WorldWideScience

Sample records for canine small intestine

  1. CCK-5: sequence analysis of a small cholecystokinin from canine brain and intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to purify and to characterize chemically cholecystokinin (CCK)-like peptides present in brain and gut extracts that elute from gel filtration after the octapeptide. Canine small intestinal mucosa and brain were boiled in water and then extracted in cold trifluoroacetic acid, and cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivity was determined by carboxyl-terminal specific radioimmunoassay. Gel permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-50 revealed a form of CCK apparently smaller than CCK-8. Microsequence analysis showed that the amino terminal primary sequence of this small CCK was Gly-Trp-Met-Asp. Immunochemical and chromatographic analysis indicated that the carboxyl-terminal residue was Phe-NH2 and thus the full sequence is Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2. An antibody that recognizes synthetic CCK-8, CCK-5, and CCK-equally did not reveal the presence of significant amounts of CCK-4. These results indicate that CCK-5 is the major CCK form smaller than the octapeptide present in brain and small intestine. This finding, coupled with the demonstration by others that CCK-5 interacts with high-affinity brain CCK receptors, indicates that CCK-5 may play a physiological role in brain function

  2. The effects of feeding and withholding food on the canine small intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiraj, Alyssa C; Harmoinen, Jaana; Isaiah, Anitah; Westermarck, Elias; Steiner, Jörg M; Spillmann, Thomas; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged lack of enteral feeding has a negative impact on gut physiology, potentially via microbiota modulation. The aims were to investigate the impact of fasting and post-prandial changes in canine jejunal microbiota. To study post-prandial effects, jejunal brushings were analyzed in 8 healthy fistulated dogs 15 min before feeding (baseline) and hourly for 8 h after feeding. To study effects of withholding food (WF), daily samples were collected for 15 days from 5 dogs. The first 5 days (PRE) dogs were fed regular diet. Food was withheld the next 5 days (days 6-10). For days 11-15 (POST), the original diet was reintroduced. Microbiota was characterized via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. In the post-prandial study, no changes in microbiome structure were seen after feeding (ANOSIM, P = 0.28), but Betaproteobacteria (P = 0.04) and Bacteroidales decreased compared to baseline. Species richness decreased by 300 min (P = 0.04). During WF, microbiota structure differed from PRE and POST period (P = 0.001). During WF, species richness did not vary over time (P = 0.69). In conclusion, a prolonged period of food withholding results in altered jejunal microbiota. How these changes affect the microbiota metabolism warrants further studies. PMID:27106050

  3. Small Intestine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  4. Small & Large Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the large intestine produces no digestive enzymes. Chemical digestion is completed in the small intestine before the chyme reaches the large intestine. Functions of the large intestine include the absorption of water and electrolytes and the elimination of ...

  5. Case study in canine intestinal lymphangiectasia

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A 9.52 kg, 9-year-old, spayed female beagle was presented with the chief complaint of abdominal distention of 1 week’s duration. A presumptive diagnosis of canine intestinal lymphangectasia was arrived at by exclusion of other causes for the patient’s ascites. The patient was successfully treated with dietary modification and immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. Nonuniform irradiation of the canine intestine. II. Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental model has been developed for quantitative studies of radiobiological damage to the canine small intestine following partial-body nonuniform irradiation. Animals were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays to simulate the nonuniform irradiation which do occur in victims of radiation accidents. The model used a short source-to-surface distance for unilateral irradiations to produce a dose gradient of a factor of two laterally across the canine intestinal region. The remainder of the animal's body was shielded to prevent lethal damage to the bone marrow. In situ dosimetry measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the radiation dose delivered as a function of position along a segment of the small intestine. This system made it possible to correlate the radiation dose delivered at a specific point along the small intestine with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the intestinal mucosa at that point, as determined by direct observation and biopsy using a fiberoptic endoscope. A key feature of this model is that dosimetry data for multiple sites, which receive a graded range of radiation doses, can be correlated with biological measurements to obtain a dose-response curve. This model is being used to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic procedures to improve survival following nonuniform irradiation

  7. Radionuclide Small Intestine Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jiri Dolezal; Marcela Kopacova

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this overview article is to present the current possibilities of radionuclide scintigraphic small intestine imaging. Nuclear medicine has a few methods—scintigraphy with red blood cells labelled by means of 99mTc for detection of the source of bleeding in the small intestine, Meckel's diverticulum scintigraphy for detection of the ectopic gastric mucosa, radionuclide somatostatin receptor imaging for carcinoid, and radionuclide inflammation imaging. Video capsule or deep enteroscop...

  8. Receptors for tachykinins in canine intestine circular muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-Tyr8-substance P binding was examined in a plasma membrane enriched fraction from the circular muscle of canine small intestine. The binding was quick in onset, reversible and saturable to a single high affinity binding site; KD and maximum receptor concentration were 0.50 = 0.06 nM and 742 +/- 173 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. KD values from kinetic and saturation studies were in agreement. The rank order of potency of the tachykinins and related compounds in displacing this binding was consistent with that of a neurokinin (NK)-P (NK-1) type binding site. 125I-eledoisin did not bind specifically to these membranes and eledoisin was relatively ineffective in displacing the 125I-Tyr8 substance P. Kassinin was totally ineffective. Based on relative agonist potencies, the tachykinins appeared to contract the circular muscle of canine small intestine in vitro by a mechanism which also could be considered to be a NK-P (NK-1) type receptor. However, a comparison of data obtained by these two techniques suggests that the NK-P (NK-1) type binding site and the receptor(s) responsible for contractile responses are not identical. There were discrepancies in relative orders of potency and in absolute potencies. The simplest explanation is that there is also an NK-A (NK-2) receptor which is functional but not labeled by our ligands. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed

  9. Small Intestinal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  10. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  11. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  12. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  13. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection in the small intestine. ... A sample of fluid from the small intestine is needed. A procedure ... done to get the sample. The fluid is placed in a special dish in ...

  14. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  15. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  16. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors in the canine gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the brain and peripheral tissues. To define possible target tissues of VIP we have used quantitative receptor autoradiography to localize and quantify the distribution of 125I-VIP receptor binding sites in the canine gastrointestinal tract. While the distribution of VIP binding sites was different for each segment examined, specific VIP binding sites were localized to the mucosa, the muscularis mucosa, the smooth muscle of submucosal arterioles, lymph nodules, and the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of the muscularis externa. These results identify putative target tissues of VIP action in the canine gastrointestinal tract. In correlation with physiological data, VIP sites appear to be involved in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions including epithelial ion transport, gastric secretion, hemodynamic regulation, immune response, esophageal, gastric and intestinal motility

  17. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bures, Jiri Cyrany, Darina Kohoutova, Miroslav Förstl, Stanislav Rejchrt, Jaroslav Kvetina, Viktor Vorisek, Marcela Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  18. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Bures, J.; Cyrany, J.; Kohoutova, D.; Förstl, M.; Rejchrt, S.; Kvetina, J.; Vorisek, V.; Kopacova, M.

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestina...

  19. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  20. Sonography of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim Nylund; Svein (φ)degaard; Trygve Hausken; Geir Folvik; Gülen Arslan Lied; Ivan Viola; Helwig Hauser; Odd-Helge Gilja

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been substantial development in the diagnostic possibilities for examining the small intestine. Compared with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy, ultrasonography has the advantage of being cheap, portable, flexible and user- and patient-friendly, while at the same time providing the clinician with image data of high temporal and spatial resolution. The method has limitations with penetration in obesity and with intestinal air impairing image quality. The flexibility ultrasonography offers the examiner also implies that a systematic approach during scanning is needed. This paper reviews the basic scanning techniques and new modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, strain rate imaging, hydrosonography, allergosonography, endoscopic sonography and nutritional imaging, and the literature on disease-specific findings in the small intestine. Some of these methods have shown clinical benefit, while others are under research and development to establish their role in the diagnostic repertoire. However, along with improved overall image quality of new ultrasound scanners, these methods have enabled more anatomical and physiological changes in the small intestine to be observed. Accordingly, ultrasound of the small intestine is an attractive clinical tool to study patients with a range of diseases.

  1. Intestinal Malrotation: A Rare Cause of Small Intestinal Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Sipahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation is established by the age of 1 year in most cases, and the condition is seldom seen in adults. In this paper, a patient with small intestinal malrotation-type intraperitoneal hernia who underwent surgery at an older age because of intestinal obstruction is presented. Case. A 73-year-old patient who presented with acute intestinal obstruction underwent surgery as treatment. Distended jejunum and ileum loops surrounded by a peritoneal sac and located between the stomach and transverse colon were determined. The terminal ileum had entered into the transverse mesocolon from the right lower part, resulting in kinking and subsequent segmentary obstruction. The obstruction was relieved, and the small intestines were placed into their normal position in the abdominal cavity. Conclusion. Small intestinal malrotations are rare causes of intestinal obstructions in adults. The appropriate treatment in these patients is placement of the intestines in their normal positions.

  2. Cancer Statistics: Cancer of the Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... party. HPF: SEER Stat Fact Sheets: Small Intestine Cancer Expand All Collapse All Lifetime risk estimates are ... Or More after Being Diagnosed with Small Intestine Cancer? Relative survival statistics compare the survival of patients ...

  3. [Sarcomas of the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyrouti, M L; Abid, M; Beyrouti, R; Ben Amar, M; Gargouri, F; Frikha, F; Affes, N; Boujelbene, S; Ghorbel, A

    2005-03-12

    Sarcomas of the small intestine are rare, clearly differentiated, malignant, mesenchymatous tumours that can be of smooth muscle, Schwann cell or fibroblastic origin. From a clinical point of view, the pain and abdominal mass are the 2 types of symptoms that frequently reveal the disease. In rare cases, sarcomas of the small intestine are manifested by an acute complication. No imaging method can clearly confirm the diagnosis. Before immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis was made on undifferentiated mesenchymatous "stromal" tumours, which are also rare. Exeresis must be complete and without perforation of the tumour because of the risk of locoregional relapse. The benefits provided by chemotherapy and radiotherapy are limited because of the low mitotic activity of the tumour cells and its weak vascularisation. Long-term survival is limited by poor prognosis criteria: high grade malignancy, size greater than 5 cm, tumour extension, perforation of the tumour, quality of surgical resection and histological type. PMID:15859576

  4. Leiomyosarcoma in leiomyomatosis of the small intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    EL-OMAR, M.; Davies, J.; Gupta, S.; Ross, H.; Thompson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple leiomyomata of the small intestine are rare. We report one such case where a leiomyosarcoma had arisen from a leiomyoma in the small intestine 8 years after presentation. The possible origin of the leiomyomata is discussed and it is concluded that small intestinal leiomyomatosis should be regarded as a premalignant condition.

  5. Sobrecrecimiento bacteriano intestinal: An update Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Quera P; Eamonn MM Quigley; Ana María Madrid S

    2005-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by nutrient malabsorption, associated with an excessive number of bacteria in the proximal small intestine. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth presents several difficulties and limitations, and as yet there is not a widespread agreement on the best diagnostic test. SIBO occurs when there are alterations in intestinal anatomy, gastrointestinal motility, or a lack of gastric acid secretion. The true association betw...

  6. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Comprehensive Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Lacy, Brian E.; Levine, Gary M

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optim...

  7. Malignant tumors of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical symptoms, kind and localization of the neoplasm are studied in 17 patients with malignant tumors of the small intestine. The treatment, evolution and survival rate are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  8. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Best, Kate E; Tennant, Peter W G; Addor, Marie-Claude;

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe....

  9. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome in children

    OpenAIRE

    Siniewicz-Luzeńczyk, Katarzyna; Bik-Gawin, Agnieszka; Zeman, Krzysztof; Bąk-Romaniszyn, Leokadia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO) is defined as an increased number of nonpathogenic bacteria over 105 organisms in 1 millilitre of small intestine content. The most common predisposing factors include, among others, gut motility disorders and chronic use of proton pump inhibitors. The results of recent studies indicate the importance of SIBO in gastrointestinal diseases. Aim To assess the prevalence of SIBO in children with abdominal pain. Material and method...

  10. Small intestinal bacteria overgrowth decreases small intestinal motility in the NASH rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-Chun Wu, Wei Zhao, Sheng Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between small intestinal motility and small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO) in Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and to investigate the effect of SIBO on the pathogenesis of NASH in rats. The effect of cidomycin in alleviating severity of NASH is also studied.METHODS: Forty eight rats were randomly divided into NASH group (n = 16), cidomycin group (n = 16) and control group (n = 16). Then each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group...

  11. Small intestinal bacteria overgrowth decreases small intestinal motility in the NASH rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wan-Chun; Zhao, Wei; Li, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between small intestinal motility and small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO) in Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and to investigate the effect of SIBO on the pathogenesis of NASH in rats. The effect of cidomycin in alleviating severity of NASH is also studied.

  12. Small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Yamamura, Eiichi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:24455340

  13. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Takano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  14. Ileal angiomyolipoma manifested by small intestinal intussusception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Ho Lee; Jong Hun Kim; Doo Hyun Yang; Yong Hwang; Myoung Jae Kang; Young Kon Kim; Min Ro Lee

    2009-01-01

    Angiomyolipomas (AMLs), a form of benign mesenchymal hamartoma, arise primarily in the kidneys of patients with or without tuberous sclerosis. Extra-renal AMLs are very rare and are most commonly found in the liver.AMLs of the small intestine are exceedingly rare. Here,a case of a 28-year-old man, who presented with ileal intussusception caused by ileal AML is reported. The clinicopathological and immunohistochemical findings of ileal AMLs are discussed and the literature on small intestinal AMLs is reviewed.

  15. Surface staining of small intestinal biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1977-01-01

    Small intestinal biopsies are most often by routine examined under a stereo-microscope, prior to embedding for histological examination. This is done in order to get a view of the appearance of the mucosal pattern, especially villus configuration. The distinctness of the surface pattern however, is...... improved considerably if the biopsies are stained with Alcian Green and/or PAS before they are examined. In the present paper a detailed description is given of staining of small intestinal biopsies as whole mounts. The difference between the unstained and the stained biopsies is illustrated by a few...

  16. Epidemiology of cancer of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Yi Pan, Howard Morrison

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer of the small intestine is very uncommon. There are 4 main histological subtypes: adenocarcinomas, carcinoid tumors, lymphoma and sarcoma. The incidence of small intestine cancer has increased over the past several decades with a four-fold increase for carcinoid tumors, less dramatic rises for adenocarcinoma and lymphoma and stable sarcoma rates. Very little is known about its etiology. An increased risk has been noted for individuals with Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, adenoma, familial adenomatous polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Several behavioral risk factors including consumption of red or smoked meat, saturated fat, obesity and smoking have been suggested. The prognosis for carcinomas of the small intestine cancer is poor (5 years relative survival < 30%, better for lymphomas and sarcomas, and best for carcinoid tumors. There has been no significant change in long-term survival rates for any of the 4 histological subtypes. Currently, with the possible exceptions of obesity and cigarette smoking, there are no established modifiable risk factors which might provide the foundation for a prevention program aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of cancers of the small intestine. More research with better quality and sufficient statistical power is needed to get better understanding of the etiology and biology of this cancer. In addition, more studies should be done to assess not only exposures of interest, but also host susceptibility.

  17. Metabolic complications in the small intestine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic complications in the syndrome of small intestine is presented in a patient of masculine sex, 27 years old, who consulted for a square of inflammation gingival, migraine, fever, anorexia and adinamia for three days, followed by maculopapular-eritematose eruption for 8 days, coincident with the ampicillin ingestion, and later on severe abdominal pain and diarrhea

  18. Sodium recirculation and isotonic transport in toad small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Signe Nielsen; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Ussing, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Small intestine; leaky epithelia; solute-coupled water transport; Na*O+ recirculation; lateral intercellular space; flux ratio analysi......Small intestine; leaky epithelia; solute-coupled water transport; Na*O+ recirculation; lateral intercellular space; flux ratio analysi...

  19. [Prevalence of intestinal canine and feline parasites in Saitama Prefecture, Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Norishige; Kon, Marina; Saito, Toshikazu; Maeno, Naohiro; Koyama, Masaya; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Masanori; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Kawanaka, Masanori

    2009-05-01

    We studied the prevalence of intestinal parasites in animal companions in Saitama Prefecture, Japan, where no detailed data is currently available. Between May 1999 and December 2007, fecal samples were collected from 906 dogs and 1,079 cats in public animal shelters and examined by microscopy. Overall, prevalence of intestinal parasites in dogs was 38.6% and cats 43.1%. Trichuris vulpis was the most prevalent canine parasite species (22.3%), followed by Toxocara canis (12.5%), Ancylostoma caninum (10.4%), Isospora ohioensis (2.1%), Spirometra erinaceieuropaei (1.0%), Crypstosporidium sp. (0.9%), Giardia intestinalis (0.9%), I. canis (0.6%), Taeniidae (0.3%), Dipylidium caninum (0.2%), Echinostoma sp. (0.1%), and Pentatrichomonas hominis (0.1%). T. cati was the most prevalent feline parasite species (21.8%), followed by A. tubaeforme (13.2%), S. erinaceieuropaei (8.3%), I. felis (4.5%), Cryptosporidium sp. (2.8%), I. rivolta (2.2%), Pharyngostomum cordatum (1.6%), D. caninum (1.4%), Eimeria sp. (0.3%), Taeniidae (0.2%), Trichuris sp. (0.2%), Capillaria sp. (0.1%), Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense (0.1%), and Metagonimus yokogawai (0.1%). Further molecular analysis to identify canine Taeniidae species and canine and feline Cryptosporidium species identified one canine taeniid positive species as Echinococcus multilocularis. Cryptosporidium species were identified as C. canis and C. felis. Parasites E. multilocularis and Cryptosporidium spp. in animal hosts were the first to be recorded in this prefecture. Compared to previous surveys conducted in the same area, the endemicity of some parasites appeared to have decreased, but some others remain. Given that most of these parasites have zoonotic potential, indicates the importance of having current data on parasite dissemination among animal companions. Government public health agencies should be responsible for educating pet owners about the control and prevention of zoonotic risk from such parasites. PMID:19522305

  20. HORSE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM: Canine intestinal microbiology and metagenomics: From phylogeny to function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guard, B C; Suchodolski, J S

    2016-06-01

    Recent molecular studies have revealed a complex microbiota in the dog intestine. Convincing evidence has been reported linking changes in microbial communities to acute and chronic gastrointestinal inflammation, especially in canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The most common microbial changes observed in intestinal inflammation are decreases in the bacterial phyla Firmicutes (i.e., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and ) and Bacteroidetes, with concurrent increases in Proteobacteria (i.e., ). Due to the important role of microbial-derived metabolites for host health, it is important to elucidate the metabolic consequences of gastrointestinal dysbiosis and physiological pathways implicated in specific disease phenotypes. Metagenomic studies have used shotgun sequencing of DNA as well as phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states (PICRUSt) to characterize functional changes in the bacterial metagenome in gastrointestinal disease. Furthermore, wide-scale and untargeted measurements of metabolic products derived by the host and the microbiota in intestinal samples allow a better understanding of the functional alterations that occur in gastrointestinal disease. For example, changes in bile acid metabolism and tryptophan catabolism recently have been reported in humans and dogs. Also, metabolites associated with the pentose phosphate pathway were significantly altered in chronic gastrointestinal inflammation and indicate the presence of oxidative stress in dogs with IBD. This review focuses on the advancements made in canine metagenomics and metabolomics and their implications in understanding gastrointestinal disease as well as the development of better treatment approaches. PMID:27285902

  1. Transplante de intestino delgado Small intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ferreira Galvão

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Avanços da biotecnologia e o desenvolvimento de novas drogas imunossupressoras melhoraram os resultados do transplante de intestino delgado. Esse transplante é atualmente indicado para casos especiais da falência intestinal. OBJETIVO: A presente revisão realça os recentes desenvolvimentos na área do transplante de intestino delgado. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Mais de 600 publicações de transplante de intestino delgado foram revisadas. O desenvolvimento da pesquisa, novas estratégias de imunossupressão, monitorização do enxerto e do receptor, e avanços na técnica cirúrgica são discutidos. RESULTADOS: Realizaram-se cerca de 700 transplante de intestino delgado em 55 centros: 44% intestino-fígado, 41% enxerto intestinal isolado e 15% transplante multivisceral. Rejeição e infecção são as principais limitações desse transplante. Sobrevida de 5 anos na experiência internacional é de 46% para o transplante de intestino isolado, 43% para o intestino-fígado e de cerca de 30% para o transplante multivisceral. Sobrevidas prolongadas são mais freqüentes nos centros com maior experiência. Em série de 165 transplantes intestinais na Universidade de Pittsburgh, PA, EUA, foi relatada sobrevida do paciente maior do que 75% no primeiro ano, 54% em 5 anos e 42% em 10 anos. Mais de 90% desses pacientes assumem dieta oral irrestrita. CONCLUSÃO: O transplante de intestino delgado evoluiu de estratégia experimental para uma alternativa viável no tratamento da falência intestinal permanente. Promover o refinamento da terapia imunossupressora, do manejo e prevenção de infecções, da técnica cirúrgica e da indicação e seleção adequada dos pacientes é crucial para melhorar a sobrevida desse transplante.BACKGROUND: Significant progress has been made in clinical small bowel transplantation over the last decade mainly due advances in biotechnology and new immunosuppressive regiments. This transplantation has now been indicated

  2. Enhanced intestinal permeability to 51Cr-labeled EDTA in dogs with small intestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E J; Batt, R M

    1990-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in dogs with small intestinal disease was measured by quantitation of 24-hour urinary excretion of 51Cr-labeled EDTA following intragastric administration. Permeability was high in dogs with a variety of naturally acquired small intestinal diseases including wheat-sensitive enteropathy of Irish Setters, small intestinal bacterial over-growth, and giardiasis, and permeability was decreased after successful treatment. These findings indicate that the assessment of intestinal permeability may be a useful technique for detecting small intestinal disease and for monitoring the efficacy of treatment in dogs. PMID:2104825

  3. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth is Associated with Intestinal Inflammation in the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana David; Alexandru Babin; Alina Picos; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth is encountered in bowel disorders, including irritable bowel symptoms. Low degrees of inflammation have been recently reported in the irritable bowel syndrome. We looked for the association between intestinal inflammation and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome.Methods. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was assessed by the H2 glucose breath test in 90 consecutive patients with irritable bowel syndrome....

  4. MRI diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease. Methods: The MRI findings in 13 cases of small intestinal Crohn's disease proved by surgery and pathology were analyzed retrospectively. The patients included 12 men and 1 woman, and their age ranged from 17 to 64 years. The MR images were reviewed for the number, location, and mural thickness of diseased bowel segments, for the ratio of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall after the IV administration of Gd-DTPA or enhanced ratio of diseased bowel wall, and for the complications (phlegmon, inflammatory mass, abscess, and fistula). Six patients received air-infused MR enteroclysis-enhanced scan was performed directly in the fat saturated coronal and axial plane after about 1000 ml of air was infused into small bowel through a nasoenteric catheter. Another 7 patients received small intestinal hydro-MRI--MR images were obtained in fat saturated enhanced coronal and axial plane as well as in unenhanced coronal plane.Twenty mg of IV anisodamine was given to reduce peristalsis in all patients, and fat saturation was used in all sequences. Results: The diseased bowel segment of every case was demonstrated in MRI. The sensitivity was 100%. Thirty-six inflammatory segments were revealed in all (mean 2.8 segments per patient). The MRI findings of small intestinal Crohn's disease were that the enhancement of diseased bowel wall increased significantly. The ratios of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall were 1.9-2.5 (mean, 2.1) in the group of air-infused enteroclysis. The ratios of signal intensity of diseased bowel wall to normal bowel wall were 1.3-2.9 (mean, 1.9) and the enhanced ratios of diseased bowel wall were 96%-223% (mean, 133%), but the enhanced ratios of normal bowel wall were 31%-78% (mean, 59%). Thirty-three segments (92%) of diseased bowel wall thickened (thickness between 5-27 mm), and the

  5. Viable intestinal passage of a canine jejunal commensal strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yurui; Saris, Per E J

    2014-10-01

    The strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 with immunomodulatory properties was previously found dominant in the jejunal chyme of four dogs, and the novel surface layer protein of LAB20 suggested its competitive colonization in canine gut. To evaluate the persistence and survival of LAB20 in healthy dogs, LAB20 was fed to five healthy pet dogs for 3 days, at a dosage of 10(8) CFU daily as fermented milk supplement. The fecal samples, from 1 day prior to feeding, three continuous feeding days, and on day 5, 7, 14, and 21, were collected for strain-specific detection of LAB20 using real-time PCR. We found that LAB20 count was significantly increased in dog fecal samples at the second feeding day, but rapidly decreased after feeding ceased. The fecal samples from prior to feeding, during feeding, and post-cessation days were plated onto mLBS7 agar, from where LAB20 was recovered and distinguishable from other fecal lactobacilli based on its colony morphotype. Using strain-specific PCR detection, the colonies were further verified as LAB20 indicating that LAB20 can survive through the passage of the canine intestine. This study suggested that canine-derived strain LAB20 maintained at high numbers during feeding, viably transited through the dog gut, and could be identified based on its colony morphotype. PMID:24849733

  6. Lubiprostone stimulates small intestinal mucin release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lisle Robert C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lubiprostone is a synthetic bicyclic fatty acid derivative of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 used for chronic constipation. The best known action of lubiprostone is simulation of Cl- dependent fluid secretion. In a mouse model of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis, we previously showed that in vivo administration of lubiprostone resulted in greater mucus accumulation in the small intestine. The aim of this study was to directly test whether lubiprostone stimulates intestinal mucin release. Methods Mucin release was measured by mounting segments (4-5 cm of mouse proximal-mid small intestine in an organ bath, allowing access to the perfusate (luminal and the bath (serosal solutions. Nifedipine (10-6 M and indomethacin (10-5 M were included in all solutions to inhibit smooth muscle activity and endogenous prostaglandin production, respectively. The tissue was equilibrated under flow for 30 min, using the perfusate collected during the final 10 min of the equilibration period to measure unstimulated release rate. Stimulus was then added to either the perfusate or the bath and the perfusate was collected for another 30 min to measure the stimulated mucin release rate. Mucin in perfusates was quantified by periodic acid-Schiff's base dot-blot assay, using purified pig gastric mucin as a standard. Results When applied luminally at 1 μM lubiprostone was ineffective at stimulating mucin release. When added to the serosal solution, 1 μM lubiprostone stimulated mucin release to ~300% of the unstimulated rate. As a positive control, serosal 1 μM prostaglandin E2 increased mucin release to ~400% of the unstimulated rate. Conclusions These results support the idea that lubiprostone has prostaglandin-like actions on the intestine, which includes stimulation of mucin release. Stimulation of mucin release by lubiprostone may be protective in gastrointestinal conditions where loss of mucus is believed to contribute to pathogenesis. Thus, in

  7. Clinical analysis of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsutomu Namikawa; Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2009-01-01

    Primary anaplastic carcinoma is a rare variant of small intestinal cancer. Most reports of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are isolated case reports, therefore the clinicopathological features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this tumor type remain unclear. This review analyzes the available clinical characteristics of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine and investigates key differences from differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. A Medline search was performed using the keywords 'small intestine' and 'anaplastic carcinoma' or 'undifferentiated carcinoma'. Additional articles were obtained from references with in the papers identified by the Medline search. The literature revealed a poor prognosis for patients who underwent surgical resection for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, which gave a 3-year overall survival rate of 10.8% and a median survival time of 5.0 mo. The literature suggests that anaplastic carcinoma is markedly more aggressive than differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Surgical resection with the aim of complete tumor removal provides the only beneficial therapeutic option for patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, because chemotherapy and radiation therapy have no significant effect on the rate of survival. However, despite complete tumor resection, most patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are at great risk of disease recurrence. Multicenter clinical trials are expected to provide additional therapeutic strategies and establish the efficacy of multimodality adjuvant therapy. This report also highlights the importance of a systematic diagnostic approach for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.

  8. Internal frontier: The pathophysiology of the small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Haruhiko Sugimura; Satoshi Osawa

    2013-01-01

    Even though the small intestine occupies a major portion of the abdominal space and is essential for life, in most pathology textbooks any chapter on small intestinal diseases, especially in human beings, is typically shorter than those for other gastrointestinal organs. Clinical and experimental investigations of the small intestine in various clinical situations, such as nutrition management, obesity interventions, and emergency care, have elucidated several important biological problems as...

  9. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pa...

  10. "Melanosis" in the small and large intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of pigment in the intestinal mucosa is commonly observed by the endoscopist, especially within the colon, and particularly during investigations for constipation. Pigment may also be detected in the small intestine. Although labeled as melanosis, electron microscopy and X-ray analytical methods have provided evidence that this pigment is not melanin at all, but lipofuscin. Often, herbal remedies or anthracene containing laxatives are often historically implicated, and experimental studies in both humans and animal models have also confirmed the intimate relationship with these pharmacological or pseudo-pharmacological remedies. The appearance of melanosis coil during colonoscopy is largely due to pigment granule deposition in macrophages located in the colonic mucosa. The pigment intensity is not uniform, being more intense in the cecum and proximal colon compared to the distal colon. Possibly, this reflects higher luminal concentrations of an offending agent in the proximal compared to distal colon, differential absorption along the length of the colon, or finally, differences in macrophage distribution within the colon. Mucosal lymphoid aggregates normally display a distinct absence of pigment producing a "starry sky" appearance, especially in the rectosigmoid region. Interestingly, some focal, usually sessile, colonic mucosal neoplastic lesions, rather than submucosal lesions, may be better appreciated as pigment deposition may be absent or limited. If detected, removal and further histopathologic analysis of the polyp may be facilitated.

  11. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting,such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partⅠ, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors,epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part Ⅱ will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids.

  12. Diagnosis and pharmacological management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children with intestinal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Bushra A; Xie, Yuan Y; Wine, Eytan; Huynh, Hien Q

    2011-01-01

    The present article provides a general overview of the possible diagnostic procedures available for the management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in pediatric patients with intestinal failure. The focus is to address current diagnostic tools and understand their associated advantages and disadvantages based on a literature search. Culture of small intestinal aspirates, noninvasive breath tests and an emerging interest in quantitative bacterial DNA fingerprinting are discussed. Prope...

  13. Validation of Intraluminal and Intraperitoneal microdialysis in ischemic small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pynnönen, Lauri; Minkkinen, Minna; Perner, Anders; Räty, Sari; Nordback, Isto; Sand, Juhani; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2013-01-01

    We sought to define the sensitivity and specificity of intraperitoneal (IP) and intraluminal (IL) microdialysate metabolites in depicting ex vivo small intestinal total ischemia during GI-tract surgery. We hypothesized that IL as opposed to IP microdialysis detects small intestinal ischemia with...

  14. Inhibition of Porcine Small Intestinal Sucrase by Validamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑裕国; 申屠旭萍; 沈寅初

    2005-01-01

    As an important medicinal intermediate with broad uses, validamine, an aminocyclitol, isolated from the enzymolysis broth of validamycins, has gained more and more attention. The absolute configuration of validamine is similar to that of α-D-glucose, and it demonstrates powerful inhibition activity on glycosidase. In this paper, the inhibitory effect of validamine on porcine small intestinal sucrase was investigated. Validamine was found to be a potent, competitive inhibitor to porcine small intestinal sucrase in vitro with an IC50 value of 6.85 × 10-4 mol·L-1. Validamine exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition effect on porcine small intestinal sucrase, whereby the inhibition interaction of validamine and porcine small intestinal sucrase was a fast binding process. The inhibition of validamine on porcine small intestinal sucrase was pH-dependent.

  15. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts support in vitro and in vivo growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Lahar

    Full Text Available The intestinal crypt-niche interaction is thought to be essential to the function, maintenance, and proliferation of progenitor stem cells found at the bases of intestinal crypts. These stem cells are constantly renewing the intestinal epithelium by sending differentiated cells from the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn to the villus tips where they slough off into the intestinal lumen. The intestinal niche consists of various cell types, extracellular matrix, and growth factors and surrounds the intestinal progenitor cells. There have recently been advances in the understanding of the interactions that regulate the behavior of the intestinal epithelium and there is great interest in methods for isolating and expanding viable intestinal epithelium. However, there is no method to maintain primary human small intestinal epithelium in culture over a prolonged period of time. Similarly no method has been published that describes isolation and support of human intestinal epithelium in an in vivo model. We describe a technique to isolate and maintain human small intestinal epithelium in vitro from surgical specimens. We also describe a novel method to maintain human intestinal epithelium subcutaneously in a mouse model for a prolonged period of time. Our methods require various growth factors and the intimate interaction between intestinal sub-epithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs and the intestinal epithelial cells to support the epithelial in vitro and in vivo growth. Absence of these myofibroblasts precluded successful maintenance of epithelial cell formation and proliferation beyond just a few days, even in the presence of supportive growth factors. We believe that the methods described here can be used to explore the molecular basis of human intestinal stem cell support, maintenance, and growth.

  16. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents

  17. Advances in small intestinal ionizing radiation injury research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intestinal ionising radiation injuries are a dose limiting factor in the course of radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic malignancies. In this paper it is reviewed that ionizing radiation injuries of small intestine,including clinical symptoms, epithelium and submucosa changes, signal molecular expression changes, histological and ultrastructure changes. The ongoing works of our laboratory on subjects of intestinal injuries induced by heavy ions and protection against these injuries are also presented. (authors)

  18. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

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  19. A deconvolution technique for processing small intestinal transit data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deconvolution technique can be used to compute small intestinal impulse response curves from scintigraphic data. Previously suggested approaches, however, are sensitive to noise from the data. We investigated whether deconvolution based on a new simple iterative convolving technique can be recommended. Eight healthy volunteers ingested a meal that contained indium-111 diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid labelled water and technetium-99m stannous colloid labelled omelette. Imaging was performed at 30-min intervals until all radioactivity was located in the colon. A Fermi function=(1+e-αβ)/(1+e(t-α)β) was chosen to characterize the small intestinal impulse response function. By changing only two parameters, α and β, it is possible to obtain configurations from nearly a square function to nearly a monoexponential function. Small intestinal input function was obtained from the gastric emptying curve and convolved with the Fermi function. The sum of least squares was used to find α and β yielding the best fit of the convolved curve to the observed small intestinal time-activity curve. Finally, a small intestinal mean transit time was calculated from the Fermi function referred to. In all cases, we found an excellent fit of the convolved curve to the observed small intestinal time-activity curve, that is the Fermi function reflected the small intestinal impulse response curve. Small intestinal mean transit time of liquid marker (median 2.02 h) was significantly shorter than that of solid marker (median 2.99 h; P<0.02). The iterative convolving technique seems to be an attractive alternative to ordinary approaches for the processing of small intestinal transit data. (orig.)

  20. A deconvolution technique for processing small intestinal transit data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinch, K. [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, H.B.W. [Danish Research Center of Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Denmark); Madsen, J.L. [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, University Hospital of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The deconvolution technique can be used to compute small intestinal impulse response curves from scintigraphic data. Previously suggested approaches, however, are sensitive to noise from the data. We investigated whether deconvolution based on a new simple iterative convolving technique can be recommended. Eight healthy volunteers ingested a meal that contained indium-111 diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid labelled water and technetium-99m stannous colloid labelled omelette. Imaging was performed at 30-min intervals until all radioactivity was located in the colon. A Fermi function=(1+e{sup -{alpha}{beta}})/(1+e{sup (t-{alpha}){beta}}) was chosen to characterize the small intestinal impulse response function. By changing only two parameters, {alpha} and {beta}, it is possible to obtain configurations from nearly a square function to nearly a monoexponential function. Small intestinal input function was obtained from the gastric emptying curve and convolved with the Fermi function. The sum of least squares was used to find {alpha} and {beta} yielding the best fit of the convolved curve to the oberved small intestinal time-activity curve. Finally, a small intestinal mean transit time was calculated from the Fermi function referred to. In all cases, we found an excellent fit of the convolved curve to the observed small intestinal time-activity curve, that is the Fermi function reflected the small intestinal impulse response curve. Small intestinal mean transit time of liquid marker (median 2.02 h) was significantly shorter than that of solid marker (median 2.99 h; P<0.02). The iterative convolving technique seems to be an attractive alternative to ordinary approaches for the processing of small intestinal transit data. (orig.) With 2 figs., 13 refs.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    A huge number of bacteria are hosted in the gastrointestinal tract, following a gradient increasing towards the colon. Gastric acid secretion and intestinal clearance provide the qualitative and quantitative partitioning of intestinal bacteria; small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when these barrier mechanisms fail. Diagnosis of SIBO is challenging due to the low specificity of symptoms, the frequent association with other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and the absence of optimal objective diagnostic tests. The therapeutic approach to SIBO is oriented towards resolving predisposing conditions, and is supported by antibiotic treatment to restore the normal small intestinal microflora and by modifications of dietary habits for symptomatic relief. In the near future, metagenomics and metabolomics will help to overcome the uncertainties of SIBO diagnosis and the pitfalls of therapeutic management, allowing the design of a personalized strategy based on the direct insight into the small intestinal microbial community. PMID:26636484

  2. Small intestinal obstruction in pregnancy and puerperium

    OpenAIRE

    Chiedozi Lawrence; Ajabor Linus; Iweze Florentus

    1999-01-01

    The problem of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy and puerperium is worsened by the risk it poses not just to the mother, but also to the fetus. In this review of 10 pregnant/puerperium patients the maternal mortality was 10% and fetal wastage 20%. In pregnancy and puerperium, intestinal obstruction carries a higher mortality, 10-33%, than in non-pregnant patients, 6-10%. The rarity of the problem, delay in diagnosis, anxiety over radiological examination in pregn...

  3. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Guang Cao; Wan-Chun Wu; Zhen Han; Meng-Ya Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin(CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress.METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA).RFSULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15%vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g,P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g,P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VTP levels between the two groups.CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine.

  4. Small intestinal obstruction in pregnancy and puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiedozi Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy and puerperium is worsened by the risk it poses not just to the mother, but also to the fetus. In this review of 10 pregnant/puerperium patients the maternal mortality was 10% and fetal wastage 20%. In pregnancy and puerperium, intestinal obstruction carries a higher mortality, 10-33%, than in non-pregnant patients, 6-10%. The rarity of the problem, delay in diagnosis, anxiety over radiological examination in pregnant women, worry over laparotomy in pregnant women, all result in delay in instituting definite treatment and contribute to the morbidity. Application of established principles in the management of intestinal obstruction even when it occurs in pregnancy and puerperium might help to improve the results of management and reduce the current level of morbidity and mortality.

  5. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Post Oesophagectomy and Gastrectomy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dooley, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    A review of patients who underwent a hydrogen breath test for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth, following an oesophagectomy or gastrectomy was carried out in the Gastrointestinal Function Unit, St. James’s Hospital, Dublin. The aim of this research was to look at the incidence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and create an optimal protocol for Hydrogen Breath Testing with the hope of improving patient compliance and reducing clinic waiting times. Factors such as lifestyle, multim...

  6. STUDYING OF FUNCTIONAL CONDITION OF THE SMALL INTESTINE IN CHOLELITHIASIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ya. M. Vakhrushev; A. P. Lukashevich; A. Yu. Gorbunov

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Complex research of the functional condition of the small intestine in different stages of cholelithiasis.Materials and methods. 47 patients with different stages of cholelithiasis were examined. There were 29 patients with the first (prestone) stage and 18 — with the second (stone) stage of cholelithiasis. In an assessment of the functional condition of the small intestine were used clinical data and results of the load tests by sugars. Cavitary digestion was studied by load test with p...

  7. Drug absorption from the irradiated rat small intestine in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of acidic drugs phenobarbitone and sulphafurazole, basic drugs mecamylamine and quinidine, and a neutral drug isoniazid was studied in situ. Rats were irradiated 750 rad whole-body with 60Co and the absorption experiment was done three and six days thereafter using the cannulated small intestine of urethane-anaesthetized rats. Drug disappearance from the intestinal lumen and drug levels in the whole blood and intestinal wall were measured. In control rats phenobarbitone showed the most rapid absorption and mecamylamine the slowest. Irradiation retarded the disappearance of all drugs from the intestinal lumen on the third postirradiation day. Fluid absorption was also diminished. On the sixth postirradiation day the absorption of phenobarbitone, sulphafurazole and mecamylamine had returned to the control level, but the absorption of quinidine and isoniazid was still retarded. After i.v. administration of drugs they were not significantly excreted into the intestinal contents and irradiation did not modify excretion. The distribution of drugs between the intestinal fluid and the intestinal wall was complete in the first 10 min of experiment. Mecamylamine and quinidine were lowered in the whole blood by irradiation. Blood levels of drugs did not correlate well to the rate of disappearance of drugs from the intestinal lumen. The reversible changes in absorption induced by irradiation are probably secondary effects of irradiation on intestinal morphology, permeability and transport capacity, composition, and possibly blood flow. (orig.)

  8. OSR1-sensitive small intestinal Na+ transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasham, V.; Pathare, G.T.; Fajol, A.; Rexhepaj, R.; Michael, D.; Pakladok, T.; Alesutan, I.; Rotte, A.; Foller, M.; Lang, F.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (OSR1) contributes to WNK (with no K)-dependent regulation of renal tubular salt transport, renal salt excretion, and blood pressure. Little is known, however, about a role of OSR1 in the regulation of intestinal salt transport. The present study thus explore

  9. Effect of dietary fat on the small intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxton, D G; Cynk, E U; Jenkins, A P; Thompson, R P

    1989-09-01

    The presence of food within the small intestinal lumen promotes mucosal cell proliferation. To define the trophic role of triglycerides, three groups of eight female Wistar rats were isocalorically fed for four weeks with either Vivonex, or Vivonex with 50% calorie substitution with an essential fatty acid mixture, or Vivonex with 50% calorie substitution with a saturated fatty acid mixture. Although Vivonex caused greater body weight gain, both essential fatty acids and saturated fatty acids increased small intestinal weight, mucosal weight, protein and DNA overall, and in each of three intestinal segments (proximal, middle and distal), compared with Vivonex. Mucosal indices were similar for essential fatty acids and saturated fatty acids. These results show that triglycerides, regardless of essential fatty acid content, are trophic to the rat small intestinal mucosa. PMID:2806993

  10. Digestion modelling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Barles, Guy; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, J.R.; Lescoat, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    International audience In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion in the small intestine, started in a previous article, by investigating the effects of dietary fibre. We recall that this model aims at taking into account the three main phenomena of the digestion, namely the transit of the bolus, the degradation of feedstuffs and the absorption through the intestinal wall. In order to study the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical ch...

  11. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yongping Su; Chunmeng Shi; Chunxue Li; Xinze Ran; Junping Wang; Shiwu Dong; Fengchao Wang; Zhongmin Zou; Dengqun Liu

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of ...

