-borne species, principally iron oxides, to settle in the canisters. The inventories of corrosion products, including those released as particulates inside the canisters, are only beginning to be characterized for the closed canisters in KW Basin. The dominant species in the KE floor sludge are oxides of aluminum, iron, and uranium. A large fraction of the aluminum and uranium floor sludge particulates may have been released during a major fuel segregation campaign in the 1980s, when fuel was emptied from 4990 canisters. Handling and jarring of the fuel and aluminum canisters seems likely to have released particulates from the heavily corroded surfaces. Four candidate methods are discussed for dealing with canister sludge emerged in the N Reactor fuel path forward: place fuel in multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) without desludging; drill holes in canisters and drain; drill holes in canisters and flush with water; and remove sludge and repackage the fuel.

  19. Mechanical integrity of canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document constitutes the final report from 'SKBs reference group for mechanical integrity of canisters for spent nuclear fuel'. A complete list of all reports initiated by the reference group can be found in the summary report in this document. The main task of the reference group has been to advice SKB regarding the choice (ranking of alternatives) of canister type for different types of storage. The choice should be based on requirements of impermeability for a given time period and identification of possible limiting mechanisms. The main conclusions from the work were: From mechanical point of view, low phosphorous oxygen free copper (Cu-OFP) is a preferred canisters material. It exhibits satisfactory ductility both during tensile and creep testing. The residual stresses in the canisters are of such a magnitude that the estimated time to creep rupture with the data obtained for the Cu-OFP material is essentially infinite. Based on the present knowledge of stress corrosion cracking of copper there appears to be a small risk for such to occur in the projected environment. This risk need some further study. Rock shear movements of the size of 10 cm should pose no direct threat to the integrity of the canisters. Considering mechanical integrity, the composite copper/steel canister is an advantageous alternative. The recommendations for further research included continued studies of the creep properties of copper and of stress corrosion cracking. However, the studies should focus more directly on the design and fabrication aspect of the canister

  20. The concrete canister program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 1974, WNRE began development and demonstration of a dry storage concept, called the concrete canister, as a possible alternative to storage of irradiated CANDU fuel in water pools. The canister is a thick-walled concrete monolith containing baskets of fuel in the dry state. The decay heat from the fuel is dissipated to the environment by natural heat transfer. Four canisters were designed and constructed. Two canisters containing electric heaters have been subjected to heat loads of 2.5 times the design, ramp heat-load cycling, and simulated weathering tests. The other two canisters were loaded with irradiated fuel, one containing fuel bundles of uniform decay heat and the other containing bundles of non-uniform decay heat in a non-symmetrical radial and axial array. The collected data were used to verify the analytical tools for prediction of effectiveness of heat transfer and radiation shielding and to verify the design of the basket and canisters. The demonstration canisters have shown that this concept is a viable alternative to water pools for the storage of irradiated CANDU fuel. (author)

  1. Design basis for the copper/steel canister. Stage four. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, W.H. [Meadow End Farm, Farnham (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    The development of the copper/iron canister which has been proposed by SKB for the containment of high level nuclear waste has been studied from the points of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and quality assurance. Cast steel has been rejected in favour of cast iron as a candidate material for the load bearing liner. Nodular (or ductile) iron is selected and this is capable of providing mechanical properties which are equally suitable as those of the originally selected high strength low alloy steel. The material specified for the overpack is Oxygen free copper with 50 ppm of phosphorus added. Corrosion studies supported by SKB indicate that in the absence of mechanical failure or accelerated localised corrosion the overpack should provide corrosion shielding of the canister for its full design life. Published work claiming that the nodular iron liner would have corrosion characteristics similar to the carbon steel which had been examined in depth is flawed since the microstructures of the iron and carbon steel specimens used were not investigated. It is highly unlikely that nodular irons in the form used for the experiments would have similar structures to nodular iron in the canisters by chance. If the overpack were breached during the aerobic period of the repository life then very rapid penetration of the inner liner could occur. It has been recognised that the roll forming method is not suitable for serial production and alternatives are being sought. The electron beam welding process has been explored with tenacity but has so far failed to produce a satisfactory lid weld. A new welder is being developed for supply to the SKB pilot plant where development will be continued. An alternative welding process, friction stir welding, is being examined as a candidate for attaching lids. Surface breaking defects may be detected using eddy current methods but there is currently no reliable way of detecting small sub surface defects in the overpack

  2. Design basis for the copper/steel canister. Stage four. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the copper/iron canister which has been proposed by SKB for the containment of high level nuclear waste has been studied from the points of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and quality assurance. Cast steel has been rejected in favour of cast iron as a candidate material for the load bearing liner. Nodular (or ductile) iron is selected and this is capable of providing mechanical properties which are equally suitable as those of the originally selected high strength low alloy steel. The material specified for the overpack is Oxygen free copper with 50 ppm of phosphorus added. Corrosion studies supported by SKB indicate that in the absence of mechanical failure or accelerated localised corrosion the overpack should provide corrosion shielding of the canister for its full design life. Published work claiming that the nodular iron liner would have corrosion characteristics similar to the carbon steel which had been examined in depth is flawed since the microstructures of the iron and carbon steel specimens used were not investigated. It is highly unlikely that nodular irons in the form used for the experiments would have similar structures to nodular iron in the canisters by chance. If the overpack were breached during the aerobic period of the repository life then very rapid penetration of the inner liner could occur. It has been recognised that the roll forming method is not suitable for serial production and alternatives are being sought. The electron beam welding process has been explored with tenacity but has so far failed to produce a satisfactory lid weld. A new welder is being developed for supply to the SKB pilot plant where development will be continued. An alternative welding process, friction stir welding, is being examined as a candidate for attaching lids. Surface breaking defects may be detected using eddy current methods but there is currently no reliable way of detecting small sub surface defects in the overpack

  3. Interim Storage of RH-TRU 72B Canisters at the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an evaluation performed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) office for potential interim storage of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) 72B waste canisters at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The evaluation included the conceptual design of a devoted canister storage facility and an assessment of the existing RHTRU waste storage facilities for storage of canisters. The concept for the devoted facility used modular concrete silos located on an above-grade storage pad. The assessment of the existing facilities considered the potential methods, facility modifications, and conceptual equipment that might be used for storage of 400 millisievert per hour (mSv/hr) canisters. The results of the evaluation indicated that the initial investment into a devoted facility was relatively high as compared to the certainty that significant storage capacity was necessary prior to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) accepting RH-TRU waste for disposal. As an alternative, the use of individual concrete overpacks provided an incremental method that could be used with the existing storage facilities and outside storage pads. For the concrete overpack concepts considered, the cylindrical design stored in a vertical orientation was determined to be the most effective

  4. Materials for Consideration in Standardized Canister Design Activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Ilgen, Anastasia Gennadyevna; Enos, David George; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01

    This document identifies materials and material mitigation processes that might be used in new designs for standardized canisters for storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. It also addresses potential corrosion issues with existing dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) that could be addressed in new canister designs. The major potential corrosion risk during storage is stress corrosion cracking of the weld regions on the 304 SS/316 SS canister shell due to deliquescence of chloride salts on the surface. Two approaches are proposed to alleviate this potential risk. First, the existing canister materials (304 and 316 SS) could be used, but the welds mitigated to relieve residual stresses and/or sensitization. Alternatively, more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic or duplex stainless steels, could be used. Experimental testing is needed to verify that these alternatives would successfully reduce the risk of stress corrosion cracking during fuel storage. For disposal in a geologic repository, the canister will be enclosed in a corrosion-resistant or corrosion-allowance overpack that will provide barrier capability and mechanical strength. The canister shell will no longer have a barrier function and its containment integrity can be ignored. The basket and neutron absorbers within the canister have the important role of limiting the possibility of post-closure criticality. The time period for corrosion is much longer in the post-closure period, and one major unanswered question is whether the basket materials will corrode slowly enough to maintain structural integrity for at least 10,000 years. Whereas there is extensive literature on stainless steels, this evaluation recommends testing of 304 and 316 SS, and more corrosion-resistant steels such as super-austenitic, duplex, and super-duplex stainless steels, at repository-relevant physical and chemical conditions. Both general and localized corrosion testing methods would be used to

  5. CANISTER TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-23

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling

  6. ALARA Analysis for Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Fuel Storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, M E

    2000-01-01

    The addition of Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assembly storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) will increase the total cumulative CSB personnel exposure from receipt and handling activities. The loaded Shippingport Spent Fuel Canisters (SSFCs) used for the Shippingport fuel have a higher external dose rate. Assuming an MCO handling rate of 170 per year (K East and K West concurrent operation), 24-hr CSB operation, and nominal SSFC loading, all work crew personnel will have a cumulative annual exposure of less than the 1,000 mrem limit.

  7. Improved Air-Treatment Canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed air-treatment canister integrates a heater-in-tube water evaporator into canister header. Improved design prevents water from condensing and contaminating chemicals that regenerate the air. Heater is evenly spiraled about the inlet header on the canister. Evaporator is brazed to the header.

  8. Status report, canister fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Claes-Goeran; Eriksson, Peter; Westman, Marika [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Emilsson, Goeran [CSM Materialteknik AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2004-06-01

    The report gives an account of the development of material and fabrication technology for copper canisters with cast inserts during the period from 2000 until the start of 2004. The engineering design of the canister and the choice of materials in the constituent components described in previous status reports have not been significantly changed. In the reference canister, the thickness of the copper shell is 50 mm. Fabrication of individual components with a thinner copper thickness is done for the purpose of gaining experience and evaluating fabrication and inspection methods for such canisters. As a part of the development of cast inserts, computer simulations of the casting processes and techniques used at the foundries have been performed for the purpose of optimizing the material properties. These properties have been evaluated by extensive tensile testing and metallographic inspection of test material taken from discs cut at different points along the length of the inserts. The testing results exhibit a relatively large spread. Low elongation values in certain tensile test specimens are due to the presence of poorly formed graphite, porosities, slag or other casting defects. It is concluded in the report that it will not be possible to avoid some presence of observed defects in castings of this size. In the deep repository, the inserts will be exposed to compressive loading and the observed defects are not critical for strength. An analysis of the strength of the inserts and formulation of relevant material requirements must be based on a statistical approach with probabilistic calculations. This work has been initiated and will be concluded during 2004. An initial verifying compression test of a canister in an isostatic press has indicated considerable overstrength in the structure. Seamless copper tubes are fabricated by means of three methods: extrusion, pierce and draw processing, and forging. It can be concluded that extrusion tests have revealed a

  9. Status report, canister fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives an account of the development of material and fabrication technology for copper canisters with cast inserts during the period from 2000 until the start of 2004. The engineering design of the canister and the choice of materials in the constituent components described in previous status reports have not been significantly changed. In the reference canister, the thickness of the copper shell is 50 mm. Fabrication of individual components with a thinner copper thickness is done for the purpose of gaining experience and evaluating fabrication and inspection methods for such canisters. As a part of the development of cast inserts, computer simulations of the casting processes and techniques used at the foundries have been performed for the purpose of optimizing the material properties. These properties have been evaluated by extensive tensile testing and metallographic inspection of test material taken from discs cut at different points along the length of the inserts. The testing results exhibit a relatively large spread. Low elongation values in certain tensile test specimens are due to the presence of poorly formed graphite, porosities, slag or other casting defects. It is concluded in the report that it will not be possible to avoid some presence of observed defects in castings of this size. In the deep repository, the inserts will be exposed to compressive loading and the observed defects are not critical for strength. An analysis of the strength of the inserts and formulation of relevant material requirements must be based on a statistical approach with probabilistic calculations. This work has been initiated and will be concluded during 2004. An initial verifying compression test of a canister in an isostatic press has indicated considerable overstrength in the structure. Seamless copper tubes are fabricated by means of three methods: extrusion, pierce and draw processing, and forging. It can be concluded that extrusion tests have revealed a

  10. Design review report for the MCO loading system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisbin, S.A.

    1997-06-23

    This design report presents the design of the MCO Loading System. The report includes final design drawings, a system description, failure modes and recovery plans, a system operational description, and stress analysis.

  11. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Takahiko; Tanai, Kenji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  12. Moisture insensitive charcoal canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continuous monitoring of 222Rn concentrations in the air in houses is the most appropriate approach for the real-time measurements, but this requires complex and expensive instruments and is not practical for large studies. Activated carbon canisters have been used extensively for determining the average concentration over a period of a few days. The ''open face'' charcoal detectors have an integration time constant of about 14 h so that they are sensitive to short-term transient changes in the radon concentration. In addition, water uptake at high relative humidities reduces the radon uptake by the charcoal. The addition of a diffusion barrier and a nylon screen results in a charcoal detector with an integration half-time ranging from 20 to 60 h and a reduced uptake of water at high humidities. Silicone rubber sheeting is relatively permeable to radon and impermeable to water vapor. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the effect of a silicone barrier on the charcoal canister radon collective device. 3 refs

  13. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT COST COMPARISON BETWEEN HYDRAULIC LOADING AND SMALL CANISTER LOADING CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GEUTHER J; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER D

    2009-08-24

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is considering two different concepts for the retrieval, loading, transport and interim storage of the K Basin sludge. The two design concepts under consideration are: (1) Hydraulic Loading Concept - In the hydraulic loading concept, the sludge is retrieved from the Engineered Containers directly into the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) while located in the STS cask in the modified KW Basin Annex. The sludge is loaded via a series of transfer, settle, decant, and filtration return steps until the STSC sludge transportation limits are met. The STSC is then transported to T Plant and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. (2) Small Canister Concept - In the small canister concept, the sludge is transferred from the Engineered Containers (ECs) into a settling vessel. After settling and decanting, the sludge is loaded underwater into small canisters. The small canisters are then transferred to the existing Fuel Transport System (FTS) where they are loaded underwater into the FTS Shielded Transfer Cask (STC). The STC is raised from the basin and placed into the Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO), loaded onto the trailer in the KW Basin Annex for transport to T Plant. At T Plant, the CTO is removed from the transport trailer and placed on the canyon deck. The CTO and STC are opened and the small canisters are removed using the canyon crane and placed into an STSC. The STSC is closed, and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. The purpose of the cost estimate is to provide a comparison of the two concepts described.

  14. Canister compatibility with Carlsbad salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No significant reaction was found when candidate canister alloys were heated with salt from Carlsbad, New Mexico, for up to 5000 hours in sealed capsules and for up to 10,000 hours in unsealed capsules at temperatures (80 to 2250C) that bracket the maximum temperature calculated for reference Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste containers at 20-foot spacings in salt. Additional tests were made at 6000C in sealed capsules to characterize reactions that may occur between candidate canister alloys and any component of the salt that is released when decrepitation occurs. Under these extreme conditions there was no significant attack of Type 304L stainless steel. But, there was up to 20-mils attack of the low-carbon steel

  15. Canister Transfer Facility Criticality Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Monroe-Rammsy

    2000-10-13

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the criticality risk in the surface facility for design basis events (DBE) involving Department of Energy (DOE) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) standardized canisters (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 2000a). Since some of the canisters will be stored in the surface facility before they are loaded in the waste package (WP), this calculation supports the demonstration of concept viability related to the Surface Facility environment. The scope of this calculation is limited to the consideration of three DOE SNF fuels, specifically Enrico Fermi SNF, Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA) SNF, and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF.

  16. Criticality safety evaluation report for spent nuclear fuelprocessing and storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially- built baskets containing either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the MCO/Cask, operations at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), and storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the k{sub eff} @ 0.95 criticality safety limit.

  17. Spent fuel canister docking station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikki, M. [Afore Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2006-01-15

    The working report for the spent fuel canister docking station presents a design for the operation and structure of the docking equipment located in the fuel handling cell for the spent fuel in the encapsulation plant. The report contains a description of the basic requirements for the docking station equipment and their implementation, the operation of the equipment, maintenance and a cost estimate. In the designing of the equipment all the problems related with the operation have been solved at the level of principle, nevertheless, detailed designing and the selection of final components have not yet been carried out. In case of defects and failures, solutions have been considered for postulated problems, and furthermore, the entire equipment was gone through by the means of systematic risk analysis (PFMEA). During the docking station designing we came across with needs to influence the structure of the actual disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel, too. Proposed changes for the structure of the steel lid fastening screw were included in the report. The report also contains a description of installation with the fuel handling cell structures. The purpose of the docking station for the fuel handling cell is to position and to seal the disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel into a penetration located on the cell floor and to provide suitable means for executing the loading of the disposal canister and the changing of atmosphere. The designed docking station consists of a docking ring, a covering hatch, a protective cone and an atmosphere-changing cap as well as the vacuum technology pertaining to the changing of atmosphere and the inert gas system. As far as the solutions are concerned, we have arrived at rather simple structures and most of the actuators of the system are situated outside of the actual fuel handling cell. When necessary, the equipment can also be used for the dismantling of a faulty disposal canister, cut from its upper end by machining. The

  18. Thermal considerations for overpack designs in drum packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensel, S.; Gromada, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    The design of the overpacks in drum packages, both in terms of thickness and materials of construction, greatly impact the ability of the package to accommodate heat source contents. The optimum overpack thermal protection needed is that which results in the lowest containment vessel temperature during both Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) and Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). For heat source packages, the use of very good or high efficiency insulating materials such as fiberboard and polyurethane results in high containment vessel temperatures during both NCT and HAC. Using a more modest or low efficiency insulating material would reduce the NCT and HAC material such as oak (low efficiency) would maintain a containment vessel with a content of 100 watts at a fraction of the temperature reported for very good or high efficiency insulating materials. Four inches of oak can prevent the containment vessel from exceeding 500{degrees}F during both NCT and HAC with 100 watts of contents, whereas using a high efficiency material the vessel would exceed 1000{degrees}F. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Advantages and limitations of navigation-based multicriteria optimization (MCO) for localized prostate cancer IMRT planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGarry, Conor K., E-mail: conor.mcgarry@belfasttrust.hscni.net [Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Bokrantz, Rasmus [Optimization and Systems Theory, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm (Sweden); O’Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Efficacy of inverse planning is becoming increasingly important for advanced radiotherapy techniques. This study’s aims were to validate multicriteria optimization (MCO) in RayStation (v2.4, RaySearch Laboratories, Sweden) against standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) optimization in Oncentra (v4.1, Nucletron BV, the Netherlands) and characterize dose differences due to conversion of navigated MCO plans into deliverable multileaf collimator apertures. Step-and-shoot IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer using both standard optimization and MCO. Acceptable standard IMRT plans with minimal average rectal dose were chosen for comparison with deliverable MCO plans. The trade-off was, for the MCO plans, managed through a user interface that permits continuous navigation between fluence-based plans. Navigated MCO plans were made deliverable at incremental steps along a trajectory between maximal target homogeneity and maximal rectal sparing. Dosimetric differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans were also quantified. MCO plans, chosen as acceptable under navigated and deliverable conditions resulted in similar rectal sparing compared with standard optimization (33.7 ± 1.8 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.117). The dose differences between navigated and deliverable MCO plans increased as higher priority was placed on rectal avoidance. If the best possible deliverable MCO was chosen, a significant reduction in rectal dose was observed in comparison with standard optimization (30.6 ± 1.4 Gy vs 35.5 ± 4.2 Gy, p = 0.047). Improvements were, however, to some extent, at the expense of less conformal dose distributions, which resulted in significantly higher doses to the bladder for 2 of the 3 tolerance levels. In conclusion, similar IMRT plans can be created for patients with prostate cancer using MCO compared with standard optimization. Limitations exist within MCO regarding conversion of navigated plans to

  20. Canister Storage Building (CSB) safety analysis report, phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy established the K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel Project to address safety and environmental concerns associated with deteriorating spent nuclear fuel presently stored under water in the Hanford Site's K Basins, which are located near the Columbia River. Recommendations for a series of aggressive projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to manage the safe removal of K Basins fuel were made in WHC-EP-0830, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Recommended Path Forward, and its subsequent update, WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Fuel. The integrated process strategy recommendations include the following steps: Fuel preparation activities at the K Basins, including removing the fuel elements from their K Basin canisters, separating fuel particulate from fuel elements and fuel fragments greater than 0.6 cm (0.25 in.) in any dimension, removing excess sludge from the fuel and fuel fragments by means of flushing, as necessary, and packaging the fuel into multicanister overpacks (MCOs); Removal of free water by draining and vacuum drying at a cold vacuum drying facility ES-122; Dry shipment of fuel from the Cold Vacuum Drying to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), a new facility in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site

  1. Inspection of disposal canisters components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the inspection techniques of disposal canister components. Manufacturing methods and a description of the defects related to different manufacturing methods are described briefly. The defect types form a basis for the design of non-destructive testing because the defect types, which occur in the inspected components, affect to choice of inspection methods. The canister components are to nodular cast iron insert, steel lid, lid screw, metal gasket, copper tube with integrated or separate bottom, and copper lid. The inspection of copper material is challenging due to the anisotropic properties of the material and local changes in the grain size of the copper material. The cast iron insert has some acoustical material property variation (attenuation, velocity changes, scattering properties), which make the ultrasonic inspection demanding from calibration point of view. Mainly three different methods are used for inspection. Ultrasonic testing technique is used for inspection of volume, eddy current technique, for copper components only, and visual testing technique are used for inspection of the surface and near surface area

  2. Creep properties of EB welded copper overpack at 125-175 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron Beam welds (EBW) chosen as primary sealing method by Posiva welding the over-pack canister lids of oxygen-free phosphorus micro-alloyed copper (OFP) have been tested for material properties relevant to long term creep life prediction. Creep rupture results are presented for the ruptured 175 deg C tests and for the ongoing long term tests at 150 deg C and 125 deg C. The current status (test time, creep strain and strain rate) of the ongoing tests are reported. The initial (175 deg C) results indicate that the EB welds are weaker than the parent material and that both round bar and spark eroded square test specimens produce weld strengths of about 0.75 at tests durations of 5000 h. The downward trend is however expected to continue for the longer test durations. The creep ductility shows decrease for the longer tests. Life estimates for the EB weld have been calculated at 100 deg C for both 50 and 80 MPa with the so far lowest measured EB weld strength factor (WSF=0.77). The state-of-the-art model on the available data give estimated lives of 21000 and 3000 years correspondingly. However, simulated to the expected temperature profile of the repository service the life fraction reached after 10000 years of service is 1 % and 7 % for the same stress levels. It is though important to remembered that the 80 MPa assumption is very conservative in nature and that the predictions do not take into account relaxation of stresses, further decline of the WSF or anisotropy of the weld and are therefore still to be considered indicative only. It is also to be remembered that there is only limited data in the long term regime for the weldments and that the estimates are based on the few EB data available in the public domain added with the Posiva data of this project. Improvement of the models and predictions are expected from the ongoing 125 deg C and 150 deg C long term tests. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of K west basin canister gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimble, D.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Gas and Liquid samples have been collected from a selection of the approximately 3,820 spent fuel storage canisters in the K West Basin. The samples were taken to characterize the contents of the gas and water in the canisters providing source term information for two subprojects of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) (Fulton 1994): the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment System Subproject (Ball 1996) and the K Basins Fuel Retrieval System Subproject (Waymire 1996). The barrels of ten canisters were sampled for gas and liquid in 1995, and 50 canisters were sampled in a second campaign in 1996. The analysis results from the first campaign have been reported (Trimble 1995a, 1995b, 1996a, 1996b). The analysis results from the second campaign liquid samples have been documented (Trimble and Welsh 1997; Trimble 1997). This report documents the results for the gas samples from the second campaign and evaluates all gas data in terms of expected releases when opening the canisters for SNFP activities. The fuel storage canisters consist of two closed and sealed barrels, each with a gas trap. The barrels are attached at a trunion to make a canister, but are otherwise independent (Figure 1). Each barrel contains up to seven N Reactor fuel element assemblies. A gas space of nitrogen was established in the top 2.2 to 2.5 inches (5.6 to 6.4 cm) of each barrel. Many of the fuel elements were damaged allowing the metallic uranium fuel to be corroded by the canister water. The corrosion releases fission products and generates hydrogen gas. The released gas mixes with the gas-space gas and excess gas passes through the gas trap into the basin water. The canister design does not allow canister water to be exchanged with basin water.

  4. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Beesley

    2005-04-21

    The purpose of this facility description document (FDD) is to establish requirements and associated bases that drive the design of the Canister Handling Facility (CHF), which will allow the design effort to proceed to license application. This FDD will be revised at strategic points as the design matures. This FDD identifies the requirements and describes the facility design, as it currently exists, with emphasis on attributes of the design provided to meet the requirements. This FDD is an engineering tool for design control; accordingly, the primary audience and users are design engineers. This FDD is part of an iterative design process. It leads the design process with regard to the flowdown of upper tier requirements onto the facility. Knowledge of these requirements is essential in performing the design process. The FDD follows the design with regard to the description of the facility. The description provided in this FDD reflects the current results of the design process.

  5. Thermal analysis of cold vacuum drying of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepho, M.G.

    1998-07-20

    The thermal analysis examined transient thermal and chemical behavior of the Multi canister Overpack (MCO) container for a broad range of cases that represent the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) processes. The cases were defined to consider both normal and off-normal operations at the CVD Facility for an MCO with Mark IV N, Reactor spent fuel in four fuel baskets and one scrap basket. This analysis provides the basis for the MCO thermal behavior at the CVD Facility for its Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (revision 4).

  6. Conceptual designs of radioactive canister transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This report covers conceptual designs of transporters for the vertical, horizontal, and inclined installation of canisters containing spent-fuel elements, high-level waste, cladding waste, and intermediate-level waste (low-level waste is not discussed). Included in the discussion are cask concepts; transporter vehicle designs; concepts for mechanisms for handling and manipulating casks, canisters, and concrete plugs; transporter and repository operating cycles; shielding calculations; operator radiation dosages; radiation-resistant materials; and criteria for future design efforts.

  7. Am/Cm canister temperature evaluation in CIM5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the evaluation of alternate canister designs, 2 canisters were outfitted with thermocouples at elevations of 1/2, 3 1/2, and 6 1/2 inches from the canister bottom. The canisters were fabricated from two inch diameter schedule 10 and two inch diameter schedule 40 stainless steel pipe. Each canister was filled with approximately 2 kilograms of 49 wt percent lanthanide (Ln) loaded 25SrABS glass during 5 inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) runs for TTR Tasks 3.03 and 4.03. Melter temperature, total mass of glass poured, and the glass pour rates were almost identical in both runs. The schedule 40 canister has a slightly smaller ID compared to the schedule 10 canister and therefore filled to a level of 9.5 inches compared to 8.0 inches for the schedule 40 canister. The schedule 40 canister had an empty mass of 1906 grams compared to 919 grams for the schedule 10 canister. The schedule 10 canister was found to have a higher maximum surface temperature by about 50--100 C (depending on height) during the glass pour compared to the schedule 40 canister. The additional thermal mass of the schedule 40 canister accounts for this difference. Once filled with glass, each of the canisters cooled at about the same rate, taking about an hour to cool below a maximum surface temperature of 200 C. No significant deformation of the either of the canisters was visually observed

  8. 40 CFR 265.316 - Disposal of small containers of hazardous waste in overpacked drums (lab packs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills § 265.316 Disposal of small containers of hazardous waste in overpacked drums (lab packs). Small containers of hazardous waste... hazardous waste in overpacked drums (lab packs). 265.316 Section 265.316 Protection of...

  9. Development of an overpack for the storage of high-level waste in Swiss granitic bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current programs aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of safe final disposal of high-level nuclear waste in Switzerland envisage a repository in the crystalline bedrock of the north of the country. The groundwater is reducing, with a mineralization of typically 10 g·L-1. The corrosion studies carried out in Switzerland have shown that unalloyed steel is a suitable overpack material under the conditions expected in the repository. The necessary corrosion allowance for a lifetime of 1000 years is 50 mm. Design work, based on the use of a typical cast steel with a tensile strength of 400 MN·m-2, has led to a reference overpack concept for a disposal of vitrified HLW. This reference overpack is designed as a self-shielding, self-supporting, cylindrical shell with hemispherical ends. 16 refs

  10. Remote controlled mover for disposal canister transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikki, M. [Optimik Oy, Turku (Finland)

    2013-10-15

    This working report is an update for an earlier automatic guided vehicle design (Pietikaeinen 2003). The short horizontal transfers of disposal canisters manufactured in the encapsulation process are conducted with remote controlled movers both in the encapsulation plant and in the underground areas at the canister loading station of the disposal facility. The canister mover is a remote controlled transfer vehicle mobile on wheels. The handling of canisters is conducted with the assistance of transport platforms (pallets). The very small automatic guided vehicle of the earlier design was replaced with a commercial type mover. The most important reasons for this being the increased loadbearing requirement and the simpler, proven technology of the vehicle. The larger size of the vehicle induced changes to the plant layouts and in the principles for dealing with fault conditions. The selected mover is a vehicle, which is normally operated from alongside. In this application, the vehicle steering technology must be remote controlled. In addition, the area utilization must be as efficient as possible. This is why the vehicle was downsized in its outer dimensions and supplemented with certain auxiliary equipment and structures. This enables both remote controlled operation and improves the vehicle in terms of its failure tolerance. Operation of the vehicle was subjected to a risk analysis (PFMEA) and to a separate additional calculation conserning possible canister toppling risks. The total cost estimate, without value added tax for manufacturing the system amounts to 730 000 euros. (orig.)

  11. Chemical compatibility of DWPF canistered waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require that the contents of the canistered waste form are compatible with one another and the stainless steel canister. The canistered waste form is a closed system comprised of a stainless steel vessel containing waste glass, air, and condensate. This system will experience a radiation field and an elevated temperature due to radionuclide decay. This report discusses possible chemical reactions, radiation interactions, and corrosive reactions within this system both under normal storage conditions and after exposure to temperatures up to the normal glass transition temperature, which for DWPF waste glass will be between 440 and 460 degrees C. Specific conclusions regarding reactions and corrosion are provided. This document is based on the assumption that the period of interim storage prior to packaging at the federal repository may be as long as 50 years

  12. Hydrogen combustion in an MCO during interim storage (fauske and associates report 99-14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-05-12

    Flammable conditions are not expected to develop in an MCO during interim storage. This report considers potential phenomena which, although not expected t o occur, could lead t o flammable conditions. For example, reactions of hydrogen w i t h fuel over decades a r e postulated t o lead t o flammable atmospheric mixtures. For the extreme cases considered in this report, the highest attainable post-combustion pressure is about 13 atmospheres absolute, almost a factor of two and a half below the MCO design pressure of 31 atmospheres.

  13. Studies of waste-canister compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compatibility studies were conducted between 7 waste forms and 15 potential canister structural materials. The waste forms were Al-Si and Pb-Sn matrix alloys, FUETAP, glass, Synroc D, and waste particles coated with carbon or carbon plus silicon carbide. The canister materials included carbon steel (bare and with chromium or nickel coatings), copper, Monel, Cu-35% Ni, titanium (grades 2 and 12), several Inconels, aluminum alloy 5052, and two stainless steels. Tests of either 6888 or 8821 h were conducted at 100 and 3000C, which bracket the low and high limits expected during storage. Glass and FUETAP evolved sulfur, which reacted preferentially with copper, nickel, and alloys of these metals. The Pb-Sn matrix alloy stuck to all samples and the carbon-coated particles to most samples at 3000C, but the extent of chemical reaction was not determined. Testing for 0.5 h at 8000C was included because it is representative of a transportation accident and is required of casks containing nuclear materials. During these tests (1) glass and FUETAP evolved sulfur, (2) FUETAP evolved large amounts of gas, (3) Synroc stuck to titanium alloys, (4) glass was molten, and (5) both matrix alloys were molten with considerable chemical interactions with many of the canister samples. If this test condition were imposed on waste canisters, it would be design limiting in many waste storage concepts

  14. Drop Calculations of HLW Canister and Pu Can-in-Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-07-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (Pu) (''can-in-canister'' [CIC] throughout this document) subjected to drop DBEs (design basis events) during the handling operation. The evaluated DBE in the former case is 7-m (23-ft) vertical (flat-bottom) drop. In the latter case, two 2-ft (0.61-m) corner (oblique) drops are evaluated in addition to the 7-m vertical drop. These Pu CIC calculations are performed at three different temperatures: room temperature (RT) (20 C ), T = 200 F = 93.3 C , and T = 400 F = 204 C ; in addition to these the calculation characterized by the highest maximum stress intensity is performed at T = 750 F = 399 C as well. The scope of the HLW canister calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of: stress intensity and effective plastic strain in the canister, directional residual strains at the canister outer surface, and change of canister dimensions. The scope of Pu CIC calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity, and effective plastic strain in the canister. The information provided by the sketches from Reference 26 (Attachments 5.3,5.5,5.8, and 5.9) is that of the potential CIC design considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the Plutonium Immobilization Project and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. It should be noted that the 9-m vertical drop DBE, included in Reference 24, is not included in the objective of this calculation since it did not become a waste acceptance requirement. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document.

  15. Design review report for the Hanford K East and K West Basins MCO loading system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisbin, S.A.

    1997-10-28

    This design report presents the final design of the MCO Loading System. The report includes final design drawings, a system description, failure modes and recovery plans, a system operational description, and stress analysis. Design comments from the final design review have been incorporated.

  16. Design review report for the Hanford K East and K West Basins MCO loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This design report presents the final design of the MCO Loading System. The report includes final design drawings, a system description, failure modes and recovery plans, a system operational description, and stress analysis. Design comments from the final design review have been incorporated

  17. Groundwork for Universal Canister System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Laura L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gross, Mike [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prouty, Jeralyn L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rigali, Mark J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Craig, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Han, Zenghu [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lee, John Hok [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liu, Yung [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Pope, Ron [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Connolly, Kevin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feldman, Matt [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jarrell, Josh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Radulescu, Georgeta [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Alan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development and go vernment - sponsored nuclear energy re search. S ome of the waste s that that must be managed have be en identified as good candidates for disposal in a deep borehole in crystalline rock (SNL 2014 a). In particular, wastes that can be disposed of in a small package are good candidates for this disposal concept. A canister - based system that can be used for handling these wastes during the disposition process (i.e., storage, transfers, transportation, and disposal) could facilitate the eventual disposal of these wastes. This report provides information for a program plan for developing specifications regarding a canister - based system that facilitates small waste form packaging and disposal and that is integrated with the overall efforts of the DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy Used Fuel Dis position Camp aign's Deep Borehole Field Test . Groundwork for Universal Ca nister System Development September 2015 ii W astes to be considered as candidates for the universal canister system include capsules containing cesium and strontium currently stored in pools at the Hanford Site, cesium to be processed using elutable or nonelutable resins at the Hanford Site, and calcine waste from Idaho National Laboratory. The initial emphasis will be on disposal of the cesium and strontium capsules in a deep borehole that has been drilled into crystalline rock. Specifications for a universal canister system are derived from operational, performance, and regulatory requirements for storage, transfers, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. Agreements between the Department of Energy and the States of Washington and Idaho, as well as the Deep Borehole Field Test plan provide schedule requirements for development of the universal canister system

  18. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY - VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONING ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the necessary airflow distribution used to size the HVAC equipment for the Canister Handling Facility. These results will be compared to the Heating and Cooling Load Calculation in detailed design. The calculations contained in this document were developed by DandE/Mechanical HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the DandE/Mechanical HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Canister Handling Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the DandE/Mechanical HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in DandE/Mechanical HVAC department

  19. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY - VENTILATION AIR CALCULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone for the Canister Handling Facility (CHF). The results of this document will be used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The analyses contained in this document are developed by D and E/Mechanical HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical HVAC in its work regarding Confinement Zoning Analysis for the Canister Handling Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from D and E/Mechanical HVAC should be consulted before use of the analyses for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical HVAC

  20. COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS MODEL FOR DWPF CANISTER FILLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesterson, M.

    2011-03-31

    The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters during filling and cooldown. Past attempts to model these processes resulted in large (>200K) differences in predicted temperatures compared to experimentally measured temperatures. This work was therefore intended to also generate a model capable of reproducing the experimentally measured trends of the glass/canister temperature during filling and subsequent cooldown of DWPF canisters. To accomplish this, a simplified model was created using the finite element modeling software COMSOL Multiphysics which accepts user defined constants or expressions to describe material properties. The model results were compared to existing experimental data for validation. A COMSOL Multiphysics model was developed to predict temperatures of the glass within DWPF canisters during filling and cooldown. The model simulations and experimental data were in good agreement. The largest temperature deviations were {approx}40 C for the 87inch thermocouple location at 3000 minutes and during the initial cooldown at the 51 inch location occurring at approximately 600 minutes. Additionally, the model described in this report predicts the general trends in temperatures during filling and cooling observed experimentally. However, the model was developed using parameters designed to fit a single set of experimental data. Therefore, Q-loss is not currently a function of pour rate and pour temperature. Future work utilizing the existing model should include modifying the Q-loss term to be variable based on flow rate and pour temperature. Further enhancements could include eliminating the Q-loss term for a user defined convection where Navier-Stokes does not need to be solved in order to have convection heat transfer.

  1. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report

  2. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahn, D.E.; Garvin, L.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the final CSB safety analysis report (SAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Report, and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY (OSU) TRAINING RESEARCH ISOTOPE GENERAL ATOMICS (TRIGA) OVERPACK CLOSURE WELDING PROCESS PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT and QUALIFICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA(regsign) Reactor is currently being stored in thirteen 55-gallon drums at the Hanford Site's low-level burial grounds. This fuel is soon to be retrieved from buried storage and packaged into new containers (overpacks) for interim storage at the Hanford Interim Storage Area (ISA). One of the key activities associated with this effort is final closure of the overpack by welding. The OSU fuel is placed into an overpack, a head inserted into the overpack top, and welded closed. Weld quality, for typical welded fabrication, is established through post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE); however, in this case, once the SNF is placed into the overpack, routine testing and NDE are not feasible. An alternate approach is to develop and qualify the welding process/parameters, demonstrate beforehand that they produce the desired weld quality, and then verify parameter compliance during production welding. Fluor engineers have developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrating that weld quality requirements for closure of packaged SNF overpacks are met, using this alternate approach. The following reviews the activities performed for this development and qualification effort

  4. TtMCO: A highly thermostable laccase-like multicopper oxidase from the thermophilic Thermobaculum terrenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Søren; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the identification, heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and characterization of TtMCO from the thermophilic bacterium Thermobaculum terrenum, the first laccase-like multi-copper oxidase (LMCO) from the distinct Phylum Chloroflexi. TtMCO has only 39% identity to its clos...... closest characterized homologue, CotA from Bacillus subtilis, but sequence and spectrophotometry confirmed copper coordination similar to that of LMCOs. TtMCO is extremely thermophilic with a half-time of inactivation of 2.24 days at 70 degrees C and 350 min at 80°C and pH 7, consistent...... with a hyperthermal habitat of the host. TtMCO was screened for activity against 56 chemically diverse substrates. It displayed limited activity on classical LMCO substrates, such as e.g. phenolics, transition metals, or bilirubin. Highest activities were observed for nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds, i.e. 1...

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Newman, Roger (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    2010-12-15

    A critical review is presented of the possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper canisters in a deep geological repository in the Fennoscandian Shield. Each of the four main mechanisms proposed for the SCC of pure copper are reviewed and the required conditions for cracking compared with the expected environmental and mechanical loading conditions within the repository. Other possible mechanisms are also considered, as are recent studies specifically directed towards the SCC of copper canisters. The aim of the review is to determine if and when during the evolution of the repository environment copper canisters might be susceptible to SCC. Mechanisms that require a degree of oxidation or dissolution are only possible whilst oxidant is present in the repository and then only if other environmental and mechanical loading conditions are satisfied. These constraints are found to limit the period during which the canisters could be susceptible to cracking via film rupture (slip dissolution) or tarnish rupture mechanisms to the first few years after deposition of the canisters, at which time there will be insufficient SCC agent (ammonia, acetate, or nitrite) to support cracking. During the anaerobic phase, the supply of sulphide ions to the free surface will be transport limited by diffusion through the highly compacted bentonite. Therefore, no HS. will enter the crack and cracking by either of these mechanisms during the long term anaerobic phase is not feasible. Cracking via the film-induced cleavage mechanism requires a surface film of specific properties, most often associated with a nano porous structure. Slow rates of dissolution characteristic of processes in the repository will tend to coarsen any nano porous layer. Under some circumstances, a cuprous oxide film could support film-induced cleavage, but there is no evidence that this mechanism would operate in the presence of sulphide during the long-term anaerobic period because copper sulphide

  6. Testing in support of on-site storage of residues in the Pipe Overpack Container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plans call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. It is desirable to use this same waste packaging for interim on-site storage in non-hardened buildings. To meet the safety concerns for this storage the Pipe Overpack Container has been subjected to a series of tests at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In addition to the tests required to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II several tests were performed solely for the purpose of qualifying the container for interim storage. This report will describe these tests and the packages response to the tests. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  8. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.T. Dexheimer

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, perform associated equipment maintenance. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the CHF and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  9. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, perform associated equipment maintenance. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the CHF and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application

  10. Canister storage building trade study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of several technical issues related to the usage of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) to safely stage and store N-Reactor spent fuel currently located at K-Basin 100KW and 100KE. Each technical issue formed the basis for an individual trade study used to develop the ROM cost and schedule estimates. The study used concept 2D from the Fluor prepared ``Staging and Storage Facility (SSF) Feasibility Report`` as the basis for development of the individual trade studies.

  11. Canister storage building trade study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of several technical issues related to the usage of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) to safely stage and store N-Reactor spent fuel currently located at K-Basin 100KW and 100KE. Each technical issue formed the basis for an individual trade study used to develop the ROM cost and schedule estimates. The study used concept 2D from the Fluor prepared ''Staging and Storage Facility (SSF) Feasibility Report'' as the basis for development of the individual trade studies

  12. EVALUATION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DWPF HIGHER CAPACITY CANISTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.; Estochen, E.; Jordan, J.; Kesterson, M.; Mckeel, C.

    2014-08-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is considering the option to increase canister glass capacity by reducing the wall thickness of the current production canister. This design has been designated as the DWPF Higher Capacity Canister (HCC). A significant decrease in the number of canisters processed during the life of the facility would be achieved if the HCC were implemented leading to a reduced overall reduction in life cycle costs. Prior to implementation of the change, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct an evaluation of the potential impacts. The specific areas of interest included loading and deformation of the canister during the filling process. Additionally, the effect of the reduced wall thickness on corrosion and material compatibility needed to be addressed. Finally the integrity of the canister during decontamination and other handling steps needed to be determined. The initial request regarding canister fabrication was later addressed in an alternate study. A preliminary review of canister requirements and previous testing was conducted prior to determining the testing approach. Thermal and stress models were developed to predict the forces on the canister during the pouring and cooling process. The thermal model shows the HCC increasing and decreasing in temperature at a slightly faster rate than the original. The HCC is shown to have a 3°F ΔT between the internal and outer surfaces versus a 5°F ΔT for the original design. The stress model indicates strain values ranging from 1.9% to 2.9% for the standard canister and 2.5% to 3.1% for the HCC. These values are dependent on the glass level relative to the thickness transition between the top head and the canister wall. This information, along with field readings, was used to set up environmental test conditions for corrosion studies. Small 304-L canisters were filled with glass and subjected to accelerated environmental testing for 3 months. No evidence of

  13. Impact testing of simulated high-level waste glass canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, M.E.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Slate, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Three Savannah River Laboratory reference high-level waste canisters were subjected to impact tests at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in June 1983. The purpose of the test was to determine the integrity of the canister, nozzle, and final closure weld and to assess the effects of impacts on the glass. Two of the canisters were fabricated from 304L stainless steel and the third canister from titanium. The titanium canister was subjected to two drops. The first drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the bottom corner of the canister receiving the impact. No failure occurred during this drop. The second drop was vertical from 9.14 m onto an unyielding surface with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. A large breach in the canister occurred in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The first stainless steel canister was dropped with the corner of the fill nozzle receiving the impact. The canister showed significant strain with no rupturing in the region where the fill nozzle joins the dished head. The second canister was dropped with the bottom corner receiving the impact and also, dropped horizontally onto an unyielding vertical solid steel cylinder in a puncture test. The bottom drop did not damage the weld and the puncture test did not rupture the canister body. The glass particles in the damaged zone of these canisters were sampled and analyzed for particle size. A comparison was made with control canister in which no impact had occurred. The particle size distribution for the control canisters and the zones of damaged glass were determined down to 1.5 ..mu..m. The quantity of glass fines, smaller than 10 ..mu..m, which must be determined for transportation safety studies, was found to be the largest in the bottom-damaged zone. The total amount of fines smaller than 10 ..mu..m after impact was less than 0.01 wt % of the total amount of glass in the canister.

  14. Design analysis report for the canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical strength of the canister (BWR and PWR types) has been studied. The loading processes are taken from the design premises report and some of them, especially the uneven bentonite swelling cases, are further developed in this study and in its references. The canister geometry is described in detail including the manufacturing tolerances of the dimensions. The canister material properties are summarised and the wide material testing programmes and model developments are referenced. The combination of various load cases are rationalised and the conservative combinations are defined. Also the probabilities of various load cases and combinations are assessed for setting reasonable safety margins. The safety margins are used according to ASME Code principles for safety class 1 components. The governing load cases are analysed with 2D- or global 3D-finite-element models including large deformation and non-linear material modelling and, in some cases, also creep. The integrity assessments are partly made from the stress and strain results using global models and partly from fracture resistance analyses using the sub-modelling technique. The sub-model analyses utilize the deformations from the global analyses as constraints on the sub-model boundaries and more detailed finite-element meshes are defined with defects included in the models together with elastic-plastic material models. The J-integral is used as the fracture parameter for the postulated defects. The allowable defect sizes are determined using the measured fracture resistance curves of the insert iron as a reference with respective safety factors according to the ASME Pressure Vessel Code requirements. Based on the BWR canister analyses, the following conclusions can be drawn. The 45 MPa isostatic pressure load case shows very robust and distinct results in that the risk for local collapse is vanishingly small. The probabilistic analysis of plastic collapse only considers the initial local collapse

  15. Design basis for the copper/steel canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, W.H. [Meadow End Farm, Tilford, Farnham, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1996-02-01

    The development of the copper/iron canister which has been proposed by SKB for the containment of high level nuclear waste has been studied from the point of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and quality assurance. This report describes the observations on progress which have been made between March 1995 and Feb 1996 and the result of further literature studies. A first trial canister has been produced using a fabricated steel liner and an extruded copper tubular, a second one using a fabricated tubular is at an advanced stage. A change from a fabricated steel inner canister to a proposed cast canister has been justified by a criticality argument but the technology for producing a cast canister is at present untried. The microstructure achieved in the extruded copper tubular for the first canister is unacceptable. Similar problems exist with plate used for the fabricated tubular, but some more favourable structures have been achieved already by this route. Seam welding of the first tubular failed through a suspected material problem. The second fabricated tubular welded without difficulty. Welding of lids and bottoms to the copper canister is problematical.There is as yet no satisfactory non destructive test procedures for the parent metal or the welds in the copper canister material, partly due to the coarse grain size which arise in the proposed material processed by the proposed routes. Further studies are also required on crevice corrosion, galvanic attack and stress corrosion cracking in the copper 50 ppm phosphorus alloy. 28 refs.

  16. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOPELIC, S.D.

    1999-02-25

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  17. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  18. Design basis for the copper/steel canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the copper/iron canister which has been proposed by SKB for the containment of high level nuclear waste has been studied from the point of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and quality assurance. This report describes the observations on progress which have been made between March 1995 and Feb 1996 and the result of further literature studies. A first trial canister has been produced using a fabricated steel liner and an extruded copper tubular, a second one using a fabricated tubular is at an advanced stage. A change from a fabricated steel inner canister to a proposed cast canister has been justified by a criticality argument but the technology for producing a cast canister is at present untried. The microstructure achieved in the extruded copper tubular for the first canister is unacceptable. Similar problems exist with plate used for the fabricated tubular, but some more favourable structures have been achieved already by this route. Seam welding of the first tubular failed through a suspected material problem. The second fabricated tubular welded without difficulty. Welding of lids and bottoms to the copper canister is problematical.There is as yet no satisfactory non destructive test procedures for the parent metal or the welds in the copper canister material, partly due to the coarse grain size which arise in the proposed material processed by the proposed routes. Further studies are also required on crevice corrosion, galvanic attack and stress corrosion cracking in the copper 50 ppm phosphorus alloy. 28 refs

  19. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  20. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

    2000-03-23

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  1. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report

  2. Description of DWPF reference waste form and canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the reference waste form and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The facility is planned for location at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1983. The reference canister is fabricated of 24-in.-OD 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and lifting and welding flanges on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in., with a wall thickness of 3/8-in. (schedule 20 pipe). The canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected to ensure that a filled canister with its shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be generally compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requireiajps. The rabarajca saspa bkri is bkrksilicapa class cojtaining approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 58% SiO2 and 15% B2O3. This composition results in a low average leachability in the waste form of approximately 5 x 10-9 g/cm2-day based on 137Cs over 365 days in 250C water. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 425 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 150,000 curies, with a radiation level of 2 x 104 rem/hour at 1 cm

  3. Description of DWPF reference waste form and canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    This document describes the reference waste form and canister for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The facility is planned for location at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1983. The reference canister is fabricated of 24-in.-OD 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and lifting and welding flanges on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in., with a wall thickness of 3/8-in. (schedule 20 pipe). The canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected to ensure that a filled canister with its shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be generally compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approximately 28 wt % sludge oxides with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains approximately 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. This composition results in a low average leachability in the waste form of approximately 5 x 10/sup -9/ g/cm/sup 2/-day based on /sup 137/Cs over 365 days in 25/sup 0/C water. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approximately 425 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the Stage 1 and Stage 2 processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 150,000 curies, with a radiation level of 2 x 10/sup 4/ rem/hour at 1 cm.

  4. COMSOL Multiphysics Model for HLW Canister Filling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesterson, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is building a Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is being temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. Wastes containing high concentrations of Al2O3 and Na2O can contribute to nepheline (generally NaAlSiO4) crystallization, which can sharply reduce the chemical durability of high level waste (HLW) glass. Nepheline crystallization can occur during slow cooling of the glass within the stainless steel canister. The purpose of this work was to develop a model that can be used to predict temperatures of the glass in a WTP HLW canister during filling and cooling. The intent of the model is to support scoping work in the laboratory. It is not intended to provide precise predictions of temperature profiles, but rather to provide a simplified representation of glass cooling profiles within a full scale, WTP HLW canister under various glass pouring rates. These data will be used to support laboratory studies for an improved understanding of the mechanisms of nepheline crystallization. The model was created using COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercially available software. The model results were compared to available experimental data, TRR-PLT-080, and were found to yield sufficient results for the scoping nature of the study. The simulated temperatures were within 60 ºC for the centerline, 0.0762m (3 inch) from centerline, and 0.2286m (9 inch) from centerline thermocouples once the thermocouples were covered with glass. The temperature difference between the experimental and simulated values reduced to 40 ºC, 4 hours after the thermocouple was covered, and down to 20 ºC, 6 hours after the thermocouple was covered

  5. Aging Model For Cane Fiberboard Overpack In The 9975 Shipping Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many radioactive material shipping packages incorporate a cane fiberboard overpack for thermal insulation and impact resistance. Mechanical, thermal and physical properties have been measured on cane fiberboard following thermal aging in several temperature/humidity environments. Several of the measured properties change significantly over time in the more severe environments, while other properties are relatively constant. Changes in each of the properties have been fit to a model to allow predictions of degradation under various storage scenarios. Additional data continue to be collected to provide for future refinements to the model.

  6. Structural Sensitivity of Dry Storage Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Karri, Naveen K.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-09-27

    This LS-DYNA modeling study evaluated a generic used nuclear fuel vertical dry storage cask system under tip-over, handling drop, and seismic load cases to determine the sensitivity of the canister containment boundary to these loads. The goal was to quantify the expected failure margins to gain insight into what material changes over the extended long-term storage lifetime could have the most influence on the security of the containment boundary. It was determined that the tip-over case offers a strong challenge to the containment boundary, and identifies one significant material knowledge gap, the behavior of welded stainless steel joints under high-strain-rate conditions. High strain rates are expected to increase the material’s effective yield strength and ultimate strength, and may decrease its ductility. Determining and accounting for this behavior could potentially reverse the model prediction of a containment boundary failure at the canister lid weld. It must be emphasized that this predicted containment failure is an artifact of the generic system modeled. Vendor specific designs analyze for cask tip-over and these analyses are reviewed and approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Another location of sensitivity of the containment boundary is the weld between the base plate and the canister shell. Peak stresses at this location predict plastic strains through the whole thickness of the welded material. This makes the base plate weld an important location for material study. This location is also susceptible to high strain rates, and accurately accounting for the material behavior under these conditions could have a significant effect on the predicted performance of the containment boundary. The handling drop case was largely benign to the containment boundary, with just localized plastic strains predicted on the outer surfaces of wall sections. It would take unusual changes in the handling drop scenario to harm the containment boundary, such as

  7. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POWERS, T.B.