  12. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish. PMID:23786678

  13. The migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, Gordon L.; Sarna, Sushil K.

    1991-10-01

    Gastric and small intestinal myoelectric and motor activity is divided into two main patterns, fed and fasted. During fasting, the predominant pattern of activity is the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC), a cyclically occurring pattern of electric and mechanical activity that is initiated in the stomach and duodenum almost simultaneously and, from there, propagates the length of the small intestine. Cyclic motor activity also occurs in the lower esophageal sphincter, the gallbladder, and the sphincter of Oddi with a duration that is related to the MMC in the small intestine. Of the possible mechanisms for initiation of the MMC in the small intestine (extrinsic neural control, intrinsic neural control, and hormonal control), intrinsic neural control via a series of coupled is the most likely. The keep this sentence in! hormone motilin also plays a role in the initiation of MMCs. After a meal, in man the MMC is disrupted and replaced by irregular contractions. The physiologic role of the MMC is to clear the stomach and small intestine of residual food, secretions, and desquamated cells and propel them to the colon. Disruption of the MMC cycle is associated with bacterial overgrowth in some patients, an observation that supports the proposed cleansing function of the MMC cycle.

  14. Small intestinal amyogenesia and dysmyogenesia induced by morphine and loperamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1990-02-01

    We studied the effects of morphine and loperamide on small bowel myoelectric and contractile activity in 12 conscious dogs. After initially producing premature migrating myoelectric complexes, both substances destabilized and obliterated electrical control activity (ECA). The obliteration of ECA occurred mainly in the proximal half of the small intestine. During ECA obliteration, the base line was almost flat at the usual amplification. At higher amplification, the base line exhibited irregular low level fluctuations that could not be related to electrical response activity (ERA) bursts or contractions. The mean time lag for obliteration of ECA in the proximal small intestine decreased at higher doses of morphine infusion. During the destabilization and obliteration of ECA, contractions and ERA bursts occurred in unusual patterns. The ERA bursts and contractions were generally discoordinated. However, in the proximal small intestine some contractions migrated rapidly and uninterrupted at 32 +/- 7 cm/s over long distances (124 +/- 24 cm). ECA destabilization and obliteration were reversed in approximately 15-30 min after the ingestion of a meal or intravenous administration of atropine, hexamethonium, or naloxone. We conclude that during the absence or destabilization of ECA, the ERA bursts and contractions occur in an uncontrolled manner. These two states were called "amyogenesia" and "dysmyogenesia," respectively. The unusual patterns of contractions during small intestinal amyogenesia and dysmyogenesia may be one of the factors in delayed intestinal transit produced by morphine and loperamide. PMID:1968317

  15. Acute changes in canine small bowel muscle prostaglandin synthesis and function after x-irradiation with 9.38 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdominal radiotherapy is often limited by radiation-induced enteritis. Prostaglandin (PG) synthesis may play a role in the altered function of small bowel (SB) muscle and mucosa. Therefore, the authors have investigated the effects of X-radiation on PG synthesis, and other aspects of canine SB smooth muscle function. Canine SB received 9.38 Gy of 250 kVp X-radiation in situ. Electrodes were used to monitor spike burst and propagation of electrical activity in the SB muscle pre- and post-exposure. Animals were sacrificed prior to irradiation and at 1 and 4 days post-irradiation. Serum PG levels were assayed from mesenteric artery and vein samples, and SB muscle was removed for analysis of PG synthesis. SB muscle myoelectric activity decreased after irradiation until sacrifice (day 4). The PG synthesis in irradiated SB muscle at days 1 and 4 increased in PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2/α and in thromboxane A/sub 2/ metabolite, while the PGI/sub 2/ metabolite decreased. PG levels in venous blood indicate similar changes after passage through the intestine. Although causality is not established, radiation does induce changes in PG synthesis which correlate with changes in myoelectric activity (motility)

  16. Paneth cells: maestros of the small intestinal crypts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevers, Hans C; Bevins, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Paneth cells are highly specialized epithelial cells of the small intestine, where they coordinate many physiological functions. First identified more than a century ago on the basis of their readily discernible secretory granules by routine histology, these cells are located at the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn, tiny invaginations that line the mucosal surface all along the small intestine. Investigations over the past several decades determined that these cells synthesize and secrete substantial quantities of antimicrobial peptides and proteins. More recent studies have determined that these antimicrobial molecules are key mediators of host-microbe interactions, including homeostatic balance with colonizing microbiota and innate immune protection from enteric pathogens. Perhaps more intriguing, Paneth cells secrete factors that help sustain and modulate the epithelial stem and progenitor cells that cohabitate in the crypts and rejuvenate the small intestinal epithelium. Dysfunction of Paneth cell biology contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23398152

  17. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P receptors in human colon and small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and substance P are found in neurons in the lamina propria and submucosa and muscularis propria of human small intestine and colon. VIP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on epithelial, smooth muscle, and mononuclear cells. This study analyzes the distribution of [125I]VIP binding and [125I]substance P in human colon and small intestine using autoradiographic techniques. [125I]VIP binding was present in high density in the mucosal layer of colon and small intestine. [125I]VIP binding was not significantly greater than nonspecific binding in smooth muscle layers or the lymphoid follicles. In contrast, [125I]substance P binding was present in high density over the colonic muscle but was not present over the mucosal layer. In human colon cancer, [125I]VIP grain density over the malignant tissue was only slightly higher than background. These autoradiographic studies of [125I]VIP binding indicate that the highest density of VIP receptors was found in the small intestine and superficial colonic mucosa, whereas the density of substance P receptors was highest over the smooth muscle layers. These findings suggest a mismatch between immunochemical content of the peptide and autoradiographic density of the receptor

  18. Reconstructive cranioplasty using a porcine small intestinal submucosal graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, D E; Gillian, T D

    2008-05-01

    A six-year-old border collie was presented with a solid mass on the dorsal cranium. Histological examination showed the mass to be a multilobular tumour of bone. A magnetic resonance imaging scan confirmed deformation of the dorsal cranium with compression of the cerebral hemispheres. A craniotomy was performed to excise the mass and overlying skin, resulting in a substantial deficit of calvarium and skin. A cranioplasty using a small intestinal submucosal (SIS) graft was performed to reconstruct the calvarial defect. A local myocutaneous advancement flap was elevated and positioned over the cranioplasty to close the skin deficit. The outcome of this reconstruction was aesthetic and functional. The small intestinal submucosal graft provided satisfactory mechanical support and was a suitable physical barrier in place of the calvarial bone. Histological examination of the small intestinal submucosal graft 128 days after implantation showed that the graft had been replaced by a dense network of collagenous tissue, with small focal areas of partially mineralised woven bone merging with a fibrocartilaginous matrix of the deeper margin. Histological examination also confirmed regrowth of the multilobular tumour of bone in the region of the small intestinal submucosal graft indicating that it is only a suitable implant if adequate surgical margins are obtained. PMID:18373537

  19. Effect of Rejection on Electrophysiologic Function of Canine Intestinal Grafts: Correlation with Histopathology and Na–K-ATPase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Takeyoshi, Izumi; Zhang, Shimin; KOKUDO, YASUTAKA; Kenjiro NAKAMURA; Ikoma, Akira; Zhu, Yue; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru

    1995-01-01

    To investigate whether electrophysiologic changes can detect the early onset and progress of intestinal rejection, changes in in vitro electrophysiologic function, intestinal histopathology, and Na–K-ATPase activity were studied in dogs. Adult mongrel dogs of both sexes, weighing 18–24 kg, were used for auto and allo small bowel transplantation. The entire small bowels, except for short segments at the proximal and distal ends, were switched between a pair of dogs (allograft). Animals receivi...

  20. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  1. Healing of the suture line in the irradiated small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the help of data from literature the author goes more deeply into the aetiology, treatment and possible prevention of lesions of the small intestine related to preceding irradiation. In a clinical retrospective study at twenty patients who, after irradiation of the abdominal and pelvic areas, have been submitted to abdominal surgery, the relation is studied between predistion factors for gastrointestinal complications after irradiation, the surgeries applied in case of small-intestine problems and postoperative complications. The third part of the thesis covers an experimental part in which the healing process of suture line in the terminal ileum has been studied after resection and reanastomosis in previously irradiated bowel of the rat. It was investigated whether differences occurred in the healing process of suture line after various periods - 4, 10 and 40 weeks, after irradiation. Also comparison took place with a control group which underwent a similar procedure with the exception of the radiation treatment, which was simulated in this group. In a second experiment it was investigated if the healing process of suture line depends on the type of anastomosis. An end-to-end anastomosis was chosen versus side-to-side anastomosis. Also in this experiment an irradiated group was compared with a control group. Furthermore a method was developed for performing micro-angiographies of the rat intestine in order to demonstrate obliteration of blood vessels in irradiated intestine and to assess neovascularization in the intestinal wall at the suture line. (author). 84 refs.; 18 figs.; 27 tabs

  2. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Sang Hyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule.

  3. Relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small intestine can be used to evaluate the effects of physical and chemical agents which interfere with the process of differentiation. Thus, exposure of cell cultures or animals to ionizing radiations shows that this physical agent causes early differentiation in proliferating cells which are damaged sublethally, lose their proliferative capacity, and differentiate earlier than the nonirradiated cells. The authors' studies have demonstrated this phenomenon of early differentiation during the first hours after irradiation prior to the appearance of acute damage. Furthermore, differentiation does not proceed normally during the recovery phase at a time when the epithelial cells of the small intestine have a normal morphological appearance, but are functionally deficient. The severity and consequences of this effect depend on the irradiation dose and the dose schedule. Although the phenomenon of early differentiation in irradiated cells of the small intestine appears well established, an application to radiation therapy seems far in the future. Nevertheless, the small intestine, because of its morphological and functional characteristics may be considered a good model for investigating optimal conditions for dose-response and better tissue tolerance with less acute and late damage

  4. STUDYING OF FUNCTIONAL CONDITION OF THE SMALL INTESTINE IN CHOLELITHIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. M. Vakhrushev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Complex research of the functional condition of the small intestine in different stages of cholelithiasis.Materials and methods. 47 patients with different stages of cholelithiasis were examined. There were 29 patients with the first (prestone stage and 18 — with the second (stone stage of cholelithiasis. In an assessment of the functional condition of the small intestine were used clinical data and results of the load tests by sugars. Cavitary digestion was studied by load test with polysaccharide (soluble starch, membrane digestion — with disaccharide (sucrose, absorption — with monosaccharide (glucose. Glucose level in blood was determined on an empty stomach, then after oral reception of 50g of glucose, sucrose or starch in 30, 60 and 120 minutes.Results. Researchers showed that in the most of patients with cholelithiasis there were disturbances in clinical and functional condition of the small intestine. In an assessment of the cavitary digestion the level of glycemia was authentically lowered by 43% in prestone stage and by 66% in stone stage of cholelithiasis in comparison with control. In an assessment of membrane digestion in patients with the stone stage of cholelithiasis the level of glycemia was lowered in comparison with group of control and with the prestone stage by 30% and 19% respectively.Conclusion. In prestone stage of cholelithiasis there were decrease of the cavitary digestion primary, and in stone stage of cholelithiasis — all stages of hydrolysis-resorptive process in the small intestine were disturbed.

  5. Morphological and Functional Alterations of Small Intestine in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya B Gubergrits

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Context The small intestine in chronic pancreatitis has not been investigated yet thoroughly. It would be important to understand fat metabolism in the course of this disease and could be explained if the small intestine has some pathological conditions and, due to this reason, pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work in all patients. Objective To investigate the pathophysiology of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis and to show the reason why in some cases pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work properly. Patients In the process of the study 33 chronic pancreatitis patients have been examined. Controls The control group includes 30 subjects without chronic pancreatitis similar for age, sex and alcohol consumption to the patients with chronic pancreatitis patients. Investigations Aspiration biopsy of jejunum mucosa followed by histological examination and investigation of intestinal enzymes by aspiration has been performed. Main outcome measures Metabolism at membranic level has been studied by enzymatic activity of amylase and lipase in the small intestine. Production of enzymes (monoglyceride lipase, lactase, saccharase, maltase, glycyl-lleucine dipeptidase promoting metabolism in enterocytes has been estimated as to their activity in homogenates of jejunum mucosasamples. Participation of mucosa in intestinal digestion has been assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity in a secretory chyme from proximal portion of jejunum. Absorptive capacity of jejunum was evaluated by D-xylose test results. DNA, lysozyme, immunoglobulin contents of chyme have also been calculated and bacteriological study of chyme has been also performed. Results Secondary enteritis, accompanied by moderate dystrophic changes of mucous membrane, thinning of limbus, and decrease of Paneth cell mitotic index, was found to occur in chronic pancreatitis patients. Enteritis is followed by changes in enzymatic processes in the sphere of membrane and intestinal

  6. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español 1-800-4-CANCER Live Chat Publications Dictionary Menu Contact Dictionary Search About Cancer Causes and Prevention Risk Factors ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  7. Pediatric Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Low-Income Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R.; Petri, William A, Jr

    2014-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted GI motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions that do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO...

  8. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G M; Chesner, I M; Asquith, P; Leyland, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a study to assess the possible contribution of lymphoid infiltration of the gastrointestinal mucosa to occult blood loss or malabsorption 20 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) had a lactulose hydrogen breath test. In 10 cases (50%) a small intestinal peak was detected, suggesting small bowel bacterial overgrowth, and this was confirmed in seven patients by the positive culture of jejunal aspirate. Of the patients with a positive hydrogen breath test, radiological exa...

  9. Dysmotility of the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kellow, J E; Phillips, S F; Miller, L J; Zinsmeister, A R

    1988-01-01

    Though the pathophysiology of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is commonly attributed to dysfunction of the large intestine, evidence exists to incriminate the small bowel. In order to further explore the role of the small bowel in IBS several stimuli were applied, in an attempt to unmask the dysmotility of the jejunum and ileum. These included infusions of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-OP), a high fat meal, neostigmine and balloon distension of the ileum. Three groups (n = 8) each of ag...

  10. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  11. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.; Bruusgaard, H.; Wallin, L.

    2008-01-01

    -lived adverse effects following intraluminal serotonin stimulations. We conclude that exogenous serotonin in the lumen of the upper part of the small intestine does not seem to change antro-duodeno-jejunal contractility significantly in healthy adult volunteers Udgivelsesdato: 2008......The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro...

  12. Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion in the small intestine, started in a previous article, by investigating the effects of dietary fibre. We recall that this model aims at taking into account the three main phenomena of the digestion, namely the transit of the bolus, the degradation of feedstuffs and the absorption through the intestinal wall. In order to study the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical characteristics which interact with the function of the small intestine, i.e. viscosity and water holding capacity. This leads us to consider some features of digestion which have not been taken into account previously, in particular the interrelationship between the evolution of dry matter and water in the bolus. The numerical results are in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fibre on the velocity of bolus along the small intestine and on its degradation. These results highlight the negative effect of soluble dietary fibre on d...

  13. Chloride channels in the small intestinal cell line IEC-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basavappa, Srisaila; Vulapalli, Sreesatya Raju; Zhang, Hui; Yule, David; Coon, Steven; Sundaram, Uma

    2005-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt cells play a critical role in modulating Cl- secretion during digestion. The types of Cl- channels mediating Cl- secretion in the small intestine was investigated using the intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-18, which was derived from rat small intestine crypt cells. In initial radioisotope efflux studies, exposure to forskolin, ionomycin or a decrease in extracellular osmolarity significantly increased 36Cl efflux as compared to control cells. Whole cell patch clamp techniques were subsequently used to examine in more detail the swelling-, Ca2+-, and cAMP-activated Cl- conductance. Decreasing the extracellular osmolarity from 290 to 200 mOsm activated a large outwardly rectifying Cl- current that was voltage-independent and had an anion selectivity of I- > Cl-. Increasing cytosolic Ca2+ by ionomycin activated whole cell Cl- currents, which were also outwardly rectifying but were voltage-dependent. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels with ionomycin was confirmed with fura-2 loaded IEC-18 cells. A third type of whole cell Cl- current was observed after increases in intracellular cAMP induced by forskolin. These cAMP-activated Cl- currents have properties consistent with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels, as the currents were blocked by glibenclamide or NPPB but insensitive to DIDS. In addition, the current-voltage relationship was linear and had an anion selectivity of Cl- > I-. Confocal immunofluorescence studies and Western blots with two different anti-CFTR antibodies confirmed the expression of CFTR. These results suggest that small intestinal crypt cells express multiple types of Cl- channels, which may all contribute to net Cl- secretion. PMID:15389550

  14. [Emergency surgery of tumors of the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, G; Aghemo, B; Laguzzi, B; Borello, M

    1978-09-15

    Ten cases of serious complications requiring emergency surgery in patients with tumours of the small intestine are presented: 3 cases of peritonitis due to perforation of a fibroleiomyoma, a jejunal adenocarcinoma, and an ileal lymphosarcoma; 3 invaginations (1 ileocolic due to an ileal polyp, and 2 ileoileal due to lymphoma and polypoid metastasis of melanoma; 3 stenosis (ileal owing to metastasis of melanoma, and duodenal and of the duodenojejunal flexure due to histologically unascertained neoplasias); 1 massive enterorrhagia from ileal anaplastic carcinoma. The frequency of such pictures is not negligible when assessed in terms of emergency surgical pathology and compared with other emergency situations arising in patients with tumours. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult even from the clinical history. Tumours of the small intestine appear to give rise to such complications in their initial stages. PMID:581225

  15. Galectin-4 and small intestinal brush border enzymes form clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; van Deurs, B

    1997-01-01

    lacking a N-terminal signal peptide for membrane translocation, was discovered in these complexes as well, and in gradient centrifugation brush border enzymes and galectin-4 formed distinct soluble high molecular weight clusters. Immunoperoxidase cytochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy showed......Detergent-insoluble complexes prepared from pig small intestine are highly enriched in several transmembrane brush border enzymes including aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase, indicating that they reside in a glycolipid-rich environment in vivo. In the present work galectin-4, an animal lectin...... that galectin-4 is indeed an intestinal brush border protein; we also localized galectin-4 throughout the cell, mainly associated with membraneous structures, including small vesicles, and to the rootlets of microvillar actin filaments. This was confirmed by subcellular fractionation, showing about...

  16. File list: DNS.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Apical Gene Transfer into Quiescent Human and Canine Polarized Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Lentivirus Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Seppen, Jurgen; Barry, Simon C.; Klinkspoor, J. Henriette; Katen, Louis J.; Lee, Sum P; Garcia, J. Victor; Osborne, William R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells secrete a protective luminal mucus barrier inhibiting viral gene transfer. Quiescent, polarized monolayers of primary epithelial cells from dog gallbladder and human colon are efficiently transduced through the apical mucus side by lentivirus vectors, suggesting their application to intestinal gene therapy.

  14. Crosslinking Decreases the Hemocompatibility of Decellularized, Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Glynn, Jeremy J.; Polsin, Elizabeth G.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2014-01-01

    Decellularized tissues have been widely used as scaffolds for biomedical applications due to their presentation of adhesion peptide sequences and growth factors, which facilitate integration with surrounding tissue. One of the most commonly used decellularized tissue is derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). In some applications, SIS is crosslinked to modulate the mechanical properties or degradation rate of the scaffold. Despite the widespread use of SIS, there has been no me...

  15. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Anant D. Patil

    2014-01-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to...

  16. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

    OpenAIRE

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R.; Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E. Ross; Carmolli, Marya P.; Ma, Jennie Z.; Petri, William A, Jr

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-...

  17. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, A E; Blomquist, L; Nord, C E; Midtvedt, T.; A. Uribe

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the microflora of the upper small intestine in patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a combination of microbial cultivation and tests for microbial metabolic activity. METHODS--Twenty five patients with seropositive RA, 12 achlorhydric control subjects, and 11 control subjects with normal gastric acid secretion were investigated. Disease activity was evaluated in the patients with RA by three different indices. Eight (32%) of the patients with RA ha...

  18. Effect of dietary fat on the small intestinal mucosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxton, D. G.; Cynk, E U; Jenkins, A P; Thompson, R P

    1989-01-01

    The presence of food within the small intestinal lumen promotes mucosal cell proliferation. To define the trophic role of triglycerides, three groups of eight female Wistar rats were isocalorically fed for four weeks with either Vivonex, or Vivonex with 50% calorie substitution with an essential fatty acid mixture, or Vivonex with 50% calorie substitution with a saturated fatty acid mixture. Although Vivonex caused greater body weight gain, both essential fatty acids and saturated fatty acids...

  19. Even low-grade inflammation impacts on small intestinal function

    OpenAIRE

    Peuhkuri, Katri; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    Independent of the cause and location, inflammation - even when minimal - has clear effects on gastrointestinal morphology and function. These result in altered digestion, absorption and barrier function. There is evidence of reduced villus height and crypt depth, increased permeability, as well as altered sugar and peptide absorption in the small intestine after induction of inflammation in experimental models, which is supported by some clinical data. Identification of inflammatory factors ...

  20. Unconventional dose administrations: modifications of body and small intestine weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modifications of body and small intestine weight were analyzed after abdominal irradiation in rats. Different doses were administered in single sessions, in two equal fractions with different splits, in multiple daily fractionations, varying the amount of the dose and the intervals among fractions. The results show that body weight gradually decreased after irradiation and only after many days it returned to control levels. Small intestine weight decreased starting from early intervals, and a rapid increase over controls was observed at 5 days. A return to control levels was reaches later. Multiple-daily-fractionation (MDF) irradiation with 12 Gy (1200 rad) produced modifications less evident than the same dose administered in single session and appeared more similar to those observed after 6 or 8 Gy, according to the different splits used. The more marked the damage the lower the interval between fractions when a total dose of 12 Gy was administered in two fractions. The modifications after 6 Gy MDF were less marked than after a single session of the same magnitude, both in body and small-intestinal weight. In conclusion the MDF used in these experiments produced a damage very easily recovered by the organism in spite of the short time of dose administration. (orig.)

  1. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: A Case-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen H. Reynolds

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition of increased microbial load in the small intestine. The microbes feed on dietary carbohydrates and starches via fermentation, leading to gas production, inflammation and damage to the lining of the small intestine. Clinical presentation is varied, including abdominal pain, bloating, malabsorption and systemic symptoms. SIBO is associated with many challenging and chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue and chronic pain syndromes, and has been shown to be a causative factor in two out of three cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Symptoms improve with antimicrobial treatment, but recurrence is common. Many providers may not be aware of SIBO. This narrative review highlights a clinical case and the most recent literature regarding SIBO, including history, clinical presentation, prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic workup, treatment and prevention. Integrative medicine approaches, including diet, supplements and manual therapies, are also reviewed. SIBO can be a challenging condition and requires an integrative, patient-centered approach. Further studies are needed to guide clinicians in the workup and treatment of SIBO.

  2. Clinic, diagnosis and therapy of tumors of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    53 cases of tumor of the small intestine were observed, of which 23 were benign, 14 carcinomas, 10 sarcomas, 6 carcinoid tumors. The age ranged from 1 to 81 years; an incidence peak was found between 51 and 60. The ratio of male and female patients was 3 : 2. Almost all patients with malignoma came to our hospital only in an already advanced stage, 65% of the malignant tumors had already developed metastases. Preoperative diagnostics was significantly improved during the last years. Since 1972, i.e. since hypotonous duodenography, double contrast technique and endoscopy are applied, accuracy of the diagnostic methods could be increased by more than 100%. But due to the fact that these improved techniques were applied too late because of atypical symptoms and signs, prognosis of malignomas of the small intestine has been bad also in the last years. 16% of the patients died of postoperative complications and the 5-year survival rate was only 18%. From this results that prognosis cannot be improved even by applying the modern diagnostic methods, because malignant tumors of the small intestine provoke pain almost exclusively in advanced stages. There don't exist typical early symptoms or signs. (orig./ARB)

  3. Nonsulfated cholecystokinins in the small intestine of pigs and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    constitute a hormone system that acts only through the CCKB-receptor. Therefore, we have now examined whether, CCK peptides occur in nonsulfated form in the small intestine of pigs and rats. The concentrations of sulfated and nonsulfated CCK were measured by RIAs, one specific for sulfated CCKs and a new two......-step assay specific for nonsulfated CCK. For further characterization, the intestinal extracts were subjected to size- and ion exchange-chromatography. The intestinal concentrations of sulfated and nonsulfated CCK were highest in the duodenum and the proximal part of jejunum both in the pig and the rat. The...... porcine duodenal mucosa contained 193±84pmol/g sulfated CCK and 31±10pmol/g nonsulfated CCK, and the upper rat intestine 70±19pmol/g and 8±2pmol/g, respectively. The degree of sulfation correlated with the endoproteolytic proCCK processing. Thus, 38% of porcine CCK-58 was unsulfated, whereas, only 12% of...

  4. The Effect of DA-6034 on Intestinal Permeability in an Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Dong Shin; Lee, Oh Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-6034 has anti-inflammatory activities and exhibits cytoprotective effects in acute gastric injury models. However, explanations for the protective effects of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability are limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury model and its protective effect against small intestinal injury. Methods Rats in the treatment group received DA-6034 from days 0 to 2 and indomethacin from days 1 to 2. Rats in the control group received indomethacin from days 1 to 2. On the fourth day, the small intestines were examined to compare the severity of inflammation. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Western blotting was performed to confirm the association between DA-6034 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Results The inflammation scores in the treatment group were lower than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Hemorrhagic lesions in the treatment group were broader than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Intestinal permeability was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. DA-6034 enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression, and intestinal permeability was negatively correlated with ERK expression. Conclusions DA-6034 may decrease intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced intestinal injury model via the ERK pathway. PMID:27114435

  5. The Relationship between Small-Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Won, Kyoung Hee; Park, Soon Min

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a frequent finding in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients with IBS also have abnormal intestinal permeability, which is probably due to low-grade inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Our aim was to verify the relationship between SIBO and small-intestinal permeability in IBS patients. Methods A cohort of 38 IBS patients (20 women and 18 men; age range 16-70 years; mean age 40.2 years) with symptoms that ...

  6. Molecular characterisation of non-absorptive and absorptive enterocytes in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, N; Newrzella, D; Böhm, C; Lyer, S; Li, L; Sorgenfrei, O; van Laer, L; Sido, B; Mollenhauer, J; Poustka, A; Schirmacher, P; Gretz, N

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Perturbation of differentiation of the crypt-villus axis of the human small intestine is associated with several intestinal disorders of clinical importance. At present, differentiation of small intestinal enterocytes in the crypt-villus axis is not well characterised. SUBJECTS...... about the physiology of the crypt-villus architecture in human small intestine and provide new insights into pathophysiological phenomena, such as villus atrophy, which is clinically important....

  7. Role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in severe small intestinal damage in chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Motoko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Machida, Hirohisa; Okazaki, Hirotoshi; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Enteric bacteria play a significant role in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal damage. However, the association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and NSAID-induced small intestinal damage remains unclear. The aim of the study was to examine the association between SIBO and the presence of NSAID-induced severe small intestinal damage or its symptoms in chronic NSAID users. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Forty-three patients who had been using NSAIDs for over 3 months were enrolled. They were examined by capsule endoscopy and a lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT). We defined severe small intestinal damage as the presence of more than four small erosions or large erosions/ulcers. The LHBT result was considered positive if there was an increase in the level of breath hydrogen gas of >20 ppm above baseline. RESULTS. Out of 43 patients, 22 (51%) had severe small intestinal damage. The LHBT was positive in 5 of 21 patients (24%) without severe small intestinal damage and in 13 of 21 patients (59%) with severe small intestinal damage. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that an LHBT-positive result was significantly associated with increased odds ratio for severe small intestinal damage (OR, 6.54; 95% CI, 1.40-30.50). There was no significant difference in the presence of symptoms between the LHBT-positive and LHBT-negative patients with severe small intestinal damage. CONCLUSION. SIBO might have a role in the development of severe small intestinal damage in chronic NSAID users. PMID:24417613

  8. Small Intestinal Tumours: An Overview on Classification, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Notaristefano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The small intestinal neoplasia group includes different types of lesions and are a relatively rare event, accounting for only 3-6% of all gastrointestinal (GI neoplasms and 1-3% of all GI malignancies. These lesions can be classified as epithelial and mesenchymal, either benign or malignant. Mesenchymal tumours include stromal tumours (GIST and other neoplasms that might arise from soft tissue throughout the rest of the body (lipomas, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, and schwannomas. Other lesions occurring in the small bowel are carcinoids, lymphomas, and melanomas. To date, carcinoids and GIST are reported as the most frequent malignant lesions occurring in the small bowel. Factors that predispose to the development of malignant lesions are different, and they may be hereditary (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, neuroendocrine neoplasia Type 1, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and neurofibromatosis Type 1, acquired (sporadic colorectal cancer and small intestine adenomas, coeliac disease, Crohn’s disease, or environmental (diet, tobacco, and obesity. Small bowel tumours present with different and sometimes nonspecific symptoms, and a prompt diagnosis is not always so easily performed. Diagnostic tools, that may be both radiological and endoscopic, possess specificity and sensitivity, as well as different roles depending on the type of lesion. Treatment of these lesions may be different and, in recent years, new therapies have enabled an improvement in life expectancy.

  9. Cytokeratin - positive rib osteosarcoma metastasizing to the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Kuwabara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a malignant tumor in which osteoid or bone is produced directly by tumor cells. Some OS cells are positive for cytokeratin (CK and epithelial membrane antigen by immunohistochemistry (IHC and this may lead to a misdiagnosis of metastatic carcinoma, particularly when the tumor location is unusual. On the other hand, gastrointestinal metastasis of OS is rare. We present the case of a 67-year-old Japanese man with a small intestinal intussusception due to metastasis of a CK-positive rib OS. The tumor cells were positive for CK, osteopontin and osteonectin by IHC and a diagnosis of a CK-positive chest wall OS metastasizing to the small intestine was considered. Osteoid or bone formation was histologically absent and therefore chest wall OS had to be differentially diagnosed from metastatic carcinoma of unknown origin. A postmortem histological analysis confirmed a rib OS. Awareness of CK-positive OS is important for making a correct diagnosis and for disease management and an immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor for expression of osteopontin and osteonectin may be used to support the diagnosis. In addition, this case shows that rib OS can metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract, albeit rarely, which may induce an intestinal intussusception.

  10. The combined 169Yb-DTPA/mannitol intestinal absorption test in small intestine enteropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of the combined D-mannitol 169Yb-DTPA test for intestinal absorption was checked in patients with different damages of the small bowel (dysbiosis, gluten sensitive enteropathia, Crohn's disease), with colitis ulcerosa and in a group of controls. (Prospective study with a total of 106 patients). The ratio of recovery of D-mannitol 169Yb-DTPA showed better results in comparison to usual resorption tests (D-xylose, lactose, Schilling's test). A positive classification in all groups of intestinal diseases was possible. The lower limit for D-mannitol recovery was 13.5% of applicated dose and 1.1% for the urinary recovery rate of 169Yb-DTPA. (author)

  11. Radiographic results upon restoration of the gastro-intestinal passage by iso and anisoperistaltic small-intestine interposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motility function, anatomy and the morphological microstructure of the small intestine are the criteria for surgical interposition in the gastro-intestinal tract and its function study by radiography. In 46 patients, post-operative X-ray checks with contrast media were carried out. The function of the anastomosis, the intestinal motion and the relief of the uncous membrane are evaluated and the results discussed. (orig.)

  12. Multiple Small Intestine Perforations after Organophosphorous Poisoning: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sudha Jasmine; Peter, John Victor; Suryawanshi, Mayur Keshav

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate poisoning has significant gastrointestinal manifestations including vomiting, diarrhea, cramps and increased salivation. We report an uncommon gastrointestinal complication of multiple small intestinal perforations following organophosphorus poisoning. A 28-year old male presented after ingesting dichlorvos mixed with alcohol. Following the initial cholinergic symptoms, the patient developed severe shock with fever, attributed to aspiration pneumonia. Despite appropriate antibiotics, shock was persistent. Over the next 24-hours, he developed abdominal distension, loose stools and high nasogastric aspirates. Computed tomography showed pneumoperitonium. Exploratory laparotomy revealed six perforations in the jejunum and ileum. The involved portion of the bowel was resected and re-anastomosed, following which only 80-cm of small bowel was left. Postoperatively, shock resolved over 72-hours. However, over the next few days, patient developed features of anastomotic leak. Since only a small portion of the small bowel was preserved, a conservative approach was adopted. He deteriorated further and finally succumbed to the illness.

  13. Defence and regenerative processes in the small intestine in radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small intestine as a complex heterostructural organ possesses morphofunctional defenceregenerative mechanisms. All elements of this mechanism suffer in irradiation of the organ especially at ionizing radiation doses causing the acute intestinal syndrome. Regenerative processes in the small intestine are suppressed not only by ionizing radiation but also by the toxic products of exo- and endogenous origin resulting from irradiation of the body

  14. File list: ALL.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small hg19 All antigens Digestive tract Intestine, Smal...3916,SRX263903,SRX213497,SRX347272,SRX142119,SRX263906 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small hg19 All antigens Digestive tract Intestine, Smal...2119,SRX263903,SRX263906,SRX136956,SRX213497,SRX347272 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small mm9 TFs and others Digestive tract Intestine, Sma...,SRX885790,SRX885798,SRX885799 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  17. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra. PMID:26951334

  18. Effect of emodin on small intestinal peristalsis of mice and relevant mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Quan Zhang; Cheng-Hua Zhou; Yu-Qing wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on small intestinal peristalsis of mice and to explore its relevant mechanisms.METHODS: The effect of emodin on small intestinal peristalsis of mice was observed by charcoal powder propelling test of small intestine. The contents of motilin and somatostatin in small intestine of mice were determinated by radioimmunoassay. The electrical potential difference (PD) related to Na+ and glucose transport was measured across the wall of reverted intestinal sacs. Na+-K+-ATPase activity of small intestinal mucosa was measured by spectroscopic analysis.RESULTS: Different dosages of emodin can improve small intestinal peristalsis of mice. Emodin increased the content of motilin, while reduced the content of somatostatin in small intestine of mice significantly. Emodin 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 g/L decreased PD when there was glucose. However, emodin had little effect when glucose was free. The Na+-K+-ATPase activity of small intestinal mucosa of mice in emodin groups was inhibited obviously. CONCLUSION: Emodin can enhance the function of small intestinal peristalsis of mice by mechanisms of promoting secretion of motilin, lowering the content of somatostatin and inhibiting Na+-K+-ATPase activity of small intestinal mucosa.

  19. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongping Su

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of 95.65%±3.72% at different times in chimerism. Donor-derived cells distributed widely in all the layers of the gastrointestinal tract. There were GFP positive BMDCs in the myenteric plexus, which resembled characteristics of ICCs, including myenteric location, c-Kit positive staining, and ramified morphology. Donor-derived ICCs in the myenteric plexus contributed to a percentage ranging 9.25%±4.9% of all the ICCs in the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, here we described that donor-derived BMDCs might differentiate into gastrointestinal ICCs after radiation injury, which provided an alternative source for the origin of the ICCs in the muscular plexus of adult intestine. These results further identified the plasticity of BMDCs and indicated therapeutic implications of BMDCs for the gastrointestinal dysmotility caused by ICCs disorders.

  20. Global hypomethylation and promoter methylation in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Fotouhi, Omid; Adel Fahmideh, Maral; Kjellman, Magnus; Sulaiman, Luqman; Höög, Anders; Zedenius, Jan; Hashemi, Jamileh; Larsson, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a feature of human cancer affecting gene expression and tumor phenotype. Here, we quantified promoter methylation of candidate genes and global methylation in 44 small intestinal-neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) from 33 patients by pyrosequencing. Findings were compared with gene expression, patient outcome and known tumor copy number alterations. Promoter methylation was observed for WIF1, RASSF1A, CTNNB1, CXCL14, NKX2–3, P16, LAMA1, and CDH1. By contrast APC, CDH3...

  1. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    K. V. Zhdanov; D. A. Gusev; S. M. Zacharenko; K. V. Kozlov; A. S. Sigidayev; M. V. Kurtukov; V. S. Sukachev

    2014-01-01

    In order to estimate the frequency of detection of bacterial overgrowth syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C, find a possible relationship between development dysbiotic changes in the small intestine and over chronic hepatitis C were examined 80 patients (68 males and 12 females). In addition to standard laboratory tests for all patients was performed hydrogen breath test with a load of lactulose and fibrogastroduodenoscopy and hepatic biopsy with subsequent histological examination ...

  2. Diagnostic Laparoscopy for Small Intestinal Intussusception in a Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Holak, M. Jałyński, Z. Peczyński, Z. Adamiak, M. Jaskólska and W. Pesta*

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopy is a low-invasive diagnostic and surgical technique for examining and performing surgical procedures in the equine peritoneal cavity. This article is a case study of a horse with weakly expressed, irregular symptoms of colic occurring over a period of four weeks. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed, and liver and spleen tissue samples were collected for a histopathological analysis. An endoscopic examination of the abdominal cavity ruled out small intestinal intussusception, and a histopathological analysis supported the identification of the causes of colic.

  3. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption. PMID:27228994

  4. Comparison of three concentration methods for the recovery of canine intestinal parasites from stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, S; Oliveira-Sequeira, T C G

    2010-10-01

    The aim of present study was to compare the efficiency of a commercial assay and two conventional methods for fecal concentration in detecting canine gastrointestinal parasites. Fecal samples from 254 dogs were processed by centrifugation-sedimentation (CS), centrifugation-flotation (CF) and a commercial assay for fecal concentration (TF-test). The following parasites were detected: Ancylostoma (37.8%), Giardia (16.9%), Toxocara canis (8.7%), Trichuris vulpis (7.1%), Isospora (3.5%), and Sarcocystis (2.7%). The calculated analytical sensitivity indicated that CF was more accurate (Pvulpis and Giardia infections. However, CF showed significantly higher sensitivity only for Ancylostoma, compared to the other two methods. The kappa index value of diagnostic agreement between TF-test and CF was high for T. canis (83%) and moderate for Giardia (72%) and Ancylostoma (63%). The advantages and limitations of each method were assessed for individual diagnosis and epidemiological investigation. PMID:20452348

  5. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world. PMID:25486880

  6. Assessment of canine intestinal permeability, using 51Cr-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 51Cr-labeled EDTA was validated as a suitable permeability probe in dogs for measurement of passive, unmediated diffusion across intestinal mucosa via intercellular pathways. The 51Cr-labeled EDTA was stable in aqueous solution and did not bind to biologic tissue and fluids. After incubation of 51Cr-labeled EDTA in isolated jejunal loops, analytic subcellular fractionation of jejunal mucosa on reorientating sucrose-density gradients was performed, and no association of 51Cr-labeled EDTA with particulate intracellular organelles was detected. Intravenously administered 51Cr-labeled EDTA was rapidly and completely excreted in urine. Intestinal permeability to 51Cr-labeled EDTA after oral administration was assessed in healthy dogs. The percentage of the administered dose of 51Cr-labeled EDTA excreted in the urine in 24 hours ranged from 2.3 to 17.6% (median, 13%)

  7. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-06-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H1 and H2 histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H1 and H2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systemic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H1 and H2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure.

  8. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systematic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure. (Author)

  9. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H1 and H2 histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H1 and H2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systemic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H1 and H2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure

  10. Autoradiographic study of the permeability characteristics of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This autoradiographic study demonstrates the distribution of a range of small solutes and macromolecules in the mucosa of the guinea-pig small intestine after intracardiac injection. The substances investigated were: 14C-urea, 3H-mannose, 3H-inulin, and 125I polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Small bowel biopsies were taken at intervals from one to 60 minutes after injection and the tissues processed for autoradiography. Light microscopic examination of the autoradiographs showed that the compartmental distribution depended on the molecular size of the substances being studied. Urea and mannose, as small solutes, were uniformly distributed throughout the intravascular, extravascular, and epithelial compartments. Inulin was evenly distributed in the vessel lumen and extravascular space but there was a considerable drop in concentration in the epithelium. PVP exhibited the most marked gradients, the concentration being greatest in the vascular lumina, lower in the extravascular space, least in the epithelium. Thus there appear to be two barriers to macromolecular passage which are freely permeable to small solutes: the capillary wall and the epithelium. At a light microscopical level it was not possible to observe whether the limiting membrane of each of these barriers is the cell plasmalemmal membrane or the basement membrane. The selectivity of the epithelial barrier was greater than that of the capillary barrier. (author)

  11. What are the effects of proton pump inhibitors on the small intestine?

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimori, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Generally, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have great benefit for patients with acid related disease with less frequently occurring side effects. According to a recent report, PPIs provoke dysbiosis of the small intestinal bacterial flora, exacerbating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury. Several meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported that patients treated with PPIs, as well as post-gastrectomy patients, have a higher frequency of small intestinal bac...

  12. Differentially expressed genes in repairing irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the differentially expressed genes correlative to irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract and its repair by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA. Divide 90 mice into 4 groups randomly. For the experimental groups, each mouse was given 40μg foreign mouse small intestinal RNA, and for the control groups, 0.4 mL of 0.9% NaCl. The intestinal specimens were collected form each group 6h, 12h, 24h, 4d and 8d after 60Co γ-rays irradiation respectively. The differentially expressed genes in the tested and control groups were checked and cloned by long-distance PCR based on subtractive hybridization. 165 differential gene clones were obtained, of which 75 named as AXCZI-75 maybe were correlated with the irradiation-induced damage in mouse intestinal tract; and 90 named as XCZ1-90 maybe were correlated with repairing of the damaged mouse intestinal tract by foreign mouse small intestinal RNA

  13. Parietal Strangulation Of Small Intestine In Femoral Hernia Site With Symptoms Of Intestinal Obstruction In Patient With Incidentally Found Small Intestine Tumor - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żyluk Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Richter’s hernia (partial enterocele is the strangulation/entrapment of only part of the circumference of the intestinal wall. It is relatively rare, and presents without mechanical obstruction – giving vague, non-specific symptoms and signs, and a threat of intestinal necrosis, gangrene, followed by perforation. A report of a case of entrapment of the jejunum in the femoral ring, which did not cause the gangrene, but symptoms of mechanical obstruction, is presented. Further inspection of the small bowel in this case revealed an extra-luminal tumour, which appeared to be a GIST. The entrapped part of the jejunum has been released and the tumour has been resected.

  14. Malignant tumors of the small intestine: A histopathologic study of 41 cases among 1,312 consecutive pecimens of small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    There are few comprehensive studies of small intestinal malignancies. The author retrospectively reviewed 1,312 archival pathologic specimens of the small intestine in the last 10 years in our pathologic laboratory in search for malignant tumors of the small intestine. There were 22 cases (1.7%) of primary adenocarcinoma, 3 cases (0.2%) of primary squamous cell carcinoma, 6 cases (0.5%) of metastatic carcinoma, 6 cases (0.5%) of malignant lymphoma, 3 cases (0.2%) of carcinoid tumor, and 1 cas...

  15. Effect of radioprotective biogenic amines on peroxide oxidation of lipids in rat small intestine mucosa microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioprotective biogenic amines, dopamine, histamine, and serotonin inhibited lipid peroxidation in rat small intestine mucosal microsomes. Possible mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are discussed

  16. Canine intestinal helminths in Finland: prevalence, risk factors and endoparasite control practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullola, T; Vierimaa, J; Saari, S; Virtala, A-M; Nikander, S; Sukura, A

    2006-09-10

    In this survey, the prevalence of canine gastrointestinal helminths in Finland was investigated by coprological examination (n = 541) and possible risk factors for helminth infections in dogs were analysed. In addition, the dog owners (n = 296) completed a questionnaire about use of anthelmintics, sources of information about parasites and antiparasitic treatments and reasons for choosing the drugs. The prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths was 5.9%. Eggs from four different species were identified in the faecal samples. Toxocara canis eggs were present in 17 dogs (3.1%), Uncinaria stenocephala eggs in 14 dogs (2.6%) and Diphyllobothrium latum eggs in 2 dogs (0.4%). Moreover, one sample contained eggs of Trichuris vulpis (0.2%). Kennel housing and visits abroad were identified as risk factors for T. canis and U. stenocephala infections. Most dogs (86.0%) received anthelmintic treatment at least once a year. Hunting dogs were dewormed least; one-third was treated less than once a year. Approximately, half of the owners occasionally changed the anthelmintic used. The most important trait of the anthelmintic was its broad spectrum, fenbendazole being the most commonly chosen. Veterinarians, dog magazines and dog breeders were the predominant sources of information concerning parasites and deworming strategies. PMID:16650936

  17. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Anant D

    2014-05-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO. PMID:24944923

  18. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant D Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered gastrointestinal (GI motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO.

  19. Lactoferrin targets T cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Mie; Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E Michael

    2010-01-01

    cells in the lamina propria. However, they were CD3(+), identifying them as T lymphocytes. Lf labeling of these cells was mainly seen in the cytosol, but occasionally nuclear staining was seen as well, suggesting a direct regulatory role of Lf. CONCLUSION: We propose that Lf functions in the immune...... pathogens, and Lf receptors have been identified at the surfaces of a number of different cells. In the small intestine Lf binds to the luminal surface, but its further interaction with the epithelial cells is controversial. METHODS: In the present work, we studied the uptake of Lf in cultured mucosal...... enterocytes by 2 h incubation. However, in addition to enterocytes, a distinct subpopulation of cells in the lamina propria also took up Lf, most likely from the serosal side of the explants. None of these cells were apoptotic, nor did they belong to the predominant group of immunoglobulin-synthesizing plasma...

  20. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia. PMID:26805916

  1. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Rapid expression of cytoskeletal components in microvilli of pig small intestinal mucosal explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Danielsen, E M

    1984-01-01

    Using alkaline extraction to separate cytoskeletal and membrane proteins of intestinal microvilli, the kinetics of assembly of these two microvillar protein compartments was studied by pulse-chase labelling of pig small intestinal mucosal explants, kept in organ culture. Following a 10 min pulse of...... pulse. These different kinetics of appearance indicate that the two microvillar protein compartments have separate mechanisms of biosynthesis and microvillar expression....

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal injury and probiotic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria play a role in the development of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury.Agents such as probiotics,able t omodify the gut ecology,might theoretically be useful in preventing small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs.The clinical studies available so far do suggest that some probiotic agents can be effective in this respect.

  3. Bacterial Overgrowth in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Null Mouse Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Norkina, Oxana; Burnett, Tim G.; De Lisle, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    We recently reported the inflammation of the cystic fibrosis (CF) mouse small intestine, and we hypothesized bacterial overgrowth as a possible cause. Quantitative PCR of bacterial 16S genomic DNA in the CF mouse small intestine revealed an increase of greater than 40-fold compared to controls. Sequencing of 16S PCR products and Gram staining showed that the majority of bacteria in the CF mouse intestine were gram negative. Bacteria were observed to colonize the mucus that accumulates in the ...

  4. Glutathione-S-transferase genotype and p53 mutations in adenocarcinoma of the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum; Kærlev, Linda; Teglbjærg, Peter Stubbe;

    2003-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the small intestine (ASI) is a rare disease of unknown aetiology. The glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) enzyme catalyses the detoxification of compounds involved in carcinogenesis of adenocarcinoma of the stomach, colon and lung, including constituents of tobacco smoke. We...... differences. Thus p53 does not seem to be the target of carcinogens acting in the small intestine....

  5. Breath testing for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: maximizing test accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Richard J; Chey, William D

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has increased considerably owing to a growing recognition of its association with common bowel symptoms including chronic diarrhea, bloating, abdominal distention, and the irritable bowel syndrome. Ideally, an accurate and objective diagnosis of SIBO should be established before initiating antibiotic treatment. Unfortunately, no perfect test exists for the diagnosis of SIBO. The current gold standard, small-bowel aspiration and quantitative culture, is limited by its high cost, invasive nature, lack of standardization, sampling error, and need for dedicated infrastructure. Although not without shortcomings, hydrogen breath testing provides the simplest noninvasive and widely available diagnostic modality for suspected SIBO. Carbohydrates such as lactulose and glucose are the most widely used substrates in hydrogen breath testing, with glucose arguably providing greater testing accuracy. Lactose, fructose, and sorbitol should not be used as substrates in the assessment of suspected SIBO. The measurement of methane in addition to hydrogen can increase the sensitivity of breath testing for SIBO. Diagnostic accuracy of hydrogen breath testing in SIBO can be maximized by careful patient selection for testing, proper test preparation, and standardization of test performance as well as test interpretation. PMID:24095975

  6. Estimation of canine intestinal parasites in Córdoba (Spain) and their risk to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, F J; Hernández, S; López-Cobos, E; Becerra, C; Acosta, I; Martínez-Moreno, A

    2007-01-19

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in dogs was studied in the province of Córdoba (southern Spain), with special attention to those parasites that can be transmitted to man. The experiment was completed with the examination of soil samples from public parks and city gardens. The study was carried out over a population of 1800 animals entered in the Control Animal Centre (CECA) by coprological methods, and within this group, 300 dogs were sacrificed and necropsied. The prevalence of any intestinal parasitic infection was 71.33%. The following parasites of the gastrointestinal tract were recorded: Isospora canis (22%), Isospora (Cystoisospora) spp. (10.22%), Sarcocystis (2.5%), Hammondia/Neospora (1.94%), Giardia canis (1%), Dipylidium caninum (13.2%), Taenia hydatigena (7.66%), Taenia pisiformis (4%), Uncinaria stenocephala (33.27%), Toxascaris leonina (14.94%), Toxocara canis (17.72%) and Trichuris vulpis (1.66%). Related to public health, it is important to point out the presence of T. canis only in puppies younger than one year and Uncinaria, more frequent in adult dogs. Soil samples of parks revealed the presence of eggs of Toxocara, and it suggests the existence of real risk for human infection. PMID:16971046

  7. The role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, intestinal permeability, endotoxaemia, and tumour necrosis factor α in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Wigg, A.; Roberts-Thomson, I; Dymock, R; McCarthy, P.; Grose, R; CUMMINS, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth may contribute to the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, perhaps by increasing intestinal permeability and promoting the absorption of endotoxin or other enteric bacterial products.
AIMS—To investigate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, increased intestinal permeability, elevated endotoxin, and tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) levels in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and in control subjects.
PATIENT...

  8. Small bowel preservation for intestinal transplantation : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roskott, Anne Margot C.; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Koudstaal, Lyan G.; Leuvenink, Henri G. D.; Ploeg, Rutger J.

    2011-01-01

    P>Intestinal transplantation has become the therapy of choice for patients with intestinal failure and life-threatening complications from total parenteral nutrition. Results, however, remain inferior as compared with other transplant types with the quality of the organ graft as the most important f

  9. Cholinergic mediation of small intestinal transit in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that small intestinal transit (SIT) in the rat is not cholinergically mediated. The geometric mean of a marker may be a more powerful method for SIT studies. Therefore, it was their goal to evaluate the effect of muscarinic blockade in normal and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-enhanced SIT using this method. Male, food-fasted rats (190 to 240 g) were first dosed subcutaneously with atropine. 30 min after the atropine the rats received an oral dose of PGE2 at 5.0 mg/kg. 5 min after PGE2, a 51Cr-labeled marker was dosed intraduodenally, and a 25 min transit period followed. The results are: (1) 5.0 mg/kg of PGE2 significantly stimulates the geometric mean of the marker in agreement with previous findings and (2) atropine is inhibitory at doses as low as 0.20 mg/kg for basal SIT and 0.10 mg/kg for PGE2-stimulated SIT. This indicates (1) the rat has cholinergically mediated SIT, and (2) cholinergic activation may be important for PGE2 effects on SIT in the rat

  10. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Zhdanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the frequency of detection of bacterial overgrowth syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C, find a possible relationship between development dysbiotic changes in the small intestine and over chronic hepatitis C were examined 80 patients (68 males and 12 females. In addition to standard laboratory tests for all patients was performed hydrogen breath test with a load of lactulose and fibrogastroduodenoscopy and hepatic biopsy with subsequent histological examination of biopsy. It was found that bacterial overgrowth syndrome, according to the hydrogen breath test detected 40% of patients with chronic hepatitis C, and the severity of it increases with the progression of the pathological process in the liver tissue. urthermore, in patients with endoscopic signs of catarrhal duodenitis according fibrogastroduodenoscopy, the level of molecular hydrogen when the hydrogen breath test at the appropriate stages of measurement was significantly lower, which may be due to the lack of saccharolytic and / or the predominance of proteolytic flora in the development of bacterial overgrowth syndrome.

  11. Unsuccessful alloplastic esophageal replacement with porcine small intestinal submucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doede, Thorsten; Bondartschuk, Michail; Joerck, Carsten; Schulze, Eberhard; Goernig, Matthias

    2009-04-01

    In general, there is no perfect method for esophageal replacement under consideration of the numerous associated risks and complications. The aim of this study was to examine a new material--small intestinal submucosa (SIS)--in alloplastic esophageal replacement. We implanted tubular SIS prosthesis about 4 cm in length in the cervical esophagus of 14 piglets (weight 9-13 kg). For the first 10 days, the animals were fed parenterally, supplemented by free given water, followed by an oral feeding phase. Four weeks after surgery, the animals were sacrificed. Only 1 of the 14 animals survived the study period of 4 weeks. The other piglets had to be sacrificed prematurely because of severe esophageal stenosis. On postmortem exploration, the prosthesis could not be found either macroscopically or histologically. Sutures between the prosthesis and the cervical muscles did not improve the results. Until now, the use of alloplastic materials in esophageal replacement has failed irrespective of the kind of material. As well as in our experiments, severe stenosis had been reported in several animal studies. The reasons for this unacceptable high rate of stenosis after alloplastic esophageal replacement seem to be multifactorial. Possible solutions could be transanastomotic splints, less inert materials, the decrease of anastomotic tension by stay sutures, the use of adult stem cells, and tissue engineering. PMID:19335409

  12. Experimental models of small intestinal transplantation in rats: orthotopic versus heterotopic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao A

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of surgical models of small intestinal transplantation (SITx in rats, namely heterotopic (HIT and orthotopic transplantion (OIT, have been reviewed. In OIT, the small intestine of the recipient is removed and the transplanted intestine replaces it in continuity. On the other hand, in the HIT model, the small intestinal grafts are rendered dysfunctional without alimentary tract continuity. Histological evidence showed that acute rejection appeared earlier in HIT as compared to OIT. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the muscularis externa produced in the chronic rejection process were more pronounced in HIT allografts. The HIT grafts showed severe mucosal atrophy due to the lack of intraluminal trophic factors, because oral feedings can stimulate tropic hormones for mucosal growth, and provide nutrients for enterocytes. Intestinal permeability was consistently higher after HIT than after OIT. The HIT grafts demonstrated less contractility and less response to chemical stimulation than did OIT grafts. The OIT models are advantageous in studies of intraluminal nutrients, and intestinal secretions in these models might modulate the intestinal immune status and possibly delay rejection. The superior intestinal barrier function and the delayed onset of rejection in OIT rats suggest that nutrients and other factors in the succus entericus are important for the maintenance of intestinal graft function.

  13. Double-balloon enteroscopy in detecting small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Fa-chao; PAN De-shou; ZHOU Dian-yuan; XIAO Bing; JIANG Bo; WAN Tian-mo; GUO Yu; ZHOU Dan; WANG Li-hui; CHEN Jin-feng; XIE Lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Digestive tract hemorrhage is a common disease of the digestive system, but about 0.4%-5% intestinal bleeding can not be detected with gastroscope or colonscope.1 Since the intestine is long, tortuous, far away from both ends of the digestive tract and unfixed in position, clinical diagnosis of the bleeding is relatively difficult. Yamamoto and Sugano2 reported the clinical application of double-balloon enteroscope at American DDW in 2003.

  14. Impaired Growth of Small Intestinal Epithelium by Adrenalectomy in Weaning Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional maturation of the small intestine occurs during the weaning period in rats. It is known that this development is facilitated by glucocorticoid. However, the effect of glucocorticoid on morphological development of small intestine has yet to be clarified. The present study evaluated the morphological development and cell proliferation of the small intestine in adrenalectomized (ADX) rat pups. To further understand the mechanism of glucocorticoid effects on intestinal development, we examined the localization of the glucocorticoid receptor in the small intestine. Microscopic analysis showed that growth of villi and crypts is age-dependent, and is significantly attenuated in ADX rats compared with sham-operated rats. BrdU-positive cells, i.e. proliferating cells, were primarily observed in crypt compartments and rapidly increased in number during the early weaning period. The increase in BrdU-positive cells could be attenuated by adrenalectomy. The morphological development of small intestine may be associated with increased proliferation of epithelial cells. On the other hand, glucocorticoid receptors were found in epithelial cells of the mid- and lower villi and not in crypts where BrdU-positive cells were localized. These results indicate that the growth of small intestine is attenuated by adrenalectomy, and that glucocorticoid indirectly acts on proliferation of epithelial cells during the weaning period

  15. Use of small intestine submucosa as ureteral allograft in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando H. Greca

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of small intestine submucosa (SIS in the reconstruction of the ureter in swine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An experimental study was performed in 10 half-breed pigs weighing between 20 and 30 K, in which a previously prepared segment of SIS measuring approximately 2.0 cm was implanted in the upper third part of the right ureter. RESULTS: Of the 10 operated animals, one died 14 days after the surgery due to a dehiscence on the suture line of the implanted graft. The remaining 9 animals were submitted to ultrasound examination of the urinary tract and were sacrificed on the 40th postoperative day. The macroscopic evaluation showed no calculus, incrustation, fistula, abscesses or adhesions in the ureters with the graft. Microscopic evaluation with hematoxylin-eosin and Sirius red showed in the experimental area (graft the presence of urothelium in 100% of the cases, collagen in 100% of the cases, and smooth muscle layer in 87.5% of the animals. In the area adjacent to the graft (proximal and distal, we observed 92.86% of urothelium, 42.86% of collagen and 71.43% of smooth muscle. In the contralateral ureter, it was found 100% of urothelium and smooth muscle and just 11.11% of collagen. The microscopic analysis of the kidneys whose ureters received the graft of SIS evidenced congestion in 55.55%, pelvic edema in 66.66% and interstitial nephritis in 77.78%. Hydronephrosis was present in 33.33% and chronic pyelonephritis in 44%. Only 1 animal presented total absence of glomerulus in the renal parenchyma. CONCLUSION: The SIS graft behaved as a biological tissue support, allowing the regeneration of the urothelium and smooth muscle grow, despite of chronic inflammatory process.

  16. Study on the receptor required for vitamin B12 intestinal absorption in the small intestinal mucous membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One and half hours after feeding of ''Co-vitamin B12 to rats, small intestines were extirpated. Using Weiser's method, gradient isolation of the intestinal epithelial cells from villus to crypt areas were carried out and five different levels of the villus and crypt areas were obtained. The uptakes of 57Co-vitamin B12 and the formations of Receptor-Intrinsic factor-57Co-vitamin B12 complex were measured, indicating that the upper villus cells have a higher uptake of 57Co-vitamin B12 and more increased formation of it than crypt cells of showing a gradient from crypt to villus. Alkaline phosphatase activity of these levels of epithelial cells also showed the same pattern. These results suggest that the receptor activity for vitamin B12 absorption in the intestinal epithelial cells indicate a gradient increase from crypt to villus areas. (auth.)

  17. Sodium recirculation and isotonic transport in toad small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedergaard, S; Larsen, E H; Ussing, H H

    1999-04-01

    Isolated small intestine of toad (Bufo bufo) was mounted on glass tubes for perfusion studies with oxygenated amphibian Ringer's solution containing glucose and acetate. Under open-circuit conditions (Vt = -3.9 +/- 1.8 mV, N = 14) the preparation generated a net influx of 134Cs+. The time course of unidirectional 134Cs+-fluxes was mono-exponential with similar rate constants for influx and outflux when measured in the same preparation. The flux-ratio was time invariant from the beginning of appearance of the tracers to steady state was achieved. Thus, just a single pathway, the paracellular pathway, is available for transepithelial transport of Cs+. From the ratio of unidirectional Cs+-fluxes the paracellular force was calculated to be, 18.2 +/- 1.5 mV (N = 6), which is directed against the small transepithelial potential difference. The paracellular netflux of cesium ions, therefore, is caused by solvent drag. The flux of 134Cs+ entering and trapped by the cells was of a magnitude similar to that passing the paracellular route. Therefore, independent of the convective flux of 134Cs+, every second 134Cs+ ion flowing into the lateral space was pumped into the cells rather than proceeding, via the low resistance pathway, to the serosal bath. It is thus indicated that the paracellular convective flow of 134Cs+ is driven by lateral Na+/K+-pumps. Transepithelial unidirectional 42K+ fluxes did not reach steady state within an observation period of 70 min, indicating that components of the fluxes in both directions pass the large cellular pool of potassium ions. The ratio of unidirectional 24Na+ fluxes was time-variant and declined from an initial value of 3.66 +/- 0.34 to a significantly smaller steady-state value of 2.57 +/- 0.26 (P water-filled pores. With a new set of equations, the fraction of the sodium flux passing the basement membrane barrier of the lateral space that is recirculated through the cellular compartment is estimated. This fraction was, on average, 0

  18. Delayed radiation effects at the small and large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work deals with 56 patients treated within a period of 15 years for delayed radiation damage to the intestine. Gynecologic carcinomas were most frequently the basic disease. By the time the complaints occurred, which mostly took the form of an ileus, the radiation therapy dated back 4 months to 38 years. The mean age of the patients was 60 years. The report points out the diagnostical problem as well as clinical, radiographic and histological findings. Especially hydronephrosis and renal failure were observed as additional radiation sequelae. Whenever possible, resection of the intestinal segment concerned should be carried through. The portion of radiological patients who attracted the disorder was of 72 per cent, with a lethal result in 37 per cent. Half the patients died from an imperfect anastomosis followed by peritonitis. In 16 per cent of the patients recidivations of the malignant basic disease occurred. Whether treatment of radiation damage of the intestine is successful depends on the care taken to give a diagnosis and on the assessment of the intestinal segment damaged. As the actinic injury tends to aggravate early surgical intervention is recommended. Because the treatment of malignant tumours by irradiation is partly quite successful, injuries to the intestine must to some extent be put up with. (orig./MG)

  19. Effects of 9402 to the sensibility of the epithelia of mouse small intestinal crypts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe on the effect of 9402 to the sensibility of the epithelia of mouse small intestinal crypts. Methods: Put tissue slices of the mouse small intestinal under the microscope, and then to observe the number of the regenerated mouse small intestinal crypts under different dose of sole radiation, and radiation plus drug. Results: in the circumstances of different dose, it all showed no obvious difference between the sole radiation group and the group of radiation plus drug. Upon statistic adjustment, it still did not show obvious difference (P>0.05). In case of joint implementation of 9402 and 60Co γ, the sensibility ratio is 1.02. Conclusion: 9402 has no obvious effect to the sensibility of normal small intestinal crypts. (authors)

  20. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus;

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) harbors a complex community of microbes. The microbiota composition varies between different locations in the GI tract, but most studies focus on the fecal microbiota, and that inhabiting the colonic mucosa. Consequently, little is known about the...... microbiota at other parts of the GI tract, which is especially true for the small intestine because of its limited accessibility. Here we deduce an ecological model of the microbiota composition and function in the small intestine, using complementing culture-independent approaches. Phylogenetic microarray...... analyses demonstrated that microbiota compositions that are typically found in effluent samples from ileostomists (subjects without a colon) can also be encountered in the small intestine of healthy individuals. Phylogenetic mapping of small intestinal metagenome of three different ileostomy effluent...

  1. Trophic effect of Efamol on the rat small-intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, A P; Thompson, R P

    1989-11-01

    1. The hypothesis that triacylglycerols are trophic to the small-intestinal mucosa of the rat was tested by comparing the action of the essential fatty acid-rich oil Efamol with that of glucose. 2. Two groups of nine female Wistar rats were pair-fed Vivonex HN with 50% calorie substitution by glucose or Efamol for 21 days. 3. Body weight gain was greater with glucose than with Efamol, but, despite this, whole gut weight, mucosal weight and mucosal protein were increased by Efamol in all small-intestinal segments. Total mucosal DNA was also increased with a significant change in the middle small-intestinal segment. These changes were associated with an increased crypt cell production rate. 4. Fasting plasma levels of peptidyltyrosyltyrosine ('peptide YY'), but not of enteroglucagon, were significantly elevated in the Efamol-fed group. 5. The data show a trophic effect of Efamol on the rat small-intestinal mucosa. Possible mechanisms are discussed. PMID:2582727

  2. The value of digital subtraction angiography in diagnosing small intestinal hemorrhage with unknown reasons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the diagnostic value of DSA for unknown reason hemorrhage of small intestine. Methods: 25 patients with hemorrhage of small intestine were performed angiography with Seldinger's technique through superior mesenteric artery. Results: Eleven cases demonstrated direct signs of hemorrhage, 12 cases of indirect signs of hemorrhage and 5 with both of the signs. The positive rate of hemorrhage was 72% including 10 cases of tumor (6 leiomyomas, 2 leiomyosarcomas, 1 interstitial tumor, 1 small intestinal cancer), 4 cases of Meckel's diverticulum, 3 cases of vascular malformation and 1 case of inflammation. The coincidence rate of positive cases with pathology was 75% and the diagnostic accuracy of localization was 100%. Conclusions: DSA angiography is very helpful for determining the location and character of unknown reason hemorrhage of small intestine. (authors)

  3. Current X-ray diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper evaluates the patients for x-ray diagnosis of Crohn's disease of the small intestine in 18 patients using the new barium contrast medium Entero-VU intended for examination of the small intestine. The authors provide a detailed description of the examination technique, x-ray appearance of Crohn's disease and make a comparative analysis of the diagnostic potential for the use of the common barium suspension and the contrast agent Entero-VU. The cases of Crohn's disease analyzed in the paper encompass its different stages and sites in the small intestine. The group of patients presenting with Crohn's disease accrued subjects who had undergone surgical treatment followed by reexamination of the small intestine using Entero-VU

  4. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Best, Kate E

    2012-09-01

    The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe.

  5. GLP-1 and GIP are colocalized in a subset of endocrine cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 are thought to be produced in separate endocrine cells located in the proximal and distal ends of the mammalian small intestine, respectively. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using double immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we found that GLP-1 was...... colocalized with either GIP or PYY in endocrine cells of the porcine, rat, and human small intestines, whereas GIP and PYY were rarely colocalized. Thus, of all the cells staining positively for either GLP-1, GIP, or both, 55-75% were GLP-1 and GIP double-stained in the mid-small intestine. Concentrations of...... extractable GIP and PYY were highest in the midjejunum [154 (95-167) and 141 (67-158) pmol/g, median and range, respectively], whereas GLP-1 concentrations were highest in the ileum [92 (80-207) pmol/l], but GLP-1, GIP, and PYY immunoreactive cells were found throughout the porcine small intestine...

  6. Clinical canine parvovirus type 2C infection in a group of Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjeltema, Jenessa; Murphy, Hayley; Rivera, Sam

    2015-03-01

    Despite the occurrence of clinical disease in a wide range of carnivore hosts, only vague accounts of clinical canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) in any otter species have been reported in the literature. Over the course of 25 days, nine Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea) presented for evaluation of inappetence, lethargy, vomiting, and diarrhea. A diagnosis of canine parvovirus type 2c was made based on electron microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing of group fecal samples. Supportive care was provided based on individual clinical assessment and included subcutaneous crystalline fluid therapy, antiemetics, antibiotics, appetite stimulants, and a neuraminidase inhibitor. Five of the nine otters exhibited moderate to severe disease requiring treatment, and one case was fatal despite supportive efforts. In light of this case report, CPV-2 should be recognized as a potential cause of gastrointestinal disease in Asian small-clawed otters. PMID:25831584

  7. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Xuan Wang; Wan-Chun Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice,and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress.METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10),bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa.RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli).There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10 (CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), ,P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related

  8. Small bowel preservation for intestinal transplantation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskott, Anne Margot C; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Dijkstra, Gerard; Koudstaal, Lyan G; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Ploeg, Rutger J

    2011-02-01

    Intestinal transplantation has become the therapy of choice for patients with intestinal failure and life-threatening complications from total parenteral nutrition. Results, however, remain inferior as compared with other transplant types with the quality of the organ graft as the most important factor of outcome after transplantation. The intestine is extremely sensitive to ischemia. Unfortunately, a relatively long ischemic preservation period is inevitable. The current standard in organ preservation [cold storage (CS) with University of Wisconsin solution] was developed for kidney/liver preservation and is suboptimal for the intestinal graft despite good results for other organs. This review aimed at appraising the results from the use of previously applied and recently developed preservation solutions and techniques to identify key areas for improvement. As the studies available do not reveal the most effective method for intestinal preservation, an optimal strategy will result from a synergistic effect of different vital elements identified from a review of published material from the literature. A key factor is the composition of the solution using a low-viscosity solution to facilitate washout of blood, including amino acids to improve viability, impermeants and colloids to prevent edema, and buffer for pH-homeostasis. Optimizing conditions include a vascular flush before CS and luminal preservation. The most effective composition of the luminal solution and a practical, clinically applicable optimal technique are yet to reach finality. Short-duration oxygenated arterial and/or luminal perfusion have to be considered. Thus, a tailor-made approach to luminal preservation solution and technique need further investigation in transplant models and the human setting to develop the ultimate technique meeting the physiologic demands of the intestinal graft during preservation. PMID:21083772

  9. Small intestinal nodular lymphoid hyperplasia in patients with giardiasis and normal serum immunoglobulins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, H; Jalan, K. N.; Maitra, T. K.; Agarwal, S. K.; Mahalanabis, D

    1983-01-01

    Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the upper small intestine was demonstrated in 25 patients with giardiasis. All had normal serum immunoglobulin levels and seven patients initially presented with clinical findings suggestive of an abdominal lymphoma. In only two, however, was the diagnosis of primary jejunal lymphoma confirmed. It is possible that an aetiological relationship exists between recurrent parasitic infestation and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the upper small intestine.

  10. Effects of Histamine on Cultured Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Murine Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byung Joo; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Euiyong; So, Insuk

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and histamine is known to regulate neuronal activity, control vascular tone, alter endothelial permeability, and modulate gastric acid secretion. However, the action mechanisms of histamine in mouse small intestinal ICCs have not been previously investigated, and thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of histamine on mouse small intestinal ICCs, and sought to identify the receptors invol...

  11. Protection against radiation injury to the small intestine by an intrapelvic silicone breast prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a patient with non resectable pelvi-perineal recurrence of epidermoid carcinoma of the anus, a silicone breast prosthesis inserted into the lower pelvis made it possible to irradiate the malignant lesion without risk of radiation-induced damage to the small intestine displaced upward by the prosthesis. This unusual technique, indicated when epipooplasty cannot be performed, has several advantages over other techniques of radioprotection of the small intestine

  12. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    OpenAIRE

    McCallum Richard W; Sostarich Sandra; Reddymasu Savio C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a gluc...

  13. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although...

  14. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Lisowska; Andrzej Pogorzelski; Grzegorz Oracz; Wojciech Skorupa; Szczepan Cofta; Jerzy Socha; Jarosław Walkowiak

    2010-01-01

    Background. Available data suggests that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may frequently occur in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. SIBO may result in synthesis of enterotoxic and unabsorbable metabolites which may cause mucosal damage and – additionally – interfere with digestion and absorption. Such a relationship was documented in CF mouse model. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the influence of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine in CF pat...

  15. Cellular differentiation in the emerging fetal rat small intestinal epithelium: mosaic patterns of gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, D.C.; Ong, D E; Gordon, J I

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the pattern of differentiation of the small intestinal epithelium in fetal rats during the 17th through 21st days of gestation. Five genes expressed in late fetal, neonatal, and adult enterocytes were used as markers of differentiation. They encode three homologous small cytoplasmic hydrophobic ligand binding proteins--liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), and cellular retinol binding protein II (CRBP II)--and two apolipopr...

  16. Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced OEA signaling in small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jin; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Guijarro, Ana; Schwartz, Gary J.; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of dietary fat stimulates production of the small-intestinal satiety factors oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NPPE), which reduce food intake through a combination of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) actions. Previous studies have shown that sympathetic innervation of the gut is necessary for duodenal infusions of fat to induce satiety, suggesting that sympathetic activity may engage small-intestinal satiety signals such as OEA and NPPE. In the prese...

  17. CD36 gene deletion decreases oleoylethanolamide levels in small intestine of free-feeding mice

    OpenAIRE

    Guijarro, Ana; Fu, Jin; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator that decreases food intake and enhances lipid catabolism. Dietary fat stimulates OEA mobilization in the proximal small intestine, through a mechanism that requires the participation of the membrane glycoprotein CD36 (fatty acid translocase, FAT). CD36 is highly expressed in small-intestinal enterocytes and is involved in fatty acid uptake and intracellular signaling. Here, we analyze the impact of genetic CD36 deletion on OEA productio...

  18. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-[14C]xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in 14CO2 excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an α2-adrenergic agonist

  19. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  20. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction ampersand classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction

  1. Small intestinal emptying time in normal Beagle dogs: a contrast radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric emptying time and small intestinal transit time in dogs are frequently discussed. However, it is often of interest to the radiologist to know what normal small intestinal emptying times should be. A total of 15 upper gastrointestinal studies was performed on five internal parasite-free, normal, standard Beagle dogs with three studies on each dog, 6 days apart. The ages and weights of the dogs ranged from 2–8 years and from 12.4–13.7 kg, respectively. Following 24-hour fasting, a dose of 10 ml/kg bw of 60% wt/vol barium sulfate suspension was administered through a stomach tube. Then, sequential radiographs were made at 30-minute intervals until the entire contrast medium column was in the colon and cecum. The mean, standard deviation, and range of gastric emptying time, small intestinal transit time, and small intestinal emptying time were 76 ± 16.7 (30–120), 73 ± 16.4 (30–120), and 214 ± 25.1 (180–300) minutes, respectively. This study offers the possibility that small intestinal emptying time may be used to further evaluate patients with suspected small intestinal partial obstruction, pseudo-obstruction, ischemia, or lymphangiectasia

  2. Dietary protein absorption of the small intestine in human neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The intestine plays a key role in the absorption of dietary proteins, which determines growth of human neonates. Bowel resection in the neonatal period brings loss of absorptive and protective surface and may consequently lead to malabsorption of dietary nutrients. However, there are no

  3. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with small intestinal malignancy and cervical carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Jie Li; Zhi-Qing Wang; Bao-Ping Wu

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of 30-year-old woman with PeutzJeghers syndrome (P.1S).Because of small intestinal obstruction,she received the small intestinal polypectomy in 2001,and the pathological diagnosis was Peutz-Jeghers polyp canceration (mucinous adenocarcinoma,infiltrating full-thickness of the intestine).The patient did not feel uncomfortable after 6 mo of chemotherapy and other management.We kept a follow-up study on her and found that she suffered from cervical cancer in 2007,with a pathological diagnosis of cervical adenosquamous carcinoma.The patient presented with typical features of PJS,but without a family history.The PJS accompanied with both small intestinal and cervical malignancies has not been reported so far in the world.

  4. The application of naso-intestinal decompression intubation in the comprehensive treatment of small intestine obstruction caused by advanced malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of naso-intestinal decompression intubation in the comprehensive treatment of small intestine obstruction caused by advanced malignant tumors. Methods: Under DSA guidance, naso-intestinal decompression intubation was performed in 18 patients with small intestine obstruction caused by advanced malignant tumors. The naso-intestinal decompression tube was inserted into the small intestine and its tip was placed in the vicinity of ligament of Treitz. The patients' clinical manifestations and the drainage condition were observed and recorded. Contrast media was injected through the tube to clarify the diagnosis. Oral administration of supportan was applied in 15 patients after abdominal distension relieved. Results: The naso-intestinal decompression tube was successfully inserted to scheduled position in all 18 patients and the symptoms of intestinal obstruction were basically alleviated in 2-7 days after the procedure. Intestinal contrast examination showed positive imaging signs. The malnutrition condition was obviously improved in 15 patients after orally taking supportan for two weeks. Conclusion: DSA-guided naso-intestinal decompression intubation is a technically simple and clinically effective method for the treatment of small bowel obstruction caused by intraperitoneal metastases, therefore, it is worthy of clinical use. (authors)

  5. Titanium dioxide induced inflammation in the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolina Maciel Nogueira; Walter Mendes de Azevedo; Maria Lucia Zaidan Dagli; Sérgio Hiroshi Toma; André Zonetti de Arruda Leite; Maria Laura Lordello; I(e)da Nishitokukado

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2)nanoparticles (NPTiO2) and microparticles (MPTiO2)on the inflammatory response in the small intestine of mice.METHODS:BI 57/6 male mice received distilled water suspensions containing TiO2 (100 mg/kg body weight)as NPTiO2 (66 nm),or MPTiO2 (260 nm) by gavage for 10 d,once a day; the control group received only distilled water.At the end of the treatment the duodenum,jejunum and ileum were extracted for assessment of cytokines,inflammatory cells and titanium content.The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b,IL-4,IL-6,IL-8,IL-IO,IL-12,IL-13,IL-17,IL-23,tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α),intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in segments of jejunum and ileum (mucosa and underlying muscular tissue).CD4+ and CD8+ T cells,natural killer cells,and dendritic cells were evaluated in duodenum,jejunum and ileum samples fixed in 10% formalin by immunohistochemistry.The titanium content was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.RESULTS:We found increased levels of T CD4+ cells (cells/mm2) in duodenum:NP 1240 ± 139.4,MP 1070 ± 154.7 vs 458 ±-50.39 (P < 0.01); jejunum:NP 908.4 ± 130.3,MP 813.8 ± 103.8 vs 526.6 ±-61.43 (P < 0.05);and ileum:NP 818.60 ± 123.0,MP 640.1 ± 32.75 vs 466.9 ± 22.4 (P < 0.05).In comparison to the control group,the groups receiving TiO2 showed a statistically significant increase in the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-12,IL-4,IL-23,TNF-α,IFN-γ,and TGF-β.The cytokine production was more pronounced in the ileum (mean ± SE):IL-12:NP 33.98 ±-11.76,MP 74.11 ± 25.65 vs 19.06 ± 3.92 (P < 0.05); IL-4:NP 17.36 ± 9.96,MP 22.94 ±-7.47 vs 2.19 ± 0.65 (P < 0.05); IL-23:NP 157.20 ± 75.80,MP 134.50 ±-38.31 vs 22.34 ±-5.81 (P < 0.05); TNFα:NP 3.71 ± 1.33,MP 5.44 ± 1.67 vs 0.99± 019 (P < 0.05); IFNy:NP 15.85± 9.99,MP 34.08 ± 11.44 vs 2.81 ± 0.69 (P

  6. Sobrecrecimiento bacteriano intestinal en pacientes con pancreatitis crónica Small intestine bacterial overgrowth in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Mancilla A; Ana María Madrid S; Carmen Hurtado H; Carolina Orellana B; Margarita Peña Z; Eduardo Tobar A; Zoltán Berger F

    2008-01-01

    Background: Previous reports describe 30-40% of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP), SIBO is a cause of persistent symptoms in this group of patients even when they are treated with pancreatic enzymes. Aim: To asses the frequency of SIBO in patients with CP. Patients and methods: We studied 14 patients with CP using an hydrogen breath test with lactulose to detect SIBO, a nonabsorbable carbohydrate, whose results are not influenced by the pre...

  7. Antibodies to selected canine pathogens and infestation with intestinal helminths in golden jackals (Canis aureus) in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, M; Yakobson, B; Baneth, G; King, R; Dar-Verker, S; Markovics, A; Aroch, I

    2001-07-01

    Blood and fecal samples, collected from 46 healthy adult free-ranging golden jackals captured in two different locations in Israel, were examined. A serological Study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of circulating antibodies reacting with four common canine pathogens: canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), Ehrlichia canis and Leishmania infantum. Faecal flotation and haematological tests were also performed. The seroprevalence of CPV, E. canis, CDV, and L. infantum were 72.3% (34/47), 54.3% (25/46), 52.2% (24/46), and 6.5% (3/46) respectively. Faecal flotation tests revealed a high prevalence of Ancylostoma caninum (13/17, 76%) and a low prevalence of Dipilidium caninum infestation. Examination of blood smears revealed Hepatazoon canis gamonts in one jackal. Golden jackals are among the most common free-ranging carnivores in Israel and neighboring countries. Their habitats are in proximity to densely populated areas and they bear close phylogenic relation to the domestic dog. These facts, combined with the high prevalence of the jackals' exposure to the major canine pathogens demonstrated in this study, suggest that they may serve as a reservoir for the transmission of certain diseases to domestic dogs. PMID:11409931

  8. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  9. Magnesium sulfate as an oral contrast medium in magnetic resonance imaging of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To explore the use of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) as an oral contrast medium (CM) in MRI of the small intestine. Methods: By comparing MgSO4 SNRs at different concentrations, we determined that 2.5% MgSO4 is the ideal concentration for small bowel MRI. Twenty volunteers underwent MRI after drinking 2.5% MgSO4. Thirty-one patients with clinical suspicion of small intestinal pathology underwent both MRI and the air-barium contrast examination. The patient's tolerance, side effects and complications were noted. Results: 2.5% MgSO4 can decrease the absorption of water and fully fill the enteric cavity, thereby increasing the contrast between the intestinal wall and lumen and facilitating radiographic examination of the small bowel. The mean diameter of the small intestine was 19.8 ± 1.21 mm in the 20 volunteers consuming 2.5% MgSO4 and 12.7 ± 0.84 mm in the 20 volunteers given water. There was a significant difference (P 0.05) in side effects between MgSO4 and water groups. Small intestinal MRI was successfully performed in all 31 patients, who were also examined by the double contrast barium, which gave almost identical diagnoses to MRI in all cases except for 1 patient with small intestinal hemorrhage. Conclusions: MRI with 2.5% MgSO4 can demonstrate intestinal abnormalities. Therefore, 2.5% MgSO4 solution is an ideal oral CM for small bowel MRI.

  10. Reappraisal of the Immunophenotype of Pancreatic Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms (IPMNs)—Gastric Pyloric and Small Intestinal Immunophenotype Expression in Gastric and Intestinal Type IPMNs—

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are mucin-producing neoplasms of the main and/or branch pancreatic ducts. To assess differences between various IPMN subtypes, immunohistochemical markers of gastric surface mucous cells (MUC5AC), gastric gland mucous cells (MUC6 and GlcNAcα1→4Galβ→R), gastric pyloric and duodenal epithelial cells (PDX1), intestinal cells (MUC2 and CDX2), small intestinal cells (CPS1) and large intestinal cells (SATB2) were evaluated in 33 surgically treated IPMNs. MUC2 expression classified IPMNs into gastric (n=17), intestinal (n=8) and mixed gastric and intestinal type (collision=7, composite=1). No differences in age or sex were observed among these types. MUC5AC and PDX1 were expressed in all IPMNs. MUC6 expression was higher in gastric and mixed types than in intestinal type. GlcNAcα1→4Galβ→R was detected in gastric and mixed type, but not in intestinal type. MUC2 and CDX2 expression were higher in intestinal type than gastric and mixed type. CPS1 expression was higher in intestinal type than gastric type. SATB2 was not observed in any IPMNs. Frequent abrupt transition between the two IPMN types in mixed-type IPMNs was observed. Gastric pyloric and small intestinal differentiation are characteristic of gastric and intestinal type IPMN, respectively, and these two IPMN types may have distinct pathogenesis

  11. Effect of acute mesenteric ischemia on rat small intestinal contractility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    analyzed from the pressure-diameter curves. Distension-induced contraction thresholds and maximum contraction amplitude of basic and flow-induced contractions were calculated in terms of mechanical stress and strain. Differences among different groups were analyzed using t-test and ANOVA . Results: After...... ischemia for 60 and 120 min, the intestinal wall thickness and wall area were significantly smaller (p < 0.05); the maximum stresses of flow- induced contractions were lower at low outlet resistance pressures (p < 0.05); the maximum pressures and strain was lower at all outlet resistance pressures (p < 0.......05 and p < 0.01); the pressure and stress thresholds to induce phasic contraction were significantly higher during ramp distension (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). These abovementioned changes were not significant after ischemia for 15 and 30 min (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The intestinal contractility was significantly...

  12. Metabolism of green tea catechins in the human small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Schantz, Markus; Erk, Thomas; Richling, Elke

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Numerous studies have shown that green tea polyphenols can be degraded in the colon, and there is abundant knowledge about the metabolites of these substances that appear in urine and plasma after green tea ingestion. However, there is very little information on the extent and nature of intestinal degradation of green tea catechins in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study presented here was to examine in detail the microbial metabolism and chemical stability of these po...

  13. Mechanisms of calcium transport in small intestine. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vitamin D hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, was demonstrated to be the prime hormonal agent regulating intestinal absorption of divalent cations. Production of the vitamin D hormone is, in turn, regulated by parathyroid hormone, low dietary calcium, low plasma phosphorus, and is suppressed by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, by high plasma phosphorus, high plasma calcium, and the absence of parathyroid hormone. A variety of analogs of the vitamin D hormone were prepared. In addition, the preparation of radiolabeled vitamin D hormone was accomplished using chemical synthesis, and this highly radioactive substance was found to localize in the nuclei of the intestinal villus cells that promote intestinal absorption of calcium. A receptor for the vitamin D hormone was also located, and the general mechanism of response to the vitamin D hormone included the binding to a receptor molecule, transfer to the nucleus, transcription of specific genes followed by translation to transport proteins. Methods were developed for the discovery of the appropriate gene products that play a role in calcium transport

  14. Perforated small intestine in a patient with T-cell lymphoma; a rare cause of peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrişor Banu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nontraumatic perforations of the small intestine are pathological entities with particular aspects in respect to diagnosis and treatment. These peculiarities derive from the nonspecific clinical expression of the peritonitis syndrome, and from the multitude of causes that might be the primary sources of the perforation: foreign bodies, inflammatory diseases, tumors, infectious diseases, etc. Accordingly, in most cases intestinal perforation is discovered only by laparotomy and the definitive diagnosis is available only after histopathologic examination. Small bowel malignancies are rare; among them, lymphomas rank third in frequency, being mostly B-cell non Hodgkin lymphomas. Only 10% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas are with T-cell. We report the case of a 57 years’ old woman with intestinal T-cell lymphoma, whose first clinical symptomatology was related to a complication represented by perforation of the small intestine. Laparotomy performed in emergency identified an ulcerative lesion with perforation in the jejunum, which required segmental enterectomy with anastomosis. The nonspecific clinical manifestations of intestinal lymphomas make from diagnosis a difficult procedure. Due to the fact that surgery does not have a definite place in the treatment of the small intestinal lymphomas (for cases complicated with perforation, and beyond the morbidity associated with the surgery performed in emergency conditions, prognosis of these patients is finally given by the possibility to control the systemic disease through adjuvant therapy.