    2000-03-16

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Hazard Analysis to support the final CSB Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis process identified hazardous conditions and material-at-risk, determined causes for potential accidents, identified preventive and mitigative features, and qualitatively estimated the frequencies and consequences of specific occurrences. The hazard analysis was performed by a team of cognizant CSB operations and design personnel, safety analysts familiar with the CSB, and technical experts in specialty areas. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process. Attachment A provides two lists of hazard analysis team members and describes the background and experience of each. The first list is a complete list of the hazard analysis team members that have been involved over the two-year long process. The second list is a subset of the first list and consists of those hazard analysis team members that reviewed and agreed to the final hazard analysis documentation. The material included in this report documents the final state of a nearly two-year long process involving formal facilitated group sessions and independent hazard and accident analysis work. The hazard analysis process led to the selection of candidate accidents for further quantitative analysis. New information relative to the hazards, discovered during the accident analysis, was incorporated into the hazard analysis data in order to compile a complete profile of facility hazards. Through this process, the results of the hazard and accident analyses led directly to the identification of safety structures, systems, and components, technical safety requirements, and other

  8. Radon measurements with charcoal canisters temperature and humidity considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Miloš Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon testing by using open-faced charcoal canisters is a cheap and fast screening method. Many laboratories perform the sampling and measurements according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency method - EPA 520. According to this method, no corrections for temperature are applied and corrections for humidity are based on canister mass gain. The EPA method is practiced in the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences with recycled canisters. In the course of measurements, it was established that the mass gain of the recycled canisters differs from mass gain measured by Environmental Protection Agency in an active atmosphere. In order to quantify and correct these discrepancies, in the laboratory, canisters were exposed for periods of 3 and 4 days between February 2015 and December 2015. Temperature and humidity were monitored continuously and mass gain measured. No significant correlation between mass gain and temperature was found. Based on Environmental Protection Agency calibration data, functional dependence of mass gain on humidity was determined, yielding Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves. The results of mass gain measurements of recycled canisters were plotted against these curves and a discrepancy confirmed. After correcting the independent variable in the curve equation and calculating the corrected mass gain for recycled canisters, the agreement between measured mass gain and Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves was attained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009: New Technologies for Monitoring and Protection of Environment from Harmful Chemical Substances and Radiation Impact

  9. US NRC-Sponsored Research on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Dry Storage Canister Materials in Marine Environments - 13344

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a number of locations in the U.S., spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is maintained at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). These ISFSIs, which include operating and decommissioned reactor sites, Department of Energy facilities in Idaho, and others, are licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 72. The SNF is stored in dry cask storage systems, which most commonly consist of a welded austenitic stainless steel canister within a larger concrete vault or overpack vented to the external atmosphere to allow airflow for cooling. Some ISFSIs are located in marine environments where there may be high concentrations of airborne chloride salts. If salts were to deposit on the canisters via the external vents, a chloride-rich brine could form by deliquescence. Austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC), particularly in the presence of residual tensile stresses from welding or other fabrication processes. SCC could allow helium to leak out of a canister if the wall is breached or otherwise compromise its structural integrity. There is currently limited understanding of the conditions that will affect the SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel exposed to marine salts. NRC previously conducted a scoping study of this phenomenon, reported in NUREG/CR-7030 in 2010. Given apparent conservatisms and limitations in this study, NRC has sponsored a follow-on research program to more systematically investigate various factors that may affect SCC including temperature, humidity, salt concentration, and stress level. The activities within this research program include: (1) measurement of relative humidity (RH) for deliquescence of sea salt, (2) SCC testing within the range of natural absolute humidity, (3) SCC testing at elevated temperatures, (4) SCC testing at high humidity conditions, and (5) SCC testing with various applied stresses. Results

  10. Testing in support of transportation of residues in the pipe overpack container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plants call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. The tests described here were performed to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II. Using a more robust container will assure the fissile materials in each container can not be mixed with the fissile material from the other containers and will provide criticality control. This will allow an increase in the payload of the TRUPACT-II from 325 fissile gram equivalents to 2,800 fissile gram equivalents

  11. Reference commercial high-level waste glass and canister definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents technical data and performance characteristics of a high-level waste glass and canister intended for use in the design of a complete waste encapsulation package suitable for disposal in a geologic repository. The borosilicate glass contained in the stainless steel canister represents the probable type of high-level waste product that will be produced in a commercial nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant. Development history is summarized for high-level liquid waste compositions, waste glass composition and characteristics, and canister design. The decay histories of the fission products and actinides (plus daughters) calculated by the ORIGEN-II code are presented

  12. Radiolysis Model Sensitivity Analysis for a Used Fuel Storage Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, Richard S.

    2013-09-20

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone (M3FT-13PN0810027) to report on a radiolysis computer model analysis that estimates the generation of radiolytic products for a storage canister. The analysis considers radiolysis outside storage canister walls and within the canister fill gas over a possible 300-year lifetime. Previous work relied on estimates based directly on a water radiolysis G-value. This work also includes that effect with the addition of coupled kinetics for 111 reactions for 40 gas species to account for radiolytic-induced chemistry, which includes water recombination and reactions with air.

  13. Retrievability of spent nuclear fuel canisters; Kaeytetyn ydinpolttoaineen loppusijoituskapseleiden palautettavuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saanio, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Raiko, H. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    As a part of the designing process of the Finnish spent nuclear fuel repository, a preliminary study has been carried out to investigate how the canisters could technically be retrieved to the ground surface. Possibility of retrieving a canister has been investigated in different phases of the disposal project. Retrievability has not been a design goal for the spent fuel repository. However, design of the repository includes some features that may ease the retrieval of canisters in the future. Spent fuel elements are packaged in massive copper-iron canisters, which are mechanically strong and long-lived. The repository consists of excavated tunnels in hard rock which are supposed to be very long-lived making the removal of the tunnel backfilling technically possible also in the future. As long as the bentonite buffer has not been installed the canister can be returned to the ground surface using the same equipment as was used when the canister was brought down to the repository and lowered into the hole. In the encapsulation station the spent fuel elements can be packaged in the other canister or in the transport cask. After a deposition tunnel has been backfilled and closed, the retrieval consists of tearing down the concrete structure at the entry of the deposition tunnel, removal of the tunnel backfilling, removal of the bentonite from the disposal hole and lifting up of the canister. Various methods, e.g., flushing the bentonite with saline solutions, can be used to detach the canister from a hole with fully saturated bentonite. Recovery will be technically possible also after closing of the disposal facility. Backfilling of the shafts and tunnels will be removed and additional new structures and systems will have to be built in the repository. After that canisters can be transported to the ground surface as described above. In addition, handling of the canisters at the ground surface will require additional facilities. Canisters can be packaged in the

  14. Evaluation of remote smearing of DWPF canistered waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating the variables of the remote smearing process for monitoring transferable contamination on the waste glass canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Smearing for transferable contamination is typically done by hand, but in this case, due to the nature of the high level waste within the canisters, remote smearing is required. The effectiveness of the smear pad was determined under varying conditions (distance traveled, force applied, and canister surface), as well as the relative importance of these factors. It was concluded that the remote smear is more reliable than the hand smear

  15. Design analysis report for the canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, Heikki (VTT (Finland)); Sandstroem, Rolf (Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)); Ryden, Haakan; Johansson, Magnus (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-04-15

    The mechanical strength of the canister (BWR and PWR types) has been studied. The loading processes are taken from the design premises report and some of them, especially the uneven bentonite swelling cases, are further developed in this study and in its references. The canister geometry is described in detail including the manufacturing tolerances of the dimensions. The canister material properties are summarised and the wide material testing programmes and model developments are referenced. The combination of various load cases are rationalised and the conservative combinations are defined. Also the probabilities of various load cases and combinations are assessed for setting reasonable safety margins. The safety margins are used according to ASME Code principles for safety class 1 components. The governing load cases are analysed with 2D- or global 3D-finite-element models including large deformation and non-linear material modelling and, in some cases, also creep. The integrity assessments are partly made from the stress and strain results using global models and partly from fracture resistance analyses using the sub-modelling technique. The sub-model analyses utilize the deformations from the global analyses as constraints on the sub-model boundaries and more detailed finite-element meshes are defined with defects included in the models together with elastic-plastic material models. The J-integral is used as the fracture parameter for the postulated defects. The allowable defect sizes are determined using the measured fracture resistance curves of the insert iron as a reference with respective safety factors according to the ASME Pressure Vessel Code requirements. Based on the BWR canister analyses, the following conclusions can be drawn. The 45 MPa isostatic pressure load case shows very robust and distinct results in that the risk for local collapse is vanishingly small. The probabilistic analysis of plastic collapse only considers the initial local collapse

  16. Technical note 4. Corrosion of copper canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives of the project: In this review assignment, SKB's treatment of copper corrosion processes or mechanisms in SR-Site shall be reviewed both for the anticipated oxic and anoxic repository environments. The reviewer(s) shall consider if corrosion and corrosion mechanisms of the copper canisters in different possible evolutionary repository environments have been properly described. The objectives of this initial review phase in the area of copper corrosion is to achieve a broad coverage of SR-Site and its supporting references and in particular identify the need for complementary information and clarifications to be delivered by SKB. Summary by the authors: It is expected that the inflow of ground water to the deposition holes and tunnels in the Forsmark repository will be very slow. Thus, it might take some few hundred years up to thousand years before the deposition holes are filled with ground water and it might take 6000 years or more before the bentonite buffer is fully water saturated and pressurized. The copper canisters will therefore meet to two completely different environments: 1. An initial period of several hundreds of years when copper is exposed to gaseous corrosion. 2. And then to aqueous corrosion. From a corrosion point of view the first 1000 years are the most critical for the copper canister since pure, or phosphorus alloyed copper, is not designed to cope with corrosion at elevated temperatures. The outer copper surface temperature is expected to reach 100 deg C within some decades after closure of the repository and then slowly cool down to around 50 deg C after 1000 years. The gaseous corrosion is treated in SKB's safety assessment as being only dependent on oxygen gas and thus easily estimated by an oxygen mass-balance calculation. This simple model has no scientific support since several corrosive trace gases, such as sulphurous and nitrous compounds, operates together with water molecules (moisture) and the corrosion product consists

  17. Thermal dimensioning of the deep repository. Influence of canister spacing, canister power, rock thermal properties and nearfield design on the maximum canister surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekmark, Harald; Faelth, Billy [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-12-01

    The report addresses the problem of the minimum spacing required between neighbouring canisters in the deep repository. That spacing is calculated for a number of assumptions regarding the conditions that govern the temperature in the nearfield and at the surfaces of the canisters. The spacing criterion is that the temperature at the canister surfaces must not exceed 100 deg C .The results are given in the form of nomographic charts, such that it is in principle possible to determine the spacing as soon as site data, i.e. the initial undisturbed rock temperature and the host rock heat transport properties, are available. Results of canister spacing calculations are given for the KBS-3V concept as well as for the KBS-3H concept. A combination of numerical and analytical methods is used for the KBS-3H calculations, while the KBS-3V calculations are purely analytical. Both methods are described in detail. Open gaps are assigned equivalent heat conductivities, calculated such that the conduction across the gaps will include also the heat transferred by radiation. The equivalent heat conductivities are based on the emissivities of the different gap surfaces. For the canister copper surface, the emissivity is determined by back-calculation of temperatures measured in the Prototype experiment at Aespoe HRL. The size of the different gaps and the emissivity values are of great importance for the results and will be investigated further in the future.

  18. Hydrogen Concentration in the Inner-Most Container within a Pencil Tank Overpack Packaged in a Standard Waste Box Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marusich, Robert M.

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate hydrogen generation within Pencil Tank Overpacks (PTO) in a Standard Waste Box (SWB), to establish plutonium (Pu) limits for PTOs based on hydrogen concentration in the inner-most container and to establish required configurations or validate existing or proposed configurations for PTOs. The methodology and requirements are provided in this report.

  19. 40 CFR 264.316 - Disposal of small containers of hazardous waste in overpacked drums (lab packs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills § 264.316 Disposal of small containers... CFR parts 173, 178, and 179), if those regulations specify a particular inside container for the waste... hazardous waste in overpacked drums (lab packs). 264.316 Section 264.316 Protection of...

  20. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CROWE, R.D.

    1999-09-09

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  1. Spent nuclear fuel canister storage building conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report provides the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project, Canister Storage Building, and as amended by letter (correspondence number 9555700, M.E. Witherspoon to E.B. Sellers, ``Technical Baseline and Updated Cost Estimate for the Canister Storage Building``, dated October 24, 1995), includes the project cost baseline and Criteria to be used as the basis for starting detailed design in fiscal year 1995.

  2. Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste

    OpenAIRE

    Hoag, Christopher Ian.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling technology. The canister is suitable for disposal of various waste forms, such as fuel assemblies and vitrified waste. The design addresses real and perceived hazards of transporting and placing high-level waste, in the form of spent reactor fuel, into a deep igneous rock env...

  3. Spent nuclear fuel canister storage building conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Conceptual Design Report provides the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project, Canister Storage Building, and as amended by letter (correspondence number 9555700, M.E. Witherspoon to E.B. Sellers, ''Technical Baseline and Updated Cost Estimate for the Canister Storage Building'', dated October 24, 1995), includes the project cost baseline and Criteria to be used as the basis for starting detailed design in fiscal year 1995

  4. Drop tests of the Three Mile Island knockout canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A type of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling canister, called a ''knockout'' canister, was subjected to a series of drop tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Drop Test Facility. These tests were designed to confirm the structural integrity of internal fixed neutron poisons in support of a request for NRC licensing of this type of canister for the shipment of TMI-2 reactor fuel debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Core Examination R and D Program. Work conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory included (1) precise physical measurements of the internal poison rod configuration before assembly, (2) canister assembly and welding, (3) nondestructive examination (an initial hydrostatic pressure test and an x-ray profile of the internals before and after each drop test), (4) addition of a simulated fuel load, (5) instrumentation of the canister for each drop test, (6) fabrication of a cask simulation vessel with a developed and tested foam impact limiter, (7) use of refrigeration facilities to cool the canister to well below freezing prior to three of the drops, (8) recording the drop test with still, high-speed, and normal-speed photography, (9) recording the accelerometer measurements during impact, (10) disassembly and post-test examination with precise physical measurements, and (11) preparation of the final report

  5. Physical properties of encapsulate spent fuel in canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel and high-level wastes will be permanently stored in a deep geological repository (AGP). Prior to this, they will be encapsulated in canisters. The present report is dedicated to the study of such canisters under the different physical demands that they may undergo, be those in operating or accident conditions. The physical demands of interest include mechanical demands, both static and dynamic, and thermal demands. Consideration is given to the complete file of the canister, from the time when it is empty and without lid to the final conditions expected in the repository. Thermal analyses of canisters containing spent fuel are often carried out in two dimensions, some times with hypotheses of axial symmetry and some times using a plane transverse section through the centre of the canister. The results obtained in both types of analyses are compared here to those of complete three-dimensional analyses. The latter generate more reliable information about the temperatures that may be experienced by the canister and its contents; they also allow calibrating the errors embodied in the two-dimensional calculations. (Author)

  6. Remote Welding, NDE and Repair of DOE Standardized Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Larsen; Art Watkins; Timothy R. McJunkin; Dave Pace; Rodney Bitsoi

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) to manage DOE’s spent nuclear fuel (SNF). One of the NSNFP’s tasks is to prepare spent nuclear fuel for storage, transportation, and disposal at the national repository. As part of this effort, the NSNFP developed a standardized canister for interim storage and transportation of SNF. These canisters will be built and sealed to American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section III, Division 3 requirements. Packaging SNF usually is a three-step process: canister loading, closure welding, and closure weld verification. After loading SNF into the canisters, the canisters must be seal welded and the welds verified using a combination of visual, surface eddy current, and ultrasonic inspection or examination techniques. If unacceptable defects in the weld are detected, the defective sections of weld must be removed, re-welded, and re-inspected. Due to the high contamination and/or radiation fields involved with this process, all of these functions must be performed remotely in a hot cell. The prototype apparatus to perform these functions is a floor-mounted carousel that encircles the loaded canister; three stations perform the functions of welding, inspecting, and repairing the seal welds. A welding operator monitors and controls these functions remotely via a workstation located outside the hot cell. The discussion describes the hardware and software that have been developed and the results of testing that has been done to date.

  7. Corrosion evaluation of fuel canister crusher rigging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel canister crusher with attached rigging is located in the 105 K-East Basin discharge chute. This equipment is slated to be moved as part of seismic mitigation to prevent a major basin leak through a construction joint located in the base of the chute. This corrosion analysis assessed the load-bearing ability of the rigging, which consists of shackles and thimble-spliced wire rope. The K-East Basin demineralized water results in corrosion rates of <2 mil/year (<0.05 mm/year) for carbon, low-alloy carbon, and stainless steels. The galvanized carbon steel shackles (with low-alloy steel anchor pins) have experienced negligible corrosion and are judged to be mechanically unaffected by their water exposure. The carbon steel wire rope and stainless steel thimbles have undergone minimal corrosion. Due to the small amount of corrosion products (as seen from video inspection), the absence of wire breakage, and a Factor of Safety calculation, it is judged that the wire rope and thimbles would withstand the proposed relocation activities

  8. Canister filling materials -- Design requirements and evaluation of candidate materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB has been evaluating a copper/steel canister for use in the disposal of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Once the canister is breached by corrosion, it is possible that the void volume inside the canister might fill with water. Water inside the canister would moderate the energy of the neutrons emitted by spontaneous fission in the fuel. It the space in the canister between and around the fuel pins is occupied by canister filling materials, the potential for criticality is avoided. The authors have developed a set of design requirements for canister filling material for the case where it is to be used alone, with no credit for burnup of the fuel or other measures, such as the use of neutron absorbers. Requirements were divided into three classes: essential requirements, desirable features, and undesirable features. The essential requirements are that the material fill at least 60% of the original void space, that the solubility of the filling material be less than 100 mg/l in pure water or expected repository waters at 50 C, and that the material not compact under its own weight by more than 10%. In this paper they review the reasons for these requirements, the desirable and undesirable features, and evaluate 11 candidate materials with respect to the design requirements and features. The candidate materials are glass beads, lead shot, copper spheres, sand, olivine, hematite, magnetite, crushed rock, bentonite, other clays, and concrete. Emphasis is placed on the determination of whether further work is needed to eliminate uncertainties in the evaluation of the ability of a particular filling material to be successfully used under actual conditions, and on the ability to predict the long-term performance of the material under the repository conditions

  9. Vitrification of high level wastes: a review of the computer thermal analyses for storage canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANIST, a two-dimensional (r and THETA) computer program that solves the unsteady-state, heat conduction equation was used to model the thermal behavior of canisters filled with waste glass. CANIST has been found to be a valuable analytical tool for predicting the temperature profile of a waste storage canister as a function of several variables, including the diameter of the canister, the placement of internal fins, the heat generation rate of the waste glass, and the thermophysical properties of the canister and the waste glass. Thus, temperature dependent processes that may affect the integrity of the glass/canister unit, for example cracking, can be investigated using an analytical approach. In the present study, the canister temperature profiles predicted by CANIST were compared to canister temperatures measured during full-scale non-radioactive waste immobilization tests conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The agreement between experimental and predicted temperatures was good, particularly considering the fact that the thermophysical properties of the waste glass modeled have not yet been accurately determined. Examination of some glass-filled canisters has revealed cracking to have occurred in the glass. However, the comparison between measured and CANIST predicted temperatures suggests that cracking does not significantly influence the heat-transfer process. CANIST was also used to evaluate different ways of reducing the centerline temperature of a canister, and to predict the centerline temperature as a function of the heat generation rate of the waste glass and the type of interim storage, i.e., air or water

  10. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONTROL DECISION REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This control decision addresses the Knock-Out Pot (KOP) Disposition KOP Processing System (KPS) conceptual design. The KPS functions to (1) retrieve KOP material from canisters, (2) remove particles less than 600 (micro)m in size and low density materials from the KOP material, (3) load the KOP material into Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) baskets, and (4) stage the MCO baskets for subsequent loading into MCOs. Hazard and accident analyses of the KPS conceptual design have been performed to incorporate safety into the design process. The hazard analysis is documented in PRC-STP-00098, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Project Conceptual Design Hazard Analysis. The accident analysis is documented in PRC-STP-CN-N-00167, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Sub-Project Canister Over Lift Accident Analysis. Based on the results of these analyses, and analyses performed in support of MCO transportation and MCO processing and storage activities at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and Canister Storage Building (CSB), control decision meetings were held to determine the controls required to protect onsite and offsite receptors and facility workers. At the conceptual design stage, these controls are primarily defined by their safety functions. Safety significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could provide the identified safety functions have been selected for the conceptual design. It is anticipated that some safety SSCs identified herein will be reclassified based on hazard and accident analyses performed in support of preliminary and detailed design.

  11. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONTROL DECISION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARRO CA

    2010-03-09

    This control decision addresses the Knock-Out Pot (KOP) Disposition KOP Processing System (KPS) conceptual design. The KPS functions to (1) retrieve KOP material from canisters, (2) remove particles less than 600 {micro}m in size and low density materials from the KOP material, (3) load the KOP material into Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) baskets, and (4) stage the MCO baskets for subsequent loading into MCOs. Hazard and accident analyses of the KPS conceptual design have been performed to incorporate safety into the design process. The hazard analysis is documented in PRC-STP-00098, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Project Conceptual Design Hazard Analysis. The accident analysis is documented in PRC-STP-CN-N-00167, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Sub-Project Canister Over Lift Accident Analysis. Based on the results of these analyses, and analyses performed in support of MCO transportation and MCO processing and storage activities at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and Canister Storage Building (CSB), control decision meetings were held to determine the controls required to protect onsite and offsite receptors and facility workers. At the conceptual design stage, these controls are primarily defined by their safety functions. Safety significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could provide the identified safety functions have been selected for the conceptual design. It is anticipated that some safety SSCs identified herein will be reclassified based on hazard and accident analyses performed in support of preliminary and detailed design.

  12. Design, production and initial state of the canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederqvist, Lars; Johansson, Magnus; Leskinen, Nina; Ronneteg, Ulf

    2010-12-15

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility.The report provides input on the initial state of the canisters to the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the canisters shall be handled and disposed. The report presents the design premises and reference design of the canister and verifies the conformity of the reference design to the design premises. The production methods and the ability to produce canisters according to the reference design are described. Finally, the initial state of the canisters and their conformity to the reference design and design premises are presented

  13. Safety Analysis Report for the PWR Spent Fuel Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won; Cho, Dong Keun; Chun, Kwan Sik; Lee, Jong Youl; Kim, Seong Ki; Kim, Seong Soo; Lee, Yang

    2005-11-15

    This report outlined the results of the safety assessment of the canisters for the PWR spent fuels which will be used in the KRS. All safety analyses including criticality and radiation shielding analyses, mechanical analyses, thermal analyses, and containment analyses were performed. The reference PWR spent fuels were in the 17x17 and determined to have 45,000 MWD/MTU burnup. The canister consists of copper outer shell and nodular cast iron inner structure with diameter of 102 cm and height of 483 cm. Criticality safety was checked for normal and abnormal conditions. It was assumed that the integrity of engineered barriers is preserved and saturated with water of 1.0g/cc for normal condition. For the abnormal condition container and bentonite was assumed to disappear, which allows the spent fuel to be surrounded by water with the most reactive condition. In radiation shielding analysis it was investigated that the absorbed dose at the surface of the canister met the safety limit. The structural analysis was conducted considering three load conditions, normal, extreme, and rock movement condition. Thermal analysis was carried out for the case that the canister with four PWR assemblies was deposited in the repository 500 meter below the surface with 40 m tunnel spacing and 6 m deposition hole spacing. The results of the safety assessment showed that the proposed KDC-1 canister met all the safety limits.

  14. Design, production and initial state of the canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is included in a set of Production reports, presenting how the KBS-3 repository is designed, produced and inspected. The set of reports is included in the safety report for the KBS-3 repository and repository facility.The report provides input on the initial state of the canisters to the assessment of the long-term safety, SR-Site. The initial state refers to the properties of the engineered barriers once they have been finally placed in the KBS-3 repository and will not be further handled within the repository facility. In addition, the report provides input to the operational safety report, SR-Operation, on how the canisters shall be handled and disposed. The report presents the design premises and reference design of the canister and verifies the conformity of the reference design to the design premises. The production methods and the ability to produce canisters according to the reference design are described. Finally, the initial state of the canisters and their conformity to the reference design and design premises are presented

  15. Decontamination of DWPF canisters by glass frit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant will be incorporated in borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The waste glass will be encapsulated in a 304L stainless steel canister. During the filling operation the outside of the canister will become contaminated. This contamination must be reduced to an accepable level before the canister leaves the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Tests with contaminated coupons have demonstrated that this decontamination can be accomplished by blasting the surface with glass frit. The contaminated glass frit byproduct of this operation is used as a feedstock for the waste glass process, so no secondary waste is created. Three blasting techniques, using glass frit as the blasting medium, were evaluated. Air-injected slurry blasting was the most promising and was chosen for further development. The optimum parametric values for this process were determined in tests using coupon weight loss as the output parameter. 1 reference, 13 figures, 3 tables

  16. SNF Interim Storage Canister Corrosion and Surface Environment Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Of particular concern is stress corrosion cracking (SCC), by which a through-wall crack could potentially form in a canister outer wall over time intervals that are shorter than possible dry storage times. In order for SCC to occur, three criteria must be met. A corrosive environment must be present on the canister surface, the metal must susceptible to SCC, and sufficient tensile stress to support SCC must be present through the entire thickness of the canister wall. SNL is currently evaluating the potential for each of these criteria to be met.

  17. Chemical stability of copper-canisters in deep repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper-iron canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The copper wall of the canister provides a long-time shield against corrosion, preventing the high-level nuclear fuel from contact with ground water. In the report, stability of metallic copper and its possible corrosion reactions in the conditions of deep bedrock are evaluated by means of thermo-dynamic calculations. (90 refs., 28 figs., 11 tabs.)

  18. Evaluation of the Frequencies for Canister Inspections for SCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-02-02

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-15SN0802042, “Evaluate the Frequencies for Canister Inspections for SCC” under Work Package FT-15SN080204, “ST Field Demonstration Support – SNL”. It reviews the current state of knowledge on the potential for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of dry storage canisters and evaluates the implications of this state of knowledge on the establishment of an SCC inspection frequency. Models for the prediction of SCC by the Japanese Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), the United States (U.S.) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) are summarized, and their limitations discussed.

  19. Debris Removal Project K West Canister Cleaning System Performance Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FARWICK, C.C.

    1999-12-09

    Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. Design criteria for a Canister Cleaning System to be installed in the KW Basin. This documents the requirements for design and installation of the system.

  20. One-pot low temperature synthesis of MFe2O4 (M=Co, Ni, Zn) superparamagnetic nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic MFe2O4 (M=Co, Ni, Zn) nanocrystals with a diameter about 30 nm and a nearly spherical shape were synthesized via a simple hydrothermal approach. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy have been used to investigate the as-prepared magnetic MFe2O4 (M=Co, Ni, Zn) nanocrystals. Magnetic properties of the as-prepared samples have been detected by a vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature and the results show that the as-prepared magnetic MFe2O4 nanocrystals are a type characteristic of superparamagnetic materials. These superparamagnetic nanocrystals are believed to be promising for wide engineering applications, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, and magnetic resonance imaging

  1. Study on the methods for analysis of the chemical poison in canister by neutron activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method that is used to analyse the poison gases in canister by neutron activity is proposed. Through theory analysis and experimental measurement, the feasibility for analysis of the poison gases in a canister by neutron activity has been demonstrated, and it is proved that the method itself do not result in radioactive problem to use again the canister. (authors)

  2. OCRWM Bulletin: Westinghouse begins designing multi-purpose canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This publication consists of two parts: OCRWM (Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management) Bulletin; and Of Mountains & Science which has articles on the Yucca Mountain project. The OCRWM provides information about OCRWM activities and in this issue has articles on multi-purpose canister design, and transportation cask trailer.

  3. Analysis of water from K west basin canisters (second campaign)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimble, D.J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    Gas and liquid samples have been obtained from a selection of the approximately 3,820 spent fuel storage canisters in the K West Basin. The samples were taken to characterize the contents of the gas and water in the canisters. The data will provide source term information for two subprojects of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) (Fulton 1994): the K Basins Integrated Water Treatment System subproject (Ball 1996) and the K Basins Fuel Retrieval System subproject (Waymire 1996). The barrels of ten canisters were sampled in 1995, and 50 canisters were sampled in a second campaign in 1996. The analysis results for the gas and liquid samples of the first campaign have been reported (Trimble 1995a; Trimble 1995b; Trimble 1996a; Trimble 1996b). An analysis of cesium-137 (137CS ) data from the second campaign samples was reported (Trimble and Welsh 1997), and the gas sample results are documented in Trimble 1997. This report documents the results of all analytes of liquid samples from the second campaign.

  4. High level waste canister emplacement and retrieval concepts study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several concepts are described for the interim (20 to 30 years) storage of canisters containing high level waste, cladding waste, and intermediate level-TRU wastes. It includes requirements, ground rules and assumptions for the entire storage pilot plant. Concepts are generally evaluated and the most promising are selected for additional work. Follow-on recommendations are made

  5. Corrosion resistance of a copper canister for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents an evaluation of copper as canister material for spent nuclear fuel. The evaluation is made from the viewpoint of corrosion and applies to a concept of 1977. Supplementary corrosion studies have been performed. The report includes 9 appendices which deal with experimental data. (G.B.)

  6. Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1978-12-01

    A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal.

  7. OCRWM Bulletin: Westinghouse begins designing multi-purpose canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication consists of two parts: OCRWM (Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management) Bulletin; and Of Mountains ampersand Science which has articles on the Yucca Mountain project. The OCRWM provides information about OCRWM activities and in this issue has articles on multi-purpose canister design, and transportation cask trailer

  8. Heat propagation from a radioactive waste repository. SKB 91 reference canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of heat propagation around a hypothetical radioactive waste repository is presented. The investigated flow domain was limited to a quarter of the flow domain around a single canister due to symmetry by vertical planes passing through the centre of the canister, half distance between the adjacent tunnels and the adjacent canisters. Strictly speaking, such an approach is applicable to a repository of infinite extent. However, from a practical point of view this assumption applies to all canisters but the ones close to the edge of the repository. The following different material regions were considered: (a.) Canister containing the spent fuel, (b.) Buffer (bentonite) around the canister, (c.) Backfilled (mixture of bentonite and sand) tunnels, and (d.) host Rock. The canister material was presented by a 'homogenized' medium obtained by weighted averaging of the main constituents of the canister, viz. spent fuel, copper and lead. A geothermal gradient of 13 degrees C/km was assumed. The initial heat effect per canister was 1066 W. The total vertical extent of the flow domain considered was about 1500 meters. The base case, with 6.2 m canister spacing and 30 m tunnel spacing, resulted in a maximum temperature at the canister/buffer interface of about 66 degrees C (corresponding to a temperature rise of about 54 degrees C), and about 50 degrees C (about 38 degrees C temperature rise) in the rock. (au)

  9. Pressure tests of two KBS-3 canister mock-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish concept for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, the so-called KBS-3 concept, relies on a multibarrier system with the copper/cast iron canister as the first barrier. The canister is designed to retain its integrity for at least 100,000 years, which means that future glaciations need to be considered. A 3 km thick ice block together with hydrostatic pressure from groundwater and swelling of the buffer material would produce hydrostatic compressive stresses of maximum 44 MPa (440 bar). Although the canister is loaded globally in compression, tensile stresses develop at fuel channel surface with increasing load. Tensile tests of the insert material in the development phase of the KBS-3 canister indicated a large scatter and relatively low values of the inserts' ductility. An important issue was whether this could lead to mechanical failure of canisters at the 44 MPa iso-static load either by plastic collapse or fracture from the defects in the regions with tensile stresses. SKB therefore initiated a project together with the European commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) Institute of Energy in Petten and a number of Swedish partners to evaluate the probability of mechanical failure during glaciation. Three inserts manufactured by different Swedish foundries and referred to as 1, 125 and 126 were used in the project. A large statistical test programme was developed to determine statistical distributions of various material parameters and defect distributions. These data were subsequently used in probabilistic analysis to determine the probability for local plastic collapse or fracture. The main conclusion was that the failure probability is extremely low at the design load (44 MPa) provided some basic geometrical requirements are fulfilled. In parallel to the statistical test programme and the associated analysis, the group decided also to perform two pressure tests of canister mock-ups to demonstrate the actual safety margins. The fractographic

  10. Drying tests conducted on Three Mile Island fuel canisters containing simulated debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    Drying tests were conducted on TMI-2 fuel canisters filled with simulated core debris. During these tests, canisters were dried by heating externally by a heating blanket while simultaneously purging the canisters` interior with hot, dry nitrogen. Canister drying was found to be dominated by moisture retention properties of a concrete filler material (LICON) used for geometry control. This material extends the drying process 10 days or more beyond what would be required were it not there. The LICON resides in a nonpurgeable chamber separate from the core debris, and because of this configuration, dew point measurements on the exhaust stream do not provide a good indication of the dew point in the canisters. If the canisters are not dried, but rather just dewatered, 140-240 lb of water (not including the LICON water of hydration) will remain in each canister, approximately 50-110 lb of which is pore water in the LICON and the remainder unbound water.

  11. Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

  12. Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, W.P.

    1995-12-01

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

  13. Analysis of probability of defects in the disposal canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a probability model for the reliability of the spent nuclear waste final disposal canister. Reliability means here that the welding of the canister lid has no critical defects from the long-term safety point of view. From the reliability point of view, both the reliability of the welding process (that no critical defects will be born) and the non-destructive testing (NDT) process (all critical defects will be detected) are equally important. In the probability model, critical defects in a weld were simplified into a few types. Also the possibility of human errors in the NDT process was taken into account in a simple manner. At this moment there is very little representative data to determine the reliability of welding and also the data on NDT is not well suited for the needs of this study. Therefore calculations presented here are based on expert judgements and on several assumptions that have not been verified yet. The Bayesian probability model shows the importance of the uncertainty in the estimation of the reliability parameters. The effect of uncertainty is that the probability distribution of the number of defective canisters becomes flat for larger numbers of canisters compared to the binomial probability distribution in case of known parameter values. In order to reduce the uncertainty, more information is needed from both the reliability of the welding and NDT processes. It would also be important to analyse the role of human factors in these processes since their role is not reflected in typical test data which is used to estimate 'normal process variation'.The reported model should be seen as a tool to quantify the roles of different methods and procedures in the weld inspection process. (orig.)

  14. BRIC-60: Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC)-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Romero, Vergel

    2016-01-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) is an anodized-aluminum cylinder used to provide passive stowage for investigations evaluating the effects of space flight on small organisms. Specimens flown in the BRIC 60 mm petri dish (BRIC-60) hardware include Lycoperscion esculentum (tomato), Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress), Glycine max (soybean) seedlings, Physarum polycephalum (slime mold) cells, Pothetria dispar (gypsy moth) eggs and Ceratodon purpureus (moss).

  15. Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) - Light Emitting Diode (LED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    The Biological Research in Canisters - LED (BRIC-LED) is a biological research system that is being designed to complement the capabilities of the existing BRIC-Petri Dish Fixation Unit (PDFU) for the Space Life and Physical Sciences (SLPS) Program. A diverse range of organisms can be supported, including plant seedlings, callus cultures, Caenorhabditis elegans, microbes, and others. In the event of a launch scrub, the entire assembly can be replaced with an identical back-up unit containing freshly loaded specimens.

  16. PAUT inspection of copper canister: Structural attenuation and POD formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianneo, A.; Carboni, M.; Mueller, C.; Ronneteg, U.

    2016-02-01

    For inspection of thick-walled (50mm) copper canisters for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden, ultrasonic inspection using phased array technique (PAUT) is applied. Because thick-walled copper is not commonly used as a structural material, previous experience on Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing for this type of application is limited. The paper presents the progress in understanding the amplitudes and attenuation changes acting on the Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing inspection of copper canisters. Previous studies showed the existence of a low pass filtering effect and a heterogeneous grain size distribution along the depth, thus affecting both the detectability of defects and their "Probability of Detection" determination. Consequently, the difference between the first and second back wall echoes were not sufficient to determine the local attenuation (within the inspection range), which affects the signal response for each individual defect. Experimental evaluation of structural attenuation was carried out onto step-wedge samples cut from full-size, extruded and pierced & drawn, copper canisters. Effective attenuation values has been implemented in numerical simulations to achieve a Multi Parameter Probability of Detection and to formulate a Model Assisted Probability of Detection through a Monte-Carlo extraction model.

  17. Stress analysis of high-level waste canisters: methods, applications, and design data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of stress analysis methods, structural design procedures, and design data is presented for canisters used to package solidified wastes, particularly borosilicate glass. In addition, waste processing, canister materials, fabrication and inspection methods, and performance testing are summarized. Sources of stress in canisters are lifting and handling loads, internal pressure, high-temperature filling operations, transient heating and cooling, differential thermal expansions of canisters and glass, and impact loadings from low-probability accidents. Results of case studies that illustrate applicable methods of stress analyses are presented for these sources of stress. Existing sections of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are applicable to canister fabrication, but the code does not cover many aspects of canister service loadings. Specialized criteria for minimum wall thicknesses to sustain filling stresses are proposed in this report. Results of a test program to measure the creep strength of candidate canister materials are described. Methods to predict residual stresses in the walls of waste canisters are described; predicted residual stress levels agree with measured stress levels. The consequences of these residual stresses are reviewed, and stress-corrosion cracking is identified as the mode of canister failure affected by residual stresses. Canister-closure design is covered in detail, particularly the welding and inspection of the final closure seal-weld. It is shown that the methods of fracture mechanics and fatigue-crack-growth analyses are valuable tools for evaluating the performance of closure welds in the presence of crack-like defects. Canister performance in process trials at PNL shows the ability of canisters to survive high temperatures and loadings during processing. Impact tests show that a suitably designed canister can sustain severe impacts without loss of intergrity

  18. Test manufacturing of copper canisters with cast inserts. Assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, C.G

    1998-08-01

    The current design of canisters for the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel consists of an outer corrosion-protective copper casing in the form of a tubular section with lid and bottom and an inner pressure-resistant insert. The insert is designed to be manufactured by casting and inside are channels in which the fuel assemblies are to be placed. Over the last years, a number of full-scale manufacturing tests of all canister components have been carried out. The purpose has been to determine and develop the best manufacturing technique and to establish long-term contacts with the best suppliers of material and technology. Part of the work has involved the developing and implementing of a quality assurance system in accordance with ISO 9001, covering the whole chain from suppliers of material up to and including the delivery of assembled canisters. This report consists of a description of the design of the canister together with current drawings and complementary technical specifications stipulating, among other things, requirements placed on different materials. The different manufacturing methods that have been used are also described and commented on in both text and illustrations. For the manufacturing of copper tubes, the roll-forming of rolled plate to tube halves and longitudinal welding is a method that has been tested on a relatively large number of tubes by now, and that probably can be developed into a functioning production method. However, the very promising outcome of performed tests on seamless tube manufacturing, has resulted in a change in direction in tube manufacturing, focusing on continued testing of extrusion as well as pierce and draw processing in the immediate future. In connection with ongoing operations, new manufacturing tests of tubes with less material thickness will be carried out. Test manufacturing of cast inserts has resulted in the choice of nodular iron as material in the continued work. This improvement in design has resulted

  19. Test manufacturing of copper canisters with cast inserts. Assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current design of canisters for the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel consists of an outer corrosion-protective copper casing in the form of a tubular section with lid and bottom and an inner pressure-resistant insert. The insert is designed to be manufactured by casting and inside are channels in which the fuel assemblies are to be placed. Over the last years, a number of full-scale manufacturing tests of all canister components have been carried out. The purpose has been to determine and develop the best manufacturing technique and to establish long-term contacts with the best suppliers of material and technology. Part of the work has involved the developing and implementing of a quality assurance system in accordance with ISO 9001, covering the whole chain from suppliers of material up to and including the delivery of assembled canisters. This report consists of a description of the design of the canister together with current drawings and complementary technical specifications stipulating, among other things, requirements placed on different materials. The different manufacturing methods that have been used are also described and commented on in both text and illustrations. For the manufacturing of copper tubes, the roll-forming of rolled plate to tube halves and longitudinal welding is a method that has been tested on a relatively large number of tubes by now, and that probably can be developed into a functioning production method. However, the very promising outcome of performed tests on seamless tube manufacturing, has resulted in a change in direction in tube manufacturing, focusing on continued testing of extrusion as well as pierce and draw processing in the immediate future. In connection with ongoing operations, new manufacturing tests of tubes with less material thickness will be carried out. Test manufacturing of cast inserts has resulted in the choice of nodular iron as material in the continued work. This improvement in design has resulted

  20. NDE to Manage Atmospheric SCC in Canisters for Dry Storage of Spent Fuel: An Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pardini, Allan F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cuta, Judith M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Adkins, Harold E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qiao, Hong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doctor, Steven R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report documents efforts to assess representative horizontal (Transuclear NUHOMS®) and vertical (Holtec HI-STORM) storage systems for the implementation of non-destructive examination (NDE) methods or techniques to manage atmospheric stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in canisters for dry storage of used nuclear fuel. The assessment is conducted by assessing accessibility and deployment, environmental compatibility, and applicability of NDE methods. A recommendation of this assessment is to focus on bulk ultrasonic and eddy current techniques for direct canister monitoring of atmospheric SCC. This assessment also highlights canister regions that may be most vulnerable to atmospheric SCC to guide the use of bulk ultrasonic and eddy current examinations. An assessment of accessibility also identifies canister regions that are easiest and more difficult to access through the ventilation paths of the concrete shielding modules. A conceivable sampling strategy for canister inspections is to sample only the easiest to access portions of vulnerable regions. There are aspects to performing an NDE inspection of dry canister storage system (DCSS) canisters for atmospheric SCC that have not been addressed in previous performance studies. These aspects provide the basis for recommendations of future efforts to determine the capability and performance of eddy current and bulk ultrasonic examinations for atmospheric SCC in DCSS canisters. Finally, other important areas of investigation are identified including the development of instrumented surveillance specimens to identify when conditions are conducive for atmospheric SCC, characterization of atmospheric SCC morphology, and an assessment of air flow patterns over canister surfaces and their influence on chloride deposition.

  1. The Unity connecting module is moved to payload canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, workers attach the overhead crane that will lift the Unity connecting module from its workstand to move the module to the payload canister. Part of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-88 in December. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach Unity to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time.

  2. Plutonium Can-In-Canister-Design Basis Event Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to perform a preliminary design basis event (DBE) analysis of the immobilized plutonium (can-in-canister) waste form to be referred to in this analysis as high level waste/plutonium (HLW/Pu). The objective of the analysis is to determine any preclosure safety impacts of the waste form on the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The scope of this analysis is to determine the offsite dose consequences and associated frequencies of selected DBEs for systems handling disposable canisters that bound all surface and subsurface off-normal events, and to compare these results against regulatory limits. The results of this work are preliminary and are intended to be used to establish a set of preliminary MGR and waste form requirements, to identify mitigation or prevention options that may be required to meet regulatory limits, and to provide input to the Site Recommendation (SR) report. This document is prepared in accordance with the associated development plan (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor [CRWMS M and O] 1999e)

  3. Measurements of Fundamental Fluid Physics of SNF Storage Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condie, Keith Glenn; Mc Creery, Glenn Ernest; McEligot, Donald Marinus

    2001-09-01

    With the University of Idaho, Ohio State University and Clarksean Associates, this research program has the long-term goal to develop reliable predictive techniques for the energy, mass and momentum transfer plus chemical reactions in drying / passivation (surface oxidation) operations in the transfer and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from wet to dry storage. Such techniques are needed to assist in design of future transfer and storage systems, prediction of the performance of existing and proposed systems and safety (re)evaluation of systems as necessary at later dates. Many fuel element geometries and configurations are accommodated in the storage of spent nuclear fuel. Consequently, there is no one generic fuel element / assembly, storage basket or canister and, therefore, no single generic fuel storage configuration. One can, however, identify generic flow phenomena or processes which may be present during drying or passivation in SNF canisters. The objective of the INEEL tasks was to obtain fundamental measurements of these flow processes in appropriate parameter ranges.

  4. Hydrogen Concentration in the Inner-Most Container within a Pencil Tank Overpack Packaged in a Standard Waste Box Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marusich, Robert M.

    2012-01-25

    A set of steady state diffusion flow equations, for the hydrogen diffusion from one bag to the next bag (or one plastic waste container to another), within a set of nested waste bags (or nested waste containers), are developed and presented. The input data is then presented and justified. Inputting the data for each volume and solving these equations yields the steady state hydrogen concentration in each volume. The input data (permeability of the bag surface and closure, dimensions and hydrogen generation rate) and equations are analyzed to obtain the hydrogen concentrations in the innermost container for a set of containers which are analyzed for the TRUCON code for the general waste containers and the TRUCON code for the Pencil Tank Overpacks (PTO) in a Standard Waste Box (SWB).

  5. Two-dimensional model of a Space Station Freedom thermal energy storage canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1990-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Power Module being developed for Space Station Freedom uses a eutectic mixture of LiF-CaF2 phase change salt contained in toroidal canisters for thermal energy storage. Results are presented from heat transfer analyses of the phase change salt containment canister. A 2-D, axisymmetric finite difference computer program which models the canister walls, salt, void, and heat engine working fluid coolant was developed. Analyses included effects of conduction in canister walls and solid salt, conduction and free convection in liquid salt, conduction and radiation across salt vapor filled void regions and forced convection in the heat engine working fluid. Void shape, location, growth or shrinkage (due to density difference between the solid and liquid salt phases) were prescribed based on engineering judgement. The salt phase change process was modeled using the enthalpy method. Discussion of results focuses on the role of free-convection in the liquid salt on canister heat transfer performance. This role is shown to be important for interpreting the relationship between ground based canister performance (in l-g) and expected on-orbit performance (in micro-g). Attention is also focused on the influence of void heat transfer on canister wall temperature distributions. The large thermal resistance of void regions is shown to accentuate canister hot spots and temperature gradients.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic assessment of concrete storage cubicle with horizontal 3013 canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-08

    The FIDAP computer code was used to perform a series of analyses to assess the thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of the concrete plutonium storage cubicles, as modified for the horizontal placement of 3013 canisters. Four separate models were developed ranging from a full height model of the storage cubicle to a very detailed standalone model of a horizontal 3013 canister.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic assessment of concrete storage cubicle with horizontal 3013 canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FIDAP computer code was used to perform a series of analyses to assess the thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of the concrete plutonium storage cubicles, as modified for the horizontal placement of 3013 canisters. Four separate models were developed ranging from a full height model of the storage cubicle to a very detailed standalone model of a horizontal 3013 canister

  8. Commercial radioactive waste management system feasibility with the universal canister concept. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) was initiated by DOE to solicit from industry new and novel ideas for improvements in the nuclear waste management system. GA Technologies Inc. was contracted to study a system utilizing a universal canister which could be loaded at the reactor and used throughout the waste management system. The proposed canister was developed with the objective of meeting the mission requirements with maximum flexibility and at minimum cost. Canister criteria were selected from a thorough analysis of the spent fuel inventory, and canister concepts were evaluated along with the shipping and storage casks to determine the maximum payload. Engineering analyses were performed on various cask/canister combinations. One important criterion was the interchangeability of the canisters between truck and rail cask systems. A canister was selected which could hold three PWR intact fuel elements or up to eight consolidated PWR fuel elements. One canister could be shipped in an overweight truck cask or six in a rail cask. Economic analysis showed a cost savings of the reference system under consideration at that time

  9. On the origin of the conductance asymmetry in CeMIn5 (M=Co, Rh, Ir)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymmetric differential conductance has been frequently observed in heavy fermion point-contact junctions. We report such data obtained from the Ce-based 1-1-5 compounds CeMIn5 (M=Co, Rh, Ir). Apart from characteristics due to superconductivity or antiferromagnetism, a striking common feature is an asymmetry in the background conductance, which shows nontrivial temperature and voltage dependencies. These behaviors cannot be explained by the local heating model combined with large Seebeck effect in heavy fermions. We propose that a Fano-like interference may cause the asymmetry. The interference can occur between two conductance channels, one into the conduction band and the other into the heavy electron band formed by the hybridization of conduction electrons with localized f-electrons.

  10. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Canister Retrieval Test. Microorganisms in buffer from the Canister Retrieval Test - numbers and metabolic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Canister Retrieval Test' (CRT) is an experiment that started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) 2000. CRT is a part of the investigations which evaluate a possible KBS-3 storage of nuclear waste. The primary aim was to see whether it is possible or not to retrieve a copper canister after storage under authentic KBS-3 conditions. However, CRT also provided a unique opportunity to investigate if bacteria survived in the bentonite buffer during storage. Therefore, in connection to the retrieval of the canister microbiological samples were extracted from the bentonite buffer and the bacterial composition was studied. In this report, microbiological analyses of a total of 66 samples at the C2, R10, R9 and R6 levels in the bentonite from CRT are presented and discussed. By culturing bacteria from the bentonite in specific media the following bacterial parameters were investigated: The total amount of culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, sulphate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria that produce the organic compound acetate (acetogens). The biovolume in the bentonite was determined by detection of the ATP content. In addition, bacteria from the bentonite were cultured in different sulphate-reducing media. In these cultures, the presence of the biotic compounds sulphide and acetate was investigated, since these have potentially negative effect on the copper canister in a KBS-3 repository. The results were to some extent compared to density, water content, and temperature data provided by Clay Technology AB. The results showed that 100-102 viable sulphate-reducing and acetogenic bacteria and 102-104 heterotrophic aerobic bacteria g-1 bentonite were present after five years of storage in the rock. Bacteria with several morphologies could be found in the cultures with bentonite. The most bacteria were detected in the bentonite buffer close to the rock but in a few samples also in bentonite close to the copper canister. When the presence of bacteria in the bentonite is

  11. Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Canister Retrieval Test. Microorganisms in buffer from the Canister Retrieval Test - numbers and metabolic diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    'Canister Retrieval Test' (CRT) is an experiment that started at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) 2000. CRT is a part of the investigations which evaluate a possible KBS-3 storage of nuclear waste. The primary aim was to see whether it is possible or not to retrieve a copper canister after storage under authentic KBS-3 conditions. However, CRT also provided a unique opportunity to investigate if bacteria survived in the bentonite buffer during storage. Therefore, in connection to the retrieval of the canister microbiological samples were extracted from the bentonite buffer and the bacterial composition was studied. In this report, microbiological analyses of a total of 66 samples at the C2, R10, R9 and R6 levels in the bentonite from CRT are presented and discussed. By culturing bacteria from the bentonite in specific media the following bacterial parameters were investigated: The total amount of culturable heterotrophic aerobic bacteria, sulphate-reducing bacteria, and bacteria that produce the organic compound acetate (acetogens). The biovolume in the bentonite was determined by detection of the ATP content. In addition, bacteria from the bentonite were cultured in different sulphate-reducing media. In these cultures, the presence of the biotic compounds sulphide and acetate was investigated, since these have potentially negative effect on the copper canister in a KBS-3 repository. The results were to some extent compared to density, water content, and temperature data provided by Clay Technology AB. The results showed that 100-102 viable sulphate-reducing and acetogenic bacteria and 102-104 heterotrophic aerobic bacteria g-1 bentonite were present after five years of storage in the rock. Bacteria with several morphologies could be found in the cultures with bentonite. The most bacteria were detected in the bentonite buffer close to the rock but in a few samples also in bentonite close to the copper canister. When the presence of bacteria in the

  12. Reliability in sealing of canister for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliability of the system for sealing the canister and inspecting the weld that has been developed for the Encapsulation plant was investigated. In the investigation the occurrence of discontinuities that can be formed in the welds was determined both qualitatively and quantitatively. The probability that these discontinuities can be detected by nondestructive testing (NDT) was also studied. The friction stir welding (FSW) process was verified in several steps. The variables in the welding process that determine weld quality were identified during the development work. In order to establish the limits within which they can be allowed to vary, a screening experiment was performed where the different process settings were tested according to a given design. In the next step the optimal process setting was determined by means of a response surface experiment, whereby the sensitivity of the process to different variable changes was studied. Based on the optimal process setting, the process window was defined, i.e. the limits within which the welding variables must lie in order for the process to produce the desired result. Finally, the process was evaluated during a demonstration series of 20 sealing welds which were carried out under production-like conditions. Conditions for the formation of discontinuities in welding were investigated. The investigations show that the occurrence of discontinuities is dependent on the welding variables. Discontinuities that can arise were classified and described with respect to characteristics, occurrence, cause and preventive measures. To ensure that testing of the welds has been done with sufficient reliability, the probability of detection (POD) of discontinuities by NDT and the accuracy of size determination by NDT were determined. In the evaluation of the demonstration series, which comprised 20 welds, a statistical method based on the generalized extreme value distribution was fitted to the size estimate of the indications

  13. Reliability in sealing of canister for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronneteg, Ulf [Bodycote Materials Testing AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Cederqvist, Lars; Ryden, Haakan [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Oeberg, Tomas [Tomas Oeberg Konsult AB, Karlskrona (Sweden); Mueller, Christina [Federal Inst. for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    The reliability of the system for sealing the canister and inspecting the weld that has been developed for the Encapsulation plant was investigated. In the investigation the occurrence of discontinuities that can be formed in the welds was determined both qualitatively and quantitatively. The probability that these discontinuities can be detected by nondestructive testing (NDT) was also studied. The friction stir welding (FSW) process was verified in several steps. The variables in the welding process that determine weld quality were identified during the development work. In order to establish the limits within which they can be allowed to vary, a screening experiment was performed where the different process settings were tested according to a given design. In the next step the optimal process setting was determined by means of a response surface experiment, whereby the sensitivity of the process to different variable changes was studied. Based on the optimal process setting, the process window was defined, i.e. the limits within which the welding variables must lie in order for the process to produce the desired result. Finally, the process was evaluated during a demonstration series of 20 sealing welds which were carried out under production-like conditions. Conditions for the formation of discontinuities in welding were investigated. The investigations show that the occurrence of discontinuities is dependent on the welding variables. Discontinuities that can arise were classified and described with respect to characteristics, occurrence, cause and preventive measures. To ensure that testing of the welds has been done with sufficient reliability, the probability of detection (POD) of discontinuities by NDT and the accuracy of size determination by NDT were determined. In the evaluation of the demonstration series, which comprised 20 welds, a statistical method based on the generalized extreme value distribution was fitted to the size estimate of the indications

  14. Study of the consequences of secondary water radiolysis within and surrounding a defective canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu; Neretnieks, I. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology; Stroemberg, Bo [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-11-01

    Consequences of secondary water radiolysis, caused by dispersed radionuclides released from spent nuclear fuel, both inside a defective canister and in the bentonite buffer surrounding the canister have been studied. The dissolution rate of the spent fuel is assumed to be controlled by chemical kinetics. Several cases have been addressed. First a simple mass balance model is presented. Some very conservative assumptions like complete failure of the canister one thousand years after its deposition in the repository and instantaneous oxidation rate of the spent fuel are deliberately made, to explore the upper bound limit of the effect of the secondary water radiolysis on the spent fuel dissolution. The model results show that the spent fuel could possibly be oxidised in an ever-increasing rate with these very simplified assumptions. More realistic and less conservative cases are then considered. In these cases, the canister is assumed to be initially defective with a hole of a few millimeters on its wall. The small hole will considerably restrict the transport of oxidants through the canister wall and the release of radionuclides to the outside of the canister. The spent fuel dissolution is assumed to be controlled by chemical kinetics at rates extrapolated from experimental studies. The cases are modelled with progressive complication. In the first case the effect of the secondary radiolysis inside fuel canister is neglected. It is also assumed that secondary phases of radionuclides do not precipitate inside the canister. The model results show that a relatively large domain of the near-field can be oxidised by the oxidants of secondary radiolysis. In the second case it is assumed that the radionuclide concentration within the canister is controlled by its respective solubility limit. The amount of radionuclides released out of the canister will then be limited by the solubility of the secondary phases. The effect of the secondary radiolysis will be quite limited in

  15. Analysis of sludge from Hanford K East Basin canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sludge samples from the canisters in the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool have been retrieved and analyzed. Both chemical and physical properties have been determined. The results are to be used to determine the disposition of the bulk of the sludge and to assess the impact of residual sludge on dry storage of the associated intact metallic uranium fuel elements. This report is a summary and review of the data provided by various laboratories. Although raw chemistry data were originally reported on various bases (compositions for as-settled, centrifuged, or dry sludge) this report places all of the data on a common comparable basis. Data were evaluated for internal consistency and consistency with respect to the governing sample analysis plan. Conclusions applicable to sludge disposition and spent fuel storage are drawn where possible

  16. STS-100 MPLM Raffaello is moved to the payload canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Workers inside the payload canister wait for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello to be lowered inside. It joins the Canadian robotic arm, SSRMS, already in place. Both elements are part of the payload on mission STS- 100 to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The arm has seven motorized joints and is capable of handling large payloads and assisting with docking the Space Shuttle. The SSRMS is self- relocatable with a Latching End Effector so it can be attached to complementary ports spread throughout the Station'''s exterior surfaces. Launch of STS-100 is scheduled for April 19, 2001 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  17. Acoustic monitoring techniques for corrosion degradation in cemented waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out to investigate acoustic emission as a monitor of corrosion and degradation of wasteforms where the waste is potentially reactive metal. Electronic monitoring equipment has been designed, built and tested to allow long-term monitoring of a number of waste packages simultaneously. Acoustic monitoring experiments were made on a range of 1 litre cemented Magnox and aluminium samples cast into canisters comparing the acoustic events with hydrogen gas evolution rates and electrochemical corrosion rates. The attenuation of the acoustic signals by the cement grout under a range of conditions has been studied to determine the volume of wasteform that can be satisfactorily monitored by one transducer. The final phase of the programme monitored the acoustic events from full size (200 litre) cemented, inactive, simulated aluminium swarf wastepackages prepared at the AEA waste cementation plant at Winfrith. (Author)

  18. Analysis of sludge from Hanford K East Basin canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makenas, B.J. [ed.] [comp.] [DE and S Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Welsh, T.L. [B and W Protec, Inc. (United States); Baker, R.B. [DE and S Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Hoppe, E.W.; Schmidt, A.J.; Abrefah, J.; Tingey, J.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Golcar, G.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-09-12

    Sludge samples from the canisters in the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool have been retrieved and analyzed. Both chemical and physical properties have been determined. The results are to be used to determine the disposition of the bulk of the sludge and to assess the impact of residual sludge on dry storage of the associated intact metallic uranium fuel elements. This report is a summary and review of the data provided by various laboratories. Although raw chemistry data were originally reported on various bases (compositions for as-settled, centrifuged, or dry sludge) this report places all of the data on a common comparable basis. Data were evaluated for internal consistency and consistency with respect to the governing sample analysis plan. Conclusions applicable to sludge disposition and spent fuel storage are drawn where possible.