  15. Prostacyclin inhibits gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit in rats and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) antagonizes 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2-induced diarrhea in rats, presumably by inhibiting the fluid accumulation of ''enteropooling'' in the small intestine. The effect of PGI2 on gastric emptying, small intestinal transit, and colonic transit was examined in rats and dogs to determine if interference with propulsion might also contribute to the antidiarrheal properties of this compound. Rats implanted with chronic duodenal cannulas were given subcutaneous PGI2 (0.1-1000 microgram/kg) followed 10 min later by intragastric 2Cr and a visually detectable duodenal transit marker. Forty-five minutes later, the animals were killed. Subcutaneous PGI2 inhibited gastric emptying maximally at 10 micrograms/kg. Small-intestinal transit was significantly decreased at 50 micrograms/kg and almost completely suppressed at 1.0 mg/kg. Subcutaneous naloxone (0.5 mg/kg) given 10 min before and 20 min after subcutaneous PGI2 administration did not block PGI2's effects. Intravenous or oral PGI2, had none of these effects. Small intestinal transit was only decreased by PGI2 infusion, suggesting that this parameter was more sensitive to a sustained blood level than gastric emptying. Hourly injections of subcutaneous PGI2 (0.5 mg/kg) had no effect on rat colonic transit measured over a 3-h period after deposition of the transit marker through a colonic cannula in a manner similar to that described for small-intestinal transit above. Small-intestinal transit was also measured in dogs given a barium suspension through a chronic duodenal cannula. In vehicle-treated dogs, barium reached the cecal area in an average of 2.8 h after instillation. In PGI2-treated dogs, barium never reached the cecum in the 5-h examination period. Thus, PGI2 inhibits gastric emptying in rat and small-intestinal transit in rat and dog but has no effect on rat colonic transit

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1 mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC.

  17. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  18. Smooth muscle NOS, colocalized with caveolin-1, modulates contraction in mouse small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F.; Cho, Woo Jung; Cena, Jonathan; Schulz, Richard; Daniel, Edwin E

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in myenteric neurons is activated during peristalsis to produce nitric oxide which relaxes intestinal smooth muscle. A putative nNOS is also found in the membrane of intestinal smooth muscle cells in mouse and dog. In this study we studied the possible functions of this nNOS expressed in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle colocalized with caveolin-1(Cav-1). Cav-1 knockout mice lacked nNOS in smooth muscle and provided control tissues. 60 mM KCl was used...

  19. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 secretion from canine L-cells is increased by glucose-dependent-insulinotropic peptide but unaffected by glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholt, A B; Buchan, A M; Kofod, Hans

    1998-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) is a potent insulinotropic peptide released from the small intestine. To investigate the regulation of GLP-1 secretion, we established a GLP-1 release assay based on primary canine intestinal L-cells. The ileal mucosa was digested with collagenase/EDTA t...

  20. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4+ IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4+ IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4+ IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ LPLs and primed splenic CD4+ T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4+ IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo

  1. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  2. [The immuno-microbiological characteristics of the small intestine and the translocation of the enteral microflora in acute intestinal obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, V N; Belik, B M; Poliak, A I; Vasil'eva, L I; Bragina, L E

    1999-01-01

    The complex examination of 72 patients with acute ileus (AI) of nontumor nature with different severity of endotoxicosis was carried out. The study revealed that AI was accompanied by deep suppression of the immunosecretory and motor evacuatory function of the small intestine, as well as by its pronounced bacterial contamination, mainly due to the significant quantitative prevalence of Gram-negative microflora. The combination of these factors played the key role in the increase of the permeability of the enteric barrier for symbiotic microflora and its massive translocation from the intestinal tract to the internal organs of the body (peritoneal exudate, portal bed), which directly correlated with the severity of endotoxicosis in AI patients. The deficiency of the barrier function of the liver was accompanied by the penetration of infective agents into the general blood stream, thus causing the development of endotoxic shock in AI patients. The analysis of the results thus obtained made it possible to determine the main ways for the elimination of intestinogenic intoxication in AI; they should be aimed at the bacterial decontamination of the small intestine, the restoration of its motor evacuatory and protective barrier functions, the liquidation of portal and systemic bacteremia, the correction of the functional deficiency of the liver. PMID:10852058

  3. Herbal Therapy Is Equivalent to Rifaximin for the Treatment of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Chedid, Victor; Dhalla, Sameer; Clarke, John O.; Roland, Bani Chander; Dunbar, Kerry B.; Koh, Joyce; Justino, Edmundo; Tomakin, Eric; Mullin, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patients with small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) have chronic intestinal and extraintestinal symptomatology which adversely affects their quality of life. Present treatment of SIBO is limited to oral antibiotics with variable success. A growing number of patients are interested in using complementary and alternative therapies for their gastrointestinal health. The objective was to determine the remission rate of SIBO using either the antibiotic rifaximin or herbals in a te...

  4. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Therrien, Amelie; Bouchard, Simon; SIDANI, SACHA; Bouin, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or si...

  5. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth Diagnosed by Glucose Hydrogen Breath Test in Post-cholecystectomy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hea Jung; Paik, Chang-Nyol; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Kang-Moon; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients undergoing cholecystectomy may have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). We investigated the prevalence and characteristics of SIBO in patients with intestinal symptoms following cholecystectomy. Methods Sixty-two patients following cholecystectomy, 145 with functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGIDs), and 30 healthy controls undergoing hydrogen (H2)-methane (CH4) glucose breath test (GBT) were included in the study. Before performing GBT, all patients were ...

  6. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intest...

  7. Perforated small intestine in a patient with T-cell lymphoma; a rare cause of peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Petrişor Banu; Vlad D. Constantin; Florian Popa; Mihaela F. Nistor

    2016-01-01

    The nontraumatic perforations of the small intestine are pathological entities with particular aspects in respect to diagnosis and treatment. These peculiarities derive from the nonspecific clinical expression of the peritonitis syndrome, and from the multitude of causes that might be the primary sources of the perforation: foreign bodies, inflammatory diseases, tumors, infectious diseases, etc. Accordingly, in most cases intestinal perforation is discovered only by laparotomy and the definit...

  8. Regulation of homeostasis in the process of protein absorption from small intestine to blood

    OpenAIRE

    Akmal Yuldashev; Ravshan Rahmanov; Mukaddas Rahmatova; Margarita Tarinova; Aziza Nishanova; Gulnara Islamova

    2010-01-01

    Electron microscopic and immunоfluorescent study in rats aged 1 and 3 days after birth allowed to establish a process of absorption of protein from the small intestine into the lymph and blood. Blood homeostasis was provided by the proteins filtrated from glomerular capillaries of nephrons and reabsorbed by the epithelial cells in canaliculi of nephrons. The absorbed natural heterologous protein was depleted by lysosomes of epithelial cells of intestine and kidneys and macrophages. It support...

  9. Presentation of small intestinal and mesenteric injuries caused by abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed 58 patients who had undergone surgery at our institute for small intestinal and mesenteric injuries caused by abdominal trauma between January 1997 and December 2007. 47 men and 11 women were examined, ranging in age from 18 to 81 years (average 51 yrs). Shock on admission was present in 39.7% of the patients and generalized abdominal tenderness in 60.3%. Abdominal ultrasonography was positive for fluid in 46/58 cases (79.3%). Computed tomography was positive for fluid in 46/57 cases (80.7%), and for free air in 20/47 cases (35.1%). It has been suggested that small intestinal and mesenteric injuries were difficult to diagnose, however in our study, computed tomography was helpful to diagnose small intestinal and mesenteric injuries. In some studies, a delay in the diagnosis of small intestinal and mesenteric injuries resulted in clinical increases in hospital stay and intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, morbidity and mortality. Our univariate analysis concluded that early diagnosis was not associated with morbidity and mortality. We suggested that low platelet counts was one of the predictive indicators regarding the mortality rate of small intestinal and mesenteric injuries. (author)

  10. Small intestine and ovarian metastasis in a patient with a history of cardiac fibrosacoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic tumors involving the small bowel are much more common than primary neoplasms. The most common metastases to the small intestine are those arising from other intra-abdominal organs. Metastases from extra-abdominal tumors are rare but may be found in patients with adenocarcinoma of the breast and carcinoma of the lung. Cutaneous melanoma is the most common extra-abdominal source involving the small intestine, with involvement of the small intestine noted in more than half of the patients dying from malignant melanoma [1]. While intestinal metastasis from sarcoma has been described, this is an extremely rare occurrence especially from a rare malignant sarcoma of cardiac origin. The dismal prognosis of cardiac sarcomas results from extensive local invasion at presentation or distant metastasis. Metastasis to the small bowel may cause obstruction, bleeding, or incapacitates in which the diagnosis may be delayed because of rarity of the condition and mild and vague abdominal symptoms at early presentation. In this report, a 35 year old woman a known case of cardiac fibrosarcoma was admitted to the emergency ward with abdominal pain and distension, bloody diarrhea, and recurrent nausea and vomiting. Jejuna-jejunal invagination was diagnosed at laparotomy along with tumoral involvement of the left ovary. Histopathological study showed that there was a fibrosarcoma compatible with the earlier diagnosis of primary cardiac tumor. We have described some aspects of diagnosis and treatment of this rare cause of intestinal intussusception

  11. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control(©), ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule. PMID:26898436

  12. The small intestinal mucosa and its stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossano Ambu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this review a brief summary of the embryology and histology of the gastrointestinal tract is provided. In the second part intestinal stem cells (ISCs are discussed. Several signaling pathways play a crucial role in the crypt base in the regulation of ISC proliferation and self-renewal; Wnt, Notch, BMP, Ephrin, JAK/STAT1, PTEN, AKT, PI3K and many more. Numerous investigators are involved in studying the location, number, and behavior of ISCs within the base of the intestinal crypts. Several markers are espressed by ISCs. Among these, Leucine-rich-repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor-5 (Lgr5, Sox9, Prominin-1, DCAMKL-1, EphB2, p-PTEN, p-AKT, Fgfr3, m-TER, and CD44. Stem cell therapy has shown promise for the treatment of some diseases characterized by tissue damage with ischemic and inflammatory lesions like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC.Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  13. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors. A case of small intestine stromal tumor (SIST) with an uncertain biological aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglino, F; Borello, M; Cumbo, P; Pietribiasi, F; Poma, A; Seglie, E; Do, D

    2000-05-01

    Tumors of the small intestine are relatively rare. The diagnosis is difficult to establish because the symptoms are vague and non-specific. Although the small intestine constitutes 75% of the length and over 90% of the mucosal surface area of the gastrointestinal tract, only 1 to 2% of gastrointestinal malignancies occur in this segment. Metastases are usually present at the time of diagnosis. The outcome of these patients can be improved if the possibility of a malignant small bowel tumor is considered in all cases of unexplained abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding, especially in younger age. Malignant tumors occur with increasing frequency in distal small bowel with a preponderance of malignant lesions in the ileum compared with the jejunum and the duodenum. Adenocarcinoma is the most common tumor of the primary malignant small bowel tumors, followed by carcinoid, lymphoma and leiomyosarcoma. Mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, traditionally regarded as smooth muscle tumors, have demonstrated different cellular differentiations based on immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features. Therefore the terms leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma have been replaced by a more encompassing term, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The majority of GISTs occurs in the stomach; stromal tumors involving the small intestine (SISTs) are far less common but seem to have greater malignant potential. The clinical a case of a small intestinal stromal tumor (SIST), localised in the jejunum and characterised by an uncertain histological aspect, is presented and a review of the literature is made. PMID:10953571

  14. Regional blood flow and the localisation of lymphoblasts in the small intestine of the mouse: effect of an elemental diet.

    OpenAIRE

    Ottaway, C A; Parrott, D M

    1981-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that food antigens influence the in vivo migration of lymphoblasts to the small intestine, the effect of an elemental diet (Vivonex) on the distribution of lymphoblasts within the small intestine of mice has been examined. Viable lymphoblasts from the mesenteric nodes of conventionally fed animals were labelled in vitro and given intravenously to recipient mice fed either a standard diet or elemental diet. The localisation of these cells within the small intestine was a...

  15. Recombinant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Accelerates Recovery of Mouse Small Intestinal Mucosa After Radiation Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether systemically administered recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) accelerates the recovery of mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation. Methods and Materials: A mouse mucosal damage model was established by administering radiation to male BALB/c mice with a single dose of 15 Gy applied to the abdomen. After irradiation, rhEGF was administered subcutaneously at various doses (0.04, 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/kg/day) eight times at 2- to 3-day intervals. The evaluation methods included histologic changes of small intestinal mucosa, change in body weight, frequency of diarrhea, and survival rate. Results: The recovery of small intestinal mucosa after irradiation was significantly improved in the mice treated with a high dose of rhEGF. In the mice that underwent irradiation without rhEGF treatment, intestinal mucosal ulceration, mucosal layer damage, and severe inflammation occurred. The regeneration of villi was noticeable in mice treated with more than 0.2 mg/kg rhEGF, and the villi recovered fully in mice given more than 1 mg/kg rhEGF. The frequency of diarrhea persisting for more than 3 days was significantly greater in the radiation control group than in the rhEGF-treated groups. Conclusions: Systemic administration of rhEGF accelerates recovery from mucosal damage induced by irradiation. We suggest that rhEGF treatment shows promise for the reduction of small intestinal damage after irradiation

  16. Robust Cre-Mediated Recombination in Small Intestinal Stem Cells Utilizing the Olfm4 Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurian Schuijers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The epithelium of the small intestine is the most rapidly self-renewing tissue in mammals. We previously demonstrated the existence of a long-lived pool of cycling stem cells defined by Lgr5 expression at the bottom of intestinal crypts. An Lgr5-eGFP-IRES-CreERT2 knockin allele has been instrumental in characterizing and profiling these cells, yet its low level expression and its silencing in patches of adjacent crypts have not allowed quantitative gene deletion. Olfactomedin-4 (Olfm4 has emerged from a gene signature of Lgr5 stem cells as a robust marker for murine small intestinal stem cells. We observe that Olfm4null animals show no phenotype and report the generation of an Olfm4-IRES-eGFPCreERT2 knockin mouse model that allows visualization and genetic manipulation of Lgr5+ stem cells in the epithelium of the small intestine. The eGFPCreERT2 fusion protein faithfully marks all stem cells in the small intestine and induces the activation of a conditional LacZ reporter with robust efficiency.

  17. Imaging of primary small intestinal tumours by enteroclysis and CT with pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative diagnosis of primary small intestinal neoplasms can be a challenge for both clinicians and radiologists. As a result of their infrequent occurrence, they invariably present difficult problems in diagnosis and management. These problems are reflected mainly in the delayed treatment and a very poor prognosis for such malignant tumours. Their morphological changes, however, shown in enteroclysis and CT, correlate almost perfectly with the lesions identified in the gross pathological specimens. This ability to accurately image a small intestinal neoplasm, independently of its size, anatomical localization and growing tendency, represents a major improvement in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. This paper, based on a large series of patients with primary small intestinal neoplasms, focuses on the recognition of their detailed radiological appearances when evaluated by enteroclysis and CT. (orig.). With 33 figs

  18. Stagnant loop syndrome resulting from small-bowel irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stagnant or blind-loop syndrome includes vitamin B12 malabsorption, steatorrhea, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. A case is presented to demonstrate this syndrome occurring after small-bowel irradiation injury with exaggeration postenterocolic by-pass. Alteration of normal small-bowel flora is basic to development of the stagnant-loop syndrome. Certain strains of bacteria as Bacteriodes and E. coli are capable of producing a malabsorption state. Definitive therapy for this syndrome developing after severe irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass includes antibiotics. Rapid symptomatic relief from diarrhea and improved malabsorption studies usually follow appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recolonization of the loop(s) with the offending bacterial species may produce exacerbation of symptoms. Since antibiotics are effective, recognition of this syndrome is important. Foul diarrheal stools should not be considered a necessary consequence of irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

  19. A Case of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth with Peripheral Edema Caused by Intestinal Bypass Surgery and Relieved by Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Young Kyung; Gwak, Geum Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Koh, Kwang Chul; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul; Lee, Joon Hyeok

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bypass surgery, particularly jejuno-ileal bypass surgery, performed for the purpose of weight reduction may cause an unexpected exacerbation of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Here, we report a case of NASH caused by small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, which developed after jejuno-colic bypass surgery and resolved dramatically after surgical correction.

  20. Salvianolate inhibits cytokine gene expression in small intestine of cirrhotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan-Hong Yang; Zai-Yuan Ye; Bo Jin; Xu-Jun He; Qin Zhang; Wei-Ming Zhou; Wen-Juan Xu; Huo-Xiang Lu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of salvianolate on expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA in small intestine of cirrhotic rats.METHODS: Cirrhosis in rats was induced using CCl4 (0.3 mL/kg).Rats were randomly divided into non-treatment group, low-dose salvianolate (12 mg/kg) treatment group, medium-dose salvianolate (24 mg/kg) treatment group, and high-dose salvianolate (48 mg/kg) treatment group, and treated for 2 wk.Another 10 healthy rats served as a normal control group.Mortality of cirrhotic rats in each group was evaluated after treatment with salvianolate.Serum samples were taken from portal vein for the detection of endotoxin.Morphological changes in tissue samples from the ileocecum were observed under a light microscope.Expression of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA in the small intestine of rats was analyzed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: The mortality of cirrhotic rats in the nontreatment group was 37.5%.No cirrhotic rat died in the high-dose salvianolate treatment group.The serum endotoxin level was significantly higher in the non-treatment group than in the salvianolate treatment and normal control groups.The intestinal mucosal and villous atrophy, necrosis and shedding of the intestinal mucosal epithelium, observed in the non-treatment group, were reversed in different salvianolate treatment groups.The TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA expression levels in small intestine were significantly lower in different salvianolate treatment groups than in the non-treatment group.CONCLUSION: Salvianolate can reduce the endotoxin level, ameliorate the injury of intestinal mucosa, and inhibit the expression of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA in small intestine of cirrhotic rats.

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal blood flow and mucosal growth in ruminating calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor-Edwards, C C; Burrin, D G; Holst, Jens Juul; McLeod, K R; Harmon, D L

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) increases small intestinal mass and blood flow in nonruminants but its effect in ruminants is unknown. Eight Holstein calves with an ultrasonic flow probe around the superior mesenteric artery and catheters in the carotid artery and mesenteric vein were paired by age......, GLP-2 increased villus height, crypt depth, and BrdU-labeling in small intestinal segments. These results demonstrate that GLP-2 induces similar increases in small intestinal blood flow and growth in ruminants to those observed in nonruminants. Furthermore, GLP-2 increases small intestinal blood flow...

  2. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides Against Small Intestinal Damage Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inlfammatory Drugs in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong; PAN Xing-chang; WANG Shao-kang; YANG Li-gang; SUN Gui-ju

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were able to produce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of small intestinal damage. In this study, the putative protective effect of wheat peptides was evaluated in a NSAID-induced small intestinal damage model in rats, different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by intragastric administration for 30 d until small intestinal damage was caused. Before sacriifcing, NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) or physiological saline were infused into the digestive tract twice. Wheat peptides administration reduced edema and small intestinal damage, and signiifcantly decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mucous membrane of small intestine. Oxidative stress was signiifcantly increased after NSAID infusion and was reduced by wheat peptides. Wheat peptides increased glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px) activity in mucous membrane of small intestine. µ-Opioid receptor mRNA expression decreased more signiifcantly in wheat peptides treated rats than in the model control group. Overall, the results suggest that non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs induced small intestinal damage in rats and wheat peptides administration may be an effective tool for protecting small intestinal tissue against NSAID-induced small intestinal damage and oxidative stress.

  3. Colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Koji; Watanabe, Toshio; Shimada, Sunao; Takeda, Shogo; Itani, Shigehiro; Higashimori, Akira; Nadatani, Yuji; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasome is a large, multiprotein complex that consists of a nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain, and pro-caspase-1. Activation of the inflammasome results in cleavage of pro-caspase-1 into cleaved caspase-1, which promotes the processing of pro-interleukin (IL)-1β into mature IL-1β. We investigated the effects of colchicine on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury and activation of the NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Colchicine treatment inhibited indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury by 86% (1 mg/kg) and 94% (3 mg/kg) as indicated by the lesion index 24 h after indomethacin administration. Colchicine inhibited the protein expression of cleaved caspase-1 and mature IL-1β, without affecting the mRNA expression of NLRP3 and IL-1β. Although treatment with recombinant IL-1β (0.1 μg/kg) did not change the severity of small intestinal damage, the preventive effects of colchicine were abolished by supplementation with the same dose of recombinant IL-1β. Indomethacin-induced small intestinal damage was reduced by 77%, as determined by the lesion index in NLRP3(-/-) mice, and colchicine treatment failed to inhibit small intestinal damage in NLRP3(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that colchicine prevents NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by inhibiting activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:27585971

  4. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  5. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  6. Endoscopically diagnosed cavernous hemangioma in the deep small intestine: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 27-year-old female with chronic iron deficiency anemia and unexplained fecal occult blood. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography disclosed a possible endoluminal lesion in the small intestine. Single-balloon enteroscopy detected the target lesion in the proximal ileum. The lesion was a 2.5-cm submucosal tumor that was purple-red, soft, had a narrow base, and exhibited superficial telangiectasia. After endoscopic marking, the tumor was resected with minimally invasive laparoscopy. It was histologically confirmed as a cavernous hemangioma. In this report, we discuss the endoscopic characteristics, surgical and pathological assessment, and management strategy of hemangiomas in the small intestine.

  7. Long-term prospective evaluation of intestinal anastomosis using stainless steel staples in 14 dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Benlloch-Gonzalez, Manuel; Gomes, Eymeric; Bouvy, Bernard; Poncet, Cyrill

    2015-01-01

    This prospective clinical study evaluated the use, complications, and clinical and ultrasonographic follow-ups of end-to-end intestinal anastomoses with skin staples in naturally occurring diseases in canine small and large intestines. Intestinal anastomoses were performed in 14 dogs and pre-, peri-, and postoperative data were recorded. Postoperative clinical and ultrasound evaluations were performed at regular intervals for 1 year. The mean time taken to construct the anastomosis was 5 min....

  8. What are the effects of proton pump inhibitors on the small intestine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shunji

    2015-06-14

    Generally, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have great benefit for patients with acid related disease with less frequently occurring side effects. According to a recent report, PPIs provoke dysbiosis of the small intestinal bacterial flora, exacerbating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury. Several meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported that patients treated with PPIs, as well as post-gastrectomy patients, have a higher frequency of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) compared to patients who lack the aforementioned conditions. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence that these conditions induce Clostridium difficile infection. At this time, PPI-induced dysbiosis is considered a type of SIBO. It now seems likely that intestinal bacterial flora influence many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune diseases. When attempting to control intestinal bacterial flora with probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation, etc., the influence of acid suppression therapy, especially PPIs, should not be overlooked. PMID:26078557

  9. Effects of total body irradiation on functions of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of intestinal mucosal immunity after gamma irradiation. Methods: The number, proliferation activity, cytotoxic activity of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), and the TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs were studied using IELs freshly isolated from whole small intestine of Kunming strain mice after 3,8 and 12 Gy total body 60Co γ-irradiation. Results: (1) The number of IELs in small intestinal mucosa of all irradiated mice significantly decreased at 8 h, reaching the lowest level at 48-72 h post-irradiation, then began to rise, but it still did not return to its normal level on day 15. (2) The proliferation activity and cytotoxic activity of IELs isolated from irradiated mice were reduced sharply. They followed the same pattern of decreasing at 8h, reaching the lowest level at 48-72 h post-irradiation, then began to rise, but it did not return to their normal levels on day 15. (3) The TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs isolated from irradiated mice were elevated at 8h, reaching their peak at 48-72 h. Conclusion: The decrease in number and important functions of IELs is one of the factors damaging the intestinal mucosal immunity barrier after total body irradiation

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Transport and Degradation of Feedstuffs in the Small Intestine

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Barles, Guy

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical modeling of the digestion in the small intestine. The main interest of our work is to consider, at the same time, different aspects of the digestion i.e. the transport of the bolus all along the intestine, feedstuffs degradation according to the enzymes and local physical conditions, and nutrients absorption. A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is used to model these phenomena. The major unknowns of this system are the position of the bolus and its composition. This system of equations is solved numerically. We present different numerical computations for the degradation, absorption and transport of the bolus with acceptable accuracy with experimental data. The main feature and interest of this model are its generality. Even if we are at an early stage of development, our approach can be adapted to treat any kind of feedstuffs in any non-ruminant animal to predict the composition and velocity of bolus in the small intestine.

  11. A "living bioreactor" for the production of tissue-engineered small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Daniel E; Sala, Frederic G; Barthel, Erik R; Speer, Allison L; Hou, Xiaogang; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe the use of a mouse model as a living bioreactor for the generation of tissue-engineered small intestine. Small intestine is harvested from donor mice with subsequent isolation of organoid units (a cluster of mesenchymal and epithelial cells). Some of these organoid units contain pluripotent stem cells with a preserved relationship with the mesenchymal stem cell niche. A preparation of organoid units is seeded onto a biodegradable scaffold and implanted intraperitoneally within the omentum of the host animal. The cells are nourished initially via imbibition until neovascularization occurs. This technique allows the growth of fully differentiated epithelium (composed of Paneth cells, goblet cells, enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells), muscle, nerve, and blood vessels of donor origin. Variations of this technique have been used to generate tissue-engineered stomach, large intestine, and esophagus. The variations include harvest technique, length of digestion, and harvest times. PMID:23494439

  12. Capsule enteroscopy and radiology of the small intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Fork, Thomas; Aabakken, Lars

    2007-01-01

    In a very few years, the video capsule for small bowel enteroscopy has gained widespread clinical acceptance. It is readily ingested, disposable, and allows for a complete, low-invasive endoscopic examination of the entire mucosa of the small bowel. It is a patient-friendly method and a first-line procedure in the difficult evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. It has the highest proven figure of diagnostic sensitivity for detecting lesions of the mucosa, irrespective of aetiology....

  13. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman;

    2004-01-01

    -CoA synthetase 5 pattern correlate with conversion of intestinal epithelial cells to a gastric phenotype. These results suggest that deranged acyl-CoA synthetase 5 expression, synthesis, and activity are closely related to the state of villus architecture and epithelial homeostasis in human small intestine.......Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology...

  14. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal--jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Kissow, Hannelouise; Jeppesen, P B; Orskov, C; Holst, J J; Poulsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    twofold in the distally resected group. Tissue GLP-2 levels were unchanged in resected rats. The data indicate that transposition of a distal part of the small intestine, and thereby exposure of L cells to a more nutrient-rich chyme, leads to intestinal growth. The adaptive intestinal growth is associated......Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), produced by enteroendocrine L-cells, regulates intestinal growth. This study investigates circulating and intestinal GLP-2 levels in conditions with altered L-cell exposure to nutrients. Rats were allocated to the following experimental groups: ileal......-jejunal transposition, resection of the proximal or distal half of the small intestine, and appropriate sham-operated controls. After two weeks, ileal-jejunal transposition led to pronounced growth of the transposed segment and also of the remaining intestinal segments. Plasma GLP-2 levels increased twofold, whereas...

  15. Experimental and Automated Analysis Techniques for High-resolution Electrical Mapping of Small Intestine Slow Wave Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Angeli, Timothy R.; O'Grady, Gregory; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Jonathan C Erickson; Du, Peng; Pullan, Andrew J; Bissett, Ian P.; Cheng, Leo K

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestine motility is governed by an electrical slow wave activity, and abnormal slow wave events have been associated with intestinal dysmotility. High-resolution (HR) techniques are necessary to analyze slow wave propagation, but progress has been limited by few available electrode options and laborious manual analysis. This study presents novel methods for in vivo HR mapping of small intestine slow wave activity. Methods Recordings were obtained from along the porcine...

  16. Capsule enteroscopy and radiology of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fork, Frans-Thomas [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Aabakken, Lars [Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-12-15

    In a very few years, the video capsule for small bowel enteroscopy has gained widespread clinical acceptance. It is readily ingested, disposable, and allows for a complete, low-invasive endoscopic examination of the entire mucosa of the small bowel. It is a patient-friendly method and a first-line procedure in the difficult evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. It has the highest proven figure of diagnostic sensitivity for detecting lesions of the mucosa, irrespective of aetiology. The limitations of capsule endoscopy include difficulty in localising mucosal lesions anatomically and its restricted use in patients with dysphagia, strictures or motor dysfunction. Strictures, transmural and extra-mural lesions in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease are evaluated by MRI- enterography and CT-enterography. (orig.)

  17. Capsule enteroscopy and radiology of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a very few years, the video capsule for small bowel enteroscopy has gained widespread clinical acceptance. It is readily ingested, disposable, and allows for a complete, low-invasive endoscopic examination of the entire mucosa of the small bowel. It is a patient-friendly method and a first-line procedure in the difficult evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. It has the highest proven figure of diagnostic sensitivity for detecting lesions of the mucosa, irrespective of aetiology. The limitations of capsule endoscopy include difficulty in localising mucosal lesions anatomically and its restricted use in patients with dysphagia, strictures or motor dysfunction. Strictures, transmural and extra-mural lesions in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease are evaluated by MRI- enterography and CT-enterography. (orig.)

  18. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis. PMID:15548172

  19. Effect of Small Intestine Strangulation Obstruction on Clinical and Histopathological Parameters An Experimental Study in Donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Mohamed M. Kuraa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To study clinical and histopathological changes occur within the first 12 hours of strangulating obstruction of the small intestine in equine, twenty five adult donkeys were used in an experimental study. Strangulation obstruction of the small intestine was performed for 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours, respectively. Clinical examination was done before surgery and at 3 hours intervals postoperatively. After euthanasia, histopathological examination was made 10 cm, 1, 2 and 3 meters proximal to the strangulated part. Three hours postoperatively, the animals began to show signs of abdominal pain, they were looking around, stamping the hind feet, falling down suddenly. Nine hours postoperatively, animals showed signs of depression with intermittent nervous movements in the form of circle movement. After 12 hours, the animals were lying down; There were a significant reduction in the body temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate, heart rate with significant increase in capillary refill time. Macroscopic changes of the strangulated part were congestion, edema, and dark red discoloration of the intestinal wall and mesentery. Distension of the intestine proximal to the strangulation extended more with increase the period of strangulation. Microscopic examination showed showed severe congestion, dark brown to blackish discoloration with fibrous shreds on the strangulated segment. Peticheal hemorrhages were observed in the intestinal wall and its mesentery for a distance up to 3 meters. The severity of signs varies according to the duration of obstruction which could give a remarkable justification of the prognosis of the patient and the availability of treatment.

  20. The radiation dose induced by double-contrast examination of the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis analyses the value of double-contrast examinations of the small intestine using water and methyl cellulose for clinical diagnostics in terms of technical feasibility, radiation dose to the patient, and rate of complications, in comparison to clinical relevance. The analysis relies on data obtained with 737 patients in the period January 1, 1976 until December 31, 1982. (MBC)

  1. Small intestinal Crohn's disease with hepatic portal venous gas: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamadera, Masato; Kajiwara, Yoshiki; Shinto, Eiji; Hokari, Ryota; Shimazaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Junji; Hase, Kazuo; Ueno, Hideki

    2016-12-01

    An 80-year-old man presented in another hospital with acute abdominal pain; computed tomography indicated hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) and small intestinal thickening. He was then transferred to our hospital, where we diagnosed idiopathic inflammation and stenosis of the ileum. Because the patient's abdominal symptoms were mild and his general condition was good, we chose to administer conservative therapy. His condition improved and we discharged him from our hospital. However, he was hospitalized again 9 days later because his abdominal pain had recurred and was worse. We performed a laparoscopic partial resection of the ileum 3 weeks after the patients' initial presentation. Macroscopically, longitudinal ulcers were observed near the stenosis of the ileum; the segment of the small intestine that contained the ulcers was removed, and subsequent pathological findings indicated Crohn's disease of the small intestine. The post-operative course was favorable, and the patient was discharged on post-operative day 9. Such serendipitous diagnosis of small intestinal Crohn's disease in an elderly patient with hepatic portal venous gas is rare; to our knowledge, this is the first of such case in which laparoscopic surgery was performed. PMID:27352296

  2. Bone marrow derivation of pericryptal myofibroblasts in the mouse and human small intestine and colon

    OpenAIRE

    Brittan, M; Hunt, T.; Jeffery, R.; Poulsom, R.; Forbes, S.J.; K. Hodivala-Dilke; Goldman, J.; Alison, M R; Wright, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: In order to establish whether extraintestinal cells contribute to the turnover and repair of gastrointestinal tissues, we studied the colons and small intestines of female mice that had received a male bone marrow transplant, together with gastrointestinal biopsies from female patients that had developed graft versus host disease after receiving a bone marrow transplant from male donors.

  3. Changes in small intestinal homeostasis, morphology, and gene expression during rotavirus infection of infant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.H. Reimerink; A.M. Korteland-van Male (Anita); V.J. van Ham; H.A. Büller (Hans); J. Dekker (Jan); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of infantile gastroenteritis. Since in vivo mucosal responses to a rotavirus infection thus far have not been extensively studied, we related viral replication in the murine small intestine to alterations in mucosal structure, epith

  4. Assessment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in uncomplicated acute diverticulitis of the colon

    OpenAIRE

    Tursi, Antonio; Brandimarte, Giovanni; Giorgetti, Gian Marco; Elisei, Walter

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may contribute to the appearance of several gastrointestinal nonspecific symptoms. Acute diverticulitis is affected by some similar symptoms and bacterial colonic overgrowth. We assessed the prevalence of SIBO in acute uncomplicated diverticulitis and evaluated its influence on the clinical course of the disease.

  5. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacs of the Small Intestine of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kirk L.; Butt, A. Grant

    2013-01-01

    The Na[superscript +]-glucose cotransporter is a key transport protein that is responsible for absorbing Na[superscript +] and glucose from the luminal contents of the small intestine and reabsorption by the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. Robert K. Crane originally described the cellular model of absorption of Na[superscript +] and…

  6. Multiple chronic non-specific ulcer of small intestine characterized by anemia and hypoalbuminemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A female patient with anemia and hypoalbuminemia was admitted to our hospital due to an over 20-year history of recurrent dizziness,fatigue and ankle edema.She was diagnosed as multiple chronic nonspecific ulcer of the small intestine characterized by non-specific histology and persistent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  7. Microbial communities in the human small intestine - coupling diversity to metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booijink, C.C.G.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place. The host-derived physiological processes and the residing microorganisms, especially in the small intestine, contribute to this nutrient supply. To circumvent sampling problems of the smal

  8. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    OpenAIRE

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio,Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.

  9. Update: The Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrate and Protein: Role of the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of the small intestine in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Indicates as outdated the view that these materials must be broken down to monomeric units before absorption and that the gut secretes a mixture of digestive juices which brings about absorption. (JN)

  10. Lipid raft organization and function in the small intestinal brush border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, Gert Helge

    2008-01-01

    The enterocyte brush border of the small intestine is a highly specialized membrane designed to function both as a high capacity digestive/absorptive surface of dietary nutrients and a permeability barrier towards lumenal pathogens. It is characterized by an unusually high content of glycolipids...

  11. Primary gastrointestinal lymphomas: a radiological-pathological review. part 2: small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary lymphoma of the small intestine is a heterogeneous group of diseases reflected in its protean imaging features. This review illustrates the widespread appearances seen on imaging methods (primarily CT and barium studies) with pathological correlation. Copyright (2006) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Morphological properties and residual strain along the small intestine in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jing-Bo; Sha, Hong; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan; Gregersen, Hans

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Residual stress and strain are important for gastrointestinal function and relate to the geometric configuration, the loading conditions and the zero-stress state of the gastrointestinal tract. The purpose of this project is to provide morphometric data and residual strains for the rat small intestine (n = 11).

  13. Contribution of mucosal maltase-glucoamylase activities to mouse small intestinal starch alpha-glucogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digestion of starch requires activities provided by 6 interactive small intestinal enzymes. Two of these are luminal endo-glucosidases named alpha-amylases. Four are exo-glucosidases bound to the luminal surface of enterocytes. These mucosal activities were identified as 4 different maltases. Two ma...

  14. The effects of selected flavonoids on cytochromes P450 in rat liver and small intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížková, J.; Burdová, K.; Stiborová, M.; Křen, Vladimír; Hodek, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2009), s. 201-204. ISSN 1337-6853 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD305/09/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : flavonoids * cytochrome p450 * small intestine Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  15. Mobilization of phagocytes during experimentally induced ischemia/reperfusion of rat small intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušková, Monika; Lojek, Antonín; Číž, Milan; Čížová, Hana; Vondráček, Jan

    Hradec Králové: Purkyně Military Medical Academy, 1995. s. 91-96. [Experimental, Therapeutic and Toxic Manipulations of Host Defence System. 12.06.1995-15.06.1995, Hradec Králové] Keywords : phagocytes * ischemia/reperfusion * small intestine * reactive oxygen species * chemiluminescence * lipid peroxidation

  16. Chromogranin A and its fragments as regulators of small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giovinazzo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chromogranin A is a neuroendocrine secretory product and its loss is a feature of malignant NEN de-differentiation. We hypothesized that chromogranin A fragments were differentially expressed during NEN metastasis and played a role in the regulation of NEN proliferation. METHODS: Chromogranin A mRNA (PCR and protein (ELISA/western blot were studied in 10 normal human mucosa, 5 enterochromaffin cell preparations, 26 small intestinal NEN primaries and 9 liver metastases. Cell viability (WST-1 assay, proliferation (bromodeoxyuridine ELISA and expression of AKT/AKT-P (CASE ELISA/western blot in response to chromogranin A silencing, inhibition of prohormone convertase and mTOR inhibition (RAD001/AKT antisense as well as different chromogranin A fragments were examined in 4 SI-NEN cell lines. RESULTS: Chromogranin A mRNA and protein levels were increased (37-340 fold, p<0.0001 in small intestinal NENs compared to normal enterochromaffin cells. Western blot identified chromogranin A-associated processing bands including vasostatin in small intestinal NENs as well as up-regulated expression of prohormone convertase in metastases. Proliferation in small intestinal NEN cell lines was decreased by silencing chromogranin A as well as by inhibition of prohormone convertase (p<0.05. This inhibition also decreased secretion of chromogranin A (p<0.05 and 5-HT (p<0.05 as well as expression of vasostatin. Metastatic small intestinal NEN cell lines were stimulated (50-80%, p<0.05 and AKT phosphorylated (Ser473: p<0.05 by vasostatin I, which was completely reversed by RAD001 (p<0.01 and AKT antisense (p<0.05 while chromostatin inhibited proliferation (~50%, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Chromogranin A was differentially regulated in primary and metastatic small intestinal NENs and cell lines. Chromogranin A fragments regulated metastatic small intestinal NEN proliferation via the AKT pathway indicating that CgA plays a far more complex role in the biology of

  17. Role of the Small Intestine in Developmental Programming: Impact of Maternal Nutrition on the Dam and Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Allison M; Caton, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    Small-intestinal growth and function are critical for optimal animal growth and health and play a major role in nutrient digestion and absorption, energy and nutrient expenditure, and immunological competence. During fetal and perinatal development, the small intestine is affected by the maternal environment and nutrient intake. In ruminants, altered small-intestinal mass, villi morphology, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, vascularity, and gene expression have been observed as a result of poor gestational nutrition or intrauterine growth restriction. Although many of these data come from fetal stages, data have also demonstrated that nutrition during mid- and late gestation affects lamb small-intestinal growth, vascularity, digestive enzyme activity, and gene expression at 20 and 180 d of age as well. The small intestine is known to be a highly plastic tissue, changing with nutrient intake and physiological state even in adulthood, and the maternal small intestine adapts to pregnancy and advancing gestation. In ruminants, the growth, vascularity, and gene expression of the maternal small intestine also adapt to the nutritional plane and specific nutrient intake such as high selenium during pregnancy. These changes likely alter both pre- and postnatal nutrient delivery to offspring. More research is necessary to better understand the role of the offspring and maternal small intestines in whole-animal responses to developmental programming, but programming of this plastic tissue seems to play a dynamic role in gestational nutrition impacts on the whole animal. PMID:27180380

  18. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Boekhorst, te J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus s

  19. Role of regenerating gene I in claudin expression and barrier function in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Yoshitaka; Fukui, Hirokazu; Hara, Ken; Eda, Hirotsugu; Kodani, Mio; Yang, Mo; Sun, Chao; Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Tomita, Toshihiko; Oshima, Tadayuki; Watari, Jiro; Takasawa, Shin; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-07-01

    We have recently shown that loss of the regenerating gene (Reg) I causes susceptibility to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastrointestinal damage. However, the mechanism by which Reg I plays a protective role against this pathophysiological condition is unclear. Here, we investigated whether Reg I plays roles in the induction of tight junction proteins and mucosal barrier function in the small intestine. The small-intestinal permeability was evaluated in Reg I-deficient mice by FITC-dextran and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) assay. The effect of REG Iα on TEER, claudins expression, and intracellular signaling was examined using Caco2 cells in vitro. Small-intestinal expression of claudins 3 and 4 was investigated in Reg I-deficient mice in vivo. REG I deficiency significantly decreased the expression of claudin 3 in the small-intestinal epithelium. When mice were treated with indomethacin, the serum level of FITC-dextran in Reg I knockout mice was significantly higher than that in wild-type (WT) mice. The level of small-intestinal TEER was significantly decreased in Reg I knockout mice compared with WT mice under normal condition. REG Iα stimulation significantly enhanced the level of TEER in Caco2 cells. Treatment with REG Iα enhanced the expression of claudins 3 and 4 and promoted Sp1, Akt, and ERK phosphorylation in Caco2 cells, whereas these effects were attenuated by treatment with anti-REG Iα antibody. Reg I may play a role in the maintenance of mucosal barrier function by inducing tight junction proteins such as claudins 3 and 4. PMID:27055226

  20. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (≥8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5+ stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ≥1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay. (author)

  1. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reinshagen Max; Mason Richard A; Adler Guido; Spaniol Ulrike; Klaus Jochen; von Tirpitz C Christian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD) are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare...

  2. In vivo demonstration of small intestinal villi in dogs and monkeys using radiographi magnification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct radiographic magnification (3.6X) and a microfocal spot radiographic tube (0.13 mm) were used in double contrast studies of intestinal villi in adult dogs and monkeys. The villi appeared as lucent lines surrounded by barium in profile, and as lucent dots en face; this was verified by specimen radiographic and histological analysis. The use of fast screen-film combination, motility depressant, microfocal spot tube, and airgap technique produced a radiograph of greater detail than that obtained with conventional focal spot, source-image distance, and film-screan combination. The advantages and limitations of microfocal direct magnification radiography of the small intestine are discussed

  3. Treatment with Parenteral Nutrition Support and Chinese Herbs in One Case of Primary Small Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-cheng Dai; Zhi-peng Tang; Gui-tong Ma; Ping Yin; Yu-ping Gong; Wen Liu; Song Wang; Ya-li Zhang; Xin-ying He

    2009-01-01

    @@ INTESTINAL lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease first reported by Waldmanin in 1961.~1 Since then, no more than two hundred cases have been reported. IL is characterized by dilated lymphatic vessles in the intestinal wall and small bowel mesentery which induce loss of protein and lymphocytes into bowel lumen. We here report a case of IL in a young male patient who was admitted for complaint of recurrent diarrhea for ten years and aggravation of the illness one year ago. He was diagnosed by endoscopy and confirmed by pathology as a primary IL and treated by parenteral nutrition support and Chinese herbs.

  4. [Familial syndrome combining short small intestine, intestinal malrotation, pyloric hypertrophy and brain malformation. 3 anatomoclinical case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezelof, C; Jaubert, F; Lyon, G

    1976-01-01

    Anatomoclinical study of 3 cases of an exceptional malformative condition characterized by: --extreme shortness of the small intestine, --mesenterium commune, --hypertrophic pylorus, --malformation of the central nervous system (heterotopia, absence of operculum temporale). Clinically this malformative condition is characterized by failure and inertia of the intestinal peristalsis producing at intervals of 10-15 days episodes of subocclusion, the repetition of which causes death. The syndrome is familial and seems to be of autosomal recessive inheritance. The absence of mechanical obstruction, the repeated failure of colostomy and ileostomy, the normal aspect of the myenteric plexuses verified by cytoenzymatic and silver stains allow to individualize this anatomoclinical syndrome and to rule out the hypothesis of Hirschsprung's disease, Chagas' disease, idiopathic megacolon or hypoplasia of the myenteric plexuses. The association of cerebral malformations leads to consider the responsibility of a lack of synthesis of a same specific intermediate factor which is up to now poorly determined, implicated in the neuronal migration and neuromuscular transmission. PMID:1023783

  5. Fasting stimulates 2-AG biosynthesis in the small intestine: role of cholinergic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Igarashi, Miki; Narayanaswami, Vidya; Murray, Conor; Gancayco, Joseph; Russell, Amy; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-10-15

    The endocannabinoids are lipid-derived signaling molecules that control feeding and energy balance by activating CB1-type cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Previous studies have shown that oral exposure to dietary fat stimulates endocannabinoid signaling in the rat small intestine, which provides positive feedback that drives further food intake and preference for fat-rich foods. We now describe an unexpectedly broader role for cholinergic signaling of the vagus nerve in the production of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), in the small intestine. We show that food deprivation increases levels of 2-AG and its lipid precursor, 1,2-diacylglycerol, in rat jejunum mucosa in a time-dependent manner. This response is abrogated by surgical resection of the vagus nerve or pharmacological blockade of small intestinal subtype-3 muscarinic acetylcholine (m3 mAch) receptors, but not inhibition of subtype-1 muscarinic acetylcholine (m1 mAch). We further show that blockade of peripheral CB1 receptors or intestinal m3 mAch receptors inhibits refeeding in fasted rats. The results suggest that food deprivation stimulates 2-AG-dependent CB1 receptor activation through a mechanism that requires efferent vagal activation of m3 mAch receptors in the jejunum, which, in turn, may promote feeding after a fast. PMID:26290104

  6. Function and expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator after small intestinal transplantation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghong Song

    Full Text Available The secretion function of intestinal graft is one of the most important factors for successful intestinal transplantation. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mediates HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we made investigation on the expression and function of CFTR in an experimental model of murine small intestinal transplantation. Heterotopic intestinal transplantations were performed in syngeneic mice. The mRNA and protein expressions of CFTR were analyzed by real time PCR and western blot. Murine intestinal mucosal HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions were examined in vitro in Ussing chambers by the pH stat and short circuit current (I(sc techniques. The results showed that forskolin, an activator of CFTR, stimulated jejunal mucosal epithelial HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in mice, but forskolin-stimulated HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice after heterotopic jejunal transplantation were markedly decreased, compared with controls (P<0.001. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CFTR in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice were also markedly lower than those in controls (P<0.001, and the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα were markedly increased in donor jejunal mucosae of mice (P<0.001, compared with controls. Further experiments showed that TNFα down-regulated the expression of CFTR mRNA in murine jejunal mucosa. In conclusion, after intestinal transplantation, the function of CFTR was impaired, and its mRNA and protein expressions were down-regulated, which may be induced by TNFα.

  7. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes. PMID:26076568

  8. Hydrogen respiratory test: pilot examinations for evaluation of the small intestinal colonization by normal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, O V; Salinas, Yu E; Vasilieva, E A; Kozlov, A V; Yashina, N V; Loginov, I A; Dalin, M V

    2013-04-01

    Respiration hydrogen analyzer H2Rate has been used in pilot examinations of a group of students. This method for noninvasive diagnosis of small intestinal diseases promotes proper interpretation of the results. Free hydrogen level in the exhaled air increases as a result of lactulose (diagnostic agent) cleavage by enteric microflora within about 3 h. Based on the experimental data, the main groups with characteristic curves reflecting the time course of hydrogen concentrations have been distinguished. Excessive bacterial colonization of the intestine can correspond to emergence of characteristic peaks of hydrogen concentrations in the curve. Hydrogen concentrations in exhaled air can also be analyzed to evaluate the rate of the substrate propulsion in the middle compartment of the intestine. PMID:23658932

  9. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, M K; Caldwell, J M; Wang, Y H; Chaplin, D D; Lee, E H; Jang, M H; Woo, S Y; Seoh, J Y; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3 deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer's patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t-positive (ROR-γt(+)) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β-deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA(+) cells and ROR-γt(+) ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  10. The small intestine and colon: Scintigraphic quantitation of motility in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, M.A. (Saint Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Medical Physiology Unit)

    1992-10-01

    Radioisotopes allow accurate quantitation of the pattern and effectiveness of the transit of chyme through the small and large intestines. Abnormalities of small bowel transit can be demonstrated in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, and patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to either a visceral myopathy or neuropathy. In the colon, radioisotopic studies of transit have demonstrated the site of delayed transit in some severely constipated patients. In patients with these disorders of transit, functional studies may influence the choice of medical or surgical therapy although there are few prospective studies which have established their worth in this context. Radioisotope studies can also be utilised to study the effectiveness of delivery of drugs to the small and large bowel, and to study the adequacy of rectal evacuation in patients with a defaecatory disturbance. The low radiation dose and possibility of frequent observations make radioisotope studies valuable for clinical and research studies in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (orig.).

  11. Effect of acetylcysteine on adaptation of intestinal smooth muscle after small bowel bypass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have postulated that the adaptive changes in function and structure of bypassed segments of small bowel are due in part to the change in intestinal contents following operation. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if a mucolytic agent could alter the adaptation. Rats were anesthetized and a 70% jejunoileal bypass was performed. The bypassed segments then were perfused with either saline or acetylcysteine for 3-12 days. Then, either intestinal transit was determined using Cr-51, or segments were taken for morphometric analysis. Transit, as assessed by the geometric center, was increased 32% by acetylcysteine treatment. Treatment also caused a decrease in hypertrophy of the muscularis. Muscle wet weight, muscle cross-sectional area, and muscle layer thickness all were significantly less in those animals infused with acetyl-cysteine. No decreases in hypertrophy were seen in the in-continuity segments. These data indicate that alterations in intestinal content can affect the course of adaptation of intestinal muscle in response to small bowel bypass

  12. Effect of early weaning on the development of immune cells in the pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-López, M A; Bailey, M; Telemo, E; Stokes, C R

    1995-02-01

    The controlled effects of age and weaning on the numbers of CD2+ T cells, subsets (CD4+, CD8+), accessory cells (macrophage/granulocyte) and cells expressing MHC class II (DQw) and IL-2R in the piglet intestine was investigated. At birth low numbers of CD2+CD4-CD8- cells were the only demonstrable T cells in the intestine. Monocyte/granulocyte and MHC class II+ cells were also detected in low numbers and IL-2R+ cells were proportionally quite numerous. All those cell populations, except the IL-2R+ cells, increased thereafter and peaked at Week 7 when the numbers of cells were comparable with those of adult animals. CD4+ cells increased dramatically after Week 1. In contrast, CD8+ remained scarce until after 5-7 weeks of age in unweaned animals. Four days after weaning at 3 weeks old, there were increases in CD2+ (P < 0.001) and macrophage/granulocyte (P < 0.01) cells in proximal small intestinal villi and in CD2+ cells only (P < 0.01) in crypts. No significant changes in cell numbers were demonstrated in the distal small intestine. PMID:7747409

  13. Proteolytic processing and activation of Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin by caprine small intestinal contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, John C; Li, Jihong; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (ETX), a pore-forming toxin produced by type B and D strains of Clostridium perfringens, mediates severe enterotoxemia in livestock and possibly plays a role in human disease. During enterotoxemia, the nearly inactive ETX prototoxin is produced in the intestines but then must be activated by proteolytic processing. The current study sought to examine ETX prototoxin processing and activation ex vivo using the intestinal contents of a goat, a natural host species for ETX-mediated disease. First, this study showed that the prototoxin has a KEIS N-terminal sequence with a molecular mass of 33,054 Da. When the activation of ETX prototoxin ex vivo by goat small intestinal contents was assessed by SDS-PAGE, the prototoxin was processed in a stepwise fashion into an ~27-kDa band or higher-molecular-mass material that could be toxin oligomers. Purified ETX corresponding to the ~27-kDa band was cytotoxic. When it was biochemically characterized by mass spectrometry, the copresence of three ETX species, each with different C-terminal residues, was identified in the purified ~27-kDa ETX preparation. Cytotoxicity of each of the three ETX species was then demonstrated using recombinant DNA approaches. Serine protease inhibitors blocked the initial proteotoxin processing, while carboxypeptidase inhibitors blocked further processing events. Taken together, this study provides important new insights indicating that, in the intestinal lumen, serine protease (including trypsin and possibly chymotrypsin) initiates the processing of the prototoxin but other proteases, including carboxypeptidases, then process the prototoxin into multiple active and stable species. Importance: Processing and activation by intestinal proteases is a prerequisite for ETX-induced toxicity. Previous studies had characterized the activation of ETX using only arbitrarily chosen amounts of purified trypsin and/or chymotrypsin. Therefore, the current study examined ETX activation ex vivo by natural

  14. Oxidative stress response in canine in vitro liver, kidney and intestinal models with seven potential dietary ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyoungju; Ortega, Maria T; Jeffery, Brett; Riviere, Jim E; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2016-01-22

    In vitro cell culture systems are a useful tool to rapidly assess the potential safety or toxicity of chemical constituents of food. Here, we investigated oxidative stress and organ-specific antioxidant responses by 7 potential dietary ingredients using canine in vitro culture of hepatocytes, proximal tubule cells (CPTC), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) and enterocyte-like cells (ELC). Cellular production of free radical species by denatonium benzoate (DB), epigallocatechin gallate (EPI), eucalyptol (EUC), green tea catechin extract (GTE) and sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC), tetrahydroisohumulone (TRA) as well as xylitol (XYL) were continuously measured for reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and superoxide (SO) for up to 24h. DB and TRA showed strong prooxidant activities in hepatocytes and to a lesser degree in ELC. DB was a weak prooxidant in BMSC. In contrast DB and TRA were antioxidants in CPTC. EPI was prooxidant in hepatocytes and BMSC but showed prooxidant and antioxidant activity in CPTC. SCC in hepatocytes (12.5mg/mL) and CPTC (0.78mg/mL) showed strong prooxidant and antioxidant activity in a concentration-dependent manner. GTE was effective antioxidant only in ELC. EUC and XYL did not induce ROS/RNS in all 4 cell types. SO production by EPI and TRA increased in hepatocytes but decreased by SCC in hepatocytes and ELC. These results suggest that organ-specific responses to oxidative stress by these potential prooxidant compounds may implicate a mechanism of their toxicities. PMID:26602166

  15. Relationship between postprandial motor activity in the human small intestine and the gastrointestinal transit of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profiles for gastric emptying and colonic filling were determined in 20 normal volunteers by means of a gamma camera and dedicated minicomputer after ingestion of a radiolabeled solid meal. These were compared with intraluminal pressure activity, recorded simultaneously from three sites (each separated by 50 cm) in the small intestine by infusion manometry. Recordings were continued for at least 8 h or until all the radioactivity appeared in the colon. Colonic filling was approximately linear, occurring at an average rate of 16% of the meal residues per hour. There were significant inverse correlations (p less than 0.01) between the pressure activity in the proximal jejunum during the first 3 h after ingestion and the times taken for 50% and 80% of the meal residues to enter the colon, and direct correlations between total small intestinal pressure activity and the half-time for gastric emptying. Phase III of the interdigestive migrating motor complex appeared between 3 and 9 h after ingestion (when between 15% and 80% of the meal remained in the small intestine), but did not necessarily migrate to the next recording site until much later. The time of appearance of phase III in the proximal jejunum was directly correlated with the half-time for gastric emptying (p less than 0.05) and with the intraluminal pressure activity recorded at that site during the first 3 h after food ingestion (p less than 0.01). The time at which 80% of the meal residues had entered the colon was significantly shorter in 6 subjects, in whom a postprandial activity front appeared to migrate throughout the small bowel, compared with 13 subjects, in whom this did not occur (5.0 +/- 0.5 h vs. 7.0 +/- 0.4 h, p less than 0.01). These studies have shown that gastrointestinal transit of a solid meal is related to both fed and fasted intraluminal pressure activity in the small intestine

  16. CONTROL AND CANCEROUS TISSUES OF HUMAN STOMACH, SMALL INTESTINE AND LARGE INTESTINE - THE AVERAGE CONTENT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Głogowska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium and potassium regulate the total amount of water in the body and the transmission of sodium into and out of individual cells also plays a role in critical body functions. The movement of sodium is critical in generation of these electrical signals. Research was conducted on samples taken from women and men aged 20-90 years, derived from the stomach, small intestine and large intestine. Samples were dried at 80ºC for 24 hours, and then increased temperature to 105ºC and dried for seven days until dry mass was obtained. All dry material of each sample was weighted and placed in a separate mineralization tubes and mixed with 1 cm3 of 65% HNO3 and heated at 105°C for 120 minutes in a thermostat-controlled digestion block, VELP Scientifica DK 20. Metals such as sodium and potassium were detected using FAAS method. The average content of sodium in patients diagnosed with stomach cancer is lower, than in healthy person. Indicate higher mean content of sodium in the control tissues of stomach (2151,730 μg•g-1d.m., compared to a sodium content in tissues adjacent to the tumor (1813,958 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (2029,442 μg•g-1d.m.. In the case of colon, control tissues have lower average content of sodium (2160,886 μg•g-1d.m., than the tissues surrounding the tumor (3325,963 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (3037,121 μg•g-1d.m.. The potassium level is higher in the control tissues of stomach (1428,993 μg•g-1d.m., than in the tissues adjacent to the tumor (1091,544 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (1220,471 μg•g-1d.m.. In the large intestine higher average content of potassium is characterized by tumor tissues (2307,234 μg•g-1d.m. and tissues adjacent to the tumor (1712,779 μg•g-1d.m., than control tissue (1389,703 μg•g-1d.m.. Comparing this relationship with data on potassium channels, it can be assumed that in the some case of malignant transformation in the colon, potassium channels also play a big role.

  17. Regulation of antibacterial defense in the small intestine by the nuclear bile acid receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Takeshi; Moschetta, Antonio; Lee, Youn-Kyoung; Peng, Li; Zhao, Guixiang; Downes, Michael; Yu, Ruth T.; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Repa, Joyce J.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Obstruction of bile flow results in bacterial proliferation and mucosal injury in the small intestine that can lead to the translocation of bacteria across the epithelial barrier and systemic infection. These adverse effects of biliary obstruction can be inhibited by administration of bile acids. Here we show that the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a nuclear receptor for bile acids, induces genes involved in enteroprotection and inhibits bacterial overgrowth and mucosal injury in ileum caused by bile duct ligation. Mice lacking FXR have increased ileal levels of bacteria and a compromised epithelial barrier. These findings reveal a central role for FXR in protecting the distal small intestine from bacterial invasion and suggest that FXR agonists may prevent epithelial deterioration and bacterial translocation in patients with impaired bile flow. bacteria | biliary obstruction | epithelial barrier | ileum

  18. Small-intestinal dysfunction accompanies the complex endocrinopathy of human proprotein convertase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Robert S; Creemers, John W M; Farooqi, I Sadaf;

    2003-01-01

    , some mature ACTH and glucagon-like peptide 17-36(amide) were detectable in her plasma, suggesting that the production of these hormones, at least in humans, does not have an absolute dependence on PC1. The presence of severe obesity and the absence of growth retardation in both subjects contrast......We have previously described the only reported case of human proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) deficiency, in a female (Subject A) with obesity, hypogonadism, hypoadrenalism, and reactive hypoglycemia. We now report the second case of human PC1 deficiency (Subject B), also due to compound...... in type. Subsequent investigation of Subject A revealed marked small-intestinal absorptive dysfunction, which was not previously clinically suspected. We postulate that PC1, presumably in the enteroendocrine cells, is essential for the normal absorptive function of the human small intestine. The...

  19. Effect of vitamin E on oxidative stress ,status in small intestine of diabetic rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of vitamin E on oxidative stress status in the small intestine of diabetic rats.METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control (C), non-treated diabetic (NTD) and vitamin E-treated diabetic (VETD)groups. The increases in lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in these three groups was compared after 6 wk.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in catalase activity between NTD and control rats.Compared to NTD rats, the treatment with vitamin E significantly decreased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and also increased catalase activity and SOD.CONCLUSION: The results revealed the occurrence of oxidative stress in the small intestine of diabetic rats. Vitamin E, as an antioxidant, attenuates lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and increases antioxidant defense mechanism.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study in...... closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep into...... LBP together with other proteins acting in the innate immune response of the gut, such as lysozyme, defensins and intelectin....

  1. A case of endometrioid adenocarcinoma originating from the serous surface of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Makihara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation of endometriosis has been extensively described in the literature. However, extragonadal endometrioid adenocarcinoma, either de novo or arising from malignant transformation of endometriosis, is rare. The present case report describes a patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma on the serous surface of the small intestine. A 25- year-old female with no history of endometriosis was referred to our hospital with an intrapelvic tumor. An internal examination, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a round mass approximately 80 mm in diameter; however, identification of the affected organ was difficult. Because we could not rule out malignancy based on the non-specific radiologic findings, laparotomy was performed. A mass with ileal adhesions was detected intraoperatively. In addition, the uterus and bilateral adnexa appeared normal. The tumor was resected with part of the ileum. Histopathology confirmed a diagnosis of endometrioid adenocarcinoma originating from the serous surface of the small intestine.

  2. Gastrointestinal complaints in runners are not due to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärtsch Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal complaints are common among long distance runners. We hypothesised that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is present in long distance runners frequently afflicted with gastrointestinal complaints. Findings Seven long distance runners (5 female, mean age 29.1 years with gastrointestinal complaints during and immediately after exercise without known gastrointestinal diseases performed Glucose hydrogen breath tests for detection of SIBO one week after a lactose hydrogen breath test checking for lactose intolerance. The most frequent symptoms were diarrhea (5/7, 71% and flatulence (6/7, 86%. The study was conducted at a laboratory. In none of the subjects a pathological hydrogen production was observed after the intake of glucose. Only in one athlete a pathological hydrogen production was measured after the intake of lactose suggesting lactose intolerance. Conclusions Gastrointestinal disorders in the examined long distance runners were not associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  3. Study of morbidity in orthotopic small intestine transplantation with Wistar rats: experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE André Dong Won

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Transplantation of the small intestine is a surgical procedure currently under investigation for its possible application in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome, aiming at the reintroduction of an oral diet. Aim - To define the morbidity and mortality of intestinal transplantation in small animals using microsurgery. Intra and postoperative morbidity and mortality were studied in Wistar rats submitted to orthotopic intestinal allotransplantation. Material and Method - The animals were divided into three groups: group A (37 donor animals, group B (37 recipient animals, and group C (10 control animals. Group B was divided into three subgroups according to survival time. Subgroup TI consisted of animals that died during surgery or due to causes directly related to surgical intervention, subgroup T2 consisted of animals that died between the 4th and 29th postoperative day, and subgroup T3 consisted of animals that survived after 30 days. Transplanted animals were evaluated in terms of surgical technique used (vascular and intestinal anastomosis, graft quality, surgical time, and clinical parameters. The animals that died by the 29th postoperative day were submitted to autopsy and the remaining ones were sacrificed after 30 days. Result - There was a high rate of complication of a surgical nature. Early mortality rate, i.e., mortality up to the third postoperative day, was 54% with vascular anastomosis being the major cause of death. Surgical time was evaluated in a restricted and homogeneous group and showed a strong prognostic value in terms of successful transplantation. Clinical parameters such as weight loss, reduction of ingestion, reduction of motor activity and diarrhea were directly correlated with acute rejection. Conclusion - The experimented intestinal transplant is a procedure companied by considerable morbidity and mortality due to surgical complications in postoperative period, vascular anastomosis and

  4. Novel canine bocavirus strain associated with severe enteritis in a dog litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, Rogier; Lapp, Stefanie; Hahn, Kerstin; Habierski, André; Förster, Christine; König, Matthias; Wohlsein, Peter; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Bocaviruses are small non-enveloped viruses with a linear ssDNA genome, that belong to the genus Bocaparvovirus of the subfamiliy Parvovirinae. Bocavirus infections are associated with a wide spectrum of disease in humans and various mammalian species. Here we describe a fatal enteritis associated with infection with a novel strain of canine bocavirus 2 (CaBoV-2), that occurred in a litter of German wirehaired pointers. Necropsy performed on three puppies revealed an enteritis reminiscent of canine parvovirus associated enteritis, accompanied with signs of lymphocytolytic disease in bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes and thymus. While other major causes of enteritis of young dogs, including canine parvovirus, were excluded, by random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel CaBoV-2 strain was detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome of this novel canine bocavirus strain indicated that this virus was indeed most closely related to group 2 canine bocaviruses. Infection with canine bocavirus was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of CaBoV-2 nucleic acid in the intestinal tract and lymphoid tissues of the dogs. In a small-scale retrospective analysis concerning the role of CaBoV-2 no additional cases were identified. The findings of this study provide novel insights into the pathogenicity of canine bocaviruses. PMID:25263495

  5. Improved technique of vascular anastomosis for small intestinal transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xin Li; Jie Shou Li; Ning Li

    2000-01-01

    AIM To establish a new improved vascular anastomotic technique to simplify the surgical technique and increase the survivsl rate of small intestinal transplantation in rats. METHODS The graft removed en bloc consisted of entire small intestine, portal vein and aortic segment with superior mesenteric artery. The graft was perfused in situ and the gut lumen was irrigated during the operation.Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed by microvascular end-to-side anastomosis between the donor aortic segment with superior mesenteric artery and the recipient abdominal aorta, and by the formation of a "Cuff" anastomosis between the donor portal vein and the recipient left renal vein. Both ends of the grafts were exteriorized as stomas. RESULTS A total of 189 intestinal transplantations were performed in rats, 33 of which were involved in the formal experimental group, with a survival rate of 84.8%. The average time for the donor surgery was 80min ±10min; for graft repair 10min ± 3min; and for recipient surgery 95min ± 15min. The average time for the arterial anastomosis and the vein anastomosis was 18min ± 5min and imin,respectively. The warm ischemic time and cold ischemic time were 22min ± 5min and less than 60min, respectively. The whole operation was completed by a single surgeon, the operative time being about 3 hours. CONCLUSION The vascular anastomosis used in this study could simplify surgical technique,reduce the operative time and elevate the survival rate of small intestinal transplantation in rats.

  6. Prevalence and treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in postoperative patients with colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Lihua; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Dongsheng; Li, Yuan; Xu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) after surgical treatment and observe whether gastrointestinal symptoms may improve with rifaximin, 43 postoperative CRC patients (CRC group) and 30 healthy individuals (normal group) were subjected to the glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT). All the patients were asked to evaluate the gastrointestinal symptoms using the visual analogue scale (VAS). SIBO-positive patients were...

  7. Rifaximin for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients without irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Boltin, Doron; Perets, Tsachi Tsadok; Shporn, Einav; Aizic, Shoshana; LEVY, SIGAL; Niv, Yaron; Dickman, Ram

    2014-01-01

    Background Rifaximin is a minimally absorbed antibiotic with high luminal activity, used to treat various gastrointestinal diseases. Although rifaximin has been proposed as first line treatment for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), few data are available regarding its efficacy in non-IBS subjects. We aimed to assess the ability of rifaximin to normalize lactulose-H2 breath tests in non-IBS subjects with symptoms suggestive of SIBO. Materials and methods Consecutive non-IBS patient...

  8. Methane production and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children living in a slum

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Santos Mello; Soraia Tahan; Lígia Cristina FL Melli; Mirian Silva do Carmo Rodrigues; Ricardo Martin Pereira de Mello; Isabel Cristina Affonso Scaletsky; Mauro Batista de Morais

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analyze small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in school-aged children and the relationship between hydrogen and methane production in breath tests. METHODS: This transversal study included 85 children residing in a slum and 43 children from a private school, all aged between 6 and 10 years, in Osasco, Brazil. For characterization of the groups, data regarding the socioeconomic status and basic housing sanitary conditions were collected. Anthropometric data was obtained in children fro...

  9. Evaluation of small intestine bacterial overgrowth in patients with functional dyspepsia through H2 breath test

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Bafutto Gomes Costa; Itaciron Luz Azeredo Jr.; Ricardo Duarte Marciano; Luciana Morelli Caldeira; Mauro Bafutto

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Functional dyspepsia is a condition in which symptoms are not related to organic underlying disease; its pathogenesis is not well known. The small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by the increase in the number and/or type of colonic bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The hypothesis of SIBO being associated to functional dyspepsia must be considered, since the impaired motility of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the main etiologic factors involve...

  10. THE ETHIOPATOGENESIS AND THE ANALYSIS OF AN ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF A SMALL INTESTINE BACTERIAL OVERGROWTH SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    V. L. Martynov; A. Kh. Khairdinov

    2015-01-01

    Article is attempt of the critical analysis of modern approaches to treatment of a small intestine bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO now is one of the major problems in gastroenterology. At the same time, the bacterial overgrowth is cause and consequence of many diseases of digestive system and extradigestive manifestations. Many researches testify to prevalence of SIBO in patients with digestive diseases. However, pathogenesis of a disease is studied insufficiently today. Neverthele...

  11. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Peralta, Claudia Cottone, Tiziana Doveri, Piero Luigi Almasio, Antonio Craxi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO.METHODS: Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a po...

  12. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vanya A Gerova; Ventsislav N Nakov; Simeon G Stoynov; Radislav V Nakov

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of small intestinal bacterialovergrowth (SIBO) and to analyze its relationship with the etiologyof the disease and the severity of liver dysfunction in patients withliver cirrhosis (LC).METHODS: Forty-three patients with LC (25 alcohol- and 18viral-induced) and ten healthy subjects consented to participate inthe study. According to Child-Pugh classification, 7 of the patientswere with class A, 14 - class В and 22 - class С. SIBO was estimatedindirectly by the lac...

  13. Rumen Degradability and Small Intestinal Digestibility of the Amino Acids in Four Protein Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Jin, L; Wen, Q N; Kopparapu, N K; Liu, J; Liu, X L; Zhang, Y G

    2016-02-01

    The supplementation of livestock feed with animal protein is a present cause for public concern, and plant protein shortages have become increasingly prominent in China. This conflict may be resolved by fully utilizing currently available sources of plant protein. We estimated the rumen degradability and the small intestinal digestibility of the amino acids (AA) in rapeseed meal (RSM), soybean meal (SBM), sunflower seed meal (SFM) and sesame meal (SSM) using the mobile nylon bag method to determine the absorbable AA content of these protein supplements as a guide towards dietary formulations for the dairy industry. Overall, this study aimed to utilize protein supplements effectively to guide dietary formulations to increase milk yield and save plant protein resources. To this end, we studied four cows with a permanent rumen fistula and duodenal T-shape fistula in a 4×4 Latin square experimental design. The results showed that the total small intestine absorbable amino acids and small intestine absorbable essential amino acids were higher in the SBM (26.34% and 13.11% dry matter [DM], respectively) than in the SFM (13.97% and 6.89% DM, respectively). The small intestine absorbable Lys contents of the SFM, SSM, RSM and SBM were 0.86%, 0.88%, 1.43%, and 2.12% (DM basis), respectively, and the absorbable Met contents of these meals were 0.28%, 1.03%, 0.52%, and 0.47% (DM basis), respectively. Among the examined food sources, the milk protein score of the SBM (0.181) was highest followed by those of the RSM (0.136), SSM (0.108) and SFM (0.106). The absorbable amino acid contents of the protein supplements accurately reflected protein availability, which is an important indicator of the balance of feed formulation. Therefore, a database detailing the absorbable AA should be established. PMID:26732449

  14. Small intestinal response to 'elemental' and 'complete' liquid feeds in the rat: effect of dietary bulk.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxton, D. G.; Cynk, E U; Thompson, R P

    1987-01-01

    The effect of oral isocaloric feeding on small intestinal structure and function was studied in the rat. The liquid 'elemental' enteral feed Vivonex HN, the liquid 'complete' feed Ensure and the same liquid complete feed with 9% bulk Enrich were compared with solid chow containing 21% bulk (normal rat chow), all given for four weeks. Weight gain was significantly less in the group fed Vivonex HN than that of any other groups. The bulkless Vivonex HN and Ensure increased proximal jejunal mass ...

  15. Evidence for a heritable contribution to neuroendocrine tumors of the small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Neklason, Deborah W; VanDerslice, James; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are rare tumors arising from the enterochromaffin cells of the gut. Having a first-degree relative with a SI-NET has been shown to confer a substantial risk arising from shared environment and genetics. Heritable risk was examined using a computerized genealogy linked to historical statewide cancer data. A population-based analysis of the observed familial clustering of SI-NETs was performed to assess the genetic risk in distant relatives. A tes...

  16. Mathematical Homogenization in the Modelling of Digestion in the Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Barles, G; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, J.R.; Lescoat, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    27 International audience Digestion in the small intestine is the result of complex mechanical and biological phenomena which can be modelled at different scales. In a previous article, we introduced a system of ordinary differential equations for describing the transport and degradation-absorption processes during the digestion. The present article sustains this simplified model by showing that it can be seen as a macroscopic version of more realistic models including biological phenom...

  17. Drug Development Against the Major Diarrhea-Causing Parasites of the Small Intestine, Cryptosporidium and Giardia

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, particularly among young children. A limited number of infectious agents account for most of these illnesses, raising the hope that advances in the treatment and prevention of these infections can have global health impact. The two most important parasitic causes of diarrheal disease are Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Both parasites infect predominantly the small intestine and colonize the lumen and epithel...

  18. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Refractory Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Shimura, Shino; Ishimura, Norihisa; Mikami, Hironobu; Okimoto, Eiko; Uno, Goichi; Tamagawa, Yuji; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Sato, Shuichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). However, the prevalence and clinical conditions of SIBO in patients with FGID remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we examined the frequency of SIBO in patients with refractory FGID. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with refractory FGID based on Rome III criteria. A glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) was performed using a gas...

  19. Effect of cholera enterotoxin on carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and small intestinal mucosa of rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vengrov, P.R.; Cherkasova, T.D.; Yurkiv, V.A.; Pokrovskii, V.I.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of cholera enterotoxin injected in vivo on glucose formation from alanine, and also on glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver and mucosa of the small intestine was studied. L-(2,3-/sup 3/H)-alanine was added to the incubation medium. Chromatograms were developed with 5% AgNO/sub 3/ with the addition of an aqueous solution of ammonia. The quantity of radioactive glucose was determined in a scintillation counter.

  20. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance contribute to irritable bowel syndrome symptomatology in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Javed Yakoob; Zaigham Abbas; Rustam Khan; Saeed Hamid; Safia Awan; Wasim Jafri

    2011-01-01

    Background /Aim: The symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome resemble those of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of SIBO and lactose intolerance (LI) occurrence in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) according to Rome III criteria. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective case-control study, patients over 18 years of age with altered bowel habit, bloating, and patients who had lactose Hydrogen bre...

  1. Glutathione redox cycle in small intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood of pediatric celiac disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vesnać Stojiljković; SnežAna Pejić; Jelena Kasapović; Ljubicać Gavrilović; Stanimirć Stojiljković; Draganć Nikolić; SnežAna B. Pajović

    2012-01-01

    The celiac disease is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder caused by gluten from wheat, rye or barley. In genetically predisposed persons, gluten induces the immune-mediated inflammation of small intestinal mucosa. Histological lesions include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hypertrophy and villous atrophy, resulting in malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The only treatment for celiac patients is a permanent gluten-free diet (GFD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative s...

  2. FOOD INTAKE REGULATES OLEOYLETHANOLAMIDE FORMATION AND DEGRADATION IN THE PROXIMAL SMALL INTESTINE

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jin; Astarita, Giuseppe; Gaetani, Silvana; Kim, Janet; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is a lipid mediator that inhibits food intake by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- α (PPAR-α). In the rodent small intestine, OEA levels decrease during food deprivation and increase upon refeeding, suggesting that endogenous OEA may participate in the regulation of satiety. Here we show that feeding stimulates OEA mobilization in the mucosal layer of rat duodenum and jejunum, but not in the serosal layer from the same intesti...

  3. Partially responsive celiac disease resulting from small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and lactose intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Misra Asha; Ghoshal Ujjala; Ghoshal Uday C; Choudhuri Gourdas

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Celiac disease is a common cause of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption syndrome all over the world. Though it was considered uncommon in India in past, it is being described frequently recently. Some patients with celiac disease do not improve despite gluten free diet (GFD). A study described 15 cases of celiac disease unresponsive to GFD in whom small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or lactose intolerance was the cause for unresponsiveness. Case presentation During...

  4. Gastrointestinal complaints in runners are not due to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    OpenAIRE

    Bärtsch Peter; Reljic Dejan; Schommer Kai; Sauer Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Gastrointestinal complaints are common among long distance runners. We hypothesised that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is present in long distance runners frequently afflicted with gastrointestinal complaints. Findings Seven long distance runners (5 female, mean age 29.1 years) with gastrointestinal complaints during and immediately after exercise without known gastrointestinal diseases performed Glucose hydrogen breath tests for detection of SIBO one week a...

  5. In vitro small intestinal epithelial cell growth on a nanocomposite polycaprolactone scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ashish; Vara, Dina S.; Punshon, Geoffrey; Sales, Kevin M.; Winslet, Marc C.; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering of the small intestine remains experimental despite worldwide attempts to develop a functional substitute for short bowel syndrome. Most published studies have reported predominant use of PLLA (poly-L-lactide acid)/PGA (polyglycolic acid) copolymer as the scaffold material, and studies have been limited by in vivo experiments. This lack of progress has inspired a fresh perspective and provoked further investigation and development in this field of tissue engineering. In the...

  6. The role of natural growth stimulators in regulation of regeneration processes in small intestinal epithelium after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, basing on recently published data, the influence of growth factors on small intestine epithelium regeneration after irradiation is presented. Our knowledge of growth control in the small intestine mucosa may become an accepted mode of radio-, chemotherapy and the treatment of acute radiation sickness in the future. Results of recent studies suggest that there are different factors which can modulate the process of epithelium regeneration. Some of them such as gastrin, enteroglucagon, CCK, EGF, FGF, TGF and IL-11 are able to enhance this process. In addition, other factor-PGE-2 is responsible for not only stimulation of small intestine epithelium growth but radioprotection as well. (author)

  7. How to Test and Treat Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: an Evidence-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Ali; Pimentel, Mark; Rao, Satish S

    2016-02-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is characterized by an excessive amount of bacteria in the small intestine and a constellation of symptoms that include bloating, pain, gas, and diarrhea. Although known for many decades, there is a lack of consensus and clarity regarding the natural history and methods for its diagnosis. Several tests have been proposed, including the glucose breath test, lactulose breath test, small intestinal aspiration and culture, and others. However, there is a lack of standardization of these tests and their interpretation. Treatment of SIBO remains empirical; generally, broad spectrum antibiotics are recommended for 2 weeks (amoxicillin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin, etc.) but evidence for their use is fair. Clearly, there is a strong need to develop a systematic approach for the management of SIBO and to perform multicenter clinical trials for the treatment of SIBO. In this review, we will discuss the current evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of SIBO, which includes (1) elimination/modification of the underlying causes, (2) induction of remission (antibiotics and elemental diet), and (3) maintenance of remission (promotility drugs, dietary modifications, repeat or cyclical antibiotics). PMID:26780631

  8. Arginine becomes an essential amino acid after massive resection of rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Y; Yamada, E; Yoshida, T; Takahashi, H

    1994-12-23

    We compared effects of feeding arginine- and/or proline- deficient diets (-Arg, -Pro, and -Arg, Pro) with those of a complete diet (Complete) in rats whose small intestine had been massively resected. After 4 weeks, the rats fed -Arg and -Arg, Pro lost weight (a mean of 28 and 32 g, respectively), whereas those fed Complete and -Pro gained 80 and 58 g, respectively. The average nitrogen balance was about 117,100, -20 and -14 mg/day for Complete, -Pro, -Arg, and -Arg, Pro diets, respectively. The concentration of arginine in skeletal muscle was about 310, 330, 91, and 65 nmol/g for Complete, -Pro, -Arg, and -Arg, Pro, respectively; while plasma arginine concentration averaged 95, 107, 56, and 46 microM, respectively. The weight loss, the negative nitrogen balance, and the markedly reduced arginine concentration in the muscle observed in rats fed -Arg and -Arg, Pro clearly indicate that arginine becomes a strictly essential amino acid in the rats with massive resection of the small intestine. However, sufficient proline can be synthesized from arginine in tissues such as the liver and kidney in the absence of the small intestine. Plasma glutamine, citrulline in the muscle and plasma, urinary excretion of orotic acid and nitrate (to assess nitric oxide formation from arginine) were also measured, and the changes in these metabolites are discussed. PMID:7798273

  9. Expression and significance of C-fos and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the small intestinal tissue of human fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-hong LIU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the expression rule of proliferating cell nuclear antigen(PCNA,C-fos proteins and apoptosis genes in the small intestinal tissue of human fetus.Methods At the second-to fourth-month of gestation,the expressions of cell proliferation and apoptosis were observed in 16 specimens of human fetal small intestinal tissue by using the immunohistochemical methods and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling(TUNEL.Results At the second to fourth month of gestation,all the PCNA and C-fos proteins were positively expressed in the small intestinal tissues and cells of human fetus.With the increase in gestational period,the positive cell number and average intensity(AI of PCNA protein increased gradually(P < 0.01.The positive cell number of C-fos protein increased first,and then decreased,while the AI of C-fos protein stably increased in the small intestinal tissues and cells of human fetus(P < 0.01.At the second to fourth month of gestation,TUNEL positive cells were seen to distribute in each layer of the small intestinal tissues of human fetus.With the increase of age,all the positive cell number and AI of TUNEL positive cells showed a tendency of decrease following increase in the small intestine of human fetus(P < 0.01.Conclusions PCNA,C-fos and apoptosis gene participate in adjusting the growth and development of the cells and tissues in the small intestine of human fetus.In the third month of gestation,especially,proliferation and apoptosis are significantly increased in the small intestinal tissue of human fetus,which may be the key period of intestinal tissue development.

  10. Protection of the small intestine against irradiation by means of a removable prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiation therapy of tumors, several techniques are used to prevent injury of the intestinal loops. Their purpose is to drive the intestine out of the external beam. Understanding the disadvantages they present, a temporary prosthesis which effectively protects the small bowel, and is easy to remove, has been developed. The device is a 600 to 1,000 ml, silicone rubber, expandable balloon. When implanted in the pelvis or retroperitoneal cavity, and filled, this balloon displaces the intestinal loops out of the pelvic irradiation field. It may remain either filled or empty between each irradiation session. Due to its particular elliptical shape, once empty, the balloon can be removed through a 3 cm incision under local or peridural anesthesia at the completion of radiotherapy. Eleven patients with recurrent (8) or primary (3) cancer have been implanted. The protective effect has been evaluated on successive biologic tests, performed during treatment. No problem related to the prosthesis, no alteration of the biologic tests, nor bowel injury have been observed after several months follow-up. This device is suitable for preventing intestinal complications during therapy, allowing a higher dose of radiations in some cases

  11. Analysis of radiation-induced small intestinal tumors in APCMin/+mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of radiation on intestinal tumorigenesis was studied using APCMin/+ mouse, a hetero-knockout strain with highly tumorigenic sensitivity due to the lack of tumor suppressing adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene (the causing gene of human familial polyposis) (Min: multiple intestinal neoplasia). Offspring crossed by male APCMin/+ and female wild type c57BL/6N mice were used for experiments. Those offspring at the age of 2 weeks were irradiated by 2 Gy of 60Co-gamma ray at 1.22 Gy/min with the irradiator RE-1082 and were maintained thereafter for 9 and 19 weeks, when they were sacrificed for physical, hematological and histological examinations. No significant radiation-related changes were observed in wild type mice. In comparison with non-irradiated APCMin/+ mice, followings were observed with significance in irradiated animals: the peripheral hemoglobin value was decreased; spleen weight was increased; number of tumors present in small intestine increased to 2-fold; and a colorectal tumor as big as >2 mm diameter was observed in one mouse. Thus radiation promoted the intestinal tumor formation in APCMin/+ mice. (T.T.)

  12. Angiographic Evaluation of Carotid Artery Grafting with Prefabricated Small-Diameter, Small-Intestinal Submucosa Grafts in Sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to report the longitudinal angiographic evaluation of prefabricated lyophilized small-intestinal submucosa (SIS) grafts placed in ovine carotid arteries and to demonstrate a variety of complications that developed. A total of 24 grafts, 10 cm long and 6 mm in diameter, were placed surgically as interposition grafts. Graft patency at 1 week was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound, and angiography was used for follow-up at 1 month and at 3 to 4 months. A 90% patency rate was found at 1 week, 65% at 1 month, and 30% at 3 to 4 months. On the patent grafts, angiography demonstrated a variety of changes, such as anastomotic stenoses, graft diffuse dilations and dissections, and aneurysm formation. These findings have not been previously demonstrated angiographically by other investigators reporting results with small-diameter vessel grafts made from fresh small-intestinal submucosa (SIS). The complications found were partially related to the graft construction from four SIS layers. Detailed longitudinal angiographic study should become an essential part of any future evaluation of small-vessel SIS grafting.