  19. Procedural development for nuclear waste canister impact testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double containment requirements for transporting nuclear waste in glass form are costly and may not be necessary for some waste forms. To allow single containment, a procedure for examining particle size distribution and the amount of respirable particles generated under accident conditions was needed. A statistically designed experiment was conducted to examine the effects of glass temperature, fill rate and canister drop orientation upon the amount of sub-ten micron particles generated under simulated accident conditions. Measuring such small particles is somewhat inaccurate because of material loss in handling. By assuming a lognormal particle size distribution, the amount of sub-ten micron particles was estimated from the results for the larger measurable particles. Analyses revealed no temperature or fill rate effect but indicated that the amount of respirable particles is affected by drop orientation. This led to identification of a worst case drop orientation to be used in qualification testing. 4 refs., 2 figs

  20. Value Engineering Study for Closing Waste Packages Containing TAD Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colleen Shelton-Davis

    2005-11-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management announced their intention to have the commercial utilities package spent nuclear fuel in shielded, transportable, ageable, and disposable containers prior to shipment to the Yucca Mountain repository. This will change the conditions used as a basis for the design of the waste package closure system. The environment is now expected to be a low radiation, low contamination area. A value engineering study was completed to evaluate possible modifications to the existing closure system using the revised requirements. Four alternatives were identified and evaluated against a set of weighted criteria. The alternatives are (1) a radiation-hardened, remote automated system (the current baseline design); (2) a nonradiation-hardened, remote automated system (with personnel intervention if necessary); (3) a nonradiation-hardened, semi-automated system with personnel access for routine manual operations; and (4) a nonradiation-hardened, fully manual system with full-time personnel access. Based on the study, the recommended design is Alternative 2, a nonradiation-hardened, remote automated system. It is less expensive and less complex than the current baseline system, because nonradiation-hardened equipment can be used and some contamination control equipment is no longer needed. In addition, the inclusion of remote automation ensures throughput requirements are met, provides a more reliable process, and provides greater protection for employees from industrial accidents and radiation exposure than the semi-automated or manual systems. Other items addressed during the value engineering study as requested by OCRWM include a comparison to industry canister closure systems and corresponding lessons learned; consideration of closing a transportable, ageable, and disposable canister; and an estimate of the time required to perform a demonstration of the recommended closure system.

  1. HANSF 1.3 Users Manual FAI/98-40-R2 Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Safety Analysis Model [SEC 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-10-07

    The HANSF analysis tool is an integrated model considering phenomena inside a multi-canister overpack (MCO) spent nuclear fuel container such as fuel oxidation, convective and radiative heat transfer, and the potential for fission product release. This manual reflects the HANSF version 1.3.2, a revised version of 1.3.1. HANSF 1.3.2 was written to correct minor errors and to allow modeling of condensate flow on the MCO inner surface. HANSF 1.3.2 is intended for use on personal computers such as IBM-compatible machines with Intel processors running under Lahey TI or digital Visual FORTRAN, Version 6.0, but this does not preclude operation in other environments.

  2. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) OCRWM Loop Error Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-07-26

    Characterization is specifically identified by the Richland Operations Office (RL) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as requiring application of the requirements in the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (RW-0333P DOE 1997a). Those analyses that provide information that is necessary for repository acceptance require application of the QARD. The cold vacuum drying (CVD) project identified the loops that measure, display, and record multi-canister overpack (MCO) vacuum pressure and Tempered Water (TW) temperature data as providing OCRWM data per Application of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance Requirements to the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project HNF-SD-SNF-RPT-007. Vacuum pressure transmitters (PT 1*08, 1*10) and TW temperature transmitters (TIT-3*05, 3*12) are used to verify drying and to determine the water content within the MCO after CVD.

  3. Choices of canisters and elements for the first fuel shipment from K West Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makenas, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    Twenty-two canisters (10 prime and 12 backup candidates) in the K West Basin have been identified as containing fuel which, when examined, will satisfy the Data Quality Objectives for the first fuel shipment from this basin. These were chosen as meeting criteria such as containing relatively long fuel elements, locking bar integrity, and the availability of gas/liquid interface level measurements for associated canister gas traps. Two canisters were identified as having reported broken fuel on initial loading. Usage and interpretation of canister cesium concentration measurements have also been established and levels of maximum and minimum acceptable cesium concentration (from a data optimization point of view) for decapping have been determined although other operational cesium limits may also apply. Criteria for picking particular elements, once a canister is opened, are reviewed in this document. A pristine, a slightly damaged, and a badly damaged element are desired. The latter includes elements with end caps removed but does not include elements which have large amounts of swelling or split cladding that might interfere with handling tools. Finally, operational scenarios have been suggested to aid in the selections of canisters and elements in a way that utilizes anticipated canister gas sampling and leads to a correct and quick choice of elements which will supply the desired data.

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Can-In-Canister Hardware Development/Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the design, development and testing of the magazines (cylinders containing cans of plutonium-ceramic pucks) and the rack that holds them in place inside the waste glass canister. Several magazine and rack concepts were evaluated to produce a design that gives the optimal balance between resistance to thermal degradation and facilitation of remote handling. This paper also reviews the effort to develop a jointed robotic arm that can remotely load seven magazines into defined locations inside a stationary canister working only through the 4 inch (102mm) diameter canister throat

  5. Preliminary design specification for Department of Energy standardized spent nuclear fuel canisters. Volume 2: Rationale document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document (Volume 2) is a companion document to a preliminary design specification for the design of canisters to be used during the handling, storage, transportation, and repository disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This document contains no procurement information, such as the number of canisters to be fabricated, explicit timeframes for deliverables, etc. However, this rationale document does provide background information and design philosophy in order to help engineers better understand the established design criteria (contained in Volume 1 respectively) necessary to correctly design and fabricate these DOE SNF canisters

  6. Metal Doping Effect of the M-Co2P/Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes (M = Fe, Ni, Cu) Hydrogen Evolution Hybrid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan; Liu, Yunqi; Lin, Yan; Liu, Chenguang

    2016-06-01

    The enhancement of catalytic performance of cobalt phosphide-based catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is still challenging. In this work, the doping effect of some transition metal (M = Fe, Ni, Cu) on the electrocatalytic performance of the M-Co2P/NCNTs (NCNTs, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes) hybrid catalysts for the HER was studied systematically. The M-Co2P/NCNTs hybrid catalysts were synthesized via a simple in situ thermal decomposition process. A series of techniques, including X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, and N2 sorption were used to characterize the as-synthesized M-Co2P/NCNTs hybrid catalysts. Electrochemical measurements showed the catalytic performance according to the following order of Fe-Co2P/NCNTs > Ni-Co2P/NCNTs > Cu-Co2P/NCNTs, which can be ascribed to the difference of structure, morphology, and electronic property after doping. The doping of Fe atoms promote the growth of the [111] crystal plane, resulting in a large specific area and exposing more catalytic active sites. Meanwhile, the Fe(δ+) has the highest positive charge among all the M-Co2P/NCNTs hybrid catalysts after doping. All these changes can be used to contribute the highest electrocatalytic activity of the Fe-Co2P/NCNTs hybrid catalyst for HER. Furthermore, an optimal HER electrocatalytic activity was obtained by adjusting the doping ratio of Fe atoms. Our current research indicates that the doping of metal is also an important strategy to improve the electrocatalytic activity for the HER. PMID:27197546

  7. Thiol- and thioether-based bifunctional chelates for the {M(CO)3}+ core (M = Tc, Re).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Neva; Babich, John; Valliant, John; Schaffer, Paul; James, Shelly; Zubieta, Jon

    2005-09-19

    By analogy to the recently described single amino acid chelate (SAAC) technology for complexation of the {M(CO)3}+ core (M = Tc, Re), a series of tridentate ligands containing thiolate and thioether groups, as well as amino and pyridyl nitrogen donors, have been prepared: (NC5H4CH2)2NCH2CH2SEt (L1); (NC5H4CH2)2NCH2CH2SH (L2); NC5H4CH2N(CH2CH2SH)2 (L3); (NC5H4CH2)N(CH2CH2SH)(CH2CO2R) [R = H (L4); R = -C2H5 (L5). The {Re(CO)3}+ core complexes of L1-L5 were prepared by the reaction of [Re(CO)3(H2O)3]Br or [NEt4]2[Re(CO)3Br3] with the appropriate ligand in methanol and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and in the case of [Re(CO)3(L2)] (Re-2) and [Re(CO)3(L1)Re(CO)3Br2] (Re-1a) by X-ray crystallography. The structure of Re-2 consists of discrete neutral monomers with a fac-Re(CO)3 coordination unit and the remaining coordination sites occupied by the amine, pyridyl, and thiolate donors of L2, leaving a pendant pyridyl arm. In contrast, the structure of Re-1a consists of discrete binuclear units, constructed from a {Re(CO)3(L1)}+ subunit linked to a {Re(CO)3Br2}- group through the sulfur donor of the pendant thioether arm. The series of complexes establishes that thiolate donors are effective ligands for the {M(CO)3}+ core and that a qualitative ordering of the coordination preferences of the core may be proposed: pyridyl nitrogen approximately thiolate > carboxylate > thioether sulfur > thiophene sulfur. The ligands L1 and L2 react cleanly with [99mTc(CO)3(H2O)3]+ in H2O/DMSO to give [99mTc(CO)3(L1)]+ (99m)Tc-1) and [99mTc(CO)3(L2)] (99mTc-2), respectively, in ca. 90% yield after HPLC purification. The Tc analogues 99mTc-1 and 99mTc-2 were subjected to ligand challenges by incubating each in the presence of 1000-fold excesses of both cysteine and histidine. The radiochromatograms showed greater than 95% recovery of the complexes. PMID:16156635

  8. Lattice specific heat for the RMIn5 (R=Gd, La, Y; M=Co, Rh) compounds: Non-magnetic contribution subtraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facio, Jorge I.; Betancourth, D.; Cejas Bolecek, N. R.; Jorge, G. A.; Pedrazzini, Pablo; Correa, V. F.; Cornaglia, Pablo S.; Vildosola, V.; García, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze theoretically a common experimental process used to obtain the magnetic contribution to the specific heat of a given magnetic material. In the procedure, the specific heat of a non-magnetic analog is measured and used to subtract the non-magnetic contributions, which are generally dominated by the lattice degrees of freedom in a wide range of temperatures. We calculate the lattice contribution to the specific heat for the magnetic compounds GdMIn5 (M=Co, Rh) and for the non-magnetic YMIn5 and LaMIn5 (M=Co, Rh), using density functional theory based methods. We find that the best non-magnetic analog for the subtraction depends on the magnetic material and on the range of temperatures. While the phonon specific heat contribution of YRhIn5 is an excellent approximation to the one of GdCoIn5 in the full temperature range, for GdRhIn5 we find a better agreement with LaCoIn5, in both cases, as a result of an optimum compensation effect between masses and volumes. We present measurements of the specific heat of the compounds GdMIn5 (M=Co, Rh) up to room temperature where it surpasses the value expected from the Dulong-Petit law. We obtain a good agreement between theory and experiment when we include anharmonic effects in the calculations.

  9. Demonstration of a Solution Film Leak Test Technique and Equipment for the S00645 Canister Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this effort was to demonstrate that the SFT technique, when adapted to a DWPF canister nozzle, is capable of detecting leaks not meeting the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) acceptance criterion

  10. Demonstration of a Solution Film Leak Test Technique and Equipment for the S00645 Canister Closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannell, G.R.

    1999-10-07

    The purpose of this effort was to demonstrate that the SFT technique, when adapted to a DWPF canister nozzle, is capable of detecting leaks not meeting the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) acceptance criterion.

  11. Coupled transport/reaction modelling of copper canister corrosion aided by microbial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100 000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphide available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the intruding groundwater, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer is included in the model. The local depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. (orig.)

  12. Coupled transport/reaction modelling of copper canister corrosion aided by microbial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jinsong; Neretnieks, I. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100 000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphide available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the intruding groundwater, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer is included in the model. The local depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. (orig.)

  13. High-level waste canister storage final design, installation, and testing. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connors, B.J.; Meigs, R.A.; Pezzimenti, D.M.; Vlad, P.M.

    1998-04-01

    This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project`s radioactive waste storage facility, the Chemical Process Cell (CPC). This facility is currently being used to temporarily store vitrified waste in stainless steel canisters. These canisters are stacked two-high in a seismically designed rack system within the cell. Approximately 300 canisters will be produced during the Project`s vitrification campaign which began in June 1996. Following the completion of waste vitrification and solidification, these canisters will be transferred via rail or truck to a federal repository (when available) for permanent storage. All operations in the CPC are conducted remotely using various handling systems and equipment. Areas adjacent to or surrounding the cell provide capabilities for viewing, ventilation, and equipment/component access.

  14. Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3:safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB

  15. Canister design concepts for disposal of spent fuel and high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its long-term plans for development of a repository for spent fuel (SF) and high level waste (HLW), Nagra is exploring various options for the selection of materials and design concepts for disposal canisters. The selection of suitable canister options is driven by a series of requirements, one of the most important of which is providing a minimum 1000 year lifetime without breach of containment. One candidate material is carbon steel, because of its relatively low corrosion rate under repository conditions and because of the advanced state of overall technical maturity related to construction and fabrication. Other materials and design options are being pursued in parallel studies. The objective of the present study was to develop conceptual designs for carbon steel SF and HLW canisters along with supporting justification. The design process and outcomes result in design concepts that deal with all key aspects of canister fabrication, welding and inspection, short-term performance (handling and emplacement) and long-term performance (corrosion and structural behaviour after disposal). A further objective of the study is to use the design process to identify the future work that is required to develop detailed designs. The development of canister designs began with the elaboration of a number of design requirements that are derived from the need to satisfy the long-term safety requirements and the operational safety requirements (robustness needed for safe handling during emplacement and potential retrieval). It has been assumed based on radiation shielding calculations that the radiation dose rate at the canister surfaces will be at a level that prohibits manual handling, and therefore a hot cell and remote handling will be needed for filling the canisters and for final welding operations. The most important canister requirements were structured hierarchically and set in the context of an overall design methodology. Conceptual designs for SF canisters

  16. Evaluation of the potential for gas pressurization and free liquid accumulation in a WVDP canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazelton, R.F.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    A full-scale canister provided by the West Valley Demonstration Project, filled during the SF-11 vitrification qualification test, was tested to determine its potential for gas generation (non-radiolitic only) and liquid accumulation. The canister was sealed and held at a temperature of about 500{degrees}C for eight weeks. Gas samples obtained during the test were analyzed using mass spectroscopy to determine the composition of gases within the canister. At the end of the eight weeks the canister gases were evacuated through a desiccant to capture any water that had been released by the glass during the test. In addition, an analysis of the glass using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was performed to determine the water content in the glass both before and after the temperature exposure.

  17. DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

  18. Status and use of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Pipe Overpack Container for TRU waste storage and shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pipe Overpack Container was designed to optimize shipments of high plutonium content transuranic waste from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The container was approved for use in the TRUPACT-II shipping container by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in February 1997. The container optimizes shipments to WIPP by increasing the TRUPACT-II criticality limit from 325 fissile grams equivalent (FGE) to 2,800 FGE and provides additional shielding for handling wastes with high americium-241 (Am-241) content. The container was subsequently evaluated and approved for storage of highly dispersible TRU wastes and residues at RFETS. Thermal evaluation of the container shows that the container will mitigate the impact of a worst case thermal event from reactive or potentially pyrophoric materials. These materials contain hazards postulated by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board for interim storage. Packaging these reactive or potentially pyrophoric residues in the container without stabilizing the materials is under consideration at RFETS. The design, testing, and evaluations used in the approvals, and the current status of the container usage, will be discussed

  19. Data quality objectives for gas and liquid samples from sealed K Basin canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makenas, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    Data Quality Objectives (DQOS) for gas and liquid sampling from the sealed canisters in K West Basin have been developed and are presented in this document. The scope of this document is limited primarily to the initial sampling effort. This sampling campaign either supports the selection of canisters to provide fuel for hotcell examinations, supports the demonstration of sampling equipment capabilities or provides an initial assessment of gas/liquid chemistry for comparison to the results of fuel element hotcell examinations. No sampling of canisters has occurred since 1983. It is proposed here that samples of gas and water be analyzed for constituents such as cesium, fission gases, and hydrogen which are markers for corrosion of uranium in a water environment. These data will allow an assessment of the risks involved when particular canisters are opened to retrieve fuel. This sampling campaign will also ensure that canisters with some failed fuel elements are included in the population that is opened for retrieval of fuel for hotcell examinations. Additionally, valuable correlations between the macroscopic visible condition of fuel, hotcell examinations, and the gases generated in canisters will be possible. The analysis of other chemical species in the gas and liquid will allow assessments of the performance of the previously added corrosion inhibitor and possibly assessments of radiolysis. Sampling of canisters will be performed with equipment that opens the valves in the canister lid and draws a 15 ml sample of either gas or water. This work will most likely be performed in one of the pits-associated with the K West Basin.

  20. Draft report: Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions.

  1. Effects of annular air gaps surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister in deep geologic storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annular air spaces surrounding an emplaced nuclear waste canister in deep geologic storage will have significant effects on the long-term performance of the waste form. Addressed specifically in this analysis is the influence of a gap on the thermal response of the waste package. Three dimensional numerical modeling predicts temperature effects for a series of parameter variations, including the influence of gap size, surface emissivities, initial thermal power generation of the canister, and the presence/absence of a sleeve. Particular emphasis is placed on determining the effects these variables have on the canister surface temperature. We have identified critical gap sizes at which the peak transient temperature occurs when gap widths are varied for a range of power levels. It is also shown that high emissivities for the heat exchanging surfaces are desirable, while that of the canister surface has the greatest influence. Gap effects are more pronounced, and therefore more effort should be devoted to optimal design, in situations where the absolute temperature of the near field medium is high. This occurs for higher power level emplacements and in geomedia with low thermal conductivities. Finally, loosely inserting a sleeve in the borehole effectively creates two gaps and drastically raises the canister peak temperature. It is possible to use these results in the design of an optimum package configuration which will maintain the canister at acceptable temperature levels. A discussion is provided which relates these findings to NRC regulatory considerations

  2. Physical properties of encapsulate spent fuel in canisters; Comportamiento fisico de las capsulas de almacenamiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Spent fuel and high-level wastes will be permanently stored in a deep geological repository (AGP). Prior to this, they will be encapsulated in canisters. The present report is dedicated to the study of such canisters under the different physical demands that they may undergo, be those in operating or accident conditions. The physical demands of interest include mechanical demands, both static and dynamic, and thermal demands. Consideration is given to the complete file of the canister, from the time when it is empty and without lid to the final conditions expected in the repository. Thermal analyses of canisters containing spent fuel are often carried out in two dimensions, some times with hypotheses of axial symmetry and some times using a plane transverse section through the centre of the canister. The results obtained in both types of analyses are compared here to those of complete three-dimensional analyses. The latter generate more reliable information about the temperatures that may be experienced by the canister and its contents; they also allow calibrating the errors embodied in the two-dimensional calculations. (Author)

  3. Design basis for the copper canister. Stage one

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowyer, W. H. [ERA Technology Limited, Leatherhead, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-01

    The copper/iron canister which has been proposed for containment of high level waste in the Swedish Nuclear Waste Disposal Programme has been studied from the points of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and quality assurance. The choice of High Strength Low Alloy steel for the load bearing element appears to be a good choice but it is necessary to understand the effect of laser welding on the structure of the chosen alloy and to ensure that the very rapid cooling rates which attend laser welding of thick material do not lead to the development of untempered martensite. The choice of an almost pure copper for the corrosion barrier is based on the very good corrosion resistance claimed for it under repository conditions. Production trials are in progress using this material and serious difficulties are expected both in manufacture and in quality assurance. The trials may or may not produce a satisfactory prototype but they will give pointers towards modifications in choice of material and processing technology. This study concludes that the chosen material is particularly difficult to process and to test, and that the claimed good corrosion resistance in in doubt. 54 refs.

  4. Corrosion of iron: A study for radioactive waste canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagha, S. Ben; Crusset, D.; Mabille, I.; Tran, M.; Bernard, M. C.; Sutter, E.

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the risks of atmospheric corrosion of steel waste canisters following their deep geological disposal in the temperature range from 303 to 363 K. The work was performed using iron samples deposited as thin films on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and disposed in a climatic chamber. The experiments showed that, in the temperature under study (298-363 K), the mass increase due to the formation of oxide/hydroxide rose sharply above 70% RH, as is commonly observed at room temperatures, indicating that the phenomenon remains electrochemical in nature. Ex situ Raman spectrometric analyses indicate the formation of magnetite, maghemite and oxyhydroxides species in the 298-363 K temperature range, and for oxygen contents above 1 vol.%, whereas only Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 are detected at 363 K. In this work, the kinetics of the rust growth is discussed, on the bases of the rate of mass increase and of the composition of the rust, as a function of the climatic parameters and the oxygen content of the atmosphere.

  5. Local structures in mixed LixFe1-yMyPO4 (M=Co, Ni) electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, K.; Lindén, J.; Karppinen, M.

    2015-10-01

    We employ 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy as a local tool to probe electrical environments of Fe2+ and Fe3+ at different lithiation (x) and cation-substitution (y) levels in LixFe1-yMyPO4/C (M=Co, Ni) Li-ion battery electrode materials. Upon delithiation the local environment of Fe3+ remains unaffected for the parent y=0 system due to the LiFePO4/FePO4 phase separation, whereas for y>0 changes in the electrical environment are seen for Fe3+. When the Fe2+/Fe3+ redox couple is partially-delithiated, a decreasing quadrupole splitting value is observed for Fe3+ with increasing y, implying a more symmetric electrical environment. The increasing concentration of the Co2+/Ni2+ substituent introduces increasing amounts of Li atoms in the Fe3+-containing phase, and these nearest-neighbor Li atoms are suspected to cause the changes seen in the local environment of Fe3+.

  6. Quantitative ion beam analysis of M-C-O systems: application to an oxidized uranium carbide sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G.; Raveu, G.; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Khodja, H.; Vickridge, I.; Barthe, M. F.; Sauvage, T.

    2014-04-01

    A large variety of materials contain both carbon and oxygen atoms, in particular oxidized carbides, carbon alloys (as ZrC, UC, steels, etc.), and oxycarbide compounds (SiCO glasses, TiCO, etc.). Here a new ion beam analysis methodology is described which enables quantification of elemental composition and oxygen concentration profile over a few microns. It is based on two procedures. The first, relative to the experimental configuration relies on a specific detection setup which is original in that it enables the separation of the carbon and oxygen NRA signals. The second concerns the data analysis procedure i.e. the method for deriving the elemental composition from the particle energy spectrum. It is a generic algorithm and is here successfully applied to characterize an oxidized uranium carbide sample, developed as a potential fuel for generation IV nuclear reactors. Furthermore, a micro-beam was used to simultaneously determine the local elemental composition and oxygen concentration profiles over the first microns below the sample surface. This method is adapted to the determination of the composition of M?C?O? compounds with a sensitivity on elemental atomic concentrations around 1000 ppm.

  7. The influence of SRT on phosphorus removal and sludge characteristics in the HA-A/A-MCO sludge reduction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, N.; Ji, F. Y.

    2013-02-01

    By researching the influence of sludge age (SRT) on phosphorous removal and sludge characteristics in the HA-A/A-MCO (hydrolysis-acidification-anaerobic/anoxic-multistep continuous oxic tank) process, which has the effect of simultaneous phosphorous and nitrogen removal and sludge reduction, it is found that extended SRT is helpful for improving the ability of anaerobic phosphorous release and chemical recovery of phosphate, but the hosphorous removal efficiency is not affected. Extended SRT causes the system to have even more active sludge; it can also lead to the system having a powerful ability of biochemical reaction by using superiority of concentration. Meanwhile, extended SRT can still reduce sludge yield. Extended SRT cannot make soluble metabolic product (SMP) accumulate in the reactor, so that the pollutant removal power is reduced; it also cannot affect the activity of the sludge. However, extended SRT is able to make the coagulation of the sludge hard, and cause the sludge volume index value increase, but cannot cause sludge bulking.

  8. Description of Defense Waste Processing Facility reference waste form and canister. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1983-08-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1984. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approx. 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains about 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Leachabilities of SRP waste glasses are expected to approach 10/sup -8/ g/m/sup 2/-day based upon 1000-day tests using glasses containing SRP radioactive waste. Tests were performed under a wide variety of conditions simulating repository environments. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approx. 470 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the sludge and supernate processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 177,000 ci, with a radiation level of 5500 rem/h at canister surface contact. The reference canister is fabricated of standard 24-in.-OD, Schedule 20, 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and a combined lifting and welding flange on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in. with a 3/8-in. wall thickness. The 3-m canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected as an optimum size from glass quality considerations, a logical size for repository handling and to ensure that a filled canister with its double containment shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. 10 references.

  9. Design package test weights for fuel retrieval system (OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-10-26

    This is a design package that documents the development of test weights used in the Spent Nuclear Fuels subproject Fuel Retrieval System. The K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project consists of the safe retrieval, preparation, and repackaging of the spent fuel stored at the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins for interim safe storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) scrap baskets and fuel baskets will be loaded and weighed under water. The equipment used to weigh the loaded fuel baskets requires daily calibration checks, using test weights traceable to National Institute of Standards Testing (NIST) standards. The test weights have been designated as OCRWM related in accordance with HNF-SD-SNF-RF'T-007 (McCormack).

  10. System-Level Logistics for Dual Purpose Canister Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinina, Elena A.

    2014-06-03

    The analysis presented in this report investigated how the direct disposal of dual purpose canisters (DPCs) may be affected by the use of standard transportation aging and disposal canisters (STADs), early or late start of the repository, and the repository emplacement thermal power limits. The impacts were evaluated with regard to the availability of the DPCs for emplacement, achievable repository acceptance rates, additional storage required at an interim storage facility (ISF) and additional emplacement time compared to the corresponding repackaging scenarios, and fuel age at emplacement. The result of this analysis demonstrated that the biggest difference in the availability of UNF for emplacement between the DPC-only loading scenario and the DPCs and STADs loading scenario is for a repository start date of 2036 with a 6 kW thermal power limit. The differences are also seen in the availability of UNF for emplacement between the DPC-only loading scenario and the DPCs and STADs loading scenario for the alternative with a 6 kW thermal limit and a 2048 start date, and for the alternatives with a 10 kW thermal limit and 2036 and 2048 start dates. The alternatives with disposal of UNF in both DPCs and STADs did not require additional storage, regardless of the repository acceptance rate, as compared to the reference repackaging case. In comparison to the reference repackaging case, alternatives with the 18 kW emplacement thermal limit required little to no additional emplacement time, regardless of the repository start time, the fuel loading scenario, or the repository acceptance rate. Alternatives with the 10 kW emplacement thermal limit and the DPCs and STADs fuel loading scenario required some additional emplacement time. The most significant decrease in additional emplacement time occurred in the alternative with the 6 kW thermal limit and the 2036 repository starting date. The average fuel age at emplacement ranges from 46 to 88 years. The maximum fuel age at

  11. Nanomembrane Canister Architectures for the Visualization and Filtration of Oxyanion Toxins with One-Step Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelmagd, Ahmed; El-Safty, Sherif A; Shenashen, Mohamed A; Elshehy, Emad A; Khairy, Mohamed; Sakaic, Masaru; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Nanomembrane canister-like architectures were fabricated by using hexagonal mesocylinder-shaped aluminosilica nanotubes (MNTs)-porous anodic alumina (PAA) hybrid nanochannels. The engineering pattern of the MNTs inside a 60 μm-long membrane channel enabled the creation of unique canister-like channel necks and cavities. The open-tubular canister architecture design provides controllable, reproducible, and one-step processing patterns of visual detection and rejection/permeation of oxyanion toxins such as selenite (SeO3(2-)) in aquatic environments (i.e., in ground and river water sources) in the Ibaraki Prefecture of Japan. The decoration of organic ligand moieties such as omega chrome black blue (OCG) into inorganic Al2O3@tubular SiO2/Al2O3 canister membrane channel cavities led to the fabrication of an optical nanomembrane sensor (ONS). The OCG ligand was not leached from the canister as observed in washing, sensing, and recovery assays of selenite anions in solution, which enabled its multiple reuse. The ONS makes a variety of alternate processing analyses of selective quantification, visual detection, rejection/permeation, and recovery of toxic selenite quick and simple without using complex instrumentation. Under optimal conditions, the ONS canister exhibited a high selectivity toward selenite anions relative to other ions and a low-level detection limit of 0.0093 μM. Real analytical data showed that approximately 96% of SeO3(2-) anions can be recovered from aquatic and wastewater samples. The ONS canister holds potential for field recovery applications of toxic selenite anions from water. PMID:26178184

  12. Tests for manufacturing technology of disposal canisters for nuclear spent fuel; Loppusijoituskapselin valmistustekniset kokeet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, H. [VTT Energy (Finland); Salonen, T. [Outokumpu Poricopper Oy (Finland); Meuronen, I. [Suomen Teknohaus Oy (Finland); Lehto, K. [Valmet Oyj Rautpohja Foundry (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The summary and status of the results of the manufacturing technology programmes concerning the disposal canister for spent nuclear fuel conducted by Posiva Oy are given in this report. Posiva has maintained a draft plan for a disposal canister design and an assessment of potential manufacturing technologies for about ten years in Finland. Now, during the year 1999, the first full scale demonstration canister is manufactured in Finland. The technology used for manufacturing of this prototype is developed by Posiva Oy mainly in co-operation with domestic industry. The main partner in developing the manufacturing technology for the copper shell has been Outokumpu Poricopper Oy, Pori, Finland, and the main partner in developing the technology for the iron insert of the canister has been Valmet Oyj Rautpohja Foundry, Jyvaeskylae, Finland. In both areas many subcontractors have been used, predominantly domestic engineering workshops, but also some foreign subcontractors, e.g. for EB-welding, who have had large enough welding equipment. This report describes the developing programmes for canister manufacturing, evaluates the results and presents some alternative methods, and tries to evaluate the pros and contras of them. In addition, the adequacy of the achieved technological know-how is assessed in respect of the required quality of the disposal canister. The following manufacturing technologies have been the concrete topics of the development programme: Electron beam welding technology development for thick-walled copper, Casting of massive copper billets, Hot rolling of thick-walled copper plates, Hot pressing and forging in lid manufacture, Extrusion and drawing of copper tubes, Bending of copper plates by roller or press, Machining of copper, Residual stress removal by heat treatment, Non-destructive testing, Long-term strength of EB-welds, Casting and machining of the iron insert of the canister The specialists from all the main developing partner companies have

  13. Manufacturing of the canister shells T54 and T55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report constitutes a summary of the manufacturing test of the disposal canister copper shells T54 and T55. The copper billets were manufactured at Luvata Pori Oy, Finland. The hot-forming and machining of the copper shells were made at Vallourec and Mannesmann Tubes, Reisholz mill, Germany. The shells were manufactured with the pierce and draw method. Both of the pipes were manufactured separately in two phases. The first phase consisted of following steps: preheating of the billet, upsetting, piercing and the first draw with mandrel through drawing ring. After cooling down the block is measured and machined in case of excessive eccentricity or surface defects. In the second phase the block is heated up again and expanded and drawn in 6 sequences. In this process the pipe inside dimension is expanded and the length is increased in each step. Before the last, the 6th step, the bottom of the pipe is deformed in a sequence of special processes. During the manufacture of the first pipe, T54, some difficulties were detected with the centralization of the billet before upsetting. For the second manufacture of the T55, an additional steering ring was made and the result was remarkably more coaxial. After the manufacture and non-destructive inspections the shells were cut in pieces and three parts of each shell were taken for destructive testing. The three inspected parts were the bottom plate, a ring from the middle of the cylinder and a ring from the top of the cylinder. The destructive testing was made by Luvata Pori Oy. In spite of some practical difficulties and accidents during the manufacturing process, the results of the examinations showed that both of the test produced copper shells fulfilled all the specified requirements as for soundness (integrity), mechanical properties, chemical composition, dimensions, hardness and grain size. (orig.)

  14. Local structures in mixed LixFe1−yMyPO4 (M=Co, Ni) electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employ 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy as a local tool to probe electrical environments of Fe2+ and Fe3+ at different lithiation (x) and cation-substitution (y) levels in LixFe1−yMyPO4/C (M=Co, Ni) Li-ion battery electrode materials. Upon delithiation the local environment of Fe3+ remains unaffected for the parent y=0 system due to the LiFePO4/FePO4 phase separation, whereas for y>0 changes in the electrical environment are seen for Fe3+. When the Fe2+/Fe3+ redox couple is partially-delithiated, a decreasing quadrupole splitting value is observed for Fe3+ with increasing y, implying a more symmetric electrical environment. The increasing concentration of the Co2+/Ni2+ substituent introduces increasing amounts of Li atoms in the Fe3+-containing phase, and these nearest-neighbor Li atoms are suspected to cause the changes seen in the local environment of Fe3+. - Graphical abstract: Local environment of iron in LixFe1−y(Co/Ni)yPO4 is studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy at different lithiation (x) and cation-substitution (y) levels. - Highlights: • Local Fe environment in LixFe1−y(Co/Ni)yPO4 is studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. • Co/Ni-for-Fe substitution results in a more symmetric electrical environment for Fe3+. • Due to presence of Co2+/Ni2+, Li atoms are introduced into the Fe3+-containing phase. • These nearest-neighbor Li atoms are suggested to change the local Fe3+ environment

  15. A review of the possible effects of hydrogen on lifetime of carbon steel nuclear waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Switzerland, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) is responsible for developing an effective method for the safe disposal of vitrified high level waste (HLW) and spent fuel. One of the options for disposal canisters is thick-walled carbon steel. The canisters, which would have a diameter of about 1 m and a length of about 3 m (HLW) or about 5 m (spent fuel), will be embedded in horizontal tunnels and surrounded with bentonite clay. The regulatory requirement for the minimum canister lifetime is 1000 years but demonstration of a minimum lifetime of 10,000 years would be desirable. The pore-water to which the canister will be exposed is of marine origin with about 0.1-0.3 M Cl-. Since hydrogen is generated during the corrosion process, it is necessary to assess the probability of hydrogen assisted cracking modes and to make recommendations to eliminate that probability. To that aim, key reports detailing projections for the local environment and associated corrosion rate of the waste canister have been evaluated with the focus on the implication for the absorbed hydrogen concentration in the steel. Simple calculations of hydrogen diffusion and accumulation in the inner compartment of the sealed canister indicate that a pressure equivalent to that for gas pockets external to the canister (envisaged to be about 10 MPa) may be attained in the proposed exposure time, an important consideration since it is not possible to modify the internal surface of the closure weld. Current ideas on mechanisms of hydrogen assisted cracking are assessed from which it is concluded that the mechanistic understanding and associated models of hydrogen assisted cracking are insufficient to provide a framework for quantitative prediction for this application. The emphasis then was to identify threshold conditions for cracking and to evaluate the likelihood that these may be exceeded over the lifetime of the containment. Based on an analysis of data in the

  16. Numerical Modelling of Mechanical Integrity of the Copper-Cast Iron Canister. A Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article presents a summary of the research works on the numerical modelling of the mechanical integrity of the composite copper-cast iron canisters for the final disposal of Swedish nuclear wastes, conducted by SKB and SKI since 1992. The objective of the review is to evaluate the outstanding issues existing today about the basic design concepts and premises, fundamental issues on processes, properties and parameters considered for the functions and requirements of canisters under the conditions of a deep geological repository. The focus is placed on the adequacy of numerical modelling approaches adopted in regards to the overall mechanical integrity of the canisters, especially the initial state of canisters regarding defects and the consequences of their evolution under external and internal loading mechanisms adopted in the design premises. The emphasis is the stress-strain behaviour and failure/strength, with creep and plasticity involved. Corrosion, although one of the major concerns in the field of canister safety, was not included

  17. A preliminary assessment of gas migration from the copper/steel canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment has been carried out of the consequences of hydrogen gas generation in the copper/steel canister, a new concept that is being considered by SKB, Sweden, for the encapsulation of spent fuel for geological disposal. The principal aims of the study were as follows: a. to determine the mechanisms by which gas generated by anaerobic corrosion will migrate from a canister; b. to identify the possible consequences of gas generation, for example overpressurization of the canisters and effects on water movement; c. to carry out studies to assess the magnitudes of the consequences of gas generation and the way in which they are influenced by the mechanisms and ease of gas migration; d. to determine the likely fate of the gas produced in the repository; for example whether the gas will eventually be dissolved in the groundwater as it moves away from the canister or whether it will collect as free gas in the tunnel or elsewhere; e. to identify the potential benefits of using computer modelling techniques for estimating hydrogen generation rates within disposal canisters during the post-emplacement period

  18. Effects of stabilizers on the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the feasibility and the effectiveness of using stabilizers (internal metal structural components) to augment the heat transfer characteristics of a nuclear waste canister. The problem was modeled as a transient two-dimensional heat transfer in two physical domains - the stabilizer and the wedge (a 30-degree-angle canister segment), which includes the heat-producing spent-fuel rods. This problem is solved by a simultaneous and interrelated numerical investigation of the two domains in cartesian and polar coordinate systems. The numerical investigations were performed for three cases. In the first case, conduction was assumed to be the dominant mechanism for heat transfer. The second case assumed that radiation was the dominant mechanism, and in the third case both radiation and conduction were considered as mechanisms of heat transfer. The results show that for typical conditions in a waste package design, the stabilizers are quite effective in reducing the overall temperature in a waste canister. Furthermore, the results show that increasing the stabilizer thickness over the thickness specified in the present design has a negligible effect on the temperature distribution in the canister. Finally, the presence of the stabilizers was found to shift the location of the peak temperature areas in the waste canister

  19. A New Frangible Composite Canister Cover with the Function of Specified Direction Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangming; Cai, Deng'an; Qian, Yuan; Deng, Jian; Wang, Xiaopei

    2016-08-01

    A lightweight and auto-separated canister cover is required for quick launching in some specific missile launchers. In this paper, a new frangible composite canister cover with the function of specified direction separation is proposed and studied via both experimental and numerical approaches. The frangible canister cover with local non-split weak zone structure, which is manufactured by traditional hand lay-up process with vacuum assisted resin infusion (VARI) method, is designed to fail and separate in a predetermined and specified direction in comparison with the cover with full split weak zone structure. This design is innovative and also necessary for reduction of potential risk to peripheral equipment around the missile launcher. The failure pressure of the cover is determined on the basis of the failure criteria used in finite element (FE) model. In experimental pressurized testing, a number of frangible canister covers subjected to pressure loadings in six cases are studied. Close agreements between the experimental and numerical results have been examined. The frangible canister covers with local non-split weak zone structure which have been studied can be separated and fly out to the specified direction.

  20. Corrosion of the copper canister in the repository environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report accounts for studies on copper corrosion performed at Studsvik Material AB during 1997-1999 on commission by SKI. The work has been focused on localised corrosion and electrochemistry of copper in the repository environment. The current theory of localised copper corrosion is not consistent with recent practical experiences. It is therefore desired to complete and develop the theory based on knowledge about the repository environment and evaluations of previous as well as recent experimental and field results. The work has therefore comprised a thorough compilation and up-date of literature on copper corrosion and on the repository environment. A selection of a 'working environment', defining the chemical parameters and their ranges of variation has been made and is used as a fundament for the experimental part of the work. Experiments have then been performed on the long-range electrochemical behaviour of copper in selected environments simulating the repository. Another part of the work has been to further develop knowledge about the thermodynamic limits for corrosion in the repository environment. Some of the thermodynamic work is integrated here. Especially thermodynamics for the system Cu-Cl-H-O up to 150 deg C and high chloride concentrations are outlined. However, there is also a rough overview of the whole system Cu-Fe-Cl-S-C-H-O as a fundament for the discussion. Data are normally accounted as Pourbaix diagrams. Some of the conclusions are that general corrosion on copper will probably not be of significant importance in the repository as far as transportation rates are low. However, if such rates were high, general corrosion could be disastrous, as there is no passivation of copper in the highly saline environment. The claim on knowledge of different kinds of localised corrosion and pitting is high, as pitting damages can shorten the lifetime of a canister dramatically. Normal pitting can happen in oxidising environment, but there is

  1. Corrosion of the copper canister in the repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P.; Eriksson, Sture [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The present report accounts for studies on copper corrosion performed at Studsvik Material AB during 1997-1999 on commission by SKI. The work has been focused on localised corrosion and electrochemistry of copper in the repository environment. The current theory of localised copper corrosion is not consistent with recent practical experiences. It is therefore desired to complete and develop the theory based on knowledge about the repository environment and evaluations of previous as well as recent experimental and field results. The work has therefore comprised a thorough compilation and up-date of literature on copper corrosion and on the repository environment. A selection of a 'working environment', defining the chemical parameters and their ranges of variation has been made and is used as a fundament for the experimental part of the work. Experiments have then been performed on the long-range electrochemical behaviour of copper in selected environments simulating the repository. Another part of the work has been to further develop knowledge about the thermodynamic limits for corrosion in the repository environment. Some of the thermodynamic work is integrated here. Especially thermodynamics for the system Cu-Cl-H-O up to 150 deg C and high chloride concentrations are outlined. However, there is also a rough overview of the whole system Cu-Fe-Cl-S-C-H-O as a fundament for the discussion. Data are normally accounted as Pourbaix diagrams. Some of the conclusions are that general corrosion on copper will probably not be of significant importance in the repository as far as transportation rates are low. However, if such rates were high, general corrosion could be disastrous, as there is no passivation of copper in the highly saline environment. The claim on knowledge of different kinds of localised corrosion and pitting is high, as pitting damages can shorten the lifetime of a canister dramatically. Normal pitting can happen in oxidising environment, but

  2. Three-Dimensional Heat Transfer Analysis for A Thermal Energy Storage Canister

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou Xinbin; Xin Yuming; Yang Chunxin; Yuan Xiugan; Dong Keyong

    2001-01-01

    High temperature latent thermal storage is one of the critical techniques for a solar dynamic power system. This paper presents results from heat transfer analysis of a phase change salt containment canister. A three dimensional analysis program is developed to model heat transfer in a PCM canister. Analysis include effects of asymmetric circumference heat flux, conduction in canister walls, liquid PCM and solid PCM, void volume change and void location, and conduction and radiation across PCM vapor void. The PCM phase change process is modeled using the enthalpy method and the simulation results are compared with those of other two dimensional investigations. It's shown that there are large difference with two-dimensional analysis, therefore the three-dimensional model is necessary for system design of high temperature latent thermal storage.

  3. Design, Manufacturing, and Performance estimation of a Disposal Canister for the Ceramic Waste from Pyroprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Jong Youl; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    A pyroprocess is currently being developed by KAERI to cope with a highly accumulated spent nuclear fuel in Korea. The pyroprocess produces a certain amount of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), which is solidified by a ceramic binder. The produced ceramic waste will be confined in a secure disposal canister and then placed in a deep geologic formation so as not to contaminate human environment. In this paper, the development of a disposal canister was overviewed by discussing mainly its design premises, constitution, manufacturing methods, corrosion resistance in a deep geologic environment, radiation shielding, and structural stability. The disposal canister should be safe from thermal, chemical, mechanical, and biological invasions for a very long time so as not to release any kind of radionuclides.

  4. Design, Manufacturing, and Performance estimation of a Disposal Canister for the Ceramic Waste from Pyroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pyroprocess is currently being developed by KAERI to cope with a highly accumulated spent nuclear fuel in Korea. The pyroprocess produces a certain amount of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), which is solidified by a ceramic binder. The produced ceramic waste will be confined in a secure disposal canister and then placed in a deep geologic formation so as not to contaminate human environment. In this paper, the development of a disposal canister was overviewed by discussing mainly its design premises, constitution, manufacturing methods, corrosion resistance in a deep geologic environment, radiation shielding, and structural stability. The disposal canister should be safe from thermal, chemical, mechanical, and biological invasions for a very long time so as not to release any kind of radionuclides.

  5. Enhanced Earthquake-Resistance on the High Level Radioactive Waste Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the earthquake-resistance type buffer was developed with the method protecting safely about the earthquake. The main parameter having an effect on the earthquake-resistant performance was analyzed and the earthquake-proof type buffer material was designed. The shear analysis model was developed and the performance of the earthquake-resistance buffer material was evaluated. The dynamic behavior of the radioactive waste disposal canister was analyzed in case the earthquake was generated. In the case, the disposal canister gets the serious damage. In this paper, the earthquake-resistance buffer material was developed in order to prevent this damage. By putting the buffer in which the density is small between the canister and buffer, the earthquake-resistant performance was improved about 80%

  6. STS-45 ATLAS-1 pallets and SSBUV canisters in OV-104's payload bay (PLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-45 payload bay (PLB) configuration onboard Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, includes the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 4 (SSBUV-4) and Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science 1 (ATLAS-1) instruments. The SSBUV get away special (GAS) canisters are mounted on a GAS adapter beam on the starboard PLB sill longeron. THE SSBUV support canister is in the foreground and the SSBUV instrument canister with motorized door assembly (MDA) is next to it. ATLAS-1 equipment includes the igloo (center - decorated with several insignias), the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) spheres, and additional instruments mounted on unpressurized spacelab pallets. In the background, are the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and vertical tail highlighted against the cloud-covered surface of the Earth.

  7. Mechanical analysis of cylindrical part of canisters for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes mechanical analyses of cylindrical part of the VVER 440-, BWR and EPR-type canisters for spent nuclear fuel. The task was first to evaluate the stresses at maximum design pressure and further by increasing pressure load to determine the limit collapse load and corresponding safety factor. Maximum design pressure 44 MPa is a sum of the hydrostatic pressure 30 MPa caused by 3 km ice layer, 7 MPa caused by ground water pressure at the deepest disposal depth of 700 m and 7 MPa from bentonite swelling pressure. The analysis presented in this report concern the middle area of the canisters, where the cast iron insert is considered to be more critical than in the ends of the canister. For the model a piece from the middle area of the canister was separated by two planes perpendicular to the axis of the canister. This piece was studied first by two-dimensional plane strain model, where the planes are constrained and no elongation of the canister takes place. In the second model one of the planes was constrained and the other plane was allowed to displace in axial direction, which remains as a plane during deformation and to which axial pressure force is directed. This analysis, which corresponds better the real condition in the canister, was performed as threedimensional. The analyses gave however practically equal results due to plastic deformation. Thus the analysis can be done by two-dimensional plane strain model leading to same accuracy with less computation effort. Analyses were performed as large displacement and large strain analyses by the PASULA computing package, which has been developed at VTT for a variety of structural analysis and for heat conduction calculations. A special routine was developed for automatic mesh generation. Before the analysis of the VVER 440-, BWR- and EPR-type canisters the calculation methodology was validated with test results, which were received from pressure tests performed with a short BWR canister in Germany

  8. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-04-15

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10{sup 5} years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10{sup 5} years.

  9. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 105 years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 105 years

  10. Design basis for the copper/steel canister. Stage three. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the copper/iron canister proposed for the containment of high-level waste in the Swedish disposal programme has been studied from the points of view of choice of materials, manufacturing technology and Q A. This report describes the observations on progress which has been made between March 1995 and February 1996 and the results of further literature studies. A first trial canister has been produced by SKB using a fabricated steel liner and an extruded copper tubular, a second one using a fabricated tubular is at an advanced stage. A change from a fabricated steel inner canister to a proposed cast canister has been justified by a criticality argument but the technology for producing a cast canister is at present untried. It is considered that such a change will require a significant development programme. The microstructure achieved in the extruded copper tubular for the first canister is unacceptable. An improved microstructure may be achieved by extruding at a lower temperature but this remains to be demonstrated. Similar problems exist with plate used for the fabricated tubular but some more favourable structures have been achieved already by this route. Seam welding of the first tubular failed through a suspected material problem. The second fabricated tubular welded without difficulty. However it was necessary to constrain it during welding and it subsequently distorted during machining. There was some evidence of hot tearing close to the weld. The distortion problem may be overcome by a stress relieving anneal but this could cause further grain size problems. 19 refs

  11. Analyses of atmospheric radon 222 / canisters exposed by Greenpeace in Niger (Arlit / Akokan sector)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The companies SOMAIR and COMINAK, subsidiaries of the AREVA group, are mining uranium deposits in northern Niger. In the course of a field mission carried out in November 2009, a Greenpeace International team deposited detectors (canisters of activated charcoal) to measure radon 222, a radioactive gas formed by the decay of the radium 226 present in the uranium ore. This report includes the results of the analysis of the activated charcoal canisters conducted in CRIIRAD's laboratory, and a brief commentary on the interpretation of the results. (authors)

  12. Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions. To evaluate the potential environment on the surface of the canisters, SNL is working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to collect and analyze dust samples from the surface of in-service SNF storage canisters. In FY 13, SNL analyzed samples from the Calvert Cliffs Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI); here, results are presented for samples collected from two additional near-marine ISFSI sites, Hope Creek NJ, and Diablo Canyon CA. The Hope Creek site is located on the shores of the Delaware River within the tidal zone; the water is brackish and wave action is normally minor. The Diablo Canyon site is located on a rocky Pacific Ocean shoreline with breaking waves. Two types of samples were collected: SaltSmart™ samples, which leach the soluble salts from a known surface area of the canister, and dry pad samples, which collected a surface salt and dust using a swipe method with a mildly abrasive ScotchBrite™ pad. The dry samples were used to characterize the mineralogy and texture of the soluble and insoluble components in the dust via microanalytical techniques, including mapping X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. For both Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon canisters, dust loadings were much higher on the flat upper surfaces of the canisters than on the vertical sides. Maximum dust sizes collected at both sites were slightly larger than 20 μm, but Phragmites grass seeds ~1 mm in size, were observed on the tops of the Hope Creek canisters

  13. System Configuration Management Implementation Procedure for the Canister Storage Building (CSB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARRISON, R.C.