  13. Serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; Parnell, Nolie K; Grützner, Niels; Mansell, Joanne; Berghoff, Nora; Schellenberg, Stefan; Reusch, Claudia E; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) protein loss, due to lymphangiectasia or chronic inflammation, can be challenging to diagnose. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1PI) concentrations to detect crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs. Serum and fecal cα1PI concentrations were measured in 120 dogs undergoing GI tissue biopsies, and were compared between dogs with and without crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. Serial serum cα1PI concentrations were also evaluated in 12 healthy corticosteroid-treated dogs. Serum cα1PI and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation than in those without (both P <0.001), and more severe lesions were associated with lower serum cα1PI concentrations, higher 3 days-mean fecal cα1PI concentrations, and lower serum/fecal cα1PI ratios. Serum and fecal cα1PI, and their ratios, distinguished dogs with moderate or severe GI crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation from dogs with only mild or none such lesions with moderate sensitivity (56-92%) and specificity (67-81%). Serum cα1PI concentrations increased during corticosteroid administration. We conclude that serum and fecal α1PI concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation in dogs. Due to its specificity for the GI tract, measurement of fecal cα1PI appears to be superior to serum cα1PI for diagnosing GI protein loss in dogs. In addition, the serum/fecal cα1PI ratio has an improved accuracy in hypoalbuminemic dogs, but serum cα1PI concentrations should be carefully interpreted in corticosteroid-treated dogs. PMID:26631946

  14. Influence of the Gut Microflora and of Biliary Constituents on Morphological Changes in the Small Intestine in Obstructive Jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saeed Quraishy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased amounts of intestinal endotoxin are absorbed in obstructive jaundice. The precise mechanism is not known but the increased absorption may arise from alterations in the luminal contents, in the intestinal flora, in the gut wall or in interactions between all three. To examine the effects of the intestinal flora we have compared the morphological changes in the small intestine in obstructive jaundice in germ free and conventional rats while the effects of bile constituents have been examined by addition of bile constituents to the diet of bile duct ligated rats. Changes in the intestine were examined, histologically, by enzyme histochemistry, and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed no differences in response between germ free and conventional rats. Feeding of diets containing bile salts exacerbated the lesion. Feeding of diets containing cholesterol, however, reduced the degree of intestinal changes produced by cholestasis and completely antagonised the increase in damage caused by feeding of bile salts.

  15. A prospective randomized controlled study of erythromycin on gastric and small intestinal distention: Implications for MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Suboptimal small intestinal distention limits jejunal visualization during MRI. • In this controlled study, erythromycin increased gastric emptying measured with MRI. • However, effects on small intestinal dimensions were variable. - Abstract: Objectives: To assess if erythromycin increases gastric emptying and hence improves small intestinal distention during MR enterography. Methods: Gastric, small intestinal, and large intestinal volumes were assessed with MR after neutral oral contrast (1350 ml in 45 min) and balanced randomization to erythromycin (200 mg i.v., age 31 ± 3y, 13 females), or placebo (37 ± 3y, 13 females) in 40 healthy asymptomatic volunteers. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR images of the abdomen were acquired on a 1.5 T magnet at standard delay times for enterography. Gastric, small, and large intestinal volumes were measured by specialized software. In addition, two radiologists manually measured diameters and percentage distention of jejunal and ileal loops. Treatment effects were evaluated by an ITT analysis based on ANCOVA models. Results: All subjects tolerated erythromycin. MRI scans of the stomach and intestine were obtained at 62 ± 2 (mean ± SEM) and 74 ± 2 min respectively after starting oral contrast. Gastric volumes were lower (P < 0.0001) after erythromycin (260 ± 49 ml) than placebo (688 ± 63 ml) but jejunal, ileal, and colonic volumes were not significantly different. However, maximum (76–100%) jejunal distention was more frequently observed (P = 0.03) after erythromycin (8/20 subjects [40%]) than placebo (2/20 subjects [10%]). The diameter of a representative ileal loop was greater (P = 0.001) after erythromycin (18.8 ± 4.3 mm) than placebo (17.3 ± 2.8 mm) infusion. Conclusions: After ingestion of oral contrast, erythromycin accelerated gastric emptying but effects on small intestinal dimensions were variable. In balance, erythromycin did not substantially enhance small intestinal distention during

  16. A prospective randomized controlled study of erythromycin on gastric and small intestinal distention: Implications for MR enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharucha, Adil E., E-mail: bharucha.adil@mayo.edu [Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.) Program, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Fidler, Jeff L., E-mail: fidler.jeff@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Huprich, James E., E-mail: huprich@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ratuapli, Shiva K., E-mail: ratuapli.shiva@mayo.edu [Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.) Program, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Holmes, David R., E-mail: holmes.david3@mayo.edu [Biomedical Imaging Resource, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Riederer, Stephen J., E-mail: riederer@mayo.edu [MR Research Laboratory, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Zinsmeister, Alan R., E-mail: zinsmeis@mayo.edu [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Suboptimal small intestinal distention limits jejunal visualization during MRI. • In this controlled study, erythromycin increased gastric emptying measured with MRI. • However, effects on small intestinal dimensions were variable. - Abstract: Objectives: To assess if erythromycin increases gastric emptying and hence improves small intestinal distention during MR enterography. Methods: Gastric, small intestinal, and large intestinal volumes were assessed with MR after neutral oral contrast (1350 ml in 45 min) and balanced randomization to erythromycin (200 mg i.v., age 31 ± 3y, 13 females), or placebo (37 ± 3y, 13 females) in 40 healthy asymptomatic volunteers. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR images of the abdomen were acquired on a 1.5 T magnet at standard delay times for enterography. Gastric, small, and large intestinal volumes were measured by specialized software. In addition, two radiologists manually measured diameters and percentage distention of jejunal and ileal loops. Treatment effects were evaluated by an ITT analysis based on ANCOVA models. Results: All subjects tolerated erythromycin. MRI scans of the stomach and intestine were obtained at 62 ± 2 (mean ± SEM) and 74 ± 2 min respectively after starting oral contrast. Gastric volumes were lower (P < 0.0001) after erythromycin (260 ± 49 ml) than placebo (688 ± 63 ml) but jejunal, ileal, and colonic volumes were not significantly different. However, maximum (76–100%) jejunal distention was more frequently observed (P = 0.03) after erythromycin (8/20 subjects [40%]) than placebo (2/20 subjects [10%]). The diameter of a representative ileal loop was greater (P = 0.001) after erythromycin (18.8 ± 4.3 mm) than placebo (17.3 ± 2.8 mm) infusion. Conclusions: After ingestion of oral contrast, erythromycin accelerated gastric emptying but effects on small intestinal dimensions were variable. In balance, erythromycin did not substantially enhance small intestinal distention during

  17. Digestion of “Resistant” Starch Sources in the Human Small Intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RoelJ.Vonk; Yue-XinYang; 等

    2001-01-01

    Background:Resistant starch sources,which are only partially digested in the small intestine,can be used to increase colonic avalialbiltiy of short chain fatty acids.Objective:To study the characteristics of the fermentiation of resistant starch,fist its small intestinal digestion has to be quantified.In our study,we performed this by comparing the metalbolic fate of highley digestible corn starch(DCS) ,Hylon VII and Novelose ,which are of corn origin and therefore naturally enriched in 13C.Design:After administration of 40g starch or glucose to seven healthy volunteers,glucose and exogenous glucose concentrations in serum and 13CO2 excretion in breasth were analyzed for 6hr.Carbon-13 abundance of CO2 was analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectormtry(IRMS) and 13C abundance of glucose by Gas Chromatography/Combustion/IRMS.Results:comparing the area under the curve(2hr) or exgenous glucose concentration in serum(13C-glycemic index)after intake of starch or glucos.digestion percentages for DCS,hylon VII and Novelose were calcualted to be 82%±23%,44%±16%and 43%±15%,Comparing 6h cumulative percentage dose recovery in breath revealed that 119%±28% of DCS,55%±23%of Hylon VII and 50±26% of Novelose is digested in the small intestine.Conclusion:Theses data show that the exogenous glucose reponse in serum and the 13CO2 excretion in breath can be used to estimate smlall intestinal digestion of resistant starch,which amounts approximately 50%.

  18. Heat-treated colostrum feeding promotes beneficial bacteria colonization in the small intestine of neonatal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Chen, Yanhong; Liang, Guanxiang; Goonewardene, Laksiri A; Guan, Le Luo

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of heat-treated colostrum feeding on the bacterial colonization in calf small intestine of neonatal calves within the first 12h of life. Newborn Holstein bull calves (n=32) were assigned to 3 treatment groups and fed with either fresh colostrum (FC, n=12) or heat-treated (60°C, 60 min) colostrum (HC, n=12) soon after birth, whereas the control (NC, n=8) group did not receive colostrum or water. Small intestinal tissues and contents were collected from proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum at 6 and 12h after birth, following euthanasia. Quantitative real time-PCR was used to explore the colonization of total bacteria, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Escherichia coli. The feeding of colostrum soon after birth increased the colonization of total bacteria in calf gut within the first 12h compared with NC. In contrast, the prevalence of Lactobacillus was lower in HC and FC compared to NC. Remarkable changes in the prevalence of small intestinal tissue-attached Bifidobacterium were observed with the feeding of HC, but not that in small intestinal contents. The prevalence of Bifidobacterium was 3.2 and 5.2 fold higher in HC than FC and NC, respectively, at 6h. Although the feeding of FC did not enhance the prevalence of tissue-attached Bifidobacterium at 6h compared with NC, it displayed a gradual increase over the time that was higher than NC, but similar to that of HC at 12h. Moreover, the colonization of E. coli was drastically reduced in HC calves compared with FC and NC. Thus, the present study suggests that the feeding of HC enhances the colonization of Bifidobacterium but lessens E. coli in the calf small intestine immediately postpartum compared with that of FC and NC. The increased colonization of beneficial bacteria along with the decreased colonization of potential pathogens in calf gut may also diminish the neonatal calf diarrhea when calves are fed heat-treated colostrum soon after birth. PMID:26342981

  19. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Novel Insight in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelos J. Giamarellos Bourboulis; Michalis Tzivras

    2009-01-01

    A total of 65-84% of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) presents with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). SIBO is defined as the presence of more than 105 cfu/ml of colonic type bacteria in the lumen of the small bowel. It is more common in patients with IBS and predominant bloating and diarrhea. Based on the implication of SIBO in the pathogenesis of IBS, six trials have been conducted and analyzed in this review aiming to define a role of rifaximin for the management of ...

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: Meaningful association or unnecessary hype

    OpenAIRE

    Uday C Ghoshal; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 105 colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fa...

  1. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); D.J. van Nispen; S. Ferdinandusse; M. Jorritsma; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were loca

  2. Williamson Fluid Model for the Peristaltic Flow of Chyme in Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine along with inserted endoscope is considered. Here, chyme is treated as Williamson fluid, and the flow is considered between the annular region formed by two concentric tubes (i.e., outer tube as small intestine and inner tube as endoscope. Flow is induced by two sinusoidal peristaltic waves of different wave lengths, traveling down the intestinal wall with the same speed. The governing equations of Williamson fluid in cylindrical coordinates have been modeled. The resulting nonlinear momentum equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The resulting problem is solved using regular perturbation method in terms of a variant of Weissenberg number We. The numerical solution of the problem is also computed by using shooting method, and comparison of results of both solutions for velocity field is presented. The expressions for axial velocity, frictional force, pressure rise, stream function, and axial pressure gradient are obtained, and the effects of various emerging parameters on the flow characteristics are illustrated graphically. Furthermore, the streamlines pattern is plotted, and it is observed that trapping occurs, and the size of the trapped bolus varies with varying embedded flow parameters.

  3. Identification and differential distribution of CART in the small intestine depending on the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, I; Olkowski, B; Szczotka-Bochniarz, A

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed at identifying and locating cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in the small intestine of broilers in relation to the diet. The feeding regime of the chicks was based on diets largely consisting of maize and one of four protein sources: post-extraction soya bean meal (SBM) or non-GM seed meal - meal from traditional variety of soy seeds Glicine max (FFS) and meal from seeds of Lupinus angustifolius (LA) and Lupinus luteus L (LY). The presence of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript immunoreactive (CART-IR) in the wall of the small intestine of the chicks was determined on the basis of staining patterns produced by the immunohistochemical method (IHC). CART-IR structures were found in the myenteric plexus (MP), submucosus plexus (SP), in endomucosal fibres, and fibres innervating miocytes and blood vessels in the muscularis membrane and adipocytes of the white adipose tissue (WAT) located on the perimeter of the serous membrane and single cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system. Based on microscopic observation and result analysis, the lowest number of CART-IR structures was identified in the group that was fed the SBM-based diet. This study confirms previous observations concerning CART distribution in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of animal and broadens current knowledge by inclusion of chicken in the list of CART-positive species. Moreover, this work provides evidence that dietary composition can be a factor that stimulates post-prandial CART secretion in intestinal nerve structures. PMID:24797515

  4. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-04-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD. PMID:27175112

  5. Successful small intestine colonization of adult mice by Vibrio cholerae requires ketamine anesthesia and accessory toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Olivier

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae colonizes the small intestine of adult C57BL/6 mice. In this study, the physical and genetic parameters that facilitate this colonization were investigated. Successful colonization was found to depend upon anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine and neutralization of stomach acid with sodium bicarbonate, but not streptomycin treatment. A variety of common mouse strains were colonized by O1, O139, and non-O1/non-O139 strains. All combinations of mutants in the genes for hemolysin, the multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxin (MARTX, and hemagglutinin/protease were assessed, and it was found that hemolysin and MARTX are each sufficient for colonization after a low dose infection. Overall, this study suggests that, after intragastric inoculation, V. cholerae encounters barriers to infection including an acidic environment and an immediate immune response that is circumvented by sodium bicarbonate and the anti-inflammatory effects of ketamine-xylazine. After initial adherence in the small intestine, the bacteria are subjected to additional clearance mechanisms that are evaded by the independent toxic action of hemolysin or MARTX. Once colonization is established, it is suggested that, in humans, these now persisting bacteria initiate synthesis of the major virulence factors to cause cholera disease. This adult mouse model of intestinal V. cholerae infection, now well-characterized and fully optimized, should serve as a valuable tool for studies of pathogenesis and testing vaccine efficacy.

  6. Intestinal small bowel lymphomas - diagnosis and treatment; Primaer intestinale Lymphome - Diagnosestellung mittels CT und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goessmann, H.; Reith, H.B. [Klinikum fuer Visceral-, Thorax und Gefaesschirurgie, Klinikum Konstanz (Germany); Goerlitz, T.; Beck, A. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Konstanz (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Primary intestinal lymphomas are most common in the stomach. The mucosa associated lymphatic tissue (MALT)-lymphoma which is closely associated with helicobacter pylori is very well known. In most cases, these malignancies are from B-cells origin. Another possible point of manifestation, although not well known, is the small bowel. Both tumors have enormous capabilities to enlarge in the abdominal cave. This is responding to their often asymptomatic manifestation. The symptoms, if they occur, are widespread and unspecific. Ileus, diarrhae, abdominal pain or bleeding will be observed, in rare cases also perforation or gastrointestinal or cutaneous fistulas. Diagnostic imaging often demonstrates a tumour of massive size by then, which is echopoor in the abdominal ultrasound. Our report concerns two cases of small intestine lymphomas, which were diagnosed by CT-scanning and treated in our clinic in only a short period of time. The first case was a low malignant jejunal lymphoma which was almost asymptomatic, whereas the second case had an ileus, due to compression of the intestine because of a high malignant lymphoma of the ileocecal region. (orig.)

  7. [The potentials of computed tomography in the study of mechanical ileus of the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelelli, G; Macarini, L; Di Giulio, G

    1991-11-01

    Eighteen patients were examined; they were suffering from small bowel obstruction due to adhesions (7 cases), hernia (3 cases), carcinoma (2 cases), metastasis from melanoma (1 case), radiation enteritis (2 cases), intramural hematoma (2 cases), and peritoneal carcinosis (1 case). CT capabilities in showing the site and the cause of obstruction were evaluated. CT was performed after conventional radiology in 13 cases, while in 5 cases it was the first exam and demonstrated the condition as an occasional finding. In all cases i.v. contrast agents were administered. Filling of the intestinal loop by oral contrast agent was never performed since the hypodense fluid present in the distended intestinal loops allowed good evaluation of intestinal walls. CT always showed the level of the obstruction thanks to the presence of the distended loops (phi: 4-8 cm) above the condition and of collapsed loops below. In 8/18 cases (44%) it was possible to show the cause of the obstruction. Those due to neoplasms, herniae and intramural hematomas were correctly diagnosed. On the contrary, it was not possible to identify the cause of the obstructions due to adhesions, radiation enteritis and peritoneal metastases because of the absence, in such cases, of specific parietal alterations. According to our results, CT is suitable in patients suffering from small bowel obstruction because it allows: to always show the site of the obstruction and, in some cases, its cause; to diagnose closed loop obstructions; to obtain a simultaneous staging in neoplastic patients. PMID:1780462

  8. The protective role of Melatonin on small intestine after Thioacetamide Intoxication in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study deals with the effect of melatonin (MT), a very potent and efficient endogenous free radical scavenger, against the toxic effect induced by thioacetamide (TAA) on structures of small intestine in rats. Melatonin acts as primary nonenzymatic antioxidant and protects the tissue from oxidative damage. Thioacetamide, which was originally used as a fungicide, is proposed hepatotoxin commonly used to induce liver cirrhosis in rats and other species. However, very little attention has been dealt with the effects of TAA on the intestinal cells and there functions. It was therefore of interest to study the aging variation in the sequenced response responses of injury caused by TAA and regeneration capacity of recovery after using melatonin. For this purpose male Wistar rats aging 1, 3 and 12 months are arranged in three main groups (15 rats for each group). Each main group then divided into: (1) control group, (2) intoxicated group (a single high dose 300 mg/kg/body weight of TAA) and (3) treated group, administered the same dose of thioacetamide with melatonin (5mg/kg/body weight) daily injected orally for four weeks. Histological investigation of TAA intoxication revealed a highest grade of pathological alterations manifested by changes of width and length of most villi in ileum of all intoxicated groups. The epithelial cells lining the top of the villi were denuded in ileum sections of newly weaned and young intoxicated animals, while they appeared degenerated with exposed lamina propria in ileum sections of adult group. There was also an increase in the number of goblet cells in most villi and in crypts of Lieberkuhn of intestinal cells. Mitotic figures were observed obviously in the crypts of onset ileum cells of intoxicated animals. Lymphocytic infiltration in lamina propria and submucosa were more obvious in the intestinal cell of young intoxicated groups. However, congestion and dilatation of blood vessels were more pronounced in ileum sections of

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium. PMID:27013459

  10. Modulation of Pacemaker Potentials by Pyungwi-San in Interstitial Cells of Cajal from Murine Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Jung Nam; Song Ho Jun; Lim Bora; Kwon Young Kyu; Kim Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pyungwi-san (PWS) plays a role in a number of physiologic and pharmacologic functions in many organs. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow waves in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of PWS in mouse small-intestinal ICCs. Methods: Enzymatic digestion was used to dissociate ICCs from the small intestine of a mouse. The wholecell patch-clamp configuration was used to record membrane potentials from the ...

  11. The morphological changes in liver and small intestine of rats under the chronic influence of ionizing radiation and cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphometric studies of a state of small intestine mucosa and liver of rats are realized under the chronic influence of γ-radiation (0.72 cGy/day) and cadmium with drinking water (0.01 mg Cd2+/l). The detected substantial changes of the liver histostructure in comparison with small intestine mucosa are possibly connected with the cadmium accumulation in cells and the enhancement of its toxic properties

  12. Acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage originating in the small intestine Hemorragia digestiva baja severa originada en el intestino delgado

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ríos; M. J. Montoya; Rodríguez, J M; P. Parrilla

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage (LGIH) is generally self-limiting, and the most frequent etiologies are located at colonic level. The objective here is to analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic handling of acute LGIH when its etiology was located in the small intestine. Patients and methods: between 1975 and March 2002, 12 acute cases of LGIH originating in the small intestine were admitted to our service. All consulted the hospital with acute rectorrhage, requiring a transfus...

  13. Evaluation of the functional state of the small intestine of patients using antibiotics for treatment of out-hospital pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Y. M. Vahrushev; N. N. Shulyateva

    2015-01-01

    Processes of hydrolysis and absorbtion in small intestine were assessed with 60 of patients using amoxicillin/ clavulanate for treatment of out-hospital pneumonia. It is established that when carrying out an antibiotikoterapiya band digestion and absorption at the kept parietal digestion is broken. Further analysis of the factors presented will allow to work out practical recommendations on prevention of side effects of antibiotics usage in small intestine.

  14. Topography of the enteric nervous system in Peyer's patches of the porcine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, H J; Kühnel, W

    1993-05-01

    The mechanisms of intercommunication between the immune and nervous systems are not fully understood. In the case of the intestine, the enteric nervous system is involved in the regulation of immune responses. It was therefore decided to employ immuno-histochemical techniques to investigate the structural organization of the enteric nervous system in Peyer's patches of the porcine small intestine. Using antibodies against various nervous system-specific markers (protein gene product 9.5, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament 200, S-100 protein and the glial fibrillary acidic protein), an intimate and specific structural association could be demonstrated between enteric nerves and the compartments of Peyer's patches: follicles, interfollicular regions and domes. Peyer's patches have a close topographical relationship to the two submucosal plexuses. Enteric nerves are located around the follicle in the interfollicular area--the so-called "traffic area"--and in the dome area, which plays an important role in the uptake and presentation of antigens. PMID:8513481

  15. Identification of interstitial cells of Cajal. Significance for studies of human small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1994-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago by Ramón y Cajal a.o. as primitive neurons in the intestines. In the period 1900-1960 a large number of light microscopical studies of ICC were published, in which ICC were identified by heir characteristic morphology. After 1960...... electron microscopical studies emphasized similarities between ICC and fibroblasts. In our early studies of ICC in the external musculature of mouse small intestine, we identified ICC by their characteristic morphology and topography, and we analyzed the relation between ICC, autonomic nerves and smooth...... muscle. These studies strongly suggested that ICC were fundamental regulators of external muscle function. These hypotheses have since been supported by independent morphological and electrophysiological evidence, strongly suggesting a pacemaker role of some ICC populations as well as other regulatory...

  16. The bacteriology of the small intestinal mucosa of free-living reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Sørmo

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in close associaton with the intestinal mucosa are thought to protect the mucosa from pathogenic microorganisms. The pH of the small intestinal mucosa and the viable populations of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria associated with the proximal and distal jejunal mucosa, were measured in four free-living reindeer in winter. The anaerobic bacterial populations were characterized. The median pH of the mucosa of the duodenum was 6.6 (n=4 at point 0.2 m from the pyloric sphincter. The mucosal pH increased along the length of the intestine to 8.3 at 14 m and then decreased to 7.9 at 19.8 m from the pyloric sphincter. Examination by transmission electron microscopy and cultivation techniques failed to reveal any bacteria on the mucosa of the proximal jejunum in two of the animals. In two other reindeer the median anaerobic bacterial densities in the proximal jejunum ranged from 25-2500 cells/g mucosa. The median anaerobic bacterial populations in the distal jejunum ranged from 80 to 20000 bacteria/g mucosa (n=4. The anaerobic population of bacteria in the proximal jejunum was dominated by streptococci and unidentified gram positive rods. Bacteroidaceae, streptococci and unidentified gram positive rods were common in the distal jejunum. The low density and the species diversity of bacteria in the small intestine suggests that these microorganisms are inhibited by components in the natural winter diet of reindeer. Bacteria evidently play a minor role in protection of the mucosa of reindeer in winter.

  17. Recurrence of an NSAID-induced diaphragmatic disease of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Daniel; Sahota, Jagjit; Schofield, John

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman was referred to the surgical team from clinic, reporting of a 1-week history of vomiting and abdominal distension on a background of previous large bowel resection for a flare up of diverticulitis with a suspicion of diaphragm disease of the small intestine diagnosed at the same time. She was initially managed conservatively owing to the likely diagnosis of adhesion(s) leading to small bowel obstruction, but a CT of the abdomen a day later revealed a recurrence of diaphragmatic disease of the small bowel causing an obstruction, most likely due to chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. She was taken to theatre for an emergency laparotomy and small bowel resection due to previous resections, from which she made a good recovery; she was discharged from hospital 8 days later. PMID:27170609

  18. Current aspects of the diagnostic evaluation of lesions of the small intestine; Aktuelle Diagnostik von Duenndarmerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessling, J.; Roos, N. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Luegering, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Medizinische Klinik B

    2001-12-01

    The conventional enteroclysis is superior to the single and fractionated passage of contrast medium, especially for detection and diagnosis of lesions of the mucosa and the intraluminal component of a tumor. Thus enteroclysis remains an indispensable modality for early detection and diagnostic evaluation of lesions of the small intestine. The specific significance of CT and MR imaging is founded on the capabilities offered for direct examination of the intestinal wall, and detection of extra-intestinal manifestations of lesions of the small intestine. These two methods hence generate information complementing the findings of enteroclysis, which puts therapy planning and differential diagnosis on a broader basis. In the diagnostic examination of Crohn disease, MRI is superior to CT in the evaluation of inflammatory processes, and as a follow-up modality. The value of the MR enteroclysis for detection of tumors of the small intestine, or malabsorption, is not clear yet. Whether it may become a primary diagnostic modality hinges essentially on the development of its potiential of detecting early stages of lesions. Another factor in this context is the cost-benefit ratio. (orig./CB) [German] Das konventionelle Enteroklysma ist der einfachen und fraktionierten Kontrastmittelpassage diagnostisch ueberlegen, insbesondere zur sicheren Erkennung von Veraenderungen auf Schleimhautniveau und der intraluminalen Komponente eines Tumors. Das Enteroklysma bleibt damit in der Fruehdiagnostik von Duenndarmerkrankungen mit einem hohen negativen Vorhersagewert unersetzbar. Die Bedeutung der Schnittbildverfahren CT und MRT ergibt sich aus der Moeglichkeit einer direkten Beurteilung der Duenndarmwand sowie der Erfassung extraintestinaler Manifestationen von Duenndarmerkrankungen. Beide Methoden liefern in Ergaenzung zum Enteroklysma therapierelevante Zusatzinformationen und erleichtern die differenzialdiagnostische Zuordnung der jeweiligen Veraenderungen. Das MR-Enteroklysma beim

  19. [Occult stromal tumour of the small intestine: a cause of chronic intestinal blood loss in a 70 year-old woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentimone, F; Gerini, A; Moncini, C; Di Stefano, S; Pagni, V; Pastine, F; Del Corso, L

    1999-03-01

    The case of a 70 year-old woman with a chronic gastrointestinal blood loss due to a stromal tumor located in the middle third of the small intestine is reported. The peculiarities of the case are the characteristic immunohistochemistry of the neoplasm and, particularly, the mimetic clinical presentation, a kind of ''phantom tumor'' confirmed only with celiotomy and surgical excision. PMID:16498316

  20. Canine Distemper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of ... Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. And Now A Note On ...

  1. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: association with toll-like receptor 4 expression and plasma levels of interleukin 8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanab, Ahmed Abu

    2011-05-01

    Experimental and clinical studies suggest an association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver injury and fibrosis could be related to exposure to bacterial products of intestinal origin and, most notably, endotoxin, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  2. Effects of octreotide on glucose transporter type 2 expression in obese rat small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Wei; Rui Liu; Yan Ou; Xian Li; Ou Qiang; Wei Guo; Cheng-Wei Tang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of the somatostatin analogue, octreotide, on maltose and sucrase activities and expression of glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) in obese rat intestinal mucosa.METHODS: We divided 49 Sprague-Dawley rats into a group of 31 high fat diet-induced obese rats and a group of 18 normal controls. The obese rats were separated into an octreotide treated group of 16 rats and an obese group of 15. The intervention group was injected with octreotide at 40 μg/kg body weight every 12 h for 8 d. Rat body weight was measured weekly to calculate Lee's index. After euthanization, maltase and sucrase activities in the small intestine were measured by activity assays, and the fasting plasma glucose level was measured. The expression of GLUT2 in small intestinal mucosa was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting assays.RESULTS: Body weight, Lee's index, fasting plasma glucose level, maltase activity in small intestinal mucosa, mucosa and apical GLUT2, GLUT2 mRNA and protein expression levels were all significantly higher in the obese group than in the normal control group (605.61 ± 141.00 vs 378.54 ± 111.75, 337.61 ± 10.82 vs 318.73 ± 20.10, 8.60 ± 1.38 vs 7.33 ± 0.70, 156.01 ± 58.81 vs 50.43 ± 30.49, 390 744.2 ± 62 469.21 vs 170 546.50 ± 50 646.14, 26 740.18 ± 3809.60 vs 354.98 ± 57.19, 0.26 ± 0.11 vs 0.07 ± 0.02, and 2.08 ± 0.59 vs 1.27 ± 0.38, respectively, all P < 0.01). Sucrase activity did not differ between the two groups. Octreotide intervention significantly decreased the body weight and fasting plasma glucose level of obese rats (508.27 ± 94.39 vs 605.61 ± 141.00, 7.58 ± 1.51 vs 8.60 ±1.38, respectively, all P < 0.05). The intestinal mucosa and apical GLUT2, expression of GLUT2 mRNA and protein were also significantly lower in the octreotide intervention group than in the obese group (269 975.2 ± 53 730.94 vs 390 744.2 ± 62 469.21, 3758.06 ±364.51 vs 26 740

  3. [Progress of Researches on Relationship between Acu-moxibustion Induced Modulation of Small Intestinal Motility and Autonomic Nervous Activity ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A large body of evidence of clinical and experimental outcomes showed that acupuncture and moxibustion can effectively treat disorders of small intestinal motility. The present articJe collected related literatures and made an analysis on the correlation between the effect of acupuncture-moxibustion intervention and needle-manipulation techniques, stimulating quantities, acupoint recipes, and the body functional states, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Results indicate that acupuncture stimulation of acupoints of the limbs mainly enhance the motility of the small intestine, while acupuncture stimulation of acupoints in the abdominal region predominately suppress it, which may be closely associated with its effects on activities of the autonomic nervous system. This conclusion tells us that in clinical treatment of small intestinal hypodynamia, acupoints of the limbs should be selected first while in treating intestinal hyperdynamia, those acupoints in the abdominal region should be taken preferably. In ad- dition, at present, non-invaded detection techniques of the small intestinal motility are definitely and urgently needed and will greatly promote the progress of researches of acu-moxibustion on the mechanism underlying modulation of small intestinal motility. PMID:25632580

  4. Regulation of Electroneutral NaCl Absorption by the Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akira; Romero, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Na+ and Cl− movement across the intestinal epithelium occurs by several interconnected mechanisms: (1) nutrient coupled Na+ absorption; (2) electroneutral NaCl absorption; (3) electrogenic Cl− secretion by CFTR; and (4) electrogenic Na+ absorption by ENaC. All of these transport modes require a favorable electrochemical gradient maintained by the basolateral Na+-K+-ATPase, a Cl− channel and K+ channels. Electroneutral NaCl absorption is observed from the small intestine to distal colon. This transport is mediated by apical Na+/H+ (NHE2/3) and Cl−/HCO3 − (Slc26a3/a6, others) exchangers that provide the major route of NaCl absorption. Electroneutral NaCl absorption and Cl− secretion by CFTR are oppositely regulated by the autonomic nerve system, immune system, and endocrine system via PKAα, PKCα, cGKII, and/or SGK1. This integrated regulation requires the formation of macromolecular complexes, which mediated by NHERF family of scaffold proteins, and involve internalization of NHE3. Using knockout mice and human mutations, a more detailed understanding of the integrated as well as subtle regulation of electroneutral NaCl absorption by the mammalian intestine has emerged. PMID:21054167

  5. Dietary Fatty Acids Directly Impact Central Nervous System Autoimmunity via the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghikia, Aiden; Jörg, Stefanie; Duscha, Alexander; Berg, Johannes; Manzel, Arndt; Waschbisch, Anne; Hammer, Anna; Lee, De-Hyung; May, Caroline; Wilck, Nicola; Balogh, Andras; Ostermann, Annika I; Schebb, Nils Helge; Akkad, Denis A; Grohme, Diana A; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Kempa, Stefan; Thöne, Jan; Demir, Seray; Müller, Dominik N; Gold, Ralf; Linker, Ralf A

    2015-10-20

    Growing empirical evidence suggests that nutrition and bacterial metabolites might impact the systemic immune response in the context of disease and autoimmunity. We report that long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) enhanced differentiation and proliferation of T helper 1 (Th1) and/or Th17 cells and impaired their intestinal sequestration via p38-MAPK pathway. Alternatively, dietary short-chain FAs (SCFAs) expanded gut T regulatory (Treg) cells by suppression of the JNK1 and p38 pathway. We used experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of T cell-mediated autoimmunity to show that LCFAs consistently decreased SCFAs in the gut and exacerbated disease by expanding pathogenic Th1 and/or Th17 cell populations in the small intestine. Treatment with SCFAs ameliorated EAE and reduced axonal damage via long-lasting imprinting on lamina-propria-derived Treg cells. These data demonstrate a direct dietary impact on intestinal-specific, and subsequently central nervous system-specific, Th cell responses in autoimmunity, and thus might have therapeutic implications for autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26488817

  6. Morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-12-16

    The present study aimed to study the morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of the experiments. Morphometry data was obtained by measuring the wall thickness and cross-sectional area. The mechanical test was done as a step-wise distension experiment. The intestinal diameter and length were obtained from digitized images of the segments at pre-selected pressure levels and at the no-load and zero-stress states. Circumferential and longitudinal stresses (force per area) and strains (deformation) were computed from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The duodenal and ileal dimensions increased slightly from 6 to 22 months, e.g. the wall thickness and the wall cross-sectional area increased about 4% and 25% for duodenum and 5% and 8% for ileum. The opening angle gradually decreased from 154 to 117 degrees for duodenum and from 144 to 87 degrees for ileum during aging. The circumferential stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 22 months (pstress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 18 months (prat intestine during aging. PMID:26596717

  7. Serosal zinc attenuate serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced secretion in piglet small intestinal epithelium in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Sehested, Jakob; Feng, Z;

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the mechanisms by which dietary zinc affects diarrhoea and aimed to study possible interactions between zinc status and the presence of zinc in vitro on secretagogue-induced secretion from piglet intestinal epithelium in Ussing chambers.......This study addressed the mechanisms by which dietary zinc affects diarrhoea and aimed to study possible interactions between zinc status and the presence of zinc in vitro on secretagogue-induced secretion from piglet intestinal epithelium in Ussing chambers....

  8. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Lisowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Available data suggests that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO may frequently occur in cystic fibrosis (CF subjects. SIBO may result in synthesis of enterotoxic and unabsorbable metabolites which may cause mucosal damage and – additionally – interfere with digestion and absorption. Such a relationship was documented in CF mouse model. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the influence of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine in CF patients on lipid digestion and absorption. Material and methods. The study comprised 60 pancreatic insufficient CF patients, 30 children and 30 adults. All enrolled CF subjects were tested for the presence of SIBO using hydrogen/methane breath test with glucose loading. According to the obtained results CF patients were divided into SIBO positive and negative subgroups. Subsequently, 13C-labelled mixed triglyceride breath test was performed to assess lipid digestion and absorption. Cumulative percentage dose recovery (cPDR was considered to reflect digestion and absorption of lipids. Results. SIBO was detected in 12 (40.0% children and 11 (36.7% adults with CF. The cPDR did not differ between SIBO positive and negative subgroups, neither when assessed separately for children (mean ±SEM: 5.5 ±0.8 vs. 7.4 ±1.0% and adults (4.9 ±0.8 vs. 7.1 ±0.7% nor for the entire studied population. Conclusions. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth does not seem to play a key role in lipid digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients.

  9. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  10. Clinical and experimental investigation on small intestinal injury following radiation therapy for carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation injury of the small bowel was observed in 6 of 460 patients with carcinoma of uterine cervix who were treated by radiation between April 1966 and December 1973 at Tokyo Women's Medical College, Department of Radiology. Three of these 6 patients were treated conservatively and the other 3 others underwent surgery but died subsequently. Clinically and surgically these 6 patients showed marked adhesions of intestinal loops, which may be accounted for by the radiation injury of the small bowel. Clinical experience has shown that it is necessary to use a small radiation field to decrease small bowel injury from radiation. An experiment using abdominal radiation in mice confirmed that LD sub(50/30) is larger with a center split, maintaining equal integral doses. In adult dogs, severe small bowel obstruction was observed with over 4000 rad irradiation. Small bowel injury was milder in case with center split, intracavitary irradiation, and small radiation field. It was concluded that center split is one of the methods of preventing radiation injury of the small bowel. (Evans, J.)

  11. Collagen fiber angle in the submucosa of small intestine and its application in gastroenterology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Jun Zeng; Ai-Ke Qiao; Ji-Dong Yu; Jing-Bo Zhao; Dong-Hua Liao; Xiao-Hu Xu; Gregersen Hans

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To propose a simple and effective method suitable for analyzing the angle and distribution of 2-dimensional collagen fiber in larger sample of small intestine and to investigate the relationship between the angles of collagen fiber and the pressure it undergoes.METHODS: A kind of 2-dimensional visible quantitative analyzing technique was described. Digital image-processing method was utilized to determine the angle of collagen fiber in parenchyma according to the changes of area analyzed and further to investigate quantitatively the distribution of collagen fiber. A series of intestinal slice′s images preprocessed by polarized light were obtained with electron microscope,and they were processed to unify each pixel. The approximate angles between collagen fibers were obtained via analyzing the images and their corresponding polarized light. The relationship between the angles of collagen fiber and the pressure it undergoes were statistically summarized.RESULTS: The angle of collagen fiber in intestinal tissue was obtained with the quantitative analyzing method of calculating the ratio of different pixels. For the same slice,with polarized light angle′s variation, the corresponding ratio of different pixels was also changed; for slices under different pressures, the biggest ratio of collagen fiber area was changed either.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the application of stress on the intestinal tissue will change the angle and content of collagen fiber. The method of calculating ratios of different pixel values to estimate collagen fiber angle was practical and reliable. The quantitative analysis used in the present study allows a larger area of soft tissue to be analyzed with relatively low cost and simple equipment.

  12. Blood and small intestine cell kinetics under radiation exposures: Mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mathematical models which describe the dynamics of two vital body systems (hematopoiesis and small intestinal epithelium) in mammals exposed to acute and chronic radiation are developed. These models, based on conventional biological theories, are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations. Their variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning, that provides successful identification and verification of the models in hand. It is shown that the predictions of the models qualitatively and quantitatively agree with the respective experimental data for small laboratory animals (mice, rats) exposed to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates. The explanation of a number of radiobiological effects, including those of the low-level long-term exposures, is proposed proceeding from the modeling results. All this bears witness to the validity of employment of the developed models, after a proper identification, in investigation and prediction of radiation effects on the hematopoietic and small intestinal epithelium systems in various mammalian species, including humans. In particular, the models can be used for estimating effects of irradiation on astronauts in the long-term space missions, such as Lunar colonies and Mars voyages.

  13. Impact of bolus volume on small intestinal intra-luminal impedance in healthy subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nam; Q; Nguyen; Laura; K; Bryant; Carly; M; Burgstad; Robert; J; Fraser; Daniel; Sifrim; Richard; H; Holloway

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of bolus volume on the characteristics of small intestinal (SI) impedance signals.METHODS: Concurrent SI manometry-impedance measurements were performed on 12 healthy volunteers to assess the pattern of proximal jejunal fluid bolus movement over a 14 cm-segment.Each subject was given 34 boluses of normal saline (volume from 1 to 30 mL) via the feeding tube placed immediately above the proximal margin of the studied segment.A bolus-induced impedance event occurred if there was > 12%...

  14. Effect of Phenobarbital on Chloramphonicol-Induced Toxicity in Rat Liver and Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Massumeh Ahmadizadeh; Masood Esmailpoor; Zahra Goodarzi

    2013-01-01

      Objective(s): The aim of the present study is to determine the effect of Chloramphenicol (CAP) on rat liver and small intestine. Effect of phenobarbital (PB) on CAP toxicity was also investigated.   Materials and Methods:   Rats were received CAP at doses of 0, 200, 400 and 600 mg/kg. Another group was pretreated with 80 mg/kg PB 30 min prior to administration of various doses of CAP. The experiment was repeated for seven consecutive days. Blood was collected for det...

  15. MicroRNA Transcriptome in Swine Small Intestine during Weaning Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Xin; Xu, Ziwei

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in intestinal diseases; however, the role of miRNAs during weaning stress is unknown. In our study, six jejunal small RNA libraries constructed from weaning piglets at 1, 4 and 7 d after weaning (libraries W1, W4 and W7, respectively) and from suckling piglets on the same days as the weaning piglets (libraries S1, S4 and S7, respectively) were sequenced using Solexa high-throughput sequencing technology. Overall, 260 known swine miRNAs and 317 novel can...

  16. Clinical findings and diagnostic imaging of small intestinal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients with small intestinal rupture due to blunt abdominal trauma were analyzed by their clinical findings and diagnostic imaging (plain film, ultrasound and computed tomography). Computed tomography was most useful for identification of intraabdominal extraluminal free air (pneumoperitoneum) and this finding was obtained in seven out of the eight patients (87.5 %). Intraabdominal fluid collection was observed in All the patients and was most clearly detectable by ultrasound and computed tomography. These examinations may be applied to identification of properties of the fluid collection. All the patients eventually developed peritonitis when laparotomy was decided. Thus, close follow up observation of abdominal physical signs was also of critical importance. (author)

  17. Mathematical Homogenization in the Modelling of Digestion in the Small Intestine

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Digestion in the small intestine is the result of complex mechanical and biological phenomena which can be modelled at different scales. In a previous article, we introduced a system of ordinary differential equations for describing the transport and degradation-absorption processes during the digestion. The present article sustains this simplified model by showing that it can be seen as a macroscopic version of more realistic models including biological phenomena at lower scales. In other words, our simplified model can be considered as a limit of more realistic ones by averaging-homogenization methods on biological processes representation.

  18. Confirmation of the efficacy of a combination tablet of spinosad and milbemycin oxime against naturally acquired infections of canine intestinal nematode parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Beate; Hayes, Brad; Wiseman, Scott; Snyder, Daniel E

    2012-03-23

    Four separate controlled and blinded studies were conducted to confirm the dose of spinosad and milbemycin oxime (MO) administered orally in combination to dogs for the treatment and control of naturally acquired infections of adult whipworm (Trichuris vulpis), hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum) and ascarids (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina). Dogs were allocated randomly based on pre-treatment quantitative nematode egg counts of each species of interest to one of two treatment groups of 10 or 11 animals each. In each study, spinosad and MO in combination, was given orally to dogs using the lower half (30-45 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-0.75 mg/kg MO) of the US commercial dose band (30-60 mg/kg spinosad; 0.5-1.0mg/kg MO) of each active ingredient on Day 0 using a tablet formulation. A corresponding vehicle control group was treated similarly in each individual study. Dogs were necropsied post-treatment on Day 7/8. All nematodes in the intestinal tract collected at necropsy were identified and counted by species and stage. The spinosad and MO combination group demonstrated significantly different adult intestinal nematode efficacy in each individual study as compared to the vehicle control group. Efficacy values for whipworm, hookworm, T. canis and T. leonina were 100%, 99.8%, 100%, 93.3%, respectively. Minor non-serious adverse events were observed in a small number of control and treated dogs that were attributed primarily to the natural nematode infections. In summary, flavored spinosad and MO combination tablets administered orally to dogs were both safe and highly efficacious delivering >93% up to 100% adult intestinal nematode control in naturally infected dogs. PMID:22115944

  19. Current state of knowledge: the canine gastrointestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Seema; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S; Swanson, Kelly S

    2012-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) microbes have important roles in the nutritional, immunological, and physiologic processes of the host. Traditional cultivation techniques have revealed bacterial density ranges from 10(4) to 10(5) colony forming units (CFU)/g in the stomach, from 10(5) to 10(7) CFU/g in the small intestine, and from 10(9) to 10(11) CFU/g in the colon of healthy dogs. As a small number of bacterial species can be grown and studied in culture, however, progress was limited until the recent emergence of DNA-based techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing technology and bioinformatics have allowed for better phylogenetic and functional/metabolic characterization of the canine gut microbiome. Predominant phyla include Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Studies using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene pyrosequencing have demonstrated spatial differences along the GI tract and among microbes adhered to the GI mucosa compared to those in intestinal contents or feces. Similar to humans, GI microbiome dysbiosis is common in canine GI diseases such as chronic diarrhea and inflammatory bowel diseases. DNA-based assays have also identified key pathogens contributing to such conditions, including various Clostridium, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia spp. Moreover, nutritionists have applied DNA-based techniques to study the effects of dietary interventions such as dietary fiber, prebiotics, and probiotics on the canine GI microbiome and associated health indices. Despite recent advances in the field, the canine GI microbiome is far from being fully characterized and a deeper characterization of the phylogenetic and functional/metabolic capacity of the GI microbiome in health and disease is needed. This paper provides an overview of recent studies performed to characterize the canine GI microbiome. PMID:22647637

  20. The role of '18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting small intestine adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the value of whole body 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIA). Methods: A retrospective study of 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed on 29 cases (male 17,female 12) of SIA, 21 cases of small intestine lymphoma (SIL) (male 15, female 6) and 10 cases of small intestine tuberculosis (SIT) (male 4, female 6). Visual and semi-quantitative methods (SUVmax) were used to summarize and analyse the 18F-FDG PET/CT results. One-way analysis of variance and χ2 test were used to analyze the data. Results: (1) 18F-FDG PET/CT for SIA showed a partially conglomerate pattern of hypermetabolic small bowel masses with nodular configurations. A typical SIL showed a partially annular abnormal growth with aggregated foci of radioactivity. SIT lesions were usually in form of stripes and/or nodules with high metabolic foci or lesions with 'skipped' distribution. The SUVmax of SIA (8.44±3.82) was significantly lower than that of SIL (11.54±4.02; F=86.96, t=2.77, both P<0.01), but not significantly different when compared with SIT (8.61±2.99; t=0.11, P>0.05). (2) The incidence rates of peri-lesion lymph node enlargement in SIA, SIL and SIT were 72.41% (21/29), 85.71% (18/21) and 70.00% (7/10), respectively (χ2=1.50, P>0.05). The SUVmax of peri-lesion lymph nodes in SIA (5.59±2.86) was significantly lower than that of SIL (11.10±5.72; F=56.56, t=3.85, both P<0.01), but was not significantly different when compared with SIT (5.63± 3.36; t=0.30, P>0.05). The detection rate of PET/CT on peri-lesion lymph node enlargement of SIA was higher than CT (41.38%, 12/29; χ2=5.69, P<0.05). (3) The incidence rate of extra-intestinal metastases was 55.17% (16/29) in SIA, and the most common metastatic sites were liver,bone and adrenal gland. The incidence rate of extra-intestinal lesions was 66.67% (14/21) in SIL, most commonly presented as widespread multifocal nodal permeation. Extra abdominal tuberculous loci were found in 80.00% (8/10) of SIT

  1. Effects of 8 Gy whole body irradiation on number and functions of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of intestinal mucosal immunity after radiation injury. Methods: Number, proliferation activity, cytotoxicity of IEL as well as the TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs were studied using freshly isolated IELs from whole small intestine of Kunming strain mice whole-body irradiated with 8 Gy 60Co rays. Results: The proliferation activity, cytotoxicity as well as the number of IELs in small intestinal mucosa were significantly decreased from 8h and reached the lowest level at 72 h post-irradiation. The TNF-α and TGF-β concentrations in supernatant of cultured IELs isolated from irradiated mice elevated at 8h and reached the peak values at 72h. Conclusion: The decrease in number and important factions of IELs might be one of the reasons which damage the intestinal mucosal immunity barrier after whole body irradiation

  2. Mechanisms underlying nutrient-induced segmentation in isolated guinea pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, R M; Bornstein, J C

    2007-04-01

    Mechanisms underlying nutrient-induced segmentation within the gut are not well understood. We have shown that decanoic acid and some amino acids induce neurally dependent segmentation in guinea pig small intestine in vitro. This study examined the neural mechanisms underlying segmentation in the circular muscle and whether the timing of segmentation contractions also depends on slow waves. Decanoic acid (1 mM) was infused into the lumen of guinea pig duodenum and jejunum. Video imaging was used to monitor intestinal diameter as a function of both longitudinal position and time. Circular muscle electrical activity was recorded by using suction electrodes. Recordings from sites of segmenting contractions showed they are always associated with excitatory junction potentials leading to action potentials. Recordings from sites oral and anal to segmenting contractions revealed inhibitory junction potentials that were time locked to those contractions. Slow waves were never observed underlying segmenting contractions. In paralyzed preparations, intracellular recording revealed that slow-wave frequency was highly consistent at 19.5 (SD 1.4) cycles per minute (c/min) in duodenum and 16.6 (SD 1.1) c/min in jejunum. By contrast, the frequencies of segmenting contractions varied widely (duodenum: 3.6-28.8 c/min, median 10.8 c/min; jejunum: 3.0-27.0 c/min, median 7.8 c/min) and sometimes exceeded slow-wave frequencies for that region. Thus nutrient-induced segmentation contractions in guinea pig small intestine do not depend on slow-wave activity. Rather they result from a neural circuit producing rhythmic localized activity in excitatory motor neurons, while simultaneously activating surrounding inhibitory motor neurons. PMID:17218474

  3. Effect of citric acid and microbial phytase on small intestinal morphology in broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Nourmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of citric acid (CA (0, 3 and 6% and microbial phytase (MP (0, 500 and 1000 IU/kg on morphology of different segments of small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum in broiler chickens fed on corn and soybean meal based diets. The effect of 9 experimental treatments (3×3 factorial design were assessed using 270 7-d-old Ross 308 male broiler chicks in a randomized complete block design in three replicates of 10 birds each. The mean villi length (VL, crypt depth (CD and goblet cell number (GCN in duodenum, jejunum and ileum and villi width (VW and VL:CD ratio in duodenum was significantly greater for the birds fed on acidified diets compared to the control birds at day 42 of age (P<0.01. Inclusion of 3% CA in diet significantly decreased the epithelial thickness (ET in duodenum, jejunum and ileum (P<0.01. The birds received diets with 1000 IU/kg of MP showed significant increase in CD (P<0.01 and GCN in jejunum (P<0.05, and significant decrease in VL:CD ratio and ET in the duodenum (P<0.01, jejunum (P<0.05 and ileum (P<0.01 segments. No variable of interest were affected by CA × MP interaction. It was concluded that CA and MP independently exhibit positive impact on morphometery of small intestine, toward facilitating the nutrient absorption and reducing the metabolic demands of the intestinal tract in broiler chickens.

  4. Dietary and Developmental Regulation of Nutrient Transporter Gene Expression in the Small Intestine of Two Lines of Broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Elizabeth Ruth

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the digestive and absorptive capacities of the chick intestine so that we may feed diets that better meet the nutritional needs of the chick, it is important to understand how expression of nutrient transporter genes changes in response to various factors. A series of feeding trials were conducted to evaluate the dietary and developmental regulation of nutrient transporter mRNA abundance in the small intestine of two lines of broilers selected on corn-based (Line A) or wh...

  5. Gastrointestinal Nutrient Infusion Site and Eating Behavior: Evidence for A Proximal to Distal Gradient within the Small Intestine?

    OpenAIRE

    Alleleyn, Annick M. E.; van Avesaat, Mark; Troost, Freddy J.; Masclee, Adrian A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity demands new strategies focusing on prevention and treatment of this significant health care problem. In the search for new and effective therapeutic modalities for overweight subjects, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is increasingly considered as an attractive target for medical and food-based strategies. The entry of nutrients into the small intestine activates so-called intestinal “brakes”, negative feedback mechanisms that influen...

  6. A mathematical model for the peristaltic flow of chyme movement in small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra

    2011-10-01

    A mathematical model based on viscoelastic fluid (fractional Oldroyd-B model) flow is considered for the peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine, which is assumed to be in the form of an inclined cylindrical tube. The peristaltic flow of chyme is modeled more realistically by assuming that the peristaltic rush wave is a sinusoidal wave, which propagates along the tube. The governing equations are simplified by making the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number. Analytical approximate solutions of problem are obtained by using homotopy analysis method and convergence of the obtained series solution is properly checked. For the realistic values of the emerging parameters such as fractional parameters, relaxation time, retardation time, Reynolds number, Froude number and inclination of tube, the numerical results for the pressure difference and the frictional force across one wavelength are computed and discussed the roles played by these parameters during the peristaltic flow. On the basis of this study, it is found that the first fractional parameter, relaxation time and Froude number resist the movement of chyme, while, the second fractional parameter, retardation time, Reynolds number and inclination of tube favour the movement of chyme through the small intestine during pumping. It is further revealed that size of trapped bolus reduces with increasing the amplitude ratio whereas it is unaltered with other parameters. PMID:21802431

  7. Surgical treatment of Peyronie's disease with small intestinal submucosa graft patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, M; Kanashiro, A; Vives, A; Sanchez, J; Peraza, M F; Moreno, D; Perona, J; De Marco, V; Ruiz-Castañe, E; Sarquella, J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to report our results using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft (Surgisis ES, Cook Medical) for tunica albuginea substitution after plaque incision. We retrospectively evaluated patients surgically treated at our institution for Peyronie's disease (PD) by means of plaque incision and porcine small intestinal submucosa grafting (Surgisis) between 2009 and 2013. At the same time a literature review was conducted, searching for similar reports and results. Forty-four patients were identified who had been diagnosed with PD between 2009 and the beginning of 2013, and had been treated with corporoplasty, plaque incision and grafting with Surgisis for a severe curvature of the penis. Curvature of the penis was dorsal in 40 patients (90%) and laterally on the right in 4 patients (10%). Mean duration of surgery was 165 min (range 90-200). Mean size of the graft was 6.5 cm(2) and the mean follow-up was 19.2 months (range 11-48). In patients with severe curvature of the penis due to PD and the need for corporoplasty with plaque incision and graft placement, Surgisis represents a good option with a low risk of complications, below the rate described with previously investigated graft tissues. PMID:27030055

  8. Whey protein hydrolysates enhance water absorption in the perfused small intestine of anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Noma, Teruyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on the water absorption rate in the small intestine using a rat small intestine perfusion model. The rate was significantly higher with 5 g/L WPH than with 5 g/L soy protein hydrolysates or physiological saline (p < 0.05). WPH dose-dependently increased the water absorption rate in the range of 1.25-10.0 g/L. WPH showed a significantly higher rate than an amino acid mixture whose composition was equal to that of WPH (p < 0.05). The addition of 4-aminomethylbenzoic acid, an inhibitor of PepT1, significantly suppressed WPH's enhancement of water absorption (p < 0.05). The rate of water absorption was significantly correlated with that of peptides/amino acids absorption in WPH (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). These data suggest that WPH have a high water absorption-promoting effect, to which PepT1 contributes. PMID:27055721

  9. Ultrastructural and Molecular Changes in the Developing Small Intestine of the Toad Bufo regularis

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    S. A. Sakr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic development of the small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis was investigated using twofold approaches, namely, ultrastructural and molecular. The former has been done using transmission electron microscope and utilizing the developmental stages 42, 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66. The most prominent ultrastructural changes were recorded at stage 60 and were more evident at stage 63. These included the appearance of apoptotic bodies/nuclei within the larval epithelium, the presence of macrophages, swollen mitochondria, distorted rough endoplasmic reticulum, chromatin condensation, and irregular nuclear envelop, and the presence of large vacuoles and lysosomes. The molecular investigation involved examining DNA content and fragmentation. The results showed that the DNA content decreased significantly during the metamorphic stages 60 and 63 compared with both larval (50 and 55 and postmetamorphic (66 stages. The metamorphic stages (60 and 63 displayed extensive DNA laddering compared with stages 50, 55, and 66. The percentage of DNA damage was 0.00%, 12.91%, 57.26%, 45.48%, and 4.43% for the developmental stages 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66, respectively. In conclusion, the recorded remodeling of the small intestine represents a model for clarifying the mechanism whereby cell death and proliferation are controlled.

  10. Effects of different kinds and modes of irradiation on histamine content in mouse small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to compare the effects of different kinds and modes of irradiation on the histamine content in mouse small intestine by using the spectrophotofluorometric mehtod. The results showed that: (1) there was more conspicuous increase of histamine content following 4Gy single neutron irradiation than after the same dose of γ-ray exposure; (2) on the third day after 15Gy γ irradiation the histamine content of small intestine was slightly higher than that after the same dose X-ray exposure; (3) after 15Gy irradiation the histamine content was obviously increased but it fluctuated within the normal range after fractionated irradiation at the same dosage; (4) on the third day after 15Gy X-ray irradiation the histamine contents of the single total body exposure group was 104.9%of the normal value. The local abdomenal exposure group and the abdomen shielded group were 131.8%, 123.1% and 111.6% of normal value respectively. The possible cause of these findings is dicussed

  11. A rare case of retroperitoneal malignant triton tumor invading renal vein and small intestine

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    Mijović Žaklina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant Triton tumor is a very rare malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. Most of those tumors occur in patients with von Recklinghausen’s disease or as a late complication of irradiation and commonly seen in the head, neck, extremities and trunk. Case report. We reported retroperitoneal malignant Triton tumor in a 57-year-old female patient. Skin lesions were not present, and there was no family history of neurofibromatosis or previous irradiation. The presented case is one of a few recorded in the specialized literature that occurs in the retroperitoneal space in sporadic form. In this case, tumor consisted of a multilobular mass was in close relation with the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava and involved the renal vein with gross invasion of the small intestine. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor and left nefrectomy was performed. The small intestine 10 cm in length was also resected and end-to-end anastomosis was conducted. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged from the hospital ten days after the surgery. Conclusion. Diagnostically, it is crucial to recognize this uncommon histological variant because malignant Triton tumor has a worse prognosis than classic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor does. The use of the immunohistochemistry is essential in making the correct diagnosis. Only appropriate pathological evaluation supported by immunostaining with S-100 protein and desmin confirmed the diagnosis. Aggressive surgical management treatment improves the prognosis of such cases with adjuvant radiotherapy.

  12. Influence of peppermint oil on absorptive and secretory processes in rat small intestine.

    OpenAIRE

    Beesley, A; HARDCASTLE, J; Hardcastle, P T; Taylor, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peppermint oil is used to relieve the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, relaxing intestinal smooth muscle by reducing the availability of calcium, but its effects on intestinal transport are unknown. AIMS: To determine the effect of peppermint oil on intestinal transport processes. METHODS: The influence of peppermint oil on intestinal transport was investigated in rat jejunum using both intestinal sheets mounted in Ussing chambers and brush border membrane vesicles. RESULTS: ...

  13. Small Intestinal Submucosa Plug for Closure of Dilated Nephrostomy Tracts: A Pilot Study in Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of a plug made of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) for closure of dilated nephrostomy tract in the kidney after nephroscopy. Ten kidneys in 5 swine had nephrostomy tracts dilated up to 8 mm. The SIS plug was placed into the dilated renal cortex under nephroscopic control. Follow-up arteriograms, retrograde pyelograms, and macroscopic and histologic studies at 24 h (n = 4), 6 weeks (n = 2), and 3 months (n = 4) were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the plug. The SIS plug effectively closed the dilated nephrostomy tract. Follow-up studies showed minimal changes of the kidneys, except for 1 small infarction, regarding inflammatory and foreign-body reactions and progressive scarring of the SIS. SIS plug is effective for occlusion of dilated nephrostomy tract after nephroscopy. Its efficacy should be compared with other therapeutic options.

  14. Efeitos hemodinâmicos e metabólicos iniciais da perfusão hipotérmica intestinal in situ.: avaliação de um novo modelo canino de autotransplante intestinal Initial hemodynamic and metabolic effects of intestinal hypothermic perfusion in situ: an alternative model of canine intestinal autotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Jorge Cruz Junior

    2004-08-01

    , hemoglobina assim como na temperatura central. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo de autotransplante intestinal é extremamente útil e de fácil execução, para a avaliação inicial de soluções de preservação e/ou drogas antioxidantes, comumente utilizadas no transplante de intestino.Intestinal transplantation is an acceptable therapy for children and adults with short bowel syndrome. The great majority of large animal experimental models of intestinal transplantation are complex and take a lot of time to be performed. In this study, we developed an alternative model of intestinal autotransplantation and evaluate the initial impact of isolated hypothermic intestinal perfusion with Ringer’s lactate solution on hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. METHODS: Six pentobarbital anesthetized mongrel dogs were used in this study (22,8±1,4 Kg. Systemic hemodynamic were evaluated through a Swan-Ganz and arterial catheters; while gastrointestinal tract perfusion by superior mesenteric vein blood flow (SMVBF, ultrasonic flowprobe and intestinal mucosal pCO2 (pCO2-int and pCO2-gap, gas tonometry. Initially, the proximal jejunum and distal ileum were transected; at the basis of the mesentery excepting the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The small bowel was then perfused in situ with cold (4ºC Ringer’s lactate solution for 30 minutes, with an automatic pump. The animals where observed for 120 minutes after reperfusion. Blood samples were collected from thoracic aorta for gas blood analysis. RESULTS: Hypothermic intestinal perfusion induced a partial reduction on SMVBF, only in the first 30 min of reperfusion (398±102,8 to 587±70,9 ml/min and an increase on pCO2-gap (2±2,7 to 29,8±6 mmHg. During the experimental protocol, we did not observe significant alterations on systemic hemodynamic or metabolic parameters (MAP, CO, pH, base excess and hemoglobin levels as well as on central core temperature. CONCLUSION: The model of intestinal transplantation is very useful to test different

  15. Onset of small intestinal atrophy is associated with reduced intestinal blood flow in TPN-fed neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niinikoski, Harri; Stoll, Barbara; Guan, Xinfu;

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the speed of onset of total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-induced mucosal atrophy, and whether this is associated with changes in intestinal blood flow and tissue metabolism in neonatal piglets. Piglets were implanted with jugular venous and duodenal catheters and either a p...

  16. Small intestinal strictures as a complication of mesenteric vessel thrombosis: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sandeep

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Small intestinal strictures secondary to mesenteric vessel thrombosis are a rare entity and thus often result in delayed diagnosis. We present two cases of ischaemic small bowel strictures secondary to mesenteric vessel thrombosis, and describe how they were subsequently managed. Case presentation We present two cases of abdominal pain, one acute and one chronic, in which the eventual diagnosis was of bowel strictures secondary to arterial and venous vessel thrombosis. In both patients, a Caucasian male aged 67 and a Caucasian female aged 78, the diagnosis was delayed because of the infrequency of their presentation. Both patients eventually underwent a resection of the affected portion of bowel with primary anastamosis and made uneventful recoveries. Conclusion There are multiple medical and surgical management options for small bowel strictures and these depend on the aetiology of the stricture. Ischaemic small bowel strictures represent a difficult diagnosis and the potential resulting delay may be partially responsible for increased morbidity. Barium small bowel follow-through should be used in making the diagnosis.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol, curcumin and simvastatin in acute small intestinal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bereswill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The health beneficial effects of Resveratrol, Curcumin and Simvastatin have been demonstrated in various experimental models of inflammation. We investigated the potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanisms of the above mentioned compounds in a murine model of hyper-acute Th1-type ileitis following peroral infection with Toxoplasma gondii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that after peroral administration of Resveratrol, Curcumin or Simvastatin, mice were protected from ileitis development and survived the acute phase of inflammation whereas all Placebo treated controls died. In particular, Resveratrol treatment resulted in longer-term survival. Resveratrol, Curcumin or Simvastatin treated animals displayed significantly increased numbers of regulatory T cells and augmented intestinal epithelial cell proliferation/regeneration in the ileum mucosa compared to placebo control animals. In contrast, mucosal T lymphocyte and neutrophilic granulocyte numbers in treated mice were reduced. In addition, levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in ileum, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen were increased whereas pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-23p19, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1 was found to be significantly lower in the ileum of treated animals as compared to Placebo controls. Furthermore, treated animals displayed not only fewer pro-inflammatory enterobacteria and enterococci but also higher anti-inflammatory lactobacilli and bifidobacteria loads. Most importantly, treatment with all three compounds preserved intestinal barrier functions as indicated by reduced bacterial translocation rates into spleen, liver, kidney and blood. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Oral treatment with Resveratrol, Curcumin or Simvastatin ameliorates acute small intestinal inflammation by down-regulating Th1-type immune responses and prevents bacterial translocation by maintaining gut barrier function. These findings provide novel

  18. Role of sodium ion in transport of folic acid in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of sodium on folate transport across the intestinal luminal membrane was analyzed using two techniques: the influx chamber and isoalted brush-border membrane vesicles. Preincubation of tissue in Na+-free medium did not have a consistent effect on folic acid influx provided that Na+ was present in the test solution. Replacement of Na+ in the test solution by choline+ resulted in a significant reduction of folic acid influx. However, when intestinal sheets that had been equilibrated in Na+-free solution were exposed to test solutions containing either Na+, Li+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Tris+, or guanidinium+ as main cations, folic acid influx was not significantly decreased. Concentration-dependence studies showed that replacement of Na+ by Rb+ did not affect the saturable mechanism of folate transport. Rather, a decrease in nonsaturable folic acid uptake accounted for the slightly reduced influx observed in the presence of Rb+. Experiments with brush-border membrane vesicles revealed that methotrexate uptake was significantly higher in the presence of external Na+ than in the presence of K+, but was not different from uptake in the presence of K+ plus valinomycin. These data suggest that 1) the saturable component of folate transport is not Na+ dependent, and 2) nonsaturable transport of folic acid across the luminal membrane occurs in part through a conductive pathway that involves a negatively charged species of folate and a cation whose membrane permeability affects the rate of folate transport. The importance of Na+ in this process in vivo derives from the fact that Na+ is the most permeant cation available at the absorptive site in the small intestine

  19. Diet effects on glucose absorption in the small intestine of neonatal calves: importance of intestinal mucosal growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Zitnan, Rudolf; Schönhusen, Ulrike; Pfannkuche, Helga; Hudakova, Monika; Metges, Cornelia C; Hammon, Harald M

    2014-10-01

    Colostrum (C) feeding in neonatal calves improves glucose status and stimulates intestinal absorptive capacity, leading to greater glucose absorption when compared with milk-based formula feeding. In this study, diet effects on gut growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters were investigated in several gut segments of the small intestine. Fourteen male German Holstein calves received either C of milkings 1, 3, and 5 (d 1, 2, and 3 in milk) or respective formulas (F) twice daily from d 1 to d 3 after birth. Nutrient content, and especially lactose content, of C and respective F were the same. On d 4, calves were fed C of milking 5 or respective F and calves were slaughtered 2h after feeding. Tissue samples from duodenum and proximal, mid-, and distal jejunum were taken to measure villus size and crypt depth, mucosa and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were taken to determine protein content, and mRNA expression and activity of lactase and mRNA expression of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) were determined from mucosal tissue. Additionally, protein expression of SGLT1 in BBMV and GLUT2 in crude mucosal membranes and BBMV were determined, as well as immunochemically localized GLUT2 in the intestinal mucosa. Villus circumference, area, and height were greater, whereas crypt depth was smaller in C than in F. Lactase activity tended to be greater in C than in F. Protein expression of SGLT1 was greater in F than in C. Parameters of villus size, lactase activity, SGLT1 protein expression, as well as apical and basolateral GLUT2 localization in the enterocytes differed among gut segments. In conclusion, C feeding, when compared with F feeding, enhances glucose absorption in neonatal calves primarily by stimulating mucosal growth and increasing absorptive capacity in the small intestine, but not by stimulating abundance of intestinal glucose transporters. PMID:25108868

  20. The effects of enteral ghrelin administration on the remodeling of the small intestinal mucosa in neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słupecka, Monika; Woliński, Jarosław; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2012-02-10

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide produced predominantly in the stomach, however substantial amounts have also been found in colostrum and milk. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exogenous ghrelin, administered intra-gastrically, on the processes of mitosis, apoptosis, autophagy, crypt fission and changes in histometry of the small intestine mucosa in neonatal pigs, fed with a milk formula. Three groups (n=6) of piglets were used in the study. The pigs were fed either milk formula (C7) or milk formula together with ghrelin, administered via a stomach tube (7.5 μg/kg body weight (BW), (LG)) and 15 μg/kg BW (HG), every 8h for 6 days. Compared to the control group (C7), feeding milk formula supplemented with ghrelin resulted in significant changes in the small intestinal morphometry and mucosa histometry. The observed changes were dependent on the dosage of hormone and the part of intestine investigated. Administration of ghrelin via the stomach tube (HG) significantly influenced epithelial cell renewal. Moreover, we demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the small intestine mucosa remodeling and ghrelin may be an important factor for its regulation. In conclusion, we found that enteral ghrelin influences the gut mucosa remodeling in a dose-related manner in the early postnatal period. Moreover in neonates, stomach activity does not interfere with the action of ghrelin in the small intestine. PMID:22137939

  1. In vitro activity of rifaximin against isolates from patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistiki, Aikaterini; Galani, Irene; Pyleris, Emmanouel; Barbatzas, Charalambos; Pimentel, Mark; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2014-03-01

    Rifaximin, a non-absorbable rifamycin derivative, has published clinical efficacy in the alleviation of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is associated with the pathogenesis of IBS. This study describes for the first time the antimicrobial effect of rifaximin against SIBO micro-organisms from humans. Fluid was aspirated from the third part of the duodenum from 567 consecutive patients; quantitative cultures diagnosed SIBO in 117 patients (20.6%). A total of 170 aerobic micro-organisms were isolated and the in vitro efficacy of rifaximin was studied by (i) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) testing by a microdilution technique and (ii) time-kill assays using bile to simulate the small intestinal environment. At a breakpoint of 32 μg/mL, rifaximin inhibited in vitro 85.4% of Escherichia coli, 43.6% of Klebsiella spp., 34.8% of Enterobacter spp., 54.5% of other Enterobacteriaceae spp., 82.6% of non-Enterobacteriaceae Gram-negative spp., 100% of Enterococcus faecalis, 100% of Enterococcus faecium and 100% of Staphylococcus aureus. For the time-kill assays, 11 E. coli, 15 non-E. coli Gram-negative enterobacteria and three E. faecalis isolates were studied. Rifaximin produced a >3 log10 decrease in the starting inoculum against most of the tested isolates at 500 μg/mL after 24h of growth. The results indicate that rifaximin has a potent effect on specific small bowel flora associated with SIBO. This conclusion should be regarded in light of the considerable time-kill effect at concentrations lower than those achieved in the bowel lumen after administration of conventional doses in humans. PMID:24461710

  2. Proximal gastric response to small intestinal nutrients is abnormal in mechanically ventilated critically iii patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nam Q Nguyen; Robert J Fraser; Marianne Chapman; Laura K Bryant; Richard H Holloway; Rosalie Vozzo; Christine Feinle-Bisset

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the response of the proximal stomach to small intestinal nutrients in critically iii patients.METHODS: Proximal gastric motility was measured in 13 critically iii patients (49.3 ± 4.7 years) and 12 healthy volunteers (27.7 ± 2.9 years) using a barostat technique.Recordings were performed at baseline, during a 60-min intra-duodenal infusion of Ensure(R) (2 kcal/min), and for 2 h following the infusion. Minimum distending pressure (MDP), intra-bag volume and fundic wave activity were determined.RESULTS: The MDP was higher in patients (11.7 ± 1.1 vs 7.8 ± 0.7 mmHg; P < 0.01). Baseline intrabag volumes were similar in the 2 groups. In healthy subjects, a 'bimodal' proximal gastric volume response was observed. In patients, the initial increase in proximal gastric volume was small and delayed, but eventually reached a maximal volume similar to that of healthy subjects. In healthy subjects, the proximal gastric volume rapidly returned to baseline level after nutrient infusion (median 18 min). In contrast, the recovery of volume to baseline was delayed in critically ill patients (median 106 min). In 6 patients, the volume had not returned to baseline level 2 hours after nutrient infusion.In patients, fundic volume waves were less frequent (P < 0.05) and had lower amplitude (P < 0.001), compared to healthy subjects.CONCLUSION: In critical illness, proximal gastric motor responses to small intestinal nutrient stimulation are abnormal.

  3. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth mimicking acute flare as a pitfall in patients with Crohn's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinshagen Max

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is characterized by excessive proliferation of colonic bacterial species in the small bowel. Potential causes of SIBO include fistulae, strictures or motility disturbances. Hence, patients with Crohn's Disease (CD are especially predisposed to develop SIBO. As result, CD patients may experience malabsorption and report symptoms such as weight loss, watery diarrhea, meteorism, flatulence and abdominal pain, mimicking acute flare in these patients. Methods One-hundred-fifty patients with CD reporting increased stool frequency, meteorism and/or abdominal pain were prospectively evaluated for SIBO with the Hydrogen Glucose Breath Test (HGBT. Results Thirty-eight patients (25.3% were diagnosed with SIBO based on positive findings at HGBT. SIBO patients reported a higher rate of abdominal complaints and exhibited increased stool frequency (5.9 vs. 3.7 bowel movements/day, p = 0.003 and lower body weight (63.6 vs 70.4 kg, p = 0.014. There was no correlation with the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. SIBO was significantly more frequent in patients with partial resection of the colon or multiple intestinal surgeries; there was also a clear trend in patients with ileocecal resection that did not reach statistical significance. SIBO rate was also higher in patients with affection of both the colon and small bowel, while inflammation of the (neoterminal ileum again showed only tendential association with the development of SIBO. Conclusion SIBO represents a frequently ignored yet clinically relevant complication in CD, often mimicking acute flare. Because symptoms of SIBO are often difficult to differentiate from those caused by the underlying disease, targeted work-up is recommended in patients with corresponding clinical signs and predisposing factors.

  4. Role of p53 in Anticancer Drug Treatment- and Radiation-Induced Injury in Normal Small Intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, the functional mucosa of the small intestine has the highest capacity for absorption of nutrients and rapid proliferation rates, making it vulnerable to chemoradiotherapy. Recent understanding of the protective role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest in the small intestinal mucosa has led researchers to explore new avenues to mitigate mucosal injury during cancer treatment. A traditional p53 inhibitor and two other molecules that exhibit strong protective effects on normal small intestinal epithelium during anticancer drug treatment and radiation therapy are introduced in this work. The objective of this review was to update current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms and targets that inhibit the side effects induced by chemoradiotherapy

  5. Mucosal necrosis of the small intestine in myopathy,encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keita Fukuyama; Yasuhide Ishikawa; Tetsuro Ogino; Hidenobu Inoue; Ryoya Yamaoka; Tetsuro Hirose; Tomohiko Nishihira

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a case of massive mucosal necrosis of the small intestine in a patient with mitochondrial myopathy,encephalopathy,lactic acidosis,and stroke-like episodes (MELAS),which particularly affects the brain,nervous system and muscles.A 45-year-old Japanese female,with an established diagnosis of MELAS,presented with vomiting.Computed tomography showed portomesenteric venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis.She underwent a resection of the small intestine.A microscopic study showed necrosis of the mucosa and vacuolar degeneration of smooth muscle cells in the arterial wall.Immunohistochemistry showed anti-mitochondrial antibody to be highly expressed in the crypts adjacent the necrotic mucosa.The microscopic and immunohistochemical findings suggested the presence of a large number of abnormal mitochondria in MELAS to be closely linked to mucosal necrosis of the small intestine.

  6. Gastrointestinal Nutrient Infusion Site and Eating Behavior: Evidence for A Proximal to Distal Gradient within the Small Intestine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleleyn, Annick M. E.; van Avesaat, Mark; Troost, Freddy J.; Masclee, Adrian A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity demands new strategies focusing on prevention and treatment of this significant health care problem. In the search for new and effective therapeutic modalities for overweight subjects, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is increasingly considered as an attractive target for medical and food-based strategies. The entry of nutrients into the small intestine activates so-called intestinal “brakes”, negative feedback mechanisms that influence not only functions of more proximal parts of the GI tract but also satiety and food intake. Recent evidence suggests that all three macronutrients (protein, fat, and carbohydrates) are able to activate the intestinal brake, although to a different extent and by different mechanisms of action. This review provides a detailed overview of the current evidence for intestinal brake activation of the three macronutrients and their effects on GI function, satiety, and food intake. In addition, these effects appear to depend on region and length of infusion in the small intestine. A recommendation for a therapeutic approach is provided, based on the observed differences between intestinal brake activation. PMID:26927170

  7. Gastrointestinal Nutrient Infusion Site and Eating Behavior: Evidence for A Proximal to Distal Gradient within the Small Intestine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleleyn, Annick M E; van Avesaat, Mark; Troost, Freddy J; Masclee, Adrian A M

    2016-03-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity demands new strategies focusing on prevention and treatment of this significant health care problem. In the search for new and effective therapeutic modalities for overweight subjects, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is increasingly considered as an attractive target for medical and food-based strategies. The entry of nutrients into the small intestine activates so-called intestinal "brakes", negative feedback mechanisms that influence not only functions of more proximal parts of the GI tract but also satiety and food intake. Recent evidence suggests that all three macronutrients (protein, fat, and carbohydrates) are able to activate the intestinal brake, although to a different extent and by different mechanisms of action. This review provides a detailed overview of the current evidence for intestinal brake activation of the three macronutrients and their effects on GI function, satiety, and food intake. In addition, these effects appear to depend on region and length of infusion in the small intestine. A recommendation for a therapeutic approach is provided, based on the observed differences between intestinal brake activation. PMID:26927170

  8. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome: are there any predictors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCallum Richard W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is a condition in which excessive levels of bacteria, mainly the colonic-type species are present in the small intestine. Recent data suggest that SIBO may contribute to the pathophysiology of Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. The purpose of this study was to identify potential predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Methods Adults with IBS based on Rome II criteria who had predominance of bloating and flatulence underwent a glucose breath test (GBT to determine the presence of SIBO. Breath samples were obtained at baseline and at 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 minutes after ingestion of 50 g of glucose dissolved in 150 mL of water. Results of the glucose breath test, which measures hydrogen and methane levels in the breath, were considered positive for SIBO if 1 the hydrogen or methane peak was >20 ppm when the baseline was Results Ninety-eight patients were identified who underwent a GBT (mean age, 49 y; 78% female. Thirty-five patients (36% had a positive GBT result suggestive of SIBO. A positive GBT result was more likely in patients >55 years of age (odds ratio [OR], 3.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-9.0 and in females (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-14.5. Hydrogen was detected more frequently in patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.4-45, and methane was the main gas detected in patients with constipation-predominant IBS (OR, 8; 95% CI, 1.3-44. There was no significant correlation between the presence of SIBO and the predominant bowel pattern or concurrent use of tegaserod, proton pump inhibitors, or opiate analgesics. Conclusions Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was present in a sizeable percentage of patients with IBS with predominance of bloating and flatulence. Older age and female sex were predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS. Identification of possible predictors of SIBO in patients with IBS could aid in the development of successful treatment plans.

  9. Scintigraphic determination of the effect of metoclopramide and morphine on small intestinal transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; Winchenbach, K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To determine if a scintigraphic method could detect pharmacologic changes in small intestinal transit time (SITT), 10 male volunteers were studied at baseline and after intravenously administered metoclopramide (10 mg) and morphine (8 mg). Five of these volunteers were studied with the hydrogen breath test method for comparison. For each of the scintigraphic studies, the volunteers were positioned supine under a large-field-of-view gamma camera after ingesting an isosmotic lactulose solution containing 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Data were collected and stored in a computer. Both gastric emptying and SITT were determined. SITT was 81 +/- 11 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; N = 10) during baseline studies, was decreased significantly to 50 +/- 6 min (N = 10; P less than 0.01) after metoclopramide, and was increased significantly to 161 +/- 15 min (N = 8; P less than 0.01) after morphine. Baseline mean values were 86.3 +/- 15 min (N = 15) for the hydrogen breath tests, 47 +/- 8 min (N = 5) for metoclopramide, and 183 +/- 16 min (N = 5) for morphine. For gastric emptying, there was no significant difference in percentage emptying at 1 hr for baseline and metochopramide (82 +/- 5% vs. 88 +/- 4%). Morphine prolonged gastric emptying at 1 hr to 63 +/- 8%. We conclude that the scintigraphic method for measuring SITT permits accurate investigation of the pharmacologic effects on intestinal motility and, in addition, may be a useful research and clinical method for SITT determination.

  10. THE ETHIOPATOGENESIS AND THE ANALYSIS OF AN ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF A SMALL INTESTINE BACTERIAL OVERGROWTH SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martynov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Article is attempt of the critical analysis of modern approaches to treatment of a small intestine bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO. SIBO now is one of the major problems in gastroenterology. At the same time, the bacterial overgrowth is cause and consequence of many diseases of digestive system and extradigestive manifestations. Many researches testify to prevalence of SIBO in patients with digestive diseases. However, pathogenesis of a disease is studied insufficiently today. Nevertheless, the available data of scientific researches allow to belong to the offered ways of diagnostics and treatment critically.Data on physiology of microbiota of the digestive tract of the healthy person are provided in a review. Mechanisms of antimicrobic resistance of a microbiota of intestines are considered. Interrelations between an antibiotikassociated degeneration of normal flora and bacterial overgrowth are presented. The analysis of an antibiotiktherapi of SIBO indicates low efficiency and also possible ways became chronicle diseaseand frequent recurrence of an illness. The multiple-factors and complexity of pathogenesis of SIBO are leaded authors to a conclusion to use ethiopathogenesis approaches for solution of SIBO.

  11. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected. PMID:25758122

  12. The effect of PGE2, gastrin and CCK-8 on postirradiation recovery of small intestine epithelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of some natural factors in the postirradiation recovery of intestinal epithelium is a very interesting and inscrutable problem. In our experiment the comparative effect of PGE2, Gastrin and CCK-8 fragment of Cholecystokinin on this problem has been investigated. Male Swiss PZH mice 8 weeks old were irradiated to the whole body with a dose of 5.5 Gy and to abdomen with a dose of 12 Gy of gamma rays. The first experimental group received PGE2 before 30 min. irradiation, the second received Gastrin after irradiation during 5 days, the third was injected with CCK-8 after irradiation during 5 days too. Unirradiated and only irradiated animals served as control groups. Survival of 30 mice in every group was registered during 30 days after irradiation. The another part of animals in every group were killed between 1 and 12 days after irradiation. Changes in the body weight were registered. Using computer image analysis system , some histological slides were examined, adding the statistical analysis of results. The preliminary results suggest that all those factors are able to stimulate the postirradiation regeneration of small intestinal epithelium (author)

  13. Scintigraphic determination of the effect of metoclopramide and morphine on small intestinal transit time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine if a scintigraphic method could detect pharmacologic changes in small intestinal transit time (SITT), 10 male volunteers were studied at baseline and after intravenously administered metoclopramide (10 mg) and morphine (8 mg). Five of these volunteers were studied with the hydrogen breath test method for comparison. For each of the scintigraphic studies, the volunteers were positioned supine under a large-field-of-view gamma camera after ingesting an isosmotic lactulose solution containing 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Data were collected and stored in a computer. Both gastric emptying and SITT were determined. SITT was 81 +/- 11 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; N = 10) during baseline studies, was decreased significantly to 50 +/- 6 min (N = 10; P less than 0.01) after metoclopramide, and was increased significantly to 161 +/- 15 min (N = 8; P less than 0.01) after morphine. Baseline mean values were 86.3 +/- 15 min (N = 15) for the hydrogen breath tests, 47 +/- 8 min (N = 5) for metoclopramide, and 183 +/- 16 min (N = 5) for morphine. For gastric emptying, there was no significant difference in percentage emptying at 1 hr for baseline and metochopramide (82 +/- 5% vs. 88 +/- 4%). Morphine prolonged gastric emptying at 1 hr to 63 +/- 8%. We conclude that the scintigraphic method for measuring SITT permits accurate investigation of the pharmacologic effects on intestinal motility and, in addition, may be a useful research and clinical method for SITT determination

  14. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Therrien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT. A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P < 0.01. The proportion of positive LBTs was significantly higher in CP patients (38.7 versus 2.5%: P < 0.01. A trend toward a higher proportion of positive LBTs in women compared with men was observed (66.6 versus 27.3%; P = 0.056. The subgroups with positive and negative LBTs were comparable in demographic and clinical characteristics, use of opiates, pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy (PERT, and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO.

  15. Alterations in the glutathione metabolism could be implicated in the ischemia-induced small intestinal cell damage in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Muela Mercedes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colic could be accompanied by changes in the morphology and physiology of organs and tissues, such as the intestine. This process might be, at least in part, due to the accumulation of oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS, secondary to intestinal ischemia. Glutathione (GSH, being the major intracellular thiol, provides protection against oxidative injury. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ischemia-induced intestinal injury could be related with alterations in GSH metabolism. Results Ischemia induced a significant increase in lipid hydroperoxides, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, and a reduction in reduced glutathione, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP content, as well as in methionine-adenosyl-transferase and methyl-transferase activities. Conclusion Our results suggest that ischemia induces harmful effects on equine small intestine, probably due to an increase in oxidative damage and proinflammatory molecules. This effect could be mediated, at least in part, by impairment in glutathione metabolism.

  16. Permeability of the small intestine after intra-arterial injection of histamine-type mediators and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permeability and selectivity of rabbit small intestine were estimated by a perfusion technique after intra-arterial injection of histamine-type mediators and an intestinal dose of 1.5 Mr gamma irradiation. It was shown that the histamine-type mediators caused an increase in capillary permeability which produced an overall moderate increase in transmucosal permeability with a moderate loss of selectivity. Local intestinal irradiation caused a very marked increase in permeability and a profound loss of selectivity. It was felt that this was produced partly by an increase in capillary permeability but largely by damage to the epithelial basement membrane. It is concluded that the intestinal capillary endothelium is both rate-limiting and selective, though not to a major degree in either case. The epithelial basement membrane, however, appears to be both rate-limiting and markedly selective. (author)

  17. Inhibition of Porcine Small Intestinal Sucrase by Validamine%井冈霉胺对猪小肠蔗糖酶的抑制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑裕国; 申屠旭萍; 沈寅初

    2005-01-01

    As an important medicinal intermediate with broad uses, validamine, an aminocyclitol, isolated from the enzymolysis broth of validamycins, has gained more and more attention. The absolute configuration of validamine is similar to that of α-D-glucose, and it demonstrates powerful inhibition activity on glycosidase. In this paper, the inhibitory effect of validamine on porcine small intestinal sucrase was investigated. Validamine was found to be a Validamine exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition effect on porcine small intestinal sucrase, whereby the inhibition interaction of validamine and porcine small intestinal sucrase was a fast binding process. The inhibition of validamine on porcine small intestinal sucrase was pH-dependent.