    2000-11-28

    This document provides configuration management for the Distributed Control System (DCS), the Gaseous Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS-100) System, the Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), the Canister Receiving Crane (CRC) CRN-001 PLC, and both North and South vestibule door interlock system PLCs at the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This procedure identifies and defines software configuration items in the CSB control and monitoring systems, and defines configuration control throughout the system life cycle. Components of this control include: configuration status accounting; physical protection and control; and verification of the completeness and correctness of these items.

  14. Transportation considerations related to waste forms and canisters for Defense TRU wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Andrews, W.B.; Schreiber, A.M.; Rosenthal, L.J.; Odle, C.J.

    1981-09-01

    This report identifies and discusses the considerations imposed by transportation on waste forms and canisters for contact-handled, solid transuranic wastes from the US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The report reviews (1) the existing raw waste forms and potential immobilized waste forms, (2) the existing and potential future DOE waste canisters and shipping containers, (3) regulations and regulatory trends for transporting commercial transuranic wastes on the ISA, (4) truck and rail carrier requirements and preferences for transporting the wastes, and (5) current and proposed Type B external packagings for transporting wastes.

  15. STS-105 ICC is moved to the payload canister for transport to pad 39A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An overhead crane in the Space Station Processing Facility lifts the Integrated Cargo Carrier from its workstand to move it to the payload canister. The ICC holds several payloads for mission STS-105, the Early Ammonia Servicer and two experiment containers. The ICC will join the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo in the payload canister for transport to Launch Pad 39A where they will be placed in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Discovery. Launch of STS-105 is scheduled for 5:38 p.m. EDT Aug. 9

  16. Transportation considerations related to waste forms and canisters for Defense TRU wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report identifies and discusses the considerations imposed by transportation on waste forms and canisters for contact-handled, solid transuranic wastes from the US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The report reviews (1) the existing raw waste forms and potential immobilized waste forms, (2) the existing and potential future DOE waste canisters and shipping containers, (3) regulations and regulatory trends for transporting commercial transuranic wastes on the ISA, (4) truck and rail carrier requirements and preferences for transporting the wastes, and (5) current and proposed Type B external packagings for transporting wastes

  17. Integrity of copper/steel canisters under crystalline bedrock repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Swedish nuclear waste disposal programme, the need to store the spent nuclear fuel safely for very long times has prompted a strategy which includes a long life canister. Technical as well as economical considerations related to design, choice of materials and manufacturing technology have lead to the selection of a reference design to be used for the continued development work. The canisters are cylindrical with a diameter close to 1 meter and a height of about 5 meters. In order to meet the need for an appropriate combination of mechanical strength, toughness, durability and corrosion resistance, the canisters comprise an inner vessel made of steel or cast iron to cope with mechanical stresses and an outer vessel made of almost pure copper to provide corrosion resistance. The Swedish nuclear industry has recently extended its development work to full-scale tests. Such experience is needed not least for the evaluation of the long-term integrity of the canister. This work has been closely followed by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) who have also carried out independent investigations and analyses. It should be emphasized that the findings relate to a canister which is under development and cannot, in general, be expected to be relevant for the fully developed canister. Significant results of the analyses include the identification of conceivable modes of canister failures. Such failures may be related to defects, segregation, limitations in inspectability, long term creep properties, adverse mechanical load situations, etc. It is assessed that the distribution functions of these failures might have their largest uncertainties at the tails extending to comparatively short times. Specific issues related to canister manufacture, scaling and non destructive testing which have been found to warrant further investigation are: defects in the copper ingot which may transfer to the rolled copper plate; the amount of work applied during the rolling or

  18. Friction stir welding - an alternative method for sealing nuclear waste storage canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.E. [TWI Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    When welding 50 mm thick copper a very high heat input is required to combat the high thermal diffusivity and only the Electron Beam Welding (EBW) process had this capability when this copper canister concept was conceived. Despite the encouraging results achieved using EBW with thick section copper, SKB felt that it would be prudent to assess other joining methods. This assessment concluded that friction welding, could also provide very high quality welds to satisfy the service life requirements of the SKB canister design. A friction welding variant called Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was shown to have the capability of welding 3 mm thick copper sheet with excellent integrity and reproducibility. This later provided sufficient encouragement for SKB to consider the potential of FSW as a method for joining thick section copper, using relatively simple machine tool based technology. It was thought that FSW might provide an alternative or complementary method for welding lids, or bases to canisters. In 1997 an FSW development programme started at TWI, focussed on the feasibility of welding 10 mm thick copper plate. Once this task was successfully completed, work continued to demonstrate that progressively thicker plate, up to 50 mm thick, could be joined. At this stage, with process viability established, a full size experimental FSW canister machine was designed and built. Work with this machine finished in January 2003, when it had been shown that FSW could definitely be used to weld lids to full size canisters. This report summarises the TWI development of FSW for SKB from 1997 to January 2003. It also highlights the important aspects of the process and the project milestones that will help to ensure that SKB has a welding technology that can be used with confidence for production fabrication of copper waste storage canisters in the future. The overall conclusion to this FSW development is that there is no doubt that the FSW process could be used to produce full

  19. Cost analysis for application of solidified waste fission product canisters in U.S. Army steam plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of the present study are to design steam plants using projected waste fission product canister characteristics, to analyze the overall impact and cost/benefit to the nuclear fuel cycle associated with these plants, and to develop plans for this application if the cost analysis so warrants it. The construction and operation of a steam plant fueled with waste fission product canisters would require the involvement and cooperation of various government agencies and private industry; thus the philosophies of these groups were studied. These philosophies are discussed, followed by a forecast of canister supply, canister characteristics, and strategies for Army canister use. Another section describes the safety and licensing of these steam plants since this affects design and capital costs. The discussion of steam plant design includes boiler concepts, boiler heat transfer, canister temperature distributions, steam plant size, and steam plant operation. Also, canister transportation is discussed since this influences operating costs. Details of economics of Army steam plants are provided including steam plant capital costs, operating costs, fuel reprocessor savings due to Army canister storage, and overall economics. Recommendations are made in the final section

  20. Rare-earth transition-metal chalcogenides Ln3MGaS7 (Ln=Nd, Sm, Dy, Er; M=Co, Ni) and Ln3MGaSe7 (Ln=Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, M=Co; Ln=Nd, Gd, Dy, M=Ni)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen new rare-earth transition-metal chalcogenides, Ln3MGaS7 (Ln=Nd, Sm, Dy, Er; M=Co, Ni) and Ln3MGaSe7 (Ln=Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, M=Co; Ln=Nd, Gd, Dy, M=Ni), have been synthesized by solid state reactions. They are isostructural, adopt Ce3Al1.67S7—related structure type, and crystallize in the non-centrosymmetric hexagonal space group P63. They adopt a three-dimensional framework composed of LnQ7 monocapped trigonal prisms with the interesting [MQ3]4− chains and isolated GaQ4 tetrahedra lying in two sets of channels in the framework. The magnetic susceptibility measurements on Ln3CoGaQ7 (Ln=Dy, Er, Q=S; Ln=Dy, Q=Se) indicate that they are paramagnetic and obey the Curie–Weiss law over the entire experimental temperature, while the magnetic susceptibility of Sm3CoGaSe7 deviates from the Curie–Weiss law as a result of the crystal field splitting. - Graphical abstract: Ln3MGaS7 (Ln=Nd, Sm, Dy, Er; M=Co, Ni) and Ln3MGaSe7 (Ln=Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, M=Co; Ln=Nd, Gd, Dy, M=Ni) adopt a three-dimensional framework composed of LnQ7 monocapped trigonal prisms with interesting [MQ3]4− chains and isolated GaQ4 tetrahedra lying in two sets of channels in the framework. - Highlights: • New compounds, Ln3MGaQ7 (Ln=rare-earth; M=Co, Ni; Q=S, Se), were synthesized. • They are isostructural and crystallize in the noncentrosymmetric space group P63. • They adopt a three-dimensional framework built by LnQ7 monocapped trigonal prisms. • Ln3CoGaQ7 (Ln=Dy, Er; Q=S, Se) are paramagnetic and obey the Curie–Weiss law. • The magnetic susceptibility of Sm3CoGaSe7 deviates from the Curie–Weiss law

  1. Hanford K basins spent nuclear fuel project update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty one hundred metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are currently stored in the Hanford Site K Basins near the Columbia River. The deteriorating conditions of the fuel and the basins provide engineering and management challenges to assure safe current and future storage. DE and S Hanford, Inc., part of the Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. lead team on the Project Hanford Management Contract, is constructing facilities and systems to move the fuel from current pool storage to a dry interim storage facility away from the Columbia River, and to treat and dispose of K Basins sludge, debris and water. The process starts in K Basins where fuel elements will be removed from existing canisters, washed, and separated from sludge and scrap fuel pieces. Fuel elements will be placed in baskets and loaded into Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and into transportation casks. The MCO and cask will be transported to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, where free water within the MCO will be removed under vacuum at slightly elevated temperatures. The MCOs will be sealed and transported via the transport cask to the Canister Storage Building

  2. An Assessment of Using Vibrational Compaction of Calcined HLW and LLW in DWPF Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1963, the INEL has calcined almost 8 million gallons of liquid mixed waste and liquid high-level waste, converting it to some 1.1 million gallons of dry calcine (about 4275.0 m3), which consists of alumina-and zirconia-based calcine and zirconia-sodium blend calcine. In addition, if all existing and projected future liquid wastes are solidified, approximately 2,000 m3 of additional calcine will be produced primarily from sodium-bearing waste. Calcine is a more desirable material to store than liquid radioactive waste because it reduces volume, is much less corrosive, less chemically reactive, less mobile under most conditions, easier to monitor and more protective of human health and the environment. This paper describes the technical issue involved in the development of a feasible solution for further volume reduction of calcined nuclear waste for transportation and long term storage, using a standard DWPF canister. This will be accomplished by developing a process wherein the canisters are transported into a vibrational machine, for further volume reduction by about 35%. The random compaction experiments show that this volume reduction is achievable. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate through computer modeling that it is feasible to use volume reduction vibrational machine without developing stress/strain forces that will weaken the canister integrity. Specifically, the paper presents preliminary results of the stress/strain analysis of the DWPF canister as a function of granular calcined height during the compaction and verifying that the integrity of the canister is not compromised. This preliminary study will lead to the development of better technology for safe compactions of nuclear waste that will have significant economical impact on nuclear waste storage and treatment. The preliminary results will guide us to find better solutions to the following questions: 1) What are the optimum locations and directions (vertical versus horizontal or

  3. Multi-dimensional modeling of a thermal energy storage canister. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., Dec. 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Power Module being developed for Space Station Freedom uses a eutectic mixture of LiF-CaF2 phase change material (PCM) contained in toroidal canisters for thermal energy storage. Presented are the results from heat transfer analyses of a PCM containment canister. One and two dimensional finite difference computer models are developed to analyze heat transfer in the canister walls, PCM, void, and heat engine working fluid coolant. The modes of heat transfer considered include conduction in canister walls and solid PCM, conduction and pseudo-free convection in liquid PCM, conduction and radiation across PCM vapor filled void regions, and forced convection in the heat engine working fluid. Void shape, location, growth or shrinkage (due to density difference between the solid and liquid PCM phases) are prescribed based on engineering judgment. The PCM phase change process is analyzed using the enthalpy method. The discussion of the results focuses on how canister thermal performance is affected by free convection in the liquid PCM and void heat transfer. Characterizing these effects is important for interpreting the relationship between ground-based canister performance (in 1-g) and expected on-orbit performance (in micro-g). Void regions accentuate canister hot spots and temperature gradients due to their large thermal resistance. Free convection reduces the extent of PCM superheating and lowers canister temperatures during a portion of the PCM thermal charge period. Surprisingly small differences in canister thermal performance result from operation on the ground and operation on-orbit. This lack of a strong gravity dependency is attributed to the large contribution of container walls in overall canister energy redistribution by conduction.

  4. New rock salt-related oxides Li{sub 3}M{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} (M=Co, Ni): Synthesis, structure, magnetism and electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, S. [Departamento de Químicas Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Morán, E., E-mail: emoran@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Químicas Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sáez-Puche, R.; Alario-Franco, M.Á.; Dos santos-Garcia, A.J. [Departamento de Químicas Inorganica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gonzalo, E.; Kuhn, A.; García-Alvarado, F. [Universidad CEU San Pablo, Facultad de Farmacia, Departamento de Química, 28668 Boadilla del Monte, Madrid (Spain); Sivakumar, T.; Tamilarasan, S.; Natarajan, S.; Gopalakrishnan, J. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2013-07-15

    We describe the synthesis, crystal structure, magnetic and electrochemical characterization of new rock salt-related oxides of formula, Li{sub 3}M{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} (M=Co, Ni). The M=Co oxide adopts the LiCoO{sub 2} (R-3m) structure, where sheets of LiO{sub 6} and (Co{sub 2}/Ru)O{sub 6} octahedra are alternately stacked along the c-direction. The M=Ni oxide also adopts a similar layered structure related to Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3}, where partial mixing of Li and Ni/Ru atoms lowers the symmetry to monoclinic (C2/c). Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that in Li{sub 3}Co{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}, the oxidation states of transition metal ions are Co{sup 3+} (S=0), Co{sup 2+} (S=1/2) and Ru{sup 4+} (S=1), all of them in low-spin configuration and at 10 K, the material orders antiferromagnetically. Analogous Li{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} presents a ferrimagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature of 100 K. The differences in the magnetic behavior have been explained in terms of differences in the crystal structure. Electrochemical studies correlate well with both magnetic properties and crystal structure. Li-transition metal intermixing may be at the origin of the more impeded oxidation of Li{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}RuO{sub 6} when compared to Li{sub 3}Co{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}. Interestingly high first charge capacities (between ca. 160 and 180 mAh g{sup −1}) corresponding to ca. 2/3 of theoretical capacity are reached albeit, in both cases, capacity retention and cyclability are not satisfactory enough to consider these materials as alternatives to LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Two new rock salt related oxides of formula, Li{sub 3}M{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}, (M=Co, Ni) have been prepared. The M=Co oxide adopts the LiCoO{sub 2} (R-3m) structure and the M=Ni oxide adopts a similar layered structure related to Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3,} monoclinic (C2/c), with partial mixing of Li and Ni/Ru atoms. For Li{sub 3}Co{sub 2}RuO{sub 6}, oxidation state for Ru is 4+ and antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is

  5. Development of single tubing-type canister for cryo-storage of bull semen and their effect on sperm motility and viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Iswadi Ismail

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of using single tubing-type canister on sperm quality. Semen was collected from the Bali cattle bull by electroejaculation technique and was cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen using slow freezing cryopreservation method. Two type of canister volume was used in this study; commercial canister (342.25π x 278 mm² and single tubing-type canister (4π x 90 mm². Makler counting chamber and computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA were used to evaluate the sperm motility and viability of post-thaw sperm. Results showed that the bull sperm motility and viability at the bottom of tubing-type canister was statistically higher and significant as compared to the commercial canister (p<0.05. Significant changes were found in sperm kinetics (VCL, VAP, VSL of tubing-type canister compared to commercial canister. No significant changes in the motility and viability of the bull sperm at the top of tubing-type canister and commercial canister. There were no significant changes in sperm progression (LIN, WOB, PROG in both the canisters. Developed tubing-type canister in this study showed potential as an alternative to be used in bull sperm cryo-storage.

  6. Examining the role of canister cooling conditions on the formation of nepheline from nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-01

    Nepheline (NaAlSiO₄) crystals can form during slow cooling of high-level waste (HLW) glass after it has been poured into a waste canister. Formation of these crystals can adversely affect the chemical durability of the glass. The tendency for nepheline crystallization to form in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al₂O₃ and Na₂O.

  7. Corrosion issues in relation to copper canisters for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saario, T. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    Spent nuclear fuel in Finland and Sweden will be disposed in deposition holes excavated in granitic bedrock at a depth of about 400 to 500 m. The release of activated products is prevented by a multi-barrier concept. A copper canister with 50 mm wall thickness will be the main corrosion shield, expected to last un-perforated for over 100 000 years. There are several different corrosion mechanisms that in principle may threaten the integrity of the copper canister. Likewise, there are several different scenarios which may expose the copper canister to these corrosion phenomena. During the years, most of the corrosion related concerns have been satisfactorily dealt with, leaving a few to be further researched. This paper gives an overview of the corrosion related issues with regard to the integrity of the copper canister, as well as the main approaches developed by the share holders to ensure the integrity for the duration needed. A more detailed description of the few remaining ongoing corrosion related research items is also included. (orig.)

  8. Stress analysis of glass-canister interaction: a study of residual stresses and fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual stresses and cracking in canisters filled with vitrified nuclear waste are simulated using finite element computer calculations. Cooling rates, internal heat generation, and thermal expansion coefficients significantly affect stress levels. Glass behavior within the softening temperature range is taken to follow the instant freezing concept of Bartenev

  9. 40 CFR 86.153-98 - Vehicle and canister preconditioning; refueling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... controlled to 50±25 grains of water vapor per pound of dry air) maintained at a nominal flow rate of 0.8 cfm... at least 1200 canister bed volumes of ambient air (with humidity controlled to 50±25 grains of water...'s air conditioner (if so equipped) shall be turned off. Ambient temperature shall be controlled...

  10. Fuel and canister process report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents fuel and canister processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. It forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Site. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process reports in the assessment, is described in the SR-Site Main report /SKB 2011/

  11. Instrumentation. Nondestructive Examination for Verification of Canister and Cladding Integrity - FY2013 Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pardini, Allan F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Denslow, Kayte M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crawford, Susan L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    This report documents FY13 efforts for two instrumentation subtasks under storage and transportation. These instrumentation tasks relate to developing effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques to (1) verify the integrity of metal canisters for the storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and to (2) characterize hydrogen effects in UNF cladding to facilitate safe storage and retrieval.

  12. Instrumentation: Nondestructive Examination for Verification of Canister and Cladding Integrity. FY2014 Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, Anthony M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-12

    This report documents FY14 efforts for two instrumentation subtasks under storage and transportation. These instrumentation tasks relate to developing effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques to (1) verify the integrity of metal canisters for the storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and to (2) verify the integrity of dry storage cask internals.

  13. Gap Analysis to Support Modeling the Long-Term Degradation of Used Nuclear Fuel Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Philip J.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Ross, Steven B.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Hanson, Brady D.; Devanathan, Ram

    2015-04-01

    Welded stainless steel canisters are being used worldwide for dry storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies, and the number of canisters in use is steadily increasing. In support of work currently being pursued at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand the atmospheric corrosion behavior of spent fuel dry storage systems, a gap analysis is underway to assess the state of knowledge for modeling of the long-term degradation of a UNF canister. The fundamental aim of this work is to inform research and development (R&D) efforts to establish a sound technical basis to support the extended dry storage of UNF for 100+ years. The analysis is considering all major components of the atmosphere corrosion degradation processes, ranging from contaminant sources and climatic interactions to regional conditions of particle transport and deposition, to microscale effects leading to stress corrosion cracking. The results of this gap analysis will be used to define the R&D pathway to develop an integrated multi-scale atmospheric corrosion modeling capability for UNF in dry storage canisters that can support the safe and reliable performance of these structures for more than 100 years.

  14. Reliability in NDT of canister for the Swedish spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronneteg, Ulf [SKB, Oskarshamn (Sweden); Mueller, Christina; Pavlovic, Mato [BAM, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The Swedish KBS-3 design for the disposal of spent fuel is based on encapsulation of the fuel in canisters consisting of cast iron inserts and an outer 5 cm thick shield of copper. The canisters are embedded in bentonite clay and will be disposed in crystalline bedrock at a depth of about 500 m. To verify that the canisters fulfil the requirements, an extensive program for quality control is developed. In this program the use of NDT is vital and therefore it is very important to determine the reliability of the developed NDT methods. The reliability of the NDT methods has been studied for six years and the results are used in several ways. One task is to identify areas where further optimizations of the NDT methods are necessary and another is to study the effect of influencing parameters prior to the upcoming qualifications. Furthermore, the reliability analyses of the NDT are combined with analyses of the manufacturing and welding processes to give input to the overall safety analyses of the long-term properties of the canisters. (orig.)

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Can-In-Canister Hardware Development/Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology to disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. Since there are significant radiation, contamination and security concerns, the project team is developing unique technologies to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. This paper covers the design, development and testing of the magazines (cylinders containing cans of ceramic pucks) and the rack that holds them in place inside the waste glass canister. Several magazine and rack concepts were evaluated to produce a design that gives the optimal balance between resistance to thermal degradation and facilitation of remote handling. This paper also reviews the effort to develop a join ted arm robot that can remotely load seven magazines into defined locations inside a stationary canister working only through the 4 inch (102 mm) diameter canister throat

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Can-In-Canister Hardware Development/Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology to disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. Since there are significant radiation, contamination and security concerns, the project team is developing unique technologies to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. This paper covers the design, development and testing of the magazines (cylinders containing cans of ceramic pucks) and the rack that holds them in place inside the waste glass canister. Several magazine and rack concepts were evaluated to produce a design that gives the optimal balance between resistance to thermal degradation and facilitation of remote handling. This paper also reviews the effort to develop a jointed arm robot that can remotely load seven magazines into defined locations inside a stationary canister working only through the 4 inch (102 mm) diameter canister throat

  17. Fuel and canister process report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werme, Lars; Lilja, Christina (eds.)

    2010-12-15

    This report documents fuel and canister processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. It forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Site. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process reports in the assessment, is described in the SR-Site Main report /SKB 2011/

  18. Development of fabrication technology for copper canisters with cast inserts. Status report in August 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an account of the results of trial fabrication of copper canisters with cast inserts carried out during the period 1998 - 2001. The work of testing of fabrication methods is being focused on a copper thickness of 50 mm. Occasional canisters with 30 mm copper thickness are being fabricated for the purpose of gaining experience and evaluating fabrication and inspection methods for such canisters. For the fabrication of copper tubes, SKB has concentrated its efforts on seamless tubes made by extrusion and pierce and draw processing. Five tubes have been extruded and two have been pierced and drawn during the period. Materials testing has shown that the resultant structure and mechanical properties of these tubes are good. Despite certain problems with dimensional accuracy, it can be concluded that both of these methods can be developed for use in the serial production of SKB' copper tubes. No new trial fabrication with roll forming of copper plate and longitudinal welding has been done. This method is nevertheless regarded as a potential alternative. Copper lids and bottoms are made by forging of continuous-cast bars. The forged blanks are machined to the desired dimensions. Due to the Canister Laboratory's need for lids to develop the technique for sealing welding, a relatively large number of forged blanks have been fabricated. It is noted in the report that the grain size obtained in lids and bottoms is much coarser than in fabricated copper tubes. Development work has been commenced for the purpose of optimizing the forging process. Nine cast inserts have been cast during the three-year period. The results of completed material testing of test pieces taken at different places along the length of the inserts have in several cases shown an unacceptable range of variation in strength properties and structure. In the continued work, insert fabrication will be developed in terms of both casting technique and iron composition. Development work on

  19. Miniature Canister (MiniCan) Corrosion Experiment Progress Report 3 for 2008-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R.; Reddy, B.; Rance, A.P. (Serco (United Kingdom))

    2011-08-15

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel rods for geological disposal, SKB of Sweden are considering using the Copper-Iron Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and a cast iron insert. Over the years a programme of laboratory work has been carried out to investigate a range of corrosion issues associated with the canister, including the possibility of expansion of the outer copper canister as a result of the anaerobic corrosion of the cast iron insert. Previous experimental work using stacks of test specimens has not shown any evidence of corrosion-induced expansion. However, as a further step in developing an understanding of the likely performance of the canister in a repository environment, Serco has set up a series of experiments in SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) using inactive model canisters, in which leaks were deliberately introduced into the outer copper canister while surrounded by bentonite, with the aim of obtaining information about the internal corrosion evolution of the internal environment. The experiments use five small-scale model canisters (300 mm long x 150 mm diameter) that simulate the main features of the SKB canister design (hence the project name, 'MiniCan'). The main aim of the work is to examine how corrosion of the cast iron insert will evolve if a leak is present in the outer copper canister. This report describes the progress on the five experiments running at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and the data obtained from the start of the experiments in late 2006 up to Winter 2010. The full details of the design and installation of the experiments are given in a previous report and this report concentrates on summarising and interpreting the data obtained to date. This report follows two earlier progress reports presenting results up to December 2009. The current document (progress report 3) describes work up to December 2010. The current report presents the results of the water analyses

  20. Miniature Canister (MiniCan) Corrosion experiment progress report 4 for 2008-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, Nick; Reddy, Bharti; Rance, Andy [Serco, Hook (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel rods for geological disposal, SKB of Sweden are considering using the Copper-Iron Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and a cast iron insert. Over the years a programme of laboratory work has been carried out to investigate a range of corrosion issues associated with the canister, including the possibility of expansion of the outer copper canister as a result of the anaerobic corrosion of the cast iron insert. Previous experimental work using stacks of test specimens has not shown any evidence of corrosion-induced expansion. However, as a further step in developing an understanding of the likely performance of the canister in a repository environment, Serco has set up a series of experiments in SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) using inactive model canisters, in which leaks were deliberately introduced into the outer copper canister while surrounded by bentonite, with the aim of obtaining information about the internal corrosion evolution of the internal environment. The experiments use five small scale model canisters (300 mm long x 150 mm diameter) that simulate the main features of the SKB canister design (hence the project name, 'MiniCan'). The main aim of the work is to examine how corrosion of the cast iron insert will evolve if a leak is present in the outer copper canister. This report describes the progress on the five experiments running at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and the data obtained from the start of the experiments in late 2006 up to Winter 2011. The full details of the design and installation of the experiments are given in a previous report and this report concentrates on summarising and interpreting the data obtained to date. This report follows the earlier progress reports presenting results up to December 2010. The current document (progress report 4) describes work up to December 2011. The current report presents the results of the water analyses

  1. Miniature Canister (MiniCan) Corrosion experiment progress report 4 for 2008-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel rods for geological disposal, SKB of Sweden are considering using the Copper-Iron Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and a cast iron insert. Over the years a programme of laboratory work has been carried out to investigate a range of corrosion issues associated with the canister, including the possibility of expansion of the outer copper canister as a result of the anaerobic corrosion of the cast iron insert. Previous experimental work using stacks of test specimens has not shown any evidence of corrosion-induced expansion. However, as a further step in developing an understanding of the likely performance of the canister in a repository environment, Serco has set up a series of experiments in SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) using inactive model canisters, in which leaks were deliberately introduced into the outer copper canister while surrounded by bentonite, with the aim of obtaining information about the internal corrosion evolution of the internal environment. The experiments use five small scale model canisters (300 mm long x 150 mm diameter) that simulate the main features of the SKB canister design (hence the project name, 'MiniCan'). The main aim of the work is to examine how corrosion of the cast iron insert will evolve if a leak is present in the outer copper canister. This report describes the progress on the five experiments running at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and the data obtained from the start of the experiments in late 2006 up to Winter 2011. The full details of the design and installation of the experiments are given in a previous report and this report concentrates on summarising and interpreting the data obtained to date. This report follows the earlier progress reports presenting results up to December 2010. The current document (progress report 4) describes work up to December 2011. The current report presents the results of the water analyses obtained in

  2. Miniature Canister (MiniCan) Corrosion Experiment Progress Report 3 for 2008-2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel rods for geological disposal, SKB of Sweden are considering using the Copper-Iron Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and a cast iron insert. Over the years a programme of laboratory work has been carried out to investigate a range of corrosion issues associated with the canister, including the possibility of expansion of the outer copper canister as a result of the anaerobic corrosion of the cast iron insert. Previous experimental work using stacks of test specimens has not shown any evidence of corrosion-induced expansion. However, as a further step in developing an understanding of the likely performance of the canister in a repository environment, Serco has set up a series of experiments in SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) using inactive model canisters, in which leaks were deliberately introduced into the outer copper canister while surrounded by bentonite, with the aim of obtaining information about the internal corrosion evolution of the internal environment. The experiments use five small-scale model canisters (300 mm long x 150 mm diameter) that simulate the main features of the SKB canister design (hence the project name, 'MiniCan'). The main aim of the work is to examine how corrosion of the cast iron insert will evolve if a leak is present in the outer copper canister. This report describes the progress on the five experiments running at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and the data obtained from the start of the experiments in late 2006 up to Winter 2010. The full details of the design and installation of the experiments are given in a previous report and this report concentrates on summarising and interpreting the data obtained to date. This report follows two earlier progress reports presenting results up to December 2009. The current document (progress report 3) describes work up to December 2010. The current report presents the results of the water analyses obtained in

  3. Thermal analysis of dry concrete canister storage system for CANDU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a thermal analysis of the concrete canisters for interim dry storage of spent, irradiated Canadian Deuterium Uranium(CANDU) fuel. The canisters are designed to contain 6-year-old fuel safely for periods of 50 years in stainless steel baskets sealed inside a steel-lined concrete shield. In order to assure fuel integrity during the storage, fuel rod temperature shall not exceed the temperature limit. The contents of thermal analysis include the following : 1) Steady state temperature distributions under the conservative ambient temperature and insolation load. 2) Transient temperature distributions under the changes in ambient temperature and insolation load. Accounting for the coupled heat transfer modes of conduction, convection, and radiation, the computer code HEATING5 was used to predict the thermal response of the canister storage system. As HEATING5 does not have the modeling capability to compute radiation heat transfer on a rod-to-rod basis, a separate calculating routine was developed and applied to predict temperature distribution in a fuel bundle. Thermal behavior of the canister is characterized by the large thermal mass of the concrete and radiative heat transfer within the basket. The calculated results for the worst case (steady state with maximum ambient temperature and design insolation load) indicated that the maximum temperature of the 6 year cooled fuel reached to 182.4 .deg. C, slightly above the temperature limit of 180 .deg. C. However,the thermal inertia of the thick concrete wall moderates the internal changes and prevents a rise in fuel temperature in response to ambient changes. The maximum extent of the transient zone was less than 75% of the concrete wall thickness for cyclic insolation changes. When transient nature of ambient temperature and insolation load are considered, the fuel temperature will be a function of the long term ambient temperature as opposed to daily extremes. The worst design

  4. Clean Assembly of Genesis Collector Canister for Flight: Lessons for Planetary Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.; Allen, C. C.; Warren, J. L.; Schwartz, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of solar composition in the Genesis collectors requires not only high sensitivity but very low blanks; thus, very strict collector contamination minimization was required beginning with mission planning and continuing through hardware design, fabrication, assembly and testing. Genesis started with clean collectors and kept them clean inside of a canister. The mounting hardware and container for the clean collectors were designed to be cleanable, with access to all surfaces for cleaning. Major structural components were made of aluminum and cleaned with megasonically energized ultrapure water (UPW). The UPW purity was >18 M resistivity. Although aluminum is relatively difficult to clean, the Genesis protocol achieved level 25 and level 50 cleanliness on large structural parts; however, the experience suggests that surface treatments may be helpful on future missions. All cleaning was performed in an ISO Class 4 (Class 10) cleanroom immediately adjacent to an ISO Class 4 assembly room; thus, no plastic packaging was required for transport. Persons assembling the canister were totally enclosed in cleanroom suits with face shield and HEPA filter exhaust from suit. Interior canister materials, including fasteners, were installed, untouched by gloves, using tweezers and other stainless steel tools. Sealants/lubricants were not exposed inside the canister, but vented to the exterior and applied in extremely small amounts using special tools. The canister was closed in ISO Class 4, not to be opened until on station at Earth-Sun L1. Throughout the cleaning and assembly, coupons of reference materials that were cleaned at the same time as the flight hardware were archived for future reference and blanks. Likewise reference collectors were archived. Post-mission analysis of collectors has made use of these archived reference materials.

  5. Evaluation of DUSTRAN Software System for Modeling Chloride Deposition on Steel Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Tracy T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Philip J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rutz, Frederick C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-29

    The degradation of steel by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) when exposed to atmospheric conditions for decades is a significant challenge in the fossil fuel and nuclear industries. SCC can occur when corrosive contaminants such as chlorides are deposited on a susceptible material in a tensile stress state. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has identified chloride-induced SCC as a potential cause for concern in stainless steel used nuclear fuel (UNF) canisters in dry storage. The modeling of contaminant deposition is the first step in predictive multiscale modeling of SCC that is essential to develop mitigation strategies, prioritize inspection, and ensure the integrity and performance of canisters, pipelines, and structural materials. A multiscale simulation approach can be developed to determine the likelihood that a canister would undergo SCC in a certain period of time. This study investigates the potential of DUSTRAN, a dust dispersion modeling system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, to model the deposition of chloride contaminants from sea salt aerosols on a steel canister. Results from DUSTRAN simulations run with historical meteorological data were compared against measured chloride data at a coastal site in Maine. DUSTRAN’s CALPUFF model tended to simulate concentrations higher than those measured; however, the closest estimations were within the same order of magnitude as the measured values. The decrease in discrepancies between measured and simulated values as the level of abstraction in wind speed decreased suggest that the model is very sensitive to wind speed. However, the influence of other parameters such as the distinction between open-ocean and surf-zone sources needs to be explored further. Deposition values predicted by the DUSTRAN system were not in agreement with concentration values and suggest that the deposition calculations may not fully represent physical processes. Overall, results indicate that with parameter

  6. Nonlinear dynamic impact analysis for installing a dry storage canister into a vertical concrete cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a series of dynamic impact analysis for installing a dry storage canister into a vertical concrete cask (VCC) is performed. The dry storage system considered herein is called HCDSS-69, recently developed by INER and being capable of accommodating 69 bundles of BWR spent nuclear fuels. The impact accident is stemming from a conservative consideration of accidental movement when the canister is being hoisted into a VCC. According to NUREG-0554, the accidental movement is conservatively simulated by 80 mm- and 160 mm-height free-drop motions and then with straight and 2°-oblique impact to a pedestal in VCC. A symmetric fully 3-D finite element model is built and analyzed using the explicit finite element code, LS-DYNA. Geometrical, contact, and material nonlinearities are all taken into account. The analysis result concludes that the permanent deformations of the canister are not severe to affect fuel retrieve after the impact accident and the maximum stress intensity in the canister shell can meet the ASME code appendix F F-1340, preventing the leakage of radioactive materials. The study also found that with properly reducing the wall thickness of the pedestal cylinder, the maximum acceleration and permanent deformation of the canister can be much alleviated, even though the drop height is increased to the double of the required brake distance specified in NUREG-0554. The damages of the pedestal in each analysis are moderate so that the heat transfer condition after the impact accident can be bounded by the off-normal event for half-blockage of air inlets

  7. Simulation of long-term behavior in HLW near-field by centrifugal model test. Part 4. Model test of coupled THM processes in isotropic stress conditions using heatable overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated the equivalent long-term behavior in the near-field of a geological repository for high level radioactive waste disposal, using the centrifugal near-field model test under the coupled thermo-hydraulic-mechanical condition. The model consisted of a sedimentary bedrock, buffer, and heating type model overpack, and was enclosed within a pressure vessel. Tests were conducted with a centrifugal force field of 30 G under isotropic stress-constrain conditions with confining pressures and injection of pore water. The temperature condition of the overpack was constantly 95°C. As the result, the values showed similar behaviors to that of the normal temperature tests partially. However, the different behaviors were measured such as the displacement of overpack change from the settlement to the heave, the extreme drop in the soil pressure of the buffer and the strain of side wall of bedrock change from the tension to the compression after injecting pore water of hundreds hours. In addition, the flow rate of the injection pore water suddenly changed after hundreds of hours. Furthermore, the density of the buffer was lower than that of the normal temperature tests by X-ray CT imaging in the post-tests. We infer that the high temperature overpack influenced the stiffness and the pore water distribution of the buffer, and the density and the soil pressure of the buffer decreased. As a result of the change of stiffness in the disposal hole (buffer), the tendency to the strain of the surrounding bedrock and the displacement of the overpack changed. (author)

  8. Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions. To evaluate the potential environment on the surface of the canisters, SNL is working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to collect and analyze dust samples from the surface of in-service SNF storage canisters. In FY 13, SNL analyzed samples from the Calvert Cliffs Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI); here, results are presented for samples collected from two additional near-marine ISFSI sites, Hope Creek NJ, and Diablo Canyon CA. The Hope Creek site is located on the shores of the Delaware River within the tidal zone; the water is brackish and wave action is normally minor. The Diablo Canyon site is located on a rocky Pacific Ocean shoreline with breaking waves. Two types of samples were collected: SaltSmart™ samples, which leach the soluble salts from a known surface area of the canister, and dry pad samples, which collected a surface salt and dust using a swipe method with a mildly abrasive ScotchBrite™ pad. The dry samples were used to characterize the mineralogy and texture of the soluble and insoluble components in the dust via microanalytical techniques, including mapping X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. For both Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon canisters, dust loadings were much higher on the flat upper surfaces of the canisters than on the vertical sides. Maximum dust sizes collected at both sites were slightly larger than 20 μm, but Phragmites grass seeds ~1 mm in size, were observed on the tops of the Hope Creek canisters

  9. Syntheses, structure and magnetic properties of two vanadate garnets Ca{sub 5}M{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} (M=Co, Ni)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Nannan [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); He, Zhangzhen, E-mail: hcz1988@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Cui, Meiyan; Guo, Wenbin; Zhang, Suyun; Yang, Ming; Tang, Yingying [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Two vanadate compounds Ca{sub 5}M{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} (M=Co, Ni) have been synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. The compounds are found to crystallize in the cubic system with a space group Ia-3d, which exhibit a typical garnet structural framework. Magnetic measurements show that Ca{sub 5}M{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} (M=Co, Ni) exhibit similar magnetic behaviors, in which Ca{sub 5}Co{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} possesses an antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N}=~6 K while Ca{sub 5}Ni{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} shows an antiferromagnetic ordering at T{sub N}=~7 K. - Graphical abstract: Garnet vanadate compounds Ca{sub 5}M{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} (M=Co, Ni) have been synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. Structural features and magnetic behaviors are also investigated. - Highlights: • New type of garnet vanadates Ca{sub 5}M{sub 4}V{sub 6}O{sub 24} (M=Co, Ni) are synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. • Structural features are confirmed by single crystal samples. • Magnetic behaviors are firstly investigated in the systems.

  10. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lata

    1996-09-26

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  11. The effect of discontinuities on the corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Ltd, Calgary, AL (Canada)

    2004-03-01

    Discontinuities may remain in the weld region of copper canisters following the final closure welding and inspection procedures. Although the shell of the copper canister is expected to exhibit excellent corrosion properties in the repository environment, the question remains what impact these discontinuities might have on the long-term performance and service life of the canister. A review of the relevant corrosion literature has been carried out and an expert opinion of the impact of these discontinuities on the canister lifetime has been developed. Since the amount of oxidant in the repository is limited and the maximum wall penetration is expected to be < 2 mm, discontinuities will only be significant if they impact the localised corrosion or stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of the canister. Not all of the discontinuities will impact the corrosion behaviour of the canister. Only surface-breaking discontinuities and those discontinuities within 2 mm of the surface will affect the corrosion behaviour. Defects located further away from the finished surface will have no impact. The relevant literature on the initiation and propagation of localised corrosion and SCC has been reviewed. Initiation of localised corrosion occurs at the microscopic scale at grain boundaries, and will not be affected by the presence of macroscopic discontinuities. The localised breakdown of a passive Cu{sub 2}O/Cu(OH){sub 2} film at a critical electrochemical potential determines where and when pits initiate, not the presence of pit-shaped surface discontinuities. The factors controlling pit growth and death are well understood. There is evidence for a maximum pit radius for copper in chloride solutions, above which the small anodic: cathodic surface area ratio required for the formation of deep pits cannot be sustained. This maximum pit radius is of the order of 0.1-0.5 mm. Surface discontinuities larger than this size are unlikely to propagate as pits, and pits generated from

  12. Investigation of exchange bias in 0.1MFe2O4/0.9BiFeO3 (M=Co, Cu, Ni) nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 0.1MFe2O4/0.9BiFeO3 (M=Co, Cu, Ni) nanocomposite samples were synthesized by the sol–gel method. Phase composition analysis was carried out, which showed that these bulk samples were composed of a ferrimagnetic MFe2O4 (M=Co, Cu, Ni) and a ferroelectric antiferromagnet (FEAF) BiFeO3 phases, respectively. The magnetic properties of all the samples were investigated by measuring their magnetization as a function of temperature and magnetic field. These results indicated that the magnetic hysteresis loops of 0.1CuFe2O4/0.9BiFeO3 sample sintered in air atmosphere at 550 °C for 3 h exhibited a negative shift and an enhanced coercivity at low temperature ascribed to strong exchange coupling between the BiFeO3 and CuFe2O4 grains. However, there were no magnetic hysteresis loops in both the 0.1CoFe2O4/0.9BiFeO3 sample and the 0.1NiFe2O4/0.9BiFeO3 sample. In view of these results, we tend to think the CuFe2O4/BiFeO3 nanocomposite system may be a useful multifunctional material. - Highlights: ► Exchange bias effect in ferroelectric antiferromagnet (FEAF)/ferromagnet (FM) nanocomposites. ► Exchange bias effect is only observed in the 0.1CuFe2O4/0.9BiFeO3 nanocomposite. ► Lower saturation magnetization is important for producing exchange bias in FEAF/FM system.

  13. The gas-cooled Li2O moderator/breeder canister blanket for fusion-synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new integrated power and breeding blanket is described. The blanket incorporates features that make it suitable for synthetic fuel production. It is matched to the thermal and electrical requirements of the General Atomic water-splitting process for producing hydrogen. The fusion reaction is the Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR) using Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) physics. The canister blanket is a high temperature, pressure balanced, crossflow heat exchanger contained within a low activity, independently cooled, moderate temperature, first wall structural envelope. The canister uses Li2O as the moderator/breeder and helium as the coolant. ''In situ'' tritium control, combined with slip stream processing and self-healing permeation barriers, assures a hydrogen product essentially free of tritium. The blanket is particularly adapted to synfuels production but is equally useful for electricity production or co-generation

  14. Oxidative Dissolution of Spent Fuel and Release of Nuclides from a Copper/Iron Canister : Model Developments and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Longcheng

    2001-01-01

    Three models have been developed and applied in the performance assessment of a final repository. They are based on accepted theories and experimental results for known and possible mechanisms that may dominate in the oxidative dissolution of spent fuel and the release of nuclides from a canister. Assuming that the canister is breached at an early stage after disposal, the three models describe three sub-systems in the near field of the repository, in which the governing processes and mechani...

  15. Automated waste canister docking and emplacement using a sensor-based intelligent controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensor-based intelligent control system is described that utilizes a multiple degree-of-freedom robotic system for the automated remote manipulation and precision docking of large payloads such as waste canisters. Computer vision and ultrasonic proximity sensing are used to control the automated precision docking of a large object with a passive target cavity. Real-time sensor processing and model-based analysis are used to control payload position to a precision of ± 0.5 millimeter

  16. NDT Reliability - Final Report. Reliability in non-destructive testing (NDT) of the canister components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the methodology of the reliability investigation performed on the ultrasonic phased array NDT system, developed by SKB in collaboration with Posiva, for inspection of the canisters for permanent storage of nuclear spent fuel. The canister is composed of a cast iron insert surrounded by a copper shell. The shell is composed of the tube and the lid/base which are welded to the tube after the fuel has been place, in the tube. The manufacturing process of the canister parts and the welding process are described. Possible defects, which might arise in the canister components during the manufacturing or in the weld during the welding, are identified. The number of real defects in manufactured components have been limited. Therefore the reliability of the NDT system has been determined using a number of test objects with artificial defects. The reliability analysis is based on the signal response analysis. The conventional signal response analysis is adopted and further developed before applied on the modern ultrasonic phased-array NDT system. The concept of multi-parameter a, where the response of the NDT system is dependent on more than just one parameter, is introduced. The weakness of use of the peak signal response in the analysis is demonstrated and integration of the amplitudes in the C-scan is proposed as an alternative. The calculation of the volume POD, when the part is inspected with more configurations, is also presented. The reliability analysis is supported by the ultrasonic simulation based on the point source synthesis method

  17. NDT Reliability - Final Report. Reliability in non-destructive testing (NDT) of the canister components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlovic, Mato; Takahashi, Kazunori; Mueller, Christina; Boehm, Rainer (BAM, Federal Inst. for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)); Ronneteg, Ulf (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    This report describes the methodology of the reliability investigation performed on the ultrasonic phased array NDT system, developed by SKB in collaboration with Posiva, for inspection of the canisters for permanent storage of nuclear spent fuel. The canister is composed of a cast iron insert surrounded by a copper shell. The shell is composed of the tube and the lid/base which are welded to the tube after the fuel has been place, in the tube. The manufacturing process of the canister parts and the welding process are described. Possible defects, which might arise in the canister components during the manufacturing or in the weld during the welding, are identified. The number of real defects in manufactured components have been limited. Therefore the reliability of the NDT system has been determined using a number of test objects with artificial defects. The reliability analysis is based on the signal response analysis. The conventional signal response analysis is adopted and further developed before applied on the modern ultrasonic phased-array NDT system. The concept of multi-parameter a, where the response of the NDT system is dependent on more than just one parameter, is introduced. The weakness of use of the peak signal response in the analysis is demonstrated and integration of the amplitudes in the C-scan is proposed as an alternative. The calculation of the volume POD, when the part is inspected with more configurations, is also presented. The reliability analysis is supported by the ultrasonic simulation based on the point source synthesis method

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-11-18

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) is to achieve the earliest possible removal of free water from Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs contain metallic uranium SNF that have been removed from the 100K Area fuel storage water basins (i.e., the K East and K West Basins) at the US. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. Removal of free water is necessary to halt water-induced corrosion of exposed uranium surfaces and to allow the MCOs and their SNF payloads to be safely transported to the Hanford Site 200 East Area and stored within the SNF Project Canister Storage Building (CSB). The CVDF is located within a few hundred yards of the basins, southwest of the 165KW Power Control Building and the 105KW Reactor Building. The site area required for the facility and vehicle circulation is approximately 2 acres. Access and egress is provided by the main entrance to the 100K inner area using existing roadways. The CVDF will remove free. water from the MCOs to reduce the potential for continued fuel-water corrosion reactions. The cold vacuum drying process involves the draining of bulk water from the MCO and subsequent vacuum drying. The MCO will be evacuated to a pressure of 8 torr or less and backfilled with an inert gas (helium). The MCO will be sealed, leak tested, and then transported to the CSB within a sealed shipping cask. (The MCO remains within the same shipping Cask from the time it enters the basin to receive its SNF payload until it is removed from the Cask by the CSB MCO handling machine.) The CVDF subproject acquired the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities. The cold vacuum drying operations result in an MCO containing dried fuel that is prepared for shipment to the CSB by the Cask transportation system. The CVDF subproject also provides equipment to dispose of solid wastes generated by the cold vacuum drying process and transfer process water removed

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) is to achieve the earliest possible removal of free water from Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs contain metallic uranium SNF that have been removed from the 100K Area fuel storage water basins (i.e., the K East and K West Basins) at the US. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. Removal of free water is necessary to halt water-induced corrosion of exposed uranium surfaces and to allow the MCOs and their SNF payloads to be safely transported to the Hanford Site 200 East Area and stored within the SNF Project Canister Storage Building (CSB). The CVDF is located within a few hundred yards of the basins, southwest of the 165KW Power Control Building and the 105KW Reactor Building. The site area required for the facility and vehicle circulation is approximately 2 acres. Access and egress is provided by the main entrance to the 100K inner area using existing roadways. The CVDF will remove free. water from the MCOs to reduce the potential for continued fuel-water corrosion reactions. The cold vacuum drying process involves the draining of bulk water from the MCO and subsequent vacuum drying. The MCO will be evacuated to a pressure of 8 torr or less and backfilled with an inert gas (helium). The MCO will be sealed, leak tested, and then transported to the CSB within a sealed shipping cask. (The MCO remains within the same shipping Cask from the time it enters the basin to receive its SNF payload until it is removed from the Cask by the CSB MCO handling machine.) The CVDF subproject acquired the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities. The cold vacuum drying operations result in an MCO containing dried fuel that is prepared for shipment to the CSB by the Cask transportation system. The CVDF subproject also provides equipment to dispose of solid wastes generated by the cold vacuum drying process and transfer process water removed

  20. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Poh -Sang [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology; Sindelar, Robert L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  1. Acceptance of canisters of consolidated spent nuclear fuel by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: failed fuel; consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; non-fuel-assembly hardware; fuel in metal storage casks; fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; inspection and testing requirements for wastes; canister criteria; spent fuel selection for deliver; and defense and commercial high-level waste packages. This document discusses canister standards and criteria. 12 refs., 7 figs., 28 tabs

  2. Localization of plastic deformation in copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savolainen, K.; Saukkonen, T.; Haenninen, H. (Aalto Univ. School of Science and Technology, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    In Finland and Sweden the spent nuclear fuel will be deposited in a deep repository in copper corrosion barrier canisters surrounding cast iron inserts. The 50 mm thick copper canisters will we sealed using either electron beam welding (EB) or friction stir welding (FSW) to join the tubes and the lids/bottoms. The canisters will deform in the repository conditions, e.g., due to the hydrostatic pressure. The deformation will localize to different discontinuities, such as defects and microstructural heterogeneity. This study compared the localization of plastic deformation in EB and FSW welds as well as in the base materials (both forged and extruded) using optical strain measurement methods. The results show that in the base materials the deformation occurs very uniformly over the entire gauge length. In FSW welds the deformation localizes in the weld at a line of entrapped oxide particles. In EB welds the deformation localizes to the large grains in the middle of the weld or at the steep grain size gradient between the weld and the tube material. Tensile strength is lowest in the EB welds (175 MPa as compared to 200 MPa or higher for the other samples). Elongation to fracture of the FSW welds is similar to those of the base materials, but for the EB welds it is significantly lower (appr. 40 % compared to 65 %). (orig.)

  3. Inner material requirements and candidates screening for spent fuel disposal canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the present Spanish 'once-through' nuclear fuel cycle, the need arises to complete the geological repository reference concept with a spent fuel canister final design. One of the main issues in its design is selecting the inner material to be placed inside the canister, between the steel walls and the spent fuel assemblies. The primary purpose of this material will be to avoid the possibility of a criticality event once the canister walls have been finally breached by corrosion and the spent fuel is flooded with groundwater. That is an important role because the increase in heat generation from such an event would act against spent fuel stability and compromise bentonite barrier functions, negatively affecting overall repository performance. To prevent this possibility a detailed set of requirements for a material to fulfil this role in the repository environment have been devised and presented in this paper. With these requirements in view, eight potentially interesting candidates were selected and evaluated: cast iron or steel, borosilicate glass, spinel, depleted uranium, dehydrated zeolites, haematite, phosphates, and olivine. Among these, the first four materials or material families are found promising for this application. In addition, other relevant non-performance-related aspects of candidate materials, which could help on decision making, are also considered and evaluated. (authors)

  4. Thermal analysis of heat storage canisters for a solar dynamic, space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichner, R. P.; Solomon, A. D.; Drake, J. B.; Williams, P. T.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal analysis was performed of a thermal energy storage canister of a type suggested for use in a solar receiver for an orbiting Brayton cycle power system. Energy storage for the eclipse portion of the cycle is provided by the latent heat of a eutectic mixture of LiF and CaF2 contained in the canister. The chief motivation for the study is the prediction of vapor void effects on temperature profiles and the identification of possible differences between ground test data and projected behavior in microgravity. The first phase of this study is based on a two-dimensional, cylindrical coordinates model using an interim procedure for describing void behavor in 1-g and microgravity. The thermal analysis includes the effects of solidification front behavior, conduction in liquid/solid salt and canister materials, void growth and shrinkage, radiant heat transfer across the void, and convection in the melt due to Marangoni-induced flow and, in 1-g, flow due to density gradients. A number of significant differences between 1-g and o-g behavior were found. This resulted from differences in void location relative to the maximum heat flux and a significantly smaller effective conductance in 0-g due to the absence of gravity-induced convection.

  5. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology; Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Materials Science and Technology

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  6. Conceptual design study of a concrete canister spent-fuel storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a conceptual design study for the interim storage of CANDU spent fuel in concrete canisters. The canisters will be concrete flasks, which contain fuel prepackaged in double steel containment, and will be cooled by natural air convection. This is one of the methods proposed as a potential alternative to water pool storage. A preliminary study of this concept was done by CAFS (Committee Assessing Fuel Storage), and WNRE (Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment) is currently conducting a development and demonstration program. This study of a central facility for the storage of all Canadian spent fuel arisings to the year 2000 was completed in 1975. A brief description of the facilities required and the operations involved, a summary of costs, a survey of the monitoring requirements and a prediction of the personnel exposures associated with this method of storing spent fuel are reported here. The estimated total cost of interim storage in cylindrical canisters at a central site is $6.02/kg U (1975 dollars). Approximately half of this cost is incurred in the shipment of fuel from the reactors to the storage facility. (author)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless-steel canister for concrete cask storage of spent fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Jun-ichi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Hara, Nobuyoshi

    2008-09-01

    Resistance to external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC) and crevice corrosion were examined for various candidate canister materials in the spent fuel dry storage condition using concrete casks. A constant load ESCC test was conducted on the candidate materials in air after deposition of simulated sea salt particles on the specimen gage section. Highly corrosion resistant stainless steels (SS), S31260 and S31254, did not fail for more than 46 000 h at 353 K with relative humidity of 35%, although the normal stainless steel, S30403 SS failed within 500 h by ESCC. Crevice corrosion potentials of S31260 and S31254 SS became larger than 0.9 V (SCE) in synthetic sea water at temperatures below 298 K, while those of S30403 and S31603 SS were less than 0 V (SCE) at the same temperature range. No rust was found on S31260 and S31254 SS specimens at temperatures below 298 K in the atmospheric corrosion test, which is consistent with the temperature dependency of crevice corrosion potential. From the test result, the critical temperature of atmospheric corrosion was estimated to be 293 K for both S31260 and S31254 SS. Utilizing the ESCC test result and the critical temperature, together with the weather station data and the estimated canister wall temperature, the integrity of canister was assessed from the view point of ESCC.

  8. Analysis of burns caused by pre-filled gas canisters used for lamps or portable camping stoves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouches, C; Salazard, B; Romain, F; Karra, C; Lavie, A; Volpe, C Della; Manelli, J C; Magalon, G

    2006-12-01

    The use of pre-filled valveless gas canisters for lamps or camping stoves has caused a number of serious burn incidents. We performed a retrospective analysis of all of the patients who were victims of such incidents admitted to the Marseille Burn Centre between January 1990 and March 2004. There were a total of 21 patients burned in such conditions. Adult males made up the majority of the victims of this sort. Lesions were often extensive (60% of the patients were burned over more than 10% of their body surface) and systematically deep. In order of frequency, burn locations were: the lower limbs, the upper limbs, the hands and the face. The incidents principally occurred during replacement of the canister near an open flame. The marketing of a canister with a valve in order to avoid gas leaks did not cause the old canisters to be taken off the market. On the contrary, European Safety Standard EN417, updated in October 2003, validated the use of these valveless canisters. The severity of the lesions caused and the existence of safe equivalent products requires the passage of a law that forbids valveless canisters. PMID:16982156

  9. Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

    2007-02-01

    This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive ‘dry’ canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

  10. Challenge to Overcome the Concern of SCC in Canister During Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to put the concrete cask in practical use in Japan (an island country), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister must be coped with. It is required to take measures for one or two of the three factors, i.e. welding residual stress, material, and environment, to cope with the SCC that may result in loss of the containment function of the canister. Prevention of loss of containment due to SCC of a canister was evaluated either by a method of comparing the amount of salt on the canister surface during storage with the minimum amount of salt to initiate rust and SCC or by a method of comparing the wetting time of the canister surface under salty-air field environment with the lifetime of the SCC fracture of the canister material. Although the use of highly corrosion-resistance stainless steel is one solution, it brings about a cost rise of the concrete cask storage. In order to suppress the cost rise, it should be evaluated whether the measure against SCC of the normal stainless steel is possible by reducing welding residual stress. In addition, technology should be developed to reduce salt particles in the air flowing into the storage facility and concrete cask. (author)

  11. Topical safety analysis report for the transportation of the NUHOMS{reg_sign} dry shielded canister. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-08-01

    This Topical Safety Analysis Report (SAR) describes the design and the generic transportation licensing basis for utilizing the NUTECH HORIZONTAL MODULAR STORAGE (NUHOMS{reg_sign}) system dry shielded canister (DSC) containing twenty-four pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies (SFA) in conjunction with a conceptually designed Transportation Cask. This SAR documents the design qualification of the NUHOMS{reg_sign} DSC as an integral part of a 10CFR71 Fissile Material Class III, Type B(M) Transportation Package. The package consists of the canister and a conceptual transportation cask (NUHOMS{reg_sign} Transportation Cask) with impact limiters. Engineering analysis is performed for the canister to confirm that the existing canister design complies with 10CFR71 transportation requirements. Evaluations and/or analyses is performed for criticality safety, shielding, structural, and thermal performance. Detailed engineering analysis for the transportation cask will be submitted in a future SAR requesting 10CFR71 certification of the complete waste package. Transportation operational considerations describe various operational aspects of the canister/transportation cask system. operational sequences are developed for canister transfer from storage to the transportation cask and interfaces with the cask auxiliary equipment for on- and off-site transport.

  12. Performance Assessment and Sensitivity Analyses of Disposal of Plutonium as Can-in-Canister Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainer Senger

    2001-09-25

    The purpose of this analysis is to examine whether there is a justification for using high-level waste (HLW) as a surrogate for plutonium disposal in can-in-canister ceramic in the total-system performance assessment (TSPA) model for the Site Recommendation (SR). In the TSPA-SR model, the immobilized plutonium waste form is not explicitly represented, but is implicitly represented as an equal number of canisters of HLW. There are about 50 metric tons of plutonium in the U. S. Department of Energy inventory of surplus fissile material that could be disposed. Approximately 17 tons of this material contain significant quantities of impurities and are considered unsuitable for mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. This material has been designated for direct disposal by immobilization in a ceramic waste form and encapsulating this waste form in high-level waste (HLW). The remaining plutonium is suitable for incorporation into MOX fuel assemblies for commercial reactors (Shaw 1999, Section 2). In this analysis, two cases of immobilized plutonium disposal are analyzed, the 17-ton case and the 13-ton case (Shaw et al. 2001, Section 2.2). The MOX spent-fuel disposal is not analyzed in this report. In the TSPA-VA (CRWMS M&O 1998a, Appendix B, Section B-4), the calculated dose release from immobilized plutonium waste form (can-in-canister ceramic) did not exceed that from an equivalent amount of HLW glass. This indicates that the HLW could be used as a surrogate for the plutonium can-in-canister ceramic. Representation of can-in-canister ceramic as a surrogate is necessary to reduce the number of waste forms in the TSPA model. This reduction reduces the complexity and running time of the TSPA model and makes the analyses tractable. This document was developed under a Technical Work Plan (CRWMS M&O 2000a), and is compliant with that plan. The application of the Quality Assurance (QA) program to the development of that plan (CRWMS M&O 2000a) and of this Analysis is described in

  13. Development and Application of an Oversize Reusable DOT 7A Type A Overpack Container at the Y-12 National Security Complex - 13150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste Management personnel at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) are concluding a multi-year effort to dispose of a large backlog of low-level waste. Six containers presented a particularly difficult technical challenge in that they each contained large robust equipment (mostly salt baths) with elevated levels of highly enriched uranium (exceeding U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) fissile-excepted quantities). The equipment was larger than the standard 1.2 m x 1.2 m x 1.8 m (4 ft x 4 ft x 6 ft) DOT Specification 7A Type A box and would have been very difficult to size-reduce because of several inches of steel plate (along with insulating block and concrete) in the equipment design. A critical breakthrough for the success of the project involved procuring and developing two oversize reusable DOT Specification 7A Type A (fissile tested) containers (referred to as the CTI Model 7AF-690-SC) that could be used as overpacks for the original boxes of equipment. The 7A Type A overpack containers are approximately 3.5 m long x 2.7 m wide x 2.8 m high (11.7 ft x 8.9 ft x 9.2 ft) with a maximum gross weight of 10,660 kg (23,500 lb) and a payload capacity of 6,804 kg (15,000 lbs). The boxes were designed and fabricated using a split cavity design that allowed the gasketed and bolted closure to lie along the horizontal centerline of the box. The central closure location in this design allows for strengthening of box corners that tend to be points of weakness or failure in 49CFR173.465 drop tests. By combining the split cavity design with large diameter tubing and diagonal cross bracing, drop test requirements of 49CFR173.465(1) and (2) were met and demonstrated through finite element analysis modeling. The development and use of this new container dramatically reduced the need for down-sizing the equipment and allowed the project to meet objectives within cost and schedule targets. (authors)

  14. Data quality objectives for the initial K West fuel examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, L.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Thornton, T.A.; Abrefah, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) were established for the examinations of the first group of fuel samples shipped from the K West Basin to the Hanford 327 Building hot cells for examinations to support the Path Forward recommended to solve the safety and environmental concerns associated with the deteriorating fuel in the K Basins. A separate DQO will be prepared for each future shipment of samples to the hot cells. The material stored in the K West Basin must ultimately be removed from the basin and placed in a stable storage configuration until it can be disposed of in a repository. The condition of the fuel in the closed canisters is a major uncertainty for any of the proposed actions. The major question to answer is what are the conditions of the materials in the closed canisters? The data to be gathered during the canister opening, handling, transport, associated hot cell handling, and examinations will also support decisions related to the Path Forward primarily in areas of transportation and the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) design.

  15. Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training

  16. Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Jackson; G.R. Kiebel

    1999-08-24

    Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.

  17. Calculation of displacements on fractures intersecting canisters induced by earthquakes: Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg examples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaPointe, P.R.; Cladouhos, T. [Golder Associates Inc. (Sweden); Follin, S. [Golder Grundteknik KB (Sweden)

    1999-01-01

    This study shows how the method developed in La Pointe and others can be applied to assess the safety of canisters due to secondary slippage of fractures intersecting those canisters in the event of an earthquake. The method is applied to the three generic sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg. Estimation of secondary slippage or displacement is a four-stage process. The first stage is the analysis of lineament trace data in order to quantify the scaling properties of the fractures. This is necessary to insure that all scales of fracturing are properly represented in the numerical simulations. The second stage consists of creating stochastic discrete fracture network (DFN) models for jointing and small faulting at each of the generic sites. The third stage is to combine the stochastic DFN model with mapped lineament data at larger scales into data sets for the displacement calculations. The final stage is to carry out the displacement calculations for all of the earthquakes that might occur during the next 100,000 years. Large earthquakes are located along any lineaments in the vicinity of the site that are of sufficient size to accommodate an earthquake of the specified magnitude. These lineaments are assumed to represent vertical faults. Smaller earthquakes are located at random. The magnitude of the earthquake that any fault could generate is based upon the mapped surface trace length of the lineaments, and is calculated from regression relations. Recurrence rates for a given magnitude of earthquake are based upon published studies for Sweden. A major assumption in this study is that future earthquakes will be similar in magnitude, location and orientation as earthquakes in the geological and historical records of Sweden. Another important assumption is that the displacement calculations based upon linear elasticity and linear elastic fracture mechanics provides a conservative (over-)estimate of possible displacements. A third assumption is that the world

  18. Development of single tubing-type canister for cryo-storage of bull semen and their effect on sperm motility and viability

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Iswadi Ismail; Khairul Osman; Siti Fatimah Ibrahim; Farah Hanan Fatihah Jaafar; Nur Azianie Abd Ghani; Fazly Ann Zainalabidin; Abas Mazni Othman

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of using single tubing-type canister on sperm quality. Semen was collected from the Bali cattle bull by electroejaculation technique and was cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen using slow freezing cryopreservation method. Two type of canister volume was used in this study; commercial canister (342.25π x 278 mm²) and single tubing-type canister (4π x 90 mm²). Makler counting chamber and computer assisted sperm analyzer (CASA) were used to ...

  19. Evaluation of Ca3(Co,M2O6 (M=Co, Fe, Mn, Ni as new cathode materials for solid-oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushao Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Series compounds Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 (M=Co, Fe, Mn, Ni with hexagonal crystal structure were prepared by sol–gel route as the cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs. Effects of the varied atomic compositions on the structure, electrical conductivity, thermal expansion and electrochemical performance were systematically evaluated. Experimental results showed that the lattice parameters of Ca3(Co0.9Fe0.12O6 and Ca3(Co0.9Mn0.12O6 were both expanded to certain degree. Electron-doping and hole-doping effects were expected in Ca3(Co0.9Mn0.12O6 and Ca3(Co0.9Ni0.12O6 respectively according to the chemical states of constituent elements and thermal-activated behavior of electrical conductivity. Thermal expansion coefficients (TEC of Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 were measured to be distributed around 16×10−6 K−1, and compositional elements of Fe, Mn, and Ni were especially beneficial for alleviation of the thermal expansion problem of cathode materials. By using Ca3(Co0.9M0.12O6 as the cathodes operated at 800 °C, the interfacial area-specific resistance varied in the order of M=CoM=Co, Fe, Mn, Ni can be used as the cost-effective cathode materials for SOFCs.

  20. HANSF 1.3 user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PLYS, M.G.

    1999-05-21

    The HANSF analysis tool is an integrated model considering phenomena inside a multi-canister overpack (MCO) spent nuclear fuel container such as fuel oxidation, convective and radiative heat transfer, and the potential for fission product release. It may be used for all phases of spent fuel disposition including cold vacuum drying, transportation, and storage. This manual reflects HANSF version 1.3, a revised version of version 1.2a. HANSF 1.3 was written to add new models for axial nodalization, add new features for ease of usage, and correct errors. HANSF 1.3 is intended for use on personal computers such as IBM-compatible machines with Intel processors running under a DOS-type operating system. HANSF 1.3 is known to compile under Lahey TI and Digital Visual FORTRAN, Version 6.0, but this does not preclude operation in other environments.

  1. Intact and Degraded Component Criticality Calculations of N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to perform intact and degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel codisposed in a 2-Defense High-Level Waste (2-DHLW)/2-Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a monitored geologic repository (MGR) (see Attachment I). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (keff) for both intact and degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the technical viability for disposing of U-metal (N Reactor) spent nuclear fuel in the potential MGR

  2. Analysis of factors influencing the reliability of retrievable storage canisters for containment of solid high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliability of stainless steel type 304L canisters for the containment of solidified high-level radioactive wastes in the glass and calcine forms was studied. A reference system, drawn largely from information furnished by Battelle Northwest Laboratories and Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company is described. Operations include filling the canister with the appropriate waste form, interim storage at a reprocessing plant, shipment in water to a Retrievable Surface Storage Facility (RSSF), interim storage at the RSSF, and shipment to a final disposal facility. The properties of stainless steel type 304L, fission product oxides, calcine, and glass were reviewed, and mechanisms of corrosion were identified and studied. The modes of corrosion important for reliability were stress-corrosion cracking, internal pressurization of the canister by residual impurities present, intergranular attack at the waste-canister interface, and potential local effects due to migration of fission products. The key role of temperature control throughout canister lifetime is considered together with interactive effects. Methods of ameliorating adverse effects and ensuring high reliability are identified and described. Conclusions and recommendations are presented

  3. Very deep borehole. Deutag's opinion on boring, canister emplacement and retrievability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An engineering feasibility study has been carried out to determine whether or not it is possible to drill the proposed Very Deep Borehole concept wells required by SKB for nuclear waste disposal. A conceptual well design has been proposed. All aspects of well design have been considered, including drilling tools, rig design, drilling fluids, casing design and annulus isolation. The proposed well design is for 1168.4 mm hole to be drilled to 500 m. A 1066.8 mm outer diameter (OD) casing will be run and cemented. A 1016 mm hole will be drilled to approximately 2000 m, where 914.4 mm OD casing will be run. This annulus will be sealed with bentonite slurry apart from the bottom 100 m which will be cemented. 838.2 mm hole will be drilled to a final depth of 4000 m, where 762 mm OD slotted casing will be run. All the hole sections will be drilled using a downhole hammer with foam as the drilling fluid medium. Prior to running each casing string, the hole will be displaced to mud to assist with casing running and cementing. The waste canisters will be run on a simple J-slot tool, with integral backup system in case the J-slot fails. The canisters will all be centralised. Canisters can be retrieved using the same tool as used to run them. Procedures are given for both running and retrieving. Logging and testing is recommended only in the exploratory wells, in a maximum hole size of 311.1 mm. This will require the drilling of pilot holes to enable logging and testing to take place. It is estimated that each well will take approximately 137 days to drill and case, at an estimated cost of 4.65 Meuro per well. This time and cost estimate does not include any logging, testing, pilot hole drilling or time taken to run the canisters. New technology developments to enhance the drilling process are required in recyclable foam systems, in hammer bit technology, and in the development of robust under-reamers. It is the authors conclusion that it is possible to drill the well with

  4. Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) will be constructed in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The CSB will be used to stage and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) removed from the Hanford Site K Basins. The objective of this chapter is to describe the characteristics of the site on which the CSB will be located. This description will support the hazard analysis and accident analyses in Chapter 3.0. The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the CSB design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB

  5. Filter Measurement System for Nuclear Material Storage Canisters. End of Year Report FY 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-03

    A test system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the aerosol collection efficiency of filters in the lids of storage canisters for special nuclear materials. Two FTS (filter test system) devices have been constructed; one will be used in the LANL TA-55 facility with lids from canisters that have stored nuclear material. The other FTS device will be used in TA-3 at the Radiation Protection Division’s Aerosol Engineering Facility. The TA-3 system will have an expanded analytical capability, compared to the TA-55 system that will be used for operational performance testing. The LANL FTS is intended to be automatic in operation, with independent instrument checks for each system component. The FTS has been described in a complete P&ID (piping and instrumentation diagram) sketch, included in this report. The TA-3 FTS system is currently in a proof-of-concept status, and TA-55 FTS is a production-quality prototype. The LANL specification for (Hagan and SAVY) storage canisters requires the filter shall “capture greater than 99.97% of 0.45-micron mean diameter dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol at the rated flow with a DOP concentration of 65±15 micrograms per liter”. The percent penetration (PEN%) and pressure drop (DP) of fifteen (15) Hagan canister lids were measured by NFT Inc. (Golden, CO) over a period of time, starting in the year 2002. The Los Alamos FTS measured these quantities on June 21, 2013 and on Oct. 30, 2013. The LANL(6-21-2013) results did not statistically match the NFT Inc. data, and the LANL FTS system was re-evaluated, and the aerosol generator was replaced and the air flow measurement method was corrected. The subsequent LANL(10-30-2013) tests indicate that the PEN% results are statistically identical to the NFT Inc. results. The LANL(10-30-2013) pressure drop measurements are closer to the NFT Inc. data, but future work will be investigated. An operating procedure for the FTS (filter test system) was written, and

  6. Very deep borehole. Deutag's opinion on boring, canister emplacement and retrievability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Tim [Well Engineering Partners BV, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2000-05-01

    An engineering feasibility study has been carried out to determine whether or not it is possible to drill the proposed Very Deep Borehole concept wells required by SKB for nuclear waste disposal. A conceptual well design has been proposed. All aspects of well design have been considered, including drilling tools, rig design, drilling fluids, casing design and annulus isolation. The proposed well design is for 1168.4 mm hole to be drilled to 500 m. A 1066.8 mm outer diameter (OD) casing will be run and cemented. A 1016 mm hole will be drilled to approximately 2000 m, where 914.4 mm OD casing will be run. This annulus will be sealed with bentonite slurry apart from the bottom 100 m which will be cemented. 838.2 mm hole will be drilled to a final depth of 4000 m, where 762 mm OD slotted casing will be run. All the hole sections will be drilled using a downhole hammer with foam as the drilling fluid medium. Prior to running each casing string, the hole will be displaced to mud to assist with casing running and cementing. The waste canisters will be run on a simple J-slot tool, with integral backup system in case the J-slot fails. The canisters will all be centralised. Canisters can be retrieved using the same tool as used to run them. Procedures are given for both running and retrieving. Logging and testing is recommended only in the exploratory wells, in a maximum hole size of 311.1 mm. This will require the drilling of pilot holes to enable logging and testing to take place. It is estimated that each well will take approximately 137 days to drill and case, at an estimated cost of 4.65 Meuro per well. This time and cost estimate does not include any logging, testing, pilot hole drilling or time taken to run the canisters. New technology developments to enhance the drilling process are required in recyclable foam systems, in hammer bit technology, and in the development of robust under-reamers. It is the authors conclusion that it is possible to drill the well with

  7. Fermi surfaces and Phase Stability of Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$M$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ (M=Co, Ni, Cu, Zn)

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Suffian; Johnson, Duane

    2014-01-01

    BaFe$_2$As$_2$ with transition-metal doping exhibits a variety of rich phenomenon from coupling of structure, magnetism, and superconductivity. Using density functional theory, we systematically compare the Fermi surfaces (FS), formation energies ($\\Delta E_f$), and density of states (DOS) of electron-doped Ba(Fe$_{1-x}$M$_x$)$_2$As$_2$ with M={Co, Ni, Cu, Zn} in tetragonal (I$4/mmm$) and orthorhombic (F$mmm$) structures in nonmagnetic (NM), antiferromagnetic (AFM), and paramagnetic (PM, disordered local moment) states. We explain changes to phase stability ($\\Delta E_f$) and Fermi surfaces (and nesting) due to chemical and magnetic disorder, and compare to observed/assessed properties and contrast alloy theory with that expected from rigid-band model. With alloying, the DOS changes from common-band (Co,Ni) to split-band (Cu,Zn), which dictates $\\Delta E_f$ and can overwhelm FS-nesting instabilities, as for Cu,Zn cases.

  8. Synthesis of PtM (M=Co, Ni)/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites as Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jialiang; Fu, Xinning; Mao, Zhou; Yang, Yushi; Qiu, Tong; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-12-01

    A series of PtM (M=Co, Ni)/reduced graphene oxide (rG-O) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The electrochemical performance and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of PtM/rG-O nanocomposites were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and the rotating disk electrode method. The results show that the addition of the reductant (1,2-hexadecanediol, HAD) in the reaction system slightly improved the ORR activity of PtM/rG-O nanocomposites with a negligible influence on the size and morphology of alloy NPs. Furthermore, PtNi/rG-O nanocomposites displayed the higher electrochemical stability than PtCo/rG-O nanocomposites. These results provide a facile strategy for the synthesis of Pt-based alloy NPs/rG-O nanocomposites for applications in catalysis and energy-related processes. PMID:26732276

  9. Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

    1997-06-01

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Processes, Techniques, and Successes in Welding the Dry Shielded Canisters of the TMI-2 Reactor Core Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is operated by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho LLC (BBWI), which recently completed a very successful $100 million Three-Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) program for the Department of Energy (DOE). This complex and challenging program used an integrated multidisciplinary team approach that loaded, welded, and transported an unprecedented 25 dry shielded canisters (DSC) in seven months, and did so ahead of schedule. The program moved over 340 canisters of TMI-2 core debris that had been in wet storage into a dry storage facility at the INEEL. The main thrust of this paper is relating the innovations, techniques, approaches, and lessons learned associated to welding of the DSC's. This paper shows the synergism of elements to meet program success and shares these lessons learned that will facilitate success with welding of dry shielded canisters in other DOE complex dry storage programs

  11. Modeling of thermal evolution of near field area around single pit mode nuclear waste canister disposal in soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft rocks like argillites/shales are under consideration worldwide as host rock for geological disposal of vitrified as well as spent fuel nuclear waste. The near field around disposed waste canister at 400-500m depth witnesses a complex heat field evolution due to varying thermal characteristics of rocks, coupling with hydraulic processes and varying intensity of heat flux from the canister. Smooth heat dissipation across the rock is desirable to avoid buildup of temperature beyond design limit (100 °C) and resultant micro fracturing due to thermal stresses in the rocks and intervening buffer clay layers. This also causes enhancement of hydraulic conductivity of the rocks, radionuclide transport and greater groundwater ingress towards the canister. Hence heat evolution modeling constitutes an important part of safety assessment of geological disposal facilities

  12. Selection of candidate canister materials for high-level nuclear waste containment in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A repository located at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site is a potential site for permanent geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The repository can be located in a horizon in welded tuff, a volcanic rock, which is above the static water level at this site. The environmental conditions in this unsaturated zone are expected to be air and water vapor dominated for much of the containment period. Type 304L stainless steel is the reference material for fabricating canisters to contain the solid high-level wastes. Alternative stainless alloys are considered because of possible susceptibility of 304L to localized and stress forms of corrosion. For the reprocessed glass wastes, the canisters serve as the recipient for pouring the glass with the result that a sensitized microstructure may develop because of the times at elevated temperatures. Corrosion testing of the reference and alternative materials has begun in tuff-conditioned water and steam environments. 21 references, 8 figures, 8 tables

  13. Yucca Mountain project canister material corrosion studies as applied to the electrometallurgical treatment metallic waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, D.D.

    1996-11-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository. As part of the repository assessment activities, candidate materials are being tested for possible use as construction materials for waste package containers. A large portion of this testing effort is focused on determining the long range corrosion properties, in a Yucca Mountain environment, for those materials being considered. Along similar lines, Argonne National Laboratory is testing a metallic alloy waste form that also is scheduled for disposal in a geologic repository, like Yucca Mountain. Due to the fact that Argonne`s waste form will require performance testing for an environment similar to what Yucca Mountain canister materials will require, this report was constructed to focus on the types of tests that have been conducted on candidate Yucca Mountain canister materials along with some of the results from these tests. Additionally, this report will discuss testing of Argonne`s metal waste form in light of the Yucca Mountain activities.

  14. Genesis Solar Wind Science Canister Components Curated as Potential Solar Wind Collectors and Reference Contamination Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Gonzalez, C. P.; Allums, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    The Genesis mission collected solar wind for 27 months at Earth-Sun L1 on both passive and active collectors carried inside of a Science Canister, which was cleaned and assembled in an ISO Class 4 cleanroom prior to launch. The primary passive collectors, 271 individual hexagons and 30 half-hexagons of semiconductor materials, are described in. Since the hard landing reduced the 301 passive collectors to many thousand smaller fragments, characterization and posting in the online catalog remains a work in progress, with about 19% of the total area characterized to date. Other passive collectors, surfaces of opportunity, have been added to the online catalog. For species needing to be concentrated for precise measurement (e.g. oxygen and nitrogen isotopes) an energy-independent parabolic ion mirror focused ions onto a 6.2 cm diameter target. The target materials, as recovered after landing, are described in. The online catalog of these solar wind collectors, a work in progress, can be found at: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/gencatalog/index.cfm This paper describes the next step, the cataloging of pieces of the Science Canister, which were surfaces exposed to the solar wind or component materials adjacent to solar wind collectors which may have contributed contamination.

  15. Summary of canister overheating incident at the Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driggers, S.A.

    1994-03-10

    The granular activated carbon (GAC)-filled canister that overheated was being used to adsorb carbon tetrachloride vapors drawn from a well near the 216-Z-9 Trench, a subsurface disposal site in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The overheating incident resulted in a band of discolored paint on the exterior surface of the canister. Although there was no other known damage to equipment, no injuries to operating personnel, and no releases of hazardous materials, the incident is of concern because it was not anticipated. It also poses the possibility of release of carbon tetrachloride and other hazardous vapors if the incident were to recur. All soil vapor extraction system (VES) operations were halted until a better understanding of the cause of the incident could be determined and controls implemented to reduce the possibility of a recurrence. The focus of this report and the intent of all the activities associated with understanding the overheating incident has been to provide information that will allow safe restart of the VES operations, develop operational limits and controls to prevent recurrence of an overheating incident, and safely optimize recovery of carbon tetrachloride from the ground.

  16. Critical review of welding technology for canisters for disposal of spent fuel and high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagra is the Swiss national cooperative for the disposal of radioactive waste and is responsible for final disposal of all types of waste produced in Switzerland, which are partitioned into two repository types, one for spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate level waste and one for low and intermediate level waste. In the general licences applied for these repositories, documentation has to show that long-term safety can be ensured and that factors for the construction, operation, and closure of the facility have been considered. Nagra has commissioned TWI to carry out a critical review of welding technologies for the sealing of HLW and SF canisters made of carbon steel. In conjunction with a material selection report, the information gained will be used as a preliminary step to provide input to developing design concepts for the canisters. The features to be considered are: a) Suitability of techniques for thickness of weld required; b) Suitability for remote operation, maintenance and set-up; c) Welding speed, weld quality, tolerances and cost; d) Effect of welding process on parent materials properties including microstructure corrosion resistance, distortion and residual stress; e) Potential post-weld treatments to reduce residual stress and enhance corrosion resistance; f) Suitability of inspection techniques for the weld thickness required; g) Impact of welding techniques on the canister design and material selection; h) Critique of emerging technologies which may be suitable in the future. The review of potential welding technologies began with a feasibility study carried out by TWI experts, where the unsuitable processes were rejected. For the remaining processes attention was focused on previous applications for the material and thickness suggested, and especially on safety critical applications such as applied in the nuclear and pressure vessel industry. Once the relevant information was gathered each process was

  17. Creep of OFHC and silver copper at simulated final repository canister-service conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of high-resolution creep rate measurements are described for estimating very long term creep life of copper and silver alloyed copper at room temperature and at stresses approaching the expected service conditions of final repository canisters. The aim was to assess the limiting service stress levels for potential canister wall materials. The 0.1% silver alloyed copper showed minimum creep rates of 10-9 to 10-10 l/h, corresponding to 1 % strain in about 1000 to 10000 years, at room temperature and uniaxial stress level of 50 to 75 MPa. The predicted time to 1 % strain, when extrapolated from literature data, was at least one order of magnitude shorter. From the results of the present work, the 1 % creep life for OFHC copper was at most a few hundreds of years at 50 MPa stress level. The technique developed and used in this work for measuring very low strain rates appears useful for assessing low temperature creep life of practical structures essentially without accelerating the test from the service conditions. (au)

  18. Creep of OFHC and silver copper at simulated final repository canister-service conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Result of high-resolution creep rate measurements are described for estimating very long term creep life of copper and silver alloyed copper at room temperature and at stresses approaching the expected service conditions of final repository canisters. The aim was to assess the limiting service stress levels for potential canister wall materials. The 0.1 % silver alloyed copper showed minimum creep rates of 10-9 to 10-10 l/h, corresponding to 1 % strain in about 1000 to 10000 years, at room temperature and uniaxial stress level of 50 to 75 MPa. The predicted time to 1 % strain, when extrapolated from literature data, was at least one order of magnitude shorter. From the results of the present work, the 1 % creep life for OFHC copper was at most a few hundreds of years at 50 MPa stress level. The technique developed and used in this work for measuring very low strain rates appears useful for assessing low temperature creep life of practical structures essentially without accelerating the test from the service conditions

  19. Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs

  20. The Swedish Concept for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Differences Between Vertical and Horizontal Waste Canister Emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) is preparing for the review of licence applications related to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) refers to its proposals for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel as the KBS-3 concept. In the KBS-3 concept, SKB plans that, after 30 to 40 years of interim storage, spent fuel will be disposed of at a depth of about 500 m in crystalline bedrock, surrounded by a system of engineered barriers. The principle barrier to radionuclide release is a cylindrical copper canister. Within the copper canister, the spent fuel is supported by a cast iron insert. Outside the copper canister is a layer of bentonite clay, known as the buffer, which is designed to provide mechanical protection for the canisters and to limit the access of groundwater and corrosive substances to their surfaces. The bentonite buffer is also designed to sorb radionuclides released from the canisters, and to filter any colloids that may form within the waste. SKB is expected to base its forthcoming licence applications on a repository design in which the waste canisters are emplaced in vertical boreholes (KBS-3V). However, SKB has also indicated that it might be possible and, in some respects, beneficial to dispose of the waste canisters in horizontal tunnels (KBS-3H). There are many similarities between the KBS-3V and KBS-3H designs. There are, however, uncertainties associated with both of the designs and, when compared, both possess relative advantages and disadvantages. SKB has identified many of the key factors that will determine the evolution of a KBS-3H repository and has plans for research and development work in many of the areas where the differences between the KBS-3V and KBS-3H designs mean that they could be significant in terms of repository performance. With respect to the KBS-3H design, key technical issues are associated with: 1. The accuracy of deposition drift construction. 2. Water

  1. Finite element analysis of stresses and deformations occurring in the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal canister deposited in a deep geological repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058 (United States); School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University of China, Xi’an 710072 (China); Gea, Hae Chang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 98 Brett Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8058 (United States); Kwon, Young Joo, E-mail: yjkwon@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, Hongik University, 2639 Sejong-ro, Jochiwon, Sejong 339-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • The weight reduction design of the PWR SNF disposal canister is presented. • The optimal SNF basket rotation angle to minimize canister weight is sought. • Conventional structural analysis and Kriging method are developed for this purpose. • The optimal SNF basket rotation angle is determined to be 45°. • The canister weight is correspondingly reduced by 16% from 25 tons to 21 tons. -- Abstract: Numerical computer experimental methodologies are investigated for the weight reduction of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal canister designed to be deposited in a Korean deep geological repository from a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Finite element analyses of stresses and deformations occurring inside the cylindrical canister under the deposited conditions are performed to assess its structural strength at various rotation angles (φ) of the SNF basket. Specifically, the cross sections of four square tube shaped SNF baskets (assemblies) contained in the canister are rotated. Using a conventional structural analysis and a Kriging method, an optimal rotation angle is determined in relation to canister diameter and weight. Both sets of results are in agreement. It was also determined that the computed deformation changes slightly in relation to variances in rotation angle, while the stress incurred inside the cast iron insert of the canister noticeably changes reaching its highest value at φ = 45° while still maintaining safe structural integrity. It is concluded that the diameter of the canister can be reduced from its original design value (102 cm) to 95.8463 cm resulting in a ∼16.0% reduction in canister weight for an optimal rotation angle of 45°.

  2. Biogeochemistry of Redox at Repository Depth and Implications for the Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian; Hermansson, Hans-Peter

    2009-08-15

    The present groundwater chemical conditions at the candidate sites for a spent nuclear fuel repository in Sweden (the Forsmark and Laxemar sites) and processes affecting its future evolution comprise essential conditions for the evaluation of barrier performance and long-term safety. This report reviews available chemical sampling information from the site investigations at the candidate sites, with a particular emphasis on redox active groundwater components and microbial populations that influence redox affecting components. Corrosion of copper canister material is the main barrier performance influence of redox conditions that is elaborated in the report. One section addresses native copper as a reasonable analogue for canister materials and another addresses the feasibility of methane hydrate ice accumulation during permafrost conditions. Such an accumulation could increase organic carbon availability in scenarios involving microbial sulphate reduction. The purpose of the project is to evaluate and describe the available knowledge and data for interpretation of geochemistry, microbiology and corrosion in safety assessment. A conclusive assessment of the sufficiency of information can, however, only be done in the future context of a full safety assessment. The authors conclude that SKB's data and models for chemical and microbial processes are adequate and reasonably coherent. The redox conditions in the repository horizon are predominantly established through the SO{sub 4}2-/HS- and Fe3+/Fe2+ redox couples. The former may exhibit a more significant buffering effect as suggested by measured Eh values, while the latter is associated with a lager capacity due to abundant Fe(II) minerals in the bedrock. Among a large numbers of groundwater features considered in geochemical equilibrium modelling, Eh, pH, temperature and concentration of dissolved sulphide comprise the most essential canister corrosion influences. Groundwater sulphide may originate from

  3. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufhold, Stephan, E-mail: s.kaufhold@bgr.de [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Hassel, Achim Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sanders, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Dohrmann, Reiner [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); LBEG, Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion at the bentonite iron interface proceeds unaerobically with formation of an 1:1 Fe silicate mineral. A series of exposure tests with different types of bentonites showed that Na–bentonites are slightly less corrosive than Ca–bentonites and highly charges smectites are less corrosive compared to low charged ones. The formation of a patina was observed in some cases and has to be investigated further. - Highlights: • At the iron bentonite interface a 1:1 Fe layer silicate forms upon corrosion. • A series of iron–bentonite corrosion products showed slightly less corrosion for Na-rich and high-charged bentonites. • In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe–silicate, which has to be investigated further. - Abstract: Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na–bentonites compared to the Ca–bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe

  4. A review of the archaeological analogue approaches to predict the long-term corrosion behaviour of carbon steel overpack and reinforced concrete structures in the French disposal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a review of several years of research on archaeological analogues in order to predict the long term behaviour of the steel canisters or the reinforced concrete structures involved in disposal or interim storage of nuclear wastes in France. This article aims at showing the specific methodology, the complementariness with different other approaches and the complete integration of the research on analogues in the frame of research programs on long term prediction. Archaeological sites on which field measurement can be performed were referenced and described. A significant number of artefacts collected from these sites was selected for study. Detailed chemical and microstructural characterisation of the artefacts were undertaken by a combination of microbeam analytical techniques (μRaman, μXRD, μRaman spectroscopy,...). Hypotheses on the corrosion mechanisms were then tested using specific isotopic markers during re-corroding experiments on analogues. Specific parameters were measured, allowing crucial steps in modelling long-term corrosion of steel.

  5. Test Plan to Determine the Maximum Surface Temperatures for a Plutonium Storage Cubicle with Horizontal 3013 Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulated full-scale plutonium storage cubicle with 22 horizontally positioned and heated 3013 canisters is proposed to confirm the effectiveness of natural circulation. Temperature and airflow measurements will be made for different heat generation and cubicle door configurations. Comparisons will be made to computer based thermal Hydraulic models

  6. Copper canister with cast inner component. Amendment to project on Alternative Systems Study (PASS), SKB TR 93-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Project on Alternative Systems Study, PASS, was described in a report dated october 1992. In the report, the reference repository concept KBS-3 is described together with three other alternatives. In the report several designs for fuel storage canisters are presented. This report describes a recently developed design for the inner component of the composite, steel and copper, canister which is the main alternative in the KBS-3-model. The new design will be manufactured by casting. A cast insert with inner walls eliminates the need for a stabilizing filler in the canister and guarantees that the fuel remains sub-critical during sufficient time in the repository. The cast insert is judged, to, in comparison with the steel tube alternative, lead to a considerably simplified process in the encapsulation plant and lower development and investment cost. Positive side effects of the design are that the mechanical strength is improved by a factor 2-3 and that the difficult filling operation is avoided in the encapsulation process. The drawbacks are higher weight and probably higher unit price for the empty canister

  7. Canister storage building (CSB) safety analysis report phase 3: Safety analysis documentation supporting CSB construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1997-04-28

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) will be constructed in the 200 East Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The CSB will be used to stage and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) removed from the Hanford Site K Basins. The objective of this chapter is to describe the characteristics of the site on which the CSB will be located. This description will support the hazard analysis and accident analyses in Chapter 3.0. The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the CSB design criteria, the design's compliance with the applicable criteria, and the basis for authorization to proceed with construction of the CSB.

  8. Acceptance of canisters of high-level waste by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E. R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high-priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high-level waste will be accepted. This document discusses the acceptance of canisters of high-level waste by the Federal Waste Management System. 16 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs

  9. Site-to-canister scale flow and transport in Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Laitinen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    Radioactive waste is originating from production of electricity in nuclear power plants. Most of the waste has only low or intermediate levels of radioactivity. However, the spent nuclear fuel is highly radioactive and it has to be isolated from the biosphere. The current nuclear waste management plan in Finland is based on direct disposal of the spent nuclear fuel deep underground. The only feasible mechanism for the radionuclides to escape from an underground repository is to be carried by the groundwater flow after the failure of waste containers. The scope of this study is to examine the groundwater flow situation and transport properties in the vicinity of the disposal canister and along the potential release paths from the repository into the biosphere. The results of this study are further applied in the site specific safety analysis of a spent fuel repository. Synthesis is made of the porous medium estimates of the groundwater flow in the regional and site scales and the detailed fracture network analysis of the flow in the canister scale. This synthesis includes estimation of the transport properties from the canister into the biosphere and flow rates around the deposition holes of the waste canisters. The modelling has been carried out for four different sites: Hastholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romavaara. According to the simulations groundwater flow rate around the deposition holes is less than about 1 litre/a for about 75 % of the deposition holes. For about 5 % of the deposition holes the flow rates are a few litres per year or higher. The highest flow rates resulted at Hastholmen, in fresh water conditions 10 000 years after present, and at Kivetty. The transport resistances were calculated for the `worst` flow paths that might have impact on the safety of the repository. The total transport resistances from the repository into the biosphere along those flow paths varied between about 40 000 a/m and 5-10{sup 6} a/m. Most of the total transport

  10. Fuel and canister process report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werme, Lars (ed.)

    2006-10-15

    This report documents fuel and canister processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. It forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Can. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process report in the assessment, is described in the SR-Can Main report. The report is written by, and for, experts in the relevant scientific fields. It should though be possible for a generalist in the area of long-term safety assessments of geologic nuclear waste repositories to comprehend the contents of the report. The report is an important part of the documentation of the SR-Can project and an essential reference within the project, providing a scientifically motivated plan for the handling of geosphere processes. It is, furthermore, foreseen that the report will be essential for reviewers scrutinising the handling of geosphere issues in the SR-Can assessment. Several types of fuel will be emplaced in the repository. For the reference case with 40 years of reactor operation, the fuel quantity from boiling water reactors, BWR fuel, is estimated at 7,000 tonnes, while the quantity from pressurized water reactors, PWR fuel, is estimated at about 2,300 tonnes. In addition, 23 tonnes of mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) fuel of German origin from BWR and PWR reactors and 20 tonnes of fuel from the decommissioned heavy water reactor in Aagesta will be disposed of. To allow for future changes in the Swedish nuclear programme, the safety assessment assumes a total of 6,000 canister corresponding to 12,000 tonnes of fuel.

  11. Fuel and canister process report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents fuel and canister processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. It forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Can. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process report in the assessment, is described in the SR-Can Main report. The report is written by, and for, experts in the relevant scientific fields. It should though be possible for a generalist in the area of long-term safety assessments of geologic nuclear waste repositories to comprehend the contents of the report. The report is an important part of the documentation of the SR-Can project and an essential reference within the project, providing a scientifically motivated plan for the handling of geosphere processes. It is, furthermore, foreseen that the report will be essential for reviewers scrutinising the handling of geosphere issues in the SR-Can assessment. Several types of fuel will be emplaced in the repository. For the reference case with 40 years of reactor operation, the fuel quantity from boiling water reactors, BWR fuel, is estimated at 7,000 tonnes, while the quantity from pressurized water reactors, PWR fuel, is estimated at about 2,300 tonnes. In addition, 23 tonnes of mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) fuel of German origin from BWR and PWR reactors and 20 tonnes of fuel from the decommissioned heavy water reactor in Aagesta will be disposed of. To allow for future changes in the Swedish nuclear programme, the safety assessment assumes a total of 6,000 canister corresponding to 12,000 tonnes of fuel

  12. Project JADE. Method and machinery description of equipment for deposition of a canister in a vertical deposition hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic evaluation of different disposal methods has been carried out. The study is named Comparison of Disposal Methods. The evaluation has included a comparison of the technical aspects, safety aspects and costs of alternatives proposed within the so-called KBS-3 method. Three alternatives have been studied and compared: vertical emplacement (KBS-3V), horizontal emplacement (KBS-3H) and emplacement in medium long horizontal holes (MLH). KBS-3V is the reference method adopted in SKB's development and planning work. This report describes eight alternative disposal methods, with variations, and forms a technical basis for the assessment of methods involving vertical disposal (KBS-3V). The alternative of emplacement behind a radiation-shielding screen has been rejected by SKB, as it has been decided that disposal will be carried out with complete radiation shielding around the canister. However, the alternative is considered in the report for the sake of comparison. Based on the applicable technical specifications, the results of fault-effect analyses, radiation protection assessments and flexibility and complexity analyses for the entire disposal process, two methods for vertical emplacement have been identified as the best from a technical point of view: Transport of a horizontally-lying canister which is raised to a vertical position during emplacement. The canister is shielded during transport and the raising movement. Radiation protection can be complete or partial. Transport with a standing canister. Under transport and disposal, the canister is surrounded by a complete radiation shield, which has a telescopic lower part. This principle involves only a few, simple mechanical movements

  13. A review of materials and corrosion issues regarding canisters for disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project 'Entsorgungsnachweis' presented by NAGRA to the Swiss Federal Government in December 2002 assessed the feasibility of disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing and long-lived intermediate level waste in an Opalinus Clay repository site in Northern Switzerland. NAGRA proposed the use of carbon steel canisters for disposal of SF/HLW and it also put forward an alternative concept of copper canisters with cast iron insert. In its reply the Federal Government acknowledged that NAGRA had successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of disposal of SF/HLW. However, some of its experts raised a number of questions related to the choice of steel as canister material. Among others, it was questioned whether hydrogen formed by corrosion of steel in contact with saturated bentonite might adversely affect the barrier function of the Opalinus clay. It was also recommended that alternative canister materials and/or design concepts should be evaluated. To deal with these concerns NAGRA convened an international group of experts, the Canister Materials Review Board (CMRB), who were to review the existing information on canister materials that could be suitable for the proposed repository environment. Based on present knowledge of materials science, the CMRB was to recommend to NAGRA the most suitable material(s) for meeting the performance requirements for SF/HLW canisters. Specifically, the CMRB was to consider corrosion, including hydrogen generation, and stress-assisted failure processes that could affect the integrity and projected life time of SF/HLW canisters or impede the functioning of geological barriers while keeping in mind the overall feasibility of manufacturing, sealing and inspecting the canisters. The CMRB was further asked to identify the needs and provide advice for further studies by NAGRA on the long term performance and safety of SF/HLW canisters in the Swiss repository concept. For the assessment of the

  14. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Austin Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Runnels, Joel T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  15. Modeling of molecular and particulate transport in dry spent nuclear fuel canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Andrew M.

    2007-09-01

    The transportation and storage of spent nuclear fuel is one of the prominent issues facing the commercial nuclear industry today, as there is still no general consensus regarding the near- and long-term strategy for managing the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The debate continues over whether the fuel cycle should remain open, in which case spent fuel will be stored at on-site reactor facilities, interim facilities, or a geologic repository; or if the fuel cycle should be closed, in which case spent fuel will be recycled. Currently, commercial spent nuclear fuel is stored at on-site reactor facilities either in pools or in dry storage containers. Increasingly, spent fuel is being moved to dry storage containers due to decreased costs relative to pools. As the number of dry spent fuel containers increases and the roles they play in the nuclear fuel cycle increase, more regulations will be enacted to ensure that they function properly. Accordingly, they will have to be carefully analyzed for normal conditions, as well as any off-normal conditions of concern. This thesis addresses the phenomena associated with one such concern; the formation of a microscopic through-wall breach in a dry storage container. Particular emphasis is placed on the depressurization of the canister, release of radioactivity, and plugging of the breach due to deposition of suspended particulates. The depressurization of a dry storage container upon the formation of a breach depends on the temperature and quantity of the fill gas, the pressure differential across the breach, and the size of the breach. The first model constructed in this thesis is capable of determining the depressurization time for a breached container as long as the associated parameters just identified allow for laminar flow through the breach. The parameters can be manipulated to quantitatively determine their effect on depressurization. This model is expanded to account for the presence of suspended particles. If

  16. Factors Affecting the Estimation of Indoor Radon Using Passive Activated Charcoal Canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpitta, Salvatore Charles

    1990-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption studies of 20 activated charcoals were conducted in a monolayer and a packed bed utilizing tracer gases. Kinetic studies, using xenon-133, demonstrate the existence of a two-compartment micropore volume with entrance capillaries which together determine the response characteristics of the charcoal to external concentration gradients of tracer gases. This new two -compartment model adequately describes the adsorption and desorption dynamics of radon in the presence of water vapor. Measurements with charcoal exposed to water vapor and Rn-222 in a monolayer and packed bed for exposure intervals of 1-7 days demonstrate that the uptake rate and total quantity of adsorbed Rn-222 are highly dependent upon the amount of water adsorbed. The effect of CO_2 on radon adsorption is small in any charcoal. The measured effective diffusion coefficient of radon in a packed bed of a peat based charcoal at 15% humidity and 25^circC is 7.97 times 10^{-6} cm^2/s. Condensed water vapor in the entrance capillaries reduces the effective pore radius, increasing the diffusion half-time, both into and out of the charcoal. The amount of adsorbed water per gram of charcoal required to block the entrance capillaries varies with the charcoal type. The proposed term for this quantity is the "break-point". A two-stage diffusion barrier charcoal monitor with a long diffusion path length was developed. This design inhibits passive airflow while maintaining the amount of adsorbed water vapor in the primary charcoal adsorbent below the break-point. Water removal at the entry port allows for longer exposure times improving the integrating capability necessary for indoor exposure assessment. The long diffusion path length increases the integration time -constant for radon adsorption normally 24 hours for conventional open-faced canisters to 50 hours for the improved canister. The increased integration time-constant allows for a 7 day sample to be measured at 70% humidity and 23

  17. Study on commercial realization of concrete cask for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel. Proposal of examination methodology for stainless steel canister lid weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the early utilization of economical and module storage methodology, the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) had already developed and issued a Code for Construction of SNF Facilities - Rules on Concrete Cask - (JSME S FB1-2003) in 2003. On the other hand, the former competent authority (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency) issued the safety requirements for concrete cask design in 2004. For confinement requirements, Ultrasonic Test (UT) should be used to inspect the lid weldment in addition to Dye Penetrant Test (PT). To contribute to the JSME codification activities for adjustment between the safety requirements and the JSME design code, we performed mock-up canister weldment tests considering the vapor from the hot water in the spent fuel canister, the UT tests with canister lid weldment at high temperature and the structural analysis of the canister under hypothetical drop conditions. As a result, the draft amendment of the JSME design code was proposed. (author)

  18. Report on hydro-mechanical and chemical-mineralogical analyses of the bentonite buffer in Canister Retrieval Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Kristensson, Ola; Olsson, Siv [Clay Technology AB (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of five years of exposure to repository-like conditions on compacted Wyoming bentonite was determined by comparing the hydraulic, mechanical, and mineralogical properties of samples from the bentonite buffer of the Canister Retrieval Test (CRT) with those of reference material. The CRT, located at the Swedish Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), was a full-scale field experiment simulating conditions relevant for the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. The compacted bentonite, surrounding a copper canister equipped with heaters, had been subjected to heating at temperatures up to 95 deg C and hydration by natural Na-Ca-Cl type groundwater for almost five years at the time of retrieval. Under the thermal and hydration gradients that prevailed during the test, sulfate in the bentonite was redistributed and accumulated as anhydrite close to the canister. The major change in the exchangeable cation pool was a loss in Mg in the outer parts of the blocks, suggesting replacement of Mg mainly by Ca along with the hydration with groundwater. Close to the copper canister, small amounts of Cu were incorporated in the bentonite. A reduction of strain at failure was observed in the innermost part of the bentonite buffer, but no influence was seen on the shear strength. No change of the swelling pressure was observed, while a modest decrease in hydraulic conductivity was found for the samples with the highest densities. No coupling was found between these changes in the hydro-mechanical properties and the montmorillonite . the X-ray diffraction characteristics, the cation exchange properties, and the average crystal chemistry of the Na-converted < 1 {mu}m fractions provided no evidence of any chemical/structural changes in the montmorillonite after the 5-year hydrothermal test.

  19. Brine: a computer program to compute brine migration adjacent to a nuclear waste canister in a salt repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a mathematical model used to predict brine migration toward a nuclear waste canister in a bedded salt repository. The mathematical model is implemented in a computer program called BRINE. The program is written in FORTRAN and executes in the batch mode on a CDC 7600. A description of the program input requirements and output available is included. Samples of input and output are given

  20. The leading of Titanium on corrosion resistance of AISI 321 stainless steel as material for nuclear waste canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultimate disposal of spent fuel or high level waste on underground, needs canister which has high corrosion resistance. The AISI 321 stainless steel which contains titanium as spent fuel or high level waste canister has been studied. The titanium content in alloy would retard the formation of Cr23C6 precipitate, so the corrosion attack will be avoided. The experiment was conducted by heating specimens at temperature of 700oC for 2 hours in which the analysis was performed by optical microscope, SEM and EDS. The analysis results showed that at the experiment temperature was undetected the Cr23C6 precipitate, although the TiC precipitate was formed with average diameter of 4.70 μm with the Ti content on the TiC and matrix were 96.20% and 0.925% of weight respectively. The fact that this material has a high corrosion resistance, so the use as spent fuel or high level waste canister will be sufficiently safe

  1. Demonstrating compliance with the waste acceptance preliminary specifications on foreign materials within DWPF canistered waste forms (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will employ a waste acceptance program based on the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). These specifications require, among other criteria, that the canistered waste form contain no free liquids, free gases, organics, or explosives. Of particular importance is the absence of liquid water. This paper summarizes efforts and discusses experiments at the Savannah River Site for demonstrating compliance with the foreign materials specifications of the WAPS. Existing data, already in the literature, is being combined with the results of new experiments. For the volatility of the waste glass, documented work is combined with new results of thermogravimetric analysis experiments on simulated waste glass samples produced during scale glass melter campaigns. The volatility of these glass samples provides evidence that no free liquids, free gases, organics, or explosives are released upon heating the waste glass to its glass transition temperature. To show compliance of the absence of liquid water, documented work is being combined with the results of new experiments involving measurement of the internal gas pressure, the composition of the gas within the canisters, and the relative humidity of sealed, canistered waste forms produced during large-scale glass melter runs and the upcoming cold runs of the DWPF. (orig.)

  2. Mission Critical Occupation (MCO) Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Agencies report resource data and targets for government-wide mission critical occupations and agency specific mission critical and/or high risk occupations. These...

  3. Experimental and Computational Investigations of Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kerslake, Thomas; Sokolov, Pavel; Tolbert, Carol

    1996-01-01

    Two sets of experimental data are examined in this paper, ground and space experiments, for cylindrical canisters with thermal energy storage applications. A 2-D computational model was developed for unsteady heat transfer (conduction and radiation) with phase-change. The radiation heat transfer employed a finite volume method. The following was found in this study: (1) Ground Experiments: the convection heat transfer is equally important to that of the radiation heat transfer; radiation heat transfer in the liquid is found to be more significant than that in the void; including the radiation heat transfer in the liquid resulted in lower temperatures (about 15 K) and increased the melting time (about 10 min.); generally, most of the heat flow takes place in the radial direction. (2) Space Experiments: radiation heat transfer in the void is found to be more significant than that in the liquid (exactly the opposite to the Ground Experiments); accordingly, the location and size of the void affects the performance considerably; including the radiation heat transfer in the void resulted in lower temperatures (about 40 K).

  4. Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics Analysis for the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Results and Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARVIN, L.J.

    1999-09-20

    The purpose for this supplemental report is to follow-up and update the information in SNF-3907, Human Factors Engineering (HFE) Analysis: Results and Findings. This supplemental report responds to applicable U.S. Department of Energy Safety Analysis Report review team comments and questions. This Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics (HFE/Erg) analysis was conducted from April 1999 to July 1999; SNF-3907 was based on analyses accomplished in October 1998. The HFE/Erg findings presented in this report and SNF-3907, along with the results of HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report,'' Chapter A3.0, ''Hazards and Accidents Analyses,'' provide the technical basis for preparing or updating HNF-3553. Annex A, Chaptex A13.0, ''Human Factors Engineering.'' The findings presented in this report allow the HNF-3553 Chapter 13.0, ''Human Factors,'' to respond fully to the HFE requirements established in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  5. INITIAL WASTE PACKAGE PROBABILISTIC CRITICALITY ANALYSIS: MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER WITH DISPOSAL CONTAINER (TBV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.R. Massari

    1995-10-06

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide an assessment of the present waste package design from a criticality risk standpoint. The specific objectives of this initial analysis are to: (1) Establish a process for determining the probability of waste package criticality as a function of time (in terms of a cumulative distribution function, probability distribution function, or expected number of criticalities in a specified time interval) for various waste package concepts; (2) Demonstrate the established process by estimating the probability of criticality as a function of time since emplacement for an intact multi-purpose canister waste package (MPC-WP) configuration; (3) Identify the dominant sequences leading to waste package criticality for subsequent detailed analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to document and demonstrate the developed process as it has been applied to the MPC-WP. This revision is performed to correct deficiencies in the previous revision and provide further detail on the calculations performed. This analysis is similar to that performed for the uncanistered fuel waste package (UCF-WP, B00000000-01717-2200-00079).

  6. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Algorithms for ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Engholm, Marcus; Olofsson, Tomas (Uppsala Univ., Signals and Systems, Dept. of Technical Sciences (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    This report contains research results concerning the use of advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala Univ. in 2009 and 2010. The first part of the report deals with ultrasonic imaging of damage in planar structures using Lamb waves. We present results of the first successful attempt to apply an adaptive beamformer for Lamb waves. Our algorithm is an extension of the adaptive beamformer based on minimum variance distortion less response (MVDR) approach to dispersive, multimodal Lamb waves. We present simulation and experimental results illustrating the performance of the MVDR applied to imaging artificial damage in an aluminum plate. In the second part of the report we present two extensions of the previously proposed 2D phase shift migration algorithms for enhancing resolution in ultrasonic imaging of solid objects. The first extension enables processing 3D data in order to fully utilize the resolution enhancement potential of the technique. The second extension, consists in generalizing the technique to allow for the processing of data acquired using an array instead of a previously concerned single transducer. Robustness issue related to objects having front surfaces that are slightly tilted relative to the scanning axis is also considered

  7. A methodology to estimate earthquake effects on fractures intersecting canister holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature review and a preliminary numerical modeling study were carried out to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating displacements on fractures near to or intersecting canister emplacement holes. The method can be applied during preliminary evaluation of candidate sites prior to any detailed drilling or underground excavation, utilizing lineament maps and published regression relations between surface rupture trace length and earthquake magnitude, rupture area and displacements. The calculated displacements can be applied to lineament traces which are assumed to be faults and may be the sites for future earthquakes. Next, a discrete fracture model is created for secondary faulting and jointing in the vicinity of the repository. These secondary fractures may displace due to the earthquake on the primary faults. The three-dimensional numerical model assumes linear elasticity and linear elastic fracture mechanics which provides a conservative displacement estimate, while still preserving realistic fracture patterns. Two series of numerical studies were undertaken to demonstrate how the methodology could be implemented and how results could be applied to questions regarding site selection and performance assessment. The first series illustrates how earthquake damage to a hypothetical repository for a specified location (Aespoe) could be estimated. A second series examined the displacements induced by earthquakes varying in magnitude from 6.0 to 8.2 as a function of how close the earthquake was in relation to the repository. 143 refs, 25 figs, 7 tabs

  8. A methodology to estimate earthquake effects on fractures intersecting canister holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Pointe, P.; Wallmann, P.; Thomas, A.; Follin, S. [Golder Assocites Inc. (Sweden)

    1997-03-01

    A literature review and a preliminary numerical modeling study were carried out to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating displacements on fractures near to or intersecting canister emplacement holes. The method can be applied during preliminary evaluation of candidate sites prior to any detailed drilling or underground excavation, utilizing lineament maps and published regression relations between surface rupture trace length and earthquake magnitude, rupture area and displacements. The calculated displacements can be applied to lineament traces which are assumed to be faults and may be the sites for future earthquakes. Next, a discrete fracture model is created for secondary faulting and jointing in the vicinity of the repository. These secondary fractures may displace due to the earthquake on the primary faults. The three-dimensional numerical model assumes linear elasticity and linear elastic fracture mechanics which provides a conservative displacement estimate, while still preserving realistic fracture patterns. Two series of numerical studies were undertaken to demonstrate how the methodology could be implemented and how results could be applied to questions regarding site selection and performance assessment. The first series illustrates how earthquake damage to a hypothetical repository for a specified location (Aespoe) could be estimated. A second series examined the displacements induced by earthquakes varying in magnitude from 6.0 to 8.2 as a function of how close the earthquake was in relation to the repository. 143 refs, 25 figs, 7 tabs.

  9. ANALYSIS OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 (MACROBATCH 5) FOR CANISTER S02902 AND SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6) FOR CANISTER S03317 DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-10-04

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), Macrobatch 5 (MB5) on May 29, 2007. Sludge Batch 4 was a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and SB4 material qualified in Tank 51. On November 28, 2008, DWPF began processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40 which is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from SB4, SB5 material qualified in Tank 51 and H-Canyon Pu and Np transfers. SB4 was processed using Frit 510 and SB5 used Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. During the processing of SB4 and SB5, glass samples were obtained during the pouring of canisters S02902 and S03317, respectively. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed (durability, chemical and radionuclide composition). The following observations and conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of the oxides for the chemical composition of both the SB4 and SB5 pour stream glasses is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) acceptance limits (95 {le} sum of oxides {le} 105). (2) The calculated Sludge Dilution Factor (SDF) for SB4 is 2.52. The measured radionuclide content is in good agreement with the calculated values from the dried sludge results from the SB4 Waste Acceptance Production Specification (WAPS) sample (References 1 and 19). (3) The calculated SDF for SB5 is 2.60. The measured radionuclide content is in good agreement with the calculated values from the dried sludge results from the SB5 WAPS sample (References 2 and 20). (4) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis shows there are noble metal inclusions, primarily ruthenium, present in both pour stream samples. (5) The Product

  10. EB-welding of the copper canister for the nuclear waste disposal. Final report of the development programme 1994-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalto, H. [Outokumpu Oy Poricopper, Pori (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    During 1994-1997 Posiva Oy and Outokumpu Poricopper Oy had a joint project Development of EB-welding method for massive copper canister manufacturing. The project was part of the national technology program `Weld 2000` and it was supported financially by Technology Development Centre (TEKES). The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The thick copper layer of the canister provides a long time corrosion resistance and prevents deposited nuclear fuel from contact with water. The quality requirements of the copper components are high because of the designed long lifetime of the canister. The EB-welding technology has proved to be applicable method for the production of the copper canisters and the EB-welding technique is needed at least when the lids of the copper canister will be closed. There are a number of parameters in EB-welding which affect weldability. However, the effect of the welding parameters and their optimization has not been extensively studied in welding of thick copper sections using conventional high vacuum EB-welding. One aim of this development work was to extensively study effect of welding parameters on weld quality. The final objective was to minimise welding defects in the main weld and optimize slope out procedure in thick copper EB-welding. Welding of 50 mm thick copper sections was optimized using vertical and horizontal EB-welding techniques. As a result two full scale copper lids were welded to a short cylinder successfully. The resulting weld quality with optimised welding parameters was reasonable good. The optimised welding parameters for horizontal and vertical beam can be applied to the longitudinal body welds of the canister. The optimal slope out procedure for the lid closure needs some additional development work. In addition of extensive EB-welding program ultrasonic inspection and creep strength of the weld were studied. According

  11. Strategy for verification and demonstration of the sealing process for canisters for spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Christina [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Oeberg, Tomas [Tomas Oeberg Konsult AB, Lyckeby (Sweden)

    2004-08-01

    Electron beam welding and friction stir welding are the two processes now being considered for sealing copper canisters with Sweden's radioactive waste. This report outlines a strategy for verification and demonstration of the encapsulation process which here is considered to consist of the sealing of the canister by welding followed by quality control of the weld by non-destructive testing. Statistical methodology provides a firm basis for modern quality technology and design of experiments has been successful part of it. Factorial and fractional factorial designs can be used to evaluate main process factors and their interactions. Response surface methodology with multilevel designs enables further optimisation. Empirical polynomial models can through Taylor series expansions approximate the true underlying relationships sufficiently well. The fitting of response measurements is based on ordinary least squares regression or generalised linear methods. Unusual events, like failures in the lid welds, are best described with extreme value statistics and the extreme value paradigm give a rationale for extrapolation. Models based on block maxima (the generalised extreme value distribution) and peaks over threshold (the generalised Pareto distribution) are considered. Experiences from other fields of the materials sciences suggest that both of these approaches are useful. The initial verification experiments of the two welding technologies considered are suggested to proceed by experimental plans that can be accomplished with only four complete lid welds each. Similar experimental arrangements can be used to evaluate process 'robustness' and optimisation of the process window. Two series of twenty demonstration trials each, mimicking assembly-line production, are suggested as a final evaluation before the selection of welding technology. This demonstration is also expected to provide a data base suitable for a baseline estimate of future performance

  12. Analysis of the effect of vibrations on the bentonite buffer in the canister hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin (AaF- Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hakami, Hossein; Ekneligoda, Thushan (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    During the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rock, blasting activities in certain deposition tunnels will occur at the same time as the deposition of canisters containing the waste is going on in another adjacent access tunnel. In fact, the deposition consists of several stages after the drilling of the deposition hole. The most vulnerable stage from a vibration point of view is when the bentonite buffer is placed in the deposition hole but the canister has not been placed yet. During this stage, a hollow column of bentonite blocks remains free to vibrate inside the deposition hole. The goal of this study was to investigate the displacement of the bentonite blocks when exposed to the highest vibration level that can be expected during the drill and blast operations. In order to investigate this, a three dimensional model in 3DEC, capable of capturing the dynamic behaviour of the bentonite buffer was set up. To define the vibration levels, which serve as input data for the 3DEC model, an extensive analysis of the recorded vibrations from the TASQ - tunnel was carried out. For this purpose, an upper expected vibration limit was defined. This was done outgoing from the fact that the planned charging for the construction of the geological repository will lie in the interval 2 to 4 kg. Furthermore, at the first stage for this study, it was decided that the vibration should be conservatively evaluated for 30 m distance. Using these data, it was concluded that the maximum vibration level that can be expected will be approximately 60 mm/s. After simplifying the vibration signal, a sinusoidal wave with the amplitude 60 mm/s was applied at the bottom of the column and it was assumed that the vibrations only affect the bentonite buffer in one direction (horizontal direction). From this simulation, it was concluded that hardly any displacements occurred. However, when applying the same sinusoidal wave both in the horizontal and the

  13. Strategy for verification and demonstration of the sealing process for canisters for spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam welding and friction stir welding are the two processes now being considered for sealing copper canisters with Sweden's radioactive waste. This report outlines a strategy for verification and demonstration of the encapsulation process which here is considered to consist of the sealing of the canister by welding followed by quality control of the weld by non-destructive testing. Statistical methodology provides a firm basis for modern quality technology and design of experiments has been successful part of it. Factorial and fractional factorial designs can be used to evaluate main process factors and their interactions. Response surface methodology with multilevel designs enables further optimisation. Empirical polynomial models can through Taylor series expansions approximate the true underlying relationships sufficiently well. The fitting of response measurements is based on ordinary least squares regression or generalised linear methods. Unusual events, like failures in the lid welds, are best described with extreme value statistics and the extreme value paradigm give a rationale for extrapolation. Models based on block maxima (the generalised extreme value distribution) and peaks over threshold (the generalised Pareto distribution) are considered. Experiences from other fields of the materials sciences suggest that both of these approaches are useful. The initial verification experiments of the two welding technologies considered are suggested to proceed by experimental plans that can be accomplished with only four complete lid welds each. Similar experimental arrangements can be used to evaluate process 'robustness' and optimisation of the process window. Two series of twenty demonstration trials each, mimicking assembly-line production, are suggested as a final evaluation before the selection of welding technology. This demonstration is also expected to provide a data base suitable for a baseline estimate of future performance. This estimate can

  14. Cleaning Genesis Sample Return Canister for Flight: Lessons for Planetary Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, J. H.; Hittle, J. D.; Mickelson, E. T.; Stansbery, Eileen K.

    2016-01-01

    Sample return missions require chemical contamination to be minimized and potential sources of contamination to be documented and preserved for future use. Genesis focused on and successfully accomplished the following: - Early involvement provided input to mission design: a) cleanable materials and cleanable design; b) mission operation parameters to minimize contamination during flight. - Established contamination control authority at a high level and developed knowledge and respect for contamination control across all institutions at the working level. - Provided state-of-the-art spacecraft assembly cleanroom facilities for science canister assembly and function testing. Both particulate and airborne molecular contamination was minimized. - Using ultrapure water, cleaned spacecraft components to a very high level. Stainless steel components were cleaned to carbon monolayer levels (10 (sup 15) carbon atoms per square centimeter). - Established long-term curation facility Lessons learned and areas for improvement, include: - Bare aluminum is not a cleanable surface and should not be used for components requiring extreme levels of cleanliness. The problem is formation of oxides during rigorous cleaning. - Representative coupons of relevant spacecraft components (cut from the same block at the same time with identical surface finish and cleaning history) should be acquired, documented and preserved. Genesis experience suggests that creation of these coupons would be facilitated by specification on the engineering component drawings. - Component handling history is critical for interpretation of analytical results on returned samples. This set of relevant documents is not the same as typical documentation for one-way missions and does include data from several institutions, which need to be unified. Dedicated resources need to be provided for acquiring and archiving appropriate documents in one location with easy access for decades. - Dedicated, knowledgeable

  15. Development of measurement technology of chlorine attached on canister using laser. Remote measurement in narrow space for the application during storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) at the surface of a stainless steel canister is a current issue in the interim storage of spent fuel by a concrete cask. The concentration measurement of salt attached on a canister is one of the important methods for inspection of environmental condition for SCC occurrence. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an attractive method for the concentration measurement of salt attached on the candidate material of a canister. In order to adopt the LIBS to the actual equipment, the remote measurement is needed because the surface of the canister is under radioactive and hot environmental condition. In this study, the remote measurement by using open pass LIBS was performed, and the prototype of compact devices for remote LIBS has been developed. The developed device for laser focusing can be inserted in the narrow space simulating the space between the concrete body and the canister. The results of open pass LIBS showed that the chlorine emission spectrum was measured in the narrow space when the distance from laser device to the measurement points was over 20 m. (author)

  16. Heat transfer and thermal storage performance of an open thermosyphon type thermal storage unit with tubular phase change material canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel open heat pipe thermal storage unit is design to improve its performance. • Mechanism of its operation is phase-change heat transfer. • Tubular canisters with phase change material were placed in thermal storage unit. • Experiment and analysis are carried out to investigate its operation properties. - Abstract: A novel open thermosyphon-type thermal storage unit is presented to improve design and performance of heat pipe type thermal storage unit. In the present study, tubular canisters filled with a solid–liquid phase change material are vertically placed in the middle of the thermal storage unit. The phase change material melts at 100 °C. Water is presented as the phase-change heat transfer medium of the thermal storage unit. The tubular canister is wrapped tightly with a layer of stainless steel mesh to increase the surface wettability. The heat transfer mechanism of charging/discharging is similar to that of the thermosyphon. Heat transfer between the heat resource or cold resource and the phase change material in this device occurs in the form of a cyclic phase change of the heat-transfer medium, which occurs on the surface of the copper tubes and has an extremely high heat-transfer coefficient. A series of experiments and theoretical analyses are carried out to investigate the properties of the thermal storage unit, including power distribution, start-up performance, and temperature difference between the phase change material and the surrounding vapor. The results show that the whole system has excellent heat-storage/heat-release performance

  17. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the ω-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization

  18. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Olofsson, Tomas; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Technical Sciences (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2006-12-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2005/2006. In the first part of the report we propose a concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique. First, we introduce the AE technique and then we present the principle of the system for monitoring the FSW process in cylindrical symmetry specific for the SKB canisters. We propose an omnidirectional circular array of ultrasonic transducers for receiving the AE signals generated by the FSW tool and the releases of the residual stress at canister's circumference. Finally, we review the theory of uniform circular arrays. The second part of the report is concerned with synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) characterized by enhanced spatial resolution. We evaluate three different approaches to perform imaging with less computational cost than that of the extended SAFT (ESAFT) method proposed in our previous reports. First, a sparse version of ESAFT is presented, which solves the reconstruction problem only for a small set of the most probable scatterers in the image. A frequency domain the {omega}-k SAFT algorithm, which relies on the far-field approximation is presented in the second part. Finally, a detailed analysis of the most computationally intense step in the ESAFT and the sparse 2D deconvolution is presented. In the final part of the report we introduce basics of the 3D ultrasonic imaging that has a great potential in the inspection of the FSW welds. We discuss in some detail the three interrelated steps involved in the 3D ultrasonic imaging: data acquisition, 3D reconstruction, and 3D visualization.

  19. Sampling and analysis plan for sludge located in fuel storage canisters of the 105-K West basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.B.

    1997-04-30

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) provides direction for the first sampling of sludge from the K West Basin spent fuel canisters. The specially developed sampling equipment removes representative samples of sludge while maintaining the radioactive sample underwater in the basin pool (equipment is described in WHC-SD-SNF-SDD-004). Included are the basic background logic for sample selection, the overall laboratory analyses required and the laboratory reporting required. These are based on requirements put forth in the data quality objectives (WHC-SD-SNF-DQO-012) established for this sampling and characterization activity.

  20. Performance of CASTOR{sup R} HAW Cask Cold Trials for Loading, Transport and Storage of HAW canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmsmeier, Marco; Vossnacke, Andre [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Hollestrasse 7A, D-45127 Essen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    On the basis of reprocessing contracts, concluded between the German Nuclear Utilities (GNUs) and the reprocessing companies in France (AREVA NC) and the UK (Nuclear Decommissioning Authority), GNS has the task to return the resulting residues to Germany. The high active waste (HAW) residuals from nuclear fuel reprocessing are vitrified and filled into steel cans, the HAW canisters. According to reprocessing contracts the equivalent number of HAW canisters to heavy metals delivered has to be returned to the country of origin and stored at an interim storage facility where applicable. The GNS' CASTOR{sup R} HAW casks are designed and licensed to fulfil the requirements for transport and long-term storage of HAW canisters. The new cask type CASTOR{sup R} HAW28M is capable of storing 28 HAW canisters with a maximum thermal power of 56 kW in total. Prior to the first active cask loading at a reprocessing facility it is required to demonstrate all important handling steps with the CASTOR{sup R} HAW28M cask according to a specific and approved sequence plan (MAP). These cold trials have to be carried out at the cask loading plant and at the reception area of an interim storage facility in Gorleben (TBL-G), witnessed by the licensing authorities and their independent experts. At transhipment stations GNS performs internal trials to demonstrate safe handling. A brand-new, empty CASTOR{sup R} HAW28M cask has been shipped from the GNS cask assembly facility in Muelheim to the TBL-G for cold trials. With this cask, GNS has to demonstrate the transhipment of casks at the Dannenberg transfer station from rail to road, transport to and reception at the TBL-G as well as incoming dose rate and contamination measurements and preparation for storage. After removal of all shock absorbers with a cask specific handling frame, tilting operation and assembly of the secondary lid with a pressure sensor, the helium leak tightness and 'Block-mass' tests have to be carried out

  1. Sampling and analysis plan for sludge located in fuel storage canisters of the 105-K West basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) provides direction for the first sampling of sludge from the K West Basin spent fuel canisters. The specially developed sampling equipment removes representative samples of sludge while maintaining the radioactive sample underwater in the basin pool (equipment is described in WHC-SD-SNF-SDD-004). Included are the basic background logic for sample selection, the overall laboratory analyses required and the laboratory reporting required. These are based on requirements put forth in the data quality objectives (WHC-SD-SNF-DQO-012) established for this sampling and characterization activity

  2. Fire simulation of the canister transfer and installation vehicle; Kapselin siirto- ja asennusajoneuvon palosimulointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltokorpi, L. [Fortum Power and Heat Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-12-15

    A pyrolysis model of the canister transfer and installation vehicle was developed and vehicle fires in the final disposal tunnel and in the central tunnel were simulated using the fire simulation program FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). For comparison, same vehicle fire was also simulated at conditions in which the fire remained as a fuel controlled during the whole simulation. The purpose of the fire simulations was to simulate the fire behaviour realistically taking into account for example the limitations coming from the lack of oxygen. The material parameters for the rubber were defined and the simulation models for the tyres developed by simulating the fire test of a front wheel loader rubber tyre done by SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden. In these simulations the most important phenomena were successfully brought out but the timing of the phenomena was difficult. The final values for the rubber material parameters were chosen so that the simulated fire behaviour was at least as intense as the measured one. In the vehicle fire simulations a hydraulic oil or diesel leak causing a pool fire size of 2 MW and 2 m{sup 2} was assumed. The pool fire was assumed to be located under the tyres of the SPMT (Self Propelled Modular Transporters) transporter. In each of the vehicle fire simulations only the tyres of the SPMT transporter were observed to be burning whereas the tyres of the trailer remained untouched. In the fuel controlled fire the maximum power was slightly under 10 MW which was reached in about 18 minutes. In the final disposal tunnel the growth of the fire was limited due to the lack of oxygen and the relatively fast air flows existing in the tunnel. Fast air flows caused the flame spreading to be limited to the certain directions. In the final disposal tunnel fire the maximum power was slightly over 7 MW which was reached about 8 minutes after the ignition. In the central tunnel there was no shortage of oxygen but the spread of the fire was limited

  3. Development of a constitutive model for the plastic deformation and creep of copper and its use in the estimate of the creep life of the copper canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Kjell [Matsafe AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    A previously developed model for the plastic deformation and creep of copper (included as an Appendix to the present report) has been used as the basis for a discussion on the possibility of brittle creep fracture of the copper canister during long term storage of nuclear waste. Reported creep tests on oxygen free (OF) copper have demonstrated that copper can have an extremely low creep ductility. However with the addition of about 50 ppm phosphorus to the copper it appears as if the creep brittleness problem is avoided and that type of copper (OFP) has consequently been chosen as the canister material. It is shown in the report that the experiments performed on OFP copper does not exclude the possibility of creep brittleness of OFP copper in the very long term. The plasticity and creep model has been used to estimate creep life under conditions of intergranular creep cracking according to a model formulated by Cocks and Ashby. The estimated life times widely exceed the design life of the canister. However the observations of creep brittleness in OF copper indicate that the Cocks-Ashby model probably does not apply to the OF copper. Thus additional calculations have been done with the plasticity and creep model in order to estimate stress as a function of time for the probably most severe loading case of the canister with regard to creep failure, an earth quake shear. Despite the fact that the stress in the canister will remain at the 100 MPa level for thousands of years after an earth quake the low temperature, about 50 deg C or less, will make the solid state diffusion process assumed to control the brittle cracking process, too slow to lead to any significant brittle creep cracking in the canister.

  4. Inspection of copper canister for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Copper characterization, FSW monitoring with acoustic emission and ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Engholm, Marcus; Olofsson, Tomas (Uppsala Univ., Signals and Systems, Dept. of Technical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2009-08-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in 2008. The first part of the report is concerned with aspects related to ultrasonic attenuation of copper material used for canisters. We present results of attenuation measurement performed for a number of samples taken from a real canister; two from the lid and four from different parts of canister wall. Ultrasonic attenuation of the material originating from canister lid is relatively low (less that 50 dB/m) and essentially frequency independent in the frequency range up to 5 MHz. However, for the material originating from the extruded canister part considerable variations of the attenuation are observed, which can reach even 200 dB/m at 3.5 MHz. In the second part of the report we present further development of the concept of the friction stir welding process monitoring by means of multiple sensors formed into a uniform circular array (UCA). After a brief introduction into modeling Lamb waves and UCA we focus on array processing techniques that enable estimating direction of arrival of multimodal Lamb waves. We consider two new techniques, the Capon beamformer and the broadband multiple signal classification technique (MUSIC). We present simulation results illustrating their performance. In the final part we present the phase shift migration algorithm for ultrasonic imaging of layered media using synthetic aperture concept. We start from explaining theory of the phase migration concept, which is followed by the results of experiments performed on copper blocks with drilled holes. We show that the proposed algorithm performs well for immersion inspection of metal objects and yields both improved spatial resolution and suppressed grain noise

  5. Thermomechanical room and canister region benchmark analyses between STEALTH-WI and SPECTROM-32: Draft final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the benchmarking of the two-dimensional waste isolation version of STEALTH (designated STEALTH-WI) against the thermomechanical performance assessment calculations performed by RE/SPEC using SPECTROM-32. An axisymmetric, canister-scale (very-near-field) analysis was performed to compute the peak stress exerted by the salt on the waste package. A plane strain, room-scale (near-field) analysis was also performed to predict disposal room roof-to-floor closure and the temperatures at key locations in the vicinity of the disposal room. Comparisons between the STEALTH and SPECTROM-32 results showed that the temperature predictions agreed to within 5/degree/C, peak canister stresses better than 10%, and the average roof-to-floor closures within 30%. The stress and displacement differences were attributed to differences in the treatment of plasticity in the constitutive laws for salt employed in STEALTH and SPECTROM-32. The temperature differences were due to minor differences in the thermal models employed in STEALTH and SPECTROM- 41, the thermal analysis code which supplies temperatures for SPECTROM-32. 9 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Horizontal deposition of canisters for spent nuclear fuel. Summary of the KBS-3H Project 2004-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKB and Posiva both selected the KBS-3 method for the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The KBS-3 method relies on stable and favourable conditions of the bedrock, long-lived canisters containing the spent fuel and the buffer functions of clay surrounding the canister. The reference design is the KBS-3V, in which the canisters with spent nuclear fuel are emplaced vertically in individual deposition holes. For a number of years SKB and Posiva have also jointly studied a design in which the canisters are instead serially emplaced in long horizontal drifts (KBS-3H). The drivers behind the development of the KBS-3H concept are that both cost and environmental impact could be reduced without compromising long-term safety. There are many similarities between KBS-3H and KBS-3V as both designs are based on the KBS-3 method. The main objectives of KBS-3H Project 2004-2007 were to demonstrate that the deposition alternative is technically feasible and that it fulfils the same long-term safety requirements as KBS-3V. These main objectives have only been partially met owing to the restrictions imposed before the start of the project and during its execution. More work is needed for the full demonstration of the engineering feasibility with due consideration to anticipated, site-specific conditions. In KBS-3H Project 2004-2007, it was demonstrated that it was possible to excavate horizontal drifts that would fulfil most of the stringent requirements on geometry dictated by the use of current standard technology. It was further demonstrated that it is possible to emplace a 46-tonne supercontainer in a deposition drift using water-cushion technology. A critical1 issue for the robustness of the KBS-3H during emplacement and saturation is that the groundwater seepage into the deposition drift is low (< 0.1 l/min over the entire length of the supercontainer section) as higher inflow may cause piping/erosion of the buffer during the saturation period. A Mega-Packer was

  7. Oxidative dissolution of spent fuel and release of nuclides from a copper/iron canister. Model developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longcheng Liu

    2001-12-01

    Three models have been developed and applied in the performance assessment of a final repository. They are based on accepted theories and experimental results for known and possible mechanisms that may dominate in the oxidative dissolution of spent fuel and the release of nuclides from a canister. Assuming that the canister is breached at an early stage after disposal, the three models describe three sub-systems in the near field of the repository, in which the governing processes and mechanisms are quite different. In the model for the oxidative dissolution of the fuel matrix, a set of kinetic descriptions is provided that describes the oxidative dissolution of the fuel matrix and the release of the embedded nuclides. In particular, the effect of autocatalytic reduction of hexavalent uranium by dissolved H{sub 2}, using UO{sub 2} (s) on the fuel pellets as a catalyst, is taken into account. The simulation results suggest that most of the radiolytic oxidants will be consumed by the oxidation of the fuel matrix, and that much less will be depleted by dissolved ferrous iron. Most of the radiolytically produced hexavalent uranium will be reduced by the autocatalytic reaction with H{sub 2} on the fuel surface. It will reprecipitate as UO{sub 2} (s) on the fuel surface, and thus very little net oxidation of the fuel will take place. In the reactive transport model, the interactions of multiple processes within a defective canister are described, in which numerous redox reactions take place as multiple species diffuse. The effect of corrosion of the cast iron insert of the canister and the reduction of dissolved hexavalent uranium by ferrous iron sorbed onto iron corrosion products and by dissolved H{sub 2} are particularly included. Scoping calculations suggest that corrosion of the iron insert will occur primarily under anaerobic conditions. The escaping oxidants from the fuel rods will migrate toward the iron insert. Much of these oxidants will, however, be consumed

  8. Horizontal deposition of canisters for spent nuclear fuel. Summary of the KBS-3H Project 2004-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    SKB and Posiva both selected the KBS-3 method for the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The KBS-3 method relies on stable and favourable conditions of the bedrock, long-lived canisters containing the spent fuel and the buffer functions of clay surrounding the canister. The reference design is the KBS-3V, in which the canisters with spent nuclear fuel are emplaced vertically in individual deposition holes. For a number of years SKB and Posiva have also jointly studied a design in which the canisters are instead serially emplaced in long horizontal drifts (KBS-3H). The drivers behind the development of the KBS-3H concept are that both cost and environmental impact could be reduced without compromising long-term safety. There are many similarities between KBS-3H and KBS-3V as both designs are based on the KBS-3 method. The main objectives of KBS-3H Project 2004-2007 were to demonstrate that the deposition alternative is technically feasible and that it fulfils the same long-term safety requirements as KBS-3V. These main objectives have only been partially met owing to the restrictions imposed before the start of the project and during its execution. More work is needed for the full demonstration of the engineering feasibility with due consideration to anticipated, site-specific conditions. In KBS-3H Project 2004-2007, it was demonstrated that it was possible to excavate horizontal drifts that would fulfil most of the stringent requirements on geometry dictated by the use of current standard technology. It was further demonstrated that it is possible to emplace a 46-tonne supercontainer in a deposition drift using water-cushion technology. A critical1 issue for the robustness of the KBS-3H during emplacement and saturation is that the groundwater seepage into the deposition drift is low (< 0.1 l/min over the entire length of the supercontainer section) as higher inflow may cause piping/erosion of the buffer during the saturation period. A Mega-Packer was

  9. Spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, D.R.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1997-09-01

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin, clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge), remove the contents from the canisters and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. This report describes fuel handling development testing performed from May 1, 1997 through the end of August 1997. Testing during this period was mainly focused on performance of a Schilling Robotic Systems` Conan manipulator used to simulate a custom designed version, labeled Konan, being fabricated for K-Basin deployment. In addition to the manipulator, the camera viewing system, process table layout, and fuel handling processes were evaluated. The Conan test manipulator was installed and fully functional for testing in early 1997. Formal testing began May 1. The purposes of fuel handling development testing were to provide proof of concept and criteria, optimize equipment layout, initialize the process definition, and identify special needs/tools and required design changes to support development of the performance specification. The test program was set up to accomplish these objectives through cold (non-radiological) development testing using simulated and prototype equipment.

  10. State of the art of the welding method for sealing spent nuclear fuel canister made of copper. Part 2 - EBW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consist the results of the development of the electron beam welding (EBW) method for sealing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal canister. This report has been used as background material for selection of the sealing method for the SNF canister. Report contains the state of the art knowledge of the EBW method and research and development (R and D) results done by Posiva. Relevant R and D results of EB-welds done by SKB are also reviewed in this report. Requirements set for the welding and weld are present. These requirements are based on the long term safety and also some part of requirements are set by other processes like non-destructive testing (NDT) and manufacturing processes of components. Initial state of the weld is described in this report. Initial state has significant effect on the long term safety issues like corrosion resistance and creep ductility. Also short and long term mechanical properties as well as corrosion properties are described. Microstructure and residual stresses of the weld is represented in this report. Report consists also imperfections of the weld and statistical analysis of the evaluation of the probability of the largest defect size on the weld. Results of corrosion and creep tests of EB-welds are reviewed in this report. EBW process and machine are described. Preliminary designing of the EBW-machine has been done including component handling equipments. Preliminary welding procedure specification (pWPS) has drawn up and qualification of the personnel is described briefly. In-line process and quality control system including seam tracking system is implemented in modern EBW machine. Also NDT methods for inspection of the weld are described in this report. Concerning the results from the research and development work it can be concluded that EB welding method is suitable method for sealing SNF canister. Weld material fulfils requirements set by the long term safety. The welding system is robust and reliable and it is based

  11. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  12. Corrosion of carbon steel overpacks for the geological disposal of radioactive waste Task 3 Characterization of radioactive waste forms a series of final reports (1985-89) No 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year research programme investigating the long-term corrosion of carbon steel overpacks for the disposal of nuclear waste in granitic and argillaceous environments. The aim of the work has been to develop mechanistic mathematical models of uniform and localized corrosion, and to test their validity by comparison with experimental data. It has been found that both models overestimate the rate of attack by factors of 4-6. It is recommended that additional work should be undertaken to improve the uniform corrosion model by including the retarding influence of accumulated corrosion products. However, in the case of localized corrosion, attention should focus on improving the estimate of the maximum period for localized attack, based on the criterion that such corrosion is only feasible under aerobic conditions. If, as seems likely, this period is only 20-40 years, the extent of penetration may then be estimated with sufficient accuracy form experimental data. However, the localized corrosion model in its present form will still have an important role in investigating the importance of different environmental conditions, with regard to the rate of corrosion penetration. 9 refs.; 17 figs.; 8 tabs

  13. A unique tungsten-based tagging approach for maintaining of continuity of knowledge of nuclear waste copper canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to the unique tagging of nuclear waste copper canisters is suggested. In this new method a combination of two different techniques, radiation and ultrasonic measurements, is used in order to get the same unique identifier of the cask. The necessary component of the method is a tungsten/lead insert marked with a binary or bar code and placed inside the container. The paper discusses results of the radiation measurements performed in lab as the first proof of the concept, as well as results of Monte-Carlo evaluation of the feasibility of proposed approach. The method makes it possible to maintain continuity of knowledge of nuclear waste for a time scale up to a few hundred years without comprising the environmental safety of casks. (author)

  14. Preselection of Ni-Cr(-Mo) alloys as potential canister materials for vitrified high active nuclear waste by electrochemical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bort, H.; Wolf, I.; Leistikow, S.

    1987-07-01

    Several Ni-Cr(-Mo) alloys (Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, Sanicro 28, Incoloy 825, Inconel 690) were tested by electrochemical methods to characterize their corrosion behavior in chloride containing solutions at various temperatures and pH-values in respect to their application as canister materials for final radioactive waste storage. Especially, Hastelloy C4 was tested by potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and galvanostic measurements. As electrolytes H 2SO 4 solutions were used, as parameters temperature, chloride content and pH-value were varied. All tested alloys showed a clearly limited resistance against pitting corrosion phenomena; under severe conditions even crevice corrosion phenomena were observed. The best corrosion behavior, however, is shown by Hastelloy C4, which has the lowest passivation current density of all tested alloys and the largest potential region with protection against local corrosion phenomena.

  15. Preselection of Ni-Cr(-Mo) alloys as potential canister materials for vitrified high active nuclear waste by electrochemical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bort, H.; Wolf, I.; Leistikow, S.

    1987-07-01

    Several Ni-Cr(-Mo) alloys (Hastelloy C4, Inconel 625, Sanicro 28, Incoloy 825, Inconel 690) were tested by electrochemical methods to characterize their corrosion behavior in chloride containing solutions at various temperatures and pH-values in respect to their application as canister materials for final radioactive waste storage. Especially, Hastelloy C4 was tested by potentiodynamic, potentiostatic and galvanostic measurements. As electrolytes H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions were used, as parameters temperature, chloride content and pH-value were varied. All tested alloys showed a clearly limited resistance against pitting corrosion phenomena; under severe conditions even crevice corrosion phenomena were observed. The best corrosion behavior, however, is shown by Hastelloy C4, which has the lowest passivation current density of all tested alloys and the largest potential region with protection against local corrosion phenomena.

  16. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo is moved to the payload canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane begins lifting the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The MPLM is being moved to the payload canister for transfer to Launch Pad 39B and installation in Space Shuttle Discovery. The Leonardo, one of Italy'''s major contributions to the International Space Station program, is a reusable logistics carrier. It is the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the primary payload on mission STS-102 and will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:45 a.m. EST.

  17. State of the art of the welding method for sealing spent nuclear fuel canister made of copper. Part 1 - FSW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to gather together comprehensive information concerning FSW as an optional welding method for welding the nuclear waste copper canister at the disposal facility. This report discusses the current situation, knowledge of the process and information concerning results of the development and research work related to welding thick copper and the special needs of the disposal environment. Most of the research work and development work has been done by Posiva's Swedish partner SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. SKB chose FSW as their reference welding method in 2005. FSW (friction stir welding) is a solid-state welding method, invented in 1991, in which frictional heat is generated between the tool and the weld metal, causing the metal to soften, normally without reaching the melting point, and allowing the tool to traverse the joint line. Friction stir welding can be used for joining many types of materials and material combinations, if the tool materials and designs can be found which operate at the forging temperature of the workpiece. The general requirements for the copper canister weld and base material are presented in Posiva's VAHA-system, which sets the most critical values or demands concerning the short- and long-term properties or other needs. The sections in this report are set out in a similar way as in the VAHA-system. Concerning the results from the research and development work, it can be said that FS weld material fulfils the values set by VAHA. The quality of the welds fulfils the set demands for intact weld material and the welding process is robust using an automatic control system. There still remains work concerning the acceptance procedure for the welding process and other open issues which are described in this report. (orig.)

  18. State of the art of the welding method for sealing spent nuclear fuel canister made of copper. Part 1 - FSW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purhonen, T.

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this report is to gather together comprehensive information concerning FSW as an optional welding method for welding the nuclear waste copper canister at the disposal facility. This report discusses the current situation, knowledge of the process and information concerning results of the development and research work related to welding thick copper and the special needs of the disposal environment. Most of the research work and development work has been done by Posiva's Swedish partner SKB, Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. SKB chose FSW as their reference welding method in 2005. FSW (friction stir welding) is a solid-state welding method, invented in 1991, in which frictional heat is generated between the tool and the weld metal, causing the metal to soften, normally without reaching the melting point, and allowing the tool to traverse the joint line. Friction stir welding can be used for joining many types of materials and material combinations, if the tool materials and designs can be found which operate at the forging temperature of the workpiece. The general requirements for the copper canister weld and base material are presented in Posiva's VAHA-system, which sets the most critical values or demands concerning the short- and long-term properties or other needs. The sections in this report are set out in a similar way as in the VAHA-system. Concerning the results from the research and development work, it can be said that FS weld material fulfils the values set by VAHA. The quality of the welds fulfils the set demands for intact weld material and the welding process is robust using an automatic control system. There still remains work concerning the acceptance procedure for the welding process and other open issues which are described in this report. (orig.)

  19. Mechanical Analysis of an SM 2 Blk IV restrained firing within a concentric canister launcher test unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassner, M C; Kennedy, T C; Puttapitukporn, T; Rosen, R S

    1999-03-01

    The Office of Naval Research (ONR) and PMS512 have undertaken a program to develop a new Vertical Launching System (VLS) for future generation ships, such as the DD-21 Destroyer. The Naval Sea Systems Command Combat Weapons Program (NAVSEA 05K) and Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) are working jointly with industry and universities to develop one such launcher design, the Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). The basic CCL design consists of a tube made of two concentric cylinders; one end is open, the other is sealed with a hemispherical end cap. During firing, the missile exhaust gas is turned 180 degrees by the hemispherical end cap and flows through the annular space between inner and outer cylinders. Depending on the missile utilized and the particular service environment of the CCL, maximum temperatures within the cylinder material have been calculated to exceed 2000 F. In an earlier study [1], the authors determined the high temperature mechanical properties of several candidate alloys being considered for fabrication of the CCL. This study [1] found that, of these candidate materials, titanium alloys exhibit higher yield stresses than that of 316L stainless steel at temperatures up to about 1000 F; above 1500 F, the yield stress of 316L stainless steel is comparable to those of the titanium alloys. The 316L stainless steel was found to strain harden (increase its flow stress with increasing strain) at temperatures up to about 1800 F. The ability of the 316L stainless steel to strain harden at high temperatures may provide an added margin of safety for engineering design of the CCL. The objective of the current study was to perform a computer simulation of the structural response of a CCL during a restrained firing, one in which a SM-2 Blk IV missile would fail to exit the canister. A finite element model of the inner cylinder, outer cylinder, end rings (mounting brackets), and lateral restraints in the uptake was constructed. An elastic

  20. Mechanical Analysis of an SM 2 Blk IV restrained firing within a concentric canister launcher test unit; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Naval Research (ONR) and PMS512 have undertaken a program to develop a new Vertical Launching System (VLS) for future generation ships, such as the DD-21 Destroyer. The Naval Sea Systems Command Combat Weapons Program (NAVSEA 05K) and Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) are working jointly with industry and universities to develop one such launcher design, the Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). The basic CCL design consists of a tube made of two concentric cylinders; one end is open, the other is sealed with a hemispherical end cap. During firing, the missile exhaust gas is turned 180 degrees by the hemispherical end cap and flows through the annular space between inner and outer cylinders. Depending on the missile utilized and the particular service environment of the CCL, maximum temperatures within the cylinder material have been calculated to exceed 2000 F. In an earlier study[1], the authors determined the high temperature mechanical properties of several candidate alloys being considered for fabrication of the CCL. This study[1] found that, of these candidate materials, titanium alloys exhibit higher yield stresses than that of 316L stainless steel at temperatures up to about 1000 F; above 1500 F, the yield stress of 316L stainless steel is comparable to those of the titanium alloys. The 316L stainless steel was found to strain harden (increase its flow stress with increasing strain) at temperatures up to about 1800 F. The ability of the 316L stainless steel to strain harden at high temperatures may provide an added margin of safety for engineering design of the CCL. The objective of the current study was to perform a computer simulation of the structural response of a CCL during a restrained firing, one in which a SM-2 Blk IV missile would fail to exit the canister. A finite element model of the inner cylinder, outer cylinder, end rings (mounting brackets), and lateral restraints in the uptake was constructed. An elastic

  1. 污泥减量化工艺:HA-A/A-MCO的除磷性能及磷回收%Characteristics of Phosphorus Removal and Phosphorus Recovery in Advanced Sludge Reduction Process HA-A/A-MCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左宁; 吉芳英; 黄力彦; 宗述安

    2009-01-01

    针对污泥减量技术中对氮、磷去除能力低的问题,开发了一种具有强化脱氮除磷功能、污泥减量化的HA-A/A-MCO工艺,其通过回流释磷污泥的水解酸化来刺激磷的厌氧释放并辅以外排富磷污水进行化学固定的方式除磷.研究发现:当进入水解酸化池的厌氧释磷污泥量为进水量的2%时,水解产生的VFA导致释磷量达57 mg/L,聚磷菌的生长得到促进而聚糖菌则受到抑制;当控制侧流除磷液量为进水量的13%、化学除磷池出水磷为5 mg/L时,系统处理出水TP<0.5 mg/L;提高厌氧释磷浓度并控制化学除磷池的出水磷浓度为5 mg/L,可以提高化学药剂利用率、减少药剂用量并提高化学污泥的含磷量,HA-A/A-MCO系统产生的化学污泥含磷率高达18%,接近纯含磷化合物的含磷率,可直接用作生产磷肥的原料.%In order to improve phosphorous and nitrogen removal in sludge reduction technologies, an advanced process combining excess sludge reduction and phosphorous and nitrogen removal was devel-oped. It is the hydrolysis acidification-anaerobic/anoxic-muhistep continuous oxic (HA-A/A-MCO) process. It realizes phosphorous removal through the hydrolysis acidification of returned P-release sludge, which improves anaerobic P-release level, and through discharging phosphorus-rich sewage. The results show that when the amount of anaerobic P-release sludge entering the hydrolysis acidification tank is about 2% of the total influent flow, VFA from hydrolysis acidification process is able to induce phosphorus con-tent reaching 57 mg/L from anaerobic release. Meanwhile, the growth of phosphate-accumulating organ-isms (PAOs) in the system is improved greatly while that of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) is inhibited. When the amount of side-stream phosphorus removal sewage is 13% of the total influent flow, and the effluent phosphorus content of the chemical phosphorus removal tank is 5 mg/L, the effluent TP of the

  2. Temperature history for canistered fuel lag storage areas during the loss of cooling air at the receiving and handling building of the MRS Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has analyzed the temperature history at a canistered fuel lag storage area during a postulated failure of the cooling system. A two-dimensional analysis was performed using the GE2D computer code, which accounts for thermal radiation, conduction, and convective heat transfer. The results indicate that the system may not reach a steady-state condition because heat transfer through the top and the bottom of the system is not enough to remove the energy generated in the canistered fuel. Although limits for abnormal operation have not been set, the temperatures do not reach limiting conditions for normal operation for 32 hours, which should be enough time to repair the cooling system

  3. Temperature history for canistered fuel lag storage areas during the loss of cooling air at the receiving and handling building of the MRS Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.

    1986-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has analyzed the temperature history at a canistered fuel lag storage area during a postulated failure of the cooling system. A two-dimensional analysis was performed using the GE2D computer code, which accounts for thermal radiation, conduction, and convective heat transfer. The results indicate that the system may not reach a steady-state condition because heat transfer through the top and the bottom of the system is not enough to remove the energy generated in the canistered fuel. Although limits for abnormal operation have not been set, the temperatures do not reach limiting conditions for normal operation for 32 hours, which should be enough time to repair the cooling system.

  4. SCOPING EVALUATION TO EXPLORE - ROCK FALL ACCIDENT CONDITION ANALYSIS ON MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER WASTE PACKAGES CORRELATED FROM INTERLOCKING BASKET WASTE PACKAGE DESIGN ANALYSIS (SCPB: N/A)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z, Ceylan

    1995-12-08

    The objective of this analysis is to correlate the results of a rock fall analysis performed for the 12 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Fuel Assembly Interlocking Basket waste package (WP) in order to determine the size of rock that can strike the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) waste packages without breaching the containment barriers. The purpose of this analysis is to document the models and methods used in the calculations.

  5. 32-Week Holding-Time Study of SUMMA Polished Canisters and Triple Sorbent Traps Used To Sample Organic Constituents in Radioactive Waste Tank Vapor Headspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two sampling methods[SUMMA polished canisters and triple sorbent traps (TSTs)] were compared for long-term storage of trace organic vapor samples collected from the headspaces of high-level radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. Because safety, quality assurance, radiological controls, the long-term stability of the sampling media during storage needed to be addressed. Samples were analyzed with a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) using cryogenic reconcentration or thermal desorption sample introduction techniques. SUMMA canister samples were also analyzed for total non-methane organic compounds (TNMOC) by GC/flame ionization detector (FID) using EPA Compendium Method TO-12 . To verify the long-term stability of the sampling media, multiple samples were collected in parallel from a typical passively ventilated radioactive waste tank known to contain moderately high concentrations of both polar and nonpolar organic compounds. Analyses for organic analytes and TNMOC were conducted at increasing intervals over a 32-week period to determine whether any systematic degradation of sample integrity occurred. Analytes collected in the SUMMA polished canisters generally showed good stability over the full 32 weeks with recoveries at the 80% level or better for all compounds studied. The TST data showed some loss (50-80% recovery) for a few high-volatility compounds even in the refrigerated samples; losses for unrefrigerated samples were far more pronounced with recoveries as low as 20% observed in a few cases

  6. B类滤毒罐防护磷化氢性能评价探讨%Evaluation of B-Type Canister Protective Performance against Phosphine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪东旺; 李泽; 赵鑫华; 尹维东; 李志坚; 元以栋

    2012-01-01

    磷化氢是粮食仓储企业使用效果最好的杀虫剂,是一种剧毒的气体熏蒸剂。所以对于从业人员来讲,安全防护就显得格外重要。长期以来粮食仓储企业一直使用自吸过滤式防毒面具(配套选用B类滤毒罐)为首选器材。近期业内对B类滤毒罐防护磷化氢的有效性提出质疑,为此,本文通过性能评价试验,说明B类滤毒罐防护磷化氢是有效的,并从理论上说明B类滤毒罐防护磷化氢是有科学依据的。%Phosphine is the best pesticides of the grain storage enterprise, and is the toxic gaseous fumigant. For users, it is important for the security. For a long time, the grain storage enterprise uses the serf-absorption filtering gas mask (selecting the B-type canister) . Recently, the protective performance against phosphine of B-type canister is doubted, through the test, this paper will explain the effective and scientific theory of B-type canister.

  7. Measurements of the equilibrium factor and radon dose in some houses in Cairo, Egypt using activated charcoal canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentration was measured in some houses in Cairo, Egypt using activated charcoal canisters. Equilibrium factor and radon annual equivalent dose are measured as well . The measurements were performed in closed and open ventilation rooms. The average radon concentration was found to be 11.55 Bq/m3 and 24.93 Bq/m3 in open rooms and closed rooms, respectively. The deduced values of equilibrium factor were ranging from 0.171 to 0.180 with an average of 0.175 in open rooms and ranging from 0.190 to 0.205 with an average of 0.194 in closed rooms. The average radon annual equivalent dose was found to be o.111 mSv/y and 0.267 mSv/y in open rooms and closed ones, respectively. These values are much lower than the maximum permissible dose of 1.0 mSv/y recommended by ICRP-60-1990.

  8. Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister Categories of Transuranic Waste Stored Below Ground within Area G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Kenneth Marshall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A large wildfire called the Las Conchas Fire burned large areas near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2011 and heightened public concern and news media attention over transuranic (TRU) waste stored at LANL’s Technical Area 54 (TA-54) Area G waste management facility. The removal of TRU waste from Area G had been placed at a lower priority in budget decisions for environmental cleanup at LANL because TRU waste removal is not included in the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Reference 1) that is the primary regulatory driver for environmental cleanup at LANL. The Consent Order is a settlement agreement between LANL and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) that contains specific requirements and schedules for cleaning up historical contamination at the LANL site. After the Las Conchas Fire, discussions were held by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with the NMED on accelerating TRU waste removal from LANL and disposing it at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report summarizes available information on the origin, configuration, and composition of the waste containers within the Tritium Packages and 17th RH Canister categories; their physical and radiological characteristics; the results of the radioassays; and potential issues in retrieval and processing of the waste containers.

  9. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Nonlinear acoustics, synthetic aperture imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingvall, Fredrik; Ping Wu; Stepinski, Tadeusz [Uppsala Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Science

    2003-03-01

    This report contains results concerning inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in year 2001/2002. The first chapter presents results of an investigation of a new method for synthetic aperture imaging. The new method presented here takes the form of a 2D filter based on minimum mean squared error (MMSE) criteria. The filter, which varies with the target position in two dimensions includes information about spatial impulse response (SIR) of the imaging system. Spatial resolution of the MMSE method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of the classical SAFT and phased array imaging. It is shown that the resolution of the MMSE algorithm, evaluated for imaging immersed copper specimen is superior to that observed for the two above-mentioned methods. Extended experimental and theoretical research concerning the potential of nonlinear waves and material harmonic imaging is presented in the second chapter. An experimental work is presented that was conducted using the RITEC RAM-5000 ultrasonic system capable of providing a high power tone-burst output. A new method for simulation of nonlinear acoustic waves that is a combination of the angular spectrum approach and the Burger's equation is also presented. This method was used for simulating nonlinear elastic waves radiated by the annular transducer that was used in the experiments.

  10. Reliable evaluation of acceptability of weld for final disposal based on the canister copper weld inspection using different NDT methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inspection of the sealing weld is an important phase for the evaluation of the acceptability of final disposal canister, but the weld is only a part of the 3D shielding of copper shell. The main tasks for reliable NDT evaluation requires an extensive evaluation of the parameters - which contains typical inspection related items like repeatability, S/N ratio, POD, setting up the equipment for inspection, and all practices for inspections. The other parameters are material parameters, their variation must be taken into account in the evaluation of NDT reliability. Further parameters include human factors, i. e. human inspectors and their interaction with technical systems; their effects were studied on an example of the evaluation of eddy current data. Final parameters are related to evaluation of detected defects, which means sizing and base for acceptance and this can be done in different ways. Some examples are given and results are compared with different methods for instance between radiographic testing and ultrasonic testing by raw data analysis and PA-SAFT results. Also, preliminary curves for the evaluation of metallographic results of 55 defects will be shown by EB weld measurements. Some practical items concerning copper inspections will be also discussed related to acceptability.

  11. Long-term integrity of copper overpack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstroem, Stefan; Salonen, Jorma; Auerkari, Pertti (VTT, Esbo (FI)); Saukkonen, Tapio (Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Esbo (FI))

    2007-05-15

    The results from extended uniaxial and multiaxial creep testing confirm the earlier indications of microstructural changes at relatively low temperatures (150-175 deg C) in Cu-OFP. These changes are probably related to recovery processes directed by the favourable crystallographic orientation on one side the related grain boundary, resulting in characteristically widening grain boundary zones. With further straining, these zones become chains of small grains decorating the original grain boundaries. The observed microstructural changes do not appear to represent particular disadvantages in terms of remaining life. In creep testing with natural weld defects (FSW, inclusion sheet 20% of cross-section), the results show much faster decreasing creep strength in time than what is observed for base material or welds without defects. However, extrapolation to 50 MPa stress level across such a defective region would still suggest a safe life of approximately 26,000 years in spite of much elevated testing temperature (175 deg C) from expected service temperature (below 100 deg C). For predicting mechanical behaviour, a creep model has been developed to include the full creep curves in a simple and robust manner. The model has been adapted to the most recent creep testing results (up to about 48,000 h in uniaxial testing). Applying this model for the extrapolated case of steady loading at 100 deg C / 50 MPa predicts time to 10% strain of about one million years. For comparison on creep ductility, also a testing program on low-phosphorus (OFHC) copper was initiated. The testing program with model vessels was completed after confirming safe short term limit load predictions. This program continues with compact tension specimens to study the potential combined effect of creep and corrosion in simulated groundwater

  12. HYDRA-I: a three-dimensional finite difference code for calculating the thermohydraulic performance of a fuel assembly contained within a canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    A finite difference computer code, named HYDRA-I, has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional performance of a spent fuel assembly contained within a cylindrical canister. The code accounts for the coupled heat transfer modes of conduction, convection, and radiation and permits spatially varying boundary conditions, thermophysical properties, and power generation rates. This document is intended as a manual for potential users of HYDRA-I. A brief discussion of the governing equations, the solution technique, and a detailed description of how to set up and execute a problem are presented. HYDRA-I is designed for operation on a CDC 7600 computer. An appendix is included that summarizes approximately two dozen different cases that have been examined. The cases encompass variations in fuel assembly and canister configurations, power generation rates, filler materials, and gases. The results presented show maximum and various local temperatures and heat fluxes illustrating the changing importance of the three heat transfer modes. Finally, the need for comparison with experimental data is emphasized as an aid in code verification although the limited data available indicate excellent agreement.

  13. Whole air canister sampling coupled with preconcentration GC/MS analysis of part-per-trillion levels of trimethylsilanol in semiconductor cleanroom air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Jason S

    2013-08-20

    The costly damage airborne trimethylsilanol (TMS) exacts on optics in the semiconductor industry has resulted in the demand for accurate and reliable methods for measuring TMS at trace levels (i.e., parts per trillion, volume per volume of air [ppt(v)] [~ng/m(3)]). In this study I developed a whole air canister-based approach for field sampling trimethylsilanol in air, as well as a preconcentration gas chromatography/mass spectrometry laboratory method for analysis. The results demonstrate clean canister blanks (0.06 ppt(v) [0.24 ng/m(3)], which is below the detection limit), excellent linearity (a calibration relative response factor relative standard deviation [RSD] of 9.8%) over a wide dynamic mass range (1-100 ppt(v)), recovery/accuracy of 93%, a low selected ion monitoring method detection limit of 0.12 ppt(v) (0.48 ng/m(3)), replicate precision of 6.8% RSD, and stability (84% recovery) out to four days of storage at room temperature. Samples collected at two silicon wafer fabrication facilities ranged from 10.0 to 9120 ppt(v) TMS and appear to be associated with the use of hexamethyldisilazane priming agent. This method will enable semiconductor cleanroom managers to monitor and control for trace levels of trimethylsilanol.

  14. Analyses of atmospheric radon 222 / canisters exposed by Greenpeace in Niger (Arlit / Akokan sector); Analyses du radon 222 dans l'air ambiant / Capteurs exposes par Greenpeace au Niger (secteur Arlit et Akokan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareyron, B.

    2010-07-01

    The companies SOMAIR and COMINAK, subsidiaries of the AREVA group, are mining uranium deposits in northern Niger. In the course of a field mission carried out in November 2009, a Greenpeace International team deposited detectors (canisters of activated charcoal) to measure radon 222, a radioactive gas formed by the decay of the radium 226 present in the uranium ore. This report includes the results of the analysis of the activated charcoal canisters conducted in CRIIRAD's laboratory, and a brief commentary on the interpretation of the results. (authors)

  15. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    valid at some stage during the repository evolution. Workshop participants suggested a need for SKI to review SKB's canister corrosion model in more detail as part of future safety assessment reviews (calculations, assumptions and data). Additional experimental work might be needed for the assessment of copper corrosion in high chloride environments and with simultaneous presence of chloride and sulphide. It is essential that altogether consistent facts, understanding and models are used when developing an argument. Any inconsistency regarding these three aspects (facts, understanding, models) needs to be identified. An example would be if thermodynamic data and theoretical calculations suggest that corrosion will not happen, while kinetic data (experimental results) suggest a significant corrosion rate. For future safety assessments, SKB is recommended to use a consistent template for the handling of different corrosion mechanisms even if their final treatment will be quite different. This may include e.g. an extended application of the exclusion principle and/or application of the decision tree approach (as applied for stress corrosion cracking in the Canadian programme). However, it should be noted that the reliability of the exclusion principle depends on the quantity and quality of information on which it is based, and that more explicit criteria might be needed to support the decision tree approach. There is also a need for a well structured approach to handling uncertainties. Examples include those that can be characterised as variability (welding defects, sulphide content of groundwater and bentonite) and as lack of knowledge (e.g. microbial viability, the existence of an unidentified groundwater component affecting corrosion or an unknown corrosion mechanism). A suitable combination of a probabilistic application of the main copper corrosion model, well supported calculation cases with mechanistic models and possibly a selection of what-if calculations could

  16. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Peter (ed.) [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (GB)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    assumption turns out not to be valid at some stage during the repository evolution. Workshop participants suggested a need for SKI to review SKB's canister corrosion model in more detail as part of future safety assessment reviews (calculations, assumptions and data). Additional experimental work might be needed for the assessment of copper corrosion in high chloride environments and with simultaneous presence of chloride and sulphide. It is essential that altogether consistent facts, understanding and models are used when developing an argument. Any inconsistency regarding these three aspects (facts, understanding, models) needs to be identified. An example would be if thermodynamic data and theoretical calculations suggest that corrosion will not happen, while kinetic data (experimental results) suggest a significant corrosion rate. For future safety assessments, SKB is recommended to use a consistent template for the handling of different corrosion mechanisms even if their final treatment will be quite different. This may include e.g. an extended application of the exclusion principle and/or application of the decision tree approach (as applied for stress corrosion cracking in the Canadian programme). However, it should be noted that the reliability of the exclusion principle depends on the quantity and quality of information on which it is based, and that more explicit criteria might be needed to support the decision tree approach. There is also a need for a well structured approach to handling uncertainties. Examples include those that can be characterised as variability (welding defects, sulphide content of groundwater and bentonite) and as lack of knowledge (e.g. microbial viability, the existence of an unidentified groundwater component affecting corrosion or an unknown corrosion mechanism). A suitable combination of a probabilistic application of the main copper corrosion model, well supported calculation cases with mechanistic models and possibly a selection

  17. Engineered Barrier System - Assessment of the Corrosion Properties of Copper Canisters. Report from a Workshop. Synthesis and extended abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Peter (ed.) [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (GB)] (and others)

    2006-03-15

    assumption turns out not to be valid at some stage during the repository evolution. Workshop participants suggested a need for SKI to review SKB's canister corrosion model in more detail as part of future safety assessment reviews (calculations, assumptions and data). Additional experimental work might be needed for the assessment of copper corrosion in high chloride environments and with simultaneous presence of chloride and sulphide. It is essential that altogether consistent facts, understanding and models are used when developing an argument. Any inconsistency regarding these three aspects (facts, understanding, models) needs to be identified. An example would be if thermodynamic data and theoretical calculations suggest that corrosion will not happen, while kinetic data (experimental results) suggest a significant corrosion rate. For future safety assessments, SKB is recommended to use a consistent template for the handling of different corrosion mechanisms even if their final treatment will be quite different. This may include e.g. an extended application of the exclusion principle and/or application of the decision tree approach (as applied for stress corrosion cracking in the Canadian programme). However, it should be noted that the reliability of the exclusion principle depends on the quantity and quality of information on which it is based, and that more explicit criteria might be needed to support the decision tree approach. There is also a need for a well structured approach to handling uncertainties. Examples include those that can be characterised as variability (welding defects, sulphide content of groundwater and bentonite) and as lack of knowledge (e.g. microbial viability, the existence of an unidentified groundwater component affecting corrosion or an unknown corrosion mechanism). A suitable combination of a probabilistic application of the main copper corrosion model, well supported calculation cases with mechanistic models and possibly a selection

  18. Evaluating the use of PAO (4 cSt polyalphaoelfin) oil instead of DOP (di-octyl phthalate) oil for measuring the aerosol capture of nuclear canister filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-18

    This document details the distinction between using PAO (4 cSt polyalphaoelfin) oil instead of DOP (di-octyl phthalate) oil for measuring the aerosol capture of filters. This document is developed to justify the use of PAO rather than DOP for evaluating the performance of filters in the SAVY 4000 and Hagan containers. The design criteria (Anderson et al, 2012) for purchasing SAVY 4000 containers and the Safety Analysis Report for the SAVY 4000 Container Series specified that the filter must “capture greater than 99.97% of 0.45 μm mean diameter dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol at the rated flow with a DOP concentration of 65±15 micrograms per liter.”This corresponds to a leakage percent of 0.03% (3.0x10-2). The density of DOP oil is 985 kg/m3 and the density of PAO oil is 819 kg/m3. ATI Test Inc measured the mass mean diameter of aerosol distributions produced by a single Laskin type III-A nozzle operating at a 20 psig air pressure as 0.563 μm for DOP oil and 0.549 μm for PAO oil. (See Appendix A.) For both types of oil in this document, the single fiber method calculated the leakage percent to be 4.4x10-5 for DOP oil and 4.7x10-5 for PAO oil. Although the percent error between these two quantities is 7.7%, these calculated leakage percent values are more than two orders of magnitude less than the criterion specified in the SAVY canister SAR. As a point of reference, the photometer used to measure the SAVY canister filter performance cannot resolve values for the leakage percent below 1.0x10-5. Additionally, over a range of particle sizes from 0.01 μm to 3.0 μm, there was less than 4.0x10-5 error between the calculated filter efficiency for the two types of oil at any particular particle size diameter. In conclusion, the difference between using DOP and PAO for testing SAVY canister filters is of inconsequential concern.

  19. Stack Flow Rate Changes and the ANSI/N13.1-1999 Qualification Criteria: Application to the Hanford Canister Storage Building Stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glissmeyer, John A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB), located in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site, is a 42,000 square foot facility used to store spent nuclear fuel from past activities at the Hanford Site. Because the facility has the potential to emit radionuclides into the environment, its ventilation exhaust stack has been equipped with an air monitoring system. Subpart H of the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants requires that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with criteria established by the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society Standard N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities.

  20. Geological Disposal of Nuclear Waste: Investigating the Thermo-Hygro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) Coupled Processes at the Waste Canister- Bentonite Barrier Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C. W.; Davie, D. C.; Charles, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geological disposal of nuclear waste is being increasingly considered to deal with the growing volume of waste resulting from the nuclear legacy of numerous nations. Within the UK there is 650,000 cubic meters of waste safely stored and managed in near-surface interim facilities but with no conclusive permanent disposal route. A Geological Disposal Facility with incorporated Engineered Barrier Systems are currently being considered as a permanent waste management solution (Fig.1). This research focuses on the EBS bentonite buffer/waste canister interface, and experimentally replicates key environmental phases that would occur after canister emplacement. This progresses understanding of the temporal evolution of the EBS and the associated impact on its engineering, mineralogical and physicochemical state and considers any consequences for the EBS safety functions of containment and isolation. Correlation of engineering properties to the physicochemical state is the focus of this research. Changes to geotechnical properties such as Atterberg limits, swelling pressure and swelling kinetics are measured after laboratory exposure to THMC variables from interface and batch experiments. Factors affecting the barrier, post closure, include corrosion product interaction, precipitation of silica, near-field chemical environment, groundwater salinity and temperature. Results show that increasing groundwater salinity has a direct impact on the buffer, reducing swelling capacity and plasticity index by up to 80%. Similarly, thermal loading reduces swelling capacity by 23% and plasticity index by 5%. Bentonite/steel interaction studies show corrosion precipitates diffusing into compacted bentonite up to 3mm from the interface over a 4 month exposure (increasing with temperature), with reduction in swelling capacity in the affected zone, probably due to the development of poorly crystalline iron oxides. These results indicate that groundwater conditions, temperature and corrosion

  1. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasonic array system. Modelling, defect detection and grain noise estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Stepinski, T. [Uppsala Univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Material Science

    1998-07-01

    The work presented in the report has been split into three overlapping tasks which have the following objectives: (1) development of beam-forming tools, and verification of modeling tools; (2) investigation of detection and resolution limits; (3) evaluation of attenuation, estimation and suppression of grain noise. For beam-forming tools, a method of designing steered and/or focused beams in immersed solids is presented based on geometrical acoustics. Presently, the beam designs are only related to delays but not to apodization. These focused, steered beams are intended to be used for sizing defects and inspecting the regions close to canisters outer walls. The modeling tool developed previously for simulating elastic fields radiated by planar arrays into immersed solids has been verified by comparing with the results obtained from PASS, a software developed by Dr. Didier Cassereau, France. The results from our modeling tool are in excellent agreement with those from PASS. Since the array coming with the ALLIN ultrasonic array system is not planar, but cylindrically curved in elevation, and it works not in transmission mode, but in pulse echo mode, the above modeling tool for the planar arrays cannot be applied directly. Therefore, the modeling tool has been upgraded for the ALLIN array. The theory underlying this modeling tool is the extended angular spectrum approach (ASA) which was developed based on the conventional ASA that only applies to planar sources. Experimental verification of the modeling tool has shown that the results from the tool agree very well with the measurements. To quantify the fields from the ALLIN array and to facilitate the comparison of simulated results with the measured ones, the ALLIN array system has been calibrated based on the existing functionality, and an analytical model has been proposed for simulating measured acoustic echo pulses. To investigate the detection and resolution limits, we have carried out a series of experiments

  2. Inspection of copper canister for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. FSW monitoring with emission, copper characterization and ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Engholm, Marcus; Olofsson, Tomas (Uppsala Univ., Signals and Systems, Dept. of Technical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in 2007. In the first part of the report we further develop the concept of monitoring of the friction stir welding (FSW) process by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique implemented using multiple sensors formed into a circular array. After a brief introduction into the field of arrays and beamforming we focus on the features of uniform circular arrays (UCA). Results obtained from the simulations of UCA beamformer based on phase mode concept are presented for the continuous wave as well as for the pulse, noise-free input signals. The influence of white noise corrupting the input pulse is also considered and a simple regularization technique proposed as a solution to this problem. The second part of the report is concerned with aspects related to ultrasonic attenuation of copper material used for canisters. We compare resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) with other methods used for characterization of the copper material. RUS is a non-destructive technique based on sensing mechanical resonances present in a tested sample in the ultrasonic frequency range. Resonance frequencies observed in a material sample (with given geometry) are directly related to the vibration modes occurring in the inspected volume defined by the material parameters (elastic constants). We solve the inverse problem that consists in using the information about resonance frequencies acquired in physical measurements for estimating material parameters. Our aim in this project is to investigate the feasibility of RUS for the grain size estimation in copper using copper specimens that were provided by SKB. In the final part we consider the design of input signals for ultrasonic arrays. The Bayesian linear minimum mean squared error (LMMSE) estimator discussed in our former reports is studied. We show that it

  3. Interior Ballistic Modeling and Simulation of Underwater Launched Missile Using Concentric Canister Launcher%同心筒水下发射内弹道建模与仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁绪龙; 王亚东; 刘维

    2013-01-01

    To construct a fast calculation method of interior ballistics of underwater launched missile using Concentric Canister Launcher(CCL),a simulation model of CCL was established according to the first law of thermodynamics,and power characteristics and underwater environment were considered.The empirical parameters in this model were decided using CFD solutions,and they were verified by more calculations.The influences of design parameters on the interior ballistics were studied by the verified model.The simulation shows that the sizes of canister top and bottom restricting parts can be used to adjust launching velocity of missile;the size of canister bottom restricting part can be adapted to modify the acceleration of missile.It can increase the adjusting range of velocity to increase initial volumes of inner and outer canister.The simulation method and results offer reference for engineers.%为构建一种快速的同心筒水下发射内弹道算法,采用热力学第一定律,结合导弹动力装置特性及水下环境需求,建立了同心筒水下发射内弹道计算模型,用CFD结果辨识并校验模型经验参数.应用校验的模型研究了发射装置设计参数对内弹道参数的影响规律.结果表明:筒口、筒底限流尺寸均可用于调速,筒底限流尺寸可用于调节过载,内、外筒初始容积增大可增大调速范围.仿真方法和结果可供工程设计人员参考.

  4. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. NDE of friction stir welds, nonlinear acoustics, ultrasonic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Lingvall, Fredrik; Wennerstroem, Erik; Ping Wu [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Materials Science (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2004-01-01

    This report contains results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2002/2003. After a short introduction a review of the NDE techniques that have been applied to the assessment of friction stir welds (FSW) is presented. The review is based on the results reported by the specialists from the USA, mostly from the aerospace industry. A separate chapter is devoted to the extended experimental and theoretical research concerning potential of nonlinear waves in NDE applications. Further studies concerning nonlinear propagation of acoustic and elastic waves (classical nonlinearity) are reported. Also a preliminary investigation of the nonlinear ultrasonic detection of contacts and interfaces (non-classical nonlinearity) is included. Report on the continuation of previous work concerning computer simulation of nonlinear propagations of ultrasonic beams in water and in immersed solids is also presented. Finally, results of an investigation concerning a new method of synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) and its comparison to the traditional phased array (PA) imaging and to the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are presented. A new spatial-temporal filtering method is presented that is a generalization of the previously proposed filter. Spatial resolution of the proposed method is investigated and compared experimentally to that of classical SAFT and PA imaging. Performance of the proposed method for flat targets is also investigated.

  5. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Electron beam evaluation, harmonic imaging, materials characterization, and ultrasonic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Lingvall, Fredrik; Stepinski, Tadeusz [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Science

    2000-12-01

    This report presents the research in the sixth phase that is concerned with ultrasonic techniques for assessing electron beam (EB) welds in copper canisters. The research has been carried out in three main aspects: (1) comparative inspections of EB welds, (2) EB weld evaluation, and (3) quantitative evaluation of attenuation in copper. Comparative inspections of EB welds in two copper canister blocks have been made by means of ultrasound and radiography. Comparison of the inspected results demonstrate that both techniques complement each other very well. The radiographic technique on the whole gives relatively better spatial resolution but low contrast in radiographs. It can reliably detect voids in EB, but cannot provide information about material structure in the EB weld. Ultrasonic technique provides information about flaw locations and shapes similar to the radiographs. Moreover, it can easily distinguish welded and non-welded zones and be used to study weld's macro- and microstructure. The defects in ultrasonic images often show higher contrast, and some flaw indications may be seen in ultrasonic inspection but not in radiographs. But small flaws are hard to distinguish from grain noise. For EB weld evaluation, first, scattering from EB weld has been investigated using three broadband transducers with different center frequencies. The investigation has shown that more information on scattering and attenuation can be exploited in this case so that the EB welds can be better characterized, and that the best frequency range for characterizing welds is 2 - 5 MHz. Secondly, harmonic imaging (HI) of EB welds have been studied using two different sources of harmonics: (i) transducer harmonics, originating from the high-order resonant modes of transmitters excited by a broadband pulse, and (ii) material harmonics, stemming from the nonlinear distortion of waves propagating in materials. The transducer HI exploits additional information due to transducer harmonics

  6. Review of NDE Methods for Detection and Monitoring of Atmospheric SCC in Welded Canisters for the Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pardini, Allan F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hanson, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sorenson, Ken B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-14

    Dry cask storage systems (DCSSs) for used nuclear fuel (UNF) were originally envisioned for storage periods of short duration (~ a few decades). However, uncertainty challenges the opening of a permanent repository for UNF implying that UNF will need to remain in dry storage for much longer durations than originally envisioned (possibly for centuries). Thus, aging degradation of DCSSs becomes an issue that may not have been sufficiently considered in the design phase and that can challenge the efficacy of very long-term storage of UNF. A particular aging degradation concern is atmospheric stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of DCSSs located in marine environments. In this report, several nondestructive (NDE) methods are evaluated with respect to their potential for effective monitoring of atmospheric SCC in welded canisters of DCSSs. Several of the methods are selected for evaluation based on their usage for in-service inspection applications in the nuclear power industry. The technologies considered include bulk ultrasonic techniques, acoustic emission, visual techniques, eddy current, and guided ultrasonic waves.

  7. 新型复合滤料层个人防护氨气滤毒罐%The development of new pattern composite filter canister for ammonia individual safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建华

    2012-01-01

    以改性椰壳活性炭和强酸离子交换纤维为复合滤料层制备出针对氨气的新型个人防护滤毒罐.按照国标GB2890-2009对制备的滤毒罐动态吸附性能及呼吸阻力性能进行了测试.扫描电镜照片显示改性处理的椰壳活性炭具有孔套孔结构,使改性活性炭的比表面积增大很多.呼吸防护时间超过2级5 min.通气阻力还需要改进处理.%The new type personal protection canisters of compos-ite filtering layer for ammonia were prepared using modified co-conut shell activated carbon and acidic ion exchange fiber. The dynamic adsorption and respiratory resistance were measured according to the national standard GB 2890-2009. The results of surface electronic microscopy revealed that the modified coco-nut shell activated carbon has a hole sets of holes structure which increases the specific surface area of the modified activa-ted carbon. The respiratory protection time exceeded the second class by 5 min. Airway resistance need to be improvement.

  8. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Synthetic aperture imaging, evaluation of ultrasonic attenuation in copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Lingvall, Fredrik; Wennerstroem, Erik; Ping Wu [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Department of Engineering Sciences

    2006-01-15

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2004/2005. After a short introduction a new super-resolution synthetic aperture imaging (SRSAI) technique is proposed. The proposed SRSAI is characterized by an excellent lateral resolution and much higher signal to noise ratio compared with ESAFT which was proposed in our previous reports. The ESAFT is based on the assumption that probability density of the imaged targets (so called prior) is Gaussian, which is the simplest case for the analysis. The increased performance of SRSAI is due to more realistic assumption concerning probability density function of targets in the region of interest. It is shown, both using simulations and in an experiment that if the target reflectivity is assumed to be positive a substantial increase of resolution and signal to noise ratio in the reconstructed image can be obtained. In the second chapter the result of the evaluation of ultrasonic attenuation in copper blocks with different grain size is presented. A short presentation of basic theory of the buffer-rod and the immersion methods is given in the beginning (the detailed derivation is provided in the appendix). Then the measurement setup and copper specimens are specified and the results of measurements made on copper specimens are presented. Correlation between the attenuation and grain size for the inspected specimens is discussed.

  9. Materials considerations relative to multibarrier waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental conditions associated with the storage of radioactive wastes are reviewed, and the corrosion of potential waste containment materials under these conditions is evaluated. The desired service life of about 1000 years is beyond the time period for which existing corrosion data can be extrapolated with certainty; however, titanium alloys seem to offer the most promise. The mechanical requirements for canisters and overpacks are considered and several candidate materials are selected. Designs for a canister and an overpack have been developed, and these are used to estimate the costs for three possible materials of construction

  10. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of Ultrasonic Array System. Electron beam evaluation, modeling and materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research conducted in the fifth phase of the SKB's study aimed at developing ultrasonic techniques for assessing EB welds copper canisters is reported here. This report covers three main tasks: evaluation of electron beam (EB) welds, modeling of ultrasonic fields and characterization of copper material. A systematic analysis of ultrasonic interaction and imaging of an EB weld has been performed. From the analysis of histograms of the weld ultrasonic image, it appeared that the porosity tended to be concentrated towards the upper side of a HV weld, and a guideline on how to select the gates for creating C-scans has been proposed. The spatial diversity method (SDM) has shown a limited ability to suppress grain noise both in the parent material (copper) and in the weld so that the ultrasonic image of the weld could be improved. The suppression was achieved at the price of reduced spatial resolution. The ability of wavelet filters to enhance flaw responses has been studied. An FIR (finite impulse response) filter, based on Sombrero mother wavelet, has yield encouraging results concerning clutter suppression. However, the physical explanation for the results is still missing and needs further research. For modeling of ultrasonic fields of the ALLIN array, an approach to computing the SIR (spatial impulse response) of a cylindrically curved, rectangular aperture has been developed. The aperture is split into very narrow strips in the cylindrically curved direction and SIR of the whole aperture by superposing the individual impulse responses of those strips. Using this approach, the SIR of the ALLIN array with a cylindrically curved surface has been calculated. The pulse excitation of normal velocity on the surface of the array, that is required for simulating actual ultrasonic fields, has been determined by measurement in combination with a deconvolution technique. Using the SIR and the pulse excitation obtained, the pulsed-echo fields from the array have been simulated

  11. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of Ultrasonic Array System. Electron beam evaluation, modeling and materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping Wu; Lingvall, F.; Stepinski, T. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Material Science

    1999-12-01

    Research conducted in the fifth phase of the SKB's study aimed at developing ultrasonic techniques for assessing EB welds copper canisters is reported here. This report covers three main tasks: evaluation of electron beam (EB) welds, modeling of ultrasonic fields and characterization of copper material. A systematic analysis of ultrasonic interaction and imaging of an EB weld has been performed. From the analysis of histograms of the weld ultrasonic image, it appeared that the porosity tended to be concentrated towards the upper side of a HV weld, and a guideline on how to select the gates for creating C-scans has been proposed. The spatial diversity method (SDM) has shown a limited ability to suppress grain noise both in the parent material (copper) and in the weld so that the ultrasonic image of the weld could be improved. The suppression was achieved at the price of reduced spatial resolution. The ability of wavelet filters to enhance flaw responses has been studied. An FIR (finite impulse response) filter, based on Sombrero mother wavelet, has yield encouraging results concerning clutter suppression. However, the physical explanation for the results is still missing and needs further research. For modeling of ultrasonic fields of the ALLIN array, an approach to computing the SIR (spatial impulse response) of a cylindrically curved, rectangular aperture has been developed. The aperture is split into very narrow strips in the cylindrically curved direction and SIR of the whole aperture by superposing the individual impulse responses of those strips. Using this approach, the SIR of the ALLIN array with a cylindrically curved surface has been calculated. The pulse excitation of normal velocity on the surface of the array, that is required for simulating actual ultrasonic fields, has been determined by measurement in combination with a deconvolution technique. Using the SIR and the pulse excitation obtained, the pulsed-echo fields from the array have been

  12. Development of a method for the study of H{sub 2} gas emission in sealed compartments containing canister copper immersed in O{sub 2}-free water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtsson, Andreas; Chukharkina, Alexandra; Eriksson, Lena; Hallbeck, Bjoern; Hallbeck, Lotta; Johansson, Jessica; Johansson, Linda; Pedersen, Karsten [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Moelnlycke (Sweden)

    2013-06-15

    Current models of copper corrosion indicate that copper is not subject to corrosion by water in itself, but that additional components, such as O{sub 2}, chloride or sulphide are needed to initiate a corrosive process. Of late however, a number of reports have suggested that copper may be susceptible to water-induced corrosion in the absence of external constituents affecting the process. The process has been proposed to rely the auto-ionization driven presence of the hydroxide ions in pure water, and to result in the development of atomic hydrogen (H), with subsequent release of H{sub 2} gas. A suggested equilibrium is reached at a partial pressure of H{sub 2} of about 1 mbar (0.1 kPa) in 73 deg C, and the corrosion reaction is proposed to be rate-limited by the supply of hydroxide ions from the water, a process being slower than proposed formation of water from a H{sub 2}-O{sub 2} reaction. In consequence, the presence of O{sub 2} in the system would result in no detectable release of H{sub 2} until all O{sub 2} was consumed, while the absence of O{sub 2} would lead to water-driven corrosion of copper proceeding until the H{sub 2} equilibrium is reached, at a partial H{sub 2} pressure of about 1 mbar. The proposed mechanism presents a novel aspect on copper corrosion processes. By extension, the suggested corrosion process may have implications for proposed strategies for long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel waste (SNF), which in part rely on the long-term (>105 years) integrity of copper canisters stored in anoxic water inundated environments (SKB 2010)

  13. 过滤罐微生物气溶胶过滤效率及其评价方法的研究%A methodological study on testing and evaluating of filtration efficiency of canister against microbial aerosol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温占波; 赵建军; 李劲松; 王洁; 鹿建春; 李娜

    2009-01-01

    目的 建立防护面具高效过滤罐微生物气溶胶测试评价方法,对过滤罐的实际防护效果进行测试评价.方法 Serratia marcescens作为模式细菌繁殖体气溶胶、Bacillus subtilis var niger芽孢作为模式芽孢气溶胶、噬菌体f2作为模式病毒气溶胶,使用实验室建立的微生物气溶胶检测技术平台,人工发生模式微生物气溶胶,分别在过滤罐过滤前后使用空气微生物采样器进行定量采样,根据过滤前后模式微生物气溶胶的浓度分别计算细菌、芽孢、病毒气溶胶过滤效率.1-1、1-2、1-3、1-44个只含有高效过滤材料的过滤罐分别测试了Serratia marcescens、Bacillus subtilis var niger、噬菌体f2气溶胶的过滤效率.543、544 2个装有活性炭的高效过滤罐测试了对Scrratia marcescens气溶胶的过滤效率.结果 1-1、1-2、1-3 3个高效过滤罐对Serratia marcescens、Bacillus subtilis var niger芽孢、噬菌体f2的气溶胶的过滤效率为100.000%,1-4高效过滤罐对Bacillus subtilis var niger芽孢气溶胶的过滤效率为990997%、Serratia marcescerts和噬菌体f2气溶胶的过滤效率均为100.000%.加入活性炭后543、544 2个过滤罐对Serratia marcescens气溶胶的过滤效率均为100.000%.结论 建立的检测方法可以用于高效过滤罐微生物气溶胶防护效果的评价,高效过滤罐(包括装有活性炭者)微生物气溶胶防护效果均佳.%Objective To establish a testing and evaluating method for filtration efficiency of the eanister against microbial aerosol. Methods Serratia marcescens aerosol served as model of bacterial aerosol, Bacillus subtilis var niger aerosol as model of spores aerosol, bacteriophage f2 aerosol as model of viral aerosol. Employing the microbial aerosol testing platform was established in lab, models of microbial aerosol generated artificially were sampled quantitatively by air samplers before and after filtrating by canisters, respectively. Filtration

  14. Multi-objective optimization for orientator of airdropping launch canister%某运发箱定向器多目标优化设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡建国; 仲健林; 马大为; 乐贵高; 周晓和; 杨风波

    2014-01-01

    为实现空投储运发射箱轻量化、保证空投安全性,对定向器进行多目标优化设计。在有限元参数化模型基础上,结合Isight优化平台建立运发箱定向器冲击动力学多目标优化框架;以复合材料定向器铺层厚度、角度为输入变量,定向器质量、最大位移、药柱最大应力为输出变量,采用最优拉丁超立方设计和径向基神经网络方法建立数学近似模型;采用非劣排序遗传算法及模糊集合理论,得到多目标优化模型的Pareto解集及选优方案,并与原方案进行了对比。结果表明:优化方案实现了储运发射箱的轻量化设计,并提高了空投安全性。%To realize the lightweight and guarantee the safety for airdropping launch canister,multi-objective optimization for the orientator was proposed. Firstly,based on the finite element parameterized model,the impact dynamics multi-objective optimization framework was built with Isight platform. Secondly,with layer thickness,layer angle as the input variables and the mass,maximum displacement of orientator,maximum stress of grain as the output variables,the mathematical approximate model was proposed with optimal latin hypercube design and radial basis function neural network method. Finally,on the basis of non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm and fuzzy set theory,the Pareto solutions and the optimum choice were obtained,and compared with the old scheme. The results show that the optimum choice can guarantee the mass of orientator and increase the safety of airdropping.

  15. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

    2010-03-09

    The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to

  16. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to

  17. A natural analogue for copper waste canisters: The copper-uranium mineralised concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a small-scale pilot study of the mineralogy and alteration characteristics of unusual sheet-like native copper occurring together with uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions in mudstones and siltstones of the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation, at Littleham Cove, south Devon, England. The host mudstones and siltstones are smectitic and have been compacted through deep Mesozoic burial. The occurrence of native copper within these rocks represents a natural analogue for the long-term behaviour of copper canisters, sealed in a compacted clay (bentonite) backfill, that will be used for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste by the SKB. The study was undertaken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB between November 1999 and June 2000. The study was based primarily on archived reference material collected by the BGS during regional geological and mineralogical surveys of the area in the 1970's and 1980's. However, a brief visit was made to Littleham Cove in January 2000 to try to examine the native copper in situ and to collect additional material. Unfortunately, recent landslips and mudflows obscured much of the outcrop, and only one new sample of native copper could be collected. The native copper occurs as thin plates, up to 160 mm in diameter, which occur parallel to bedding in the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation at Littleham Cove (near Budleigh Salterton) in south Devon. Each plate is made up of composite stacks of individual thin copper sheets each 1-2 mm thick. The copper is very pure (>99.4% Cu) but is accompanied by minor amounts of native silver (also pure - >99%) which occurs as small inclusions within the native copper. Detailed mineralogical and petrological studies of the native copper sheets, using optical petrography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalytical techniques, reveal a complex history of

  18. A natural analogue for copper waste canisters: The copper-uranium mineralised concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Styles, M.T.; Hards, V.L. [Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom). British Geological Survey

    2000-08-01

    This report presents the results of a small-scale pilot study of the mineralogy and alteration characteristics of unusual sheet-like native copper occurring together with uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions in mudstones and siltstones of the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation, at Littleham Cove, south Devon, England. The host mudstones and siltstones are smectitic and have been compacted through deep Mesozoic burial. The occurrence of native copper within these rocks represents a natural analogue for the long-term behaviour of copper canisters, sealed in a compacted clay (bentonite) backfill, that will be used for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste by the SKB. The study was undertaken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB between November 1999 and June 2000. The study was based primarily on archived reference material collected by the BGS during regional geological and mineralogical surveys of the area in the 1970's and 1980's. However, a brief visit was made to Littleham Cove in January 2000 to try to examine the native copper in situ and to collect additional material. Unfortunately, recent landslips and mudflows obscured much of the outcrop, and only one new sample of native copper could be collected. The native copper occurs as thin plates, up to 160 mm in diameter, which occur parallel to bedding in the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation at Littleham Cove (near Budleigh Salterton) in south Devon. Each plate is made up of composite stacks of individual thin copper sheets each 1-2 mm thick. The copper is very pure (>99.4% Cu) but is accompanied by minor amounts of native silver (also pure - >99%) which occurs as small inclusions within the native copper. Detailed mineralogical and petrological studies of the native copper sheets, using optical petrography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalytical techniques, reveal a complex history of

  19. A natural analogue for copper waste canisters: The copper-uranium mineralised concretions in the Permian mudrocks of south Devon, United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Styles, M.T.; Hards, V.L. [Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom). British Geological Survey

    2000-08-01

    This report presents the results of a small-scale pilot study of the mineralogy and alteration characteristics of unusual sheet-like native copper occurring together with uraniferous and vanadiferous concretions in mudstones and siltstones of the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation, at Littleham Cove, south Devon, England. The host mudstones and siltstones are smectitic and have been compacted through deep Mesozoic burial. The occurrence of native copper within these rocks represents a natural analogue for the long-term behaviour of copper canisters, sealed in a compacted clay (bentonite) backfill, that will be used for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste by the SKB. The study was undertaken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB between November 1999 and June 2000. The study was based primarily on archived reference material collected by the BGS during regional geological and mineralogical surveys of the area in the 1970's and 1980's. However, a brief visit was made to Littleham Cove in January 2000 to try to examine the native copper in situ and to collect additional material. Unfortunately, recent landslips and mudflows obscured much of the outcrop, and only one new sample of native copper could be collected. The native copper occurs as thin plates, up to 160 mm in diameter, which occur parallel to bedding in the Permian Littleham Mudstone Formation at Littleham Cove (near Budleigh Salterton) in south Devon. Each plate is made up of composite stacks of individual thin copper sheets each 1-2 mm thick. The copper is very pure (>99.4% Cu) but is accompanied by minor amounts of native silver (also pure - >99%) which occurs as small inclusions within the native copper. Detailed mineralogical and petrological studies of the native copper sheets, using optical petrography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and electron probe microanalytical techniques, reveal a complex history of

  20. Geochemical assessment of nuclear waste isolation. Report of activities during fiscal year 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the following investigations is reported: canister/overpack-backfill chemical interactions and mechanisms; backfill and near-field host rock chemical interactions mechanisms; far-field host rock geochemical interactions; verification and improvement of predictive algorithms for radionuclide migration; and geologic systems as analogues for long-term radioactive waste isolation

  1. Geochemical assessment of nuclear waste isolation. Report of activities during fiscal year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-07-01

    The status of the following investigations is reported: canister/overpack-backfill chemical interactions and mechanisms; backfill and near-field host rock chemical interactions mechanisms; far-field host rock geochemical interactions; verification and improvement of predictive algorithms for radionuclide migration; and geologic systems as analogues for long-term radioactive waste isolation.

  2. Neutron-sensitive ZnS/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic scintillator detector as an alternative to a {sup 3}He-gas-based detector for a plutonium canister assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T., E-mail: nakamura.tatsuya@jaea.go.jp [J-PARC, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ohzu, A. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Toh, K.; Sakasai, K.; Suzuki, H.; Honda, K. [J-PARC, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Birumachi, A.; Ebine, M. [Nuclear Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamagishi, H. [J-PARC, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takase, M.; Haruyama, M.; Kureta, M. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Soyama, K. [J-PARC, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakamura, H. [Tokai Reprocessing Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Seya, M. [Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    A neutron-sensitive ZnS/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic scintillator detector was developed as an alternative to a {sup 3}He-gas-based detector for use in a plutonium canister assay system. The detector has a modular structure, with a flat ZnS/{sup 10}B{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic scintillator strip that is installed diagonally inside a light-reflecting aluminium case with a square cross-section, and where the scintillation light is detected using two photomultiplier tubes attached at both ends of the case. The prototype detectors, which have a neutron-sensitive area of 30 mm×250 mm, exhibited a sensitivity of 21.7–23.4±0.1 cps/nv (mean±SD) for thermal neutrons, a {sup 137}Cs gamma-ray sensitivity of 1.1–1.9±0.2×10{sup −7} and a count variation of less than 6% over the detector length. A trial experiment revealed a temperature coefficient of less than −0.24±0.05%/°C over the temperature range of 20–50 °C. The detector design and the experimental results are presented.

  3. Neutron-sensitive ZnS/10B2O3 ceramic scintillator detector as an alternative to a 3He-gas-based detector for a plutonium canister assay system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Ohzu, A.; Toh, K.; Sakasai, K.; Suzuki, H.; Honda, K.; Birumachi, A.; Ebine, M.; Yamagishi, H.; Takase, M.; Haruyama, M.; Kureta, M.; Soyama, K.; Nakamura, H.; Seya, M.

    2014-11-01

    A neutron-sensitive ZnS/10B2O3 ceramic scintillator detector was developed as an alternative to a 3He-gas-based detector for use in a plutonium canister assay system. The detector has a modular structure, with a flat ZnS/10B2O3 ceramic scintillator strip that is installed diagonally inside a light-reflecting aluminium case with a square cross-section, and where the scintillation light is detected using two photomultiplier tubes attached at both ends of the case. The prototype detectors, which have a neutron-sensitive area of 30 mm×250 mm, exhibited a sensitivity of 21.7-23.4±0.1 cps/nv (mean±SD) for thermal neutrons, a 137Cs gamma-ray sensitivity of 1.1-1.9±0.2×10-7 and a count variation of less than 6% over the detector length. A trial experiment revealed a temperature coefficient of less than -0.24±0.05%/°C over the temperature range of 20-50 °C. The detector design and the experimental results are presented.

  4. 同心筒水下发射筒口气泡变化的数值模拟%Numerical Simulation of Change of Bubble in Tube Opening Underwater Launch Using Concentric Canister Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓佳; 毕世华; 李景须

    2015-01-01

    为了研究同心筒水下热发射过程中筒口气泡变化规律,采用三维多相流模型对发射过程进行了模拟。研究表明,同心筒结构应用于水下发射时筒口气泡受到弹体表面黏性力、气流附壁效应以及两相互相作用过程影响,筒口气泡的形态会经历3个典型阶段,筒口附近的压强和速度受气泡运动和发展影响而振荡变化。研究的结果在水下发射技术的发展上具有一定的理论意义和工程应用价值。%In order to study the development change rule of bubble in tube opening during underwater launching process using concentric canister structure,three-dimensional multiphase flow model was used to simulate the process of launching. The results indicate that when concentric tube structure is applied to the underwater launch,bubbles at concentric tube edge are affected by projectile surface viscous force,airflow coanda effect and the above two phase’s process between each other,and the shape of jet bubble experi-enced three typical forms. Pressure and velocity inside the bubbles oscillated and changed for the motion and development of bubble. Results of this study have theoretical significance and engineering value in the development of underwater launch technology.

  5. Cold vacuum drying facility site evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to transport Multi-Canister Overpacks to the Canister Storage Building they must first undergo the Cold Vacuum Drying process. This puts the design, construction and start-up of the Cold Vacuum Drying facility on the critical path of the K Basin fuel removal schedule. This schedule is driven by a Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestone requiring all of the spent nuclear fuel to be removed from the K Basins by December, 1999. This site evaluation is an integral part of the Cold Vacuum Drying design process and must be completed expeditiously in order to stay on track for meeting the milestone

  6. Sealed Planetary Return Canister (SPRC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sample return missions have primary importance in future planetary missions. A basic requirement is that samples be returned in pristine, uncontaminated condition,...

  7. SNF fuel retrieval sub project safety analysis document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety analysis is for the SNF Fuel Retrieval (FRS) Sub Project. The FRS equipment will be added to K West and K East Basins to facilitate retrieval, cleaning and repackaging the spent nuclear fuel into Multi-Canister Overpack baskets. The document includes a hazard evaluation, identifies bounding accidents, documents analyses of the accidents and establishes safety class or safety significant equipment to mitigate accidents as needed

  8. SNF fuel retrieval sub project safety analysis document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BERGMANN, D.W.

    1999-02-24

    This safety analysis is for the SNF Fuel Retrieval (FRS) Sub Project. The FRS equipment will be added to K West and K East Basins to facilitate retrieval, cleaning and repackaging the spent nuclear fuel into Multi-Canister Overpack baskets. The document includes a hazard evaluation, identifies bounding accidents, documents analyses of the accidents and establishes safety class or safety significant equipment to mitigate accidents as needed.

  9. Preliminary conceptual designs for advanced packages for the geologic disposal of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study assumes that the spent fuel will be disposed of in mined repositories in continental geologic formations, and that the post-emplacement control of the radioactive species will be accomplished independently by both the natural barrier, i.e., the geosphere, and the engineered barrier system, i.e., the package components consisting of the stabilizer, the canister, and the overpack; and the barrier components external to the package consisting of the hole sleeve and the backfill medium. The present document provides an overview of the nature of the spent fuel waste; the general approach to waste containment, using the defense-in-depth philosophy; material options, both metallic and nonmetallic, for the components of the engineered barrier system; a set of strawman criteria to guide the development of package/engineered barrier systems; and four preliminary concepts representing differing approaches to the solution of the containment problem. These concepts use: a corrosion-resistant meta canister in a special backfill (2 barriers); a mild steel canister in a corrosion-resistant metallic or nonmetallic hole sleeve, surrounded by a special backfill (2 barriers); a corrosion-resistant canister and a corrosion-resistant overpack (or hole sleeve) in a special backfill (3 barriers); and a mild steel canister in a massive corrosion-resistant bore sleeve surrounded by a polymer layer and a special backfill (3 barriers). The lack of definitive performance requirements makes it impossible to evaluate these concepts on a functional basis at the present time

  10. Draft Geologic Disposal Requirements Basis for STAD Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, Anastasia G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-25

    This document provides the basis for requirements in the current version of Performance Specification for Standardized Transportation, Aging, and Disposal Canister Systems, (FCRD-NFST-2014-0000579) that are driven by storage and geologic disposal considerations. Performance requirements for the Standardized Transportation, Aging, and Disposal (STAD) canister are given in Section 3.1 of that report. Here, the requirements are reviewed and the rationale for each provided. Note that, while FCRD-NFST-2014-0000579 provides performance specifications for other components of the STAD storage system (e.g. storage overpack, transfer and transportation casks, and others), these have no impact on the canister performance during disposal, and are not discussed here.

  11. Conceptual design for remote handling methods using the HIP process in the Calcine Immobilization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report recommends the remote conceptual design philosophy for calcine immobilization using the hot isostatic press (HIP) process. Areas of remote handling operations discussed in this report include: (1) introducing the process can into the front end of the HIP process, (2) filling and compacting the calcine/frit mixture into the process can, (3) evacuating and sealing the process can, (4) non-destructive testing of the seal on the process can, (5) decontamination of the process can, (6) HIP furnace loading and unloading the process can for the HIPing operation, (7) loading an overpack canister with processed HIP cans, (8) sealing the canister, with associated non-destructive examination (NDE) and decontamination, and (9) handling canisters for interim storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site

  12. Study on corrosion behavior of overpack and migration behavior of radionuclides in buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozaki, Tamotsu; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kozai, Naofumi; Baba, Tsunetaka

    1999-10-01

    Non-stationary diffusion experiments were carried out using Na-type montmorillonite and apparent diffusion coefficients were obtained for Cs{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Cl{sup -}. Deduced activation energies proved to reveal complex dry-density dependencies, suggesting change of the diffusion process with increase of the dry density. In order to study the corrosion behavior of iron in pressurized clay, the diffusion rate of iron in bentonite and apparent diffusion coefficient of the corrosion products were determined using radioactive iron foil sandwiched between two bentonite blocks. The result was reproduced well by the diffusion equation with diffusion origins of constant concentration and the degree of oxidation of iron pyrites was found to substantially affect the corrosion reaction and migration behavior of corrosion products. Furthermore, a diffusion experiment and experiment of selective sequential extraction were carried out with {sup 237}Np in order to collect information on the adsorption condition of Np. (H. Baba)

  13. Biosynthesis of the Cyclotide MCoTI-II using an Engineered Intein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, J; Camarero, J A

    2006-08-15

    Cyclotides are an emerging family of naturally occurring circular mini-proteins ({approx}30-40 amino acids) characterized by six conserved Cys residues (forming 3 disulfide bridges) that create a topologically unique structure designated as a cyclic cysteine knot (CCK). The cysteine knot motif, which is embedded within the macrocylic backbone, is described as two disulfide bridges that form a ring that is penetrated by the third disulfide bridge. The cyclic backbone and CCK motif together confer cyclotides with a remarkable stability and resistance to proteolytic, chemical, and thermal degradation. Further, cyclotides are functionally diverse and display a wide range of functions including uterotonic activity, trypsin inhibition, cytotoxicity, neurotensin binding, anti-HIV, antimicrobial, and insecticidal activity. Together, these characteristics make cyclotides attractive candidates for both drug design and agricultural applications, both in their native forms and as molecular scaffolds for the incorporation of novel bioactivities. [1] The ability to manipulate production of cyclotides within biological systems is critical for mutagenesis studies, production of grafted products, and the mass production of cyclotides with novel activities. My adviser's hope is to achieve this capability by employing recombinant DNA expression techniques to generate large combinatorial libraries of cyclotides. The advantage in creating a biosynthetic library (containing {approx}10{sup 6}-10{sup 10} members/library vs. chemically based libraries with typical values ranging from {approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} members/library) is that it can be lead to the in vivo application of biological screening and selection methodologies based on a specific clone's ability to affect certain cellular processes.

  14. Engineered design features in the HI-STAR/HI-STORM systems to maximize ALARA, safety, and community acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blessing, Christian [Holtec International, New Jersey (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Heltec International is a U.S. corporation headquartered in New Jersey, dedicated to providing capital goods and technical services to the power industry. Over 75 percent of the company's product output is destined for nuclear power plants. Holter counts among its active clients a majority of the nuclear plants in the United States, as well as Korea, Taiwan, Mexico, and Brazil. The company also has a growing market presence in Japan and the European Union. Leading U.S. nuclear plant owners, such as Entergy, Exelon, FPL, Southern Nuclear, PG and E and TVA have a long-term and continuous business relationship with Holtec International. This article deals with Holtec dry storage system description, the multi-purpose canister, hi-star 100 overpack, hi-storm 100 overpack and unique advantages of holtec's dry storage technology.

  15. Engineered design features in the HI-STAR/HI-STORM systems to maximize ALARA, safety, and community acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heltec International is a U.S. corporation headquartered in New Jersey, dedicated to providing capital goods and technical services to the power industry. Over 75 percent of the company's product output is destined for nuclear power plants. Holter counts among its active clients a majority of the nuclear plants in the United States, as well as Korea, Taiwan, Mexico, and Brazil. The company also has a growing market presence in Japan and the European Union. Leading U.S. nuclear plant owners, such as Entergy, Exelon, FPL, Southern Nuclear, PG and E and TVA have a long-term and continuous business relationship with Holtec International. This article deals with Holtec dry storage system description, the multi-purpose canister, hi-star 100 overpack, hi-storm 100 overpack and unique advantages of holtec's dry storage technology

  16. Development of a dry storage cask for PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd.(KHNP), which operates all the nuclear power plants in Korea, is developing a new dry storage cask to store twenty four spent fuel assemblies generated from pressurized water reactors for at-reactor or away-from-reactor interim storage facility in Korea. The dry storage cask is designed and evaluated according to the requirements of the IAEA, the US NRC and the Korean regulations for the dry spent fuel storage system. It provides confinement, radiation shielding, structural integrity, subcritical control and passive heat removal for normal and accident conditions. The dry storage cask consists of a dual purpose canister providing a confinement boundary for the PWR spent fuel, and a storage overpack providing a structural and radiological boundary for long-term storage of the canister placed inside it. The overpack is constructed by a combination of steel and concrete, and is equipped with penetrating ducts near its lower and upper extremities to permit natural circulation of air to provide for the passive cooling of the canister and the contained spent fuel assemblies. This paper describes development status, description, design criteria, evaluation and demonstration tests of the dry storage cask. (authors)

  17. WIPP conceptual design report. Addendum J. Support equipment in the high level waste facility of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aerojet Manufacturing Company (AMCO) received a contract in November 1976 to provide consulting services in assisting Holmes and Narver, Incorporated with the conceptual designs, cost estimates, and schedules of equipment used to handle waste casks, to decontaminate waste canisters and to overpack damaged or highly contaminated waste canisters for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Also, the layout of the hot cell in which canister handling, overpack and decontamination takes place was to be reviewed along with the time and motion study of the cell operations. This report has been prepared to present the results of the efforts and contains all technical and planning data developed during the program. The contents of this report are presented in three sections: (1) comments on the existing design criteria, equipment conceptual designs, hot cell design and time and motion studies of projected hot cell activities; (2) design descriptions of the equipment concepts and justification for varying from the existing concept (if a variation occurred). Drawings of each concept are provided in Appendix A. These design descriptions and drawings were used as the basis for the cost estimates; and (3) schedule projections and cost estimates for the equipment described in Section 2. Detail cost estimate backup data is provided in Appendix B

  18. Retrievable storage concept designs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E.

    1979-03-01

    Three tasks related to the reference design of retrievable storage canisters for radioactive waste have been completed. The three tasks consist of the reference design itself, the definition of failure modes most appropriate for structural integrity determinations for the reference canister, and the development of a failure methodology for the structural integrity of the containers. The reference design is a sealed storage canister concept based upon the waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) design, with slight modifications. The modifications consist of an alternate lifting yoke arrangement for the top head and a revised bottom head design for absorption of impact energy. Welded closures provide the seal at each end. Overpacking is considered as a possibility, but is not included in the preliminary reference design. The four failure modes that are deemed the most appropriate for the design of the reference canister are: (i) a loss of functional capability; (ii) ductile rupture of the canister; (iii) buckling of the structural members; and (iv) stress corrosion cracking. Failure scenarios are provided for each of the relevant failure modes. In addition, a failure methodology based upon the distribution of demand and the distribution of capacity for the structural members, with respect to each failure mode, is proffered.

  19. New Strategies for Licensing the Storage and Transportation of High Burn-up Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States - 12546

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative approach may be needed to the licensing of high-burnup fuel for storage and transportation based on the assumption that spent fuel cladding may not always remain intact. The approach would permit spent fuel to be retrieved on a canister basis and could lessen the need for repackaging of spent fuel. This approach is being presented as a possible engineering solution to address the uncertainties and lack of data availability for cladding properties for high burnup fuel and extended storage time frames. The proposed approach does not involve relaxing current safety standards for criticality safety, containment, or permissible external dose rates. Packaging strategies and regulations should be developed to reduce the potential for requiring fuel to be repackaged unnecessarily. This would lessen the chance of accidents and mishaps during loading and unloading of casks, and decrease dose to workers. A packaging approach that shifts the safety basis from reliance upon the fuel condition to reliance upon an inner canister could eliminate or lessen the need for repackaging. In addition, the condition of canisters can be more readily monitored and inspected than the condition of fuel cladding. Canisters can also be repaired and/or replaced when deemed necessary. In contrast, once a fuel assembly is loaded into a canister and placed in a storage overpack, there is little opportunity to monitor its condition or take mitigating measures if cladding degradation is suspected or proven to occur. (authors)

  20. Project W-441, cold vacuum drying facility design requirements document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-08

    This document has been prepared and is being released for Project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document sets forth the physical design criteria, Codes and Standards, and functional requirements that were used in the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document contains section 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements Document. The remaining sections will be issued at a later date. The purpose of the Facility is to dry, weld, and inspect the Multi-Canister Overpacks before transport to dry storage.

  1. The electrochemistry of carbon steel in simulated concrete pore water in boom clay repository environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosas-Camacho O.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The prediction of corrosion damage of canisters to experimentally inaccessible times is vitally important in assessing various concepts for the disposal of High Level Nuclear Waste. Such prediction can only be made using deterministic models, whose predictions are constrained by the time-invariant natural laws. In this paper, we describe the measurement of experimental electrochemical data that will allow the prediction of damage to the carbon steel overpack of the super container in Belgium’s proposed Boom Clay repository by using the Point Defect Model (PDM. PDM parameter values are obtained by optimizing the model on experimental, wide-band electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data.

  2. Materials to be used for radionuclide transport experiments (milestones SPL3A1M4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments to determine the effect of canister corrosion products on the transport of radionuclides will be undertaken using the FE(III) oxides goethite and hematite as proxies for the expected corrosion envelope that will form as a result of alteration of the corrosion allowance overpack prior to the breaching of the waste container. Samples of ESF invert concrete that have been crushed, or left intact but fractured, and that have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration will be used to determine the effect of cementitious materials on transport of radionuclides. A mixture of CaCO3, Si02, and aggregate will be used as a proxy for completely carbonated concrete

  3. Study on the Corrosion of Shang and Zhou Dynasty Bronze Relics---A Case Study of Artificial Analogue of HLW Disposal System Canister%商周青铜文物的腐蚀研究--高放废物处置系统人为类似物研究实例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈璋如; 刘月妙; 范光; 温志坚; 孙淑云; 李延祥; 张展适

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents compositional analyses and structure observations of unearthed Shang Zhou dynasty bronze relict samples and environmental conditions of the sites where the samples were collected.Research results revealed that the bronze relics had been continuously corroded with time.The corrosion layer consisted of at least two sub layers ,such as oxide and carbonate.There was a mechani‐cal corrosion sub layer found in few samples (a loose sub layer) . A SnO2 sub layer also occurred in a few samples. The thickness of bronze corrosion layers varied with the different climate environments in which the samples were taken. Their thickness was 50~260μm and 320~800μm and humid climate re‐gions respectively. In the view of natural corrosion resistance , bronze is recommendable as a material for HLW repository system canisters.%文章论述了出土商周时代青铜文物的化学成分和结构特征以及样品采集地区的环境条件。研究表明青铜文物随时间而不断腐蚀。腐蚀层至少由两个亚层组成,即氧化物层和碳酸盐亚层。有些样品出现物理腐蚀亚层,即疏松层;有些样品则产出SnO2亚层。青铜腐蚀层的厚度在不同环境条件下发生变化,干旱条件下为50~260μm ,潮湿条件下为320~800μm。从天然抗腐蚀观点看,青铜可推荐作为高放废物处置系统废物罐的材料。

  4. Radioactive waste containing vessel for underground disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A canister and an over packing vessel for containing the canister are assembled. Preceding to underground disposal, a sealing medium under a pressurized state is sealed to the space in the overpacking vessel. As the sealing medium, non-compressible medium of a liquid or a fluid such as a mineral oil, vegetable oil, cement mortar is used in an ordinary cases. Alternatively, gases such as of nitrogen or argon are applied for the purpose of increasing pressure of the space portion to more than the pressure of underground water and the like. In the state of the underground disposal, difference of pressure between the external pressure such as of underground water and a pressure of the sealed medium is applied to the wall of the over packing vessel. With such a constitution, since the wall of the over packing vessel can be reduced, the weight and the cost can be reduced. (I.N.)

  5. Mechanical performance and life prediction for canister copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantala, J.; Auerkari, P.; Salonen, J.; Holmstroem, S.; Laukkanen, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)); Saukkonen, T. (Aalto Univ. School of Science and Technology, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    The creep response of the OFP copper at 175 deg C has been studied by uniaxial, multiaxial creep testing, metallography and surface inspections. Surface cracks have been observed in a uniaxial test which has been running for more than 70 000 h (eight years). In a CT-specimen creep cavities have been observed after an exposure of 25 000 h. A purpose-built creep strain model has been implemented into FE analysis to characterize the stress multiaxiality and the stress state of the CT specimen. The results have been applied for life prediction of copper at foreseen levels of stress and temperature at the repository. (orig.)

  6. CARRIER/CASK HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.F. Loros

    2000-06-23

    The Carrier/Cask Handling System receives casks on railcars and legal-weight trucks (LWTs) (transporters) that transport loaded casks and empty overpacks to the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) from the Carrier/Cask Transport System. Casks that come to the MGR on heavy-haul trucks (HHTs) are transferred onto railcars before being brought into the Carrier/Cask Handling System. The system is the interfacing system between the railcars and LWTs and the Assembly Transfer System (ATS) and Canister Transfer System (CTS). The Carrier/Cask Handling System removes loaded casks from the cask transporters and transfers the casks to a transfer cart for either the ATS or CTS, as appropriate, based on cask contents. The Carrier/Cask Handling System receives the returned empty casks from the ATS and CTS and mounts the casks back onto the transporters for reshipment. If necessary, the Carrier/Cask Handling System can also mount loaded casks back onto the transporters and remove empty casks from the transporters. The Carrier/Cask Handling System receives overpacks from the ATS loaded with canisters that have been cut open and emptied and mounts the overpacks back onto the transporters for disposal. If necessary, the Carrier/Cask Handling System can also mount empty overpacks back onto the transporters and remove loaded overpacks from them. The Carrier/Cask Handling System is located within the Carrier Bay of the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of cranes, hoists, manipulators, and supporting equipment. The Carrier/Cask Handling System is designed with the tooling and fixtures necessary for handling a variety of casks. The Carrier/Cask Handling System performance and reliability are sufficient to support the shipping and emplacement schedules for the MGR. The Carrier/Cask Handling System interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Transport System, ATS, and CTS as noted above. The Carrier/Cask Handling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for building

  7. Scoping study of casks shipped from the MRS facility to various repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine the maximum number of specialized repository waste packages that could be shipped from the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility in Pb-, Fe-, and U-shielded casks weighing 200,000 or 300,000 lbs. The study included 18 different waste packages designed for the Salt, Tuff, and Basalt repositories. Nine of these contained consolidated PWR fuel pins, and nine contained consolidated BWR fuel pins. Discrete ordinates calculations were performed to determine the neutron and gamma shield thicknesses that would ensure a dose rate of 10 millirem/hr, 10 ft from the centerline of the cask(s). Over 100 casks of particular interest have been identified, while preliminary design information is also given for 522 casks of potential interest. Relative to the 200,000-lb casks, 50 to 100% more fuel may be shipped in the larger 300,000-lb casks. Placing the spent fuel canisters in overpacks prior to shipment from the MRS will reduce the net payload by 30 to 50%. The highest-capacity cask/waste package combination studied corresponds to a 300,000-lb U-shielded cask containing 84 consolidated PWR fuel assemblies in 21 canisters, or 171 consolidated BWR fuel assemblies in 19 canisters. Criticality analyses have shown these high-capacity casks to be safely subcritical - even if all the canisters were loaded with unirradiated LWR fuel containing 3.4 wt % U-235

  8. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 22. Nuclear considerations for repository design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/22, ''Nuclear Considerations for Repository Design,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. Included in this volume are baseline design considerations such as characteristics of canisters, drums, casks, overpacks, and shipping containers; maximum allowable and actual decay-heat levels; and canister radiation levels. Other topics include safeguard and protection considerations; occupational radiation exposure including ALARA programs; shielding of canisters, transporters and forklift trucks; monitoring considerations; mine water treatment; canister integrity; and criticality calculations.

  9. Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project: Recommended path forward. Volume 2: Alternatives and path forward evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has completed an evaluation of four alternatives for expediting the removal of spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins and stabilizing and placing the fuel into interim storage. Four alternatives were compared: (1) Containerizing fuel in the K Basins, transporting fuel to a facility for stabilization, and interim storage of stabilized fuel in a dry storage facility (DSF); (2) Containerizing fuel in the K Basins, transporting fuel to a wet temporary staging facility, moving fuel to a facility for stabilization, and transporting stabilized fuel to an interim DSF; (3) Containerizing fuel in the K Basins in multi-canister overpacks, transporting fuel directly to a stabilization facility for passivation in the overpack, and interim storage of stabilized fuel in a DSF; (4) Packaging fuel for transport overseas and shipping fuel to a foreign reprocessing facility for reprocessing with eventual return of U, Pu and vitrified high level waste. The comparative evaluation consisted of a multi-attribute utility decision analysis, a public, worker and environmental health risk assessment, and a programmatic risk evaluation. The evaluation concluded that the best Path Forward combines the following concepts: Removal of K Basin fuel and sludge is uncoupled from the operation of a stabilization facility; A storage capability is provided to act as a lag storage or staging operation for overpack fuel containers as they are removed from the K Basins; Metal fuel drying and passivation should be maintained as the fuel stabilization process with the option of further refinements as more information becomes available; and The near term NEPA strategy should focus on expeditious removal of fuel and sludge from K Basins and placing overpacked fuel in temporary storage

  10. Considerations for Disposition of Dry Cask Storage System Materials at End of Storage System Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry cask storage systems are deployed at nuclear power plants for used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage when spent fuel pools reach their storage capacity and/or the plants are decommissioned. An important waste and materials disposition consideration arising from the increasing use of these systems is the management of the dry cask storage systems' materials after the UNF proceeds to disposition. Thermal analyses of repository design concepts currently under consideration internationally indicate that waste package sizes for the geologic media under consideration may be significantly smaller than the canisters being used for on-site dry storage by the nuclear utilities. Therefore, at some point along the UNF disposition pathway, there could be a need to repackage fuel assemblies already loaded into the dry storage canisters currently in use. In the United States, there are already over 1650 of these dry storage canisters deployed and approximately 200 canisters per year are being loaded at the current fleet of commercial nuclear power plants. There is about 10 cubic meters of material from each dry storage canister system that will need to be dispositioned. The concrete horizontal storage modules or vertical storage overpacks will need to be reused, re-purposed, recycled, or disposed of in some manner. The empty metal storage canister/cask would also have to be cleaned, and decontaminated for possible reuse or recycling or disposed of, likely as low-level radioactive waste. These material disposition options can have impacts of the overall used fuel management system costs. This paper will identify and explore some of the technical and interface considerations associated with managing the dry cask storage system materials. (authors)

  11. Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100 degree C. 52 refs., 9 figs

  12. Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100{degree}C. 52 refs., 9 figs.

  13. TURVA-2012: Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and application for a construction licence for a repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site in south-western Finland. This paper gives a summary of the analyses of the radionuclide release scenarios formulated in a companion paper, TURVA-2012: Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios (Marcos, 2014). The scenarios and the analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in a further paper: TURVA-2012: Performance Assessment (Hellae, 2014). For each scenario, calculation cases are analysed to evaluate compliance of the proposed repository with regulatory requirements on radiological protection, as well as to illustrate the impact of specific uncertainties or combinations of uncertainties on the calculated results. Each case illustrates different possibilities for how the repository might evolve and perform over time, taking into account uncertainties in the models and parameter values used to represent radionuclide release, retention and transport and, for biosphere assessment calculation cases, radiation exposure. The calculation cases each address a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are considered: - The presence of an initial defect in the copper overpack of the canister that penetrates the overpack completely (subsequent corrosion of the insert may then lead to an enlargement of the defect). - Corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion. - Shear movements on fractures intersecting the deposition holes. However, the likelihood and consequences of more than one canister failure occurring during the assessment time fame are also considered, generally based on the findings from the single canister calculations. Quantitative

  14. Conceptual Design Report Cask Loadout Sys and Cask Drop Redesign for the Immersion Pail Support Structure and Operator Interface Platform at 105 K West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LANGEVIN, A.S.

    1999-07-12

    This conceptual design report documents the redesign of the IPSS and the OIP in the 105 KW Basin south loadout pit due to a postulated cask drop accident, as part of Project A.5/A.6, Canister Transfer Facility Modifications. Project A.5/A.6 involves facility modifications needed to transfer fuel from the basin into the cask-MCO. The function of the IPSS is to suspend, guide, and position the immersion pail. The immersion pail protects the cask-MCO from contamination by basin water and acts as a lifting device for the cask-MCO. The OIP provides operator access to the south loadout pit. Previous analyses studied the effects of a cask-MCO drop on the south loadout pit concrete structure and on the IPSS. The most recent analysis considered the resulting loads at the pit slab/wall joint (Kanjilal, 1999). This area had not been modeled previously, and the analysis results indicate that the demand capacity exceeds the allowable at the slab/wall joint. The energy induced on the south loadout pit must be limited such that the safety class function of the basin is maintained. The solution presented in this CDR redesigns the IPSS and the OIP to include impact-absorbing features that will reduce the induced energy. The impact absorbing features of the new design include: Impact-absorbing material at the IPSS base and at the upper portion of the IPSS legs. A sleeve which provides a hydraulic means of absorbing energy. Designing the OIP to act as an impact absorber. The existing IPSS structure in 105 KW will be removed. This conceptual design considers only loads resulting from drops directly over the IPSS and south loadout pit area. Drops in other areas of the basin are not considered, and will be covered as part of a future revision to this CDR.

  15. Conceptual Design Report - Cask Loadout System Cask Drop Redesign for the Immersion Pail Support Structure and Operator Interface Platform, 105 K West Basin, Project A.5/A.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conceptual design report documents the redesign of the immersion pail support structure (IPSS) and the OIP in the 105 KW Basin south loadout pit due to a postulated cask drop accident, as part of Project A.5lA.6, Canister Transfer Facility Modifications. Project A.5lA.6 involves facility modifications needed to transfer fuel from the basin into the cask-MCO. The junction of the IPSS is to suspend, guide, and position the immersion pail. The immersion pail protects the cask-MCO from contamination by basin water and acts as a lifting device for the cask-MCO. The OIP provides operator access to the south loadout pit. Previous analyses studied the effects of a cask-MCO drop on the south loadout pit concrete structure and on the IPSS. The most recent analysis considered the resulting loads at the pit slab/wall joint (Kanjilal, 1999). This area had not been modeled previously, and the analysis results indicate that the demand capacity exceeds the allowable at the slablwall joint. The energy induced on the south loadout pit must be limited such that the safety class function of the basin is maintained. The solution presented in this CDR redesigns the IPSS and the OIP to include impact-absorbing features that will reduce the induced energy. The impact absorbing features of the new design include: Impact-absorbing material at the IPSS base and at the upper portion of the IPSS legs. A sleeve which provides a hydraulic means of absorbing energy. Designing the OIP to act as an impact absorber. The existing IPSS structure in 105 KW will be removed. This conceptual design considers only loads resulting from drops directly over the IPSS and south loadout pit area. Drops in other areas of the basin are not considered, and will be covered as part of a future revision to this CDR

  16. Electrochemical properties of LaMO3 (M=Co or Fe) as the negative electrode in a hydrogen battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D.-K.; Im, H.-N.; Kim, J.; Song, S.-J.

    2013-01-01

    Undoped orthorthombic LaFeO3 and monoclinic LaCoO3 oxides were selected as an anode material for Ni-H battery due to their high electron conductivity by multivalent transition status of B-site cation. Both groups of oxides were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method, and their electrochemical charge/discharge properties were investigated. The electrochemical kinetic properties, exchange current density, and proton diffusivity were also extracted using linear polarization measurement and the potential-step method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to measure the oxidation state of the transition metal in the specimens. A non-linear least-square fitting deconvoluted the peaks, suggesting that the valence state of Fe and Co in the sample was mainly +3. The hydrogen diffusion rate was also estimated using the potential-step method, giving 5.42×10-16 and 5.72×10-16 cm2 s-1 for LaCoO3 and LaFeO3, respectively which are an order of magnitude larger than that of Sr doped LaFeO3 oxide electrodes.

  17. A Facile Synthesis of MPd (M=Co, Cu) Nanoparticles and Their Catalysis for Formic Acid Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, Vismadeb [Brown University; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Mankin, Max [Brown University; Liu, Yi [Brown University; Metin, Onder [Ataturk University; Sun, Daohua [Xiamen University, China; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Sun, Shouheng [Brown University

    2012-01-01

    Monodisperse CoPd nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and studied for catalytic formic acid (HCOOH) oxidation (FAO). The NPs were prepared by coreduction of Co(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate) and PdBr2 at 260 C in oleylamine and trioctylphosphine, and their sizes (5-12 nm) and compositions (Co10Pd90 to Co60Pd40) were controlled by heating ramp rate, metal salt concentration, or metal molar ratios. The 8 nm CoPd NPs were activated for HCOOH oxidation by a simple ethanol wash. In 0.1 M HClO4 and 2 M HCOOH solution, their catalytic activities followed the trend of Co50Pd50 > Co60Pd40 > Co10Pd90 > Pd. The Co50Pd50 NPs had an oxidation peak at 0.4 V with a peak current density of 774 A/gPd. As a comparison, commercial Pd catalysts showed an oxidation peak at 0.75 V with peak current density of only 254 A/gPd. The synthesis procedure could also be extended to prepare CuPd NPs when Co(acac)2 was replaced by Cu(ac)2 (ac = acetate) in an otherwise identical condition. The CuPd NPs were less active catalysts than CoPd or even Pd for FAO in HClO4 solution. The synthesis provides a general approach to Pd-based bimetallic NPs and will enable further investigation of Pd-based alloy NPs for electro-oxidation and other catalytic reactions.

  18. NMR measurements in milled R E-M2 compounds (R E=Gd and T M=Co, Fe)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milled samples of the Laves phase intermetallic compounds Gd Fe2 and Gd Co2 were measured by NMR at 4.2 K. The milling was made from the crystalline intermetallic compounds, inside a cylindrical tool made of hard steel, under argon atmosphere, for several different time intervals. The initial compounds were produced from high purity elements in an arc furnace, under inert atmosphere. Their X-ray diffraction patterns agreed with those of the literature. The milling of Gd Fe2 and of Gd Co2 induces amorphization. Above 1 hour the milling of Gd Fe2 leads to segregation of α-Fe and formation of a Gd-Fe phase. These results are shown in the X-ray analysis. The spin-echo pulse NMR technique was utilized to study some structural and magnetic properties as a function of milling time. The measurements were made in a broad band pulse NMR spectrometer. The NMR spectra of the 155 Gd and 157 Gd isotopes in Gd Fe2 show a broadening and displacement of the NMR lines, reflecting the introduction of defects, some kind of disorder and also the formation of a new Gd-rich phase after 1 hour. This result is in agreement with the X-ray spectra. In both systems, the spectra of the amorphous samples show broader lines, and the measured hyperfine fields do not change much with milling. (author)

  19. Theoretical study of the multiferroic properties in M-doped (M=Co, Cr, Mg) ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahoosh, S.G. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Apostolov, A.T. [University of Architecture, Civil Engineering and Geodesy, Faculty of Hydrotechnics, Department of Physics, 1, Hristo Smirnenski Blvd., 1046 Sofia (Bulgaria); Apostolova, I.N. [University of Forestry, Faculty of Forest Industry, 10, Kl. Ohridsky Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Trimper, S. [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-University, D-06099 Halle (Germany); Wesselinowa, Julia M. [University of Sofia, Department of Physics, Blvd. J. Bouchier 5, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-01-01

    The origin of multiferroism is still an open problem in ZnO. We propose a microscopic model to clarify the occurrence of multiferroism in this material. Using Green's function technique we study the influence of ion doping and size effects on the magnetization and polarization of ZnO thin films. The calculations for magnetic Co- and Cr-ions are based on the s–d model, the transverse Ising model in terms of pseudo-spins and a biquadratic magnetoelectric coupling, whereas in case of nonmagnetic Mg-ions the model takes into account the Coulomb interaction and an indirect coupling between the pseudo-spins via the conduction electrons. We show that the magnetization M exhibits a maximum for a fixed concentration of the doping ions. Furthermore M increases with decreasing film thickness N. The polarization increases with increasing concentration of the dopant and decreasing N. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data. - Highlights: • The paper analyzes the multiferroic properties of doped ZnO thin films by a microscopic model. • The magnetization exhibits a maximum at a fixed doping concentration. • The polarization increases with growing dopant concentration. • The ferroelectric transition temperature is enhanced for increasing dopant concentration.

  20. Test Plan for the Boiling Water Reactor Dry Cask Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The thermal performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks are evaluated through detailed numerical analysis . These modeling efforts are completed by the vendor to demonstrate performance and regulatory compliance. The calculations are then independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the efficiency of internal conduction pathways and by increasing the internal convection through greater canister helium pressure. These same vertical, canistered cask systems rely on ventilation between the canister and the overpack to convect heat away from the canister to the environment for both above and below-ground configurations. While several testing programs have been previously conducted, these earlier validation attempts did not capture the effects of elevated helium pressures or accurately portray the external convection of above-ground and below-ground canistered dry cask systems. The purpose of the investigation described in this report is to produce a data set that can be used to test the validity of the assumptions associated with the calculations presently used to determine steady-state cladding temperatures in modern vertical, canistered dry cask systems. The BWR cask simulator (BCS) has been designed in detail for both the above-ground and below-ground venting configurations. The pressure vessel representing the canister has been designed, fabricated, and pressure tested for a maximum allowable pressure (MAWP) rating of 24 bar at 400 deg C. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly is being deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents the

  1. Analysis of Dust Samples Collected from an Unused Spent Nuclear Fuel Interim Storage Container at Hope Creek, Delaware.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Enos, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July, 2014, the Electric Power Research Institute and industry partners sampled dust on the surface of an unused canister that had been stored in an overpack at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station for approximately one year. The foreign material exclusion (FME) cover that had been on the top of the canister during storage, and a second recently - removed FME cover, were also sampled. This report summarizes the results of analyses of dust samples collected from the unused Hope Creek canister and the FME covers. Both wet and dry samples of the dust/salts were collected, using SaltSmart(TM) sensors and Scotch - Brite(TM) abrasive pads, respectively. The SaltSmart(TM) samples were leached and the leachate analyzed chemically to determine the composition and surface load per unit area of soluble salts present on the canister surface. The dry pad samples were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence and by scanning electron microscopy to determine dust texture and mineralogy; and by leaching and chemical analysis to deter mine soluble salt compositions. The analyses showed that the dominant particles on the canister surface were stainless steel particles, generated during manufacturing of the canister. Sparse environmentally - derived silicates and aluminosilicates were also present. Salt phases were sparse, and consisted of mostly of sulfates with rare nitrates and chlorides. On the FME covers, the dusts were mostly silicates/aluminosilicates; the soluble salts were consistent with those on the canister surface, and were dominantly sulfates. It should be noted that the FME covers were w ashed by rain prior to sampling, which had an unknown effect of the measured salt loads and compositions. Sulfate salts dominated the assemblages on the canister and FME surfaces, and in cluded Ca - SO4 , but also Na - SO4 , K - SO4 , and Na - Al - SO4 . It is likely that these salts were formed by particle - gas conversion reactions, either

  2. Long-Term Dry Storage of High Burn-Up Spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Fuel in TAD (Transportation, Aging, and Disposal) Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TAD canister, in conjunction with specially-designed over-packs can accomplish the functions of transportation, aging, and disposal (TAD) in the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Industrial dry cask systems currently available for SNF are licensed for storage-only or for dual-purpose (i.e., storage and transportation). By extending the function to include the indefinite storage and perhaps, eventual geologic disposal, the TAD canister would have to be designed to enhance, among others, corrosion resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-safety control. This investigative paper introduces the use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials for SNF transportation, aging, and disposal.The objective of this investigative project is to explore the interest that KAERI would research and develop its specific SAM coating materials for the TAD canisters to satisfy the requirements of corrosion-resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-controls for long-term dry storage of high burn-up spent PWR fuel

  3. Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

    2014-07-01

    Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

  4. Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-12

    The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the accesses using a rail mounted transporter, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The defense high level waste (HLW) disposal container provides long-term confinement of the commercial HLW and defense HLW (including immobilized plutonium waste forms (IPWF)) placed within disposable canisters, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in disposable canisters may also be placed in a defense HLW disposal container along with commercial HLW waste forms, which is known as 'co-disposal'. The Defense High Level Waste Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container/waste package maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual canister temperatures after emplacement, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Defense HLW disposal containers for HLW disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters. Defense HLW disposal containers for co-disposal will hold up to five HLW canisters arranged in a ring and one DOE SNF canister in the ring. Defense HLW disposal containers also will hold two Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs) and two HLW canisters in one disposal container. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinders, outer and inner cylinder lids, and may include a canister guide. An exterior label will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. Different

  5. Materials to be used for radionuclide transport experiments (milestones SPL3A1M4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viani, B., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    Experiments to determine the effect of canister corrosion products on the transport of radionuclides will be undertaken using the FE(III) oxides goethite and hematite as proxies for the expected corrosion envelope that will form as a result of alteration of the corrosion allowance overpack prior to the breaching of the waste container. Samples of ESF invert concrete that have been crushed, or left intact but fractured, and that have been subjected to hydrothermal alteration will be used to determine the effect of cementitious materials on transport of radionuclides. A mixture of CaCO{sub 3}, Si0{sub 2}, and aggregate will be used as a proxy for completely carbonated concrete.

  6. Preclosure analysis of conceptual waste package designs for a nuclear waste repository in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the selection and analysis of conceptual waste package developed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project for possible disposal of high-level nuclear waste at a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The design requirements that the waste package must conform to are listed, as are several desirable design considerations. Illustrations of the reference and alternative designs are shown. Four austenitic stainless steels (316L SS, 321 SS, 304L SS and Incoloy 825 high nickel alloy) have been selected for candidate canister/overpack materials, and 1020 carbon steel has been selected as the reference metal for the borehole liners. A summary of the results of technical and ecnonmic analyses supporting the selection of the conceptual waste package designs is included. Postclosure containment and release rates are not analyzed in this report

  7. Tabulation of thermodynamic data for chemical reactions involving 58 elements common to radioactive waste package systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of release and migration of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository to the biosphere is dependent on chemical interactions between groundwater, the geologic host rock, and the radioactive waste package. For the purpose of this report, the waste package includes the wasteform, canister, overpack, and repository backfill. Chemical processes of interest include sorption (ion exchange), dissolution, complexation, and precipitation. Thermochemical data for complexation and precipitation calculations for 58 elements common to the radioactive waste package are presented. Standard free energies of formation of free ions, complexes, and solids are listed. Common logarithms of equilibrium constants (log K's) for speciation and precipitation reactions are listed. Unless noted otherwise, all data are for 298.150K and one atmosphere

  8. Guidelines for the development and testing of NWTS waste-package materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to the NWTS projects for the testing of waste package materials. The information contained herein is provided in detail to describe the required development and testing to qualify materials for use in the waste package. These materials include the waste form, structural and corrosion-resistant barriers, and backfills to be placed around the canister and overpack. The guidelines include a description of methods, procedures, and test conditions. Each potential geologic site will use the guidelines to aid in selecting specific tests to qualify materials for that site. Thus, each NWTS project must develop specific test programs to meet its requirements. The guidelines are provided as a documented description of the test methods and procedures that are available to qualify and select materials for waste packages for a variety of geologic settings and host rocks

  9. Role of a buffer component within an engineered barrier waste package and a preliminary evaluation of bentonite as a backfill material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the functions, properties, and compositions of backfill components to be used in the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste in basalt. A conceptual design for a repository located in basalt is being developed by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) in which these backfill components are part of the waste package and the repository sealing system (rooms, tunnels, and shafts). The first part of the paper concerns the role of a buffer component which is located between the primary and secondary physical barriers of the waste package (the canister and overpack). The second part of the paper deals with the chemical and physical properties of bentonite, which is a primary candidate for a backfill material both in the outer backfill barrier of the waste package and in the rooms, tunnels, and shafts above the waste package

  10. Feasibility study for the processing of Hanford Site cesium and strontium isotopic sources in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final environmental impact statement for the disposal of defense-related wastes at the Hanford Site (Final Environmental Impact Statement: Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes [HDW-EIS] [DOE 1987]) states that the preferred alternative for disposal of cesium and strontium wastes at the Hanford Site will be to package and ship these wastes to the commercial high-level waste repository. The Record of Decision for this EIS states that before shipment to a geologic repository, these wastes will be packaged in accordance with repository waste acceptance criteria. However, the high cost per canister for repository disposal and uncertainty about the acceptability of overpacked capsules by the repository suggest that additional alternative means of disposal be considered. Vitrification of the cesium and strontium salts in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) has been identified as a possible alternative to overpacking. Subsequently, Westinghouse Hanford Company's (Westinghouse Hanford) Projects Technical Support Office undertook a feasibility study to determine if any significant technical issues preclude the vitrification of the cesium and strontium salts. Based on the information presented in this report, it is considered technically feasible to blend the cesium chloride and strontium fluoride salts with neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) and/or complexant concentrate (CC) waste feedstreams, or to blend the salts with fresh frit and process the waste through the HWVP

  11. Remotisation aspects of vitrification facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities such as handling of HLW for its transfer from the reprocessing facility, concentration in thermo-siphon evaporators, feeding the concentrate into the furnaces, decontamination of the gases emanating during evaporation and vitrification, handling of vitrified waste product (VWP) for its filling into the canisters, capping, decontamination and overpacking etc. are carried out remotely inside concrete shielded cells. Further, handling of VWP overpacks for its loading into the shielding casks for its transportation and emplacing the same into interim storage/disposal facilities, are also done remotely. Liquid sampling and handling of filters for cleaning of vessel off gases (VOG) are some of other major activities requiring remote handling. A new dimension in remote operations has been added while dismantling melter components and subsequently managing the secondary wastes generated at Trombay and Tarapur as well. Having equipped with rich experience and broad analysis of the operations involved in vitrification of HLW and handling the VWP, we can embark on design of the new facilities having much higher degree of automation and use of robots

  12. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way

  13. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives.

  14. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way.

  15. Spent Fuel Dry Storage Cask Thermal Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most nuclear power plants maintain their spent fuel discharged at a reactor in wet storage pools. However, after several years of use, many pools are filled to capacity. Therefore, finding a sufficient capacity for storage is essential because of the continued delays in obtaining a safe, interim storage facility if nuclear power plants are to be allowed to continue to operate. Dry storage cask will be one solution for solving an interim storage problem. The dry storage cask consists of two separate components: an over-pack, and a canister. The structure strength part of the over-pack is made of carbon steel, and the inner cavity of the structure strength part is filled with concrete, which accomplishes the role as a radiation shield. The outer diameter of the dry storage cask is 3,550 mm and the its overall height is 5,885 mm. It weighs approximately 135 tons. The dry storage cask accommodates 24 PWR spent fuel assemblies with a burn-up of 55,000 MWD/MTU and a cooling time of 7 years. The decay heat from the 24 PWR spent fuel assemblies is 25.2 kW This paper discusses the experimental approach used to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics of the dry storage cask

  16. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives

  17. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios sits within Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' report portfolio and has the objective of presenting an assessment of the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases that have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. A base scenario, variant scenarios and disturbance scenarios are considered. For each scenario, a range of calculation cases, also identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, has been analysed, complemented by Monte Carlo simulations, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and other supporting calculations. The calculation cases and analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in Performance Assessment. Quality control and assurance measures have been adopted to ensure transparency and traceability of the calculations performed and hence to promote confidence in the analysis of the calculation cases. The calculation cases each consider a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are addressed: (1) the presence of an initial penetrating defect in the copper overpack of the canister, (2) corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (3) shear movement on a fracture intersecting a deposition hole. The likelihood and consequences of multiple canister failure occurring during the assessment time frame are also considered. In particular, the analyses consider: The likelihood and consequences of there being multiple canisters with initial penetrating defects; The consequences if canister failure due to corrosion following buffer erosion were to occur; and The low annual probability of there being an earthquake large enough to give rise to canister failure due to rock shear movements and the potential consequences of such an earthquake

  18. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios sits within Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' report portfolio and has the objective of presenting an assessment of the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases that have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. A base scenario, variant scenarios and disturbance scenarios are considered. For each scenario, a range of calculation cases, also identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, has been analysed, complemented by Monte Carlo simulations, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and other supporting calculations. The calculation cases and analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in Performance Assessment. Quality control and assurance measures have been adopted to ensure transparency and traceability of the calculations performed and hence to promote confidence in the analysis of the calculation cases. The calculation cases each consider a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are addressed: (1) the presence of an initial penetrating defect in the copper overpack of the canister, (2) corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (3) shear movement on a fracture intersecting a deposition hole. The likelihood and consequences of multiple canister failure occurring during the assessment time frame are also considered. In particular, the analyses consider: The likelihood and consequences of there being multiple canisters with initial penetrating defects; The consequences if canister failure due to corrosion following buffer erosion were to occur; and The low annual probability of there being an earthquake large enough to give rise to canister failure due to rock shear movements and the potential consequences of such an earthquake, taking into

  19. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Co, Mg, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles using ricin oil as capping agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gherca, Daniel [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Blvd. Carol I nr 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Pui, Aurel, E-mail: aurel@uaic.ro [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Blvd. Carol I nr 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Cornei, Nicoleta [Faculty of Chemistry, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Blvd. Carol I nr 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Cojocariu, Alina; Nica, Valentin; Caltun, Ovidiu [Faculty of Physics and Carpath Center, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Blvd. Carol I nr 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2012-11-15

    We focused on obtaining MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles using ricin oil solution as surfactant and on their structural characterization and magnetic properties. The annealed samples at 500 Degree-Sign C in air for 6 h were analyzed for the crystal phase identification by powder X-ray diffraction using CuK{alpha} radiation. The particle size, the chemical composition and the morphology of the calcinated powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. All sintered samples contain only one phase, which has a cubic structure with crystallite sizes of 12-21 nm. From the infrared spectra of all samples were observed two strong bands around 600 and 400 cm{sup -1}, which correspond to the intrinsic lattice vibrations of octahedral and tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively, and characteristic vibration for capping agent. The magnetic properties of fine powders were investigated at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The room temperature M-H hysteresis loops show ferromagnetic behavior of the calcined samples, with specific saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) values ranging between 11 and 53 emu/g. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles obtained using ricin oil as surfactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures were confirmed by SEM micrographs, FTIR spectra and XRD spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples contain only one phase with crystallite sizes of 12-21 nm.

  20. Role of Bismuth Oxide in Bi-MCo2O4(M=Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) Catalysts for Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Peng-bo; CHENG Tie-xin; ZHUANG Hong; CUI Xiang-hao; BI Ying-li; ZHEN Kai-ji

    2004-01-01

    Two series of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel catalysts were prepared by the decomposition of the corresponding nitrates. The catalysts doped with bismuth oxide exhibit a higher activity in the wet air oxidation of acetic acid than those without dopant bismuth oxide. The catalysts were investigated by XRD, TEM, ESR, UV-DRS and XPS, and the interaction between Co and Bi was studied as well. It has been found that nano-sized bismuth oxide is paved on the surface of cobalt spinel crystal and the structures of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel are still maintained. The shift of the binding energy of Bi4f7/2 is related to the catalytic activity of these catalysts doped with bismuth oxide.

  1. Low-energy vibrations of the group 10 metal monocarbonyl MCO (M = Ni, Pd, and Pt): rotational spectroscopy and force field analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Okabayashi, Emi Y; Tanimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2011-03-17

    The rotational spectra of NiCO and PdCO in the ground and ν(2) excited vibrational states were observed by employing a source-modulated microwave spectrometer. The NiCO and PdCO molecules were generated in a free space cell by the sputtering reaction of nickel and palladium sheets, respectively, lining the inner surface of a stainless steel cathode with a dc glow plasma of CO and Ar. The molecular constants of NiCO and PdCO were determined by least-squares analysis. By force field analysis for the molecular constants of not only NiCO and PdCO but also of PtCO as previously reported, the harmonic force constants were determined for these three group 10 metal monocarbonyls. The vibrational wavenumbers derived for the lower M-C stretching vibrations were in good agreement with those obtained from the IR spectra in noble gas matrices and those predicted by several quantum chemical calculations published in the past. The bending vibrational wavenumbers derived by the force field analysis were also consistent with most quantum chemical calculations previously reported, but showed systematic discrepancies from the matrix IR values by about 40 cm(-1), even after reassignment (ν(2) band → 2ν(2) band) of the matrix IR spectra of PdCO and PtCO. PMID:21332227

  2. Synthesis, characterization and magnetic properties of MFe2O4 (M=Co, Mg, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles using ricin oil as capping agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We focused on obtaining MFe2O4 nanoparticles using ricin oil solution as surfactant and on their structural characterization and magnetic properties. The annealed samples at 500 °C in air for 6 h were analyzed for the crystal phase identification by powder X-ray diffraction using CuKα radiation. The particle size, the chemical composition and the morphology of the calcinated powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. All sintered samples contain only one phase, which has a cubic structure with crystallite sizes of 12–21 nm. From the infrared spectra of all samples were observed two strong bands around 600 and 400 cm−1, which correspond to the intrinsic lattice vibrations of octahedral and tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively, and characteristic vibration for capping agent. The magnetic properties of fine powders were investigated at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The room temperature M–H hysteresis loops show ferromagnetic behavior of the calcined samples, with specific saturation magnetization (Ms) values ranging between 11 and 53 emu/g. - Highlights: ► MFe2O4 nanoparticles obtained using ricin oil as surfactant. ► The structures were confirmed by SEM micrographs, FTIR spectra and XRD spectroscopy. ► The samples contain only one phase with crystallite sizes of 12–21 nm.

  3. Mechanism of thermal ring closure of M(CO) sub 5 L (L = bidentate ligand) produced during photolysis of group 6 hexacarbonyl complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, K.B.; van Eldik, R. (Univ. of Witten/Herdecke (West Germany))

    1990-05-01

    The kinetics of the thermal ring-closure reactions of M(CO){sub 5}L, produced during the photolysis of M(CO){sub 6}/L for L = ethylenediamine (en) and 1,4-diisopropyl-1,4-diazabutadiene (dab), were studied as a function of (L), temperature, and pressure. The values of {Delta}S{double dagger} and {Delta}V{double dagger} are significantly negative, {minus}40 to {minus}170 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1} and {minus}5.4 to {minus}13.7 cm{sup 3} mol{sup {minus}1}, respectively, for M = Cr (L = en) and M = Mo, W (L = en, dab) and support an associative ring-closure mechanism. The results demonstrate the crucial role played by the size of the metal center and the steric hindrance on L.

  4. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1986-January 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Harrison, S.; Shull, R.; Linzer, M.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

    1987-10-01

    This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon and stainless steels, and copper. In the section on tuff, the current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned. Within the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) section, discussions are given on problems concerning groundwater, materials for use in the metallic overpack, and diffusion through the packing. For the proposed salt site, questions are raised on the work on both ASTM A216 Steel and Ti-Code 12. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is covered. NBS reviews of selected DOE technical reports and a summary of current waste-package activities of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is presented. Using a database management system, a computerized database for storage and retrieval of reviews and evaluations of HLW data has been developed and is described. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Thermal response of the waste package/MPC and EBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal evaluations of the multi-Purpose Canister in repository emplacement have been performed by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Managing and Operating Contractor (YMP-M ampersand O). Thermal effects have been a major study area of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). In the past the project has concentrated primarily on borehole-emplaced waste packages, but the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) with a capacity of twenty-one pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies (or more) will likely be drift emplaced with a multi-barrier disposal container or overpack. This study investigates the thermal behavior of the waste package/MPC and its effect on the repository near-field. Results indicate that peak internal temperatures occur one to five years post emplacement, and the timing of the peak is highly dependent on the choice of design basis fuel and thermal loading. The maximum acceptable capacity of the MPC, with ten year old fuel, was determined to be twenty-one PWRs based on the current peak temperature goal of 350 degrees C; however, higher capacities can be achieved if older fuel is substituted

  6. Safety Tests of Concrete Storage Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation for the timely installation of interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SF), KORAD is developing domestic models of SF storage systems and the concrete storage cask is one of them. A concrete cask consists of a metallic canister which confines SF with welded closure and a concrete overpack which provides radiation shielding and physical protection to the canister. The safety requirements for a SF storage cask is well established in US and summarized in regulatory guides such as NUREG-1536. KAERI has been performing tests of the concrete cask to demonstrate its safety and compliance to the regulatory requirements with high priority stipulated in NUREG-1536. The test program includes the structural performance tests under tip-over and earthquake and decay heat removal test under normal, off-normal and accident conditions. In this paper, brief introduction to the structural tests and their results are provided. Safety tests to demonstrate the safety of KORAD21C concrete storage cask were successfully performed. The structural integrity during tip-over and earthquake were demonstrated with scale model tests and the results are analyzed in comparison with safety analysis results

  7. Government/industry development of a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is currently engaged in a cooperative program with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to develop a spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS). The system will enable the transfer of individual spent nuclear fuel assemblies between a conventional top loading cask and multi-purpose canister in a shielded overpack, or accommodate spent nuclear fuel transfers between two conventional casks. The DTS has several significant applications and could benefit the Federal waste management system and utilities in number of ways. It has the potential to: permit shutdown reactor sites to decommission pools; provide capability at interim storage facilities to transfer assemblies from small transportation casks to sealed canisters; provide capability at reactor sites with limited crane capacity to transfer assemblies into large packages to facilitate on-site storage in larger capacity casks; allow recovery operations at shutdown reactor sites with independent spent nuclear fuel storage installations; provide a means for utilities that can presently handle only a truck cask to utilize a rail cask; allow transfers of spent nuclear fuel from existing utility dual purpose systems into alternative systems if required, without returning to the reactor storage pool; and support existing and future DOE spent nuclear fuel management activities. The project is managed by a Technical Management Committee consisting of DOE and EPRI representatives and includes a member from Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (authors)

  8. Westinghouse Hanford Company recommended strategy for K Basin sludge disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this document is to present the recommended strategy for removal of sludges from the K Basins. This document ties sludge removal activities to the plan for the K Basin spent nuclear fuel (SNF) described in WHC-EP-0830, Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Recommended Path Forward and is consistent with follow-on direction provided in February 1995. Solutions and processes for resolving sludge removal technical and management issues to meet accelerated K Basin deactivation objectives are described. The following outlines the major elements of the recommendation: (1) manage all sludges as SNF while in the K Basins; (2) once loose sludges are collected and removed from the facilities, manage them as radioactive or mixed waste consistent with the upcoming characterization results, the preferred sludge path forward alternative sends sludges to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) and/or the Hanford Solid Waste Disposal as appropriate; (3) continue to manage sludge within the fuel canisters at the time they are loaded into the multi-canister overpacks as SNF

  9. Modeling void growth and movement with phase change in thermal energy storage canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Douglas; Namkoong, David; Skarda, J. R. L.

    1993-01-01

    A scheme was developed to model the thermal hydrodynamic behavior of thermal energy storage salts. The model included buoyancy, surface tension, viscosity, phases change with density difference, and void growth and movement. The energy, momentum, and continuity equations were solved using a finite volume formulation. The momentum equation was divided into two pieces. The void growth and void movement are modeled between the two pieces of the momentum equations. Results showed this scheme was able to predict the behavior of thermal energy storage salts.

  10. Fluid Phase Separation (FPS) experiment for flight on a space shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Bruce; Wingo, Dennis; Bower, Mark; Amborski, Robert; Blount, Laura; Daniel, Alan; Hagood, Bob; Handley, James; Hediger, Donald; Jimmerson, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    The separation of fluid phases in microgravity environments is of importance to environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) and materials processing in space. A successful fluid phase separation experiment will demonstrate a proof of concept for the separation technique and add to the knowledge base of material behavior. The phase separation experiment will contain a premixed fluid which will be exposed to a microgravity environment. After the phase separation of the compound has occurred, small samples of each of the species will be taken for analysis on the Earth. By correlating the time of separation and the temperature history of the fluid, it will be possible to characterize the process. The experiment has been integrated into space available on a manifested Get Away Special (GAS) experiment, CONCAP 2, part of the Consortium for Materials Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) Program, scheduled for STS-42. The design and the production of a fluid phase separation experiment for rapid implementation at low cost is presented.

  11. Feasibility study of electron beam welding of spent nuclear fuel canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thick walled copper container is presently the prime Swedish alternative for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of encapsulating high-level nuclear waste in copper containers, a study of electron beam welding of thick copper has been performed. Two copper qualities have been investigated, oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper and phosphorous desoxydized high conductivity copper (PDO). The findings in this study are summarized below. In 100 mm thick copper penetration can be achived at power level of about 75 kW (typically 150 kV x 500 mA) at welding speed of 100 mm/min. The welds in OFHC copper made under these conditions are free from major defects during constant welding conditions. The welds in PDO copper show a microporosity level considerably higher than those in OFHC copper, but no major defects are produced in the welds in PDO copper. In the ending of the weld (ie the fade out) it is still not possible to completely eliminate root and cold-shut defects. A semi-full-scale lid weld has been performed successfully. Automatic ultrasonic C-scan has been shown to be useful in detecting and displaying defects, but some problems still remain with defect sizing. The different speciments of OFHS copper had different attenuation of the ultrasonic signal, forged copper showing a far lower attenuation than hot extruded copper, indicating that attention must be paid in choosing copper that allows accurate ultrasonic testing. Resiudal stresses in the welded zone has been measured and are found to lie in the range -32N/mm2 to +36N/mm2. The peak stress was less than half the assumed value of the proof stress of the fused metal. (authors)

  12. Developing a structural health monitoring system for nuclear dry cask storage canister

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyi; Lin, Bin; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Knight, Travis; Lam, Poh-Sang; Yu, Lingyu

    2015-03-01

    Interim storage of spent nuclear fuel from reactor sites has gained additional importance and urgency for resolving waste-management-related technical issues. In total, there are over 1482 dry cask storage system (DCSS) in use at US plants, storing 57,807 fuel assemblies. Nondestructive material condition monitoring is in urgent need and must be integrated into the fuel cycle to quantify the "state of health", and more importantly, to guarantee the safe operation of radioactive waste storage systems (RWSS) during their extended usage period. A state-of-the-art nuclear structural health monitoring (N-SHM) system based on in-situ sensing technologies that monitor material degradation and aging for nuclear spent fuel DCSS and similar structures is being developed. The N-SHM technology uses permanently installed low-profile piezoelectric wafer sensors to perform long-term health monitoring by strategically using a combined impedance (EMIS), acoustic emission (AE), and guided ultrasonic wave (GUW) approach, called "multimode sensing", which is conducted by the same network of installed sensors activated in a variety of ways. The system will detect AE events resulting from crack (case for study in this project) and evaluate the damage evolution; when significant AE is detected, the sensor network will switch to the GUW mode to perform damage localization, and quantification as well as probe "hot spots" that are prone to damage for material degradation evaluation using EMIS approach. The N-SHM is expected to eventually provide a systematic methodology for assessing and monitoring nuclear waste storage systems without incurring human radiation exposure.

  13. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-12

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  14. Radiation effects on polymers for coatings on copper canisters used for the containment of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work proposes applying polyurethane coatings as an additional barrier in the design of Canadian nuclear waste disposal containers. The goal of the present research is to investigate the physico-mechanical integrity of a natural castor oil-based polyurethane (COPU) to be used as a coating material in pH-radiation-temperature environments. As the first part to these inquiries, the present paper investigates the effect of a mixed radiation field supplied by a SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor on COPUs that differ only by their isocyanate structure. FTIR, DSC, DMA, WAXS, and MALDI are used to characterize the changes that occur as a result of radiation and to relate these changes to polymer structure and composition. The COPUs used in the present work have demonstrated sustained physico-mechanical properties up to accumulated doses of 2.0 MGy and are therefore suitable for end-uses in radiation environments such as those expected in the deep geological repository

  15. Radiation effects on polymers for coatings on copper canisters used for the containment of radioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortley, Aba; Bonin, H. W.; Bui, V. T.

    2008-05-01

    The present work proposes applying polyurethane coatings as an additional barrier in the design of Canadian nuclear waste disposal containers. The goal of the present research is to investigate the physico-mechanical integrity of a natural castor oil-based polyurethane (COPU) to be used as a coating material in pH-radiation-temperature environments. As the first part to these inquiries, the present paper investigates the effect of a mixed radiation field supplied by a SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor on COPUs that differ only by their isocyanate structure. FTIR, DSC, DMA, WAXS, and MALDI are used to characterize the changes that occur as a result of radiation and to relate these changes to polymer structure and composition. The COPUs used in the present work have demonstrated sustained physico-mechanical properties up to accumulated doses of 2.0 MGy and are therefore suitable for end-uses in radiation environments such as those expected in the deep geological repository.

  16. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion

  17. Topical safety analysis report for the transportation of the NUHOMS reg-sign dry shielded canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal analyses for the 10CFR71 normal conditions of . transport and hypothetical accident conditions is presented for the conceptual NUHOMS reg-sign Transportation Cask and NUHOMS reg-sign-24P DSC system. The purpose of the thermal analyses presented herein is to demonstrate that the conceptual NUHOMS reg-sign Transportation Cask with the NUHOMS reg-sign-24P DSC provides suitable heat dissipation to maintain the heat removal capacity of the loaded NUHOMS reg-sign Transportation Cask. The thermal analyses results show that the maximum temperatures and pressures of the NUHOMS reg-sign Transportation Cask and the NUHOMS reg-sign-24P DSC are within their allowable material temperature and pressure limits

  18. 42 CFR 438.56 - Disenrollment: Requirements and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... enrollees); and (3) Specify the methods by which the MCO, PIHP, PAHP, or PCCM assures the agency that it... enrollee seek redress through the MCO, PIHP, PAHP, or PCCM's grievance system before making a determination... MCO, PIHP, PAHP, or PCCM files the request. (2) If the MCO, PIHP, PAHP, or PCCM or the State...

  19. Refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel radioactive scrap metals, FY 94 bi-annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, R.E. [ed.] [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Metal Recycle; Atteridge, D.G.; Buckentin, J.; Carter, J.; Davis, H.L.; Devletian, J.H.; Scholl, M.R.; Turpin, R.B.; Webster, S.L. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1994-08-01

    The research addressed under this project is the recycling of metallic nuclear-related by-product materials under the direction of Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). The program addresses the recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) for beneficial re-use within the DOE complex; in particular, this program addresses the recycling of stainless steel RSM. It is anticipated that various stainless steel components under WINCO control at the Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory (INEL), such as fuel pool criticality barriers and fuel storage racks will begin to be recycled in FY94-95. The end product of this recycling effort is expected to be waste and overpack canisters for densified high level waste for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific components of this problem area that are presently being, or have been, addressed by CAAMSEC are: (1) the melting/remelting of stainless steel RSM into billet form; (2) the melting/remelting initial research focus will be on the use of radioactive surrogates to study; (3) the cost effectiveness of RSM processing oriented towards privatization of RSM reuse and/or resale. Other components of this problem that may be addressed under program extension are: (4) the melting/remelting of carbon steel; (5) the processing of billet material into product form which shall meet all applicable ASTM requirements; and, (6) the fabrication of an actual prototypical product; the present concept of an end product is a low carbon Type 304/316 stainless steel cylindrical container for densified and/or vitrified high level radioactive waste and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific work reported herein covers the melting/remelting of stainless steel {open_quotes}scrap{close_quotes} metal into billet form and the study of surrogate material removal effectiveness by various remelting techniques.

  20. Refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel radioactive scrap metals, FY 94 bi-annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research addressed under this project is the recycling of metallic nuclear-related by-product materials under the direction of Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). The program addresses the recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) for beneficial re-use within the DOE complex; in particular, this program addresses the recycling of stainless steel RSM. It is anticipated that various stainless steel components under WINCO control at the Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory (INEL), such as fuel pool criticality barriers and fuel storage racks will begin to be recycled in FY94-95. The end product of this recycling effort is expected to be waste and overpack canisters for densified high level waste for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific components of this problem area that are presently being, or have been, addressed by CAAMSEC are: (1) the melting/remelting of stainless steel RSM into billet form; (2) the melting/remelting initial research focus will be on the use of radioactive surrogates to study; (3) the cost effectiveness of RSM processing oriented towards privatization of RSM reuse and/or resale. Other components of this problem that may be addressed under program extension are: (4) the melting/remelting of carbon steel; (5) the processing of billet material into product form which shall meet all applicable ASTM requirements; and, (6) the fabrication of an actual prototypical product; the present concept of an end product is a low carbon Type 304/316 stainless steel cylindrical container for densified and/or vitrified high level radioactive waste and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific work reported herein covers the melting/remelting of stainless steel open-quotes scrapclose quotes metal into billet form and the study of surrogate material removal effectiveness by various remelting techniques