  18. Canine gastrointestinal physiology: Breeds variations that can influence drug absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Hayley; Sharkey, Michele; Pade, Devendra; Martinez, Marilyn N

    2015-11-01

    Although all dogs belong to Canis lupus familiaris, the physiological diversity resulting from selective breeding can lead to wide interbreed variability in drug pharmacokinetics (PK) or in oral drug product performance. It is important to understand this diversity in order to predict the impact of drug product formulation attributes on in vivo dissolution and absorption characteristics across the canine population when the dog represents the targeted patient population. Based upon published information, this review addresses breed differences in gastrointestinal (GI) physiology and discusses the in vivo implications of these differences. In addition to the importance of such information for understanding the variability that may exist in the performance of oral dosage forms in dogs for the purpose of developing canine therapeutics, an appreciation of breed differences in GI physiology can improve our prediction of oral drug formulation performance when we extrapolate bioavailability results from the dog to the humans, and vice versa. In this literature review, we examine reports of breed associated diversity in GI anatomy and morphology, gastric emptying time (GET), oro-cecal transit time (OCTT), small intestinal transit time (SITT), large intestinal transit time (LITT), intestinal permeability, sodium/potassium fecal concentrations, intestinal flora, and fecal moisture content. PMID:26409436

  19. A New Marmoset P450 4F12 Enzyme Expressed in Small Intestines and Livers Efficiently Metabolizes Antihistaminic Drug Ebastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yuki, Yukako; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are attracting attention as animal models in preclinical studies for drug development. However, cytochrome P450s (P450s), major drug-metabolizing enzymes, have not been fully identified and characterized in marmosets. In this study, based on the four novel P450 4F genes found on the marmoset genome, we successfully isolated P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 cDNAs in marmoset livers. Deduced amino acid sequences of the four marmoset P450 4F forms exhibited high sequence identities (87%-93%) to the human and cynomolgus monkey P450 4F homologs. Marmoset P450 4F3B and 4F11 mRNAs were predominantly expressed in livers, whereas marmoset P450 4F2 and 4F12 mRNAs were highly expressed in small intestines and livers. Four marmoset P450 4F proteins heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed the ω-hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 In addition, marmoset P450 4F12 effectively catalyzed the hydroxylation of antiallergy drug ebastine, a human P450 2J/4F probe substrate. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by small intestine and liver microsomes from marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys showed greatly higher values than those of humans. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by marmoset and cynomolgus monkey small intestine microsomes were inhibited (approximately 60%) by anti-P450 4F antibodies, unlike human small intestine microsomes, suggesting that contribution of P450 4F enzymes for ebastine hydroxylation in the small intestine might be different between marmosets/cynomolgus monkeys and humans. These results indicated that marmoset P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 were expressed in livers and/or small intestines and were functional in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds, similar to those of cynomolgus monkeys and humans. PMID:27044800

  20. Small intestinal tubular adenoma in a pediatric patient with Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Ying; Chen, Lian; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kui-Ran

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a female chromosomal disorder caused by the lack of an X chromosome. The loss of this chromosome may result in the deficiency of tumor-suppressive or DNA repair genes, leading to tumorigenesis. Recombinant human growth hormone (GH) has been popularly used for treatment in TS patients for growth promotion. Although treatment with GH has been correlated with precancerous and cancerous lesions in TS children, its associations with gastric or colonic tumors, especially ileal tubular adenomas, have not been reported frequently. We here report a case of a 16-year-old patient with TS and tubular adenoma of the small intestine. Whether the ileal adenoma was caused by TS itself or GH therapy was discussed. PMID:23599636

  1. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina;

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... or 3' untranslated regions. Among these, 11 genes had been previously associated with cancer, with 4 genes being known tumor suppressors: DCC, PDZD2, MAGI1, and DACT2. We validated the APA in three out of three cases with quantitative real-time-PCR. Our findings suggest that changes of APA pattern...... in these 16 genes could be involved in the tumorigenesis of SI-NETs. Furthermore, they also point to APA as a new target for both diagnostic and treatment of SI-NETs. The identified genes with APA specific to the SI-NETs could be further tested as diagnostic markers and drug targets for disease prevention...

  2. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: An Underdiagnosed Cause of Diarrhea in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bustillo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir: Pancreatic cancer is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer related death in the United States, with an overall survival rate at five years of diagnosis of less than 5%. It affects more men than women, with slight preponderance for African Americans and 77% of patients are diagnosed after the age of 60 years [1]. The majority of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer report a poor quality of life, with special compromise in the areas of emotional and social functioning, presumably due to anxiety and depression [2]. Among the physical symptoms reported to affect quality of life, fatigue and pain were ranked the highest. However, we are yet to understand how other less commonly recognized symptoms such as diarrhea and weight loss affect the functioning and comfort level of these patients. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth is a frequent, yet unrecognized, cause of diarrhea in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

  3. Tyrosine sulfation, a post-translational modification of microvillar enzymes in the small intestinal enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1987-01-01

    membrane-bound components were all enriched in the microvillar fraction but either absent or barely detectable in intracellular or basolateral membranes. Immunopurification of sucrase-isomaltase, maltase-glucoamylase, aminopeptidase N and aminopeptidase A showed that these microvillar enzymes become...... sulfated. Most if not all the sulfate was bound to tyrosine residues rather than to the carbohydrate of the microvillar enzymes, showing that this type of modification can occur on plasma membrane proteins as well as on secretory proteins.......Protein sulfation in small intestinal epithelial cells was studied by labelling of organ cultured mucosal explants with [35S]-sulfate. Six bands in SDS-PAGE became selectively labelled; four, of 250, 200, 166 and 130 kd, were membrane-bound and two, of 75 and 60 kd, were soluble. The sulfated...

  4. Endocytic trafficking from the small intestinal brush border probed with FM dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border functions as the body's main portal for uptake of dietary nutrients and simultaneously acts as the largest permeability barrier against pathogens. To enable this, the digestive enzymes of the brush border are organized in lipid raft microdomains stabilized by cross...... incorporated into the brush border, and by 15 min faint but distinct punctae were detectable about 1 m beneath the brush border, indicative of a constitutive endocytosis. The punctae represented a subpopulation of early endosomes confined to the actomyosin-rich terminal web region, and their number...... localized deeper into the cytoplasm of the enterocytes. Two major raft-associated brush border enzymes, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N, were excluded from endocytosis. We propose that the terminal web cytoskeleton, by inhibiting traffic from apical early endosomes further into the cell...

  5. Evidence for a heritable contribution to neuroendocrine tumors of the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neklason, Deborah W; VanDerslice, James; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2016-02-01

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are rare tumors arising from the enterochromaffin cells of the gut. Having a first-degree relative with a SI-NET has been shown to confer a substantial risk arising from shared environment and genetics. Heritable risk was examined using a computerized genealogy linked to historical statewide cancer data. A population-based analysis of the observed familial clustering of SI-NETs was performed to assess the genetic risk in distant relatives. A test for significant excess relatedness of 384 individuals with genealogy data and histologically confirmed SI-NETs was performed by comparing pairwise relatedness of cases to 1000 sets of matched controls. Overall significant excess pairwise relatedness was found for the 384 cases (PDefinition of the genetic risk factors will be an important tool for earlier diagnosis and better outcomes for SI-NETs. PMID:26604321

  6. Simultaneous Renal Cell Carcinoma and Giant Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma Involving Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznichenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-01-01

    Background. The concomitant occurrence of a renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma is extremely rare with only few cases being reported. Methods. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma involving small intestine. Surgical resection of retroperitoneal sarcoma and simultaneous right nephrectomy were performed. Results. Patient developed recurrent and metastatic disease and underwent debulking surgery following by chemotherapy. Despite aggressive behavior of the retroperitoneal sarcomas, patient is currently (7 years after simultaneous resection and nephrectomy) recurrence-free. Conclusions. Complete surgical resection is the mainstay of therapy for both renal cell carcinoma and retroperitoneal sarcoma. We present a case of simultaneous renal cell carcinoma and exceptionally large size retroperitoneal sarcoma. Debulking surgery and chemotherapy were helpful in our case. PMID:27595033

  7. Methotrexate-induced nitrosative stress may play a critical role in small intestinal damage in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolli, Viswa Kalyan; Abraham, Premila [Christian Medical College, Department of Biochemistry, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Rabi, Suganthy [Christian Medical College, Department of Anatomy, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2008-10-15

    Methotrexate (MTX), a structural analogue of folic acid, is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for leukemia and other malignancies. One of the major toxic effects of MTX is intestinal injury and enterocolitis.The mechanism of gastrointestinal toxicity of methotrexate has not been investigated completely. Therefore cancer chemotherapy has to be accompanied by symptomatic therapy such as antibiotics and anti-diarrheal drugs. It is important to investigate the mechanism by which methotrexate induces intestinal damage in order to perform cancer chemotherapy effectively by preventing the side effects. This study aimed at investigating whether nitrosative stress plays a role in methotrexate induced small intestinal damage using a rat model. Adult male rats were administered methotrexate at the dose of 7 mg/kg body weight intraperitoneally for 3 consecutive days and sacrificed 12 or 24 h after the final dose of methotrexate. Vehicle treated rats served as control. The intestinal tissue was used for light microscopic studies and markers of nitrosative stress including tissue nitrite level and nitrotyrosine. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration was also measured in intestinal homogenates. The villi were damaged at 12 h and the damage progressed and became severe at 24 h after the final dose of MTX. Biochemically, tissue nitrate was elevated fivefold at 12 h and fourfold at 24 h after the final dose of MTX as compared with control. Nitrotyrosine, measured immunohistochemically was detected in all the parts of the small intestine. Duodenum stained the most for nitrotyrosine, followed by ileum and then jejunum. The staining for nitrotyrosine was more intense at 24 h as compared with 12 h after the final dose of methotrexate. There was marked neutrophil infiltration as evidenced by increase in MPO activity in the small intestines. In conclusion, the results of the present study reveal that nitrosative stress may play a critical role in

  8. Transport and uptake effects of marine complex lipid liposomes in small intestinal epithelial cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Yu-Hong; Xu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Ming; Xue, Chang-Hu; Kurihara, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koretaro

    2016-04-20

    Nowadays, marine complex lipids, including starfish phospholipids (SFP) and cerebrosides (SFC) separated from Asterias amurensis as well as sea cucumber phospholipids (SCP) and cerebrosides (SCC) isolated from Cucumaria frondosa, have received much attention because of their potent biological activities. However, little information is known on the transport and uptake of these lipids in liposome forms in small intestinal cells. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of these complex lipid liposomes on transport and uptake in Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. The results revealed that SFP and SCP contained 42% and 47.9% eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), respectively. The average particle sizes of liposomes prepared in this study were from 169 to 189 nm. We found that the transport of the liposomes across the M cell monolayer model was much higher than the Caco-2 cell monolayer model. The liposomes consisting of SFP or SCP showed significantly higher transport and uptake than soy phospholipid (soy-PL) liposomes in both Caco-2 and M cell monolayer models. Our results also exhibited that treatment with 1 mM liposomes composed of SFP or SCP for 3 h tended to increase the EPA content in phospholipid fractions of both differentiated Caco-2 and M cells. Moreover, it was also found that the hybrid liposomes consisting of SFP/SFC/cholesterol (Chol) revealed higher transport and uptake across the M cell monolayer in comparison with other liposomes. Furthermore, treatment with SFP/SFC/Chol liposomes could notably decrease the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) values of Caco-2 and M cell monolayers. The present data also showed that the cell viability of differentiated Caco-2 and M cells was not affected after the treatment with marine complex lipids or soy-PL liposomes. Based on the data in this study, it was suggested that marine complex lipid liposomes exhibit prominent transport and uptake in small intestinal epithelial cell models. PMID

  9. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  10. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models

  11. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.maranghi@iss.it [Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Stecca, Laura [European Commission-Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection Chemical assessment and Testing Unit, Via E. Fermi, 2749I-21027 Ispra (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and diagnosis method of small intestine primary malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-FDG PET/CT data of 44 patients with small intestine disease (malignant, 25; benign, 19) were analyzed retrospectively. All results were proved by pathological, or diagnostic therapy and/or clinical follow-up. Visual and quantitative [intestinal wall thickness (IWT)] and semiquantitative methods [standardized uptake value (SUV)] were used to analyze the imaging features. The SUVmean and IWT were taken as the diagnostic threshold value for malignant when the Youden's index (YI) was maximum. The diagnostic test evaluation was compared with the final diagnostic results. The following results were obtained. (1) The 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging signs of small intestine carcinoma presented as intestinal local mass formation (84.00%), local wall thickening (76.00%), stenosis (25.00%), obstruction (32.00%) and enlargement of mesenteric lymph nodes (72.00%). But the incidence rates of these signs in the benign lesions were 31.58%, 42.11%, 10.53%, 15.79% and 52.63%, respectively. Only the signs of intestinal local mass formation (χ2=10.40, p2=3.90, pmax =0.589, the diagnostic threshold of IWT was 9.5 mm. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80.00%, 78.95% and 79.55%, respectively. (3) The SUVmean of intestinal malignant and benign lesions was 3.55±1.84 and 6.98±3.62 (t=3.77, pmax =0.379,the diagnostic threshold of SUVmean was 3.65. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80.00%, 57.89% and 70.48%, respectively. (4) Taking the intestinal mass formation as the diagnostic standard of malignant lesions, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 84.00%, 78.95% and 81.82%, respectively. The YImax was 0.630. (5) Taking the intestinal mass formation and SUVmean of max was 0.855. It can be used as the main evidence to differentiate the small intestine primary malignant and benign lesion with the 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging qualitative and quantitative signs for the intestinal mass formation, at SUVmean <3.65, and local wall thickening or IWT <9.50 mm. (authors)

  13. Indolent small intestinal CD4+ T-cell lymphoma is a distinct entity with unique biologic and clinical features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Margolskee

    Full Text Available Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas (EATL are rare and generally aggressive types of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Rare cases of primary, small intestinal CD4+ T-cell lymphomas with indolent behavior have been described, but are not well characterized. We describe morphologic, phenotypic, genomic and clinical features of 3 cases of indolent primary small intestinal CD4+ T-cell lymphomas. All patients presented with diarrhea and weight loss and were diagnosed with celiac disease refractory to a gluten free diet at referring institutions. Small intestinal biopsies showed crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy and a dense lamina propria infiltrate of small-sized CD4+ T-cells often with CD7 downregulation or loss. Gastric and colonic involvement was also detected (n = 2 each. Persistent, clonal TCRβ gene rearrangement products were detected at multiple sites. SNP array analysis showed relative genomic stability, early in disease course, and non-recurrent genetic abnormalities, but complex changes were seen at disease transformation (n = 1. Two patients are alive with persistent disease (4.6 and 2.5 years post-diagnosis, despite immunomodulatory therapy; one died due to bowel perforation related to large cell transformation 11 years post-diagnosis. Unique pathobiologic features warrant designation of indolent small intestinal CD4+ T-cell lymphoma as a distinct entity, greater awareness of which would avoid misdiagnosis as EATL or an inflammatory disorder, especially celiac disease.

  14. Treatment of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the small intestine: an analysis of 33 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the clinical feature, diagnosis, treatment and prognostic factors of primary lymphoma of the small bowel. Methods: From April 1989 to May 2002, 33 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the small bowel were analyzed retrospectively. The Ann Arbor stages were: I E 12, II E 15 and IV E 6. The histological subtypes were: T-cell lymphoma 1 and B-cell lymphomas 32. All the patients received surgical treatment including radical or palliative resection. Twenty-six patients received postoperative radiotherapy including strip-field technique in 12 and opposed anterior-posterior fields in 14, with a median dose of 2543.5 Gy. Postoperative chemotherapy were applied to all patients including CHOP regimen in 17, COMP regimen in 6, COP regimen in 3, MINE regimen in 2, COPP regimen in 3 and BACOP regimen in 2. The median number of cycle was 4. Results: The overall 5-year survival rate and disease-free survival rate were 48% and 39%. The 5-year survival rates were: IE stage 42%, IIE stage 67% and IVE stage 17%, respectively. Conclusions: Most of the primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the small intestine are in stage IE and IIE, and the intermediate-grade and high-grade pathological subtypes are predominant. Surgery based combined treatment is effective and is advised. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy may improve the survival. (authors)

  15. Vitamin A Controls the Presence of RORγ+ Innate Lymphoid Cells and Lymphoid Tissue in the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, Gera; Labao-Almeida, Carlos; Ferreira, Manuela; Molenaar, Rosalie; Wahlen, Sigrid; Konijn, Tanja; Koning, Jasper; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique; Mebius, Reina E

    2016-06-15

    Changes in diet and microbiota have determining effects on the function of the mucosal immune system. For example, the active metabolite of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA), has been described to maintain homeostasis in the intestine by its influence on both lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Additionally, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), important producers of cytokines necessary for intestinal homeostasis, are also influenced by vitamin A in the small intestines. In this study, we show a reduction of both NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets in the small intestine of mice raised on a vitamin A-deficient diet. Additionally, the percentages of IL-22-producing ILCs were reduced in the absence of dietary vitamin A. Conversely, mice receiving additional RA had a specific increase in the NCR(-) ILC3 subset, which contains the lymphoid tissue inducer cells. The dependence of lymphoid tissue inducer cells on vitamin A was furthermore illustrated by impaired development of enteric lymphoid tissues in vitamin A-deficient mice. These effects were a direct consequence of ILC-intrinsic RA signaling, because retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt-Cre × RARα-DN mice had reduced numbers of NCR(-) and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets within the small intestine. However, lymphoid tissue inducer cells were not affected in these mice nor was the formation of enteric lymphoid tissue, demonstrating that the onset of RA signaling might take place before retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt is expressed on lymphoid tissue inducer cells. Taken together, our data show an important role for vitamin A in controlling innate lymphoid cells and, consequently, postnatal formed lymphoid tissues within the small intestines. PMID:27183576

  16. Hemorrhagic small intestine cancer with solitary pulmonary metastasis initially presented as suspected primary lung cancer: an autopsy report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Takashi; Inoue, Kiyotoshi; Kiriike, Sachiko; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Morita, Ryuhei; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Takemura, Masashi; Osugi, Harusi; Wakasa, Kenichi; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-12-01

    Cancer of the small intestine presenting with a solitary pulmonary metastasis is rare. Diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhagic small intestinal disease is clinically problematic due to its anatomic aspect, especially after multiple laparotomies. The case that we present here was a 79-year-old man who was initially diagnosed with suspected T2N2M0 lung cancer. After non-diagnostic results on two bronchoscopic biopsies and computed tomography-guided needle biopsy, he was admitted for thoracoscopic biopsy and possible curative operation. The patient had a history of multiple laparotomies for gastric ulcer and had no abdominal symptoms. A fecal occult blood test was positive; this was thought to be because of persistent bloody sputum. During the preoperative evaluation period, massive intestinal hemorrhage occurred. Intestinal tumor was identified by double-balloon enteroscopy and emergency laparotomy was performed to control the bleeding. The histopathological diagnosis was metastatic adenocarcinoma. However, intestinal bleeding started again. His systemic status deteriorated progressively, resulting in death. Autopsy revealed a large polypoid tumor with hemorrhagic necrosis in the jejunum that was histologically and immunohistochemically diagnosed as primary poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in the small intestine. Multiple small submucosal tumors with central ulceration were confirmed as intramural metastases. A lung mass in the right lower lobe was diagnosed as a metastatic lesion. In the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, we faced several clinically difficult problems. We here describe in detail the clinical course and the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of this rare case, with some references to the literature. PMID:18432067

  17. Contaminated small drinking water supplies and risk of infectious intestinal disease: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Risebro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study sought to identify whether elevated risk of infectious intestinal disease (IID exists in contaminated small water supply consumers compared with consumers drinking from small supplies complying with current standards and whether this effect is modified by age. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A prospective cohort study of 611 individuals receiving small supplies in England was conducted. Water supplies received sanitary inspection and examination for indicator bacteria and participants maintained a daily record of IID. Regression modeling with generalized estimating equations that included interaction terms between age and indicators of fecal pollution was performed. Crude IID prevalence was 9 · 3 days with symptoms/1000 person days (95%CI: 8 · 4, 10 · 1 and incidence was 3 · 2 episodes/1000 person days (95%CI, 2 · 7, 3 · 7 or 1 · 2 episodes per person year. Although there was no overall association between IID risk and indicator presence, there was strong interaction between age and indicator presence. In children under ten, relative risk (RR of IID in those drinking from enterococci contaminated supplies was 4.8 (95%CI: 1.5, 15.3 for incidence and 8.9 (95%CI: 2.8, 27.5 for prevalence. In those aged 10 to 59, IID risk was lower but not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Contaminated small water supplies pose a substantial risk of IID to young children who live in homes reliant on these supplies. By contrast older children and adults do not appear to be at increased risk. Health care professionals with responsibility for children living in homes provided by very small water supplies should make parents aware of the risk.

  18. Functional Comparison of Human Colonic Carcinoma Cell Lines and Primary Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells for Investigations of Intestinal Drug Permeability and First-Pass Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yoshiyuki; Chapron, Brian D; Wang, Zhican; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2016-03-01

    To further the development of a model for simultaneously assessing intestinal absorption and first-pass metabolism in vitro, Caco-2, LS180, T84, and fetal human small intestinal epithelial cells (fSIECs) were cultured on permeable inserts, and the integrity of cell monolayers, CYP3A4 activity, and the inducibility of enzymes and transporters involved in intestinal drug disposition were measured. Caco-2, T84, and fSIECs all formed tight junctions, as assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy for zonula occludens-1, which was well organized into circumscribing strands in T84, Caco-2, and fSIECs but was diffuse in LS180 cells. The transepithelial electrical resistance value for LS180 monolayers was lower than that for Caco-2, T84, and fSIECs. In addition, the apical-to-basolateral permeability of the paracellular marker Lucifer yellow across LS180 monolayers was greater than in fSIECs, T84, and Caco-2 monolayers. The transcellular marker propranolol exhibited similar permeability across all cells. With regard to metabolic capacity, T84 and LS180 cells showed comparable basal midazolam hydroxylation activity and was inducible by rifampin and 1α,25(OH)2D3 in LS180 cells, but only marginally so in T84 cells. The basal CYP3A4 activity of fSIECs and Caco-2 cells was much lower and not inducible. Interestingly, some of the drug transporters expressed in LS180 and Caco-2 cells were induced by either 1α,25(OH)2D3 or rifampin or both, but effects were limited in the other two cell lines. These results suggest that none of the cell lines tested fully replicated the drug disposition properties of the small intestine and that the search for an ideal screening tool must continue. PMID:26700954

  19. EVALUATION OF THE ULTRASTRUCTURE OF THE SMALL INTESTINE OF HIV INFECTED CHILDREN BY TRANSMISSION AND SCANNING ELECTRONIC MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Araujo Chaves LEITE

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To describe HIV children's small intestinal ultrastructural findings. Methods Descriptive, observational study of small intestine biopsies performed between August 1994 and May 1995 at São Paulo, SP, Brazil. This material pertained to 11 HIV infected children and was stored in a laboratory in paraffin blocks. Scanning and transmission electronic microscopy were used to view those intestine samples and ultrastructural findings were described by analyzing digitalized photos of this material. Ethical Committee approval was obtained. Results In most samples scanning microscopy showed various degrees of shortening and decreasing number of microvilli and also completes effacements in some areas. Derangement of the enterocytes was seen frequently and sometimes cells well defined borders limits seemed to be loosened. In some areas a mucous-fibrin like membrane with variable thickness and extension appeared to partially or totally coat the epithelial surface. Fat drops were present in the intestinal lumen in various samples and a bacterium morphologically resembling bacilli was seen in two occasions. Scanning microscopy confirmed transmission microscopy microvilli findings and also showed little “tufts” of those structures. In addition, it showed an increased number of vacuoles and multivesicular bodies inside various enterocytes, an increased presence of intraepithelial lymphocytes, mitochondrial vacuolization and basement membrane enlargement in the majority of samples analyzed. However, some samples exhibited normal aspect. Conclusions Our study showed the common occurrence of various important intestinal ultrastructural alterations with variable degrees among HIV infected children, some of them in our knowledge not described before.

  20. Effect of 137Cs gamma radiation on the fibronectin content in basement membrane of mouse small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of fibronectin in the small intestine of the mouse was investigated using an indirect immunofluorescence technique. Tissue fibronectin was preferentially located in the basement membrane and in the muscularis layer. Semiquantitative immunofluorescence determination of tissue fibronectin in the basement membrane showed only minor changes at 24 or 48 hours after 10 or 20 Gy of 137Cs gamma irradiation. (Auth.)

  1. Bioavailability of dietary (poly)phenols: a study with ileostomists to discriminate between absorption in small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gina; Lean, Michael E J; Roberts, Susan A; Crozier, Alan

    2013-04-30

    A feeding study was carried out in which six healthy ileostomists ingested a juice drink containing a diversity of dietary (poly)phenols derived from green tea, apples, grapes and citrus fruit. Ileal fluid and urine collected at intervals over the ensuing 24 h period were then analysed by HPLC-MS. Urinary excretions were compared with results obtained in an earlier study in which the juice drink was ingested by ten healthy control subjects with an intact colon. Some polyphenol components, such as (epi)catechins and (epi)gallocatechin(s), were excreted in urine in similar amounts in ileostomists and subjects with an intact colon, demonstrating that absorption took place principally in the small intestine. In the urine of ileostomists, there were reduced levels of other constituents, including hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and dihydrochalcones, indicating their absorption in both the small and large intestine. Ileal fluid analysis revealed that even when absorption occurred in the small intestine, in subjects with a functioning colon a substantial proportion of the ingested components still pass from the small into the large intestine, where they may be either absorbed before or after catabolism by colonic bacteria. PMID:23471276

  2. Chronic systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor in the rat increases the mucosal surface of the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, Peter;

    1995-01-01

    We examined the effects of treatment with human recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the functioning small intestine in the rat. Male Wistar rats, 7-8 weeks old, were treated with EGF administered subcutaneously in doses of 0 (n = 7) or 150 micrograms/kg/day (n = 8) for 4 weeks. The histo...... that EGF treatment in rats increases the mucosal weight and surface area of the functioning small intestine.......We examined the effects of treatment with human recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the functioning small intestine in the rat. Male Wistar rats, 7-8 weeks old, were treated with EGF administered subcutaneously in doses of 0 (n = 7) or 150 micrograms/kg/day (n = 8) for 4 weeks. The...... histological composition and mucosal surface area of the perfusion-fixed small intestine was quantified with stereological principles. The length of the gut remained unchanged. The amount of tissue and surface area per length of gut (median (ranges)) were increased from 117 (101-131) mg/cm and 2.6 (2.1-3.5) cm...

  3. Effect of Kaiyu Qingwei Jianji on the morphometry and residual strain distribution of small intestine in experimental diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sha, Hong; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhou, Shui-Ping; Tong, Xiao-Lin; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a Chinese medicine, Kaiyu Qingwei Jianji (KYQWJJ) used for diabetic treatment, on the morphometry and residual strain distribution of the small intestine in streptozotocin (STZ) -induced diabetic rats. Correlation analysis was also performed between the opening angle and residual strain with the blood glucose level.

  4. A functional study on small intestinal smooth muscles in jejunal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Tyagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was aimed to assess the contractile status of neonatal small intestinal smooth muscle of dilated pre-atretic part of intestinal atresia to resolve debatable issues related to mechanisms of persistent dysmotility after surgical repair. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 longitudinally sectioned strips were prepared from pre-atretic dilated part of freshly excised 8 jejunal atresia type III a cases. Spontaneous as well as acetylcholine- and histamine-induced contractions were recorded in vitro by using organ bath preparations. Chemically evoked contractions were further evaluated after application of atropine (muscarinic blocker, pheniramine (H1 blocker, and lignocaine (neuronal blocker to ascertain receptors and neuronal involvement. Histological examinations of strips were made by using Masson trichrome stain to assess the fibrotic changes. Results: All 34 strips, except four showed spontaneous contractions with mean frequency and amplitude of 5.49 ± 0.26/min and 24.41 ± 5.26 g/g wet tissue respectively. The response to ACh was nearly twice as compared to histamine for equimolar concentrations (100 μM. ACh (100 μM induced contractions were attenuated (by 60% by atropine. Histamine (100 μM-induced contractions was blocked by pheniramine (0.32 μM and lignocaine (4 μM by 74% and 78%, respectively. Histopathological examination showed varying degree of fibrotic changes in muscle layers. Conclusions: Pre-atretic dilated part of jejunal atresia retains functional activity but with definitive histopathologic abnormalities. It is suggested that excision of a length of pre-atretic part and early stimulation of peristalsis by locally acting cholinomimetic or H1 agonist may help in reducing postoperative motility problems in atresia patients.

  5. Protective effect of vitamin A on acute radiation injury in the small intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of vitamin A on the development of early radiation-induced reactions in the rat small intestine. The early effects of intraoperative gamma-radiation on the small bowel utilizing the terminal ileum of Sprague-Dawley rats and the protective effect of supplemental vitamin A on acute radiation injury were investigated. Three groups were included in the study: group I (10 rats) was the surgical control group; group II (13 rats) underwent only intraoperative irradiation; and group III (10 rats) was the vitamin A plus irradiation group. Exteriorized terminal ileal segments of groups II and III were exposed to a single fraction of 20 Gy of intraoperative gamma-irradiation. On the seventh postoperative day, terminal ileal segments of all rats were resected and histopathologically evaluated for ulceration, enteritis cystica profunda, atypical epithelial regeneration, fibrosis, vascular sclerosis, and inflammatory process. Although none of the above findings were present in the surgical control group, group III rats experienced less severe effects than group II rats. The results suggest the early side effects of radiation may be prevented by vitamin A supplementation. (author)

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: meaningful association or unnecessary hype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 10⁵ colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fallacious criteria [post-lactulose breath-hydrogen rise 20 PPM above basal within 90 min (early-peak)]. Glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) has a low sensitivity to diagnose SIBO. Hence, studies based on GHBT might have under-estimated frequency of SIBO. Therefore, it is important to analyze these studies carefully to evaluate whether the reported association between IBS and SIBO is over or under-projected. This review evaluates studies on association between SIBO and IBS, discordance between different studies, their strength and weakness including methodological issues and evidence on therapeutic manipulation of gut flora on symptoms of IBS. PMID:24627585

  7. Regional distribution and variation of gamma-globulin absorption from the small intestine of the neonatal calf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    125I-labeled immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 in colostral whey was used to determine the region of maximum absorption of Ig from the small intestine of the neonatal calf and the variation in Ig absorption among calves at the intestinal level. In experiment 1, 5 segments (approx 5%, 35%, 60%, 80%, and 95% of the duodenocecal length) were formed in the small intestine of 9 colostrum-deprived calves shortly after birth. These segments were injected with colostral whey containing 125I-IgG1 4 hours after birth, and uptake, transfer, and absorption (defined as uptake plus transfer) were determined for each segment 2 hours later. Raw data were adjusted for the milligrams of IgG1 injected per gram of intestinal tissue to obtain the least squares mean (LSM) value. The LSM values for absorption of IgG1 from distal segments 3, 4, and 5 were significantly greater (P less than 0.05) than those values for proximal segments 1 and 2. The region of the maximum IgG1 absorption was the lower small intestine, 60% to 80% of the duodenocecal length. There was also an indication of independence between uptake and transfer in each of the segments. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) were present among calves in the LSM values for uptake and absorption, but not for transfer. In experiment 2, thoracic ducts of 8 newborn calves were cannulated 4 to 5 hours after birth. At 6 hours after birth, colostral whey with 125I-IgG1 was injected into an intestinal segment (approx 60% to 80% of the duodenocecal length)

  8. Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu extract prevents radiation-induced small intestinal injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: to investigate the therapeutic effect of traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice. Methods: Proliferation improvement of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) was tested by MTT assay in vitro. The preventive effect of the prescription was also tested in vivo. Mice were treated with Shenlingbaizhu by intragastric administration immediately after receiving local irradiation to the abdomen at a dose of 10 Gy (60Co γ-ray). The body mass, diarrhea and survival were recorded. The pathological changes in the jejunum of mice were stained by HE and observed. Results: Shenlingbaizhu Extract could significantly promote the proliferation of irradiated intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Shenlingbaizhu Extract treatment reduced the diarrhea of irradiated mice, improved the intestinal structural recovery and increased the mice survival. Conclusion: Traditional Chinese prescription Shenlingbaizhu Extract shows significant protective effect on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice, providing data for clinical treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. (authors)

  9. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The large intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible ... the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the cecum. Material passes through the ...

  10. Possible role of 99mTc-Dextran (99mTc-Dx) in detection of occult small intestinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases are presented wherein 99mTc-dextran (99mTc-Dx) imaging localised focal pathology in the small intestine and contributed in reaching a preoperative diagnosis. In the first case, 99mTc-pertechnetate and 99mTc-Dx accumulated in a suspected Meckel's diverticulum equally well. 99mTc-Dx additionally identified exudative discharge from the lesion. In the second case, 99mTc-Dx identified a distal ileal lesion later proved to be a non-specific ulcer on surgery. 99mTc-Dx scanning may have a role in imaging of occult intestinal lesions. (author)

  11. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)3 was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of 125I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured

  12. IMPORTANCE OF AGNI (DIGESTIVE FIRE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GRAHANI DISEASE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO LAVANBHASKARCHURNA IN GRAHANIROGA (SMALL INTESTINE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wange Mangala Dilip

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to see the effect of Lavanbhaskar churna in Grahaniroga (Small intestine disease. An uncontrolled, open label clinical study was done on 15 patients of Grahaniroga (Small intestine disease. Lavanbhaskar churna 1-3 g twice a day as an Agnideepan (stimulating digestion was given to patient after their enrolment in study. Assessment of signs such as Agnimandya (suppressed digestive fire, Aruchi (loss of taste, Trushna (thirst, Chardi (vomiting, Adhmana (distension, randomly loose or hard stool (Asamyak mal pravrutti was assessed. Every patient assessed for any clinical improvement and for adverse effects regularly, follow-up taken at every week for 2 month. Improvement in condition was recorded as shifting of gradation in signs of Grahaniroga (Small intestine disease. Clinical study has shown symptomatic improvement in Grahaniroga (Small intestine disease. This indicates that the effect of drug is extremely significant in the Grahaniroga (Small intestine disease as an Agnideepan (stimulating digestion.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of restraint and footshock stress on small intestinal motility by an improved method using a radionuclide, 51Cr, in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of two different stress stimuli, restraint stress and footshock stress, on small intestinal motility was evaluated by a more reliable method with improvement of the previous method using a radionuclide, 51Cr. The small intestinal transit was significantly inhibited by restraint stress, but not by footshock stress, although plasma corticosterone levels were significantly elevated to the same extent by restraint stress and footshock stress. These results suggest that restraint stress and footshock stress stimuli influence small intestinal motility via different mechanisms, but the reason for the difference is unclear. This experimental system using 51Cr seems to be useful for the elucidation of mechanisms for restraint stress-induced dysfunction of small intestinal motility because of its excellent quantitative evaluation of small intestinal transit. (author)

  14. Optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue determined by Kubelka-Munk method in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Jiang Wei; Da Xing; Guo-Yong Wu; Ying Jin; Huai-Min Gu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm,532 nm, 808 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation.METHODS: A double-integrating-sphere system, the basic principle of measuring technology of light radiation, and an optical model of biological tissues were used in the study.RESULTS: The results of measurement showed that there were no significant differences in the absorption coefficients of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm,496.5 nm laser in the Kubelka-Munk two-flux model (P>0.05).The absorption coefficients of the tissue at 514.5 nm, 532 nm,808 nm laser irradiation were obviously increased with the decrease of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficients of the tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation were increased with the decrease of these wavelengths.The scattering coefficients at 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm laser irradiation were obviously increased with the increase of these wavelengths. The scattering coefficient of the tissue at 532 nm laser irradiation was bigger than that at 808 nm.There were no significant differences in the total attenuation coefficient of the tissue at 476.5 nm and 488 nm laser irradiation (P>0.05). The total attenuation coefficient of the tissue at 488 nm, 496.5 nm, 514.5 nm, 532 nm, 808 nm laser irradiation was obviously increased with the decrease of these wavelengths, and their effective attenuation coefficient revealed the same trend. There were no significant differences among the forward scattered photon fluxe,backward scattered photon fiuxe, and total scattered photon fiuxe of the tissue at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation. They were all obviously increased with attenuation of tissue thickness. The attenuations of forward and backward scattered photon fluxes, and the total scattered photon fiuxe of the tissue at 514.5 nm laser irradiation were slower than those at 476.5 nm, 488 nm, 496.5 nm laser irradiation

  15. Breath Hydrogen Gas Concentration Linked to Intestinal Gas Distribution and Malabsorption in Patients with Small-bowel Pseudo-obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Urita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The patient with colonic obstruction may frequently have bacterial overgrowth and increased breath hydrogen (H2 levels because the bacterium can contact with food residues for longer time. We experienced two cases with intestinal obstruction whose breath H2 concentrations were measured continuously.Case 1: A 70-year-old woman with small bowel obstruction was treated with a gastric tube. When small bowel gas decreased and colonic gas was demonstrated on the plain abdominal radiograph, the breath H2 concentration increased to 6 ppm and reduced again shortly.Case 2: A 41-year-old man with functional small bowel obstruction after surgical treatment was treated with intravenous administration of erythromycin. Although the plain abdominal radiograph demonstrated a decrease of small-bowel gas, the breath H2 gas kept the low level. After a clear-liquid meal was supplied, fasting breath H2 concentration increased rapidly to 22 ppm and gradually decreased to 9 ppm despite the fact that the intestinal gas was unchanged on X-ray. A rapid increase of breath H2 concentration may reflect the movement of small bowel contents to the colon in patients with small-bowel pseudo-obstruction or malabsorption following diet progression.Conclusions: Change in breath H2 concentration had a close association with distribution and movement of intestinal gas.

  16. Protective Effect of Soy Isoflavone Genistein on Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat Small Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Yuki; Itagaki, Shirou; Oikawa, Setsu; Ogura, Jiro; Kobayashi, Masaki; Hirano, Takeshi; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Iseki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury of the intestine is an important factor associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Intestinal I/R is a common clinical problem in the settings of severe burns, circulatory shock and strangulation ileus. Intestinal I/R damages remote organs and promotes multi-organ failure. It has been shown that enteral feeding before ischemic insults is beneficial for reducing organ injury and improving survival after intestinal I/R. In that study, the authors us...

  17. Protective Effect of Royal Jelly against Phenylhydrazine-induced Histological Injuries of Small Intestine of Mice: Morphometric Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojat Anbara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Phenylhydrazine (PHZ, as a known hemolytic agent, causes toxicity in different tissues at various levels. The aim of the current study was to examine the possible protective effects of royal jelly (RJ against PHZ-induced histological injuries of small intestine in mice.   Methods: In this experimental study, adult male mice were randomly divided into four groups of 8 mice each. PHZ was administered intraperitoneally to two groups of mice (at a dose of 60mg/kg every 48 hours for 35 days. One of the groups received RJ (100mg/kg orally 4 hours before PHZ administration. The third group only received RJ, and the forth group was considered as control. Twenty-four hours after the last treatment, different segments of small intestine were dissected out, then histological sections were prepared and quantitative morphometric assessments were performed. To compare the groups, one-way ANOVA and multiple comparative Tukey tests were used. The significance level was considered to be p<0.05.   Results: In this study, PHZ caused significant decreases in depth of duodenal crypts, distribution rate of the goblet cells in ileal villi, width of duodenal and jejunal villi, and height of villi in all three segments of small intestine. Co-administration of RJ partially improved the changes in the above parameters.   Conclusion: From results of this study, it seems that RJ as a free radical scavenger could reduce PHZ-induced intestinal toxicity in mouse.

  18. Effect of colostrum and milk on small intestine expression of AQP4 and AQP5 in newborn buffalo calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillacioti, C; De Luca, A; Pero, M E; Vassalotti, G; Lombardi, P; Avallone, L; Mirabella, N; Pelagalli, A

    2015-12-01

    Functional studies indicate differences in newborn gastrointestinal morphology and physiology after a meal. Both water and solutes transfer across the intestinal epithelial membrane appear to occur via aquaporins (AQPs). Given that the physiological roles of AQP4 and AQP5 in the developing intestine have not been fully established, the objective of this investigation was to determine their distribution, expression and respective mRNA in the small intestine of colostrums-suckling buffalo calves by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis. Results showed different tissue distribution between AQP4 and AQP5 with the presence of the former along the enteric neurons and the latter in the endocrine cells. Moreover, their expression levels were high in the ileum of colostrum-suckling buffalo calves. The data present a link between feeding, intestinal development and water homeostasis, suggesting the involvement of these channel proteins in intestinal permeability and fluid secretion/absorption during this stage of development after birth. PMID:26679810

  19. Glutathione redox cycle in small intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood of pediatric celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesnać Stojiljković

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The celiac disease is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder caused by gluten from wheat, rye or barley. In genetically predisposed persons, gluten induces the immune-mediated inflammation of small intestinal mucosa. Histological lesions include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hypertrophy and villous atrophy, resulting in malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The only treatment for celiac patients is a permanent gluten-free diet (GFD. Reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress are strongly associated with the celiac disease. Glutathione (GSH is a main detoxifier of endogenous and exogenous ROS in the intestine. In order to explain the role of glutathione redox cycle in celiac patients, we examined the activities of GSH-related antioxidant (AO enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione reductase (GR, as well as the concentration of GSH in small intestinal biopsies and peripheral blood of children affected by the celiac disease. The concentration of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH as markers of oxidative damage was measured in the same samples. The results clearly demonstrate a significant malfunction of GSH redox cycle with a concomitant decrease in the capacity to regenerate GSH and detoxify LOOH in celiac patients, even after several years of GFD. The oral administration of GSH and a diet rich in natural antioxidants, as well as appropriate dietary supplements, could be of great benefit to the patients.A doença celíaca é uma desordem gastrointestinal causada pelo glúten proveniente do trigo, centeio ou cevada. Em pessoas geneticamente predispostas, o glúten induz uma inflamação imune da mucosa do intestino delgado. As lesões histológicas incluem linfocitose intraepitelial, hipertrofia de criptas e atrofia vilosa, resultando em malabsorção de micro- e macronutrientes. O único tratamento para os pacientes celíacos é a restrição permanente de glúten na dieta (GFD.Espécies reativas de oxigênio (ROS e o

  20. Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting