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Sample records for canine small intestine

  1. Morphometric study of the layers of the canine small intestine at five sampling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarriá, R; Latorre, R; Henroteaux, M; Henroteaux, N; Soria, F; Pérez-Cuadrado, E; López Albors, O

    2012-06-01

    The histology of the canine intestine has not been accurately defined. To establish the precise thickness of its different layers, whole wall samples of the small intestine were removed from 41 cadavers at five standardised sampling sites (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, proximal ileum and distal ileum). The total thickness was estimated by morphometry, as was the thickness of the mucosa, muscularis mucosae, submucosa and muscularis externa. In addition, the size of the lymphoid aggregates in the submucosa and the thickness of the circular and longitudinal layers within both the muscularis mucosae and the muscularis externa were estimated. The total intestinal thickness depended very much upon the thickness of the mucosa and submucosa. The mucosa decreased progressively from proximal to distal parts of the small intestine (47% reduction). The thickness of the submucosa, however, changed little from the duodenum to the distal jejunum, but increased significantly in the ileum; this change was positively correlated with the amount of lymphoid tissue. Sex influenced the thickness of the intestinal wall, with males displaying higher thickness values along the small intestine. Conversely, no correlation between bodyweight and intestinal thickness was found for any of the five sampling sites. This study gives absolute and relative values for the thickness of the layers of the dog intestine which might help in the diagnosis of small intestinal pathology from postmortem samples and/or endoscopic biopsies.

  2. Effects of laxative and nonlaxative hydrophilic polymers on canine small intestinal motor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J; Bass, P

    1986-03-01

    Bulk-forming laxatives increase fecal volume and elicit aborally directed colonic motility patterns. Recently, it was demonstrated that test meals of the bulk-laxative fibers (cellulose and bran) elicited organized jejunal motor activity while nonlaxative fiber meals (guar) elicited unorganized jejunal motor activity. However, whether bulk-forming laxatives, as a class of compounds, differentially affect small intestinal motility has not been studied. Therefore, a study was made of the effects of the bulk laxatives psyllium and polycarbophil and the nonlaxative pectin on canine jejunal motor activity. Psyllium and pectin are examples of dietary fiber, while polycarbophil is a synthetic polymer. Pectin and psyllium test meals presented as viscous gels. In contrast, polycarbophil meals presented as a combination of discrete particles plus meal water. After each meal, measurements were made of the jejunal motility index, the time of reappearance of interdigestive burst activity, and overall motility patterns. Pectin and psyllium meals increased in viscosity as meal fiber content increased. As meal content and hence viscosity increased, both the laxative (psyllium) and nonlaxative (pectin) fiber meals elicited increasing jejunal motor activity and delays in the reappearance of the burst interval. For both fiber types, motor activity presented as randomly appearing contractions. In contrast, meals of the laxative polycarbophil elicited no more motor activity than the saline control meal. However, this control-level amount of activity presented as propagated clusters of contractions, ie, the "laxative-induced pattern." Polycarbophil did not delay the reappearance of burst activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Immunocytochemical evidence for a paracrine interaction between GIP and GLP-1-producing cells in canine small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damholt, A B; Kofod, Hans; Buchan, A M

    1999-01-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide 1 (GLP-1) released from the intestine is considered to be an important incretin. We have recently demonstrated that glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) stimulated GLP-1 secretion from canine ileal L cells in culture. To investigate further the interplay between GL...

  4. Efficacy and safety of small intestinal submucosa in dural defect repair in a canine model.

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    He, Shu-Kun; Guo, Jin-Hai; Wang, Zhu-le; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Yun-Hu; Wu, Shi-Zhou; Huang, Fu-Guo; Xie, Hui-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Dural defects are a common problem, and inadequate dural closure can lead to complications. Several types of dural substitute materials have recently been discarded or modified owing to poor biocompatibility or mechanical properties and adverse reactions. The small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a promising material used in a variety of applications. Based on the limitations of previous studies, we conducted an animal study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the SIS in preclinical trials. Twenty-four male beagle dogs were subjected to surgical resection to produce dural defects. SIS or autologous dural mater was patched on the dural defect. Gross and histological evaluations were carried out to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the therapy. Our findings demonstrated that the SIS, which stimulated connective and epithelial tissue responses for dural regeneration and functional recovery without immunological rejection, could provide prolonged defect repair and prevent complications. The mechanical properties of the SIS could be adjusted by application of multiple layers, and the biocompatibility of the material was appropriate. Thus, our data suggested that this material may represent an alternative option for clinical treatment of dural defects.

  5. The effects of feeding and withholding food on the canine small intestinal microbiota.

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    Kasiraj, Alyssa C; Harmoinen, Jaana; Isaiah, Anitah; Westermarck, Elias; Steiner, Jörg M; Spillmann, Thomas; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged lack of enteral feeding has a negative impact on gut physiology, potentially via microbiota modulation. The aims were to investigate the impact of fasting and post-prandial changes in canine jejunal microbiota. To study post-prandial effects, jejunal brushings were analyzed in 8 healthy fistulated dogs 15 min before feeding (baseline) and hourly for 8 h after feeding. To study effects of withholding food (WF), daily samples were collected for 15 days from 5 dogs. The first 5 days (PRE) dogs were fed regular diet. Food was withheld the next 5 days (days 6-10). For days 11-15 (POST), the original diet was reintroduced. Microbiota was characterized via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. In the post-prandial study, no changes in microbiome structure were seen after feeding (ANOSIM, P = 0.28), but Betaproteobacteria (P = 0.04) and Bacteroidales decreased compared to baseline. Species richness decreased by 300 min (P = 0.04). During WF, microbiota structure differed from PRE and POST period (P = 0.001). During WF, species richness did not vary over time (P = 0.69). In conclusion, a prolonged period of food withholding results in altered jejunal microbiota. How these changes affect the microbiota metabolism warrants further studies.

  6. Evaluation of a canine small intestinal submucosal xenograft and polypropylene mesh as bioscaffolds in an abdominal full-thickness resection model of growing rats.

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    Lee, A-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee; Kim, Hwi-Yool

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biological scaffold properties of canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compared to a those of polypropylene mesh in growing rats with full-thickness abdominal defects. SIS is used to repair musculoskeletal tissue while promoting cell migration and supporting tissue regeneration. Polypropylene mesh is a non-resorbable synthetic material that can endure mechanical tension. Canine SIS was obtained from donor German shepherds, and its porous collagen fiber structure was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A 2.50-cm(2) section of canine SIS (SIS group) or mesh (mesh group) was implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 1, 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, the implants were histopathologically examined and tensile load was tested. One month after surgery, CD68+ macrophage numbers in the SIS group were increased, but the number of CD8+ T cells in this group declined more rapidly than that in rats treated with the mesh. In the SIS group, few adhesions and well-developed autologous abdominal muscle infiltration into the SIS collagen fibers were observed. No significant differences in the tensile load test results were found between the SIS and mesh groups at 24 weeks. Canine SIS may therefore be a suitable replacement for artificial biological scaffolds in small animals.

  7. The effect of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin on microbial diversity in the canine small intestine as demonstrated by massive parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolcott Randy D

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have shown that the fecal microbiota is generally resilient to short-term antibiotic administration, but some bacterial taxa may remain depressed for several months. Limited information is available about the effect of antimicrobials on small intestinal microbiota, an important contributor to gastrointestinal health. The antibiotic tylosin is often successfully used for the treatment of chronic diarrhea in dogs, but its exact mode of action and its effect on the intestinal microbiota remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of tylosin on canine jejunal microbiota. Tylosin was administered at 20 to 22 mg/kg q 24 hr for 14 days to five healthy dogs, each with a pre-existing jejunal fistula. Jejunal brush samples were collected through the fistula on days 0, 14, and 28 (14 days after withdrawal of tylosin. Bacterial diversity was characterized using massive parallel 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Results Pyrosequencing revealed a previously unrecognized species richness in the canine small intestine. Ten bacterial phyla were identified. Microbial populations were phylogenetically more similar during tylosin treatment. However, a remarkable inter-individual response was observed for specific taxa. Fusobacteria, Bacteroidales, and Moraxella tended to decrease. The proportions of Enterococcus-like organisms, Pasteurella spp., and Dietzia spp. increased significantly during tylosin administration (p Escherichia coli-like organisms increased by day 28 (p = 0.04. These changes were not accompanied by any obvious clinical effects. On day 28, the phylogenetic composition of the microbiota was similar to day 0 in only 2 of 5 dogs. Bacterial diversity resembled the pre-treatment state in 3 of 5 dogs. Several bacterial taxa such as Spirochaetes, Streptomycetaceae, and Prevotellaceae failed to recover at day 28 (p Conclusion Tylosin may lead to prolonged effects on the composition and diversity of

  8. Small Intestine Disorders

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    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  9. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  10. Small intestine (image)

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    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  11. Small intestine aspirate and culture

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    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  12. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

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    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  13. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  14. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

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    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  15. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan; Bures; Jiri; Cyrany; Darina; Kohoutova; Miroslav; Frstl; Stanislav; Rejchrt; Jaroslav; Kvetina; Viktor; Vorisek; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymi-crobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO).SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. There...

  16. Sonography of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kim Nylund; Svein (φ)degaard; Trygve Hausken; Geir Folvik; Gülen Arslan Lied; Ivan Viola; Helwig Hauser; Odd-Helge Gilja

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been substantial development in the diagnostic possibilities for examining the small intestine. Compared with computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy, ultrasonography has the advantage of being cheap, portable, flexible and user- and patient-friendly, while at the same time providing the clinician with image data of high temporal and spatial resolution. The method has limitations with penetration in obesity and with intestinal air impairing image quality. The flexibility ultrasonography offers the examiner also implies that a systematic approach during scanning is needed. This paper reviews the basic scanning techniques and new modalities such as contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, strain rate imaging, hydrosonography, allergosonography, endoscopic sonography and nutritional imaging, and the literature on disease-specific findings in the small intestine. Some of these methods have shown clinical benefit, while others are under research and development to establish their role in the diagnostic repertoire. However, along with improved overall image quality of new ultrasound scanners, these methods have enabled more anatomical and physiological changes in the small intestine to be observed. Accordingly, ultrasound of the small intestine is an attractive clinical tool to study patients with a range of diseases.

  17. Small intestinal tophus mimicking tumor

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    Pragya Katoch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 72 year old male with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2 and previous gouty arthritis presented with weight loss, nausea, and vomiting. Ultrasound and CT scanning of the abdomen revealed a circumscribed tumor mass of the jejunum, 3.7 cm in diameter. Microscopic examination of the resected jejunum revealed the tumor to be a gouty tophus. To the best of our knowledge, three cases of tophi in the large intestine have previously been reported but none in the small intestine.

  18. COMPARISON OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND ABDOMINAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF CANINE MECHANICAL INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.

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    Drost, Wm Tod; Green, Eric M; Zekas, Lisa J; Aarnes, Turi K; Su, Lillian; Habing, Gregory G

    2016-07-01

    Vomiting, often caused by mechanical intestinal obstruction, is common in dogs. Equivocal radiographic signs often necessitate repeat radiographs or additional imaging procedures. For our prospective, case-controlled, accuracy study, we hypothesized the following: (1) using computed tomography (CT), radiologists will be more sensitive and specific for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery compared to using radiographs; and (2) using measurements, radiologists will be more sensitive and specific using radiographs or CT for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery. Twenty dogs had abdominal radiographs and abdominal CT. Seventeen dogs had abdominal surgery and three dogs were not obstructed based on clinical follow-up. Confidence levels (five-point scale) of three experienced radiologists for mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery were recorded before and after making selected measurements. Eight dogs had surgically confirmed mechanical intestinal obstruction, and 12 dogs did not have obstruction. For detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction, CT was more sensitive (95.8% vs. 79.2%) and specific (80.6% vs. 69.4%) compared to radiographs, but the difference was not statistically significant. For recommending surgery, radiography was more sensitive (91.7% vs. 83.3%) and specific (83.3% vs. 72.2%) than using CT, but differences were not statistically significant. We reported objective CT measurements for predicting small mechanical intestinal obstruction. By incorporating these objective data, the diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction changed in five of 120 instances (radiographs and CT). In no instance (0/120), did the objective data change the recommendation for surgery. Using CT or abdominal radiographs for the detection of canine mechanical intestinal obstruction is sensitive and specific when evaluated by experienced veterinary radiologists.

  19. Distinguishing Intestinal Lymphoma From Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Canine Duodenal Endoscopic Biopsy Samples.

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    Carrasco, V; Rodríguez-Bertos, A; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Wise, A G; Maes, R; Mullaney, T; Kiupel, M

    2015-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and intestinal lymphoma are intestinal disorders in dogs, both causing similar chronic digestive signs, although with a different prognosis and different treatment requirements. Differentiation between these 2 conditions is based on histopathologic evaluation of intestinal biopsies. However, an accurate diagnosis is often difficult based on histology alone, especially when only endoscopic biopsies are available to differentiate IBD from enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type 2, a small cell lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of histopathology; immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD3, CD20, and Ki-67; and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for antigen receptor rearrangement (T-cell clonality) in the differential diagnosis of severe IBD vs intestinal lymphoma. Endoscopic biopsies from 32 dogs with severe IBD or intestinal lymphoma were evaluated. The original diagnosis was based on microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections alone followed by a second evaluation using morphology in association with IHC for CD3 and CD20 and a third evaluation using PCR for clonality. Our results show that, in contrast to feline intestinal lymphomas, 6 of 8 canine small intestinal lymphomas were EATL type 1 (large cell) lymphomas. EATL type 2 was uncommon. Regardless, in dogs, intraepithelial lymphocytes were not an important diagnostic feature to differentiate IBD from EATL as confirmed by PCR. EATL type 1 had a significantly higher Ki-67 index than did EATL type 2 or IBD cases. Based on the results of this study, a stepwise diagnostic approach using histology as the first step, followed by immunophenotyping and determining the Ki67 index and finally PCR for clonality, improves the accuracy of distinguishing intestinal lymphoma from IBD in dogs.

  20. Amyloidosis of the small intestine

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    Kala, Zdenek [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: zkala@tiscali.cz; Valek, Vlastimil [Department of Radiology, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: v.valek@fnbrno.cz; Kysela, Petr [Department of Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno, Jihlavska 20, 62500 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: pkysel@email.cz

    2007-07-15

    Amyloidosis is a rare disease characterized by forming pathological protein deposits - amyloid - in many organs and tissues. This decreases their functionality. The aim of this small study was to determine, whether the radiological picture of the small intestine involvement in amyloidosis is in some sense specific as sometimes described in literature giving rise to high suspicion for the disease in symptomatic patients. Material and methods: The prospective study comprising seven patients hospitalized in surgical department is presented together with a survey on the disease, its appearance in radiological imaging. All patients underwent abdominal ultrasound (ATL 5000 HDI, 7-12 MHz linear probe, no contrast enhancement, supine position), abdominal CT (Somatom Plus, Siemens, single detector, conventional abdominal CT protocol) and enteroclysis (Micropaque suspension 300 ml, application rate of 75 ml/min, dilution with HP-7000 being 1:1 and HP-7000 solution 2000 ml, application rate of 120 ml/min.). Results: The amyloid deposits in the small intestine could be visualized in five of seven patients with the disease. Enteroclysis revealed a diffuse slowed down intestinal motility with an obstruction-like picture in all of our seven patients. The intestinal secretion was normal, plicae were getting polyp-like shape in five of them forming so called 'thumb printing' picture. CT showed thickening of the intestinal wall due to deposits with poor blood supply and contrast retention in five of seven patients. Ultrasound visualized thickened, hypoechoic nodular plicae and slowed down motility in these five patients. The most striking finding was the pathological deposits in the intestinal wall were highly hypo-vascular. However, this picture is very similar to that of ischemic enteritis. All seven patients had proven amyloid deposits from bioptic specimens. Conclusion: The diagnosis of amyloidosis must be supported by bioptic examination as it has no pathognomic

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

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    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  2. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intestine . The digestive system removes and processes nutrients ( vitamins , minerals , carbohydrates , fats, proteins , and water) from foods ... a microscope to see whether they contain cancer. Bypass : Surgery to allow food in the small intestine ...

  3. Clinical radiology of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlinger, H.; Maglinte, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book discussed embryology, anatomy, physiology, and immunology of the small intestine. Radiographic procedures in the small intestine especially enterolysis are presented. Focus is on the role of other types of imaging techniques including sonography, computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, angiography, biopsy, and enteroscopy.

  4. Small intestine bleeding due to multifocal angiosarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa Zacarias F(o)ohrding; Arne Macher; Stefan Braunstein; Wolfram Trudo Knoefel; Stefan Andreas Topp

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of an 84-year-old male patient with primary small intestinal angiosarcoma.The patient initially presented with anemia and melena.Consecutive endoscopy revealed no signs of upper or lower active gastrointestinal bleeding.The patient had been diagnosed 3 years previously with an aortic dilation,which was treated with a stent.Computed tomography suggested an aorto-intestinal fistula as the cause of the in-testinal bleeding,leading to operative stent explantation and aortic replacement.However,an aorto-intestinal fistula was not found,and the intestinal bleeding did not arrest postoperatively.The constant need for blood transfusions made an exploratory laparotomy imperative,which showed multiple bleeding sites,predominately in the jejunal wall.A distal loop jejunostomy was conducted to contain the small intestinal bleeding and a segmental resection for histological evaluation was performed.The histological analysis revealed a lessdifferentiated tumor with characteristic CD31,cytokeratin,and vimentin expression,which led to the diagnosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma.Consequently,the infiltrated part of the jejunum was successfully resected in a subsequent operation,and adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel was planned.Angiosarcoma of the small intestine is an extremely rare malignant neoplasm that presents with bleeding and high mortality.Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve outcome.A small intestinal angiosarcoma is a challenging diagnosis to make because of its rarity,nonspecific symptoms of altered intestinal function,nonspecific abdominal pain,severe melena,and acute abdominal signs.Therefore,a quick clinical and histological diagnosis and decisive measures including surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy should be the aim.

  5. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Best, Kate E; Tennant, Peter W G; Addor, Marie-Claude;

    2012-01-01

    The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe.......The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe....

  6. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

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    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  7. Small Bowel Obstruction due to Intestinal Xanthomatosis

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    L. E. Barrera-Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vast majority of bowel obstruction is due to postoperative adhesions, malignancy, intestinal inflammatory disease, and hernias; however, knowledge of other uncommon causes is critical to establish a prompt treatment and decrease mortality. Xanthomatosis is produced by accumulation of cholesterol-rich foamy macrophages. Intestinal xanthomatosis is an uncommon nonneoplastic lesion that may cause small bowel obstruction and several cases have been reported in the English literature as obstruction in the jejunum. We report a case of small intestinal xanthomatosis occurring in a 51-year-old female who presented with one day of copious vomiting and intermittent abdominal pain. Radiologic images revealed jejunal loop thickening and inflammatory changes suggestive of foreign body obstruction, diagnostic laparoscopy found two strictures at the jejunum, and a pathologic examination confirmed a segmental small bowel xanthomatosis. This case illustrates that obstruction even without predisposing factors such as hyperlipidemia or lymphoproliferative disorders.

  8. Ileal angiomyolipoma manifested by small intestinal intussusception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Ho Lee; Jong Hun Kim; Doo Hyun Yang; Yong Hwang; Myoung Jae Kang; Young Kon Kim; Min Ro Lee

    2009-01-01

    Angiomyolipomas (AMLs), a form of benign mesenchymal hamartoma, arise primarily in the kidneys of patients with or without tuberous sclerosis. Extra-renal AMLs are very rare and are most commonly found in the liver.AMLs of the small intestine are exceedingly rare. Here,a case of a 28-year-old man, who presented with ileal intussusception caused by ileal AML is reported. The clinicopathological and immunohistochemical findings of ileal AMLs are discussed and the literature on small intestinal AMLs is reviewed.

  9. Surface staining of small intestinal biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1977-01-01

    Small intestinal biopsies are most often by routine examined under a stereo-microscope, prior to embedding for histological examination. This is done in order to get a view of the appearance of the mucosal pattern, especially villus configuration. The distinctness of the surface pattern however......, is improved considerably if the biopsies are stained with Alcian Green and/or PAS before they are examined. In the present paper a detailed description is given of staining of small intestinal biopsies as whole mounts. The difference between the unstained and the stained biopsies is illustrated by a few...

  10. Flow and mixing by small intestine villi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Y F; de Loubens, C; Love, R J; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M

    2015-06-01

    Flow and mixing in the small intestine are multi-scale processes. Flows at the scale of the villi (finger-like structures of ≈500 μm length) are poorly understood. We developed a three-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model to gain insight into the effects of villous movements and the rheology of digesta on flow, mixing and absorption of nutrients at the periphery of the intestinal lumen. Our model simulated the hydrodynamic consequences of villi movements that resulted from folding of the mucosa during longitudinal contractions. We found that cyclic approximation and separation of groups of villi generated laminar eddies at the edges of the group and augmented mass transfers in the radial direction between the inter-villous space and the intestinal lumen which improved the absorption of nutrients and mixing at the periphery of the lumen. This augmentation was greater with highly diffusible nutrients and with high levels of shear-thinning (pseudoplasticity) of the fluid. We compared our results with bulk flows simulations done by previous workers and concluded that villous movements during longitudinal contractions is a major radial mixing mechanism in the small intestine and increases mixing and absorption around the mucosa despite adverse rheology.

  11. Sodium recirculation and isotonic transport in toad small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Signe Nielsen; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Ussing, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Small intestine; leaky epithelia; solute-coupled water transport; Na*O+ recirculation; lateral intercellular space; flux ratio analysi......Small intestine; leaky epithelia; solute-coupled water transport; Na*O+ recirculation; lateral intercellular space; flux ratio analysi...

  12. Transplante de intestino delgado Small intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ferreira Galvão

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Avanços da biotecnologia e o desenvolvimento de novas drogas imunossupressoras melhoraram os resultados do transplante de intestino delgado. Esse transplante é atualmente indicado para casos especiais da falência intestinal. OBJETIVO: A presente revisão realça os recentes desenvolvimentos na área do transplante de intestino delgado. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Mais de 600 publicações de transplante de intestino delgado foram revisadas. O desenvolvimento da pesquisa, novas estratégias de imunossupressão, monitorização do enxerto e do receptor, e avanços na técnica cirúrgica são discutidos. RESULTADOS: Realizaram-se cerca de 700 transplante de intestino delgado em 55 centros: 44% intestino-fígado, 41% enxerto intestinal isolado e 15% transplante multivisceral. Rejeição e infecção são as principais limitações desse transplante. Sobrevida de 5 anos na experiência internacional é de 46% para o transplante de intestino isolado, 43% para o intestino-fígado e de cerca de 30% para o transplante multivisceral. Sobrevidas prolongadas são mais freqüentes nos centros com maior experiência. Em série de 165 transplantes intestinais na Universidade de Pittsburgh, PA, EUA, foi relatada sobrevida do paciente maior do que 75% no primeiro ano, 54% em 5 anos e 42% em 10 anos. Mais de 90% desses pacientes assumem dieta oral irrestrita. CONCLUSÃO: O transplante de intestino delgado evoluiu de estratégia experimental para uma alternativa viável no tratamento da falência intestinal permanente. Promover o refinamento da terapia imunossupressora, do manejo e prevenção de infecções, da técnica cirúrgica e da indicação e seleção adequada dos pacientes é crucial para melhorar a sobrevida desse transplante.BACKGROUND: Significant progress has been made in clinical small bowel transplantation over the last decade mainly due advances in biotechnology and new immunosuppressive regiments. This transplantation has now been indicated

  13. [Snow white small intestinal villi in hypobetalipoproteinemia].

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    Goerg, K J; Borchard, F; Luley, C; Schubert, G E

    1996-09-01

    In contrast to the severe clinical picture of abetalipoproteinemia patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia are often asymptomatic. We demonstrate a 52-years-old female patient with a white mucosa of the small intestine casually observed by endoscopy. The white appearance of the mucosa was limited to the villi. As demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopy this was caused by fat loaded enterocytes similar to the picture of abetalipoproteinemia. Fasting serum lipids and apolipoproteins were only if the lower norm level for some parameters, but no increase of the serum lipids was observed after an oral fat load. Because of the missing symptoms, the typical histomorphology and laboratory findings the snow white mucosa of the small intestine is due by the hetocygote form of the autosomal dominant hypobetalipoproteinemia with fat loaded enterocytes.

  14. Multifocal stenosing ulceration of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2009-01-01

    Several reports have described an apparently uncommon clinicopathological disorder that is characterized by multifocal stenosing small-intestinal ulceration. Compared to Crohn's disease, the ulcers are not transmural and typically remain shallow, and involve only the mucosa and submucosa. The disorder seems to be localized in the jejunum and proximal ileum only, and not the distal ileum or colon. Only nonspecific inflammatory changes are present without giant cells or other typical features of granulomatous inflammation. Most patients present clinically with recurrent obstructive events that usually respond to steroids, surgical resection, or both. With the development of newer imaging modalities to visualize the small-intestinal mucosa, such as double-balloon enteroscopy, improved understanding of the long-term natural history of this apparently distinctive disorder should emerge.

  15. Small intestinal bacteria overgrowth decreases small intestinal motility in the NASH rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-Chun Wu; Wei Zhao; Sheng Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the relationship between small intestinal motility and small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO) in Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and to investigate the effect of SIBO on the pathogenesis of NASH in rats. The effect of cidomycin in alleviating severity of NASH is also studied.METHODS: Forty eight rats were randomly divided into NASH group (n = 16), cidomycin group (n = 16)and control group (n = 16). Then each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 8),bacteria group (n = 8) respectively. A semi-solid colored marker was used for monitoring small intestinal transit.The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (E. coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). Liver pathologic score was calculated to qualify the severity of hepatitis.Serum ALT, AST levels were detected to evaluate the severity of hepatitis.RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited in NASH group (P < 0.01). Rats treated with cidomycin had higher small intestine transit rate than rats in NASH group (P < 0.01). High fat diet resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli) but not in the anoerobics (Lactobacill). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora in NASH group than in control group (1.70 ± 0.12 log10 (CFU/g) vs 1.28 ± 0.07 log10 (CFU/g), P < 0.01). TNF-a concentration was significantly higher in NASH group than in control group (1.13±0.15 mmol/L vs 0.57±0.09 mmol/L, P < 0.01). TNF-α concentration was lower in cidomycin group than in NASH group (0.63±0.09 mmol/L vs 1.13 ± 0.15 mmol/L, P < 0.01). Treatment with cidomycin showed its effect by significantly lowering serum ALT, AST and TNF-α levels of NASH rats.CONCLUSION: SIBO may decrease small intestinal movement in NASH rats. SIBO may be an important pathogenesis of Nash. And treatment with cidomycin by mouth can alleviate the severity of NASH.

  16. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner-Thorpe, James; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Ito, Hiromichi; Perez, Alexander; Ashley, Stanley W; Vacanti, Joseph P; Whang, Edward E

    2003-12-01

    Tissue-engineered intestine offers promise as a potential novel therapy for short bowel syndrome. In this study we characterized the microvasculature and angiogenic growth factor profile of the engineered intestine. Twenty-three tissue-engineered small intestinal grafts were harvested from Lewis rat recipients 1 to 8 weeks after implantation. Architectural similarity to native bowel obtained from juvenile rats was assessed with hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Capillary density, measured after immunohistochemical staining for CD34, was expressed as number of capillaries per 1000 nuclei. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) tissue levels were measured by ELISA and normalized to total protein. Over the 8-week period cysts increased in volume (0.5 cm(3) at week 1 versus 12.6 cm(3) at week 8) and mass (1.30 +/- 0.29 versus 9.74 +/- 0.3 g; mean +/- SEM). Muscular and mucosal layers increased in thickness, but capillary density remained constant (82.95 +/- 4.81 capillaries per 1000 nuclei). The VEGF level was significantly higher in juvenile rat bowel than in engineered cyst (147.6 +/- 23.9 versus 42.3 +/- 3.4 pg/mg; p < 0.001). Tissue bFGF levels were also higher (315 +/- 65.48 versus 162.3 +/- 15.09 pg/mg; p < 0.05). The mechanism driving angiogenesis differs in engineered intestine and in normal bowel. VEGF and bFGF delivery may prove useful for bioengineering of intestine.

  17. Lubiprostone stimulates small intestinal mucin release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lisle Robert C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lubiprostone is a synthetic bicyclic fatty acid derivative of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1 used for chronic constipation. The best known action of lubiprostone is simulation of Cl- dependent fluid secretion. In a mouse model of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis, we previously showed that in vivo administration of lubiprostone resulted in greater mucus accumulation in the small intestine. The aim of this study was to directly test whether lubiprostone stimulates intestinal mucin release. Methods Mucin release was measured by mounting segments (4-5 cm of mouse proximal-mid small intestine in an organ bath, allowing access to the perfusate (luminal and the bath (serosal solutions. Nifedipine (10-6 M and indomethacin (10-5 M were included in all solutions to inhibit smooth muscle activity and endogenous prostaglandin production, respectively. The tissue was equilibrated under flow for 30 min, using the perfusate collected during the final 10 min of the equilibration period to measure unstimulated release rate. Stimulus was then added to either the perfusate or the bath and the perfusate was collected for another 30 min to measure the stimulated mucin release rate. Mucin in perfusates was quantified by periodic acid-Schiff's base dot-blot assay, using purified pig gastric mucin as a standard. Results When applied luminally at 1 μM lubiprostone was ineffective at stimulating mucin release. When added to the serosal solution, 1 μM lubiprostone stimulated mucin release to ~300% of the unstimulated rate. As a positive control, serosal 1 μM prostaglandin E2 increased mucin release to ~400% of the unstimulated rate. Conclusions These results support the idea that lubiprostone has prostaglandin-like actions on the intestine, which includes stimulation of mucin release. Stimulation of mucin release by lubiprostone may be protective in gastrointestinal conditions where loss of mucus is believed to contribute to pathogenesis. Thus, in

  18. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  19. Clinical analysis of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsutomu Namikawa; Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2009-01-01

    Primary anaplastic carcinoma is a rare variant of small intestinal cancer. Most reports of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are isolated case reports, therefore the clinicopathological features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this tumor type remain unclear. This review analyzes the available clinical characteristics of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine and investigates key differences from differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. A Medline search was performed using the keywords 'small intestine' and 'anaplastic carcinoma' or 'undifferentiated carcinoma'. Additional articles were obtained from references with in the papers identified by the Medline search. The literature revealed a poor prognosis for patients who underwent surgical resection for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, which gave a 3-year overall survival rate of 10.8% and a median survival time of 5.0 mo. The literature suggests that anaplastic carcinoma is markedly more aggressive than differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Surgical resection with the aim of complete tumor removal provides the only beneficial therapeutic option for patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, because chemotherapy and radiation therapy have no significant effect on the rate of survival. However, despite complete tumor resection, most patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are at great risk of disease recurrence. Multicenter clinical trials are expected to provide additional therapeutic strategies and establish the efficacy of multimodality adjuvant therapy. This report also highlights the importance of a systematic diagnostic approach for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.

  20. The small intestine microbiota, nutritional modulation and relevance for health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Aidy, Sahar; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays a profound role in human health and extensive research has been dedicated to identify microbiota aberrations that are associated with disease. Most of this work has been targeting the large intestine and fecal microbiota, while the small intestine microbiota may also

  1. Analysis of Small Intestinal Microbiome in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    overgrowth of specific populations of bacteria and analyze the relationship between the intestinal flora and behavior. Our current sub-contractor...determine if there is an overgrowth of specific populations of bacteria and analyze the relationship between the intestinal flora and behavior. In aim 1, we...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0477 TITLE: Analysis of Small Intestinal Microbiome

  2. "Melanosis" in the small and large intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of pigment in the intestinal mucosa is commonly observed by the endoscopist, especially within the colon, and particularly during investigations for constipation. Pigment may also be detected in the small intestine. Although labeled as melanosis, electron microscopy and X-ray analytical methods have provided evidence that this pigment is not melanin at all, but lipofuscin. Often, herbal remedies or anthracene containing laxatives are often historically implicated, and experimental studies in both humans and animal models have also confirmed the intimate relationship with these pharmacological or pseudo-pharmacological remedies. The appearance of melanosis coil during colonoscopy is largely due to pigment granule deposition in macrophages located in the colonic mucosa. The pigment intensity is not uniform, being more intense in the cecum and proximal colon compared to the distal colon. Possibly, this reflects higher luminal concentrations of an offending agent in the proximal compared to distal colon, differential absorption along the length of the colon, or finally, differences in macrophage distribution within the colon. Mucosal lymphoid aggregates normally display a distinct absence of pigment producing a "starry sky" appearance, especially in the rectosigmoid region. Interestingly, some focal, usually sessile, colonic mucosal neoplastic lesions, rather than submucosal lesions, may be better appreciated as pigment deposition may be absent or limited. If detected, removal and further histopathologic analysis of the polyp may be facilitated.

  3. Diaphragm disease of the small intestine: an interesting case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sana; Ajab, Shereen; Rao, Rajashekhar; Raghunathan, Girish; DaCosta, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Diaphragm disease of small intestine usually presents with nonspecific clinical features. Radiological investigations often fail to differentiate it from small intestinal tumors and inflammatory bowel disease. It is therefore diagnosed on final histology after surgical resection. We hereby report an interesting case of a suspected small bowel tumor later diagnosed as diaphragm disease on histology.

  4. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laurie Drozdowski; Alan BR Thomson

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting,such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partⅠ, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors,epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part Ⅱ will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids.

  5. Validation of Intraluminal and Intraperitoneal microdialysis in ischemic small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pynnönen, Lauri; Minkkinen, Minna; Perner, Anders;

    2013-01-01

    We sought to define the sensitivity and specificity of intraperitoneal (IP) and intraluminal (IL) microdialysate metabolites in depicting ex vivo small intestinal total ischemia during GI-tract surgery. We hypothesized that IL as opposed to IP microdialysis detects small intestinal ischemia...

  6. Inhibition of Porcine Small Intestinal Sucrase by Validamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑裕国; 申屠旭萍; 沈寅初

    2005-01-01

    As an important medicinal intermediate with broad uses, validamine, an aminocyclitol, isolated from the enzymolysis broth of validamycins, has gained more and more attention. The absolute configuration of validamine is similar to that of α-D-glucose, and it demonstrates powerful inhibition activity on glycosidase. In this paper, the inhibitory effect of validamine on porcine small intestinal sucrase was investigated. Validamine was found to be a potent, competitive inhibitor to porcine small intestinal sucrase in vitro with an IC50 value of 6.85 × 10-4 mol·L-1. Validamine exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition effect on porcine small intestinal sucrase, whereby the inhibition interaction of validamine and porcine small intestinal sucrase was a fast binding process. The inhibition of validamine on porcine small intestinal sucrase was pH-dependent.

  7. Ultrasound of selected pathologies of the small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Intestines, especially the small bowel, are rarely subject to US assessment due to the presence of gases and chyme. The aim of this paper was to analyze ultrasound images in selected pathologies of the small intestine in adults, including the aspects of differential diagnosis. Material and methods In 2001–2012, abdominal ultrasound examinations were conducted in 176 patients with the following small bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (n=35), small bowel obstruction (n=35), yersiniosis (n=28), in...

  8. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  9. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  10. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  11. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Cramer

    Full Text Available The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  12. Identification of the Paneth cells in chicken small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Li, J; Li, J; Li, R X; Lv, C F; Li, S; Mi, Y L; Zhang, C Q

    2016-07-01

    The Paneth cells are highly specialized cells in the epithelium of the small intestine of many vertebrate species. These cells reside at the base of crypts of the Lieberkühn and contain abundant secretory granules. Previous studies suggesting the existence of Paneth cells in the chicken (Gallus gallus) remained controversial. Here we seek to identify the Paneth cells in the chicken small intestine through morphological examination and specific gene expression. Histological staining and transmission electron microscope confirmed the presence of granulated secretory cells at the base of the crypts in the chicken small intestine. Western blotting experiment also manifested the expression of lysozyme protein, which is specifically secreted by the Paneth cells in the small intestine. Moreover, lysozyme c and lysozyme g mRNAs were expressed in the small intestine of chickens at different ages. Lysozyme c mRNA, in particular, was located at the base of the small intestinal crypts as displayed by in situ hybridization. Collectively, we provide evidences that the Paneth cells indeed exist in the small intestine of the chicken.

  13. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption.

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  13. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  14. Lactoferrin targets T cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sanne Mie; Hansen, Gert Helge; Danielsen, E Michael

    2010-01-01

    pathogens, and Lf receptors have been identified at the surfaces of a number of different cells. In the small intestine Lf binds to the luminal surface, but its further interaction with the epithelial cells is controversial. METHODS: In the present work, we studied the uptake of Lf in cultured mucosal...... explants of pig small intestine by immunofluorescence and immunogold microscopy. RESULTS: Lf rapidly bound to the brush border and subsequently appeared in punctae in the apical cytoplasm, indicating internalization into an endosomal compartment. Essentially, no labeling was detected elsewhere...... defense of the small intestinal mucosa by targeting the population of T cells in the lamina propria....

  15. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Guang Cao; Wan-Chun Wu; Zhen Han; Meng-Ya Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin(CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress.METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA).RFSULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15%vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g,P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g,P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VTP levels between the two groups.CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine.

  16. Small doses of melatonin increase intestinal motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Filippo; Macauda, Silvia; Salehi, Soudabeh

    2002-09-01

    Since melatonin receptors are present in the intestines, the possibility that this hormone may affect intestinal motility has been studied in the rat. Sprague-Dawley male rats were given a carmine cochineal powder meal and were injected intraperitoneally with 1, 10, 100, or 1000 microg/kg melatonin. Sixty minutes after treatment, intestinal transit was found to be faster in animals treated with small doses of melatonin (1 or 10 microg/kg) than in saline-injected controls. This effect, however, appear to be clearly reversed with 100 or 1000 microg/kg melatonin. In fact, these doses of the hormone reduced intestinal transit in rats. The nonselective melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole (administered intraperitoneally in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg, 15 min prior to melatonin injection) totally prevented the accelerating effect of melatonin (10 microg/kg) on intestinal transit. Luzindole per se failed to affect gut motility. Injection of the reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and cholinergic agent, neostigmine, accelerated intestinal transit but failed to influence melatonin effect on this parameter. In contrast, intraperitoneal injection of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine delayed intestinal transit per se but did not reduce the stimulating effect of melatonin on this parameter. Intestinal myoelectrical recording revealed that intestinal myoelectrical activity was increased by intraperitoneal injection of melatonin (10 microg/kg). Administration of luzindole totally prevented melatonin-induced increase of intestinal myoelectrical activity. These results indicate that melatonin may affect intestinal motility in rats when administered in small doses. This effect might be mediated by melatonin receptors in the intestines, although the involvement of central receptors for the hormone is also possible.

  17. Small intestinal obstruction in pregnancy and puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiedozi Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of intestinal obstruction in pregnancy and puerperium is worsened by the risk it poses not just to the mother, but also to the fetus. In this review of 10 pregnant/puerperium patients the maternal mortality was 10% and fetal wastage 20%. In pregnancy and puerperium, intestinal obstruction carries a higher mortality, 10-33%, than in non-pregnant patients, 6-10%. The rarity of the problem, delay in diagnosis, anxiety over radiological examination in pregnant women, worry over laparotomy in pregnant women, all result in delay in instituting definite treatment and contribute to the morbidity. Application of established principles in the management of intestinal obstruction even when it occurs in pregnancy and puerperium might help to improve the results of management and reduce the current level of morbidity and mortality.

  18. Histomorphometric changes of small intestine in pregnant rat

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Food intake of rats increases during pregnancy. This requires changes in the structure of the small intestine to absorb additional food. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological changes in the layers of small intestine in rats during pregnancy. Duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 18 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (day 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy) were collected. Villous height and width and thickness of lamina propria, tunica muscularis entirely and separately (circular and lo...

  19. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  20. OSR1-sensitive small intestinal Na+ transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasham, V.; Pathare, G.T.; Fajol, A.; Rexhepaj, R.; Michael, D.; Pakladok, T.; Alesutan, I.; Rotte, A.; Foller, M.; Lang, F.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (OSR1) contributes to WNK (with no K)-dependent regulation of renal tubular salt transport, renal salt excretion, and blood pressure. Little is known, however, about a role of OSR1 in the regulation of intestinal salt transport. The present study thus explore

  1. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine.

  2. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy R. Finkbeiner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Short bowel syndrome (SBS is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, called human intestinal organoids (HIOs, have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  3. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  4. Time-dependent viscoelastic properties along rat small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James B Smith; Jing-Bo Zhao; Yan-Ling Dou; Hans Gregersen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To measure the time-dependent (viscoelastic)behavior in the change of the small intestinal opening angle and to test how well the behavior could be described by the Kelvin model for a standard linear solid.METHODS: Segments from the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were harvested from 10 female Wistar rats and the luminal diameter, wall thickness, and opening angleover time (θ(t)) were measured from rings cut from thesesegments.RESULTS: Morphometric variations were found along thesmall intestine with an increase in luminal area and adecrease in wall thickness from the duodenum to theileum. The opening angle obtained after 60 min washighest in the duodenum (220.8±12.9°) and decreasedalong the length of the intestine to 143.9±8.9° in the jejunum and 151.4±9.4° in the ileum. The change ofopening angle as a function of time, fitted well to theKelvin model using the equation θ(t)/θo = [1-ηexp (-λt)]after the ring was cut. The computed creep rate λ did notdiffer between the segments. Compared to constantcalculated from pig aorta and coronary artery, it showedthat α agreed well (within 5%), η was three times largerthan that for vascular tissue, and λ ranged ±40% from the value of the pig coronary artery and was a third of the value of pig aorta.CONCLUSION: The change of opening angle over timefor all the small intestine segments fits well to the standardlinear spring-dashpot model. This viscoelastic constantof the rat small intestine is fairly homogenous along itslength. The data obtained from this study add to a baseset of biomechanical data on the small intestine andprovide a reference state for comparison to other tissues,diseased intestinal tissue or intestinal tissue exposed todrugs or chemicals.

  5. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish.

  6. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use an endoscope. Instead, the patient swallows a capsule (about the size of a large vitamin pill) that has a light and a very small camera. Like any other pill, the capsule goes through the stomach and into the small ...

  7. [Treatment of children with intestinal failure: intestinal rehabilitation, home parenteral nutrition or small intestine transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, E.G.; Oers, H.A. van; Escher, J.C.; Damen, G.M.; Rings, E.H.; Tabbers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterised by inadequate absorption of food or fluids, which is caused by insufficient bowel surface area or functioning. Children with chronic intestinal failure are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), which can be provided at home (HPN). In the Netherlands, HPN for chi

  8. Developmental morphology of the small intestine of African ostrich chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J X; Peng, K M

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological development of the small intestine of African ostrich chicks and to examine the changes in the number of goblet cells therein by observing the gross anatomy and performing histochemistry and morphometry. The BW; length, height, and width of the villi; muscle thickness; depth of the crypts; and number of goblet cells in the intestinal villi and crypts were measured on neonatal d 1, 45, 90, and 334. Our results revealed that the weights of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum (relative to the BW) peaked on d 90, 45, and 45, respectively, and tended to decline thereafter. The villus height and width and muscle thickness in the small intestine were positively correlated with the age of the birds. The ratio of the villus height to the crypt depth differed among the segments of the small intestine and at the different time points. The number of goblet cells in the intestinal villi and crypts increased rapidly up to postnatal d 45 and then decreased rapidly between d 45 and 90. The number of goblet cells in the villi was greatest in the jejunum on d 1 and in the ileum on d 45, whereas that in the crypt was greatest in the ileum on d 1 and 90 and in the duodenum on d 45. These results suggest that the small intestine develops gradually from postnatal d 1 to 90 and that the period up to postnatal d 45 is marked by significant developmental changes in the parameters reflective of the digestive capacity, such as the weight, length, and surface area of the intestine and the number of goblet cells. Therefore, in reared African ostrich chicks, feed management should be enhanced between postnatal d 1 and 45.

  9. Intestinal protease-activated receptor-2 and fecal serine protease activity are increased in canine inflammatory bowel disease and may contribute to intestinal cytokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shingo; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Igarashi, Hirotaka; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Serine proteases elicit cellular responses via protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) which is known to regulate inflammation and the immune response. Although the gastrointestinal tract is exposed to large amounts of proteolytic enzymes, the role of PAR-2 in canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of PAR-2 activation on inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression in canine intestine and the expression of intestinal PAR-2 and fecal serine protease activity in dogs with IBD. Duodenal biopsies from healthy dogs were cultured and treated ex vivo with trypsin or PAR-2 agonist peptide, and inflammatory cytokine/chemokine gene expression in the tissues was then quantified by real-time PCR. PAR-2 mRNA and protein expression levels in the duodenal mucosa were examined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Fecal serine protease activity was determined by azocasein assay. In ex vivo-cultured duodenum, trypsin and PAR-2 agonist peptide induced significant up-regulation of mRNA expression levels of interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-8, mucosae-associated epithelial chemokine (MEC) and fractalkine, and this up-regulation was inhibited by a serine protease inhibitor. Duodenal PAR-2 mRNA and protein expression levels were higher in dogs with IBD than in healthy control dogs. Fecal serine protease activity was significantly elevated in dogs with IBD, and the level of activity correlated positively with the clinical severity score. These results suggest that PAR-2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of canine IBD by inducing expression of inflammatory mediators in response to luminal serine proteases.

  10. Biomechanical remodeling of the chronically obstructed Guinea pig small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storkholm, Jan Henrik; Zhao, Jingbo; Villadsen, Gerda E; Hager, H; Jensen, Steen L; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-02-01

    Small intestinal obstruction is a frequently encountered clinical problem. To understand the mechanisms behind obstruction and the clinical consequences, data are needed on the relation between the morphologic and biomechanical remodeling that takes place in the intestinal wall during chronic obstruction. We sought to determine the effect of partial obstruction on mechanical and morphologic properties of the guinea pig small intestine. Partial obstruction was created surgically in 2 groups of animals living for 2 and 4 weeks. Controls were sham operated and lived for 4 weeks. A combined impedance planimetry-high-frequency ultrasound system was designed to measure the luminal cross-sectional area and wall thickness. These measures were used to compute the circumferential stress and strain of the excised intestinal segments. The incremental elastic modulus was obtained by using nonlinear fitting of the stress-strain curve. Histologic analysis and the measurements of total wall collagen were also performed. The luminal cross-sectional area, wall thickness, and elastic modulus in circumferential direction increased in a time-dependent manner proximal to the obstruction site (P 0.25). The circumferential stress-strain curves of the proximal segments in 2- and 4-week groups shifted to the left, indicating the intestinal wall became stiffer. Histologic examination revealed a massive increase in the thickness of the muscle layer especially the circular smooth muscle layer (P < 0.05). The collagen content proximal to the obstruction site was significantly larger in the partially obstructed animals compared to controls (P < 0.05). No difference was found distal to the obstruction site. Strong correlation was found between the collagen content and the elastic modulus at stress levels of 70 kPa stress (P < 0.01) and 10 kPa (P < 0.05) proximal to the obstruction site suggesting that the alteration of collagen has great impact on the mechanical remodeling. The morphologic and

  11. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

  12. STUDYING OF FUNCTIONAL CONDITION OF THE SMALL INTESTINE IN CHOLELITHIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. M. Vakhrushev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Complex research of the functional condition of the small intestine in different stages of cholelithiasis.Materials and methods. 47 patients with different stages of cholelithiasis were examined. There were 29 patients with the first (prestone stage and 18 — with the second (stone stage of cholelithiasis. In an assessment of the functional condition of the small intestine were used clinical data and results of the load tests by sugars. Cavitary digestion was studied by load test with polysaccharide (soluble starch, membrane digestion — with disaccharide (sucrose, absorption — with monosaccharide (glucose. Glucose level in blood was determined on an empty stomach, then after oral reception of 50g of glucose, sucrose or starch in 30, 60 and 120 minutes.Results. Researchers showed that in the most of patients with cholelithiasis there were disturbances in clinical and functional condition of the small intestine. In an assessment of the cavitary digestion the level of glycemia was authentically lowered by 43% in prestone stage and by 66% in stone stage of cholelithiasis in comparison with control. In an assessment of membrane digestion in patients with the stone stage of cholelithiasis the level of glycemia was lowered in comparison with group of control and with the prestone stage by 30% and 19% respectively.Conclusion. In prestone stage of cholelithiasis there were decrease of the cavitary digestion primary, and in stone stage of cholelithiasis — all stages of hydrolysis-resorptive process in the small intestine were disturbed.

  13. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Sang Hyo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule.

  14. Giant primary angiosarcoma of the small intestine showing severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mizuna; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Domen, Hiromitsu; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hirano, Satoshi; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-11-21

    Primary malignant tumors of the small intestine are rare, comprising less than 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. An 85-year-old woman was admitted with fever of 40 °C and marked abdominal distension. Her medical history was unremarkable, but blood examination showed elevated inflammatory markers. Abdominal computed tomography showed a giant tumor with central necrosis, extending from the epigastrium to the pelvic cavity. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine communicating with the gastrointestinal tract or with superimposed infection was suspected. Because no improvement occurred in response to antibiotics, surgery was performed. Laparotomy revealed giant hemorrhagic tumor adherent to the small intestine and occupying the peritoneal cavity. The giant tumor was a solid tumor weighing 3490 g, measuring 24 cm × 17.5 cm × 18 cm and showing marked necrosis. Histologically, the tumor comprised spindle-shaped cells with anaplastic large nuclei. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for vimentin, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen, but negative for c-kit and CD34. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed. Although no postoperative complications occurred, the patient experienced enlargement of multiple metastatic tumors in the abdominal cavity and died 42 d postoperatively. The prognosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma is very poor, even after volume-reducing palliative surgery.

  15. Paneth cells: maestros of the small intestinal crypts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, H.C.; Bevins, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Paneth cells are highly specialized epithelial cells of the small intestine, where they coordinate many physiological functions. First identified more than a century ago on the basis of their readily discernible secretory granules by routine histology, these cells are located at the base of the cryp

  16. Latest concepts on the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury and intestinal bacterial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shunji; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-10-01

    Luminal bacteria, one of the main aggressive factors of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), induce small intestinal mucosal injury. Because most bacteria invading from the mouth are eliminated by the highly acidic gastric environment, the upper small intestine contains relatively low numbers of microorganisms. With decreased peristalsis, decreased acidity, and lower oxidation-reduction potential, the ileum maintains a more diverse microflora and a higher bacterial population. As NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcerations tend to localize in the small intestinal distal part, as viewed by capsule endoscopy, the ulcers are in contact with a large amount of luminal bacteria. Recently, it was reported that proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbate NSAID-induced small intestinal injury in rats. The study showed that PPIs impair the ability to disinfect due to the PPI-induced low acidic gastric environment, and this resulted in transubstantiation of intestinal flora which exacerbated NSAID-induced small intestinal injury. If it is true that PPIs exacerbate small intestinal injury, the methods of preventing NSAID-induced gastroduodenal injury to defend PPI-induced small intestinal injury should be reconsidered. Following several studies, there may be a possibility that probiotics and prebiotics are useful treatments for the prevention of NSAID-induced small intestinal injury. A method of determining bacterial flora maintenance including alteration of the environment and the administration of various drugs is required.

  17. Cideb facilitates the lipidation of chylomicrons in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Jun; Wang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Wu, Jie; Liu, Fang; Li, Le; Gao, Xing; Zhao, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Pei-Zhen; Li, Peng; Ye, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector b (Cideb), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, has been shown to play a critical role in maintaining hepatic lipid homeostasis by promoting the lipidation and maturation of VLDL particles. Here, we observed that Cideb is expressed in the jejunum and ileum sections of the small intestine, and its expression was induced by high-fat diet. Intragastric gavage with lipids resulted in the retention of lipids in the intestine in Cideb-deficient mice. In addition, we observed that mice with Cideb deficiency exhibited reduced intestinal chylomicron-TG secretion and increased lipid accumulation in the enterocytes. The sizes of chylomicrons secreted from the small intestine of Cideb-deficient mice were also smaller than those from wild-type mice. Furthermore, the overexpression of Cideb increased TG secretion and reduced lipid accumulation in the enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. In addition, we proved that Cideb was localized to the ER and LDs and could interact with ApoB48 in Caco-2 cells. Overall, these data revealed that Cideb plays an important role in controlling intestinal chylomicron lipidation.

  18. Small intestinal mucosa expression of putative chaperone fls485

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raupach Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation of enterocytes along the small intestinal crypt-villus axis is associated with significant changes in gene expression profiles. fls485 coding a putative chaperone protein has been recently suggested as a gene involved in this process. The aim of the present study was to analyze fls485 expression in human small intestinal mucosa. Methods fls485 expression in purified normal or intestinal mucosa affected with celiac disease was investigated with a molecular approach including qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and expression strategies. Molecular data were corroborated with several in situ techniques and usage of newly synthesized mouse monoclonal antibodies. Results fls485 mRNA expression was preferentially found in enterocytes and chromaffine cells of human intestinal mucosa as well as in several cell lines including Rko, Lovo, and CaCo2 cells. Western blot analysis with our new anti-fls485 antibodies revealed at least two fls485 proteins. In a functional CaCo2 model, an increase in fls485 expression was paralleled by cellular maturation stage. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated fls485 as a cytosolic protein with a slightly increasing expression gradient along the crypt-villus axis which was impaired in celiac disease Marsh IIIa-c. Conclusions Expression and synthesis of fls485 are found in surface lining epithelia of normal human intestinal mucosa and deriving epithelial cell lines. An interdependence of enterocyte differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and fls485 chaperone activity might be possible.

  19. Morphological and Functional Alterations of Small Intestine in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya B Gubergrits

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Context The small intestine in chronic pancreatitis has not been investigated yet thoroughly. It would be important to understand fat metabolism in the course of this disease and could be explained if the small intestine has some pathological conditions and, due to this reason, pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work in all patients. Objective To investigate the pathophysiology of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis and to show the reason why in some cases pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work properly. Patients In the process of the study 33 chronic pancreatitis patients have been examined. Controls The control group includes 30 subjects without chronic pancreatitis similar for age, sex and alcohol consumption to the patients with chronic pancreatitis patients. Investigations Aspiration biopsy of jejunum mucosa followed by histological examination and investigation of intestinal enzymes by aspiration has been performed. Main outcome measures Metabolism at membranic level has been studied by enzymatic activity of amylase and lipase in the small intestine. Production of enzymes (monoglyceride lipase, lactase, saccharase, maltase, glycyl-lleucine dipeptidase promoting metabolism in enterocytes has been estimated as to their activity in homogenates of jejunum mucosasamples. Participation of mucosa in intestinal digestion has been assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity in a secretory chyme from proximal portion of jejunum. Absorptive capacity of jejunum was evaluated by D-xylose test results. DNA, lysozyme, immunoglobulin contents of chyme have also been calculated and bacteriological study of chyme has been also performed. Results Secondary enteritis, accompanied by moderate dystrophic changes of mucous membrane, thinning of limbus, and decrease of Paneth cell mitotic index, was found to occur in chronic pancreatitis patients. Enteritis is followed by changes in enzymatic processes in the sphere of membrane and intestinal

  20. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal-jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, Jesper; Hartmann, B.; Kissow, H.;

    2001-01-01

    Anatomy, glucagon-like peptide 2, small intestine, short bowel, intestinal adaptation, growth factors, rat......Anatomy, glucagon-like peptide 2, small intestine, short bowel, intestinal adaptation, growth factors, rat...

  1. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INSIDIOUS RECURRENT SMALL INTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小东; 陶蔚; 郑朝纪; 张振寰

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To improve the localized diagnosis of insidious recurrent small intestinal hemorrhage. Methods. This retrospective analysis include 64 cases of such diseases, which were admitted from 1988 to 1998 toour hospital. Result. Ultrasonography, CT, small bowel pneumobariunlgraphy, diluted barium enema, isetopic examination, DSA and intraoperafive small-bowel endoscopy were used for diagnosis of hemonrrhagic site, and 37 cases got a defirfite location before operation, while 10 cases were confirmed the diagnosis during the operation. Forty-seven cases were treated surgically, while the other 17 cases had non-surgical treatment. Of the 47 cases,39 cases underwent partial en-terectomy, 5 cases had suture and ligature of vascular deformity, 2 cases had Whipple's operation, and one patient had ectomy of the end of ileum and right colon. Conclusion. DSA, Isotopic examination and intraoperafive enteroscopy are of considerable importance for the lo-cation judgement of recurrent small intestinal hemorrhage.

  2. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INSIDIOUS RECURRENT SMALL INTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何小东; 陶蔚; 郑朝纪; 张振寰

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To improve the localized diagn osis of insidious recurrent small intestinal hemorrhage. Methods. This retrospective analysis include 64 cases of such diseases, which were admitted from 1988 to 1998 to our hospital. Result. Ultrasonography, CT, small bowel pneumobariumgraphy, diluted barium enema, isotopic examination, DSA and intraoperative small-bowel endoscopy were used for diagnosis of hemorrhagic site, and 37 cases got a definite location before operation, while 10 cases were confirmed the diagnosis during the operation. Forty-seven cases were treated surgically, while the other 17 cases had non-surgical treatment. Of the 47 cases,39 cases underwent partual en terectomy, 5 cases had suture and ligature of vascular deformity, 2 cases had Whipple' s operation, and one patient had ectomy of the end of ileum and right colon. Conclusion. DSA, Isotopic examination and intraoperative enteroscopy are of considerable importance for the lo cation judgement of recurrent small intestinal hemorrhage.

  3. Effects of ceftriaxone-induced intestinal dysbacteriosis on dendritic cells of small intestine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Weihua; Wen, Shu; Liu, Yinhui; Tang, Li

    2013-08-01

    Intestinal microflora plays a pivotal role in the development of the innate immune system and is essential in shaping adaptive immunity. Dysbacteriosis of intestinal microflora induces altered immune responses and results in disease susceptibility. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-presenting cells, have gained increasing attention because they connect innate and adaptive immunity. They generate both immunity in response to stimulation by pathogenic bacteria and immune tolerance in the presence of commensal bacteria. However, few studies have examined the effects of intestinal dysbacteriosis on DCs. In this study, changes of DCs in the small intestine of mice under the condition of dysbacteriosis induced by ceftriaxone sodium were investigated. It was found that intragastric administration of ceftriaxone sodium caused severe dysteriosis in mice. Compared with controls, numbers of DCs in mice with dysbacteriosis increased significantly (P = 0.0001). However, the maturity and antigen-presenting ability of DCs were greatly reduced. In addition, there was a significant difference in secretion of IL-10 and IL-12 between DCs from mice with dysbacteriosis and controls. To conclude, ceftriaxone-induced intestinal dysbacteriosis strongly affected the numbers and functions of DCs. The present data suggest that intestinal microflora plays an important role in inducing and maintaining the functions of DCs and thus is essential for the connection between innate and adaptive immune responses.

  4. Fermentation in the Small Intestine Contributes Substantially to Intestinal Starch Disappearance in Calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Myrthe S.; Pantophlet, Andre J.; Berends, Harma; Pluschke, Anton M.; van den Borne, Joost J. G. C.; Hendriks, Wouter H.; Schols, Henk A.; Gerrits, Walter J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The proportion of starch disappearing from the small intestinal lumen is generally lower in ruminants than in monogastric animals, and there are indications that the starch digestion capacity in ruminants is limited. Objectives: Milk-fed calves were used to study the rate-limiting enzyme

  5. The radiographic appearances of non-specific small intestinal ulceration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Thomas H.; Jackson, James E

    2002-02-01

    AIM: To determine the imaging characteristics of non-specific ulceration of the small intestine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The radiographic investigations undertaken in three patients originally referred for visceral angiography in whom a histological diagnosis of non-specific ulceration of the small bowel was subsequently made were retrospectively reviewed. Two men and one woman aged from 17 to 24 years all presented with anaemia requiring blood transfusion. Visceral angiography was available for review in all three patients, abdominal computed tomography in two, and a small bowel enema and white cell scintigraphy in one. RESULTS: In all three patients an angiographic abnormality was present within the ileum consisting of irregularity of the vasa recta, an area of subtle increased vascularity and early venous return. A long, non-branching vessel interpreted as a persistent vitello-intestinal artery was seen in two of these patients. A CT abnormality was present in two individuals consisting of a focal area of thickened small bowel. The single small bowel enema demonstrated a focal stricture and the white cell scan showed localized accumulation of radioactivity within the pelvis. CONCLUSION: Non-specific small intestinal ulceration may produce abnormalities that are discernible on barium studies, computed tomography, radiolabelled white cell scanning and visceral angiography. Recognition of these findings may allow a pre-operative diagnosis of this condition. Bryant, T.H. and Jackson, J.E. (2001)

  6. Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion in the small intestine, started in a previous article, by investigating the effects of dietary fibre. We recall that this model aims at taking into account the three main phenomena of the digestion, namely the transit of the bolus, the degradation of feedstuffs and the absorption through the intestinal wall. In order to study the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical characteristics which interact with the function of the small intestine, i.e. viscosity and water holding capacity. This leads us to consider some features of digestion which have not been taken into account previously, in particular the interrelationship between the evolution of dry matter and water in the bolus. The numerical results are in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fibre on the velocity of bolus along the small intestine and on its degradation. These results highlight the negative effect of soluble dietary fibre on d...

  7. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  8. Digestion modeling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghipoor, M; Barles, G; Georgelin, C; Licois, J R; Lescoat, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the modeling of the digestion in the small intestine is developed by investigating specifically the effects of dietary fiber. As our previous model, this new version takes into account the three main phenomena of digestion: transit of the bolus, degradation of feedstuffs and absorption through the intestinal wall. However the two main physiochemical characteristics of dietary fiber, namely viscosity and water holding capacity, lead us to substantially modify our initial model by emphasizing the role of water and its intricated dynamics with dry matter in the bolus. Various numerical simulations given by this new model are qualitatively in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fiber on the velocity of bolus and on its degradation all along the small intestine. These simulations reproduce the negative effect of soluble dietary fiber on digestion as it has been experimentally observed. Although, this model is generic and contains a large number of parameters but, to the best of our knowledge, it is among the first qualitative dynamical models of fiber influence on intestinal digestion.

  9. Free perforation of the small intestine in collagenous sprue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh J Freeman; Douglas L Webber

    2009-01-01

    A 67-year-old man with celiac disease developed recurrent diarrhea, profound weakness and weight loss, with evidence of marked protein depletion. His clinical course was refractory to a strict gluten-free diet and steroid therapy. Postmortem studies led to definition of unrecognized collagenous sprue that caused ulceration and small intestinal perforation. Although PCR showed identical monoclonal T-cell populations in antemortem duodenal biopsies and postmortem jejunum, careful pathological evaluation demonstrated no frank lymphoma. Rarely, overt or even cryptic T-cell lymphoma may complicate collagenous sprue, however, small intestinal ulcers and perforation may also develop independently. The dramatic findings here may reflect an underlying or early molecular event in the eventual clinical appearance of overt T-cell lymphoma.

  10. Diagnostic Laparoscopy for Small Intestinal Intussusception in a Horse

    OpenAIRE

    P. Holak, M. Jałyński, Z. Peczyński, Z. Adamiak, M. Jaskólska and W. Pesta*

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopy is a low-invasive diagnostic and surgical technique for examining and performing surgical procedures in the equine peritoneal cavity. This article is a case study of a horse with weakly expressed, irregular symptoms of colic occurring over a period of four weeks. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed, and liver and spleen tissue samples were collected for a histopathological analysis. An endoscopic examination of the abdominal cavity ruled out small intestinal intussusception, and ...

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    Full Text Available NoD.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small mm9 No description Digestive tract Intestine, Sma...ll http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  9. Histomorphometric changes of small intestine in pregnant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Tamadon, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Food intake of rats increases during pregnancy. This requires changes in the structure of the small intestine to absorb additional food. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological changes in the layers of small intestine in rats during pregnancy. Duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 18 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (day 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy) were collected. Villous height and width and thickness of lamina propria, tunica muscularis entirely and separately (circular and longitudinal layers) were measured on transverse sections. During pregnancy increasing villi length and muscular layer thickness was observed in duodenum. Furthermore, along with the progress of gestation greatest histomorphometric change in small intestine was observed in the jejunum. The reduction in the ileum histomorphologic indices was observed during pregnancy. In conclusion, increase in histomorphologic indices of duodenum and jejunum supplies more capacity of duodenum to digest food intake during pregnancy and decrease in these indices in ileum controls the absorption of excess produced amino acids and glucose by hyperphagia.

  10. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  11. Small Intestinal Tumours: An Overview on Classification, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Notaristefano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The small intestinal neoplasia group includes different types of lesions and are a relatively rare event, accounting for only 3-6% of all gastrointestinal (GI neoplasms and 1-3% of all GI malignancies. These lesions can be classified as epithelial and mesenchymal, either benign or malignant. Mesenchymal tumours include stromal tumours (GIST and other neoplasms that might arise from soft tissue throughout the rest of the body (lipomas, leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, fibromas, desmoid tumours, and schwannomas. Other lesions occurring in the small bowel are carcinoids, lymphomas, and melanomas. To date, carcinoids and GIST are reported as the most frequent malignant lesions occurring in the small bowel. Factors that predispose to the development of malignant lesions are different, and they may be hereditary (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, neuroendocrine neoplasia Type 1, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and neurofibromatosis Type 1, acquired (sporadic colorectal cancer and small intestine adenomas, coeliac disease, Crohn’s disease, or environmental (diet, tobacco, and obesity. Small bowel tumours present with different and sometimes nonspecific symptoms, and a prompt diagnosis is not always so easily performed. Diagnostic tools, that may be both radiological and endoscopic, possess specificity and sensitivity, as well as different roles depending on the type of lesion. Treatment of these lesions may be different and, in recent years, new therapies have enabled an improvement in life expectancy.

  12. Cytokeratin - positive rib osteosarcoma metastasizing to the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Kuwabara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a malignant tumor in which osteoid or bone is produced directly by tumor cells. Some OS cells are positive for cytokeratin (CK and epithelial membrane antigen by immunohistochemistry (IHC and this may lead to a misdiagnosis of metastatic carcinoma, particularly when the tumor location is unusual. On the other hand, gastrointestinal metastasis of OS is rare. We present the case of a 67-year-old Japanese man with a small intestinal intussusception due to metastasis of a CK-positive rib OS. The tumor cells were positive for CK, osteopontin and osteonectin by IHC and a diagnosis of a CK-positive chest wall OS metastasizing to the small intestine was considered. Osteoid or bone formation was histologically absent and therefore chest wall OS had to be differentially diagnosed from metastatic carcinoma of unknown origin. A postmortem histological analysis confirmed a rib OS. Awareness of CK-positive OS is important for making a correct diagnosis and for disease management and an immunohistochemical analysis of the tumor for expression of osteopontin and osteonectin may be used to support the diagnosis. In addition, this case shows that rib OS can metastasize to the gastrointestinal tract, albeit rarely, which may induce an intestinal intussusception.

  13. Contractile effect of tachykinins on rabbit small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Sofía VALERO; Diego Santos FAGUNDES; Laura GRASA; María Pilar ARRUEBO; Miguel (A)ngel PLAZA; María Divina MURILLO

    2011-01-01

    Aim:To study the role of the tachykinin receptors in spontaneous contractions of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle from rabbit small intestine and to determine the mechanism of action of Substance P(SP).Methods:Rabbit duodenum,jejunum and ileum segments were prepared.The spontaneous contractions of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle were recorded using a computer via an isometric force transducer.The specific agonists and antagonists of tachykinin receptors were added into the organ bath.Results:The agonists of tachykinin NKl receptor(SP and[Sar9]SP).NK2 receptor(NKA and(β-Ala8)-NKA),and NK3 receptor(NKBand Senktide)all induced contractions in the small intestine.The contractions were diminished bv NKl receptor antagonist L-733.060,NK2 receptor antagonist GR-94800, and NK3 receptor antagonist SB 218795.Contractions caused by SP were also reduced by atropine, verapamil, PKC inhibitor staurosporine, and PLC Inhibitor U73122.Conclusion:Ttachykinin NKl,NK2, and NK3 receptors mediate the contractions of the smooh muscle in rabbit intestine.Furthermore,SP acts directly on smooth muscle cells through the tachykinin NK1 receptor.

  14. Parietal Strangulation Of Small Intestine In Femoral Hernia Site With Symptoms Of Intestinal Obstruction In Patient With Incidentally Found Small Intestine Tumor--A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyluk, Andrzej; Majewski, Włodzimierz

    2015-08-01

    Richter's hernia (partial enterocele) is the strangulation/entrapment of only part of the circumference of the intestinal wall. It is relatively rare, and presents without mechanical obstruction - giving vague, non-specific symptoms and signs, and a threat of intestinal necrosis, gangrene, followed by perforation. A report of a case of entrapment of the jejunum in the femoral ring, which did not cause the gangrene, but symptoms of mechanical obstruction, is presented. Further inspection of the small bowel in this case revealed an extra-luminal tumour, which appeared to be a GIST. The entrapped part of the jejunum has been released and the tumour has been resected.

  15. File list: ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small hg19 All antigens Digestive tract Intestine, Smal...2119,SRX263903,SRX263906,SRX136956,SRX213497,SRX347272 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.50.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small hg19 All antigens Digestive tract Intestine, Smal...3916,SRX263903,SRX213497,SRX347272,SRX142119,SRX263906 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Dig.05.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small mm9 TFs and others Digestive tract Intestine, Sma...,SRX885790,SRX885798,SRX885799 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.AllAg.Intestine,_Small.bed ...

  18. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra.

  19. Effect of emodin on small intestinal peristalsis of mice and relevant mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Quan Zhang; Cheng-Hua Zhou; Yu-Qing wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on small intestinal peristalsis of mice and to explore its relevant mechanisms.METHODS: The effect of emodin on small intestinal peristalsis of mice was observed by charcoal powder propelling test of small intestine. The contents of motilin and somatostatin in small intestine of mice were determinated by radioimmunoassay. The electrical potential difference (PD) related to Na+ and glucose transport was measured across the wall of reverted intestinal sacs. Na+-K+-ATPase activity of small intestinal mucosa was measured by spectroscopic analysis.RESULTS: Different dosages of emodin can improve small intestinal peristalsis of mice. Emodin increased the content of motilin, while reduced the content of somatostatin in small intestine of mice significantly. Emodin 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 g/L decreased PD when there was glucose. However, emodin had little effect when glucose was free. The Na+-K+-ATPase activity of small intestinal mucosa of mice in emodin groups was inhibited obviously. CONCLUSION: Emodin can enhance the function of small intestinal peristalsis of mice by mechanisms of promoting secretion of motilin, lowering the content of somatostatin and inhibiting Na+-K+-ATPase activity of small intestinal mucosa.

  20. Diagnostic Laparoscopy for Small Intestinal Intussusception in a Horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Holak, M. Jałyński, Z. Peczyński, Z. Adamiak, M. Jaskólska and W. Pesta*

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopy is a low-invasive diagnostic and surgical technique for examining and performing surgical procedures in the equine peritoneal cavity. This article is a case study of a horse with weakly expressed, irregular symptoms of colic occurring over a period of four weeks. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed, and liver and spleen tissue samples were collected for a histopathological analysis. An endoscopic examination of the abdominal cavity ruled out small intestinal intussusception, and a histopathological analysis supported the identification of the causes of colic.

  1. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Donowitz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90 of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60 and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62. Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02 and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004 were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation.

  2. Modified techniques of heterotopic total small intestinal transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ting Wu; Jie-Shou Li; Xiao-Fei Zhao; Wen Zhuang; Xie-Lin Feng

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To establish a successful model of heterotopictotal small intestinal transplantation (SIT) in rats inorder to reduce the complications and increase thesurvival rate.METHODS: A total of 196 Wistar rats underwentheterotopic SIT with microsurgical technique. Technicalmodifications included shortening fasting time andsupplying energy before surgery, administering optimalvolume of crystalloid fluid to the donor and recipientduring surgical procedures, reducing mechanical andischemic injuries to donor intestine, revascularizingsmall intestinal graft with a combination ofconventional aorta to aorta anastomosis and a cuffedportal vein to left renal vein anastomosis which resultedin an acceptably short warm ischemic time, and alsoan adequate blood supply and drainage of the graft.RESULTS: The average time for the donor surgery was86min±20min, the mean operative time for therecipient was 115min±20min and warm ischemia timewas shortened to 40min±5min. There was a shorterrevascularizing time of the graft, the abdominal aorta(AA) to AA anastomosis being 21min±10min, and thecuffed portal vein (PV) to the renal vein anastomosisbeing 5min±5min.The one-week survival rate of 98 ratswith SIT was 88.78% (87/98), without thrombosis andstenosis of anastomosis. The longest survival time ofrecipient rats was more than 389 days after SIT, therats were maintaining normal weight, with perfectintestinal function and intact intestinal histology.CONCLUSION: These modified techniques for SIT wouldremarkably reduce the complications and improve survival rate in rats, which provided a potentially more consistent and practical model for experimental andclinical studies.

  3. Comparison of three concentration methods for the recovery of canine intestinal parasites from stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, S; Oliveira-Sequeira, T C G

    2010-10-01

    The aim of present study was to compare the efficiency of a commercial assay and two conventional methods for fecal concentration in detecting canine gastrointestinal parasites. Fecal samples from 254 dogs were processed by centrifugation-sedimentation (CS), centrifugation-flotation (CF) and a commercial assay for fecal concentration (TF-test). The following parasites were detected: Ancylostoma (37.8%), Giardia (16.9%), Toxocara canis (8.7%), Trichuris vulpis (7.1%), Isospora (3.5%), and Sarcocystis (2.7%). The calculated analytical sensitivity indicated that CF was more accurate (Pindividual diagnosis and epidemiological investigation.

  4. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption.

  5. Neural control of small intestinal giant migrating contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterson, M F; Sarna, S K

    1994-04-01

    We investigated the neural mechanisms of control of giant migrating contractions (GMCs) in five conscious dogs. After control recordings, a Thiry-Vella loop was prepared from the middle segment, and the remaining two segments were reanastomosed. GMCs were stimulated by intravenous administration of fentanyl and erythromycin lactobionate, oral administration of loperamide and erythromycin stearate, and gastric or intraluminal administration of cider vinegar in the loop. In the intact state, the agents stimulated GMCs in all three segments, and they propagated uninterruptedly from the point of their origin to the terminal ileum. The propagation velocity of GMCs increased, whereas that of migrating motor complexes (MMCs) decreased distally. After Thiry-Vella loop formation, the agents stimulated GMCs independently in the three segments, and they propagated only to the end of the segment in which they started. In the intact small intestine, the GMCs produced ascending and descending inhibition of spontaneous phase II contractions but did not interrupt the caudad propagation of the ongoing MMC. After Thiry-Vella loop formation, the ascending inhibition was unaltered, but the descending inhibition occurred only in the segment containing the GMC. We conclude that the propagation of GMCs in the small intestine is controlled by the enteric nerves. The extrinsic nerves control the ascending inhibition produced by GMCs, whereas the enteric nerves control the descending inhibition.

  6. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal bleeding: Retrospective analysis of 76 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Chen Ba; San-Hua Qing; Xiang-Cheng Huang; Ying Wen; Guo-Xin Li; Jiang Yu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes of small intestinal bleeding as well as its diagnosis and therapeutic approaches.METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted according to the clinical records of 76 patients with small intestinal bleeding admitted to our hospital in the past 5 years.RESULTS: In these patients, tumor was the most frequent cause of small intestinal bleeding (37/76), followed by Meckel's diverticulum (21/76), angiopathy (15/76) and ectopic pancreas (3/76). Of the 76 patients,21 were diagnosed by digital subtraction angiography,13 by barium and air double contrast X-ray examination of the small intestine, 11 by 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy of the abdominal cavity, 6 by enteroscopy of the small intestine, 21 by laparoscopic laparotomy, and 4 by exploratory laparotomy. Although all the patients received surgical treatment, most of them (68/76) received part enterectomy covering the diseased segment and enteroanastomosis. The follow-up time ranged from 1 year to 5 years. No case had recurrent alimentary tract bleeding or other complications.CONCLUSION: Tumor is the major cause of small intestinal bleeding followed by Meckel's diverticulum and angiopathy. The main approaches to definite diagnosis of small intestinal bleeding include digital subtraction angiography, 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy of the abdominal cavity, barium and air double contrast X-ray examination of the small intestine, laparoscopic laparotomy or exploratory laparotomy. Part enterectomy covering the diseased segment and enteroanastomosis are the most effective treatment modalities for small intestinal bleeding.

  8. Microbial communities in the human small intestine: coupling diversity to metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booijink, Carien C G M; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M

    2007-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place. The host-derived physiological processes and the residing microorganisms, especially in the small intestine, contribute to this nutrient supply. To circumvent sampling problems of the small intestine, several model systems have been developed to study microbial diversity and functionality in the small intestine. In addition, metagenomics offers novel possibilities to gain insight into the genetic potential and functional properties of these microbial communities. Here, an overview is presented of the most recent insights into the diversity and functionality of the microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract, with a focus on the small intestine.

  9. Parietal Strangulation Of Small Intestine In Femoral Hernia Site With Symptoms Of Intestinal Obstruction In Patient With Incidentally Found Small Intestine Tumor - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żyluk Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Richter’s hernia (partial enterocele is the strangulation/entrapment of only part of the circumference of the intestinal wall. It is relatively rare, and presents without mechanical obstruction – giving vague, non-specific symptoms and signs, and a threat of intestinal necrosis, gangrene, followed by perforation. A report of a case of entrapment of the jejunum in the femoral ring, which did not cause the gangrene, but symptoms of mechanical obstruction, is presented. Further inspection of the small bowel in this case revealed an extra-luminal tumour, which appeared to be a GIST. The entrapped part of the jejunum has been released and the tumour has been resected.

  10. [Characterization of the microflora of the small intestine (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, H; Knoke, M

    1980-03-01

    Normal and abnormal microflora of the upper small intestine was studied in 356 patients. Low counts are characteristic of normal microbial colonization (eubiosis), changes in quality and/or quantity are pathological (dysbiosis). The latter status is described as overgrowth syndrome. We found some types of dysbiosis. Prevalent was type Dys1 with the highest counts and the greatest variety of bacteria and yeasts. In contrast to this, type Dys2 showed higher germ counts of only one genus like coliforms (Dys2 Coli), streptococci (Dys2 Str.), lactobacilli (Dys2 L.) or yeasts (Dys2 Y.). In dysbiosis, we frequently saw bifidobacterium and bacteroides. Simultaneous sampling from stomach, duodenum, and jejunum indicated different modes of colonization of these parts (oral or fecal type).

  11. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant D Patil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered gastrointestinal (GI motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO.

  12. Galectin-4 and small intestinal brush border enzymes form clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; van Deurs, B

    1997-01-01

    Detergent-insoluble complexes prepared from pig small intestine are highly enriched in several transmembrane brush border enzymes including aminopeptidase N and sucrase-isomaltase, indicating that they reside in a glycolipid-rich environment in vivo. In the present work galectin-4, an animal lectin...... lacking a N-terminal signal peptide for membrane translocation, was discovered in these complexes as well, and in gradient centrifugation brush border enzymes and galectin-4 formed distinct soluble high molecular weight clusters. Immunoperoxidase cytochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy showed...... by a nonclassical pathway, and the brush border enzymes represent a novel class of natural ligands for a member of the galectin family. Newly synthesized galectin-4 is rapidly "trapped" by association with intracellular structures prior to its apical secretion, but once externalized, association with brush border...

  13. Increased intestinal barrier function in the small intestine of formula-fed neonatal piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygelen, V; De Vos, M; Willemen, S; Tambuyzer, B; Casteleyn, C; Knapen, D; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2012-12-01

    Within-litter birth weight variation is adversely correlated to piglet survival and postnatal growth. A less efficient epithelial barrier function in light piglets may partly explain this inverse relationship between birth weight and zootechnical performance. A compromised epithelial barrier increases paracellular permeability; consequently, toxins, allergenic compounds, or bacteria may enter systemic circulation and induce inflammatory responses. Dietary effects on function of gut epithelium of piglet are largely unknown. This study investigated epithelial barrier function of the small intestine of normal birth weight (NBW) piglets (1.46 ± 0.10 kg) and low birth weight (LBW) piglets (excretion was measured using enzymatic spectrophotometry. Irrespective of birth weight, lactulose levels of FOR10 (4.4 ± 2.3 mmol/L) tended to be lower (P = 0.07) than SOW10 (26.4 ± 10.2 mmol/L) indicating a reduced paracellular intestinal permeability in FOR10. This reduction was associated with a 6-fold elevated (P < 0.01) protein expression of occludin, an important tight junction protein, in FOR10 compared to SOW10. Mannitol levels in FOR10 (31.0 ± 18.2 mmol/L) did not differ (P = 0.28) from SOW10 (61.1 ± 10.2 mmol/L). However, shorter villi (P < 0.01) in FOR10 indicated a reduced absorptive capacity. In conclusion, formula feeding caused minor symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction compared to sow-fed piglets irrespective of their birth weight.

  14. Genetics and epigenetics in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålberg, P; Westin, G; Thirlwell, C

    2016-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumour of the small intestine (SI-NET), formerly known as midgut carcinoid tumour, is the most common small intestinal malignancy. The incidence is rising, with recent reports of 0.67 per 100 000 in the USA and 1.12 per 100 000 in Sweden. SI-NETs often present a challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment, as patients often have widespread disease and are beyond cure by surgery. Somatostatin analogues provide the mainstay of medical treatment to control hormonal excess and increase the time to progression. Despite overall favourable prognosis (5-year overall survival of 65%), there is a need to find markers to identify both patients with worse outcome and new targets for therapy. Loss on chromosome 18 has been reported in 60-90% of SI-NETs, but mutated genes on this chromosome have failed detection. Recently, a putative tumour suppressor role has been suggested for TCEB3C occurring at 18q21 (encoding elongin A3), which may undergo epigenetic repression. CDKN1B has recently been revealed as the only recurrently mutated gene in SI-NETs but, with a frequency as low as 8%, its role as a driver in SI-NET development may be questioned. Integrated genomewide analysis including exome and whole-genome sequencing, gene expression, DNA methylation and copy number analysis has identified three novel molecular subtypes of SI-NET with differing clinical outcome. DNA methylation analysis has demonstrated that SI-NETs have significant epigenetic dysregulation in 70-80% of tumours. In this review, we focus on understanding of the genetic, epigenetic and molecular events that lead to development and progression of SI-NETs.

  15. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia.

  16. Gamma/delta intraepithelial lymphocytes in the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Masaki; Itoh, Tsunetoshi

    2016-09-01

    Although many studies of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have been reported, most of them have focused on αβ-IELs; little attention has been paid to γδ-IELs. The function of γδ-IELs remains largely unclear. In this article, we briefly review a number of reports on γδ-IELs, especially those in the small intestine, along with our recent studies. We found that γδ-IELs are the most abundant (comprising >70 % of the) IELs in the duodenum and the jejunum, implying that it is absolutely necessary to investigate the function(s) of γδ-IELs when attempting to delineate the in vivo defense system of the small intestine. Intraperitoneal injection of anti-CD3 mAb stimulated the γδ-IELs and caused rapid degranulation of them. Granzyme B released from their granules induced DNA fragmentation of duodenal and jejunal epithelial cells (paracrine) and of the IELs themselves (autocrine). However, perforin (Pfn) was not detected, and DNA fragmentation was induced even in Pfn-knockout mice; our system was therefore found to present a novel type of in vivo Pfn-independent DNA fragmentation. We can therefore consider γδ-IELs to be a novel type of large granular lymphocyte without Pfn. Fragmented DNA was repaired in the cells, indicating that DNA fragmentation alone cannot be regarded as an unambiguous marker of cell death or apoptosis. Finally, since the response was so rapid and achieved without the need for accessory cells, it seems that γδ-IELs respond readily to various stimuli, are activated only once, and die 2-3 days after activation in situ without leaving their site. Taken together, these results suggest that γδ-IELs are not involved in the recognition of specific antigen(s) and are not involved in the resulting specific killing or exclusion of the relevant antigen(s).

  17. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells.

  18. Community and genomic analysis of the human small intestine microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.

    2013-01-01

      Our intestinal tract is densely populated by different microbes, collectively called microbiota, of which the majority are bacteria. Research focusing on the intestinal microbiota often use fecal samples as a representative of the bacteria that inhabit the end of the large intestine. These s

  19. Small bowel autotransplantation combined with pancreato-duodenectomy for enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yong; WU Hong; YANG Jia-yin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Recent advances in transplantation techniques have allowed pancreatoduodenectomy, distal gastrectomy, hemicolectomy and small bowel autotransplantation to be the therapy of choice for enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery. There have been a few case reports about small bowel autotransplantation combined with pancreatoduodenectomy for enormous mesenteric cavernous hemangioma of small intestine.1-4 The present surgical methods for enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery mainly included tumor excision and/or small bowel resection. However, these therapies are not effective for those patients in whom the angiocavernoma has infiltrated the mesenteric artery or pancreas, and these patients often give up therapy. It is recognized that enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery is a benign lesion, and patients may have an excellent prognosis after complete resection of the lesion.

  20. Perfuração de intestino delgado por doença diverticular jejunal Intestinal perforation in consequence of small intestine's diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilmar Moura Leal

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Small Intestine's diverticulosis is an uncommon pathology of intestine. It's more evident at jejune and can be complicated by intestinal perforation, obstruction or diverticulitis, increasing the mortality. We describe a forty years old female patient that arrived at emergency service complained of diffuse abdominal pain. There aren't signals of peritonitis and the radiological evaluation showed small intestine's distension. Surgical intervention was performed revealing multiples diverticulums at jejune and intestinal perforation. The aim of this article is present a case of Small Intestine's diverticulosis and its complications that had precise intervention resulting in a favorable resolution.

  1. Factors associated with development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Daniel J; Lelewski, Roxana; Weese, J Scott; Mcgill-Worsley, Jamie; Shankel, Catharine; Mendonca, Sonia; Sager, Tara; Smith, Michael; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between presence of respiratory pathogens and development of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC) in dogs in 5 Canadian small animal clinics. In total, 86 dogs were tested using a commercial PCR respiratory panel; 64 dogs were considered as cases and 22 were control dogs matched by veterinary clinic. No control animals (0/22) were positive for canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), whereas 27/64 (42%) CIRDC cases were positive. Furthermore, 81% of case dogs tested positive for Mycoplasma cynos, compared with 73% of control dogs. Canine respiratory corona virus (CRCoV) was detected in no control dogs compared with 9.4% of clinical dogs. No animals were positive for any influenza virus type A present in the diagnostic panel. Presence of CPIV was associated (P < 0.01) with the occurrence of CIRDC after adjustment for demographic factors and presence of CRCoV (P = 0.09).

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal injury and probiotic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mario Guslandi

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria play a role in the development of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)-induced small intestinal injury.Agents such as probiotics,able t omodify the gut ecology,might theoretically be useful in preventing small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs.The clinical studies available so far do suggest that some probiotic agents can be effective in this respect.

  3. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal in circular muscle of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    1993-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine.......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) may be important regulatory cells in gut muscle layers. This study examined ICC within the circular muscle of human small intestine....

  4. Intestinal epithelial HuR modulates distinct pathways of proliferation and apoptosis and attenuates small intestinal and colonic tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammanco, Antonina; Blanc, Valerie; Montenegro, Grace; Klos, Coen; Xie, Yan; Kennedy, Susan; Luo, Jianyang; Chang, Sung-Hee; Hla, Timothy; Nalbantoglu, Ilke; Dharmarajan, Sekhar; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2014-09-15

    HuR is a ubiquitous nucleocytoplasmic RNA-binding protein that exerts pleiotropic effects on cell growth and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the impact of conditional, tissue-specific genetic deletion of HuR on intestinal growth and tumorigenesis in mice. Mice lacking intestinal expression of HuR (Hur (IKO) mice) displayed reduced levels of cell proliferation in the small intestine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced acute intestinal injury, as evidenced by decreased villus height and a compensatory shift in proliferating cells. In the context of Apc(min/+) mice, a transgenic model of intestinal tumorigenesis, intestinal deletion of the HuR gene caused a three-fold decrease in tumor burden characterized by reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased expression of transcripts encoding antiapoptotic HuR target RNAs. Similarly, Hur(IKO) mice subjected to an inflammatory colon carcinogenesis protocol [azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) administration] exhibited a two-fold decrease in tumor burden. Hur(IKO) mice showed no change in ileal Asbt expression, fecal bile acid excretion, or enterohepatic pool size that might explain the phenotype. Moreover, none of the HuR targets identified in Apc(min/+)Hur(IKO) were altered in AOM-DSS-treated Hur(IKO) mice, the latter of which exhibited increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, where elevation of a unique set of HuR-targeted proapoptotic factors was documented. Taken together, our results promote the concept of epithelial HuR as a contextual modifier of proapoptotic gene expression in intestinal cancers, acting independently of bile acid metabolism to promote cancer. In the small intestine, epithelial HuR promotes expression of prosurvival transcripts that support Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis, whereas in the large intestine epithelial HuR indirectly downregulates certain proapoptotic RNAs to attenuate colitis-associated cancer. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5322-35. ©2014 AACR.

  5. Tissue engineering of the small intestine by acellular collagen sponge scaffold grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Y; Nakamura, T; Matsumoto, K; Kurokawa, Y; Satomi, S; Shimizu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue engineering of the small intestine will prove a great benefit to patients suffering from short bowel disease. However cell seeding in tissue engineering, such as fetal cell use, is accompanied by problems of ethical issues, rejection, and short supply. To overcome these problems, we carried out an experimental study on tissue engineering of the small intestine by acellular collagen sponge scaffold grafting. We resected the 5 cm long jejunum from beagle dogs and reconstructed it by acellular collagen sponge grafting with a silicon tube stent. The graft was covered with the omentum. At 1 month after operation, the silicon stent was removed endoscopically. Animals were sacrificed 1 and 4 months after operation, and were examined microscopically. Neo-intestinal regeneration was observed and the intestinal mucosa covered the luminal side of the regenerated intestine across the anastomosis. Thus, the small intestine was regenerated by tissue engineering technology using an acellular collagen sponge scaffold.

  6. Structural features of colloidal species in the human fasted upper small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullertz, Anette; Reppas, Christos; Psachoulias, Dimitrios;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to study the features of colloidal species in the lumen of the upper small intestine of two healthy adults at fasted state by means of electron microscopy. Methods Samples were aspirated from a location near the ligament of Treitz 30 min (volunteer no. 1, Aspirate30min...... with previously studied samples from the lower intestine in the fasted state. Micelles and unilamellar vesicles observed in both samples closely resemble morphological characteristics of those found in fluids simulating the colloidal species in fasted upper intestinal environment. Conclusions Features...... of colloidal species in contents of fasted small intestine have similarities with fluids simulating the contents in fasted upper small intestine and with contents of lower intestine in the fasted state....

  7. Application of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of massive small intestinal bleeding: Report of 22 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Chen Ba; San-Hua Qing; Xiang-Cheng Huang; Ying Wen; Guo-Xin Li; Jiang Yu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of laparoscopy in patients with massive small intestinal bleeding.METHODS: Twenty-two patients with massive small intestinal bleeding and hemodynamic alteration underwent laparoscopic laparotomy in our unit from December 2002 to April 2005. Post pathologic sites were found, laparoscopy- or laparoscopy-assisted part small intestinal resection including pathologic intestinal site and enteroanastomosis was performed in all these patients.RESULTS: The bleeding sites were successfully detected by laparoscopy in all these 22 patients. Massive small intestinal bleeding was caused by jejunum benign stromal tumor in 8 cases, by jejunum potential malignant stromal tumor in 5 cases, by jejunum malignant stromal tumor in 1 case, by Mechel's diverticulum in 5 cases,by small intestinal vascular deformity in 2 cases, and by ectopic pancreas in 1 case. A total of 16 patients underwent laparoscopy-assisted enterectomy and enteroanastomosis of small intestine covering the of the diseased segment under laparoscope. No surgical complications occurred and the outcome was satisfactory.CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of massive small intestinal bleeding is noninvasive with less pain, short recovery time and definite therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Ultrasonography of small intestinal inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschen, Lorrie

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasonography, which has become a mainstay of diagnosing intestinal diseases in dogs and cats, is often one of the first diagnostic tools used to differentiate inflammatory from neoplastic infiltration of the small intestine. Although overlap in the sonographic appearances of inflammatory and neoplastic infiltration make a definitive diagnosis difficult, awareness of features of both diseases is important for the accurate interpretation of the sonographic findings. Full-thickness intestinal biopsy remains the gold standard for differentiating inflammatory from neoplastic disease of the small intestine.

  9. Nonsulfated cholecystokinins in the small intestine of pigs and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2015-01-01

    -step assay specific for nonsulfated CCK. For further characterization, the intestinal extracts were subjected to size- and ion exchange-chromatography. The intestinal concentrations of sulfated and nonsulfated CCK were highest in the duodenum and the proximal part of jejunum both in the pig and the rat...

  10. Morphological profiles of neutron and X-irradiated small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, K.E.; O`Shea, O.; Hazzard, R.A.; McCullough, J.S. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hume, S.P.; Nelson, A.C.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the response of mouse small intestine, at several time points after treatment with neutron or X-irradiation, using doses expected to give similar effects in terms of crypt/microcolony survival. Using resin histology, the effects of radiation on the numbers of duodenal cell types and measurements of tissue areas were assessed. The results for individual parameters and for an estimate of overall damage are given in a data display, which summarises the morphological profile of the organ after both types of radiation. Damage and recovery were seen for many of the parameters studied but there was no standard response pattern applicable for all parameters. In particular, the response of individual crypt cell types could not be predicted from knowledge of the change in crypt numbers. With regard to the holistic response of the gut, neutron irradiation appeared to have caused more damage and produced more early effects than the X-irradiation. More specifically, neutron treatment led to more damage to the neuromuscular components of the wall, while X-irradiation produced early vascular changes. (author).

  11. Estimation of canine intestinal parasites in Córdoba (Spain) and their risk to public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, F J; Hernández, S; López-Cobos, E; Becerra, C; Acosta, I; Martínez-Moreno, A

    2007-01-19

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in dogs was studied in the province of Córdoba (southern Spain), with special attention to those parasites that can be transmitted to man. The experiment was completed with the examination of soil samples from public parks and city gardens. The study was carried out over a population of 1800 animals entered in the Control Animal Centre (CECA) by coprological methods, and within this group, 300 dogs were sacrificed and necropsied. The prevalence of any intestinal parasitic infection was 71.33%. The following parasites of the gastrointestinal tract were recorded: Isospora canis (22%), Isospora (Cystoisospora) spp. (10.22%), Sarcocystis (2.5%), Hammondia/Neospora (1.94%), Giardia canis (1%), Dipylidium caninum (13.2%), Taenia hydatigena (7.66%), Taenia pisiformis (4%), Uncinaria stenocephala (33.27%), Toxascaris leonina (14.94%), Toxocara canis (17.72%) and Trichuris vulpis (1.66%). Related to public health, it is important to point out the presence of T. canis only in puppies younger than one year and Uncinaria, more frequent in adult dogs. Soil samples of parks revealed the presence of eggs of Toxocara, and it suggests the existence of real risk for human infection.

  12. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  13. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences.

  14. Clinical analysis of primary small intestinal disease:A report of 309 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhan; Zhong-Sheng Xia; Ying-Qiang Zhong; Shi-Neng Zhang; Lin-Yun Wang; Hong Shu; Zhao-Hua Zhu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the major clinical symptom, etiology, and diagnostic method in patients with primary small intestinal disease in order to improve the diagnosis.METHODS: A total of 309 cases with primary small intestinal disease were reviewed, and the major clinical symptoms,etiology, and diagnostic methods were analyzed.RESULTS: The major clinical symptoms included abdominal pain (71%), abdominal mass (14%), vomiting (10%),melaena (10%), and fever (9%). The most common disease were malignant tumor (40%). diverticulum (32%) and benign tumor (10%). Duodenal disease was involved in 36% of the patients with primary small intestinal diseases. The diagnostic rate for primary small intestinal diseases by double-contrast enteroclysis was 85.6%.CONCLUSION: Abdominal pain is the most common clinical symptom in patients with primary small intestinal disease.Malignant tumors are the most common diseases. Duodenum was the most common part involved in small intestine.Double-contrast enteroclysis was still the simplest and the most available examination method in diagnosis of primary small intestinal disease. However, more practical diagnostic method should be explored to improve the diagnostic accuracy.

  15. Shear Modulus of the Partially Obstructed Rat Small Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Daming; Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua;

    2016-01-01

    A number of factors influence gastrointestinal tissue structure and mechanical properties such as the physical environment and diseases like partial obstruction. Hence multi-axial biomechanical properties are important for understanding the pathophysiology of the obstructed intestine. The aim......-cm intestinal segments were used for histological and mechanical analysis. The segments were obtained distal (S1), proximal (S2) and further proximal (S3) to the site of obstruction or suturing site. The tri-axial testing included simultaneous torsion, inflation and longitudinal stretching. The lumen...... and longitudinal direction where as it was softer in shear direction, especially in S2 (p intestinal obstruction site....

  16. Experimental models of small intestinal transplantation in rats: orthotopic versus heterotopic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakao A

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of surgical models of small intestinal transplantation (SITx in rats, namely heterotopic (HIT and orthotopic transplantion (OIT, have been reviewed. In OIT, the small intestine of the recipient is removed and the transplanted intestine replaces it in continuity. On the other hand, in the HIT model, the small intestinal grafts are rendered dysfunctional without alimentary tract continuity. Histological evidence showed that acute rejection appeared earlier in HIT as compared to OIT. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the muscularis externa produced in the chronic rejection process were more pronounced in HIT allografts. The HIT grafts showed severe mucosal atrophy due to the lack of intraluminal trophic factors, because oral feedings can stimulate tropic hormones for mucosal growth, and provide nutrients for enterocytes. Intestinal permeability was consistently higher after HIT than after OIT. The HIT grafts demonstrated less contractility and less response to chemical stimulation than did OIT grafts. The OIT models are advantageous in studies of intraluminal nutrients, and intestinal secretions in these models might modulate the intestinal immune status and possibly delay rejection. The superior intestinal barrier function and the delayed onset of rejection in OIT rats suggest that nutrients and other factors in the succus entericus are important for the maintenance of intestinal graft function.

  17. Cellular cross talk in the small intestinal mucosa: postnatal lymphocytic immigration elicits a specific epithelial transcriptional response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Maltesen, Henrik R; Balmer, Sophie;

    2008-01-01

    such physiological cross talk between the immune system and the epithelium in the postnatal small intestinal mucosa is lacking. We have investigated the transcriptome changes occurring in the postnatal mouse small intestine using DNA microarray technology, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time RT...... migration into the small intestinal mucosa....

  18. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Bioavailability Regulates Angiogenesis and Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation during Postnatal Small Intestinal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holoyda, Kathleen A.; Hou, Xiaogang; Fowler, Kathryn L.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly conserved, master regulatory molecule required for endothelial cell proliferation, organization, migration and branching morphogenesis. Podocoryne carnea and drosophila, which lack endothelial cells and a vascular system, express VEGF homologs, indicating potential roles beyond angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The role of VEGF in the development and homeostasis of the postnatal small intestine is unknown. We hypothesized regulating VEGF bioavailability in the postnatal small intestine would exhibit effects beyond the vasculature and influence epithelial cell stem/progenitor populations. Methods VEGF mutant mice were created that overexpressed VEGF in the brush border of epithelium via the villin promotor following doxycycline treatment. To decrease VEGF bioavailability, sFlt-1 mutant mice were generated that overexpressed the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 upon doxycycline administration in the intestinal epithelium. Mice were analyzed after 21 days of doxycycline administration. Results Increased VEGF expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR and ELISA in the intestine of the VEGF mutants compared to littermates. The VEGF mutant duodenum demonstrated increased angiogenesis and vascular leak as compared to littermate controls. The VEGF mutant duodenum revealed taller villi and increased Ki-67-positive cells in the transit-amplifying zone with reduced Lgr5 expression. The duodenum of sFlt-1 mutants revealed shorter villi and longer crypts with reduced proliferation in the transit-amplifying zone, reduced expression of Dll1, Bmp4 and VE-cadherin, and increased expression of Sox9 and EphB2. Conclusions Manipulating VEGF bioavailability leads to profound effects on not only the intestinal vasculature, but epithelial stem and progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Elucidation of the crosstalk between VEGF signaling in the vasculature, mesenchyme and epithelial stem/progenitor cell populations may direct future

  19. Intestinal absorption of berberine and 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine and their effects on sugar absorption in rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi-chao; Dong, Su; Xu, Li-jun; Zhang, Chen-yu

    2014-04-01

    The intestinal absorption of berberine (Ber) and its structural modified compound 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine (Hdber) was compared, and their effects on the intestinal absorption of sugar by perfusion experiment were investigated in order to reveal the mechanism of low dose and high activity of Hdber in the treatment of hyperglycemia. The absorption of Hdber and Ber in rat small intestine was measured by in situ perfusion. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the concentrations of Hdber and Ber. In situ perfusion method was also used to study the effects of Hdber and Ber on sugar intestinal absorption. Glucose oxidase method and UV spectrophotometry were applied to examine the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in the perfusion fluid. The results showed that the absorption rate of Ber in the small intestine was lower than 10%, but that of Hdber was larger than 70%. Both Hdber and Ber inhibited the absorption of glucose and sucrose at the doses of 10 and 20 μg/mL. However, Hdber presented stronger activity than Ber (Pabsorption of sugar is better than Ber.

  20. Effect of Tributyrin on Electrical Activity in the Small Intestine during Early Postoperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropskaya, N S; Kislyakova, E A; Popova, T S

    2015-12-01

    The effect of enteral administration of tributyrin on electrical activity in the upper segments of the small intestine was examined in rats on the model of postoperative ileus. This postoperative state is characterized with pronounced and long-term disturbances in generation of migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine. The enteral administration of tributyrin in the early postoperative period aimed to suppress the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic influences and activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways is an effective procedure to normalize the migrating myoelectric complex and therefore the coordinated propulsive peristalsis in the small intestine.

  1. Double-balloon enteroscopy in detecting small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Fa-chao; PAN De-shou; ZHOU Dian-yuan; XIAO Bing; JIANG Bo; WAN Tian-mo; GUO Yu; ZHOU Dan; WANG Li-hui; CHEN Jin-feng; XIE Lu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Digestive tract hemorrhage is a common disease of the digestive system, but about 0.4%-5% intestinal bleeding can not be detected with gastroscope or colonscope.1 Since the intestine is long, tortuous, far away from both ends of the digestive tract and unfixed in position, clinical diagnosis of the bleeding is relatively difficult. Yamamoto and Sugano2 reported the clinical application of double-balloon enteroscope at American DDW in 2003.

  2. Parameterization of small intestinal water volume using PBPK modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Anil; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Edginton, Andrea

    2015-01-25

    To facilitate accurate predictions of oral drug disposition, mechanistic absorption models require optimal parameterization. Furthermore, parameters should maintain a biological basis to establish confidence in model predictions. This study will serve to calculate an optimal parameter value for small intestinal water volume (SIWV) using a model-based approach. To evaluate physiologic fidelity, derived volume estimates will be compared to experimentally-based SIWV determinations. A compartmental absorption and transit (CAT) model, created in Matlab-Simulink®, was integrated with a whole-body PBPK model, developed in PK-SIM 5.2®, to provide predictions of systemic drug disposition. SIWV within the CAT model was varied between 52.5mL and 420mL. Simulations incorporating specific SIWV values were compared to pharmacokinetic data from compounds exhibiting solubility induced non-proportional changes in absorption using absolute average fold-error. Correspondingly, data pertaining to oral administration of acyclovir and chlorothiazide were utilized to derive estimates of SIWV. At 400mg, a SIWV of 116mL provided the best estimates of acyclovir plasma concentrations. A similar SIWV was found to best depict the urinary excretion pattern of chlorothiazide at a dose of 100mg. In comparison, experimentally-based estimates of SIWV within adults denote a central tendency between 86 and 167mL. The derived SIWV (116mL) represents the optimal parameter value within the context of the developed CAT model. This result demonstrates the biological basis of the widely utilized CAT model as in vivo SIWV determinations correspond with model-based estimates.

  3. Canine small clear cell/T-zone lymphoma: clinical presentation and outcome in a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, V; Marconato, L; Poggi, A; Riondato, F; Aresu, L; Cozzi, M; Comazzi, S

    2016-08-01

    Published studies, taken together, suggest the existence of a single canine lymphoma entity, with a small clear cell appearance by cytological evaluation, a histopathological T-zone pattern and an aberrant CD45-negative T-cell phenotype, mostly characterized by long-term survival. We describe clinical presentation and outcome in a retrospective case series of canine small clear cell/T-zone lymphoma. Despite the reported predisposition of Golden retriever, this breed was not represented in our case series. Most dogs presented with stage V disease, whereas only few had clinical signs or peripheral cytopenias. Blood was almost always more infiltrated than bone marrow. Median survival confirmed the favourable prognosis described in literature, but a few dogs died within a short time. Also, a subgroup of dogs developed second malignancies, eventually leading to death. We did not investigate possible prognostic factors because of the wide variety in treatments, and further studies are needed to identify high-risk animals.

  4. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Yamamoto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth.

  5. Digestibilidade intestinal verdadeira da proteína de alimentos para ruminantes True small intestinal protein digestibility of ruminant feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ferriani Branco

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A digestibilidade intestinal verdadeira de diferentes classes de alimentos usados em dietas para ruminantes foi avaliada por meio das técnicas in situ e in vitro. Foram utilizados dois bovinos machos castrados (450 kg PV com cânulas implantadas no rúmen para incubação in situ de concentrados protéicos de origens animal e vegetal e energéticos, resíduos da agroindústria e alimentos volumosos. Avaliou-se a digestibilidade intestinal verdadeira dos alimentos submetidos à digestão apenas com pepsina ou com pepsina + pancreatina, precedida ou não da incubação ruminal. A incubação ruminal diminuiu a digestibilidade intestinal verdadeira da proteína de 24 dos 30 alimentos testados, com exceção da farinha de penas, da aveia preta, do grão de milho triturado a 2,5 mm e dos fenos de aveia e tifton, para os quais ocorreu aumento, e do farelo de girassol, para o qual não houve efeito da incubação ruminal. A digestibilidade intestinal da proteína não-degradada no rúmen (PNDR, na maioria dos alimentos utilizados em dietas para ruminantes, é menor que a da proteína original do alimento. Entre os alimentos avaliados, 29 apresentaram maior digestibilidade intestinal verdadeira quando incubados com pepsina + pancreatina, evidenciando a importância da etapa de digestão abomasal sobre as proteínas dos alimentos (com exceção à aveia preta. A digestibilidade intestinal dos alimentos é variável e, portanto, deve ser considerada na formulação de dietas para atendimento das exigências de proteína metabolizável.The true protein digestibility in the small intestine of different ruminant feeds were measured using in situ and in vitro techniques. Two steers with average body weight of 450 kg and fitted with ruminal cannulas were used for in situ incubation of different feeds. The following feedstuffs were evaluated: animal and vegetable protein concentrate, energy concentrate, fiber by-products, and forage. Protein truly digested in

  6. Mucin dynamics in the chick small intestine are altered by starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Asya; Sklan, David; Uni, Zehava

    2004-04-01

    The absorptive surface of the small intestine is covered by a layer of mucus secreted by goblet cells. The secreted mucins and thickness of the adherent layer influence nutrient digestion and absorption processes as well as the functionality of the mucosa. In this study, methods for the analysis of mucin synthesis and dynamics in the chick small intestine are described. A fragment of chicken mucin cDNA was isolated and characterized; this fraction had 60% homology to human mucin MUC-5AC. The thickness of the mucus adherent layer and the relative amounts of mucin glycoprotein and mRNA were also examined in the small intestines of control and starved chicks. Relative amounts of intestinal mucin mRNA and protein increased in the duodenum and jejunum of starved chicks, and mucus adherent layer thickness decreased throughout the small intestine. In starved chicks, higher mRNA expression and protein concentrations with lower amounts of adherent mucus may be related to a higher rate of degradation of the mucus layer, a lower rate of mucus secretion, or an altered rate of mucin turnover. It thus appears that starvation alters mucus dynamics in the small intestine, and this may affect intestinal digestive function and defense.

  7. Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  8. GLP-1 and GIP are colocalized in a subset of endocrine cells in the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine; Christensen, Louise Lundby; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incretin hormones GIP and GLP-1 are thought to be produced in separate endocrine cells located in the proximal and distal ends of the mammalian small intestine, respectively. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using double immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we found that GLP-1...... was colocalized with either GIP or PYY in endocrine cells of the porcine, rat, and human small intestines, whereas GIP and PYY were rarely colocalized. Thus, of all the cells staining positively for either GLP-1, GIP, or both, 55-75% were GLP-1 and GIP double-stained in the mid-small intestine. Concentrations...... of extractable GIP and PYY were highest in the midjejunum [154 (95-167) and 141 (67-158) pmol/g, median and range, respectively], whereas GLP-1 concentrations were highest in the ileum [92 (80-207) pmol/l], but GLP-1, GIP, and PYY immunoreactive cells were found throughout the porcine small intestine...

  9. The human small intestinal microbiota is driven by rapid uptake and conversion of simple carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetendal, Erwin G; Raes, Jeroen; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) harbors a complex community of microbes. The microbiota composition varies between different locations in the GI tract, but most studies focus on the fecal microbiota, and that inhabiting the colonic mucosa. Consequently, little is known about...... the microbiota at other parts of the GI tract, which is especially true for the small intestine because of its limited accessibility. Here we deduce an ecological model of the microbiota composition and function in the small intestine, using complementing culture-independent approaches. Phylogenetic microarray...... analyses demonstrated that microbiota compositions that are typically found in effluent samples from ileostomists (subjects without a colon) can also be encountered in the small intestine of healthy individuals. Phylogenetic mapping of small intestinal metagenome of three different ileostomy effluent...

  10. Clinical outcome in patients with small-intestinal non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, Shinichi; Oshima, Kumi; Sato, Miki; Terasako, Kiriko; Okuda, Shinya; Nakasone, Hideki; Yamazaki, Rie; Tanaka, Yukie; Tanihara, Aki; Kawamura, Yutaka; Kiyosaki, Hirokazu; Higuchi, Takakazu; Nishida, Junji; Konishi, Fumio; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2009-10-01

    The clinical features and outcome of small intestinal lymphoma remain unclear. We retrospectively analyzed 23 patients who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a small intestinal lesion. With a median follow-up of 37 months, the 5-year overall survival and failure-free survival (FFS) were 64% and 60%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, a worse performance status at the start of treatment and the occurrence of abdominal symptoms or perforation during treatment were associated with poor survival. Perforation often resulted in a dismal prognosis in patients with uncontrollable lymphoma, but not in patients with lymphoma in remission. The role of surgery in small intestinal lymphoma remains equivocal. In the current study, surgery before other therapies favorably influenced FFS, and all patients who underwent complete resection of the small intestinal lesion had extremely favorable results. Further studies are warranted to establish optimal therapeutic strategies.

  11. Epidemiology of small intestinal atresia in Europe: a register-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Best, Kate E

    2012-09-01

    The epidemiology of congenital small intestinal atresia (SIA) has not been well studied. This study describes the presence of additional anomalies, pregnancy outcomes, total prevalence and association with maternal age in SIA cases in Europe.

  12. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Xuan Wang; Wan-Chun Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice,and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress.METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10),bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa.RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli).There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10 (CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), ,P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related

  13. Light microscopic immunocytochemical localization of hepatic and intestinal types of fatty acid-binding proteins in rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, H M; Bates, M L; Bass, N M; Best, C J; Alpers, D H; Ockner, R K

    1986-05-01

    Monospecific antisera to purified hepatic fatty acid-binding protein (hFABP) and gut fatty acid-binding protein (gFABP) have been used to localize these two proteins in the small intestine of fed rats at the light microscopic level. Pieces of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were removed from 4-, 10-, 20-, 22-, and 60-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Both cryostat and paraffin sections were studied for the presence of hFABP or gFABP by the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Slides were graded blind for the intensity of staining. Despite the structural and immunological differences between these two proteins, we showed no major differences between their staining patterns or their staining intensity throughout the intestine during postnatal development. The staining for both fatty acid-binding proteins was cytoplasmic. No brush border staining was found. Staining was more intense in the proximal rather than distal intestine, in the villus rather than crypt cells, and in the apex rather than the base of intestinal cells. Shifts in staining patterns, and staining intensity occurring during development may be related to variations in dietary fat intake, rates of cell proliferation, intestinal anatomy, and mechanisms for fat absorption.

  14. Effects of realimentation on small intestinal morphology and disaccharidase activity in malnutrition Sprague-Dawley rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rustadi Sosrosumihardjo; Agus Firmansyah; Asri Rasad; Daldiyono Harjodisastro; Endi Ridwan; Septilia I. Wanandi; Dwirini Retno

    2006-01-01

    Low birth-weight infant and intrauterine growth retardation are still a health problem, especially in Indonesia due to high prevalence and need to be reduced. Malnutrition in infants are most common occur in low birth-weight infants. Malnutrition in rats resulted in hypotrophic and normoplastic mucosa of the small intestine. The finding was not only showed that small intestine was able to maintain its cell number in condition with restriction nutrient, however also suggested the posibility of...

  15. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Lisowska; Andrzej Pogorzelski; Grzegorz Oracz; Wojciech Skorupa; Szczepan Cofta; Jerzy Socha; Jarosław Walkowiak

    2010-01-01

    Background. Available data suggests that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may frequently occur in cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. SIBO may result in synthesis of enterotoxic and unabsorbable metabolites which may cause mucosal damage and – additionally – interfere with digestion and absorption. Such a relationship was documented in CF mouse model. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the influence of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine in CF pat...

  16. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy experience high rates of dose-limiting morbidity. Recently, short-term fasting prior to chemotherapy was shown to decrease toxicity. Herein we report that fasting protects multiple small intestinal stem cell populations marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression and maintains barrier function to preserve small intestinal architecture from lethal DNA damage. Our findings provide insight into how fasting protects the host from toxicity associated with high-...

  17. Small intestinal lipomas:Diagnostic value of multi-slice CT enterography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To analyze the clinical and imaging features of the small intestinal lipomas and to evaluate the diagnostic value of multi-slice computed tomography(CT) enterography.METHODS:Fourteen cases(one had two intestinal lesions) of surgically confirmed lipomas of the small intestine were retrospectively analyzed.The location,size,clinical and radiological aspects were discussed.RESULTS:Twelve patients presented with abdominal pain,of whom three complained of paroxysmal colic.Melena or bloody stools was mentione...

  18. The development of the chicken small intestine: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatakou, O; Paraskevakou, E; Tseleni-Balafouta, S; Athanasiadis, A; Fasseas, K

    2003-07-01

    The surface pattern of the small intestine of the chicken was studied using SEM in stages ranging from 11th day of foetal development to 60 days of post-natal life. The definite villi of the small intestine were preceded by the development of the previllous ridges. The villi were finger like and of unequal length during incubation. After hatching, gradually, the villi were longer, well formed with furrows along their sides. Respectively, the crypts, being present at late incubation, increased with age. Columnar epithelial cells with dense microvilli lined the luminal surface of the intestine with obvious goblet cells openings among them.

  19. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  20. Myc deletion rescues Apc deficiency in the small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sansom, O.J.; Meniel, V.S.; Muncan, V.; Phesse, T.J.; Wilkins, J.A.; Reed, K.R.; Vass, J.K.; Athineos, D.; Clevers, J.C.; Clarke, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    The APC gene encodes the adenomatous polyposis coli tumour suppressor protein, germline mutation of which characterizes familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), an autosomal intestinal cancer syndrome. Inactivation of APC is also recognized as the key early event in the development of sporadic colorect

  1. Analysis of the Small Intestinal Microbiome of Children With Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    was found for eight bacterial species. There was a correlation between disaccharidase activity (particularly lactase ) and duodenal microbiota...was used for duodenal microbiome analysis. Intestinal disaccharidase activity analysis included lactase , sucrase, maltase, and palatinase...Table 2 Enzyme activity Subjects Lactase Sucrase Maltase Palatinase Autistics 15.15±3.84

  2. Dietary protein absorption of the small intestine in human neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, Maaike W.; de Bruijn, Adrianus C. J. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Renes, Ingrid B.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The intestine plays a key role in the absorption of dietary proteins, which determines growth of human neonates. Bowel resection in the neonatal period brings loss of absorptive and protective surface and may consequently lead to malabsorption of dietary nutrients. However, there are no

  3. Small intestinal biopsies in celiac disease: duodenal or jejunal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, JW; Wahab, PJ; Mulder, C.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, pediatric societies advise that intestinal mucosal specimens should be obtained using suction capsule from the jejunum. This procedure is strenuous for patients, time-consuming, expensive and requires radiographic guidance. Mucosal biopsies

  4. Titanium dioxide induced inflammation in the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolina Maciel Nogueira; Walter Mendes de Azevedo; Maria Lucia Zaidan Dagli; Sérgio Hiroshi Toma; André Zonetti de Arruda Leite; Maria Laura Lordello; I(e)da Nishitokukado

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2)nanoparticles (NPTiO2) and microparticles (MPTiO2)on the inflammatory response in the small intestine of mice.METHODS:BI 57/6 male mice received distilled water suspensions containing TiO2 (100 mg/kg body weight)as NPTiO2 (66 nm),or MPTiO2 (260 nm) by gavage for 10 d,once a day; the control group received only distilled water.At the end of the treatment the duodenum,jejunum and ileum were extracted for assessment of cytokines,inflammatory cells and titanium content.The cytokines interleukin (IL)-1b,IL-4,IL-6,IL-8,IL-IO,IL-12,IL-13,IL-17,IL-23,tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α),intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in segments of jejunum and ileum (mucosa and underlying muscular tissue).CD4+ and CD8+ T cells,natural killer cells,and dendritic cells were evaluated in duodenum,jejunum and ileum samples fixed in 10% formalin by immunohistochemistry.The titanium content was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.RESULTS:We found increased levels of T CD4+ cells (cells/mm2) in duodenum:NP 1240 ± 139.4,MP 1070 ± 154.7 vs 458 ±-50.39 (P < 0.01); jejunum:NP 908.4 ± 130.3,MP 813.8 ± 103.8 vs 526.6 ±-61.43 (P < 0.05);and ileum:NP 818.60 ± 123.0,MP 640.1 ± 32.75 vs 466.9 ± 22.4 (P < 0.05).In comparison to the control group,the groups receiving TiO2 showed a statistically significant increase in the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-12,IL-4,IL-23,TNF-α,IFN-γ,and TGF-β.The cytokine production was more pronounced in the ileum (mean ± SE):IL-12:NP 33.98 ±-11.76,MP 74.11 ± 25.65 vs 19.06 ± 3.92 (P < 0.05); IL-4:NP 17.36 ± 9.96,MP 22.94 ±-7.47 vs 2.19 ± 0.65 (P < 0.05); IL-23:NP 157.20 ± 75.80,MP 134.50 ±-38.31 vs 22.34 ±-5.81 (P < 0.05); TNFα:NP 3.71 ± 1.33,MP 5.44 ± 1.67 vs 0.99± 019 (P < 0.05); IFNy:NP 15.85± 9.99,MP 34.08 ± 11.44 vs 2.81 ± 0.69 (P

  5. Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with small intestinal malignancy and cervical carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Jie Li; Zhi-Qing Wang; Bao-Ping Wu

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of 30-year-old woman with PeutzJeghers syndrome (P.1S).Because of small intestinal obstruction,she received the small intestinal polypectomy in 2001,and the pathological diagnosis was Peutz-Jeghers polyp canceration (mucinous adenocarcinoma,infiltrating full-thickness of the intestine).The patient did not feel uncomfortable after 6 mo of chemotherapy and other management.We kept a follow-up study on her and found that she suffered from cervical cancer in 2007,with a pathological diagnosis of cervical adenosquamous carcinoma.The patient presented with typical features of PJS,but without a family history.The PJS accompanied with both small intestinal and cervical malignancies has not been reported so far in the world.

  6. Molecular characterisation of non-absorptive and absorptive enterocytes in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, N; Newrzella, D; Böhm, C;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Perturbation of differentiation of the crypt-villus axis of the human small intestine is associated with several intestinal disorders of clinical importance. At present, differentiation of small intestinal enterocytes in the crypt-villus axis is not well characterised. SUBJECTS...... genes, and vesicle/transport related genes was found. CONCLUSION: Two types of enterocytes were dissected at the molecular level, the non-absorptive enterocyte located in the upper part of crypts and the absorptive enterocyte found in the middle of villi. These data improve our knowledge about...... the physiology of the crypt-villus architecture in human small intestine and provide new insights into pathophysiological phenomena, such as villus atrophy, which is clinically important....

  7. [Report on 16 cases of small intestine ascariasis diagnosed by capsule endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; Li, Rong-Zhi; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2013-06-01

    The clinical data and capsule endoscopy image of 16 adult patients with small intestine ascariasis were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively from June 2006 to June 2012 in West China Hospital. Among the 16 patients, 15 cases manifested as gastrointestinal bleeding, 15 cases showed anemia (3 severe, 10 moderate, and 2 mild), 2 had hypoalbuminemia, 1 had peripheral blood eosinophilia. All the cases were found to be fecal occult blood positive, but no Ascaris eggs found in the feces. Capsule endoscopy showed they were infected with Ascaris worms. The worms were found in the proximal small intestine in 14 patients and 2 in the distal intestine. Mucosal erythema and erosions around the worm were observed in 3 cases, and 7 cases were found with active bleeding or old haemorrhage in small intestine.

  8. Polydatin Alleviates Small Intestine Injury during Hemorrhagic Shock as a SIRT1 Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the role of SIRT1 in small intestine damage following severe hemorrhagic shock and to investigate whether polydatin (PD can activate SIRT1 in shock treatment. Research Design and Methods. The severe hemorrhagic shock model was reproduced in Sprague Dawley rats. Main Outcome Measures. Two hours after drug administration, half of the rats were assessed for survival time evaluation and the remainder were used for small intestinal tissue sample collection. Results. Bleeding and swelling appeared in the small intestine with epithelial apoptosis and gut barrier disturbance during hemorrhagic shock. SIRT1 activity and PGC-1α protein expression of the small intestine were decreased, which led to an increase in acetylated SOD2 and decreases in the expression and activity of SOD2, resulting in severe oxidative stress. The decreased SIRT1 activity and expression were partially restored in the PD administration group, which showed reduced intestine injury and longer survival time. Notably, the effect of PD was abolished after the addition of Ex527, a selective inhibitor of SIRT1. Conclusions. The results collectively suggest a role for the SIRT1-PGC-1α-SOD2 axis in small intestine injury following severe hemorrhagic shock and that PD is an effective SIRT1 activator for the shock treatment.

  9. Effects of dietary pectin and fat on the small intestinal contents and exocrine pancreas of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, L P; Schneeman, B O

    1980-10-01

    The effects of dietary pectin and fat level on digestive enzyme activities in the pancreas and small intestine and on intestinal bile acid levels were investigated. In unfed rats, dietary pectin did not influence the pancreatic enzymes studied, but a higher level of corn oil in the diet lowered the amylase activity in the pancreas, increased pancreatic lipase activity and slightly lowered the chymotrypsin and trypsin activities. Diet did not change the dry weight of the pancreas. In the fed rats, dietary pectin increased the dry weight of the small gut wash plus the mucosal scraping. Dietary pectin increased the small intestinal lipase and chymotrypsin levels and at the low level of fat only, increased amylase and trypsin activities in the small intestine of fed rats. Intestinal lipase levels were higher and amylase levels lower in rats consuming the high level of corn oil. These results indicate that changes in dietary fat level led to changes in the amylase and lipase content of secreted pancreatic juice and that differences in absorption associated with diets containing pectin could be the result of increased material in the small intestine.

  10. High-resolution 3D analysis of mouse small-intestinal stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2016-09-01

    Here we detail a protocol for whole-mount immunostaining of mouse small-intestinal villi that can be used to generate high-resolution 3D images of all gut cell types, including blood and lymphatic vessel cells, neurons, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and immune cells. The procedure describes perfusion, fixation, dissection, immunostaining, mounting, clearing, confocal imaging and quantification, using intestinal vasculature as an example. As intestinal epithelial cells prevent visualization with some antibodies, we also provide an optional protocol to remove these cells before fixation. In contrast to alternative current techniques, our protocol enables the entire villus to be visualized with increased spatial resolution of cell location, morphology and cell-cell interactions, thus allowing for easy quantification of phenotypes. The technique, which takes 7 d from mouse dissection to microscopic examination, will be useful for researchers who are interested in most aspects of intestinal biology, including mucosal immunology, infection, nutrition, cancer biology and intestinal microbiota.

  11. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis.

  12. Effects of Clostridium perfringens Beta-Toxin on the Rabbit Small Intestine and Colon▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jorge E.; McClane, Bruce A.; Saputo, Juliann; Parker, Jaquelyn; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B and type C isolates, which produce beta-toxin (CPB), cause fatal diseases originating in the intestines of humans or livestock. Our previous studies demonstrated that CPB is necessary for type C isolate CN3685 to cause bloody necrotic enteritis in a rabbit ileal loop model and also showed that purified CPB, in the presence of trypsin inhibitor (TI), can reproduce type C pathology in rabbit ileal loops. We report here a more complete characterization of the effects of purified CPB in the rabbit small and large intestines. One microgram of purified CPB, in the presence of TI, was found to be sufficient to cause significant accumulation of hemorrhagic luminal fluid in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal loops treated for 6 h with purified CPB, while no damage was observed in corresponding loops receiving CPB (no TI) or TI alone. In contrast to the CPB sensitivity of the small intestine, the colon was not affected by 6 h of treatment with even 90 μg of purified CPB whether or not TI was present. Time course studies showed that purified CPB begins to induce small intestinal damage within 1 h, at which time the duodenum is less damaged than the jejunum or ileum. These observations help to explain why type B and C infections primarily involve the small intestine, establish CPB as a very potent and fast-acting toxin in the small intestines, and confirm a key role for intestinal trypsin as an innate intestinal defense mechanism against CPB-producing C. perfringens isolates. PMID:18625730

  13. Effects of Clostridium perfringens beta-toxin on the rabbit small intestine and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jorge E; McClane, Bruce A; Saputo, Juliann; Parker, Jaquelyn; Uzal, Francisco A

    2008-10-01

    Clostridium perfringens type B and type C isolates, which produce beta-toxin (CPB), cause fatal diseases originating in the intestines of humans or livestock. Our previous studies demonstrated that CPB is necessary for type C isolate CN3685 to cause bloody necrotic enteritis in a rabbit ileal loop model and also showed that purified CPB, in the presence of trypsin inhibitor (TI), can reproduce type C pathology in rabbit ileal loops. We report here a more complete characterization of the effects of purified CPB in the rabbit small and large intestines. One microgram of purified CPB, in the presence of TI, was found to be sufficient to cause significant accumulation of hemorrhagic luminal fluid in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal loops treated for 6 h with purified CPB, while no damage was observed in corresponding loops receiving CPB (no TI) or TI alone. In contrast to the CPB sensitivity of the small intestine, the colon was not affected by 6 h of treatment with even 90 mug of purified CPB whether or not TI was present. Time course studies showed that purified CPB begins to induce small intestinal damage within 1 h, at which time the duodenum is less damaged than the jejunum or ileum. These observations help to explain why type B and C infections primarily involve the small intestine, establish CPB as a very potent and fast-acting toxin in the small intestines, and confirm a key role for intestinal trypsin as an innate intestinal defense mechanism against CPB-producing C. perfringens isolates.

  14. Perforated small intestine in a patient with T-cell lymphoma; a rare cause of peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrişor Banu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The nontraumatic perforations of the small intestine are pathological entities with particular aspects in respect to diagnosis and treatment. These peculiarities derive from the nonspecific clinical expression of the peritonitis syndrome, and from the multitude of causes that might be the primary sources of the perforation: foreign bodies, inflammatory diseases, tumors, infectious diseases, etc. Accordingly, in most cases intestinal perforation is discovered only by laparotomy and the definitive diagnosis is available only after histopathologic examination. Small bowel malignancies are rare; among them, lymphomas rank third in frequency, being mostly B-cell non Hodgkin lymphomas. Only 10% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas are with T-cell. We report the case of a 57 years’ old woman with intestinal T-cell lymphoma, whose first clinical symptomatology was related to a complication represented by perforation of the small intestine. Laparotomy performed in emergency identified an ulcerative lesion with perforation in the jejunum, which required segmental enterectomy with anastomosis. The nonspecific clinical manifestations of intestinal lymphomas make from diagnosis a difficult procedure. Due to the fact that surgery does not have a definite place in the treatment of the small intestinal lymphomas (for cases complicated with perforation, and beyond the morbidity associated with the surgery performed in emergency conditions, prognosis of these patients is finally given by the possibility to control the systemic disease through adjuvant therapy.

  15. A Multicellular Approach Forms a Significant Amount of Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Frédéric G.; Matthews, Jamil A.; Speer, Allison L.; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Barthel, Erik R.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has successfully been used to rescue Lewis rats after massive small bowel resection. In this study, we transitioned the technique to a mouse model, allowing investigation of the processes involved during TESI formation through the transgenic tools available in this species. This is a necessary step toward applying the technique to human therapy. Multicellular organoid units were derived from small intestines of transgenic mice and transplanted within the abdomen on biodegradable polymers. Immunofluorescence staining was used to characterize the cellular processes during TESI formation. We demonstrate the preservation of Lgr5- and DcamKl1-positive cells, two putative intestinal stem cell populations, in proximity to their niche mesenchymal cells, the intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs), at the time of implantation. Maintenance of the relationship between ISEMF and crypt epithelium is observed during the growth of TESI. The engineered small intestine has an epithelium containing a differentiated epithelium next to an innervated muscularis. Lineage tracing demonstrates that all the essential components, including epithelium, muscularis, nerves, and some of the blood vessels, are of donor origin. This multicellular approach provides the necessary cell population to regenerate large amounts of intestinal tissue that could be used to treat short bowel syndrome. PMID:21395443

  16. Characteristic and functional analysis of a newly established porcine small intestinal epithelial cell line.

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    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available The mucosal surface of intestine is continuously exposed to both potential pathogens and beneficial commensal microorganisms. Recent findings suggest that intestinal epithelial cells, which once considered as a simple physical barrier, are a crucial cell lineage necessary for maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Therefore, establishing a stable and reliable intestinal epithelial cell line for future research on the mucosal immune system is necessary. In the present study, we established a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (ZYM-SIEC02 by introducing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene into small intestinal epithelial cells derived from a neonatal, unsuckled piglet. Morphological analysis revealed a homogeneous cobblestone-like morphology of the epithelial cell sheets. Ultrastructural indicated the presence of microvilli, tight junctions, and a glandular configuration typical of the small intestine. Furthermore, ZYM-SIEC02 cells expressed epithelial cell-specific markers including cytokeratin 18, pan-cytokeratin, sucrase-isomaltase, E-cadherin and ZO-1. Immortalized ZYM-SIEC02 cells remained diploid and were not transformed. In addition, we also examined the host cell response to Salmonella and LPS and verified the enhanced expression of mRNAs encoding IL-8 and TNF-α by infection with Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium. Results showed that IL-8 protein expression were upregulated following Salmonella invasion. TLR4, TLR6 and IL-6 mRNA expression were upregulated following stimulation with LPS, ZYM-SIEC02 cells were hyporeponsive to LPS with respect to IL-8 mRNA expression and secretion. TNFα mRNA levels were significantly decreased after LPS stimulation and TNF-α secretion were not detected challenged with S. Typhimurium neither nor LPS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ZYM-SIEC02 cells retained the morphological and functional characteristics typical of primary swine

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Induces Developmental Stage-Dependent Structural Changes in the Immature Small Intestine

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    Kathryn S. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Premature infants are commonly subject to intestinal inflammation. Since the human small intestine does not reach maturity until term gestation, premature infants have a unique challenge, as either acute or chronic inflammation may alter the normal development of the intestinal tract. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been shown to acutely alter goblet cell numbers and villus length in adult mice. In this study we tested the effects of TNF on villus architecture and epithelial cells at different stages of development of the immature small intestine. Methods. To examine the effects of TNF-induced inflammation, we injected acute, brief, or chronic exposures of TNF in neonatal and juvenile mice. Results. TNF induced significant villus blunting through a TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1 mediated mechanism, leading to loss of villus area. This response to TNFR1 signaling was altered during intestinal development, despite constant TNFR1 protein expression. Acute TNF-mediated signaling also significantly decreased Paneth cells. Conclusions. Taken together, the morphologic changes caused by TNF provide insight as to the effects of inflammation on the developing intestinal tract. Additionally, they suggest a mechanism which, coupled with an immature immune system, may help to explain the unique susceptibility of the immature intestine to inflammatory diseases such as NEC.

  18. Gut microbial colonization orchestrates TLR2 expression, signaling and epithelial proliferation in the small intestinal mucosa.

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    Nives Hörmann

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that determines renewal of the intestinal epithelium and remodeling of the intestinal mucosa. At present, it is not resolved if components of the gut microbiota can augment innate immune sensing in the intestinal epithelium via the up-regulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Here, we report that colonization of germ-free (GF Swiss Webster mice with a complex gut microbiota augments expression of TLR2. The microbiota-dependent up-regulation of components of the TLR2 signaling complex could be reversed by a 7 day broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. TLR2 downstream signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 and protein-kinase B (AKT induced by bacterial TLR2 agonists resulted in increased proliferation of the small intestinal epithelial cell line MODE-K. Mice that were colonized from birth with a normal gut microbiota (conventionally-raised; CONV-R showed signs of increased small intestinal renewal and apoptosis compared with GF controls as indicated by elevated mRNA levels of the proliferation markers Ki67 and Cyclin D1, elevated transcripts of the apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells per intestinal villus structure. In accordance, TLR2-deficient mice showed reduced proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that a tuned proliferation response of epithelial cells following microbial colonization could aid to protect the host from its microbial colonizers and increase intestinal surface area.

  19. Co-and post-translational events in the biogenesis of pig small intestinal aminopeptidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    1982-01-01

    ,000. When translation was performed in the presence of dog pancreatic microsomes, a Mr 140,000 polypeptide was also observed. A polypeptide of Mr 115,000 was seen for the enzyme, purified from tunicamycin exposed explants. This result suggests that aminopeptidase N is co-translationally inserted......The biogenesis of pig small intestinal aminopeptidase N (EC 3. 4. 11. 2) was studied by cell-free translation of intestinal mRNA and by labelling of organ cultured intestinal explants. In cell-free translation, the primary mRNA translation product of aminopeptidase N was a polypeptide of Mr 115...

  20. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru, E-mail: atotuka@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  1. Digestion of so-called resistant starch sources in the human small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Hagedoorn, RE; de Graaff, R; Elzinga, H; Tabak, S; Yang, YX; Stellaard, F

    2000-01-01

    Background: Resistant starch sources, which are only partially digested in the small intestine, can be used to increase colonic availability of short-chain fatty acids. Objective: To study the characteristics of the fermentation of resistant starch, the digestion of resistant starch in the small int

  2. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Becker

    Full Text Available Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation.

  3. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  4. The effect of small intestine heterogeneity on irreversible electroporation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is an ablation modality that utilizes microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. This results in selective cell death while preserving all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix. Here, finite element analysis and experimental results are utilized to examine the effect of NTIRE on the small intestine due to concern over collateral damage to this organ during NTIRE treatment of abdominal cancers. During previous studies, the electrical treatment parameters were chosen based on a simplified homogeneous tissue model. The small intestine, however, has very distinct layers, and a more realistic model is needed to further develop this technology for precise clinical applications. This study uses a two-dimensional finite element solution of the Laplace and heat conduction equations to investigate how small intestine heterogeneities affect the electric field and temperature distribution. Experimental results obtained by applying NTIRE to the rat small intestine in vivo support the heterogeneous effect of NTIRE on the tissue. The numerical modeling indicates that the electroporation parameters chosen for this study avoid thermal damage to the tissue. This is supported by histology obtained from the in vivo study, which showed preservation of extracellular structures. The finite element model also indicates that the heterogeneous structure of the small intestine has a significant effect on the electric field and volume of cell ablation during electroporation and could have a large impact on the extent of treatment. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue should be accounted for in clinical treatment planning.

  5. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro-duodeno-jejunal contrac......The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro......-duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  6. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES 130/0.4 impairs intestinal barrier integrity and metabolic function: findings from a mouse model of the isolated perfused small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Lung Wong

    Full Text Available The application of hydroxyethyl starch (HES for volume resuscitation is controversially discussed and clinical studies have suggested adverse effects of HES substitution, leading to increased patient mortality. Although, the intestine is of high clinical relevance and plays a crucial role in sepsis and inflammation, information about the effects of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity is very scarce. We therefore evaluated the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of HES on intestinal function and barrier integrity employing an isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine.An isolated perfused model of the mouse small intestine was established and intestines were vascularly perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 3% Albumin (N=7 or 3% HES (130/0.4; N=7. Intestinal metabolic function (galactose uptake, lactate-to-pyruvate ratio, edema formation (wet-to-dry weight ratio, morphology (histological and electron microscopical analysis, fluid shifts within the vascular, lymphatic and luminal compartments, as well as endothelial and epithelial barrier permeability (FITC-dextran translocation were evaluated in both groups.Compared to the Albumin group, HES perfusion did not significantly change the wet-to-dry weight ratio and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. However, perfusing the small intestine with 3% HES resulted in a significant loss of vascular fluid (p<0.01, an increased fluid accumulation in the intestinal lumen (p<0.001, an enhanced translocation of FITC-dextran from the vascular to the luminal compartment (p<0.001 and a significantly impaired intestinal galactose uptake (p<0.001. Morphologically, these findings were associated with an aggregation of intracellular vacuoles within the intestinal epithelial cells and enlarged intercellular spaces.A vascular perfusion with 3% HES impairs the endothelial and epithelial barrier integrity as well as metabolic function of the small intestine.

  7. Preventative Effects of Sodium Alginate on Indomethacin-induced Small-intestinal Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Sayo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Kawauchi, Shoji; Mizuno, Shigeto; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic technologies have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause serious mucosal injury in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (including the small intestine). A drug to treat NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury (SII) is lacking. Sodium alginate is a soluble dietary fiber extracted from brown seaweed and its solution has been used as a hemostatic agent to treat gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric ulcers. Whether sodium alginate has therapeutic effects on NSAID-induced SII and its mechanism of action are not known. Here, we investigated if administration of two forms (high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW)) of sodium alginate could ameliorate indomethacin-induced SII. Pretreatment with HMW sodium alginate or LMW sodium alginate before indomethacin administration improved ulceration and the resultant intestinal shortening was associated with reduced histological severity of mucosal injury and ameliorated mRNA expression of inflammation-related molecules in the small intestine. We found that mRNAs of secretory Muc2 and membrane-associated Muc1, Muc3 and Muc4 were expressed in the small intestine. mRNA expression of Muc1-4 was increased in indomethacin-induced SII, and these increases were prevented by sodium alginate. Thus, administration of sodium alginate could be a therapeutic approach to prevent indomethacin-induced SII.

  8. Class II antigen-associated invariant chain mRNA in mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, A J; Frederick, D; Hagen, S J; Katz, J D

    1991-09-30

    MHC class II antigen-associated invariant (Ii) chain mRNA appears in mouse small intestine during postnatal development. Ii chain cDNA hybridizes to RNA from epithelial sheets dissociated from the lamina propria with EDTA. Of several mouse organs tested, only bone marrow and spleen contain higher levels of Ii chain mRNA than small bowel. Ii chain mRNA is not detected in stomach, colon, duodenum, testis, liver, submandibular gland, or L-cell RNA; brain contains a cross-reactive but uncharacterized sequence. cDNA amplification using primers specific for both Ii31 and Ii41 chain mRNAs showed that both forms occur in small intestine. These results support the conclusion that regulation of the class II Ii chain gene is associated with the ontogeny of intestinal immunity.

  9. Stagnant loop syndrome resulting from small-bowel irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Stagnant or blind-loop syndrome includes vitamin B12 malabsorption, steatorrhea, and bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. A case is presented to demonstrate this syndrome occurring after small-bowel irradiation injury with exaggeration postenterocolic by-pass. Alteration of normal small-bowel flora is basic to development of the stagnant-loop syndrome. Certain strains of bacteria as Bacteriodes and E. coli are capable of producing a malabsorption state. Definitive therapy for this syndrome developing after severe irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass includes antibiotics. Rapid symptomatic relief from diarrhea and improved malabsorption studies usually follow appropriate antibiotic therapy. Recolonization of the loop(s) with the offending bacterial species may produce exacerbation of symptoms. Since antibiotics are effective, recognition of this syndrome is important. Foul diarrheal stools should not be considered a necessary consequence of irradiation injury and intestinal by-pass.

  10. Laparoscopic resection of synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ding-Wei; Pan, Yu; Yan, Jia-Fei; Mou, Yi-Ping

    2014-05-28

    Synchronous gastric cancer and primary small intestinal lymphoma are extremely rare. A 49-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with a history of upper abdominal pain for two weeks and was diagnosed with synchronous cancer. During hospitalization, the patient underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy + resection of bilateral ovaries + partial resection of both small intestine and descending colon. Pathological examination revealed a synchronous cancer consisting of early gastric cancer with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma located in mucosa, with lymph node metastasis (3+/29) (T1N1M0, stage IB); and diffuse large B cell lymphoma of small intestine involving descending colon and bilateral ovaries, with lymph node metastasis (2+/5) (Ann Arbor IIE). The patient recovered well, without any obvious complications and was discharged on post-operative day 7. The patient received six cycles of chemotherapy after operation. She has been doing well with no evidence of recurrence for 13 mo.

  11. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourret, Jérôme; Willing, Benjamin P; Croxen, Matthew A; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity.

  12. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Benjamin P.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:27096607

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of a gap junction protein (connexin43) in the muscularis externa of murine, canine, and human intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Huizinga, J D; Thuneberg, L;

    1993-01-01

    colon the border layer between the circular muscle and the submucosa reacted strongly, and scattered activity was found in the portion of the circular muscle layer (one tenth of its thickness) closest to the submucosa. The remainder of the circular muscle layer and the entire longitudinal muscle layer...... were negative in the canine colon. In the coronary artery we could not confirm the positive, specific labeling reported by other investigators (l.c.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  14. Effects of early feeding and exogenous putrescine on growth and small intestinal development in posthatch ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, P; Xu, J; Chen, W; Tangara, M; Qi, Z L; Peng, J

    2010-02-01

    1. Effects of early feeding with a diet containing added putrescine on duck intestinal development and growth performance were examined by a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement with two different feeding times (6 and 48 h) and two levels of putrescine (0 and 025%). 2. A significant main effect of early feeding on increasing body weight (BW) was observed from hatch to 35 d, whereas dietary putrescine had no significant effect on BW. 3. In the first week posthatch, enhanced small intestinal weight and intestinal density (weight of intestinal tissue/unit length of intestine), increased villus length and reduced crypt depth were observed in the early feeding group, while no effect was observed when putrescine was added to the diet. 4. Maltase and sucrase activity and protein/DNA ratio in jejunum were increased by early feeding in the first week, while decreased by putrescine supplementation. 5. In conclusion, early feeding methods have great potential for small intestine development and thereafter enhanced the growth performance of ducks, but dietary putrescine used during this period should be used cautiously to avoid toxicity.

  15. Diagnostic algorithm to differentiate lymphoma from inflammation in feline small intestinal biopsy samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiupel, M; Smedley, R C; Pfent, C; Xie, Y; Xue, Y; Wise, A G; DeVaul, J M; Maes, R K

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and small intestinal lymphoma in cats is often difficult, especially when only endoscopic biopsy specimens are available for evaluation. However, a correct diagnosis is imperative for proper treatment and prognosis. A retrospective study was performed using surgical and endoscopic intestinal biopsy specimens from 63 cats with a history of chronic diarrhea or vomiting or weight loss. A diagnosis of lymphoma or inflammation was based on microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections alone, HE-stained sections plus results of immunohistochemical labeling (IHC) for CD3e and CD79a, and HE staining, immunophenotyping, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results for B and/or T cell clonality. In addition, various histomorphologic parameters were evaluated for significant differences between lymphoma and IBD using Fisher's exact test. The sensitivity and specificity of each parameter in the diagnosis of lymphoma were also determined. Results of Bayesian statistical analysis demonstrated that combining histologic evaluation of small intestinal biopsy specimens with immunophenotyping and analysis of clonality of lymphoid infiltrates results in more accurate differentiation of neoplastic versus inflammatory lymphocytes. Important histologic features that differentiated intestinal lymphoma from IBD included lymphoid infiltration of the intestinal wall beyond the mucosa, epitheliotropism (especially intraepithelial nests and plaques), heterogeneity, and nuclear size of lymphocytes. Based on the results of this study, a stepwise diagnostic algorithm that first uses histologic assessment, followed by immunophenotyping and then PCR to determine clonality of the lymphocytes, was developed to more accurately differentiate between intestinal lymphoma and IBD.

  16. Effects of realimentation on small intestinal morphology and disaccharidase activity in malnutrition Sprague-Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustadi Sosrosumihardjo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Low birth-weight infant and intrauterine growth retardation are still a health problem, especially in Indonesia due to high prevalence and need to be reduced. Malnutrition in infants are most common occur in low birth-weight infants. Malnutrition in rats resulted in hypotrophic and normoplastic mucosa of the small intestine. The finding was not only showed that small intestine was able to maintain its cell number in condition with restriction nutrient, however also suggested the posibility of epithelial regeneration if given adequate nutrient intake. Did realimentation recover the hypotrophic normoplastic mucosa to normotrophic normoplastic? The study aim to answer that question. Experimental animal study with post test-control group design was performed using 40 male litter of Sprague-Dawley rats, was fed standard chow. The study was divided into phases prenatally-induced malnutrition and continued with phase realimentation. The result of this study is the body weight, mucosal thickness, villus height, cryptus depth, ratio of villus/ crypt, number of villi, protein content, and disaccharidases of rats realimentation group was higher than non-realimentation group, but lower than control group. Prenatally-induced malnutrition did not reduced the population of small intestinal enterocytes. Realimentation in rats in prenatally-induced malnutrition was able to improve the hypotrophy of small intestinal mucosa and to increase the disaccharidases activities but did not reach the normal values. Realimentation in rats in prenatally-induced malnutrition was able to improve the maturity of small intestine mucosa but did not reach the normal values. The information will be helpfull to decide the policy of maternal malnutrition. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:208-16Keywords: small intestinal morphology, disaccharidase activity, Sprague-Dawley rats, prenatally-induced malnutrition, realimentation.

  17. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides Against Small Intestinal Damage Induced by Non-Steroidal Anti-Inlfammatory Drugs in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hong; PAN Xing-chang; WANG Shao-kang; YANG Li-gang; SUN Gui-ju

    2014-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were able to produce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of small intestinal damage. In this study, the putative protective effect of wheat peptides was evaluated in a NSAID-induced small intestinal damage model in rats, different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by intragastric administration for 30 d until small intestinal damage was caused. Before sacriifcing, NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) or physiological saline were infused into the digestive tract twice. Wheat peptides administration reduced edema and small intestinal damage, and signiifcantly decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in mucous membrane of small intestine. Oxidative stress was signiifcantly increased after NSAID infusion and was reduced by wheat peptides. Wheat peptides increased glutathione peroxidase(GSH-Px) activity in mucous membrane of small intestine. µ-Opioid receptor mRNA expression decreased more signiifcantly in wheat peptides treated rats than in the model control group. Overall, the results suggest that non-steroidal anti-inlfammatory drugs induced small intestinal damage in rats and wheat peptides administration may be an effective tool for protecting small intestinal tissue against NSAID-induced small intestinal damage and oxidative stress.

  18. Immunohistochemical characterization of cellular proliferation in small intestinal hyperplasia of rats with hepatic Strobilocercus fasciolaris infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagapa, J T; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    2008-07-01

    Rats infected with the larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis harbour the intermediate stage of the parasite Strobilocercus fasciolaris within the liver. Affected animals also develop gastric and intestinal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of the gastric hyperplasia has been extensively investigated, but few studies have addressed the nature of the intestinal changes. This study characterizes the proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemical labelling for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. At 6 weeks post-infection (wpi) there was an increase in villous length but crypt depth was normal. At 9 wpi there was evidence of epithelial hyperplasia, increased villous length and crypt depth, and expansion of zones of epithelial proliferation. Immunohistochemical labelling indicated that an increase in the number of proliferating cells produced a greater number of progeny cells. Intestinal hyperplasia during experimental infection with T. taeniaeformis larvae is likely to be related to the associated gastropathy, although the mechanisms underlying both changes remain undefined.

  19. Ultrasonographic thickening of the muscularis propria in feline small intestinal small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma in the cat. More recently, an ultrasonographic pattern associated with feline small cell T-cell gastrointestinal lymphoma has been recognized as a diffuse thickening of the muscularis propria of the small intestine. This pattern is also described with feline inflammatory bowel disease. To evaluate the similarities between the diseases, we quantified the thickness of the muscularis propria layer in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of...

  20. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1.

  1. Endocytic trafficking from the small intestinal brush border probed with FM dye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border functions as the body's main portal for uptake of dietary nutrients and simultaneously acts as the largest permeability barrier against pathogens. To enable this, the digestive enzymes of the brush border are organized in lipid raft microdomains stabilized by cross...... localized deeper into the cytoplasm of the enterocytes. Two major raft-associated brush border enzymes, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N, were excluded from endocytosis. We propose that the terminal web cytoskeleton, by inhibiting traffic from apical early endosomes further into the cell......, contributes to the overall permeability barrier of the gut. Key words: FM dye, small intestine, brush border, endocytosis....

  2. Intestinal growth adaptation and glucagon-like peptide 2 in rats with ileal--jejunal transposition or small bowel resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Kissow, Hannelouise;

    2001-01-01

    , and twofold in the distally resected group. Tissue GLP-2 levels were unchanged in resected rats. The data indicate that transposition of a distal part of the small intestine, and thereby exposure of L cells to a more nutrient-rich chyme, leads to intestinal growth. The adaptive intestinal growth is associated......Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), produced by enteroendocrine L-cells, regulates intestinal growth. This study investigates circulating and intestinal GLP-2 levels in conditions with altered L-cell exposure to nutrients. Rats were allocated to the following experimental groups: ileal...... GLP-2 levels in the intestinal segments were unchanged. In resected rats with reduced intestinal capacity, adaptive small bowel growth was more pronounced following proximal resection than distal small bowel resection. Circulating GLP-2 levels increased threefold in proximally resected animals...

  3. What are the effects of proton pump inhibitors on the small intestine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Shunji

    2015-06-14

    Generally, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have great benefit for patients with acid related disease with less frequently occurring side effects. According to a recent report, PPIs provoke dysbiosis of the small intestinal bacterial flora, exacerbating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury. Several meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported that patients treated with PPIs, as well as post-gastrectomy patients, have a higher frequency of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) compared to patients who lack the aforementioned conditions. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence that these conditions induce Clostridium difficile infection. At this time, PPI-induced dysbiosis is considered a type of SIBO. It now seems likely that intestinal bacterial flora influence many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune diseases. When attempting to control intestinal bacterial flora with probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation, etc., the influence of acid suppression therapy, especially PPIs, should not be overlooked.

  4. Villous B cells of the small intestine are specialized for invariant NK T cell dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Peter; Wei, Bo; McPherson, Michael; Mendoza, Lesley Marie A; Nguyen, Sandra L; Turovskaya, Olga; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Huang, Tiffany T; Schrage, Matthew; Lobato, Lynn N; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Brewer, Sarah; Arditi, Moshe; Cheng, Genhong; Sartor, R Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D; Braun, Jonathan

    2008-04-01

    B cells are important in mucosal microbial homeostasis through their well-known role in secretory IgA production and their emerging role in mucosal immunoregulation. Several specialized intraintestinal B cell compartments have been characterized, but the nature of conventional B cells in the lamina propria is poorly understood. In this study, we identify a B cell population predominantly composed of surface IgM(+) IgD(+) cells residing in villi of the small intestine and superficial lamina propria of the large intestine, but distinct from the intraepithelial compartment or organized intestinal lymphoid structures. Small intestinal (villous) B cells are diminished in genotypes that alter the strength of BCR signaling (Bruton tyrosine kinase(xid), Galphai2(-/-)), and in mice lacking cognate BCR specificity. They are not dependent on enteric microbial sensing, because they are abundant in mice that are germfree or genetically deficient in TLR signaling. However, villous B cells are reduced in the absence of invariant NK T cells (Jalpha18(-/-) or CD1d(-/-) mice). These findings define a distinct population of conventional B cells in small intestinal villi, and suggest an immunologic link between CD1-restricted invariant NK T cells and this B cell population.

  5. Prevalence and pathological study of Paramphistomum infection in the small intestine of slaughtered ovine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Aliasghar; Javanbakht, Javad; Khani, Farzaneh; Hassan, Mehdi Aghamohammad; Khadivar, Farshid; Dadashi, Fereshteh; Alimohammadi, Samad; Amani, Amir

    2015-03-01

    Paramphistomiasis, a trematode infectious disease in ruminants, has been neglected but has recently emerged as an important cause of productivity loss. The small intestine of slaughtered sheep was collected weekly from abattoirs (Kermanshah, Sanandaj, Tabriz and Urmia Slaughterhouses) to monitoring the seasonal occurrence of Paramphistomosis, 2,421 sheep carcasses (743 male (30.69 %) and 1,678 female (69.31 %)) were examined, out of which 0.041 % were positive for Paramphistomum infestation. Furthermore, upon evaluation Paramphistomum termatodes, Gastrothylax crumenifer and Cotylophoron detected as well. Overall, the small intestinal infestation by such parasite was 0.041 % which contained hyperemia, severe congestion and haemorrhage. The highest infection in the sheep infected with Paramphistomum spp. was found during the summer (July to August) (6.7, 2 %) and followed by the autumn seasons (November to October) (3.8, 2.3 %). Microscopic study of the small intestine revealed dilatation of intestinal glands, destruction of superficial glands, replacement of fibrin, diffuse infiltration of inflammatory cells and fibrinonecrotic enteritis. Other changes as congestion hemorrhage and nodules of Ostertagia were observed in total examination of small intestines. According to statistical analysis by SPSS software and Chi square test revealed that there is significant difference between pathologic changes, seasons and ecological situations of the region (p  0.05).According to the results of pathologic changes of sheep small intestines, preventive measurements in the area should be taken to decrease the damages, so applying a parasitic control program is recommended.

  6. Membrane potential gradient is carbon monoxide-dependent in mouse and human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Lei; Farrugia, Gianrico; Harmsen, W Scott; Szurszewski, Joseph H

    2007-08-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the change in resting membrane potential (RMP) across the thickness of the circular muscle layer in the mouse and human small intestine and to determine whether the gradient in RMP is dependent on the endogenous production of carbon monoxide (CO). Conventional sharp glass microelectrodes were used to record the RMPs of circular smooth muscle cells at different depths in the human small intestine and in wild-type, HO2-KO, and W/W(V) mutant mouse small intestine. In the wild-type mouse and human intestine, the RMP of circular smooth muscle cells near the myenteric plexus was -65.3 +/- 2 mV and -58.4 +/- 2 mV, respectively, and -60.1 +/- 2 mV and -49.1 +/- 1 mV, respectively, in circular smooth muscle cells at the submucosal border. Oxyhemoglobin (20 microM), a trapping agent for CO, and chromium mesoporphyrin IX, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase, abolished the transwall gradient. The RMP gradients in mouse and human small intestine were not altered by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine (200 microM). No transwall RMP gradient was found in HO2-KO mice and W/W(V) mutant mice. TTX (1 microM) and 1H-[1,2,4-]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 microM) had no effect on the RMP gradient. These data suggest that the gradient in RMP across the thickness of the circular muscle layer of mouse and human small intestine is CO dependent.

  7. Development and Function of Secondary and Tertiary Lymphoid Organs in the Small Intestine and the Colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Manuela; Lochner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune system of the gut has evolved a number of specific lymphoid structures that contribute to homeostasis in the face of microbial colonization and food-derived antigenic challenge. These lymphoid organs encompass Peyer’s patches (PP) in the small intestine and their colonic counterparts that develop in a programed fashion before birth. In addition, the gut harbors a network of lymphoid tissues that is commonly designated as solitary intestinal lymphoid tissues (SILT). In contrast to PP, SILT develop strictly after birth and consist of a dynamic continuum of structures ranging from small cryptopatches (CP) to large, mature isolated lymphoid follicles (ILF). Although the development of PP and SILT follow similar principles, such as an early clustering of lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and the requirement for lymphotoxin beta (LTβ) receptor-mediated signaling, the formation of CP and their further maturation into ILF is associated with additional intrinsic and environmental signals. Moreover, recent data also indicate that specific differences exist in the regulation of ILF formation between the small intestine and the colon. Importantly, intestinal inflammation in both mice and humans is associated with a strong expansion of the lymphoid network in the gut. Recent experiments in mice suggest that these structures, although they resemble large, mature ILF in appearance, may represent de novo-induced tertiary lymphoid organs (TLO). While, so far, it is not clear whether intestinal TLO contribute to the exacerbation of inflammatory pathology, it has been shown that ILF provide the critical microenvironment necessary for the induction of an effective host response upon infection with enteric bacterial pathogens. Regarding the importance of ILF for intestinal immunity, interfering with the development and maturation of these lymphoid tissues may offer novel means for manipulating the immune response during intestinal infection or inflammation. PMID

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep......Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study...... into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP...

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Transport and Degradation of Feedstuffs in the Small Intestine

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Barles, Guy

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical modeling of the digestion in the small intestine. The main interest of our work is to consider, at the same time, different aspects of the digestion i.e. the transport of the bolus all along the intestine, feedstuffs degradation according to the enzymes and local physical conditions, and nutrients absorption. A system of coupled ordinary differential equations is used to model these phenomena. The major unknowns of this system are the position of the bolus and its composition. This system of equations is solved numerically. We present different numerical computations for the degradation, absorption and transport of the bolus with acceptable accuracy with experimental data. The main feature and interest of this model are its generality. Even if we are at an early stage of development, our approach can be adapted to treat any kind of feedstuffs in any non-ruminant animal to predict the composition and velocity of bolus in the small intestine.

  10. Morphology and stress-strain properties along the small intestine in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yanling; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2003-04-01

    The stress-strain relationship is determined by the inherent mechanical properties of the intestinal wall, the geometric configurations, the loading conditions and the zero-stress state of the segment. The purpose of this project was to provide morphometric and biomechanical data for rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The circumferential strains were referenced to the zero-stress state. Large morphometric variations were found along the small intestine with an increase in the outer circumferential length and luminal area and a decrease in wall thickness in distal direction. The serosal residual strain was tensile and decreased in distal direction (P small intestine. The zero-stress state must be considered in future biomechanical studies in the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Cross-sectional small intestinal surveillance of maintenance hemodialysis patients using video capsule endoscopy: SCHEMA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoe, Naoki; Matsukawa, Shigeaki; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Naganuma, Makoto; Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Ida, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Yoshitsugu; Hibi, Toshifumi; Ogata, Haruhiko; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Small intestinal pathology in hemodialysis (HD) patients has been studied in only a small number of retrospective case series. One method for noninvasively surveying small intestinal disorders is video capsule endoscopy (VCE). The primary aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of small intestinal abnormalities among asymptomatic maintenance HD outpatients using VCE. The secondary aim was to assess the clinical impact of these abnormalities. Patients and methods: This study consisted of two phases. In phase I, a cross-sectional study, a cohort of patients who received maintenance HD three times weekly at an outpatient hemodialysis clinic were studied using VCE. Phase II was a prospective cohort study with follow up for 1 year after VCE. Results: Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study, and two were excluded from analysis due to capsule retention in the stomach. The prevalence of small bowel abnormalities in HD patients was 64.8 % (35/54) (95 % confidential interval 52.1 % – 77.6 %). Of 54 patients, 21 (38.9 %) had mucosal lesions, 10 (18.5 %) had vascular lesions, and 4 (7.4 %) had both lesion types. During the 1-year follow-up period, events occurred in four patients. A small bowel-associated event was observed in one patient, who underwent laparoscopy-assisted small intestinal partial resection 3 months after diagnosis by VCE. All patients in whom events were seen had small bowel abnormalities; no events were observed in the VCE-negative group. Conclusions: Although asymptomatic maintenance HD patients had a high prevalence of small bowel abnormalities (64.8 %), they did not have a high incidence of small bowel-associated events during the 1-year follow-up. PMID:27227120

  12. Binding Studies on Isolated Porcine Small Intestinal Mucosa and in vitro Toxicity Studies Reveal Lack of Effect of C. perfringens Beta-Toxin on the Porcine Intestinal Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Roos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Beta-toxin (CPB is the essential virulence factor of C. perfringens type C causing necrotizing enteritis (NE in different hosts. Using a pig infection model, we showed that CPB targets small intestinal endothelial cells. Its effect on the porcine intestinal epithelium, however, could not be adequately investigated by this approach. Using porcine neonatal jejunal explants and cryosections, we performed in situ binding studies with CPB. We confirmed binding of CPB to endothelial but could not detect binding to epithelial cells. In contrast, the intact epithelial layer inhibited CPB penetration into deeper intestinal layers. CPB failed to induce cytopathic effects in cultured polarized porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 and primary jejunal epithelial cells. C. perfringens type C culture supernatants were toxic for cell cultures. This, however, was not inhibited by CPB neutralization. Our results show that, in the porcine small intestine, CPB primarily targets endothelial cells and does not bind to epithelial cells. An intact intestinal epithelial layer prevents CPB diffusion into underlying tissue and CPB alone does not cause direct damage to intestinal epithelial cells. Additional factors might be involved in the early epithelial damage which is needed for CPB diffusion towards its endothelial targets in the small intestine.

  13. Capsule enteroscopy and radiology of the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fork, Frans-Thomas [Malmoe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Aabakken, Lars [Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-12-15

    In a very few years, the video capsule for small bowel enteroscopy has gained widespread clinical acceptance. It is readily ingested, disposable, and allows for a complete, low-invasive endoscopic examination of the entire mucosa of the small bowel. It is a patient-friendly method and a first-line procedure in the difficult evaluation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. It has the highest proven figure of diagnostic sensitivity for detecting lesions of the mucosa, irrespective of aetiology. The limitations of capsule endoscopy include difficulty in localising mucosal lesions anatomically and its restricted use in patients with dysphagia, strictures or motor dysfunction. Strictures, transmural and extra-mural lesions in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease are evaluated by MRI- enterography and CT-enterography. (orig.)

  14. Exacerbation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal lesions by antisecretory drugs in rats: the role of intestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-11-01

    Antisecretory drugs such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2-RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used for the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the effects of these drugs on NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers are not fully understood. The effects of H2-RAs and PPIs on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions and small intestinal motility were examined in rats. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were used. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg) was administered orally in fasted or fed rats, and gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after indomethacin administration. Intestinal motility was measured by using a balloon method under urethane anesthesia. Indomethacin produced multiple lesions in the gastric corpus in fasted rats and in the small intestine in fed rats: 1) H2-RAs (cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine) and PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) markedly inhibited the formation of gastric lesions. 2) The drugs, except for lansoprazole, increased intestinal lesions. 3) H2-RAs augmented the increase in intestinal motility caused by indomethacin, and the effects of H2-RAs on motility and intestinal lesions were markedly inhibited by atropine. 4) Lansoprazole inhibited the formation of intestinal lesions, and the effect was prevented by both pharmacological ablation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and pretreatment with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a selective inhibitor of nitric-oxide synthesis. The results suggest that: 1) inhibition of acid secretion by antisecretory drugs may exacerbate NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, 2) H2-RAs further aggravate lesions by increasing intestinal motility via the activation of cholinergic pathways, and 3) lansoprazole protects the intestinal mucosa against NSAID-related ulcerative stimuli.

  15. Drug elimination function of rat small intestine: metabolism and intraluminal excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, M; Kurosaki, Y; Kimura, T; Sezaki, H

    1984-10-15

    The metabolic and excretory function of the small intestine was investigated after oral and intravenous administration of drugs having an aromatic amino group to rats. After administration of drugs into the intestinal loop at the initial concentration of 0.1 mM, significant excretion of their N-acetylated forms into the lumen was observed. The amount of N-acetyl forms excreted in the lumen were 39.3 +/- 3.5, 63.5 +/- 20.9 and 18.0 +/- 13.8% of disappeared drugs from the lumen for p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), p-aminosalicylic acid and sulfanilic acid, respectively. The excretion of p-acetamidobenzoic acid (Ac-PABA) after the absorption of PABA was reduced by the coadministration with salicylic acid, benzoic acid and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Salicylic acid noncompetitively inhibited the acetylation of PABA by the intestinal N-acetyltransferase. A good correlation was found between the intestinal N-acetyltransferase activities for drugs and the intraluminal excretion of N-acetyl derivatives after intestinal absorption of drugs. These results indicate that a drug having a higher susceptibility to intestinal N-acetyltransferase would undergo a greater excretion into the lumen in its N-acetyl form after intestinal absorption. After intravenous administration of PABA at a dose of 100 mumole/kg, 4.02 +/- 0.51% of dose was excreted in the lumen as Ac-PABA in 30 min. On the other hand, a significantly smaller fraction (2.72 +/- 0.68% of dose) was excreted in the lumen after intravenous injection of 100 mumole/kg of Ac-PABA. The larger excretion of Ac-PABA after administration of PABA indicates the contribution of intestinal metabolism on the transfer of PABA not only after oral, but also after intravenous administration.

  16. A breakdown in communication? Understanding the effects of aging on the human small intestine epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabbott, Neil A

    2015-10-01

    In the intestine, a single layer of epithelial cells sealed together at their apical surfaces by tight junctions helps to prevent the luminal commensal and pathogenic micro-organisms and their toxins from entering host tissues. The intestinal epithelium also helps to maintain homoeostasis in the mucosal immune system by expressing anti-inflammatory cytokines in the steady state and inflammatory cytokines in response to pathogens. Although the function of the mucosal immune system is impaired in elderly humans, the molecular mechanisms which cause this dramatic functional decline are poorly understood. Our current understanding of the effects of aging on the physical and immunological properties of the intestinal epithelial barrier is also very limited. In this issue of Clinical Science, Man et al. provide further insight into the effects of aging on small intestinal barrier function in humans and the influence that gut luminal micro-organisms may have on it. Using human terminal ileal biopsy tissues they show that intestinal permeability to solutes, but not macromolecules, was significantly increased in the intestines of elderly humans. This was accompanied by elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 which appeared to modulate claudin-2 expression and solute permeability in the epithelium. Conversely, IL-8 synthesis in response to flagellin stimulation was reduced in intestines of the elderly subjects, but was not associated with effects on Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) expression. These data provide an important advance in our understanding on the effects of aging on intestinal permeability and innate mucosal immune responsiveness in elderly humans.

  17. Characterization of the diffuse mucosal associated lymphoid tissue of feline small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccabianca, P; Woo, J C; Moore, P F

    2000-06-30

    Characterization of the feline intestinal mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) will facilitate investigation of intestinal disease in the cat and promote the cat as an animal model for a range of human diseases which involve the intestinal lymphoid tissue. This includes inflammatory bowel disease, viral and non-viral associated intestinal lymphomas and immunodeficiency associated syndromes. Morphologic and phenotypic characterization of the normal small intestinal diffuse MALT in 22 SPF cats was performed using flow cytometry and cytology on isolated intestinal leukocytes from the intra-epithelial and lamina proprial compartments, as well as immunohistology on tissues from the feline duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The intra-epithelial compartment (IEC) was dominated by lymphocytes (>85%) which frequently contained intracytoplasmic granules. The most striking findings in the IEC were the elevated percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (40%), presumed to express CD8 alpha alpha chains, and CD4-/CD8- (double negative) lymphocytes (44%), and the consistent presence of a minor subpopulation of CD3+/CD11d+ IELs (6%). Small percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (10%) were observed such that the IEL CD4:CD8 ratio (0.25) was low. The LPC also contained a majority of T cells and few plasma cells. However, this compartment had reduced percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (28%) and increased percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (27%) relative to the IEC. However, the LPL CD4:CD8 ratio (1.0) remained low compared with the ratio in peripheral blood. In feline MALT, MHC class II expression was lower than in other peripheral lymphoid compartments. The results of this study provide important reference values for future investigations involving feline intestinal lymphocytes and demonstrates that the leukocyte distribution and phenotypic characteristics of the feline diffuse MALT appear largely similar to the murine, rat and human counterparts.

  18. Longitudinal residual strain and stress-strain relationship in rat small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yanhua

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To obtain a more detailed description of the stress-free state of the intestinal wall, longitudinal residual strain measurements are needed. Furthermore, data on longitudinal stress-strain relations in visceral organs are scarce. The present study aims to investigate the longitudinal residual strain and the longitudinal stress-strain relationship in the rat small intestine. Methods The longitudinal zero-stress state was obtained by cutting tissue strips parallel to the longitudinal axis of the intestine. The longitudinal residual stress was characterized by a bending angle (unit: degrees per unit length and positive when bending outwards. Residual strain was computed from the change in dimensions between the zero-stress state and the no-load state. Longitudinal stresses and strains were computed from stretch experiments in the distal ileum at luminal pressures ranging from 0–4 cmH2O. Results Large morphometric variations were found between the duodenum and ileum with the largest wall thickness and wall area in the duodenum and the largest inner circumference and luminal area in the distal ileum (p 0.5. The longitudinal residual strain was tensile at the serosal surface and compressive at the mucosal surface. Hence, the neutral axis was approximately in the mid-wall. The longitudinal residual strain and the bending angle was not uniform around the intestinal circumference and had the highest values on the mesenteric sides (p α constant increased with the pressure, indicating the intestinal wall became stiffer in longitudinal direction when pressurized. Conclusion Large longitudinal residual strains reside in the small intestine and showed circumferential variation. This indicates that the tissue is not uniform and cannot be treated as a homogenous material. The longitudinal stiffness of the intestinal wall increased with luminal pressure. Longitudinal residual strains must be taken into account in studies of

  19. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangran; Li, Jianjun; Tan, Bie; Wang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Guan, Guiping; Li, Fengna; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999) from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  20. The influence of small intestinal mucus structure on particle transport ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajka, Balázs H; Rigby, Neil M; Cross, Kathryn L; Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    Mucus provides a barrier to bacteria and toxins while allowing nutrient absorption and waste transport. Unlike colonic mucus, small intestinal mucus structure is poorly understood. This study aimed to provide evidence for a continuous, structured mucus layer and assess the diffusion of different sized particles through it. Mucus structure was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Ultra-structure was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Tracking of 100 nm and 500 nm latex beads was conducted using ex vivo porcine mucus. The porcine jejunum and ileum were filled with mucus. Layered MUC2 staining was visible throughout the small intestine, covering villus tips. Scanning electron microscopy showed net-like mucin sheets covering villi (211 ± 7 nm pore diameter). Particle tracking of 100 nm latex beads, showed no inhibition of diffusion through mucus while 500 nm beads displayed limited diffusion. These results suggest a continuous mucus layer exists throughout the small intestine, which is highly stratified adjacent to the epithelium. The network observed is consistent with previous observations and correlates with stratified MUC2 staining. Mucin pore size is consistent with free diffusion of 100 nm and limited diffusion of 500 nm particles. Small Intestinal mucus structure has important implications for drug delivery systems and prevention and treatment of conditions like mucositis and inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Creep feed intake during lactation enhances net absorption in the small intestine after weaning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuller, W.I.; Beers-Schreurs, van H.M.G.; Soede, N.M.; Langendijk, P.; Taverne, M.A.M.; Kemp, B.; Verheijden, J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the effect of creep feeding during lactation on net absorption in the small intestine at 4 days after weaning. Intermittent suckling was used to increase creep feed intake during lactation. Creep feed containing chromic oxide was provided. Based on the colour of t

  2. Update: The Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrate and Protein: Role of the Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leese, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the role of the small intestine in the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and proteins. Indicates as outdated the view that these materials must be broken down to monomeric units before absorption and that the gut secretes a mixture of digestive juices which brings about absorption. (JN)

  3. Sexually dimorphic characteristics of the small intestine and colon of prepubescent C57BL/6 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steegenga, W.T.; Mischke, M.; Lute, C.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Pruis, M.G.M.; Lendvai, A.; Verkade, H.J.; Boekhorst, J.; Timmerman, H.M.; Plösch, T.; Müller, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing appreciation for sexually dimorphic effects, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are only partially understood. In the present study, we explored transcriptomics and epigenetic differences in the small intestine and colon of prepubescent male and fema

  4. Sexually dimorphic characteristics of the small intestine and colon of prepubescent C57BL/6 mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Mischke, Mona; Lute, Carolien; Boekschoten, Mark V; Pruis, Maurien Gm; Lendvai, Agnes; Verkade, Henkjan J; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Plösch, Torsten; Müller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is increasing appreciation for sexually dimorphic effects, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are only partially understood. In the present study, we explored transcriptomics and epigenetic differences in the small intestine and colon of prepubescent male and fem

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Veillonella parvula HSIVP1, Isolated from the Human Small Intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Boekhorst, J.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    Veillonella species are frequently encountered commensals in the human small intestine. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the first cultured representative from this ecosystem, Veillonella parvula strain HSIVP1. The genome is predicted to encode all the necessary enzymes required for the

  6. [The up-to-date methods of management of NSAIDs-induced injuries of small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, S M; Balabantseva, H P; Levchenko, A R

    2014-01-01

    In the article the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical featuries, diagnostic, prevention and treatment of NSAIDs-induced injuries of small intestine are presented. The different strategies of management of NSAID-induced enteropathy, such as use of PPI, COX-2-inhibitors, prostaglandins, antibiotics and probiotics, new combination of NSAIDs with phosphatidylcholine, NO or H2S, food supplements and other drugs are discussed.

  7. Glucose Transport into Everted Sacs of the Small Intestine of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kirk L.; Butt, A. Grant

    2013-01-01

    The Na[superscript +]-glucose cotransporter is a key transport protein that is responsible for absorbing Na[superscript +] and glucose from the luminal contents of the small intestine and reabsorption by the proximal straight tubule of the nephron. Robert K. Crane originally described the cellular model of absorption of Na[superscript +] and…

  8. Multiple chronic non-specific ulcer of small intestine characterized by anemia and hypoalbuminemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A female patient with anemia and hypoalbuminemia was admitted to our hospital due to an over 20-year history of recurrent dizziness,fatigue and ankle edema.She was diagnosed as multiple chronic nonspecific ulcer of the small intestine characterized by non-specific histology and persistent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Regulation of small intestinal transport function by fatty acids and the role of PPAR alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den H.M.

    2008-01-01

    A key function of the small intestine is to form a selective barrier between the body and the environment. Potentially dangerous compounds and organisms have to be kept in the lumen, while simultaneously nutrients have to be taken up efficiently. Furthermore, the enterocyte is the first place where

  10. Probing the role of PPAR alpha in the small intestine : a functional nutrigenomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bünger, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor known for its control of metabolism in response to diet. Although functionally best characterized in liver, PPARα is also abundantly expressed in small intestine, the organ by which nut

  11. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  12. Microsomal quercetin glucuronidation in rat small intestine depends on age and segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in 3 equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats, n=8/age using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin...

  13. Induction of phase I and II drug metabolism in rat small intestine and colon in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kerkhof, E. G.; de Graaf, I. A. M.; de Jager, M. H.; Groothuis, G. M. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate drug metabolism in rat small intestinal and colon precision-cut slices during 24 h of incubation and the applicability of these slices for enzyme induction studies. Various parameters were evaluated: intracellular levels of ATP (general viability marker), alkali

  14. Analysis of diversity and function of the human small intestinal microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booijink, C.C.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place in humans. As the small intestine is the first site of interaction between the microbiota and ingested food, knowledge about the microbial composition as well as functionality is essen

  15. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  16. The C-13/H-2-glucose test for determination of small intestinal lactase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, RJ; Stellaard, F; Priebe, MG; Koetse, HA; Hagedoorn, RE; de Bruijn, S; Elzinga, H; Lenoir-Wijnkoop, [No Value; Antoine, JM

    2001-01-01

    Background To diagnose hypolactasia, determination of lactase enzyme activity in small intestinal biopsy material is considered to be the golden standard. Because of its strongly invasive character and the sampling problems, alternative methods have been looked for. Design We analysed the C-13-gluco

  17. Serine protease immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry in the small intestine of weaned and unweaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Wells, M

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of goblet cells containing serine protease and of those binding the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) in the pig small intestine is altered during the period after weaning. Goblet cells exhibiting binding of other lectins were not altered. These alterations and other...

  18. Changes in small intestinal homeostasis, morphology, and gene expression during rotavirus infection of infant mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Boshuizen; J.H. Reimerink; A.M. Korteland-van Male (Anita); V.J. van Ham; H.A. Büller (Hans); J. Dekker (Jan); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractRotavirus is the most important cause of infantile gastroenteritis. Since in vivo mucosal responses to a rotavirus infection thus far have not been extensively studied, we related viral replication in the murine small intestine to alterations in mucosal structure, epith

  19. Macrophage-like cells in the muscularis externa of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L; Rumessen, J J;

    1985-01-01

    In muscularis externa of mouse small intestine, cells with ultrastructural features of macrophages were invariably observed in three layers: in the subserosal layer, between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers, and in association with the deep circular plexus. These macrophage-like cells...

  20. Semimacroscopic examinations of the surface pattern of small intestinal mucosa in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1975-01-01

    The mucosal surface pattern of surgical specimens from small intestine affected by Crohn's disease are studied using Alcian-green staining of whole mounts. The semimacroscopic appearance of the mucosa is described. Our findings include i.a. malformation and enlargement of villi-often to extreme...

  1. Intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct causing small-bowel obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauleau, Ghislain; Commandeur, Diane; Andro, Christophe; Chapellier, Xavier

    2012-07-11

    Persistent omphalomesenteric duct as a cause of small-bowel obstruction is an exceptional finding. A neonate presented with occlusion due to intestinal prolapse through a persistent omphalomesenteric duct. Remnants of the duct were successfully resected, and the postoperative course was uneventful. We discuss the presentation of omphalomesenteric duct and its management.

  2. Microbial communities in the human small intestine - coupling diversity to metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booijink, C.C.G.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place. The host-derived physiological processes and the residing microorganisms, especially in the small intestine, contribute to this nutrient supply. To circumvent sampling problems of the smal

  3. Crypt base columnar stem cells in small intestines of mice are radioresistant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, G.; Thin, T.H.; Feldman, R.; Haimovitz-Friedman, A.; Clevers, H.; Fuks, Z.; Kolesnick, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adult stem cells have been proposed to be quiescent and radiation resistant, repairing DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end joining. However, the population of putative small intestinal stem cells (ISCs) at position +4 from the crypt base contradicts this model, in that t

  4. Vascularization of the small intestine in lesser anteaters, Tamandua tetradactyla (Xenarthra: Myrmecophagidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussara R Ferreira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The blood supply in the small intestine of seven Tamandua tetradactyla (Linnaeus, 1758, was studied. The method included preparation of the macroscopic collection report, perfusion of the arterial network with water (40ºC, injection of colored latex (Neoprene 650®, 2350-0003 Suvinil® dye, fixation in formaldehyde (10%, and preservation in ethanol (50%. For description and analyzes, dissection under mesoscopic light and photo documentation were performed. The small intestine of T. tetradactyla is irrigated by the cranial mesenteric artery, the ventral visceral branch of the abdominal aorta. The artery emerges from the retroperitoneum and disperses between the layers of the common mesentery, parallel to the caudal mesenteric artery. The primary cranial collateral branches irrigate the pancreas, duodenum, jejunum (13 arteries, ileum (14 vessels, and the cecocolic region. The arteries anastomose with adjacent vessels to form arches. Terminal branches are derived from these peri-intestinal arcs that reach into the intestine through the mesenteric boundary and form capillaries within the lining. The vascular pattern of the lesser anteater differs from those of other previously described vertebrates, but is similar to the pattern found in fetuses of domestic mammals during early intestinal development.

  5. Effect of Small Intestine Strangulation Obstruction on Clinical and Histopathological Parameters An Experimental Study in Donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Mohamed M. Kuraa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To study clinical and histopathological changes occur within the first 12 hours of strangulating obstruction of the small intestine in equine, twenty five adult donkeys were used in an experimental study. Strangulation obstruction of the small intestine was performed for 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours, respectively. Clinical examination was done before surgery and at 3 hours intervals postoperatively. After euthanasia, histopathological examination was made 10 cm, 1, 2 and 3 meters proximal to the strangulated part. Three hours postoperatively, the animals began to show signs of abdominal pain, they were looking around, stamping the hind feet, falling down suddenly. Nine hours postoperatively, animals showed signs of depression with intermittent nervous movements in the form of circle movement. After 12 hours, the animals were lying down; There were a significant reduction in the body temperature, respiratory rate, pulse rate, heart rate with significant increase in capillary refill time. Macroscopic changes of the strangulated part were congestion, edema, and dark red discoloration of the intestinal wall and mesentery. Distension of the intestine proximal to the strangulation extended more with increase the period of strangulation. Microscopic examination showed showed severe congestion, dark brown to blackish discoloration with fibrous shreds on the strangulated segment. Peticheal hemorrhages were observed in the intestinal wall and its mesentery for a distance up to 3 meters. The severity of signs varies according to the duration of obstruction which could give a remarkable justification of the prognosis of the patient and the availability of treatment.

  6. Stem cells and biopharmaceuticals: vital roles in the growth of tissue-engineered small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchior, Gustavo Gross; Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Grikscheit, Tracy Cannon

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering currently constitutes a complex, multidisciplinary field exploring ideal sources of cells in combination with scaffolds or delivery systems in order to form a new, functional organ to replace native organ lack or loss. Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a life-threatening condition with high morbidity and mortality rates in children. Current therapeutic strategies consist of costly and risky allotransplants that demand lifelong immunosuppression. A promising alternative is the implantation of autologous organoid units (OU) to create a tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI). This strategy is proven to be stem cell and mesenchyme dependent. Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are located at the base of the crypt and are responsible for repopulating the cycling mucosa up to the villus tip. The stem cell niche governs the biology of ISCs and, together with the rest of the epithelium, communicates with the underlying mesenchyme to sustain intestinal homeostasis. Biopharmaceuticals are broadly used in the clinic to activate or enhance known signaling pathways and may greatly contribute to the development of a full-thickness intestine by increasing mucosal surface area, improving blood supply, and determining stem cell fate. This review will focus on tissue engineering as a means of building the new small intestine, highlighting the importance of stem cells and recombinant peptide growth factors as biopharmaceuticals.

  7. Chromogranin A and its fragments as regulators of small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Giovinazzo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chromogranin A is a neuroendocrine secretory product and its loss is a feature of malignant NEN de-differentiation. We hypothesized that chromogranin A fragments were differentially expressed during NEN metastasis and played a role in the regulation of NEN proliferation. METHODS: Chromogranin A mRNA (PCR and protein (ELISA/western blot were studied in 10 normal human mucosa, 5 enterochromaffin cell preparations, 26 small intestinal NEN primaries and 9 liver metastases. Cell viability (WST-1 assay, proliferation (bromodeoxyuridine ELISA and expression of AKT/AKT-P (CASE ELISA/western blot in response to chromogranin A silencing, inhibition of prohormone convertase and mTOR inhibition (RAD001/AKT antisense as well as different chromogranin A fragments were examined in 4 SI-NEN cell lines. RESULTS: Chromogranin A mRNA and protein levels were increased (37-340 fold, p<0.0001 in small intestinal NENs compared to normal enterochromaffin cells. Western blot identified chromogranin A-associated processing bands including vasostatin in small intestinal NENs as well as up-regulated expression of prohormone convertase in metastases. Proliferation in small intestinal NEN cell lines was decreased by silencing chromogranin A as well as by inhibition of prohormone convertase (p<0.05. This inhibition also decreased secretion of chromogranin A (p<0.05 and 5-HT (p<0.05 as well as expression of vasostatin. Metastatic small intestinal NEN cell lines were stimulated (50-80%, p<0.05 and AKT phosphorylated (Ser473: p<0.05 by vasostatin I, which was completely reversed by RAD001 (p<0.01 and AKT antisense (p<0.05 while chromostatin inhibited proliferation (~50%, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Chromogranin A was differentially regulated in primary and metastatic small intestinal NENs and cell lines. Chromogranin A fragments regulated metastatic small intestinal NEN proliferation via the AKT pathway indicating that CgA plays a far more complex role in the biology of

  8. A computational framework for the statistical analysis of cardiac diffusion tensors: application to a small database of canine hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Sermesant, Maxime; Pennec, Xavier; Delingette, Hervé; Xu, Chenyang; McVeigh, Elliot R; Ayache, Nicholas

    2007-11-01

    We propose a unified computational framework to build a statistical atlas of the cardiac fiber architecture from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images (DT-MRIs). We apply this framework to a small database of nine ex vivo canine hearts. An average cardiac fiber architecture and a measure of its variability are computed using most recent advances in diffusion tensor statistics. This statistical analysis confirms the already established good stability of the fiber orientations and a higher variability of the laminar sheet orientations within a given species. The statistical comparison between the canine atlas and a standard human cardiac DT-MRI shows a better stability of the fiber orientations than their laminar sheet orientations between the two species. The proposed computational framework can be applied to larger databases of cardiac DT-MRIs from various species to better establish intraspecies and interspecies statistics on the anatomical structure of cardiac fibers. This information will be useful to guide the adjustment of average fiber models onto specific patients from in vivo anatomical imaging modalities.

  9. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  10. Role of the Small Intestine in Developmental Programming: Impact of Maternal Nutrition on the Dam and Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Allison M; Caton, Joel S

    2016-01-01

    Small-intestinal growth and function are critical for optimal animal growth and health and play a major role in nutrient digestion and absorption, energy and nutrient expenditure, and immunological competence. During fetal and perinatal development, the small intestine is affected by the maternal environment and nutrient intake. In ruminants, altered small-intestinal mass, villi morphology, hypertrophy, hyperplasia, vascularity, and gene expression have been observed as a result of poor gestational nutrition or intrauterine growth restriction. Although many of these data come from fetal stages, data have also demonstrated that nutrition during mid- and late gestation affects lamb small-intestinal growth, vascularity, digestive enzyme activity, and gene expression at 20 and 180 d of age as well. The small intestine is known to be a highly plastic tissue, changing with nutrient intake and physiological state even in adulthood, and the maternal small intestine adapts to pregnancy and advancing gestation. In ruminants, the growth, vascularity, and gene expression of the maternal small intestine also adapt to the nutritional plane and specific nutrient intake such as high selenium during pregnancy. These changes likely alter both pre- and postnatal nutrient delivery to offspring. More research is necessary to better understand the role of the offspring and maternal small intestines in whole-animal responses to developmental programming, but programming of this plastic tissue seems to play a dynamic role in gestational nutrition impacts on the whole animal.

  11. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiko Nakadate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  12. Expression of acyl-CoA synthetase 5 reflects the state of villus architecture in human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gassler, Nikolaus; Kopitz, Jürgen; Tehrani, Arman

    2004-01-01

    Several disorders of the small intestine are associated with disturbances in villus architecture. Thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with the differentiation of villi represents an important step in the improvement of the understanding of small intestinal pathology. Scr...

  13. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, B. van den; Boekhorst, J.; Herrmann, R.; Smid, E.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus s

  14. Single incision laparoscopic surgery approach for obscure small intestine bleeding localized by CT guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Martinez

    2014-01-01

    PRESENTATION OF CASE: We present a new technique used in a patient with angiodysplasia of the small intestine, in where preoperative localization was done using percutaneous computed tomography (CT guided injection of methylene blue dye. This allowed us to perform a single incision laparoscopic small intestine resection of the culprit.

  15. Small bowel volvulus in a patient with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef, Haney; Rashid, Sidi H; Cellador, Enrique Collantes; Baragwanath, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP) is a rare syndrome of ineffectual gut motility associated with clinical, endoscopic and radiological exclusion of mechanical causes, as well as evidence of air–fluid levels in distended bowel loops. A case of small bowel volvulus in a patient with an established diagnosis of CIIP is presented. The case is illustrated by images of operative findings and computed tomography scan reconstruction, showing the classical appearances of small bo...

  16. Intestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  17. Regulation of homeostasis in the process of protein absorption from small intestine to blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akmal Yuldashev

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopic and immunоfluorescent study in rats aged 1 and 3 days after birth allowed to establish a process of absorption of protein from the small intestine into the lymph and blood. Blood homeostasis was provided by the proteins filtrated from glomerular capillaries of nephrons and reabsorbed by the epithelial cells in canaliculi of nephrons. The absorbed natural heterologous protein was depleted by lysosomes of epithelial cells of intestine and kidneys and macrophages. It supported not only blood homeostasis but also prevented loss of protein by an organism, formed sites for its digestion in the organism.

  18. Treatment with Parenteral Nutrition Support and Chinese Herbs in One Case of Primary Small Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-cheng Dai; Zhi-peng Tang; Gui-tong Ma; Ping Yin; Yu-ping Gong; Wen Liu; Song Wang; Ya-li Zhang; Xin-ying He

    2009-01-01

    @@ INTESTINAL lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease first reported by Waldmanin in 1961.~1 Since then, no more than two hundred cases have been reported. IL is characterized by dilated lymphatic vessles in the intestinal wall and small bowel mesentery which induce loss of protein and lymphocytes into bowel lumen. We here report a case of IL in a young male patient who was admitted for complaint of recurrent diarrhea for ten years and aggravation of the illness one year ago. He was diagnosed by endoscopy and confirmed by pathology as a primary IL and treated by parenteral nutrition support and Chinese herbs.

  19. [Effect of age on absorption and membrane digestion in the rat small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metel'skiĭ, S T

    2004-01-01

    By the short-circuit current method in our modification, kinetic constants for nutrient transporters in rat gastric-intestinal tract and unstirred layer thickness near mucosa surface, were studied. In experiments on rats it was shown that in ageing, the nutrient monomer transporters number in the small intestine increases twofold, while its affinity to correspondent nutrients remains unchanged. For the peptide the situation may be the opposite one. The layer thickness in the vicinity of mucosa surface measured by glucose decreased in ageing. It was suggested that in old rats the role of volume digestion is enhanced resulting in adapting increase of nutrient monomer transporters number.

  20. Biochemical investigation and gene expression analysis of the immunostimulatory functions of an edible Salacia extract in rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Kamei, Asuka; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Roots and bark from plants belonging to genus Salacia of the family Hippocrateaceae (Salacia reticulata, Salacia oblonga, etc.) have been used for traditional Ayurvedic medicine, particularly for the treatment of diabetes. In our study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles in the small intestinal epithelium of rats that were given a Salacia plant extract to gain insight into its effects on the small intestine. In detail, DNA microarray analysis was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in the rat ileal epithelium. The intestinal bacterial flora was also studied using T-RFLP (Nagashima method) in these rats. Expressions of many immune-related genes, especially Th1-related genes associated with cell-mediated immunity, were found to increase in the small intestinal epithelium and the intestinal bacterial flora became similar to those in the case with Salacia plant extract administration. Our study thus revealed that Salacia plant extract exerts bioregulatory functions by boosting intestinal immunity.

  1. Double-balloon enteroscopy reliably directs surgical intervention for patients with small intestinal bleeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mou-Bin Lin; Lu Yin; Jian-Wen Li; Wei-Guo Hu; Qian-Jian Qian

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate preoperative double-balloon enteroscopy for determining bleeding lesions of small intestine, thus directing selective surgical intervention.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients who underwent double-balloon enteroscopy to localize intestinal bleeding prior to surgical intervention, and compared enteroscopic findings with those of intraoperation to determine the accuracy of enteroscopy in identifying and localizing the sites of small intestinal bleeding.RESULTS: Double-balloon enteroscopy was performed in all 56 patients in a 30-mo period. A possible site of blood loss was identified in 54 (96%) patients. Enteroscopy provided accurate localization of the bleeding in 53 (95%) of 56 patients, but failed to disclose the cause of bleeding in 4 (7%). There was one case with negative intraoperative finding (2%). Resection of the affected bowel was carried out except one patient who experienced rebleeding after operation. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was most frequently diagnosed (55%).CONCLUSION: Double-balloon enteroscopy is a safe, reliable modality for determining bleeding lesion of small intestine. This technique can be used to direct selective surgical intervention.

  2. Effect of fasting in the digestive system: histological study of the small intestine in house sparrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funes, Samanta Celeste; Filippa, Verónica Palmira; Cid, Fabricio Damián; Mohamed, Fabián; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Chediack, Juan Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    In birds and mammals the metabolic response to fasting has been studied and can be characterized by three consecutive phases reflecting metabolic and physiological adjustments. An effective way to minimize energy expenditure during food scarcity is to decrease the mass of the organs. As the digestive system is metabolically expensive to maintain, the small intestine and the liver are the most affected organs. We evaluated the effects of phase III starvation on the mass of the different organs and histological parameters on house sparrows, a small non-migrant bird. In a short period of time (34 h) we observed a larger reduction in the digestive organ mass when compared to the mass of the body and non-alimentary tissues. Furthermore, the intestinal mass was proportionally more reduced than its length and nominal surface area. A reduction on the intestinal mucosal layer also resulted in a shortening of villus (length and thickness) and crypt depth. Moreover, the morphology of the enterocytes changed from cylindrical to cubical, suggesting that the surface exposed to the lumen was conserved. This may indicate an adaptive response to the moment of refeeding. The nominal surface area/body mass remained constant in both groups and several histological parameters were reduced, suggesting that starving induces the atrophy of the small intestine. However, the goblet cells were conserved after fasting indicating a protective tendency.

  3. Morphological alterations in small intestine of rats with myenteric plexus denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, M; Kilinç, M; Hatipoğlu, E S

    2004-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of myenteric denervation by benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on small intestine morphology in the rat, and whether segmental myenteric denervation alters morphology elsewhere in the small intestine. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into 4 groups: control (0.9% NaCl); denervation (0.062% BAC); chemical inflammation (5% acetic acid), and intraluminal stasis produced by partial obstruction. 28 days after operation tissue samples were taken from the treated segment, 10 cm distal to the treated segment, and 20 cm proximal to the treated segment. Morphological changes and the number of ganglion cells were examined under the light microscope. BAC application reduced the number of myenteric neurons by 85% in the treated segment. Denervation increased villus height and crypt depth in the treated and proximal segments. But changes in muscle thickness were seen throughout the intestine. As a result, although myenteric plexus denervation caused mucosa morphology in the treated and proximal segments, it caused smooth muscle changes throughout the small intestine.

  4. Phenotypical and Functional Analysis of Intraepithelial Lymphocytes from Small Intestine of Mice in Oral Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Ruberti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we evaluated the effects of administration of OVA on phenotype and function of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs from small intestine of transgenic (TGN DO11.10 and wild-type BALB/c mice. While the small intestines from BALB/c presented a well preserved structure, those from TGN showed an inflamed aspect. The ingestion of OVA induced a reduction in the number of IELs in small intestines of TGN, but it did not change the frequencies of CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets. Administration of OVA via oral + ip increased the frequency of CD103+ cells in CD4+ T-cell subset in IELs of both BALB/c and TGN mice and elevated its expression in CD8β+ T-cell subset in IELs of TGN. The frequency of Foxp3+ cells increased in all subsets in IELs of BALB/c treated with OVA; in IELs of TGN, it increased only in CD25+ subset. IELs from BALB/c tolerant mice had lower expression of all cytokines studied, whereas those from TGN showed high expression of inflammatory cytokines, especially of IFN-γ, TGF-β, and TNF-α. Overall, our results suggest that the inability of TGN to become tolerant may be related to disorganization and altered proportions of inflammatory/regulatory T cells in its intestinal mucosa.

  5. Influence of delayed placement and dietary lysine levels on small intestine morphometrics and performance of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JRG Franco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment studied the influence of delayed placement (HI and digestible lysine level (DL on the morphometrics of the intestinal mucosa and on the performance of broilers. A total number of 1,705 Cobb 500 male chicks were used in a completely randomized experimental design in a factorial arrangement with four HI (12, 24, 36 and 48h, and two DL level in the starter diet (1.143 and 1.267%, with four replicates and 55 birds per experimental unit. The amino acids methionine-cystine, threonine, and tryptophan were balanced according to the ideal protein (IP concept. Small intestine morphometrics was evaluated using histology slides of the duodenum and jejunum. There was no interaction between HI and DL levels for any of the studied parameters. The 1.143% level of DL promoted better performance results at 21 and 42 days of age, as well as higher duodenum and jejunum crypt depth, and duodenum villi height at 21 days of age. HI negatively influenced the morphometrics of the small intestine during the starter phase, and the performance of broilers up to 42 days of age. There was no effect of the treatments on yolk sac utilization or abdominal fat percentage. It was concluded that the use of 1.143% DL and HI of 12 hours promoted better development of the small intestine mucosa up to 21 days of age, and broiler performance at market age.

  6. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartholomeus Van den Bogert

    Full Text Available The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  7. Comparative genomics analysis of Streptococcus isolates from the human small intestine reveals their adaptation to a highly dynamic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine.

  8. [Effects of ischemia and revascularization on the epithelium of the small intestine: study on swine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthod, F

    1994-05-01

    Ischaemia of the small intestine leads to the destruction of the intestinal mucosa. The capacity of the epithelium to regenerate is proportional to the duration of revascularization. The aim of this work was to analyze the kinetic aspects of intestinal epithelial regeneration after destruction due to prolonged ischaemia. This study was conducted in 44 animals (swine) after development of an ischaemia-revascularization protocol of a jejunal loop and bipolar secondary cutaneous exteriorization. After a first series with ischaemia times of 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours, the 4 hour period of ischaemia was chosen for further analysis of the regeneration kinetics over a period of 21 days since it leads to regular and total destruction of the epithelium compatible with regeneration. This analysis included (1) a histological examination (semi-thin slices), (2) immunofluorescent detection of intestinal brush border proteins on frozen slices (villin, saccharase-isomaltase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV) and mucines, (3) measurement of specific intestinal hydrolase activities (saccharase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and alkaline phosphatase) in enriched brush border fractions, and (4) an analysis of variations in intestinal flora. After the 4 hour ischaemia, total destruction of the epithelium with disappearance of the villin and intestinal hydrolases and disorganization of the mucosa invaded by mucosal lacks was observed. Epithelial regeneration was rapid and two days later the histological aspect of the mucosa showed apical expression (still discontinuous), villin and intestinal hydrolase activity. Luminal apical expression of the markers became continuous on day 4, demonstrating the total recovery of the intestinal barrier as confirmed by stable microbial flora. Mucine expression also returned to normal. This regeneration was however incomplete since the mucosa was seen to be flat, without villosities. Immunofluorescence showed the weak intensity of brush

  9. Identification of interstitial cells of Cajal. Significance for studies of human small intestine and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1994-01-01

    electron microscopical studies emphasized similarities between ICC and fibroblasts. In our early studies of ICC in the external musculature of mouse small intestine, we identified ICC by their characteristic morphology and topography, and we analyzed the relation between ICC, autonomic nerves and smooth......Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described a century ago by Ramón y Cajal a.o. as primitive neurons in the intestines. In the period 1900-1960 a large number of light microscopical studies of ICC were published, in which ICC were identified by heir characteristic morphology. After 1960...... functions (mechanoreceptive, mediating inhibitory nervous input). In spite of this possible fundamental importance for G-I motility, ICC have not been adequately described or even identified in human intestine, and hence, never included in ultrastructural studies of G-I neuropathology. This survey presents...

  10. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing of Mouse Small Intestinal Organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwank, Gerald; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an RNA-guided genome-editing tool that has been recently developed based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas immune defense system. Due to its versatility and simplicity, it rapidly became the method of choice for genome editing in various biological systems, including mammalian cells. Here we describe a protocol for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing in murine small intestinal organoids, a culture system in which somatic stem cells are maintained by self-renewal, while giving rise to all major cell types of the intestinal epithelium. This protocol allows the study of gene function in intestinal epithelial homeostasis and pathophysiology and can be extended to epithelial organoids derived from other internal mouse and human organs.

  11. Pathway underlying small intestine apoptosis by dietary nickel chloride in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bangyuan; Guo, Hongrui; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Huang, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the pathways which dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) affects small intestine apoptosis in broiler chickens by observing the ultrastructure, and bcl-2, bax, and caspase-3 protein expression and mRNA expression, and cytochrome C, bak and caspase-9 mRNA expression of the small intestine. A total of 240 one-day-old avian broilers were divided into four groups and fed a corn-soybean basal diet as the control diet or three experimental diets supplemented with 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg of NiCl2 for 42 days. Ultrastructurally, the microvilli were apparently exfoliated, and the mitochondria were swollen and the number of lysosomes increased in the intestinal cells of three experimental groups. As measured by TUNEL and flow cytometry (FCM), the percentage of apoptotic cells in the small intestine and the lymphocytes in the ileum were significantly increased in three experimental groups when compared with those of the control group. Meanwhile, immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that the protein expression, mRNA expression levels were decreased in the bcl-2, whereas those of bax and caspase-3, and the cytochrome C, bak and caspase-9 mRNA expression levels were increased in three experimental groups. The abovementioned results show that pathway of dietary NiCl2-induced small intestine apoptosis is related to the mitochondrial damage and promotion of the cytochrome C release from mitochondria, which activates the mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis pathway.

  12. Pancreatic digestive enzyme blockade in the small intestine prevents insulin resistance in hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 h) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution), and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared with control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine led to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared with controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels 2 h after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock but is restored when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  13. Histomorphological Comparison of Proventriculus and Small Intestine of Heavy and Light Line Pre- and at Hatching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Nassir Wali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Gross, histomorphometric and histochemical comprasion of proventriculus and small intestinal segments were determined in heavy and light line at last day’s incubation. Five embryos from each line were used at 16 day, 19 day and 21 day incubation. The weight of the proventriculus, yolk sac and weight in addition to the length of each separated straightened intestinal segments were recorded. Histological samples were stained with Harris Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson’s Trichrome stain for histological structures, combined Alcian blue-PAS and Aldehyde Fuschin-Alcian blue stain for mucin classification. The thickness of wall layers of these organs were determined, measurement of villus height, villus surface area and height of epithelial mucosa of each intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum and ileum were recorded. The relative weight of yolk sac, proventriculus, jejunum and ileum were significantly higher in heavy line. The relative length of intestine was not constant between breeds. However, the heavy line had longer jejunum and ileum at 16 day and 21 days incubation. Histologically, the well-developed proventricular glands and epithelial folds appeared since 16 day incubation in both breeds. The thicknesses of these glands was greater in heavy line. The duodenal of heavy line had dominantly longer villi with higher villus surface area, for jejunam was restricted at 21 days only. Similar pattern was found for epithelial height and number of goblet cells in intestinal mucosa. The histochemical observations showed presence of neutral and acidic mucin in intestinal epithelium with most mucous cells were had sulphated mucin. Intestinal development patterns were similar for both lines but growth was more rapid in heavyline than the light line.

  14. Function and expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator after small intestinal transplantation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghong Song

    Full Text Available The secretion function of intestinal graft is one of the most important factors for successful intestinal transplantation. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mediates HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we made investigation on the expression and function of CFTR in an experimental model of murine small intestinal transplantation. Heterotopic intestinal transplantations were performed in syngeneic mice. The mRNA and protein expressions of CFTR were analyzed by real time PCR and western blot. Murine intestinal mucosal HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions were examined in vitro in Ussing chambers by the pH stat and short circuit current (I(sc techniques. The results showed that forskolin, an activator of CFTR, stimulated jejunal mucosal epithelial HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in mice, but forskolin-stimulated HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice after heterotopic jejunal transplantation were markedly decreased, compared with controls (P<0.001. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CFTR in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice were also markedly lower than those in controls (P<0.001, and the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα were markedly increased in donor jejunal mucosae of mice (P<0.001, compared with controls. Further experiments showed that TNFα down-regulated the expression of CFTR mRNA in murine jejunal mucosa. In conclusion, after intestinal transplantation, the function of CFTR was impaired, and its mRNA and protein expressions were down-regulated, which may be induced by TNFα.

  15. Characteristics of Jeffrey fluid model for peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine with magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S.; Lee, Changhoon

    In the present article we have analyzed the Jeffrey fluid model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in the small intestine. We have formulated the problem using two non-periodic sinusoidal waves of different wavelengths propagating with same speed c along the outer wall of the tube. Governing equations for the problem under consideration have been simplified under the assumptions of long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation (such assumptions are consistent since Re (Reynolds number) is very small and long wavelength approximation also exists in the small intestine). Exact solutions have been calculated for velocity and pressure rise. Physical behavior of different parameters of Jeffrey fluid has been presented graphically for velocity, pressure rise, pressure gradient and frictional forces. The trapping phenomenon is also discussed at the end of the article.

  16. The small intestine and colon: Scintigraphic quantitation of motility in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, M.A. (Saint Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Medical Physiology Unit)

    1992-10-01

    Radioisotopes allow accurate quantitation of the pattern and effectiveness of the transit of chyme through the small and large intestines. Abnormalities of small bowel transit can be demonstrated in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, and patients with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to either a visceral myopathy or neuropathy. In the colon, radioisotopic studies of transit have demonstrated the site of delayed transit in some severely constipated patients. In patients with these disorders of transit, functional studies may influence the choice of medical or surgical therapy although there are few prospective studies which have established their worth in this context. Radioisotope studies can also be utilised to study the effectiveness of delivery of drugs to the small and large bowel, and to study the adequacy of rectal evacuation in patients with a defaecatory disturbance. The low radiation dose and possibility of frequent observations make radioisotope studies valuable for clinical and research studies in functional gastrointestinal disorders. (orig.).

  17. Endogenous ethanol production in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinucci, Giulio; Guidetti, Mariacristina; Lanzoni, Elisabetta; Pironi, Loris

    2006-07-01

    The case of the gastrointestinal production of ethanol from Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a Caucasian man with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is reported. The patient, who declared to have always abstained from alcohol, was hospitalized for abdominal pain, belching and mental confusion. The laboratory findings showed the presence of ethanol in the blood. Gastric juice and faecal microbiological cultures were positive for C. albicans and S. cerevisiae. At home, he was on oral antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid for a small bowel bacterial overgrowth, associated with a simple sugar-rich diet. Twenty-four hours after stopping both the antibiotic therapy and the simple sugar-rich diet, the blood ethanol disappeared. A provocative test, performed by giving amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid associated with the simple sugar-rich diet was followed by the reappearance of ethanol in the blood. A review of the literature is reported.

  18. A Review of Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastrointestinal Injury: Focus on Prevention of Small Intestinal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Fujimori

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Capsule endoscopy and balloon endoscopy, advanced modalities that allow full investigation of the entire small intestine, have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs can cause a variety of abnormalities in the small intestine. Recently, several reports show that traditional NSAIDs (tNSAIDs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA can induce small intestinal injuries. These reports have shown that the preventive effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs does not extend to the small intestine, suggesting that concomitant therapy may be required to prevent small intestinal side effects associated with tNSAID/ASA use. Recently, several randomized controlled trials used capsule endoscopy to evaluate the preventive effect of mucoprotective drugs against tNSAID/ASA-induced small intestinal injury. These studies show that misoprostol and rebamipide reduce the number and types of tNSAID-induced small intestinal mucosal injuries. However, those studies were limited to a small number of subjects and tested short-term tNSAID/ ASA treatment. Therefore, further extensive studies are clearly required to ascertain the beneficial effect of these drugs.

  19. The small intestine and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): a batch process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Brian C

    2008-11-01

    Faults in a batch process model of the small intestine create the symptoms of all types of irritable bowel syndrome. The model has three sequential processing sections corresponding to the natural divisions of the intestine. It is governed by a brain controller that is divided into four sub-controllers, each with a unique neurotransmitter. Each section has a sub-controller to manage transport. Sensors in the walls of the intestine provide input and output goes to the muscles lining the walls of the intestine. The output controls the speed of the food soup, moves it in both directions, mixes it, controls absorption, and transfers it to the next section at the correct speed (slow). The fourth sub-controller manages the addition of chemicals. It obtains input from the first section of the process via the signalling hormone Cholecystokinin and sends output to the muscles that empty the gall bladder and pancreas. The correct amounts of bile salts and enzymes are then added to the first section. The sub-controllers produce output only when input is received. When output is missing the enteric nervous system applies a default condition. This default condition normally happens when no food is in the intestine. If food is in the intestine and a transport sub-controller fails to provide output then the default condition moves the food soup to the end of that section. The movement is in one direction only (forward), at a speed dependent on the amount and type of fibre present. Cereal, bean and vegetable fibre causes high speeds. This default high speed transport causes irritable bowel syndrome. A barrier is created when a section moving fast at the default speed, precedes a section controlled by a transport sub-controller. Then the sub-controller constricts the intestine to stop the fast flow. The barrier causes constipation, cramping, and bloating. Diarrhoea results when the section terminating the process moves at the fast default speed. Two problems can occur to prevent

  20. Lymphocyte Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 and Epithelial Thymus-Expressed Chemokine (Teck) Expression Distinguish the Small Intestinal Immune Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The immune system has evolved specialized cellular and molecular mechanisms for targeting and regulating immune responses at epithelial surfaces. Here we show that small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and lamina propria lymphocytes migrate to thymus-expressed chemokine (TECK). This attraction is mediated by CC chemokine receptor (CCR)9, a chemoattractant receptor expressed at high levels by essentially all CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the small intestine. Only a small subset of lymp...

  1. Diabetes-related dysfunction of the small intestine and the colon: focus on motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Viktor József; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Izbéki, Ferenc; Körei, Anna Erzsébet; Gerő, László; Lengyel, Csaba; Kempler, Péter; Várkonyi, Tamás

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to gastric dysfunction, diabetes-related functional impairments of the small and large intestine have been studied less intensively. The gastrointestinal tract accomplishes several functions, such as mixing and propulsion of luminal content, absorption and secretion of ions, water, and nutrients, defense against pathogens, and elimination of waste products. Diverse functions of the gut are regulated by complex interactions among its functional elements, including gut microbiota. The network-forming tissues, the enteric nervous system) and the interstitial cells of Cajal, are definitely impaired in diabetic patients, and their loss of function is closely related to the symptoms in diabetes, but changes of other elements could also play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus-related motility disorders. The development of our understanding over the recent years of the diabetes-induced dysfunctions in the small and large intestine are reviewed in this article.

  2. [A Case of Fournier's Gangrene Caused by Small Intestinal Perforation during Bevacizumab Combination Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takashi; Shinozaki, Hiroharu; Ozawa, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Toshimichi; Kato, Subaru; Wakabayashi, Taiga; Matsumoto, Kenji; Sasakura, Yuuichi; Shimizu, Tetsuichiro; Terauchi, Toshiaki; Kimata, Masaru; Furukawa, Junji; Kobayashi, Kenji; Ogata, Yoshiro

    2016-07-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent abdominoperineal resection for advanced rectal cancer at a hospital. He attended our outpatient clinic 58 months later with pain in the external genitalia, and was diagnosed with local pelvic recurrence and metastasis to the para-aortic lymph node and both adrenal glands. He received a total of 30 Gy of radiation for analgesia; subsequently, chemotherapy(mFOLFOX6 plus bevacizumab)was initiated. However, extreme left buttock and left femoral pain developed after the 6 courses of chemotherapy. Abdominal CT revealed Fournier's gangrene caused by small intestinal perforation. Emergency drainage under spinal anesthesia was immediately performed. Two additional drainage procedures were required thereafter and an ileostomy was constructed. The patient was discharged 100 days after the initial drainage. This is an extremely rare example of a bevacizumab-related small intestinal perforation that developed into Fournier's gan- grene.

  3. A case of endometrioid adenocarcinoma originating from the serous surface of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Makihara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation of endometriosis has been extensively described in the literature. However, extragonadal endometrioid adenocarcinoma, either de novo or arising from malignant transformation of endometriosis, is rare. The present case report describes a patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma on the serous surface of the small intestine. A 25- year-old female with no history of endometriosis was referred to our hospital with an intrapelvic tumor. An internal examination, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a round mass approximately 80 mm in diameter; however, identification of the affected organ was difficult. Because we could not rule out malignancy based on the non-specific radiologic findings, laparotomy was performed. A mass with ileal adhesions was detected intraoperatively. In addition, the uterus and bilateral adnexa appeared normal. The tumor was resected with part of the ileum. Histopathology confirmed a diagnosis of endometrioid adenocarcinoma originating from the serous surface of the small intestine.

  4. Whey protein hydrolysates enhance water absorption in the perfused small intestine of anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Noma, Teruyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on the water absorption rate in the small intestine using a rat small intestine perfusion model. The rate was significantly higher with 5 g/L WPH than with 5 g/L soy protein hydrolysates or physiological saline (p absorption rate in the range of 1.25-10.0 g/L. WPH showed a significantly higher rate than an amino acid mixture whose composition was equal to that of WPH (p absorption (p absorption was significantly correlated with that of peptides/amino acids absorption in WPH (r = 0.82, p absorption-promoting effect, to which PepT1 contributes.

  5. Gastrointestinal complaints in runners are not due to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bärtsch Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal complaints are common among long distance runners. We hypothesised that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO is present in long distance runners frequently afflicted with gastrointestinal complaints. Findings Seven long distance runners (5 female, mean age 29.1 years with gastrointestinal complaints during and immediately after exercise without known gastrointestinal diseases performed Glucose hydrogen breath tests for detection of SIBO one week after a lactose hydrogen breath test checking for lactose intolerance. The most frequent symptoms were diarrhea (5/7, 71% and flatulence (6/7, 86%. The study was conducted at a laboratory. In none of the subjects a pathological hydrogen production was observed after the intake of glucose. Only in one athlete a pathological hydrogen production was measured after the intake of lactose suggesting lactose intolerance. Conclusions Gastrointestinal disorders in the examined long distance runners were not associated with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  6. FETAL METABOLIC PROGRAMMING OF THE SMALL INTESTINE IN A COPENHAGEN SHEEP MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Khanal, Prabhat; Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft

    Fetal metabolic programming states that early life nutrition is implicated with the risk of later disease development and both under- and overnutrition during gestation might predispose individuals to develop obesity or diabetes later in life. Obesity operations called “gastric bypass” operations...... have shown unexpected involvement of the small intestine in diabetes pathophysiology as it in most cases result in a complete resolution of the diabetes before weight loss. Therefore we hypothesize that the small intestine is a subject of metabolic programming and that this programming can predispose...... for diabetes development. Twin-pregnant ewes where fed a Normal, a Low or a High diet during the last 6 weeks of gestation and the twin lambs where fed either a Conventional or a High fat, High carbohydrate (HCHF) diet during the first 6 months of life. Feeding challenge tests were performed on all lambs...

  7. Postprandial increase of oleoylethanolamide mobilization in small intestine of the Burmese python (Python molurus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Rourke, Bryan C; Andersen, Johnnie Bremholm

    2006-01-01

    to the induction of between-meal satiety. Here we examined whether feeding-induced OEA mobilization also occurs in Burmese pythons (Python molurus), a species of ambush-hunting snakes that consumes huge meals after months of fasting and undergoes massive feeding-dependent changes in gastrointestinal hormonal...... release and gut morphology. Using liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (LC/MS), we measured OEA levels in the gastrointestinal tract of fasted (28 days) and fed (48h after feeding) pythons. We observed a nearly 300-fold increase in OEA levels in the small intestine of fed compared to fasted animals......-unsaturated, but not polyunsaturated fatty-acid ethanolamides (FAE) in the small intestine of fed pythons. The identification of OEA and other FAEs in the gastrointestinal tract of Python molurus suggests that this class of lipid messengers may be widespread among vertebrate groups and may represent an evolutionarily ancient means...

  8. Effect of vitamin E on oxidative stress ,status in small intestine of diabetic rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of vitamin E on oxidative stress status in the small intestine of diabetic rats.METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control (C), non-treated diabetic (NTD) and vitamin E-treated diabetic (VETD)groups. The increases in lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in these three groups was compared after 6 wk.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in catalase activity between NTD and control rats.Compared to NTD rats, the treatment with vitamin E significantly decreased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and also increased catalase activity and SOD.CONCLUSION: The results revealed the occurrence of oxidative stress in the small intestine of diabetic rats. Vitamin E, as an antioxidant, attenuates lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, and increases antioxidant defense mechanism.

  9. Rebamipide Promotes the Regeneration of Aspirin-Induced Small-Intestine Mucosal Injury through Accumulation of β-Catenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lai

    Full Text Available The effect of rebamipide on repairing intestinal mucosal damage induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and its mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we sought to explore the mechanism whereby rebamipide could promote the regeneration of aspirin-induced intestinal mucosal damage.BALB/c mice were administered aspirin (200 mg/kg/d for 5 days to induce acute small intestinal injury (SII. Subsequently, SII mice were treated with rebamipide (320 mg/kg/d for 5 days. The structure of intestinal barrier was observed with transmission electron microscope, and Zo-1 and occludin expressions were detected. The proliferative index was indicated by the percentage of proliferating cell nuclear antigen positive cells. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 levels in the small intestine tissues were measured by an enzyme immunoassay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cyclooxygenase (COX and β-catenin signal were detected in the small intestine using quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively.COX expression was significantly down-regulated in aspirin induced SII (P < 0.05. In SII mice treated with rebamipide, histopathological findings of aspirin-induced intestinal inflammation were significantly milder and tight junctions between intestinal epithelial cells were improved significantly. The proliferative index increased after rebamipide treatment when compared with that in the control mice. The expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and c-myc and the PGE2 concentrations in small intestinal tissues were significantly increased in mice with rebamipide treatments (P < 0.05.Rebamipide administration in aspirin-induced SII mice could improve the intestinal barrier structure and promote the regeneration of small intestinal epithelial injury through up-regulating COX-2 expression and the accumulation of β-catenin.

  10. Ultrasonographic thickening of the muscularis propria in feline small intestinal small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniaux, Lise A; Laurenson, Michele P; Marks, Stanley L; Moore, Peter F; Taylor, Sandra L; Chen, Rachel X; Zwingenberger, Allison L

    2014-02-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma in the cat. More recently, an ultrasonographic pattern associated with feline small cell T-cell gastrointestinal lymphoma has been recognized as a diffuse thickening of the muscularis propria of the small intestine. This pattern is also described with feline inflammatory bowel disease. To evaluate the similarities between the diseases, we quantified the thickness of the muscularis propria layer in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 14 cats affected by small cell T-cell lymphoma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and 19 healthy cats. We found a significantly increased thickness of the muscularis propria in cats with lymphoma and IBD compared with healthy cats. The mean thickness of the muscularis propria in cats with lymphoma or IBD was twice the thickness of that of healthy cats, and was the major contributor to significant overall bowel wall thickening in the duodenum and jejunum. A muscularis to submucosa ratio >1 is indicative of an abnormal bowel segment. Colic lymph nodes in cats with lymphoma were increased in size compared with healthy cats. In cats with gastrointestinal lymphoma and histologic transmural infiltration of the small intestines, colic or jejunal lymph nodes were rounded, increased in size and hypoechoic.

  11. Characterization of slow waves generated by myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal of the rabbit small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Mitsui, Retsu; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2015-03-01

    Slow waves (slow wavesICC) were recorded from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in situ in the rabbit small intestine, and their properties were compared with those of mouse small intestine. Rabbit slow wavesICC consisted of an upstroke depolarization followed by a distinct plateau component. Ni(2+) and nominally Ca(2+)-free solutions reduced the rate-of-rise and amplitude of the upstroke depolarization. Replacement of Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) enhanced the upstroke component but decreased the plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In contrast, replacing Ca(2+) with Sr(2+) decreased both components of mouse slow wavesICC. The plateau component of rabbit slow wavesICC was inhibited in low-extracellular-Cl(-)-concentration (low-[Cl(-)]o) solutions and by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), an inhibitor of Cl(-) channels, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), an inhibitor of internal Ca(2+) pumps, or bumetanide, an inhibitor of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1). Bumetanide also inhibited the plateau component of mouse slow wavesICC. NKCC1-like immunoreactivity was observed mainly in ICC-MY in the rabbit small intestine. Membrane depolarization with a high-K(+) solution reduced the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC. In cells depolarized with elevated external K(+), DIDS, CPA, and bumetanide blocked slow wavesICC. These results suggest that the upstroke component of rabbit slow wavesICC is partially mediated by voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx, whereas the plateau component is dependent on Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) efflux. NKCC1 is likely to be responsible for Cl(-) accumulation in ICC-MY. The results also suggest that the mechanism of the upstroke component differs in rabbit and mouse slow wavesICC in the small intestine.

  12. Distribution and density of mast cells in camel small intestine and influence of fixation techniques

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    MB Al-Zghoul

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to gather species-specific data on mast-cell density and distribution in camel small intestine under different fixation conditions and to elucidate the presence and cross-reactivity of tryptase in the camel small intestine using human specific anti-tryptase antibody. Tissue specimens from the jejunum, duodenum, and ileum were obtained from 9 healthy, 9-12 months old, male camels. Specimens were fixed either with carnoy’s fluid or formalinbuffered solution and stained with either methylene blue or immunohistochemically to identify mast cells. The present study demonstrated for the first time, the presence and cross-reactivity of tryptase in the camel small intestine using a specific mouse anti-human tryptase antibody. Mast cells were detected in all histological layers of the camel small intestine (mucosal, submucosal, muscularis externa and serosa. Among all locations examined in the duodenum, ileum and jejunum, no significant difference was observed in mast-cell counts among the lamina propria, muscularis mucosae, muscularis externa and the serosa. The only significant difference observed was the mast-cell count in submucosa region where the highest and lowest mast count was observed in the jejenual and ileal submucosa, respectively. Significant differences regarding the distribution of mast cell as well as the influence of the fixation method could be observed. This underlines the fact that data regarding mast cell heterogeneity from other species, obtained by different fixation methods, are not comparable. This fact has to be taken into account when evaluating mast cell subtypes under pathological conditions.

  13. Characterization and Regulation of the Amino Acid Transporter SNAT2 in the Small Intestine of Piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangran Li

    Full Text Available The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2, which has dual transport/receptor functions, is well documented in eukaryotes and some mammalian systems, but has not yet been verified in piglets. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 in the small intestine of piglets. The 1,521-bp porcine full cDNA sequence of SNAT2 (KC769999 from the small intestine of piglets was cloned. The open reading frame of cDNA encodes 506 deduced amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 56.08 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI of 7.16. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that SNAT2 is highly evolutionarily conserved in mammals. SNAT2 mRNA can be detected in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum by real-time quantitative PCR. During the suckling period from days 1 to 21, the duodenum had the highest abundance of SNAT2 mRNA among the three segments of the small intestine. There was a significant decrease in the expression of SNAT2 mRNA in the duodenal and jejunal mucosa and in the expression of SNAT2 protein in the jejunal and ileal mucosa on day 1 after weaning (P < 0.05. Studies with enterocytes in vitro showed that amino acid starvation and supplementation with glutamate, arginine or leucine enhanced, while supplementation with glutamine reduced, SNAT2 mRNA expression (P < 0.05. These results regarding the characteristics and regulation of SNAT2 should help to provide some information to further clarify its roles in the absorption of amino acids and signal transduction in the porcine small intestine.

  14. [The x-ray microanalysis of the mucosa of the rat small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, A G; Matys, Iu V

    1990-01-01

    A rat small intestine mucosa is shown to accumulate significant amount of potassium and chloride. There was found a correlation between the content of these chemical elements and glycoprotein compartmentalization in goblet cell secret, brush border of enterocytes and a mucus layer. In this connection a role of mucus glycoproteins in membrane digestion is discussed. For preparation of samples the cryotechniques of electron microscopy are used.

  15. Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, S W; Pusztai, A

    1999-10-16

    Diets containing genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing the lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) had variable effects on different parts of the rat gastrointestinal tract. Some effects, such as the proliferation of the gastric mucosa, were mainly due to the expression of the GNA transgene. However, other parts of the construct or the genetic transformation (or both) could also have contributed to the overall biological effects of the GNA-GM potatoes, particularly on the small intestine and caecum.

  16. Improved technique of vascular anastomosis for small intestinal transplantation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Xin Li; Jie Shou Li; Ning Li

    2000-01-01

    AIM To establish a new improved vascular anastomotic technique to simplify the surgical technique and increase the survivsl rate of small intestinal transplantation in rats. METHODS The graft removed en bloc consisted of entire small intestine, portal vein and aortic segment with superior mesenteric artery. The graft was perfused in situ and the gut lumen was irrigated during the operation.Heterotopic small bowel transplantation was performed by microvascular end-to-side anastomosis between the donor aortic segment with superior mesenteric artery and the recipient abdominal aorta, and by the formation of a "Cuff" anastomosis between the donor portal vein and the recipient left renal vein. Both ends of the grafts were exteriorized as stomas. RESULTS A total of 189 intestinal transplantations were performed in rats, 33 of which were involved in the formal experimental group, with a survival rate of 84.8%. The average time for the donor surgery was 80min ±10min; for graft repair 10min ± 3min; and for recipient surgery 95min ± 15min. The average time for the arterial anastomosis and the vein anastomosis was 18min ± 5min and imin,respectively. The warm ischemic time and cold ischemic time were 22min ± 5min and less than 60min, respectively. The whole operation was completed by a single surgeon, the operative time being about 3 hours. CONCLUSION The vascular anastomosis used in this study could simplify surgical technique,reduce the operative time and elevate the survival rate of small intestinal transplantation in rats.

  17. Study of morbidity in orthotopic small intestine transplantation with Wistar rats: experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE André Dong Won

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - Transplantation of the small intestine is a surgical procedure currently under investigation for its possible application in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome, aiming at the reintroduction of an oral diet. Aim - To define the morbidity and mortality of intestinal transplantation in small animals using microsurgery. Intra and postoperative morbidity and mortality were studied in Wistar rats submitted to orthotopic intestinal allotransplantation. Material and Method - The animals were divided into three groups: group A (37 donor animals, group B (37 recipient animals, and group C (10 control animals. Group B was divided into three subgroups according to survival time. Subgroup TI consisted of animals that died during surgery or due to causes directly related to surgical intervention, subgroup T2 consisted of animals that died between the 4th and 29th postoperative day, and subgroup T3 consisted of animals that survived after 30 days. Transplanted animals were evaluated in terms of surgical technique used (vascular and intestinal anastomosis, graft quality, surgical time, and clinical parameters. The animals that died by the 29th postoperative day were submitted to autopsy and the remaining ones were sacrificed after 30 days. Result - There was a high rate of complication of a surgical nature. Early mortality rate, i.e., mortality up to the third postoperative day, was 54% with vascular anastomosis being the major cause of death. Surgical time was evaluated in a restricted and homogeneous group and showed a strong prognostic value in terms of successful transplantation. Clinical parameters such as weight loss, reduction of ingestion, reduction of motor activity and diarrhea were directly correlated with acute rejection. Conclusion - The experimented intestinal transplant is a procedure companied by considerable morbidity and mortality due to surgical complications in postoperative period, vascular anastomosis and

  18. CD36 deficiency impairs the small intestinal barrier and induces subclinical inflammation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifarelli, Vincenza; Ivanov, Stoyan; Xie, Yan; Son, Ni-Huiping; Saunders, Brian T.; Pietka, Terri A.; Shew, Trevor M.; Yoshino, Jun; Sundaresan, Sinju; Davidson, Nicholas O.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims CD36 has immuno-metabolic actions and is abundant in the small intestine on epithelial, endothelial and immune cells. We examined the role of CD36 in gut homeostasis using mice null for CD36 (CD36KO) and with CD36 deletion specific to enterocytes (Ent-CD36KO) or endothelial cells (EC-CD36KO). Methods Intestinal morphology was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy (EM). Intestinal inflammation was determined from neutrophil infiltration and expression of cytokines, toll-like receptors and COX-2. Barrier integrity was assessed from circulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran administered intragastrically. Epithelial permeability to luminal dextran was visualized using two photon microscopy. Results The small intestines of CD36KO mice fed a chow diet showed several abnormalities including extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation with increased expression of ECM proteins, evidence of neutrophil infiltration, inflammation and compromised barrier function. EM showed shortened desmosomes with decreased desmocollin 2 expression. Systemically, leukocytosis and neutrophilia were present together with 80% reduction of anti-inflammatory Ly6Clow monocytes. Bone marrow transplants supported the primary contribution of non-hematopoietic cells to the inflammatory phenotype. Specific deletion of endothelial but not of enterocyte CD36 reproduced many of the gut phenotypes of germline CD36KO mice including fibronectin deposition, increased interleukin 6, neutrophil infiltration, desmosome shortening and impaired epithelial barrier function. Conclusions CD36 loss results in chronic neutrophil infiltration of the gut, impairs barrier integrity and systemically causes subclinical inflammation. Endothelial cell CD36 deletion reproduces the major intestinal phenotypes. The findings suggest an important role of the endothelium in etiology of gut inflammation and loss of epithelial barrier integrity. PMID:28066800

  19. CONTROL AND CANCEROUS TISSUES OF HUMAN STOMACH, SMALL INTESTINE AND LARGE INTESTINE - THE AVERAGE CONTENT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Głogowska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium and potassium regulate the total amount of water in the body and the transmission of sodium into and out of individual cells also plays a role in critical body functions. The movement of sodium is critical in generation of these electrical signals. Research was conducted on samples taken from women and men aged 20-90 years, derived from the stomach, small intestine and large intestine. Samples were dried at 80ºC for 24 hours, and then increased temperature to 105ºC and dried for seven days until dry mass was obtained. All dry material of each sample was weighted and placed in a separate mineralization tubes and mixed with 1 cm3 of 65% HNO3 and heated at 105°C for 120 minutes in a thermostat-controlled digestion block, VELP Scientifica DK 20. Metals such as sodium and potassium were detected using FAAS method. The average content of sodium in patients diagnosed with stomach cancer is lower, than in healthy person. Indicate higher mean content of sodium in the control tissues of stomach (2151,730 μg•g-1d.m., compared to a sodium content in tissues adjacent to the tumor (1813,958 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (2029,442 μg•g-1d.m.. In the case of colon, control tissues have lower average content of sodium (2160,886 μg•g-1d.m., than the tissues surrounding the tumor (3325,963 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (3037,121 μg•g-1d.m.. The potassium level is higher in the control tissues of stomach (1428,993 μg•g-1d.m., than in the tissues adjacent to the tumor (1091,544 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (1220,471 μg•g-1d.m.. In the large intestine higher average content of potassium is characterized by tumor tissues (2307,234 μg•g-1d.m. and tissues adjacent to the tumor (1712,779 μg•g-1d.m., than control tissue (1389,703 μg•g-1d.m.. Comparing this relationship with data on potassium channels, it can be assumed that in the some case of malignant transformation in the colon, potassium channels also play a big role.

  20. Effects of monochromatic light on mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers in the small intestine of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, D; Li, J; Wang, Z X; Cao, J; Li, T T; Chen, J L; Chen, Y X

    2011-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that green and blue monochromatic lights were effective to stimulate immune response of the spleen in broilers. This study was designed to investigate the effects of monochromatic light on both gut mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers. A total of 120 Arbor Acre male broilers on post-hatching day (P) 0 were exposed to red light, green light (GL), blue light (BL), and white light (WL) for 49 d, respectively. As compared with broilers exposed to WL, the broilers exposed to GL showed that the villus height of small intestine was increased by 19.5% (P = 0.0205) and 38.8% (P = 0.0149), the crypt depth of small intestine was decreased by 15.1% (P = 0.0049) and 10.1% (P = 0.0005), and the ratios of villus height to crypt depth were increased by 39.3% (P < 0.0001) and 52.5% (P < 0.0001) at P7 and P21, respectively. Until P49, an increased villus height (33.6%, P = 0.0076), a decreased crypt depth (15.4%, P = 0.0201), and an increased villus height-to-crypt depth ratio (58.5%, P < 0.0001) were observed in the BL group as compared with the WL group. On the other hand, the numbers of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (27.9%, P < 0.0001 and 37.0%, P < 0.0001), goblet cells (GC, 22.1%, P < 0.0001 and 18.1%, P < 0.0001), and IgA(+) cells (14.8%, P = 0.0543 and 47.9%, P = 0.0377) in the small intestine were significantly increased in the GL group as compared with the WL group at P7 and P21, respectively. The numbers of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (36.2%, P < 0.0001), GC (26.5%, P < 0.0001), and IgA(+) cells (68.0%, P = 0.0177) in the BL group were also higher than those in the WL group at P49. These results suggest that both mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers of the small intestine may be improved by rearing broilers under GL at an early age and under BL at an older age.

  1. In vivo deep tissue fluorescence imaging of the murine small intestine and colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosignani, Viera; Dvornikov, Alexander; Aguilar, Jose S.; Stringari, Chiara; Edwards, Roberts; Mantulin, Williams; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-03-01

    Recently we described a novel technical approach with enhanced fluorescence detection capabilities in two-photon microscopy that achieves deep tissue imaging, while maintaining micron resolution. This technique was applied to in vivo imaging of murine small intestine and colon. Individuals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), commonly presenting as Crohn's disease or Ulcerative Colitis, are at increased risk for developing colorectal cancer. We have developed a Giα2 gene knock out mouse IBD model that develops colitis and colon cancer. The challenge is to study the disease in the whole animal, while maintaining high resolution imaging at millimeter depth. In the Giα2-/- mice, we have been successful in imaging Lgr5-GFP positive stem cell reporters that are found in crypts of niche structures, as well as deeper structures, in the small intestine and colon at depths greater than 1mm. In parallel with these in vivo deep tissue imaging experiments, we have also pursued autofluorescence FLIM imaging of the colon and small intestine-at more shallow depths (roughly 160μm)- on commercial two photon microscopes with excellent structural correlation (in overlapping tissue regions) between the different technologies.

  2. A Rare Case Report: A Giant Angiomyolipoma Located in the Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Gürcan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An angiomyolipoma is a mesenchymal neoplasm of the tumor and is composed of a varying heterogeneous mixture of blood vessels, smooth muscles, and adipose cells. Extra-renal angiomyolipomas are rarely seen and are most commonly found in the liver. Angiomyolipomas of the small intestine are extremely rare. We report the case of a 32-year-old man who had an ileal angiomyolipoma and who clinically presented with weakness and abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed a massive lesion, and segmental resection of the small intestine was performed. In the microscopic examination of the material that was sent for pathological evaluation, a tumor that included a cystic dilated vascular structure, adipose tissue, and muscular tissue extending from the serosa to the mucosa was seen. On immunohistochemical staining, various regions of the tumor were stained positive by actin, desmin, vimentin, CD31, CD34, and D2-40. With these histopathological findings, the patient was diagnosed with angiomyolipoma of the small intestinal mesentery.

  3. Plasmablastic lymphoma of the small intestine: Case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Wei Wang; Wen Yang; Jun-Zhong Sun; Jiang-Yang Lu; Min Li; Lin Sun

    2012-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder,which has been characterized by the World Health Organization as a new entity.Although PBL is most commonly seen in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients,it can also be seen in extraoral sites in immunocompromised patients who are HIV-negative.Here we present a rare case of PBL of the small intestine in a 55-year-old HIV-negative male.Histopathological examination of the excisional lesion showed a large cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation diffusely infiltTating the small intestine and involving the surrounding organs.The neoplastic cells were diffusely positive for CD79a,CD138 and CD10 and partly positive for CD38 and epithelial membrane antigen.Approximately 80% of the tumor cells were positive for Ki-67.A monodonal rearrangement of the kappa light chain gene was demonstrated.The patient died approximately 1.5 mo after diagnosis in spite of receiving two courses of the CHOP chemotherapy regimen.In a review of the literature,this is the first case report of PBL with initial presentation in the small intestine without HIV and Epstein-Barr virus infection,and a history of hepatitis B virus infection and radiotherapy probably led to the iatrogenic immunocompromised state.

  4. A paradigm shift in enteric coating: achieving rapid release in the proximal small intestine of man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Basit, Abdul W

    2010-10-15

    The in vivo performance of a novel enteric double-coating technology designed to accelerate release in the proximal small intestine of humans was investigated. Tablet cores were coated with a double layer formulation consisting of an inner layer of EUDRAGIT L 30 D-55 neutralised to pH 6.0 in the presence of 10% citric acid, and an outer layer of standard EUDRAGIT L 30 D-55. A conventional single coating of EUDRAGIT L 30 D-55 was also applied to tablets for comparison purposes, with the identical coating formulation and thickness (5mg/cm(2)) as the outer layer of the double coating. Eight fasted volunteers received the double-coated and single-coated tablets in a two-way crossover study. The formulations were radiolabelled and followed by gamma scintigraphy; the disintegration times and positions were recorded. After leaving the stomach, tablets coated with the single-coating formulation showed a significant time delay before disintegration occurred in the mid to distal small intestine, with a mean disintegration time of 66 ± 22 min post gastric emptying. The double-coated tablets disintegrated earlier at 28 ± 6min post gastric emptying with consistent disintegration in the proximal small intestine. The accelerated in vivo disintegration of the double-coating system can overcome the limitations of conventional enteric coatings.

  5. Estimating fermentative amino acid catabolism in the small intestine of growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus, D A; Cant, J P; de Lange, C F M

    2015-11-01

    Fermentative catabolism (FAAC) of dietary and endogenous amino acids (AA) in the small intestine contributes to loss of AA available for protein synthesis and body maintenance functions in pigs. A continuous isotope infusion study was performed to determine whole body urea flux, urea recycling and FAAC in the small intestine of ileal-cannulated growing pigs fed a control diet (CON, 18.6% CP; n=6), a high fibre diet with 12% added pectin (HF, 17.7% CP; n = 4) or a low-protein diet (LP, 13.4% CP; n = 6). (15)N-ammonium chloride and (13)C-urea were infused intragastrically and intravenously, respectively, for 4 days. Recovery of ammonia at the distal ileum was increased by feeding additional fibre when compared with the CON (P > 0.05) but was not affected by dietary protein (0.24, 0.39 and 0.14 mmol nitrogen/kg BW/day for CON, HF and LP, respectively; P 0.05)compared with CON. The two-pool model developed in the present study allows for estimation of FAAC but still has limitations. Quantifying FAAC in the small intestine of pigs, as well as other non-ruminants and humans, offers a number of challenges but warrants further investigation.

  6. [Somatic pain sensitivity under indometacin induced gastric and small intestinal injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarushkina, N I; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study the effect of indometacin (IM) induced gastrointestinal injury on somatic pain sensitivity in awake rats. IM was administered at the ulcerogenic dose (35 mg/kg, s. c.) to fasted (24 h) and fed rats. Somatic pain sensitivity was evaluated using a tail flick test. Latency time was measured under conditions of the formation of gastric erosion (1 - 4 h after IM injection) as well as small intestinal injury (24, 48 and 72 h after IM injection). IM administration caused the gastric erosion formation only in fasted rats (4 h after the administration) and the small intestinal injury in both fasted and fed rats (24, 48, 72 h after the administration). Indomethacin-caused gastric and small intestinal injury resulted in an increase in tail flick latency. We did not observe any changes in tail flick latency in IM-treated rats without significant gastrointestinal injury. The gastrointestinal injury was accompanied by signs of chronic stress: long-lasting increase in corticosterone blood level, adrenal hypertrophy, thymus involution, and loss of body weight. Thus, the IM-induced gastrointestinal injury formation resulted in somatic pain inhibition in awake rats.

  7. Irradiation induced injury reduces energy metabolism in small intestine of Tibet minipigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jue Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The radiation-induced energy metabolism dysfunction related to injury and radiation doses is largely elusive. The purpose of this study is to investigate the early response of energy metabolism in small intestinal tissue and its correlation with pathologic lesion after total body X-ray irradiation (TBI in Tibet minipigs. METHODS AND RESULTS: 30 Tibet minipigs were assigned into 6 groups including 5 experimental groups and one control group with 6 animals each group. The minipigs in these experimental groups were subjected to a TBI of 2, 5, 8, 11, and 14 Gy, respectively. Small intestine tissues were collected at 24 h following X-ray exposure and analyzed by histology and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. DNA contents in this tissue were also examined. Irradiation causes pathologic lesions and mitochondrial abnormalities. The Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA content-corrected and uncorrected adenosine-triphosphate (ATP and total adenine nucleotides (TAN were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by 2-8 Gy exposure, and no further reduction was observed over 8 Gy. CONCLUSION: TBI induced injury is highly dependent on the irradiation dosage in small intestine and inversely correlates with the energy metabolism, with its reduction potentially indicating the severity of injury.

  8. Effect of supplementary feeding during the sucking period on net absorption from the small intestine of weaned pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Hoogendoorn, A.; Zijderveld-van Bemmel, van A.

    1996-01-01

    An intestinal perfusion technique was used to measure the effects of supplementary feeding (experiment 1) and temporary weaning (experiment 2) during the sucking period on the net absorption of fluid, sodium, chloride and potassium from the small intestine of pigs after weaning. The technique was al

  9. Ecophysiology of the developing total bacterial and Lactobacillus communities in the terminal small intestine of weaning piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, R.; Janzcyk, P.; Zeyner, A.; Smidt, H.; Guiard, V.; Souffrant, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Weaning of the pig is generally regarded as a stressful event which could lead to clinical implications because of the changes in the intestinal ecosystem. The functional properties of microbiota inhabiting the pig's small intestine (SI), including lactobacilli which are assumed to exert health-prom

  10. [Glucose absorption in the rat small intestine in vivo after various levels of local substrate load].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzdkov, A A; Gromova, L V

    2013-05-01

    In order to evaluate relative roles of various mechanisms of glucose transport in the small intestine at high substrate loads in chronic experiments on rats, we investigated kinetics of glucose absorption in isolated part (-20 cm) of the intestine after its perfusion for 6 and 14 days during 1.5 h per day with 125 mM glucose solution (gr. 1--increased substrate load) or during 45-60 min per day with 25 mM glucose solution (gr. 2--reduced substrate load). The results of the experiments were analyzed by means of mathematical simulation. It was found that in the rats of gr. 1 the regular substrate load was more effective in maintaining a high level of glucose absorption in the isolated part of the intestine. Adaptation of glucose absorption to the increased local glucose load occurs due to enhancement of the secondary active transport via SGLT1. This component in many times exceeds the "unsaturated" component of glucose absorption, which is mainly determined by the facilitated diffusion via GLUT2, both at high and low glucose concentrations in the intestinal lumen.

  11. Novel canine bocavirus strain associated with severe enteritis in a dog litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, Rogier; Lapp, Stefanie; Hahn, Kerstin; Habierski, André; Förster, Christine; König, Matthias; Wohlsein, Peter; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-11-07

    Bocaviruses are small non-enveloped viruses with a linear ssDNA genome, that belong to the genus Bocaparvovirus of the subfamiliy Parvovirinae. Bocavirus infections are associated with a wide spectrum of disease in humans and various mammalian species. Here we describe a fatal enteritis associated with infection with a novel strain of canine bocavirus 2 (CaBoV-2), that occurred in a litter of German wirehaired pointers. Necropsy performed on three puppies revealed an enteritis reminiscent of canine parvovirus associated enteritis, accompanied with signs of lymphocytolytic disease in bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes and thymus. While other major causes of enteritis of young dogs, including canine parvovirus, were excluded, by random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel CaBoV-2 strain was detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome of this novel canine bocavirus strain indicated that this virus was indeed most closely related to group 2 canine bocaviruses. Infection with canine bocavirus was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of CaBoV-2 nucleic acid in the intestinal tract and lymphoid tissues of the dogs. In a small-scale retrospective analysis concerning the role of CaBoV-2 no additional cases were identified. The findings of this study provide novel insights into the pathogenicity of canine bocaviruses.

  12. Effects of Ginger (Zingiberaceae on Diabetes Mellitus Induced Changes in the Small Intestine of Rat

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    M Karimipour

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrine disorder and causes gastrointestinal complications .The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ginger on the small intestine of diabetic rats. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was done in the anatomy department of Uremia Medical University in 1385. 24 adult male rats, weighing 250±20 gr were randomly selected and divided into 3 following groups: control, diabetic (induced by 60mg/kg STZ and treatment groups. The treatment group was given ginger powder (5% of their consumed food weight during day/night period. After 8 weeks, all rats were anaesthetized and their small intestines were removed and measured for their weight and length. For histological assessment, samples from each part of duodenum, jejunum and ileum was fixed in 10% formalin and slides with hematoxilin & eosin staining were prepared. Villi length, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness were assessed by graticule eye piece of light microscope. Statistical analysis, one- way analysis of variance and Tukey’s SPSS software was used for data analysis. Results: The results showed that mean of intestinal length and weight, villi length and muscular layer thickness in all three parts and crypts depth in duodenum and jejunum in diabetic group increased significantly in comparison with control and treatment groups, but there was no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that ginger as an antioxidant, through decreasing oxidative stress, can prevent pathologic alterations induced by diabetes in small intestine.

  13. Digestion of “Resistant” Starch Sources in the Human Small Intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RoelJ.Vonk; Yue-XinYang; 等

    2001-01-01

    Background:Resistant starch sources,which are only partially digested in the small intestine,can be used to increase colonic avalialbiltiy of short chain fatty acids.Objective:To study the characteristics of the fermentiation of resistant starch,fist its small intestinal digestion has to be quantified.In our study,we performed this by comparing the metalbolic fate of highley digestible corn starch(DCS) ,Hylon VII and Novelose ,which are of corn origin and therefore naturally enriched in 13C.Design:After administration of 40g starch or glucose to seven healthy volunteers,glucose and exogenous glucose concentrations in serum and 13CO2 excretion in breasth were analyzed for 6hr.Carbon-13 abundance of CO2 was analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectormtry(IRMS) and 13C abundance of glucose by Gas Chromatography/Combustion/IRMS.Results:comparing the area under the curve(2hr) or exgenous glucose concentration in serum(13C-glycemic index)after intake of starch or glucos.digestion percentages for DCS,hylon VII and Novelose were calcualted to be 82%±23%,44%±16%and 43%±15%,Comparing 6h cumulative percentage dose recovery in breath revealed that 119%±28% of DCS,55%±23%of Hylon VII and 50±26% of Novelose is digested in the small intestine.Conclusion:Theses data show that the exogenous glucose reponse in serum and the 13CO2 excretion in breath can be used to estimate smlall intestinal digestion of resistant starch,which amounts approximately 50%.

  14. Functional reentry and circus movement arrhythmias in the small intestine of normal and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Wim J E P; Stephen, B; Karam, S M

    2012-04-01

    In a few recent studies, the presence of arrhythmias based on reentry and circus movement of the slow wave have been shown to occur in normal and diseased stomachs. To date, however, reentry has not been demonstrated before in any other part of the gastrointestinal system. No animals had to be killed for this study. Use was made of materials obtained during the course of another study in which 11 rats were treated with streptozotocin and housed with age-matched controls. After 3 and 7 mo, segments of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were isolated and positioned in a tissue bath. Slow wave propagation was recorded with 121 extracellular electrodes. After the experiment, the propagation of the slow waves was reconstructed. In 10 of a total of 66 intestinal segments (15%), a circus movement of the slow wave was detected. These reentries were seen in control (n = 2) as well as in 3-mo (n = 2) and 7-mo (n = 6) diabetic rats. Local conduction velocities and beat-to-beat intervals during the reentries were measured (0.42 ± 0.15 and 3.03 ± 0.67 cm/s, respectively) leading to a wavelength of 1.3 ± 0.5 cm and a circuit diameter of 4.1 ± 1.5 mm. This is the first demonstration of a reentrant arrhythmia in the small intestine of control and diabetic rats. Calculations of the size of the circuits indicate that they are small enough to fit inside the intestinal wall. Extrapolation based on measured velocities and rates indicate that reentrant arrhythmias are also possible in the distal small intestine of larger animals including humans.

  15. INTESTINAL CANDIDASIS CAUSING SU B ACUTE SMALL BOWEL OBSTRUCTION: A RARE CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patibandla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is increasingly encountered in daily medical practice. As a result, the concomitant risk for opportunistic infections is higher. Immuno - compromised patients may present with uncommon clinical and radiologic conditions. We report a case of 48 - year - old man chronic alcoholic for 25yrs who presented with abdominal pain and features suggestive of small bowel obstruction. On exploratory laparotomy and enterostomy yellow, shaggy necrotic material adherent to the folds of intestine was found. After the histopathological confirmation extensive fungal enteritis due to Candida albicans with partial small bowel obstruction was diagnosed.

  16. Small intestine adenocarcinoma in conjunction with multiple adenomas causing acute colic in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Juan A Muñoz; Lemberger, Karin; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Lepage, Olivier M

    2008-01-01

    An 11-year-old Andalusian stallion developed marked signs of colic associated with an acute small intestine obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a distal jejunum full-thickness wall induration and multiple small adherent intraluminal masses. Fifteen centimeters of jejunum, including the induration, and several intraluminal masses were resected. Histologic examination revealed an adenocarcinoma and multiple polypoid adenomas. The horse was discharged, and no complications were reported 12 months postoperatively. Colic was considered secondary to partial jejunal lumen obstruction by the adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma recurrence or transformation from remaining adenomas into an adenocarcinoma is still a major risk.

  17. Heat-treated colostrum feeding promotes beneficial bacteria colonization in the small intestine of neonatal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Chen, Yanhong; Liang, Guanxiang; Goonewardene, Laksiri A; Guan, Le Luo

    2015-11-01

    The present study investigated the effect of heat-treated colostrum feeding on the bacterial colonization in calf small intestine of neonatal calves within the first 12h of life. Newborn Holstein bull calves (n=32) were assigned to 3 treatment groups and fed with either fresh colostrum (FC, n=12) or heat-treated (60°C, 60 min) colostrum (HC, n=12) soon after birth, whereas the control (NC, n=8) group did not receive colostrum or water. Small intestinal tissues and contents were collected from proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum at 6 and 12h after birth, following euthanasia. Quantitative real time-PCR was used to explore the colonization of total bacteria, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Escherichia coli. The feeding of colostrum soon after birth increased the colonization of total bacteria in calf gut within the first 12h compared with NC. In contrast, the prevalence of Lactobacillus was lower in HC and FC compared to NC. Remarkable changes in the prevalence of small intestinal tissue-attached Bifidobacterium were observed with the feeding of HC, but not that in small intestinal contents. The prevalence of Bifidobacterium was 3.2 and 5.2 fold higher in HC than FC and NC, respectively, at 6h. Although the feeding of FC did not enhance the prevalence of tissue-attached Bifidobacterium at 6h compared with NC, it displayed a gradual increase over the time that was higher than NC, but similar to that of HC at 12h. Moreover, the colonization of E. coli was drastically reduced in HC calves compared with FC and NC. Thus, the present study suggests that the feeding of HC enhances the colonization of Bifidobacterium but lessens E. coli in the calf small intestine immediately postpartum compared with that of FC and NC. The increased colonization of beneficial bacteria along with the decreased colonization of potential pathogens in calf gut may also diminish the neonatal calf diarrhea when calves are fed heat-treated colostrum soon after birth.

  18. A prospective randomized controlled study of erythromycin on gastric and small intestinal distention: Implications for MR enterography

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    Bharucha, Adil E., E-mail: bharucha.adil@mayo.edu [Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.) Program, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Fidler, Jeff L., E-mail: fidler.jeff@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Huprich, James E., E-mail: huprich@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ratuapli, Shiva K., E-mail: ratuapli.shiva@mayo.edu [Clinical Enteric Neuroscience Translational and Epidemiological Research (C.E.N.T.E.R.) Program, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Holmes, David R., E-mail: holmes.david3@mayo.edu [Biomedical Imaging Resource, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Riederer, Stephen J., E-mail: riederer@mayo.edu [MR Research Laboratory, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Zinsmeister, Alan R., E-mail: zinsmeis@mayo.edu [Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St. S.W., Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Suboptimal small intestinal distention limits jejunal visualization during MRI. • In this controlled study, erythromycin increased gastric emptying measured with MRI. • However, effects on small intestinal dimensions were variable. - Abstract: Objectives: To assess if erythromycin increases gastric emptying and hence improves small intestinal distention during MR enterography. Methods: Gastric, small intestinal, and large intestinal volumes were assessed with MR after neutral oral contrast (1350 ml in 45 min) and balanced randomization to erythromycin (200 mg i.v., age 31 ± 3y, 13 females), or placebo (37 ± 3y, 13 females) in 40 healthy asymptomatic volunteers. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR images of the abdomen were acquired on a 1.5 T magnet at standard delay times for enterography. Gastric, small, and large intestinal volumes were measured by specialized software. In addition, two radiologists manually measured diameters and percentage distention of jejunal and ileal loops. Treatment effects were evaluated by an ITT analysis based on ANCOVA models. Results: All subjects tolerated erythromycin. MRI scans of the stomach and intestine were obtained at 62 ± 2 (mean ± SEM) and 74 ± 2 min respectively after starting oral contrast. Gastric volumes were lower (P < 0.0001) after erythromycin (260 ± 49 ml) than placebo (688 ± 63 ml) but jejunal, ileal, and colonic volumes were not significantly different. However, maximum (76–100%) jejunal distention was more frequently observed (P = 0.03) after erythromycin (8/20 subjects [40%]) than placebo (2/20 subjects [10%]). The diameter of a representative ileal loop was greater (P = 0.001) after erythromycin (18.8 ± 4.3 mm) than placebo (17.3 ± 2.8 mm) infusion. Conclusions: After ingestion of oral contrast, erythromycin accelerated gastric emptying but effects on small intestinal dimensions were variable. In balance, erythromycin did not substantially enhance small intestinal distention during

  19. Influence of the Gut Microflora and of Biliary Constituents on Morphological Changes in the Small Intestine in Obstructive Jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saeed Quraishy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased amounts of intestinal endotoxin are absorbed in obstructive jaundice. The precise mechanism is not known but the increased absorption may arise from alterations in the luminal contents, in the intestinal flora, in the gut wall or in interactions between all three. To examine the effects of the intestinal flora we have compared the morphological changes in the small intestine in obstructive jaundice in germ free and conventional rats while the effects of bile constituents have been examined by addition of bile constituents to the diet of bile duct ligated rats. Changes in the intestine were examined, histologically, by enzyme histochemistry, and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed no differences in response between germ free and conventional rats. Feeding of diets containing bile salts exacerbated the lesion. Feeding of diets containing cholesterol, however, reduced the degree of intestinal changes produced by cholestasis and completely antagonised the increase in damage caused by feeding of bile salts.

  20. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate reduces ischemia-reperfusion injury of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ismail H Mallick; Wen-Xuan Yang; Marc C Winslet; Alexander M Seifalian

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an enhancer of HO production, attenuates intestinal IR injury.METHODS: Eighteen male rats were randomly allocated into three groups: (a) sham; (b) IR, consisting of 30 min of intestinal ischemia, followed by 2-h period of reperfusion; and (c) PDTC treatment before IR. Intestinal microvascular perfusion (IMP) was monitored continuously by laser Doppler fiowmetry. At the end of the reperfusion, serum samples for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and biopsies of ileum were obtained. HO activity in the ileum was assessed at the end of the reperfusion period.RESULTS: At the end of the reperfusion in the IR group,IMP recovered partially to 42.5% of baseline (P<0.05vs sham), whereas PDTC improved IMP to 67.3% of baseline (P<0.01 vs IR). There was a twofold increase in HO activity in PDTC group (2 062.66±106.11) as compared to IR (842.3±85.12) (P<0.001). LDH was significantly reduced (P<0.001) in PDTC group (585.6±102.4)as compared to IR group (1 973.8±306.5). Histological examination showed that the ileal mucosa was significantly less injured in PDTC group as compared with IR group.CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that PDTC improves the IMP and attenuates IR injury of the intestine possibly via HO production. Additional studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of PDTC in the prevention of IR injury of the small intestine.

  1. Morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-12-16

    The present study aimed to study the morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of the experiments. Morphometry data was obtained by measuring the wall thickness and cross-sectional area. The mechanical test was done as a step-wise distension experiment. The intestinal diameter and length were obtained from digitized images of the segments at pre-selected pressure levels and at the no-load and zero-stress states. Circumferential and longitudinal stresses (force per area) and strains (deformation) were computed from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The duodenal and ileal dimensions increased slightly from 6 to 22 months, e.g. the wall thickness and the wall cross-sectional area increased about 4% and 25% for duodenum and 5% and 8% for ileum. The opening angle gradually decreased from 154 to 117 degrees for duodenum and from 144 to 87 degrees for ileum during aging. The circumferential stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 22 months (p<0.05) whereas the longitudinal stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 18 months (p<0.01) both for duodenum and ileum. The intestinal wall became stiffer circumferentially and longitudinally during the aging. Furthermore, the intestinal wall was stiffer longitudinally than circumferentially. In conclusion, pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling occurred in the rat intestine during aging.

  2. The mesenterially perfused rat small intestine: A versatile approach for pharmacological testings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Dominik; Klotz, Markus; Laures, Kerstin; Clasohm, Jasmin; Bischof, Michael; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds enter the body via several major natural gateways; i.e. the lung, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Drug application during surgical operations can lead to severe impairment of gastrointestinal motility, which can contribute to a paralytic ileus. Here we investigated an ex vivo perfused small intestine model that allows us to ascertain the influence of pharmaceuticals upon the gut. Corresponding segments from the proximal jejunum of adult rats were used. Their mesenteric arteries and veins were cannulated and the jejunal segment excised. The individual segments were placed in a custom designed perfusion chamber and perfusion performed through the intestinal lumen as well as the mesenteric superior artery. Three test drugs, which are commonly used in anesthesiology; i.e. pentobarbital, propofol and ketamine were administered via the blood vessels. Their effects upon gastrointestinal motility patterns were evaluated by optical measurements. Longitudinal and pendular movements were distinguishable and separately analyzed. Pharmacological effects of the individual substances could be investigated. Propofol (50-200 μg/ml) was found to decrease intestinal motility, especially longitudinal movements in a dose dependent manner. Pentobarbital decreased intestinal motility only at high concentrations, above 2.5 mg/ml. A dose of 2.5 mg/ml lead to an increase in longitudinal- and pendular movements in comparison to control, while ketamine (2.5-10 mg/ml) did not alter intestinal motility at all. Histological examination of the perfused segments revealed only minor changes in tissue morphology after perfusion. The perfusion approach shown here allows for the identification of compounds which interfere with gut motility in a highly sophisticated way. It is suitable for characterization of drug and dose specific changes in motility patterns and can be used in drug development and preclinical studies.

  3. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); D.J. van Nispen; S. Ferdinandusse; M. Jorritsma; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were loca

  4. Magnetic resonance enterography for the evaluation of the deep small intestine in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Takenaka, Kento; Kitazume, Yoshio; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Maiko; Nagaishi, Takashi; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-04-01

    For the control of Crohn's disease (CD) a thorough assessment of the small intestine is essential; several modalities may be utilized, with cross-sectional imaging being important. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography, i.e., MRE is recommended as a modality with the highest accuracy for CD lesions. MRE and MR enteroclysis are the two methods performed following distension of the small intestine. MRE has sensitivity and specificity comparable to computed tomography enterography (CTE); although images obtained using MRE are less clear compared with CTE, MRE does not expose the patient to radiation and is superior for soft-tissue contrast. Furthermore, it can assess not only static but also dynamic and functional imaging and reveals signs of CD, such as abscess, comb sign, fat edema, fistula, lymph node enhancement, less motility, mucosal lesions, stricture, and wall enhancement. Several indices of inflammatory changes and intestinal damage have been proposed for objective evaluation. Recently, diffusion-weighted imaging has been proposed, which does not need bowel preparation and contrast enhancement. Comprehension of the characteristics of MRE and other modalities is important for better management of CD.

  5. Migration of epithelial cells in the small intestine of mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadoff, N; Loria, R M; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S A

    1979-03-01

    The rate of cell migration in the small intestine during enteric viral infections has not been assessed previously. CD-1 mice (33 days old) were infected perorally with 1.0 X 10(8) plague-forming units of coxsackievirus B5 and 12 hr later were injected intraperitoneally with 2 micron Ci of [3H]thymidine/g of body weight. After 2, 12, 24, 48, 60, and 72 hr, mice were killed, and the small intestine was removed. Specimens obtained at each interval were examined by radioautography; similar specimens were titrated for virus by plaque assay in HeLa cells. In mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5, epithelial cells migrated from crypt to villus tip in 60 hr, as compared with 48 hr in uninfected control mice and 24 hr previously reported for mice perorally infected with enteric bacteria (e.g., Salmonella typhimurium). Virus was recovered from intestinal tissue, but no inflammatory response in the limina propria was apparent. These observations are consistent with previous report that substrate absorption rates may be altered during viral and bacterial enteric infection.

  6. Ornithine decarboxylase expression in the small intestine of broilers submitted to feed restriction and glutamine supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AV Fischer da Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred and forty one-day-old Cobb male broilers were used to evaluate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC expression in the mucosa of the small intestine. Birds were submitted to early feed restriction from 7 to 14 days of age. The provided feed was supplemented with glutamine. A completely randomized design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement was used (with or without glutamine, with or without feed restriction. Restricted-fed birds were fed at 30% the amount of the ad libitum fed group from 7 to 14 days of age. Glutamine was added at the level of 1% in the diet supplied from 1 to 28 days of age. Protein concentration in the small intestine mucosa was determined, and ODC expression at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of age was evaluated by dot blotting. ODC was present in the mucosa of broilers, and the presence of glutamine in the diet increased ODC activation. Glutamine prevented mucosa atrophy by stimulating protein synthesis, and was effective against the effects of feed restriction. Dot blotting can be used to quantify ODC expression in the intestinal mucosa of broilers.

  7. Williamson Fluid Model for the Peristaltic Flow of Chyme in Small Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohail Nadeem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model for the peristaltic flow of chyme in small intestine along with inserted endoscope is considered. Here, chyme is treated as Williamson fluid, and the flow is considered between the annular region formed by two concentric tubes (i.e., outer tube as small intestine and inner tube as endoscope. Flow is induced by two sinusoidal peristaltic waves of different wave lengths, traveling down the intestinal wall with the same speed. The governing equations of Williamson fluid in cylindrical coordinates have been modeled. The resulting nonlinear momentum equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The resulting problem is solved using regular perturbation method in terms of a variant of Weissenberg number We. The numerical solution of the problem is also computed by using shooting method, and comparison of results of both solutions for velocity field is presented. The expressions for axial velocity, frictional force, pressure rise, stream function, and axial pressure gradient are obtained, and the effects of various emerging parameters on the flow characteristics are illustrated graphically. Furthermore, the streamlines pattern is plotted, and it is observed that trapping occurs, and the size of the trapped bolus varies with varying embedded flow parameters.

  8. Identification and differential distribution of CART in the small intestine depending on the diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, I; Olkowski, B; Szczotka-Bochniarz, A

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed at identifying and locating cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in the small intestine of broilers in relation to the diet. The feeding regime of the chicks was based on diets largely consisting of maize and one of four protein sources: post-extraction soya bean meal (SBM) or non-GM seed meal - meal from traditional variety of soy seeds Glicine max (FFS) and meal from seeds of Lupinus angustifolius (LA) and Lupinus luteus L (LY). The presence of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript immunoreactive (CART-IR) in the wall of the small intestine of the chicks was determined on the basis of staining patterns produced by the immunohistochemical method (IHC). CART-IR structures were found in the myenteric plexus (MP), submucosus plexus (SP), in endomucosal fibres, and fibres innervating miocytes and blood vessels in the muscularis membrane and adipocytes of the white adipose tissue (WAT) located on the perimeter of the serous membrane and single cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system. Based on microscopic observation and result analysis, the lowest number of CART-IR structures was identified in the group that was fed the SBM-based diet. This study confirms previous observations concerning CART distribution in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of animal and broadens current knowledge by inclusion of chicken in the list of CART-positive species. Moreover, this work provides evidence that dietary composition can be a factor that stimulates post-prandial CART secretion in intestinal nerve structures.

  9. Successful small intestine colonization of adult mice by Vibrio cholerae requires ketamine anesthesia and accessory toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Olivier

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae colonizes the small intestine of adult C57BL/6 mice. In this study, the physical and genetic parameters that facilitate this colonization were investigated. Successful colonization was found to depend upon anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine and neutralization of stomach acid with sodium bicarbonate, but not streptomycin treatment. A variety of common mouse strains were colonized by O1, O139, and non-O1/non-O139 strains. All combinations of mutants in the genes for hemolysin, the multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxin (MARTX, and hemagglutinin/protease were assessed, and it was found that hemolysin and MARTX are each sufficient for colonization after a low dose infection. Overall, this study suggests that, after intragastric inoculation, V. cholerae encounters barriers to infection including an acidic environment and an immediate immune response that is circumvented by sodium bicarbonate and the anti-inflammatory effects of ketamine-xylazine. After initial adherence in the small intestine, the bacteria are subjected to additional clearance mechanisms that are evaded by the independent toxic action of hemolysin or MARTX. Once colonization is established, it is suggested that, in humans, these now persisting bacteria initiate synthesis of the major virulence factors to cause cholera disease. This adult mouse model of intestinal V. cholerae infection, now well-characterized and fully optimized, should serve as a valuable tool for studies of pathogenesis and testing vaccine efficacy.

  10. [Primary gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma of the small intestine with massive hemorrhage: a report of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akiyasu; Tsujimura, Hideki; Sugiyama, Takahiro; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamada, Shuhei; Ono, Keiko; Wang, Xiaofei; Sugawara, Takeaki; Ise, Mikiko; Itami, Makiko; Kumagai, Kyouya

    2016-03-01

    Primary gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma (FL) has an indolent clinical presentation and many of cases are diagnosed incidentally during routine endoscopic examinations. Herein, we present 3 cases with FL of the small intestine developed massive intestinal hemorrhage that necessitated blood transfusion. In all three patients, upper and lower endoscopic examinations failed to detect the bleeding sites. Eventually, video capsule endoscopies identified ulcerative lesions in the jejunum and biopsies using single- or double-balloon endoscopy confirmed the FL diagnosis in our three cases. The respective clinical stages according to the Lugano system were I, II-1 and II-1. PET-CT did not play a significant role in identifying the gastrointestinal lesions. Two patients received rituximab monotherapy and achieved a complete response. The other remains under observation after termination of antiplatelet drug therapy. Generally, the macroscopic appearance of multiple whitish nodules and the absence of symptoms represent the typical clinical picture of gastrointestinal FL. However, this study demonstrates that patients with ulcerative lesions may be at risk for massive bleeding. Further discussion is required to determine the optimal indications for total endoscopic examination of the small intestine.

  11. Intestinal small bowel lymphomas - diagnosis and treatment; Primaer intestinale Lymphome - Diagnosestellung mittels CT und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goessmann, H.; Reith, H.B. [Klinikum fuer Visceral-, Thorax und Gefaesschirurgie, Klinikum Konstanz (Germany); Goerlitz, T.; Beck, A. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Konstanz (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Primary intestinal lymphomas are most common in the stomach. The mucosa associated lymphatic tissue (MALT)-lymphoma which is closely associated with helicobacter pylori is very well known. In most cases, these malignancies are from B-cells origin. Another possible point of manifestation, although not well known, is the small bowel. Both tumors have enormous capabilities to enlarge in the abdominal cave. This is responding to their often asymptomatic manifestation. The symptoms, if they occur, are widespread and unspecific. Ileus, diarrhae, abdominal pain or bleeding will be observed, in rare cases also perforation or gastrointestinal or cutaneous fistulas. Diagnostic imaging often demonstrates a tumour of massive size by then, which is echopoor in the abdominal ultrasound. Our report concerns two cases of small intestine lymphomas, which were diagnosed by CT-scanning and treated in our clinic in only a short period of time. The first case was a low malignant jejunal lymphoma which was almost asymptomatic, whereas the second case had an ileus, due to compression of the intestine because of a high malignant lymphoma of the ileocecal region. (orig.)

  12. Protective Effect of Sodium Nitroprusside on the Rat Small Intestine Transplanted Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Hua Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosal epithelium is extremely susceptible to even brief periods of ischemia. Mucosal barrier damage, which is associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and consequently bacterial translocation, remains a major obstacle for clinically successful small bowel transplantation (SBT. Previous studies have demonstrated a protective effect of nitric oxide (NO on other transplanted organs and NO mediated intestinal protection has also been reported in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor, on graft mucosal histology and molecular markers of function after SBT in rats. We used SNP in different period of heterotopic SBT rats. The groups consisted of SBT, pre-SNP group, and post-SNP group. Interestingly, the pre-SNP graft samples exhibited less damage compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. In addition, mucosal samples from the pre-SNP group showed higher Na+-K+-ATPase activity and higher levels of laminin expression compared to the SBT and post-SNP samples. The findings of the present study reveal that SNP given before graft ischemia/reperfusion injury has a protective effect on mucosal histology and molecular markers of function in the transplanted small intestine.

  13. Evaluation of CD45 protein expression and transcript in canine small clear cell/T zone lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Cozzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Canine small clear cell lymphoma is a peculiar lymphoma entity with T-zone histopathological pattern andindolent clinical course. From an immunophenotypic point of view the main feature is the lack of CD45 staining by flow-cytometry (FC, which accounts for >95% of cases. Underlying mechanisms have never been investigated.Aim of this work was to evaluate CD45 protein and mRNA expression in small clear cell lymphoma.Lymph nodes of 18 cases and 11 controls, with either reactive hyperplasia or CD45-positive high grade T-cell lymphoma, were investigated. FC was performed on lymph node fine needle aspiration and CD45 median fluorescence intensity (MFI was then evaluated on small clear cells and normal residual T-lymphocytes. CD45 surface expression was also evaluated by immunohistochemical reaction on paraffin wax-embedded lymph node sections.Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed on cases and controls. Total RNA was isolated from cell suspension in RNA later. The generated CD45cDNA was amplified and ΔΔCt method was used for the relative mRNA quantification.CD45-MFI in neoplastic cells was <1% compared to normal residual T-lymphocytes in the same sample. Cells were also negative for CD45 stain on histopathological preparations. RT-PCR showed a significantly lower amount of CD45 transcript in neoplastic samples compared to controls, likely due to the residual population.Results showed the lack of CD45 surface antigen and the virtually absence of CD45-mRNA in small clear cell lymphoma. We hypothesize a possible genomic/epigenomic aberration; further studies are in progress to investigate the pathogenesis of this aberrancy and the possible linkage to lymphomagenesis.

  14. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  15. An analytical solution for the model of drug distribution and absorption in small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyu, Xu

    1990-11-01

    According to the physiological and anatomical characteristics of small intestine, neglecting the effect of its motility on the distribution and absorption of drug and nutrient, Y. Miyamoto et al.[1] proposed a model of two-dimensional laminar flow in a circular porous tube with permeable wall and calculated the concentration profile of drug by numerical analysis. In this paper, we give a steady state analytical solution of the above model including deactivation term. The obtained results are in agreement with the results of their numerical analysis. Moreover the analytical solution presented in this paper reveals the relation among the physiological parameters of the model and describes the basic absorption rule of drug and nutrient through the intestinal wall and hence provides a theoretical basis for determining the permeability and reflection coefficient through in situ experiments.

  16. Case of congenital short small intestine: survival with use of long-term parenteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, S F; Byrne, W J; Ament, M E

    1986-03-01

    Isolated congenital short small intestine is a rare anomaly. Of six (one male, five females) previously reported cases, four died in infancy from intractable diarrhea. We report the case of 7-year-old boy with this syndrome in whom a 2-year period of parenteral feeding at home allowed normal weight gain, growth, and development while intestinal adaptation occurred. Parenteral feeding was discontinued at age 2 1/3 years, and for the past 5 years his weight has remained between the tenth and 25th percentiles and his stature between the 25th and 50th percentiles. His development has been normal and he functions at or above grade level at school. Coefficient of fat absorption has increased from 54% to 81%. Vitamin B12 absorption has improved but has not normalized. He remains lactose intolerant. We believe his survival, growth, and development would have been compromised if he had not received a prolonged period of parenteral feeding.

  17. Small intestinal hydrolysis of plant glucosides: higher glucohydrolase activities in rodents than passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessner, Krista M; Dearing, M Denise; Izhaki, Ido; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Arad, Zeev; Karasov, William H

    2015-09-01

    Glycosides are a major group of plant secondary compounds characterized by one or more sugars conjugated to a lipophilic, possibly toxic aglycone, which is released upon hydrolysis. We compared small intestinal homogenate hydrolysis activity of three rodent and two avian species against four substrates: amygdalin and sinigrin, two plant-derived glucosides, the sugar lactose, whose hydrolysis models some activity against flavonoid and isoflavonoid glucosides, and the disaccharide sugar maltose (from starch), used as a comparator. Three new findings extend our understanding of physiological processing of plant glucosides: (1) the capacity of passerine birds to hydrolyze plant glucosides seems relatively low, compared with rodents; (2) in this first test of vertebrates' enzymic capacity to hydrolyze glucosinolates, sinigrin hydrolytic capacity seems low; (3) in laboratory mice, hydrolytic activity against lactose resides on the enterocytes' apical membrane facing the intestinal lumen, but activity against amygdalin seems to reside inside enterocytes.

  18. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Simon; Sidani, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT). A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P PERT), and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO. PMID:27446865

  19. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  20. Serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Romy M; Parnell, Nolie K; Grützner, Niels; Mansell, Joanne; Berghoff, Nora; Schellenberg, Stefan; Reusch, Claudia E; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) protein loss, due to lymphangiectasia or chronic inflammation, can be challenging to diagnose. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1PI) concentrations to detect crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs. Serum and fecal cα1PI concentrations were measured in 120 dogs undergoing GI tissue biopsies, and were compared between dogs with and without crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. Serial serum cα1PI concentrations were also evaluated in 12 healthy corticosteroid-treated dogs. Serum cα1PI and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation than in those without (both P <0.001), and more severe lesions were associated with lower serum cα1PI concentrations, higher 3 days-mean fecal cα1PI concentrations, and lower serum/fecal cα1PI ratios. Serum and fecal cα1PI, and their ratios, distinguished dogs with moderate or severe GI crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation from dogs with only mild or none such lesions with moderate sensitivity (56-92%) and specificity (67-81%). Serum cα1PI concentrations increased during corticosteroid administration. We conclude that serum and fecal α1PI concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation in dogs. Due to its specificity for the GI tract, measurement of fecal cα1PI appears to be superior to serum cα1PI for diagnosing GI protein loss in dogs. In addition, the serum/fecal cα1PI ratio has an improved accuracy in hypoalbuminemic dogs, but serum cα1PI concentrations should be carefully interpreted in corticosteroid-treated dogs.

  1. [An inhibitory analysis of the role of the enterocyte cytoskeleton in the absorption of food substances in the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, I A; Verina, T Iu

    1993-06-01

    The effect of colchicine and cytochalasin B and D on the process of glucose and plant oil absorption in the small intestine of rats was studied using the light and electron microscopy and biochemical methods. The colchicine and CB, CD action on the elements of enterocytes' apical contractile complex and cytoskeleton inhibited the absorption thus suggesting the major role of endocytosis in the process of nutrients absorption in the small intestine.

  2. [Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on local tissue blood flow to a small intestine transplant intended for esophagoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnitskiĭ, L I; Piuskiulian, L I; Zhidkov, I L; Demurov, E A

    1981-04-01

    The time course of the local tissue blood flow in the small intestinal graft used for esophagoplasty was studied in 54 acute experiments on rabbits exposed to hyperbaric oxygenation (1 hour, 2 ata). It has been shown that hyperbaric oxygenation prevents alterations in the local tissue blood flow in the small intestine. This fact provides evidence in favour of hyperbaric oxygenation application under clinical conditions.

  3. Consistency between computed tomographic enterography and enteroscopy in the detection of small intestinal Crohn’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐安涛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of computed tomographic enterography(CTE)in the detection of small intestinal Crohn’s disease(CD)with balloon-assisted enterography(BAE)as reference standard.Methods The CTE and BAE data of 81 patients with CD were retrospectively analyzed.The small intestine of CD patients was divided into four segments,such as duode-

  4. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG increases Toll-like receptor 3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, A; Saito, S; Fukiya, S; Aoki, R; Takayama, Y; Suzuki, C; Sonoyama, K

    2016-06-01

    Administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) has been reported to be therapeutically effective against acute secretory diarrhoea resulting from the structural and functional intestinal mucosal lesions induced by rotavirus infection; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be completely elucidated. Because Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) plays a key role in the innate immune responses following the recognition of rotavirus, the present study examined whether LGG influences TLR3 gene expression in murine small intestine ex vivo and in vivo. We employed cultured intestinal organoids derived from small intestinal crypts as an ex vivo tissue model. LGG supplementation increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the intestinal organoids, as estimated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Likewise, single and 7-day consecutive daily administrations of LGG increased TLR3 mRNA levels in the small intestine of C57BL/6N mice. The mRNA levels of other TLRs were not substantially altered both ex vivo and in vivo. In addition, LGG supplementation increased the mRNA levels of an antiviral type 1 interferon, interferon-α (IFN-α), and a neutrophil chemokine, CXCL1, upon stimulation with a synthetic TLR3 ligand, poly(I:C) in the intestinal organoids. LGG administration did not alter IFN-α and CXCL1 mRNA levels in the small intestine in vivo. Supplementation of other bacterial strains, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus paracasei, failed to increase TLR3 and poly(I:C)-stimulated CXCL1 mRNA levels ex vivo. We propose that upregulation of TLR3 gene expression may play a pivotal role in the therapeutic efficacy of LGG against rotavirus-associated diarrhoea. In addition, we demonstrated that intestinal organoids may be a promising ex vivo tissue model for investigating host-pathogen interactions and the antiviral action of probiotics in the intestinal epithelium.

  5. P-glycoprotein in sheep liver and small intestine: gene expression and transport efflux activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballent, M; Wilkens, M R; Maté, L; Muscher, A S; Virkel, G; Sallovitz, J; Schröder, B; Lanusse, C; Lifschitz, A

    2013-12-01

    The role of the transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the disposition kinetics of different drugs therapeutically used in veterinary medicine has been demonstrated. Considering the anatomo-physiological features of the ruminant species, the constitutive expression of P-gp (ABCB1) along the sheep gastrointestinal tract was studied. Additionally, the effect of repeated dexamethasone (DEX) administrations on the ABCB1 gene expression in the liver and small intestine was also assessed. The ABCB1 mRNA expression was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. P-gp activity was evaluated in diffusion chambers to determine the efflux of rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in the ileum from experimental sheep. The constitutive ABCB1 expression was 65-fold higher in the liver than in the intestine (ileum). The highest ABCB1 mRNA expression along the small intestine was observed in the ileum (between 6- and 120-fold higher). The treatment with DEX did not elicit a significant effect on the P-gp gene expression levels in any of the investigated gastrointestinal tissues. Consistently, no significant differences were observed in the intestinal secretion of Rho 123, between untreated control (Peff S-M = 3.99 × 10(-6)  ± 2.07 × 10(-6) ) and DEX-treated animals (Peff S-M = 6.00 × 10(-6)  ± 2.5 × 10(-6) ). The understanding of the efflux transporters expression and activity along the digestive tract may help to elucidate clinical implications emerging from drug interactions in livestock.

  6. The bacteriology of the small intestinal mucosa of free-living reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Sørmo

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in close associaton with the intestinal mucosa are thought to protect the mucosa from pathogenic microorganisms. The pH of the small intestinal mucosa and the viable populations of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria associated with the proximal and distal jejunal mucosa, were measured in four free-living reindeer in winter. The anaerobic bacterial populations were characterized. The median pH of the mucosa of the duodenum was 6.6 (n=4 at point 0.2 m from the pyloric sphincter. The mucosal pH increased along the length of the intestine to 8.3 at 14 m and then decreased to 7.9 at 19.8 m from the pyloric sphincter. Examination by transmission electron microscopy and cultivation techniques failed to reveal any bacteria on the mucosa of the proximal jejunum in two of the animals. In two other reindeer the median anaerobic bacterial densities in the proximal jejunum ranged from 25-2500 cells/g mucosa. The median anaerobic bacterial populations in the distal jejunum ranged from 80 to 20000 bacteria/g mucosa (n=4. The anaerobic population of bacteria in the proximal jejunum was dominated by streptococci and unidentified gram positive rods. Bacteroidaceae, streptococci and unidentified gram positive rods were common in the distal jejunum. The low density and the species diversity of bacteria in the small intestine suggests that these microorganisms are inhibited by components in the natural winter diet of reindeer. Bacteria evidently play a minor role in protection of the mucosa of reindeer in winter.

  7. Fgf10 overexpression enhances the formation of tissue-engineered small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torashima, Yasuhiro; Levin, Daniel E; Barthel, Erik R; Speer, Allison L; Sala, Frédéric G; Hou, Xiaogang; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2016-02-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a morbid and mortal condition characterized in most patients by insufficient intestinal surface area. Current management strategies are inadequate, but tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a potential therapy. A barrier to translation of TESI is the generation of scalable mucosal surface area to significantly increase nutritional absorption. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) is a critical growth factor essential for the development of the gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that overexpression of Fgf10 would improve the generation of TESI. Organoid units, the multicellular donor tissue that forms TESI, were derived from Rosa26(rtTA/+), tet(o)Fgf10/(-) or Fgf10(Mlc-nlacZ-v24) (hereafter called Fgf10(lacZ)) mice. These were implanted into the omentum of NOD/SCID γ-chain-deficient mice and induced with doxycycline in the case of tet(o)Fgf10/(-). Resulting TESI were explanted at 4 weeks and studied by histology, quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Four weeks after implantation, Fgf10 overexpressing TESI was larger and weighed more than the control tissues. Within the mucosa, the villus height was significantly longer and crypts contained a greater percentage of proliferating epithelial cells. A fully differentiated intestinal epithelium with enterocytes, goblet cells, enteroendocrine cells and Paneth cells was identified in the Fgf10-overexpressing TESI, comparable to native small intestine. β-Galactosidase expression was found in both the epithelium and the mesenchyme of the TESI derived from the Fgf10(LacZ) duodenum. However, this was not the case with TESI generated from jejunum and ileum. We conclude that Fgf10 enhances the formation of TESI.

  8. The influence of restricted feeding on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing cells in the chicken small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monir, M M; Hiramatsu, K; Yamasaki, A; Nishimura, K; Watanabe, T

    2014-04-01

    The influence of restricted feeding on the distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing endocrine cells in the chicken small intestine was investigated using immunohistochemical and morphometrical techniques. This study demonstrated that the restricted feeding had an influence on the activity of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the chicken small intestine. There were differences in the localization and the frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the small intestine between control and restricted groups, especially 25% feed supply group provided with 25% of the intake during the adapting period. GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the control chickens were mainly located in epithelium from crypts to the lower part of intestinal villi. Those in restricted groups, however, tended to be located from crypts to the middle part of intestinal villi. The frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells was lowest in the control group, medium in 50% feed supply group and highest in 25% feed supply group at each intestinal region examined in this study, that is, increased with the advancement of restricting the amount of feed supply. These data show that the quantity of food intake is one of signals that have an influence on the secretion of GLP-1 from L cells in the chicken small intestine.

  9. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively.

  10. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine.

  11. Chronic systemic treatment with epidermal growth factor in the rat increases the mucosal surface of the small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter-Jensen, Lars; Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Kissmeyer-Nielsen, Peter;

    1995-01-01

    . The histological composition and mucosal surface area of the perfusion-fixed small intestine was quantified with stereological principles. The length of the gut remained unchanged. The amount of tissue and surface area per length of gut (median (ranges)) were increased from 117 (101-131) mg/cm and 2.6 (2.1-3.5) cm......We examined the effects of treatment with human recombinant epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the functioning small intestine in the rat. Male Wistar rats, 7-8 weeks old, were treated with EGF administered subcutaneously in doses of 0 (n = 7) or 150 micrograms/kg/day (n = 8) for 4 weeks......2/cm in the controls to 146 (138-152) mg/cm and 3.5 (2.5-3.8) cm2/cm for the complete small intestine (both comparisons P intestine, whereas the surface area was only increased in proximal and middle parts. It is concluded...

  12. Canine Distemper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of ... Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. And Now A Note On ...

  13. Small Intestine but Not Liver Lysophosphatidylcholine Acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) Deficiency Has a Dominant Effect on Plasma Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Inamul; Li, Zhiqiang; Bui, Hai H; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Gao, Guangping; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (Lpcat3) is involved in phosphatidylcholine remodeling in the small intestine and liver. We investigated lipid metabolism in inducible intestine-specific and liver-specificLpcat3gene knock-out mice. We producedLpcat3-Flox/villin-Cre-ER(T2)mice, which were treated with tamoxifen (at days 1, 3, 5, and 7), to deleteLpcat3specifically in the small intestine. At day 9 after the treatment, we found that Lpcat3 deficiency in enterocytes significantly reduced polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines in the enterocyte plasma membrane and reduced Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), CD36, ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1), and ABCG8 levels on the membrane, thus significantly reducing lipid absorption, cholesterol secretion through apoB-dependent and apoB-independent pathways, and plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, and phospholipid levels, as well as body weight. Moreover, Lpcat3 deficiency does not cause significant lipid accumulation in the small intestine. We also utilized adenovirus-associated virus-Cre to depleteLpcat3in the liver. We found that liver deficiency only reduces plasma triglyceride levels but not other lipid levels. Furthermore, there is no significant lipid accumulation in the liver. Importantly, small intestine Lpcat3 deficiency has a much bigger effect on plasma lipid levels than that of liver deficiency. Thus, inhibition of small intestine Lpcat3 might constitute a novel approach for treating hyperlipidemia.

  14. Infection with fully mature Corynosoma cf. validum causes ulcers in the human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Ito, Takahiro; Sato, Tomonobu; Goto, Mitsuru; Kawamoto, Toru; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yoshinori; Nakao, Minoru; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fujiya, Mikihiro

    2016-06-01

    Corynosoma is a parasite that can normally be found in the intestinal tract of fish-eating mammals, particularly in seals and birds. The present case proposed that Corynosoma could attain full maturity in the human intestine. A 70-year-old female complained of abdominal pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a swelling of the intraperitoneal lymph nodes with no responsible lesion. Video capsule endoscopy and double-balloon endoscopy detected several ulcerations and one parasite in the ileum, which was tightly attached at the bottom of the ulcerations. The parasite was cylindrical and measured approximately 10 mm (long) x 3 mm (wide). Pathologically, the worm had a four-layered body wall and contained embryonated eggs. The sequences of the parasite-derived nuclear ribosomal DNA fragment and mitochondrial DNA fragment of cox1 were almost identical to those of Corynosoma validum. The patient's abdominal pain immediately improved after the administration of pyrantel pamoate (1,500 mg). Corynosoma was possibly the responsible disease in a patient who complained of abdominal pain and in whom no responsible lesion was detected by CT, gastroduodenoscopy or colonoscopy. Examinations of the small intestines should be aggressively performed in such cases.

  15. Transport phenomena of microbial flora in the small intestine with peristalsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, T; Sato, T; Mohit, G; Imai, Y; Yamaguchi, T

    2011-06-21

    The gastrointestinal tract of humans is colonized by indigenous prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial cells that form a complex ecological system called microbial flora. Although the microbial flora has diverse functions, its homeostasis inside the gastrointestinal tract is still largely unknown. Therefore, creating a model for investigating microbial flora in the gastrointestinal tract is important. In this study, we developed a novel numerical model to explore the transport phenomena of microbial flora in the small intestine. By simultaneously solving the flow field generated by peristalsis, the concentrations of oxygen and nutrient, and the densities of moderate anaerobes and aerobes, the effects of fluid mechanics on the transport phenomena of microbial flora are discussed. The results clearly illustrated that fluid mechanics have considerable influence not only on the bacterial population, but also on the concentration distributions of oxygen and nutrient. Especially, the flow field enhances the radial variation of the concentration fields. We also show scaling arguments for bacterial growth and oxygen consumption, which capture the main features of the results. Additionally, we investigated the transport phenomena of microbial flora in a long tube with 40 constrictions. The results showed a high growth rate of aerobes in the upstream side and a high growth rate of anaerobes in the downstream side, which qualitatively agrees with experimental observations of human intestines. These new findings provide the fundamental basis for a better understanding of the transport phenomena of microbial flora in the intestine.

  16. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Impairs Small Intestinal Mucosal Immunity in Neonatal Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Zhong, Xiang; Ahmad, Hussain; Li, Wei; Wang, Yuanxiao; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2014-07-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a very common problem in both piglet and human neonate populations. We hypothesized that IUGR neonates have impaired intestinal mucosal immunity from birth. Using neonatal piglets as IUGR models, immune organ weights, the weight and length of the small intestine (SI), intestinal morphology, intraepithelial immune cell numbers, levels of cytokines and immunoglobulins, and the relative gene expression of cytokines in the SI were investigated. IUGR neonatal piglets were observed to have lower absolute immune organ weight and SI length, decreased relative weights of the thymus, spleen, mesenteric lymph node, and thinner but longer SIs. Damaged and jagged villi, shorter microvilli, presence of autophagosomes, swelled mitochondria, and decreased villus surface areas were also found in the SIs of IUGR neonatal piglets. We also found a smaller number of epithelial goblet cells and lymphocytes in the SIs of IUGR neonates. In addition, we detected reduced levels of the cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ and decreased gene expression of cytokines in IUGR neonates. In conclusion, IUGR was shown to impair the mucosal immunity of the SI in neonatal piglets, and the ileum was the major site of impairment.

  17. Gene expression profile in rat small intestinal allografts after cold preservation/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Feng Wang; Qi Liang; Guo-Wei Li; Kun Gao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the changes of gene expression profile in small intestinal allografts in rats after cold preservation/reperfusion, and to identify the genes relevant to cold preservation/reperfusion injury.METHODS: Heterotopic segmental small bowel transplantation was performed in six rats with a sham operation and they were used as controls. Total RNA was extracted from the allografts (experimental group) and normal intestines (control group) 1 h after cold preservation/reperfusion, and then purified to mRNA, which was then reversely transcribed to cDNA, and labeled with fluorescent Cy5-dUTP and Cy3-dUTP to prepare hybridization probes.The mixed probes were hybridized to the cDNA microarray.After high-stringent washing, the fluorescent signals on cDNA microarray chip werescanned and analyzed.RESULTS: Among the 4 096 target genes, 82 differentially expressed genes were identified between the two groups.There were 18 novel genes, 33 expression sequence tags,and 31 previously reported genes. The selected genes may be divided into four classes: genes modulating cellular adhesion, genes regulating cellular energy, glucose and protein metabolism, early response genes and other genes.CONCLUSION: A total of 82 genes that may be relevant to cold preservation/reperfusion injury in small intestinal allografts are identified. Abnormal adhesion between polymorphonuclears and endothelia and failure in energy,glucose and protein metabolism of the grafts may contribute to preservation/reperfusion injury. The functions of the novel genes identified in our study need to be darified further.

  18. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  19. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and fat digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Lisowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Available data suggests that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO may frequently occur in cystic fibrosis (CF subjects. SIBO may result in synthesis of enterotoxic and unabsorbable metabolites which may cause mucosal damage and – additionally – interfere with digestion and absorption. Such a relationship was documented in CF mouse model. Therefore, in the present study we aimed to assess the influence of bacterial overgrowth in small intestine in CF patients on lipid digestion and absorption. Material and methods. The study comprised 60 pancreatic insufficient CF patients, 30 children and 30 adults. All enrolled CF subjects were tested for the presence of SIBO using hydrogen/methane breath test with glucose loading. According to the obtained results CF patients were divided into SIBO positive and negative subgroups. Subsequently, 13C-labelled mixed triglyceride breath test was performed to assess lipid digestion and absorption. Cumulative percentage dose recovery (cPDR was considered to reflect digestion and absorption of lipids. Results. SIBO was detected in 12 (40.0% children and 11 (36.7% adults with CF. The cPDR did not differ between SIBO positive and negative subgroups, neither when assessed separately for children (mean ±SEM: 5.5 ±0.8 vs. 7.4 ±1.0% and adults (4.9 ±0.8 vs. 7.1 ±0.7% nor for the entire studied population. Conclusions. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth does not seem to play a key role in lipid digestion and absorption in cystic fibrosis patients.

  20. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: association with toll-like receptor 4 expression and plasma levels of interleukin 8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanab, Ahmed Abu

    2011-05-01

    Experimental and clinical studies suggest an association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver injury and fibrosis could be related to exposure to bacterial products of intestinal origin and, most notably, endotoxin, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS).

  1. The uptake of soluble and particulate antigens by epithelial cells in the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Savannah E; Lickteig, Duane J; Plunkett, Kyle N; Ryerse, Jan S; Konjufca, Vjollca

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) overlying the villi play a prominent role in absorption of digested nutrients and establish a barrier that separates the internal milieu from potentially harmful microbial antigens. Several mechanisms by which antigens of dietary and microbial origin enter the body have been identified; however whether IECs play a role in antigen uptake is not known. Using in vivo imaging of the mouse small intestine, we investigated whether epithelial cells (enterocytes) play an active role in the uptake (sampling) of lumen antigens. We found that small molecular weight antigens such as chicken ovalbumin, dextran, and bacterial LPS enter the lamina propria, the loose connective tissue which lies beneath the epithelium via goblet cell associated passageways. However, epithelial cells overlying the villi can internalize particulate antigens such as bacterial cell debris and inert nanoparticles (NPs), which are then found co-localizing with the CD11c+ dendritic cells in the lamina propria. The extent of NP uptake by IECs depends on their size: 20-40 nm NPs are taken up readily, while NPs larger than 100 nm are taken up mainly by the epithelial cells overlying Peyer's patches. Blocking NPs with small proteins or conjugating them with ovalbumin does not inhibit their uptake. However, the uptake of 40 nm NPs can be inhibited when they are administered with an endocytosis inhibitor (chlorpromazine). Delineating the mechanisms of antigen uptake in the gut is essential for understanding how tolerance and immunity to lumen antigens are generated, and for the development of mucosal vaccines and therapies.

  2. Blood and small intestine cell kinetics under radiation exposures: Mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mathematical models which describe the dynamics of two vital body systems (hematopoiesis and small intestinal epithelium) in mammals exposed to acute and chronic radiation are developed. These models, based on conventional biological theories, are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations. Their variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning, that provides successful identification and verification of the models in hand. It is shown that the predictions of the models qualitatively and quantitatively agree with the respective experimental data for small laboratory animals (mice, rats) exposed to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates. The explanation of a number of radiobiological effects, including those of the low-level long-term exposures, is proposed proceeding from the modeling results. All this bears witness to the validity of employment of the developed models, after a proper identification, in investigation and prediction of radiation effects on the hematopoietic and small intestinal epithelium systems in various mammalian species, including humans. In particular, the models can be used for estimating effects of irradiation on astronauts in the long-term space missions, such as Lunar colonies and Mars voyages.

  3. Diaphragmatic rupture with right colon and small intestine herniation after blunt trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muroni Mirko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are an unusual presentation of trauma, and are observed in about 10% of diaphragmatic injuries. The diagnosis is often missed because of non-specific clinical signs, and the absence of additional intra-abdominal and thoracic injuries. Case presentation We report a case of a 59-year-old Italian man hospitalized for abdominal pain and vomiting. His medical history included a blunt trauma seven years previously. A chest X-ray showed right diaphragm elevation, and computed tomography revealed that the greater omentum, a portion of the colon and the small intestine had been transposed in the hemithorax through a diaphragm rupture. The patient underwent laparotomy, at which time the colon and small intestine were reduced back into the abdomen and the diaphragm was repaired. Conclusions This was a unusual case of traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic hernia. Diaphragmatic ruptures may be revealed many years after the initial trauma. The suspicion of diaphragmatic rupture in a patient with multiple traumas contributes to early diagnosis. Surgical repair remains the only curative treatment for diaphragmatic hernias. Prosthetic patches may be a good solution when the diaphragmatic defect is severe and too large for primary closure, whereas primary repair remains the gold standard for the closure of small to moderate sized diaphragmatic defects.

  4. Methane production and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children living in a slum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carolina Santos Mello; Soraia Tahan; Lígia Cristina FL Melli; Mirian Silva do Carmo Rodrigues; Ricardo Martin Pereira de Mello; Isabel Cristina Affonso Scaletsky; Mauro Batista de Morais

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To analyze small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in school-aged children and the relationship between hydrogen and methane production in breath tests.METHODS:This transversal study included 85 children residing in a slum and 43 children from a private school,all aged between 6 and 10 years,in Osasco,Brazil.For characterization of the groups,data regarding the socioeconomic status and basic housing sanitary conditions were collected.Anthropometric data was obtained in children from both groups.All children completed the hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) breath test in order to assess small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).SIBO was diagnosed when there was an increase in H2 ≥ 20 ppm or CH4 ≥ 10 ppm with regard to the fasting value until 60 min after lactulose ingestion.RESULTS:Children from the slum group had worse living conditions and lower nutritional indices than children from the private school.SIBO was found in 30.9% (26/84) of the children from the slum group and in 2.4% (1/41) from the private school group (P =0.0007).Greater hydrogen production in the small intestine was observed in children from the slum group when compared to children from the private school (P =0.007).A higher concentration of hydrogen in the small intestine (P < 0.001) and in the colon (P < 0.001) was observed among the children from the slum group with SIBO when compared to children from the slum group without SIBO.Methane production was observed in 63.1% (53/84) of the children from the slum group and in 19.5% (8/41) of the children from the private school group (P < 0.0001).Methane production was observed in 38/58 (65.5%) of the children without SIBO and in 15/26 (57.7%) of the children with SIBO from the slum.Colonic production of hydrogen was lower in methaneproducing children (P =0.017).CONCLUSION:Children who live in inadequate environmental conditions are at risk of bacterial overgrowth and methane production.Hydrogen is a substrate for methane

  5. A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    a portion of the proliferative cells in this model using the one-target-one-hit theory of cell damage (Lea, 1955) Another powerful model of small...71.5, pp. 786–792. Sato F et al. (1972). “Radiation effects on cell populations in the intestinal epithelium of mice and its theory ”. Cell and Tissue...DTRA-TR-16-059 DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution is unlimited. Exposure to burn and radiation elicit epithelial cell death in

  6. Impact of bolus volume on small intestinal intra-luminal impedance in healthy subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nam; Q; Nguyen; Laura; K; Bryant; Carly; M; Burgstad; Robert; J; Fraser; Daniel; Sifrim; Richard; H; Holloway

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of bolus volume on the characteristics of small intestinal (SI) impedance signals.METHODS: Concurrent SI manometry-impedance measurements were performed on 12 healthy volunteers to assess the pattern of proximal jejunal fluid bolus movement over a 14 cm-segment.Each subject was given 34 boluses of normal saline (volume from 1 to 30 mL) via the feeding tube placed immediately above the proximal margin of the studied segment.A bolus-induced impedance event occurred if there was > 12%...

  7. Clinicopathologic and prognostic associations of KRAS and BRAF mutations in small intestinal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Sun-Young; Kim, Misung; Jin Gu, Mi; Kyung Bae, Young; Chang, Hee-Kyung; Sun Jung, Eun; Jang, Kee-Taek; Kim, Jihun; Yu, Eunsil; Woon Eom, Dae; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2016-04-01

    Activating KRAS and/or BRAF mutations have been identified as predictors of resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. But the status of KRAS and BRAF mutations and their clinicopathologic and prognostic significance has not been extensively evaluated in small intestinal adenocarcinomas. In this work, the KRAS and BRAF genes in 190 surgically resected small intestinal adenocarcinoma cases were sequenced and their association with various clinicopathologic variables, including survival of the patients, was analyzed. KRAS or BRAF mutations were observed in 63 (33%) cases. Sixty-one cases had KRAS mutations and 2 had BRAF mutations and the two types of mutation were mutually exclusive. The majority of KRAS mutations were G>A transition (43/61 cases, 71%) or p.G12D (31/61 cases, 51%). The patients with mutant KRAS tended to have higher pT classifications (P=0.034) and more frequent pancreatic invasion (P=0.020) than those with wild-type KRAS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that certain mutated KRAS subtypes (G>A transitions and G12D mutations) were significantly correlated with higher pT classification (P=0.015 and 0.004, respectively) than wild-type KRAS and other KRAS mutations. The patients with KRAS or BRAF mutation had a tendency to shorter overall survival than those with wild-type KRAS and BRAF (P=0.148), but subgroup analysis demonstrated the patients with KRAS mutations showed worse survival (median, 46.0 months; P=0.046) than those with wild-type KRAS (85.4 months) in lower pT classification (pT1-pT3) group. In summary, KRAS and, infrequently, BRAF mutations are observed in a subset of small intestinal adenocarcinomas, and are associated with higher pT classification and more frequent pancreatic invasion. KRAS mutation is a poor prognostic predictor in patients with lower pT classification tumors. Anti-EGFR targeted therapy could be applied to about two-thirds of small intestinal

  8. Similarity of hydrolyzing activity of human and rat small intestinal disaccharidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oku T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tsuneyuki Oku¹, Kenichi Tanabe¹, Shigeharu Ogawa², Naoki Sadamori¹, Sadako Nakamura¹¹Graduate School of Human Health Science, University of Nagasaki, Siebold, Nagayo, Japan; ²Juzenkai Hospital, Kagomachi, Nagasaki, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study was to clarify whether it is possible to extrapolate results from studies of the hydrolyzing activity of disaccharidases from rats to humans.Materials and methods: We measured disaccharidase activity in humans and rats using identical preparation and assay methods, and investigated the similarity in hydrolyzing activity. Small intestinal samples without malignancy were donated by five patients who had undergone bladder tumor surgery, and homogenates were prepared to measure disaccharidase activity. Adult rat homogenates were prepared using small intestine.Results: Maltase activity was the highest among the five disaccharidases, followed by sucrase and then palatinase in humans and rats. Trehalase activity was slightly lower than that of palatinase in humans and was similar to that of sucrase in rats. Lactase activity was the lowest in humans, but was similar to that of palatinase in rats. Thus, the hydrolyzing activity of five disaccharidases was generally similar in humans and rats. The relative activity of sucrose and palatinase versus maltase was generally similar between humans and rats. The ratio of rat to human hydrolyzing activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase was 1.9–3.1, but this was not a significant difference. Leaf extract from Morus alba strongly inhibited the activity of maltase, sucrase, and palatinase, but not trehalase and lactase, and the degree of inhibition was similar in humans and rats. L-arabinose mildly inhibited sucrase activity, but hardly inhibited the activity of maltase, palatinase, trehalase and lactase in humans and rats. The digestibility of 1-kestose, galactosylsucrose, and panose by small intestinal enzymes was very similar between humans and

  9. Tyrosine sulfation, a post-translational modification of microvillar enzymes in the small intestinal enterocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M

    1987-01-01

    Protein sulfation in small intestinal epithelial cells was studied by labelling of organ cultured mucosal explants with [35S]-sulfate. Six bands in SDS-PAGE became selectively labelled; four, of 250, 200, 166 and 130 kd, were membrane-bound and two, of 75 and 60 kd, were soluble. The sulfated mem...... sulfated. Most if not all the sulfate was bound to tyrosine residues rather than to the carbohydrate of the microvillar enzymes, showing that this type of modification can occur on plasma membrane proteins as well as on secretory proteins....

  10. A Rare Case of Mycosis Fungoides in the Oral Cavity and Small Intestine Complicated by Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Arthur Emge

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracutaneous involvement in mycosis fungoides (MF carries a poor prognosis. Oral and gastrointestinal (GI tract lesions are both rare locations of disease. We describe the clinical findings of one case with oral and GI MF complicated by perforation after systemic antineoplastic treatment, and review the relevant literature. The patient had a 1-year history of MF before development of tongue and palate tumors. He was treated with local electron beam radiation, but re-presented to the hospital after what was found to be small intestine perforation following systemic antineoplastic therapy. The case reveals key insights into the progression and complications of lymphomas with GI tract involvement.

  11. Mathematical Homogenization in the Modelling of Digestion in the Small Intestine

    CERN Document Server

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-René; Lescoat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Digestion in the small intestine is the result of complex mechanical and biological phenomena which can be modelled at different scales. In a previous article, we introduced a system of ordinary differential equations for describing the transport and degradation-absorption processes during the digestion. The present article sustains this simplified model by showing that it can be seen as a macroscopic version of more realistic models including biological phenomena at lower scales. In other words, our simplified model can be considered as a limit of more realistic ones by averaging-homogenization methods on biological processes representation.

  12. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. I. Light microscopical studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1982-01-01

    The zinc iodide/osmic acid (ZIO) method was used in a modification that selectively stained nerves and associated interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) of muscularis externa. Due to its selectivity the method allowed a detailed stereoscopical analysis of whole mounts with respect to the topography...... muscularis profundus (PMP). PMP was revealed throughout the small intestine as a continuous network of elongated, circularly oriented meshes. The pattern of connections between PMP and the other enteric plexuses was studied stereoscopically. Ganglion cells intrinsic to PMP occurred widely scattered...

  13. The effect of dinoprost on transport of water and imipramine through rat small intestinal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimori, K; Deshimaru, M; Nakano, M

    1992-01-01

    The relation between transmucosal fluid movement and its effect on absorption and exsorption of imipramine was studied with the in-situ single-pass perfusion technique in rats. Dinoprost (prostaglandin F2 alpha, PGF2 alpha) caused a dose-related inhibition of both absorption and secretion of water across the intestinal membrane. When PGF2 alpha was infused at a rate of 5 mumols kg-1 h-1, the absorption rate of water decreased from 51.7 to 21.5 mL h-1 and the secretion rate decreased from 48.9 to 26.8 mL h-1. Net water flux changed from net water absorption (0.9 mL h-1) to net water secretion (5.33 mL h-1) by infusion of PGF2 alpha. However, absorption and exsorption of imipramine were little affected by infusion of PGF2 alpha. The absorption rates of imipramine were 3.03 and 2.36 mg h-1 in the absence and presence of PGF2 alpha, respectively. Furthermore, the average amounts of imipramine exsorbed into the intestinal lumen in 2 h were 7.82 and 8.10% in the absence and presence of PGF2 alpha, respectively. Infusion of PGF2 alpha also enhanced motility of the small intestine compared with the control. From these results, it appears that PGF2 alpha has no effect on the absorption and exsorption of imipramine across the intestinal membrane although it is reasonable to use PGF2 alpha in the case of patients with overdoses of drugs which decrease gastrointestinal motility.

  14. Collagen fiber angle in the submucosa of small intestine and its application in gastroenterology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Jun Zeng; Ai-Ke Qiao; Ji-Dong Yu; Jing-Bo Zhao; Dong-Hua Liao; Xiao-Hu Xu; Gregersen Hans

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To propose a simple and effective method suitable for analyzing the angle and distribution of 2-dimensional collagen fiber in larger sample of small intestine and to investigate the relationship between the angles of collagen fiber and the pressure it undergoes.METHODS: A kind of 2-dimensional visible quantitative analyzing technique was described. Digital image-processing method was utilized to determine the angle of collagen fiber in parenchyma according to the changes of area analyzed and further to investigate quantitatively the distribution of collagen fiber. A series of intestinal slice′s images preprocessed by polarized light were obtained with electron microscope,and they were processed to unify each pixel. The approximate angles between collagen fibers were obtained via analyzing the images and their corresponding polarized light. The relationship between the angles of collagen fiber and the pressure it undergoes were statistically summarized.RESULTS: The angle of collagen fiber in intestinal tissue was obtained with the quantitative analyzing method of calculating the ratio of different pixels. For the same slice,with polarized light angle′s variation, the corresponding ratio of different pixels was also changed; for slices under different pressures, the biggest ratio of collagen fiber area was changed either.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the application of stress on the intestinal tissue will change the angle and content of collagen fiber. The method of calculating ratios of different pixel values to estimate collagen fiber angle was practical and reliable. The quantitative analysis used in the present study allows a larger area of soft tissue to be analyzed with relatively low cost and simple equipment.

  15. Effect of colostrum and milk on small intestine expression of AQP4 and AQP5 in newborn buffalo calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillacioti, C; De Luca, A; Pero, M E; Vassalotti, G; Lombardi, P; Avallone, L; Mirabella, N; Pelagalli, A

    2015-12-01

    Functional studies indicate differences in newborn gastrointestinal morphology and physiology after a meal. Both water and solutes transfer across the intestinal epithelial membrane appear to occur via aquaporins (AQPs). Given that the physiological roles of AQP4 and AQP5 in the developing intestine have not been fully established, the objective of this investigation was to determine their distribution, expression and respective mRNA in the small intestine of colostrums-suckling buffalo calves by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis. Results showed different tissue distribution between AQP4 and AQP5 with the presence of the former along the enteric neurons and the latter in the endocrine cells. Moreover, their expression levels were high in the ileum of colostrum-suckling buffalo calves. The data present a link between feeding, intestinal development and water homeostasis, suggesting the involvement of these channel proteins in intestinal permeability and fluid secretion/absorption during this stage of development after birth.

  16. Fibroblast growth factor 10 alters the balance between goblet and Paneth cells in the adult mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alam, Denise; Danopoulos, Soula; Schall, Kathy; Sala, Frederic G; Almohazey, Dana; Fernandez, G Esteban; Georgia, Senta; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Grikscheit, Tracy; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial cell renewal relies on the right balance of epithelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Intestinal epithelial cells consist of absorptive and secretory lineage. The latter is comprised of goblet, Paneth, and enteroendocrine cells. Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) plays a central role in epithelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in several organs. The expression pattern of FGF10 and its receptors in both human and mouse intestine and their role in small intestine have yet to be investigated. First, we analyzed the expression of FGF10, FGFR1, and FGFR2, in the human ileum and throughout the adult mouse small intestine. We found that FGF10, FGFR1b, and FGFR2b are expressed in the human ileum as well as in the mouse small intestine. We then used transgenic mouse models to overexpress Fgf10 and a soluble form of Fgfr2b, to study the impact of gain or loss of Fgf signaling in the adult small intestine. We demonstrated that overexpression of Fgf10 in vivo and in vitro induces goblet cell differentiation while decreasing Paneth cells. Moreover, FGF10 decreases stem cell markers such as Lgr5, Lrig1, Hopx, Ascl2, and Sox9. FGF10 inhibited Hes1 expression in vitro, suggesting that FGF10 induces goblet cell differentiation likely through the inhibition of Notch signaling. Interestingly, Fgf10 overexpression for 3 days in vivo and in vitro increased the number of Mmp7/Muc2 double-positive cells, suggesting that goblet cells replace Paneth cells. Further studies are needed to determine the mechanism by which Fgf10 alters cell differentiation in the small intestine.

  17. Immunohistochemical study of the membrane skeletal protein, membrane protein palmitoylated 6 (MPP6), in the mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo, Akio; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Ohno, Shinichi; Terada, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    The membrane protein palmitoylated (MPP) family belongs to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family. MPP1 interacts with the protein 4.1 family member, 4.1R, as a membrane skeletal protein complex in erythrocytes. We previously described the interaction of another MPP family, MPP6, with 4.1G in the mouse peripheral nervous system. In the present study, the immunolocalization of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine was examined and compared with that of E-cadherin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and 4.1B, which we previously investigated in intestinal epithelial cells. The immunolocalization of MPP6 was also assessed in the small intestines of 4.1B-deficient (-/-) mice. In the small intestine, Western blotting revealed that the molecular weight of MPP6 was approximately 55-kDa, and MPP6 was immunostained under the cell membranes in the basolateral portions of almost all epithelial cells from the crypts to the villi. The immunostaining pattern of MPP6 in epithelial cells was similar to that of E-cadherin, but differed from that of ZO-1. In intestinal epithelial cells, the immunostained area of MPP6 was slightly different from that of 4.1B, which was restricted to the intestinal villi. The immunolocalization of MPP6 in small intestinal epithelial cells was similar between 4.1B(-/-) mice and 4.1B(+/+) mice. In the immunoprecipitation study, another MAGUK family protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), was shown to molecularly interact with MPP6. Thus, we herein showed the immunolocalization and interaction proteins of MPP6 in the mouse small intestine, and also that 4.1B in epithelial cells was not essential for the sorting of MPP6.

  18. Changes in the small intestine of Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Alba Cristina Miranda de Barros; Neves, Renata Heisler; de Oliveira, Albanita Viana; Machado-Silva, José Roberto

    2012-05-01

    The consumption of a high-fat diet modifies both the morphology of the small intestine and experimentally tested effects of schistosomiasis mansoni. However, whether a schistosomiasis infection associated with a high-fat diet causes injury to the small intestine has never been investigated. Mice were fed either a high-fat or a standard-fat diet for 6 months and were then infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Physical characteristics of the intestinal tissue (mucosal thickness, small intestinal villi length and height, and abundance of goblet cells and enterocytes on the villous surface) and the distribution of granulomas along the intestinal segments and their developmental stage were measured at the time of sacrifice (9 or 17 weeks post-infection). The group fed a high-fat diet exhibited different granuloma stages, whereas the control group possessed only exudative granulomas. The chronically infected mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited higher granuloma and egg numbers than the acutely infected group. Exudative, exudative/exudative-productive and exudative-productive granulomas were present irrespective of diet. Computer-aided morphometric analysis confirmed that villus length, villus width, muscular height and submucosal height of the duodenal and jejunal segments were affected by diet and infection. In conclusion, a high-fat diet and infection had a significant impact on the small intestine morphology and morphometry among the animals tested.

  19. Type I collagen as an extracellular matrix for the in vitro growth of human small intestinal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyad Jabaji

    Full Text Available We previously reported in vitro maintenance and proliferation of human small intestinal epithelium using Matrigel, a proprietary basement membrane product. There are concerns over the applicability of Matrigel-based methods for future human therapies. We investigated type I collagen as an alternative for the culture of human intestinal epithelial cells.Human small intestine was procured from fresh surgical pathology specimens. Small intestinal crypts were isolated using EDTA chelation. Intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts were isolated from a pediatric sample and expanded in vitro. After suspension in Matrigel or type I collagen gel, crypts were co-cultured above a confluent layer of myofibroblasts. Crypts were also grown in monoculture with exposure to myofibroblast conditioned media; these were subsequently sub-cultured in vitro and expanded with a 1∶2 split ratio. Cultures were assessed with light microscopy, RT-PCR, histology, and immunohistochemistry.Collagen supported viable human epithelium in vitro for at least one month in primary culture. Sub-cultured epithelium expanded through 12 passages over 60 days. Histologic sections revealed polarized columnar cells, with apical brush borders and basolaterally located nuclei. Collagen-based cultures gave rise to monolayer epithelial sheets at the gel-liquid interface, which were not observed with Matrigel. Immunohistochemical staining identified markers of differentiated intestinal epithelium and myofibroblasts. RT-PCR demonstrated expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in myofibroblasts and E-Cadherin, CDX2, villin 1, intestinal alkaline phosphatase, chromogranin A, lysozyme, and Lgr5 in epithelial cells. These markers were maintained through several passages.Type I collagen gel supports long-term in vitro maintenance and expansion of fully elaborated human intestinal epithelium. Collagen-based methods yield familiar enteroid structures as well as a new pattern of sheet

  20. Glucose stimulates calcium-activated chloride secretion in small intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liangjie; Vijaygopal, Pooja; MacGregor, Gordon G; Menon, Rejeesh; Ranganathan, Perungavur; Prabhakaran, Sreekala; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Mei; Binder, Henry J; Okunieff, Paul; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan

    2014-04-01

    The sodium-coupled glucose transporter-1 (SGLT1)-based oral rehydration solution (ORS) used in the management of acute diarrhea does not substantially reduce stool output, despite the fact that glucose stimulates the absorption of sodium and water. To explain this phenomenon, we investigated the possibility that glucose might also stimulate anion secretion. Transepithelial electrical measurements and isotope flux measurements in Ussing chambers were used to study the effect of glucose on active chloride and fluid secretion in mouse small intestinal cells and human Caco-2 cells. Confocal fluorescence laser microscopy and immunohistochemistry measured intracellular changes in calcium, sodium-glucose linked transporter, and calcium-activated chloride channel (anoctamin 1) expression. In addition to enhancing active sodium absorption, glucose increased intracellular calcium and stimulated electrogenic chloride secretion. Calcium imaging studies showed increased intracellular calcium when intestinal cells were exposed to glucose. Niflumic acid, but not glibenclamide, inhibited glucose-stimulated chloride secretion in mouse small intestines and in Caco-2 cells. Glucose-stimulated chloride secretion was not seen in ileal tissues incubated with the intracellular calcium chelater BAPTA-AM and the sodium-potassium-2 chloride cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) blocker bumetanide. These observations establish that glucose not only stimulates active Na absorption, a well-established phenomenon, but also induces a Ca-activated chloride secretion. This may explain the failure of glucose-based ORS to markedly reduce stool output in acute diarrhea. These results have immediate potential to improve the treatment outcomes for acute and/or chronic diarrheal diseases by replacing glucose with compounds that do not stimulate chloride secretion.

  1. Stimulation of mucosal secretion by lubiprostone (SPI-0211) in guinea pig small intestine and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Guijun; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liu, Sumei; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Guo-Du; Qu, Mei-Hua; Wang, Xi-Yu; Xia, Yun; Sun, Xiaohong; Bohn, Laura M; Cooke, Helen J; Wood, Jackie D

    2009-04-01

    Actions of lubiprostone, a selective type-2 chloride channel activator, on mucosal secretion were investigated in guinea pig small intestine and colon. Flat-sheet preparations were mounted in Ussing flux chambers for recording short-circuit current (Isc) as a marker for electrogenic chloride secretion. Lubiprostone, applied to the small intestinal mucosa in eight concentrations ranging from 1-3000 nM, evoked increases in Isc in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 42.5 nM. Lubiprostone applied to the mucosa of the colon in eight concentrations ranging from 1-3000 nM evoked increases in Isc in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 31.7 nM. Blockade of enteric nerves by tetrodotoxin did not influence stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone. Antagonists acting at prostaglandin (PG)E2, EP1-3, or EP4 receptors did not suppress stimulation of Isc by lubiprostone but suppressed or abolished PGE2-evoked responses. Substitution of gluconate for chloride abolished all responses to lubiprostone. The selective CFTR channel blocker, CFTR(inh)-172, did not suppress lubiprostone-evoked Isc. The broadly acting blocker, glibenclamide, suppressed (Plubiprostone-evoked Isc. Lubiprostone, in the presence of tetrodotoxin, enhanced carbachol-evoked Isc. The cholinergic component, but not the putative vasoactive intestinal peptide component, of neural responses to electrical field stimulation was enhanced by lubiprostone. Application of any of the prostaglandins, E2, F2, or I2, evoked depolarization of the resting membrane potential in enteric neurons. Unlike the prostaglandins, lubiprostone did not alter the electrical behavior of enteric neurons. Exposure to the histamine H2 receptor agonists increased basal Isc followed by persistent cyclical increases in Isc. Lubiprostone increased the peak amplitude of the dimaprit-evoked cycles.

  2. Effect of citric acid and microbial phytase on small intestinal morphology in broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouhollah Nourmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of citric acid (CA (0, 3 and 6% and microbial phytase (MP (0, 500 and 1000 IU/kg on morphology of different segments of small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum in broiler chickens fed on corn and soybean meal based diets. The effect of 9 experimental treatments (3×3 factorial design were assessed using 270 7-d-old Ross 308 male broiler chicks in a randomized complete block design in three replicates of 10 birds each. The mean villi length (VL, crypt depth (CD and goblet cell number (GCN in duodenum, jejunum and ileum and villi width (VW and VL:CD ratio in duodenum was significantly greater for the birds fed on acidified diets compared to the control birds at day 42 of age (P<0.01. Inclusion of 3% CA in diet significantly decreased the epithelial thickness (ET in duodenum, jejunum and ileum (P<0.01. The birds received diets with 1000 IU/kg of MP showed significant increase in CD (P<0.01 and GCN in jejunum (P<0.05, and significant decrease in VL:CD ratio and ET in the duodenum (P<0.01, jejunum (P<0.05 and ileum (P<0.01 segments. No variable of interest were affected by CA × MP interaction. It was concluded that CA and MP independently exhibit positive impact on morphometery of small intestine, toward facilitating the nutrient absorption and reducing the metabolic demands of the intestinal tract in broiler chickens.

  3. A preparation of perfused small intestine for the study of absorption in amphibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D S; Prichard, J S

    1968-09-01

    1. A preparation of amphibian small intestine perfused through its vascular system is described. Vascular perfusion with a bicarbonate Ringer solution containing a colloid is used to control the composition of the environment of the submucosal faces of the absorbing cells and to carry away for collection any material extruded from these cells. Oxygenation of the mucosal cells is derived primarily from fluid circulated through the intestinal lumen. The preparation exhibits physiological properties of transport for periods of up to 5 hr. After 5 hr perfusion the epithelial cells show no signs of gross cellular damage when examined either by light or by electron microscopy.2. The relationship between the hydrostatic pressure at the mesenteric artery and the rate of perfusion through the vascular bed is substantially linear. The pressure-flow relationships in the mesenteric bed, including an apparent ;critical closing pressure', are primarily determined by the hydrostatic pressure in the intestinal lumen. Alterations in the hydrostatic pressure in the intestinal lumen also change the relative proportions of the vascular infusate which appear in the portal venous effluent and in the fluid exuded from the serosal surface of the preparation (;sweat'). Hydrostatic distension pressures above about 10 cm H(2)O reduce the rate of collection of fluid from the portal vein and increase the rate of collection of ;sweat'.3. An increase in the rate of vascular perfusion increases the total rate of glucose appearance although the glucose concentrations in both the portal effluent and the ;sweat' are reduced.4. The glucose translocation rate is related in an alinear saturable fashion to the luminal concentration of glucose. By making a correction for metabolic loss of glucose during its passage through the intestinal cell, the relationship existing between the lumen concentration and the uptake of the sugar by the mucosal cells has been calculated. This relationship is found to fit

  4. Mixing and Transport in the Small Intestine: A Lattice-Boltzmann Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banco, Gino; Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing; Aliani, Amit; Webb, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    The two primary functions of the small intestine are absorption of nutrients into the blood stream and transport of material along the gut for eventual evacuation. The primary transport mechanism is peristalsis. The time scales for absorption, however, rely on mixing and transport of molecules between the bulk flow and epithelial surface. Two basic motions contribute to mixing: peristalsis and repetitive segmental contraction of short segments of the gut. In this study we evaluate the relative roles of peristalsis vs. segmental contraction on the degree of mixing and time scales of nutrient transport to the epithelium using a two-dimensional model of flow and mixing in the small intestine. The model uses the lattice-Boltzmann framework with second-order moving boundary conditions and passive scalar (Sc = 10). Segmental and peristaltic contractions were parameterized using magnetic resonance imaging data from rat models. The Reynolds numbers (1.9), segment lengths (33 mm), max radii (2.75 mm) and occlusion ratios (0.33) were matched for direct comparison. Mixing is quantified by the rate of dispersion of scalar from an initial concentration in the center of the segment. We find that radial mixing is more rapid with segmental than peristaltic motion, that radial dispersion is much more rapid than axial, and that axial is comparable between the motions.

  5. Ultrastructural and Molecular Changes in the Developing Small Intestine of the Toad Bufo regularis

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    S. A. Sakr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic development of the small intestine of the toad Bufo regularis was investigated using twofold approaches, namely, ultrastructural and molecular. The former has been done using transmission electron microscope and utilizing the developmental stages 42, 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66. The most prominent ultrastructural changes were recorded at stage 60 and were more evident at stage 63. These included the appearance of apoptotic bodies/nuclei within the larval epithelium, the presence of macrophages, swollen mitochondria, distorted rough endoplasmic reticulum, chromatin condensation, and irregular nuclear envelop, and the presence of large vacuoles and lysosomes. The molecular investigation involved examining DNA content and fragmentation. The results showed that the DNA content decreased significantly during the metamorphic stages 60 and 63 compared with both larval (50 and 55 and postmetamorphic (66 stages. The metamorphic stages (60 and 63 displayed extensive DNA laddering compared with stages 50, 55, and 66. The percentage of DNA damage was 0.00%, 12.91%, 57.26%, 45.48%, and 4.43% for the developmental stages 50, 55, 60, 63, and 66, respectively. In conclusion, the recorded remodeling of the small intestine represents a model for clarifying the mechanism whereby cell death and proliferation are controlled.

  6. Surgical treatment of Peyronie's disease with small intestinal submucosa graft patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, M; Kanashiro, A; Vives, A; Sanchez, J; Peraza, M F; Moreno, D; Perona, J; De Marco, V; Ruiz-Castañe, E; Sarquella, J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the study was to report our results using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft (Surgisis ES, Cook Medical) for tunica albuginea substitution after plaque incision. We retrospectively evaluated patients surgically treated at our institution for Peyronie's disease (PD) by means of plaque incision and porcine small intestinal submucosa grafting (Surgisis) between 2009 and 2013. At the same time a literature review was conducted, searching for similar reports and results. Forty-four patients were identified who had been diagnosed with PD between 2009 and the beginning of 2013, and had been treated with corporoplasty, plaque incision and grafting with Surgisis for a severe curvature of the penis. Curvature of the penis was dorsal in 40 patients (90%) and laterally on the right in 4 patients (10%). Mean duration of surgery was 165 min (range 90-200). Mean size of the graft was 6.5 cm(2) and the mean follow-up was 19.2 months (range 11-48). In patients with severe curvature of the penis due to PD and the need for corporoplasty with plaque incision and graft placement, Surgisis represents a good option with a low risk of complications, below the rate described with previously investigated graft tissues.

  7. Two patients with a neuroendocrine tumour of the small intestine and paraneoplastic myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, M A W; Stelten, B M L; Haak, H R; de Herder, W W; Dercksen, M W

    2014-01-01

    Summary This paper reports on two patients with a long-standing diagnosis of an ENETS stage IV neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the small intestine who developed neurological symptoms. The first patient only had bulbar symptoms and tested positive for acetylcholine receptor antibodies. The second patient had more classical symptoms of fatigable diplopia and muscle weakness of the legs, but no detectable antibodies. The diagnosis of paraneoplastical myasthenia gravis (MG) was postulated. Both patients were treated with pyridostigmine for MG and octreotide for the NETs. Interestingly, treatment of the NETs resulted in improvement of myasthenic symptoms. Paraneoplastic MG has been described to occur with certain malignancies, mainly thymoma. Herein, we prove that the association with gastrointestinal NETs, however, rare, is also one to be considered by clinicians dealing with either of these diseases. The pathogenesis has yet to be elucidated. Learning points NETs are rare malignancies with a wide variety of symptoms.Paraneoplastic MG can occur with various types of malignancies.Herein, we provide evidence of paraneoplastic MG in association with a grade IV NET of the small intestine.Treatment of the NETs resulted in remission of myasthenic symptoms in one patient. PMID:24839548

  8. The Secretion and Action of Brush Border Enzymes in the Mammalian Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooton, Diane; Lentle, Roger; Monro, John; Wickham, Martin; Simpson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Microvilli are conventionally regarded as an extension of the small intestinal absorptive surface, but they are also, as latterly discovered, a launching pad for brush border digestive enzymes. Recent work has demonstrated that motor elements of the microvillus cytoskeleton operate to displace the apical membrane toward the apex of the microvillus, where it vesiculates and is shed into the periapical space. Catalytically active brush border digestive enzymes remain incorporated within the membranes of these vesicles, which shifts the site of BB digestion from the surface of the enterocyte to the periapical space. This process enables nutrient hydrolysis to occur adjacent to the membrane in a pre-absorptive step. The characterization of BB digestive enzymes is influenced by the way in which these enzymes are anchored to the apical membranes of microvilli, their subsequent shedding in membrane vesicles, and their differing susceptibilities to cleavage from the component membranes. In addition, the presence of active intracellular components of these enzymes complicates their quantitative assay and the elucidation of their dynamics. This review summarizes the ontogeny and regulation of BB digestive enzymes and what is known of their kinetics and their action in the peripheral and axial regions of the small intestinal lumen.

  9. In vitro inhibition of rat small intestinal absorption by lipophilic organic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenhans, B; Blume, R; Lembcke, B; Caspary, W F

    1985-02-28

    Cationic, lipid-soluble organic compounds may interfere with cation-mediated membrane transport processes. Thus, small intestinal absorption may be influenced by lipophilic organic cations. Therefore a series of arylalkylamines was studied in the concentration range from 0.5 to 20 mmol/l for their effect on the transport of various monosaccharides and leucine in the rat small intestine in vitro by means of the tissue accumulation technique. Whereas the monophenyl substituted monoamines (e.g. benzylamine, 2-phenylethylamine, 3-phenylpropylamine) did not show a significant effect on the active transport, the corresponding omega,omega-diphenyl derivatives exhibited a strong inhibition of the active transport of the sugars and the amino acid. These monoamines and drugs of similar structure (e.g. benzoctamine, diphenydramine) exhibited a mixed or non-competitive type of inhibition which correlated quite well with their octanol-water partition coefficients. In contrast, di- or triamines (e.g. harmaline, imipramine, pyrilamine) revealed a rather pure competitive type of inhibition. These findings tentatively suggest a different mode of action on the active transport by lipid-soluble organic amines according to the molecular charge distribution. In addition, membrane vesicles were used to examine the effect of the different amines on the sucrase activity. Regarding the cation-dependent hydrolysis of sucrose, however, no distinct pattern developed.

  10. A rare case of retroperitoneal malignant triton tumor invading renal vein and small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijović Žaklina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant Triton tumor is a very rare malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. Most of those tumors occur in patients with von Recklinghausen’s disease or as a late complication of irradiation and commonly seen in the head, neck, extremities and trunk. Case report. We reported retroperitoneal malignant Triton tumor in a 57-year-old female patient. Skin lesions were not present, and there was no family history of neurofibromatosis or previous irradiation. The presented case is one of a few recorded in the specialized literature that occurs in the retroperitoneal space in sporadic form. In this case, tumor consisted of a multilobular mass was in close relation with the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava and involved the renal vein with gross invasion of the small intestine. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor and left nefrectomy was performed. The small intestine 10 cm in length was also resected and end-to-end anastomosis was conducted. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged from the hospital ten days after the surgery. Conclusion. Diagnostically, it is crucial to recognize this uncommon histological variant because malignant Triton tumor has a worse prognosis than classic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor does. The use of the immunohistochemistry is essential in making the correct diagnosis. Only appropriate pathological evaluation supported by immunostaining with S-100 protein and desmin confirmed the diagnosis. Aggressive surgical management treatment improves the prognosis of such cases with adjuvant radiotherapy.

  11. Early protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on small intestinal graft in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Feng Wang; Guo-Wei Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the early protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on small intestinal graft in rats.METHODS: SD rats were randomly divided into the following groups: sham operation group (S group, n=6),small bowel transplantation group (SBT group, n=12),ischemic preconditioning plus small bowel transplantation group (ISBT group, n=12). Heterotopic SBT was performed with a technique modified from that described by Monchik et al.When the graft was revascularized successfully and reperfused for 1 h, samples were obtained from the different groups. Laminin was analyzed with immunohistochemical staining. Quantitative analysis of laminin positive signals was performed using image acquiring analysis system. Apoptotic epithelia of small intestinal graft were detected by the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. The morphological change of epithelial basement membrane was observed by transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: The mean optical density value of laminin positive signals was 39.52±2.60, 13.53±0.44, 25.40±1.79,respectively, in S, SBT and ISBT groups. The average optical density value of laminin positive products in SBT group was sharply lower than that in S group (P<0.05). However,the mean optical density value of laminin positive products in ISBT group was significantly higher than that in SBT group (P<0.05). The apoptotic index (AI) in S, SBT and ISBT group was 2.2±0.83,30.8±3.2, 13.2±2.86, respectively.The AI in SBT group was significantly higher than that in S group (P<0.05), and AI in ISBT group was sharply lower than that in SBT group (P<0.05). On transmission electron microscopy, the epithelial basement membrane in S group stayed normal, but in SBT group it became disrupted and collapsed, even disappeared. The lesion of epithelial basement membrane in ISBT group was slighter compared with that in SBT group.CONCLUSION: Ischemic preconditioning has an early protective effect on epithelial cells and extracellur matrix of small

  12. Low lactase activity in a small-bowel biopsy specimen : Should dietary lactose intake be restricted in children with small intestinal mucosal damage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, HA; Vonk, RJ; Gonera-de Jong, GBC; Priebe, MG; Antoine, JM; Stellaard, F; Sauer, PJJ

    2006-01-01

    Objective. Small intestinal mucosal damage can result in decreased lactase activity (LA). When LA is low in a small-bowel biopsy (SBB) specimen, a reduction of dietary lactose intake is usually advised. This is often done by reducing dietary dairy products, which also reduces the intake of calcium,

  13. Current state of knowledge: the canine gastrointestinal microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Seema; Minamoto, Yasushi; Suchodolski, Jan S; Swanson, Kelly S

    2012-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) microbes have important roles in the nutritional, immunological, and physiologic processes of the host. Traditional cultivation techniques have revealed bacterial density ranges from 10(4) to 10(5) colony forming units (CFU)/g in the stomach, from 10(5) to 10(7) CFU/g in the small intestine, and from 10(9) to 10(11) CFU/g in the colon of healthy dogs. As a small number of bacterial species can be grown and studied in culture, however, progress was limited until the recent emergence of DNA-based techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing technology and bioinformatics have allowed for better phylogenetic and functional/metabolic characterization of the canine gut microbiome. Predominant phyla include Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Studies using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene pyrosequencing have demonstrated spatial differences along the GI tract and among microbes adhered to the GI mucosa compared to those in intestinal contents or feces. Similar to humans, GI microbiome dysbiosis is common in canine GI diseases such as chronic diarrhea and inflammatory bowel diseases. DNA-based assays have also identified key pathogens contributing to such conditions, including various Clostridium, Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia spp. Moreover, nutritionists have applied DNA-based techniques to study the effects of dietary interventions such as dietary fiber, prebiotics, and probiotics on the canine GI microbiome and associated health indices. Despite recent advances in the field, the canine GI microbiome is far from being fully characterized and a deeper characterization of the phylogenetic and functional/metabolic capacity of the GI microbiome in health and disease is needed. This paper provides an overview of recent studies performed to characterize the canine GI microbiome.

  14. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates adaptive expression of the zinc transporter Zip4 in mouse small intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Liuzzi, Juan P.; Guo, Liang; Chang, Shou-Mei; Cousins, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the small intestine are the site of zinc absorption. Intestinal uptake of zinc is inversely proportional to the dietary supply of this essential micronutrient. The mechanism responsible for this adaptive differential in apical zinc transport is not known. The zinc transporter Zip4 (Slc39a4) is essential for adequate enteric zinc uptake. In mice, Zip4 expression is upregulated at low zinc intakes with a concomitant ZIP4 localization to the apical enterocyte plasma membrane....

  15. The value of RI scintigraphy and angiography in small intestinal bleeding; Report of eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosawa, Susumu; Kuwata, Hajime; Kushibiki, Kyoko; Akimoto, Kimihiko; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Toshiya (Showa General Hospital, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    We retrospectively reviewed eight cases of small intestinal bleeding and assessed the value of RI scintigraphy and angiography in diagnosing the bleeding site. The patients' average age was 56.2 years. Chief complaint was melena of variable degree. In most cases neither upper endoscopy nor colonoscopy was diagnostic. RI scientigraphy (Tc-99 labeled human serum albumin) showed 75% of positive rate whereas angiography showed 66.7% (4/6) of positive rate. All four cases of leiomyosarcoma and leiomyoma demonstrated hypervascular stain and/or extra-vasation in angiography whereas RI scintigraphy failed to detect active gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 of the 4 cases. Therefore angiography was considered useful for the detection of bleeding from leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma which are often hypervascular. Scintigraphy is thought of most value in the demonstration of small amount of bleeding with minimum vascular abnormality. (author).

  16. Small bowel volvulus in a patient with chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Haney; Rashid, Sidi H; Cellador, Enrique Collantes; Baragwanath, Phil

    2009-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP) is a rare syndrome of ineffectual gut motility associated with clinical, endoscopic and radiological exclusion of mechanical causes, as well as evidence of air-fluid levels in distended bowel loops. A case of small bowel volvulus in a patient with an established diagnosis of CIIP is presented. The case is illustrated by images of operative findings and computed tomography scan reconstruction, showing the classical appearances of small bowel volvulus. The patient recovered well after surgery and is maintained on parenteral nutrition. CIIP is a heterogeneous disorder in which the primary aims of management are nutrition, pain control and the avoidance of unnecessary repeated laparotomies. However, even in the presence of an established diagnosis of CIIP, surgeons should be vigilant to the possibility that an operable mechanical obstruction may still occur.

  17. Influencing factors of rat small intestinal epithelial cell cultivation and effects of radiation on cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Ze Ran; Yong Ping Su; Yong Jiang Wei; Guo Ping Ai; Tian Min Cheng; Yuan Lin

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONCrypt epithelial cells in normal small intestineproliferate at a high speed. But they are verydifficult to culture in vitro and passage stably. A lotof studies have been done[1-16]. Some domestic labsisolated and cultured crypt cells from embryonalintestines and aseptic animal intestine, but failed.We introduced normal rat epithelial cell line-IEC-6from the USA and its living condition for stablepassage was successfully established after trials. Thecell line was testified to be the small intestinalepithelial cell by electron microscopy,immunihistochemistry and enzymatic histoch-emistry. It has been applied to some relatedresearch work[17-21]. It was found that manyfactors were involved in the culture system. Ourpresent study focuses on the culture method and theinfluencing factors on IEC-6.

  18. Mycophenolate mofetil toxicity mimicking acute cellular rejection in a small intestinal transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, Ross; Asadi, Khashayar; Lokan, Julie; Kam, Ning; Testro, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an important medication used for maintenance immunosuppression in solid organ transplants. A common gastrointestinal (GI) side effect of MMF is enterocolitis, which has been associated with multiple histological features. There is little data in the literature describing the histological effects of MMF in small intestinal transplant (SIT) recipients. We present a case of MMF toxicity in a SIT recipient, with histological changes in the donor ileum mimicking persistent acute cellular rejection (ACR). Concurrent biopsies of the patient’s native colon showed similar changes to those from the donor small bowel, suggesting a non-graft specific process, raising suspicion for MMF toxicity. The MMF was discontinued and complete resolution of these changes occurred over three weeks. MMF toxicity should therefore be considered as a differential diagnosis for ACR and graft-versus-host disease in SITs. PMID:28280702

  19. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestinal mucosa in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G E; Erokhina, M V; Abramchuk, S S; Shaitan, K V; Raspopov, R V; Smirnova, V V; Vasilevskaya, L S; Gmoshinski, I V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Tutelyan, V A

    2012-12-01

    Penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles into enterocytes after their administration into isolated loop of rat small intestine was shown in vivo by transmission electron microscopy. Using electron diffraction, titanium dioxide nanoparticles were identified in the apical regions of the cells under plasma membranes and in deeper parts of the cytoplasm as solitary objects or small aggregations. Water dispersions of nanoparticles (3-h exposure to high concentrations) caused no appreciable morphological changes in enterocyte ultrastructure. A 28-day subacute intragastric administration of water dispersion of nanoparticles to rats led to titanium accumulation in the liver, their level was significantly higher than in the control group, which was shown by mass spectrometry with inductive-bound plasma. These data indicated the possibility of penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles through the gastrointestinal barrier under near-physiological conditions.

  20. Organisation of autonomic nervous structures in the small intestine of chinchilla (Chinchilla laniger, Molina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, E

    2014-08-01

    Using histochemical, histological and immunocytochemical methods, organisation of the autonomic nerve structures in small intestine of chinchilla was investigated. Myenteric plexus was localised between circular and longitudinal layers of the smooth muscles. Forming network nodes, the small autonomic, cholinergic ganglia were linked with the bundles of nerve fibres. Adrenergic structures were visible as specific varicose, rosary-like fibres forming bundles of parallel fibres connecting network nodes. Structures of the submucosal plexus formed a finer network than those of the myenteric plexus. Moreover, in 'whole-mount' specimens, fibres forming thick perivascular plexuses were also observed. Immunocytochemical studies confirmed the cholinergic and adrenergic character of the investigated structures. VAChT-positive neurones were found only in myenteric plexus, and numerous VAChT-positive and DBH-positive fibres were found in both plexuses.

  1. A cholesterol-free, high-fat diet suppresses gene expression of cholesterol transporters in murine small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Bosch, Heleen M. de Vogel-van; de Wit, Nicole J. W.; Hooiveld, Guido J. E. J.; Vermeulen, Hanneke; van der Veen, Jelske N.; Houten, Sander M.; Kuipers, Folkert; Mueller, Michael; van der Meer, Roelof

    2008-01-01

    A cholesterol-free, high-fat diet suppresses gene expression of cholesterol transporters in murine small intestine. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 294: G1171-G1180, 2008. First published March 20, 2008; doi:10.1152/ajpgi.00360.2007.-Transporters present in the epithelium of the small intest

  2. Mesenteric lymph nodes contribute to proinflammatory Th17-cell generation during inflammation of the small intestine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Nobu; Yamaki, Satoshi; Sun, Shu-Lan; Asao, Atsuko; Okuyama, Yuko; So, Takanori; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ishii, Naoto

    2016-05-01

    T cells of the small intestine, including Th17 cells, are critically involved in host protection from microbial infection, and also contribute to the pathogenesis of small bowel inflammatory disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) play important roles in gut-tropic T-cell generation, although it is still unclear if MLNs are involved in the pathogenesis of small intestine inflammation. To address this issue, we analyzed the roles of both MLNs and Peyer's patches (PPs) by evaluating MLN- or PP-deficient mice in an experimental model of small intestine inflammation, induced by CD3-specific mAb injection. Interestingly, MLNs, but not PPs, were essential for the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation, in particular the accumulation and infiltration of CD4(+) T-cell populations, including Th17 cells, from the blood. In addition, CD4(+) T-cell accumulation was dependent on the function of the α4 β7 integrin. Furthermore, MLN removal led to a significantly reduced number of peripheral α4 β7 (+) CD4(+) effector memory T cells under normal conditions, suggesting that MLNs may play a role in maintaining the number of gut-tropic CD4(+) effector memory T cells circulating in the blood. Taken together, the present study highlights the important role of MLNs in contributing to the pathogenesis of small intestine inflammation.

  3. Chronic diarrhea associated with high serum level of immunoglobulin A and diffuse infiltration of plasma cell in small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junwen; Chen, Shuijiao; Chen, Linlin; Ouyang, Miao; Li, Fujun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic diarrhea in adult patients due to various causes is very common in clinic, but patient suffering with mal-absorption due to immunoproliferative small intestinal disease was rarely reported in China. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: A 35-year-old female presented with more than three years history of chronic diarrhea, rickets, high serum value of immunoglobulin A protein, and anemia. Bone marrow aspiration suggested that the patient was in a sideropenic and megalobastic anemia stage. Duodenal and ileac biopsies revealed atrophy and blunting villi. The bowel lamina propria was infiltrated with slightly increased intraepithelial lymphocytes and mainly with diffuse plasma cells. The following enzyme labeling immunohistochemistry results were strongly positive to alpha-heavy-chain. Computed tomography manifested she had diffuse thickening of small intestine wall. At last a diagnosis of immunoproliferative small intestinal disease was made. Interventions and Outcomes: On the first month, the patient was treated with vitamin D supplements, calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, folic acid, mecobalamin replacements and microflora probiotics. The patient frequency of water diarrhea alleviated slightly, but her weight loss, anxiety neurosis and other disorders were still severe. After taking with prednisone (40 mg per day, and gradually reduced to the lowest dose) for another month, the symptoms was gradually subsided. Lessons: The study shows that immunohistochemical staining for alpha-heavy chain proteins should be completed on small intestine biopsy specimens if the patient is suspected a diagnosis of immunoproliferative small intestinal disease. PMID:28151917

  4. Small intestinal cannabinoid receptor changes following a single colonic insult with oil of mustard in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward S Kimball

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids are known to be clinically beneficial for control of appetite disorders and nausea/vomiting, with emerging data that they can impact other GI disorders, such as inflammation. Post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS is a condition of perturbed intestinal function that occurs subsequent to earlier periods of intestinal inflammation. Cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R and CB2R alterations in GI inflammation have been demonstrated in both animal models and clinically, but their continuing role in the post-inflammatory period has only been implicated to date. Therefore, to provide direct evidence for CBR involvement in altered GI functions in the absence of overt inflammation, we used a model of enhanced upper GI transit that persists for up to 4 weeks after a single insult by intracolonic 0.5% oil of mustard (OM in mice. In mice administered OM, CB1R immunostaining in the myenteric plexus was reduced at day 7, when colonic inflammation is subsiding, and then increased at 28 days, compared to tissue from age-matched vehicle-treated mice. In the lamina propria CB2R immunostaining density was also increased at day 28. In mice tested 28 day after OM, either a CB1R-selective agonist, ACEA (1 and 3 mg/kg, s.c. or a CB2R-selective agonist, JWH-133 (3 and 10 mg/kg, s.c. reduced the enhanced small intestinal transit in a dose-related manner. Doses of ACEA and JWH-133 (1 mg/kg, alone or combined, reduced small intestinal transit of OM-treated mice to a greater extent than control mice. Thus, in this post-colonic inflammation model, both CBR subtypes are up-regulated and there is increased efficacy of both CB1R and CB2R agonists. We conclude that CBR remodeling occurs not only during GI inflammation but continues during the recovery phase. Thus, either CB1R- or CB2-selective agonists could be efficacious for modulating GI motility in individuals experiencing diarrhea-predominant PI-IBS.

  5. Study of a Novel Small Caliber Vascular Graft in a Canine Model with Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yi-min; QI Song-tao; SHI Xiao-feng; ZENG Shao-wen; LI Wei-qiu; HUANG Guang-long; ZHUANG Bing-rong

    2007-01-01

    A novel biological small-diameter vascular graft was evaluated in a canine model. 3 cm long segments with 4 mm I. D. were implanted end-to-end in the carotid position of 12 dogs for 6 months. Color Doppler sonography was performed at the first week post-operation, and angiography was then administered to 9 grafts at 4th week, 12th week and 24th week respectively to monitor the graft pantency and blood flow characteristics.Vascular samples containing the grafts were collected at 1st week, 8th week, 12th week and 24th week after implantation. Morphological changes of the grafts were observed by optical and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies and compared with that of the original prosthesis and the normal host vessel. All grafts were patent throughout the experiment except one graft. Histopathology and SEM demonstrated both a nearly complete inner capsule of varied thickness lining the graft luminal surface and connective tissue adventitia formation at one-week post-operation. The neointima became confluent at 8 weeks and then compact but had no signs of hyperplasia up to 12 weeks; meanwhile on the neointimal surface newly grown endothelial-like cells were migrating from the stoma to the middle portion. The grafts also illustrated endothelialization in many "islands" in the mid-segment luminal surface of the grafts. In addition, the closer distance the cells towards the stoma were, the more morphological similarity the cells with the normal endothelial were. Taken together, the biological vascular graft remained patent for 24 weeks as a carotid prosthesis,characterized by the early and complete neointima formation plus endothelialization starting before 12 weeks post grafting. Therefore, the graft seems suitable for reconstruction of vascular lesions in dogs. Further studies may be carried out to extend the graft application for the clinical use.

  6. Blood flow response in small intestinal loops at different depths during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2013-08-01

    High closure rates of the open abdomen have been reported following negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, the method has occasionally been associated with increased development of intestinal fistulae. We have previously shown that the application of NPWT to the open abdomen causes a decrease in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal loop and the omentum adjacent to the visceral protective layer of the dressing. In this study we investigate whether the negative pressure affects only small intestinal loops lying directly below the dressing or if it also affects small intestinal loops that are not in direct contact with the dressing. Six pigs underwent midline incision and application of NPWT to the open abdomen. The microvascular blood flow was measured in four intestinal loops at different depths from the visceral protective layer, at two different locations: beneath the dressing and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of NPWT of -50, -70, -100, -120, -150 and -170 mmHg, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Negative pressures between -50 and -170 mmHg caused a significant decrease in the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal loops in direct contact with the visceral protective layer. A slight, but significant, decrease in blood flow was also seen in the intestinal loops lying beneath these loops. The decrease in microvascular blood flow increased with the amount of negative pressure applied. No difference in blood flow was seen in the intestinal loops lying deeper in the abdominal cavity. A decrease in blood flow was seen in the upper two intestinal loops located apically and anteriorly, but not in the lower two, indicating that this is a local effect and that pressure decreases with distance from the source. A long-term decrease in blood flow in the intestinal wall may induce ischaemia and secondary necrosis in the intestinal wall, which could promote the development of intestinal fistulae. We believe that NPWT of

  7. Mechanical Characteristics of a Polymer Spring Device used to Lengthen Small Intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Douglas J.

    Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a condition that occurs due to an insufficient amount of small intestine needed for nutrient absorption and water regulation of the body. A compression spring device is being developed in order to provide a mechanical stimulus to the tissue, as this type of force has been shown to promote lengthening of the tissue. The research completed in this thesis investigated the mechanical characteristics of the spring device and attempted to relate it to the functionality in rat and porcine intestinal tissue. Results from the evaluation of the springs show that Poly(epsilon-caprolactone), or PCL, is a sufficient polymer to use for creating a biodegradable device as the spring dimensions can be adjusted through variations in the diameter, thickness, and band size in order to provide an adequate spring constant for multiple animal types. Design of the springs, however, need to take into account the size of the gelatin capsule used, the amount of plastic deformation and creep behavior of the spring under compression for an extended time period, and the variation in the mechanical properties of the animal soft tissue that requires lengthening. Integration of the spring in-continuity requires a feature that will provide a mechanical resistance to force that is greater than the force of the spring in the compressed state. The spring still requires further development and any design should also take into account the possibility of intestinal perforations or obstructions. The polymer spring device provides a good means towards developing a treatment option for SBS, and other potential soft tissue lengthening needs of the body.

  8. Enhanced Permeability of Etoposide across Everted Sacs of Rat Small Intestine by Vitamin E-TPGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Abdolhamid; Saadati, Roonak; Abbasian, Zahra; Azad Aramaki, Saeed; Dadashzadeh, Simin

    2013-01-01

    Etoposide, a widely used anticancer drug, exhibits low and variable oral bioavailability mainly because of being substrate for the efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the effect of D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) and PEG 400 as P-gp inhibitors on the intestinal absorption of etoposide. Everted sacs of rat small intestine were incubated in Krebs buffer solution which contained etoposide in the absence or presence of various concentrations of TPGS or PEG 400. The effect of verapamil as a known P-gp inhibitor on the absorption of drug was also studied. The absorptive transport of etoposide was significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) in the presence of verapamil (100 μg/mL) and TPGS (over the concentration range of 0.002- 0.1 mg/mL), suggesting that the inhibition of P-gp located in the intestine may be involved in the enhancement of etoposide absorption. However, the addition of PEG 400 at various concentrations (0.05, 0.1 and 0.5% w/v) had no effect on the etoposide transport. No significant difference was found between the permeability values in the absence and presence of the maximum concentration of TPGS for two transport markers, lucifer yellow and imipramine, indicating that the enhancement in etoposide permeability in the presence of TPGS was not due to the compromise in tight junctions or membrane integrity of epithelial cells. The results of the study suggest that the use of TPGS as a safe excipient in etoposide formulations may enhance the oral bioavailability of etoposide and result in a predictable oral absorption.

  9. Effect of dietary fibres on small intestine histomorphology and lipid metabolism in young broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatnejad, E; Saki, A A

    2016-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of dietary fibres on small intestine histomorphology and lipid metabolism in broilers from 1 to 21 day of age. In experiment 1, diets containing insoluble [cellulose (CEL); 2% and 4%] or soluble [carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); 2% and 4%] fibre were fed to broilers from day 1 to 21 post-hatch and ileal tissue was collected at day 21 of age for histological evaluation. In experiment 2, broilers diet was supplemented with 0%, 1% or 2% insoluble fibre (Arbocel) during day 7 to 21 post-hatch and plasma and liver lipid metabolism were evaluated at day 21. In experiment 1, inclusion of CMC reduced body weight gain (BWG) and feed intake (FI) and increased feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared with others. Intestinal histomorphology was unaffected by CEL, but CMC led to an increase in crypt depth (CD) and serosa thickness and a decrease in villus height (VH), villus width (VW), VH:CD ratio and villus surface area (VSA), rather than control and CEL groups. Treatment did not affect goblet cell type. Moreover, the CMC-fed birds had greater total goblet cell count (GCC) as compared with others. In experiment 2, fibre inclusion was associated with increases in BWG from 7 to 14 day of age and an improvement in FCR, whereas FI was not influenced by treatments. Inclusion of fibre in the diet decreased the weight of the abdominal fat and cholesterol concentrations of liver and plasma. No significant effects on fatty acid composition of liver lipid were observed by fibre supplementation. These findings suggest dietary fibre affects performance, intestinal histomorphology and lipid metabolism in young chicks, which may directly affect poultry feeding strategies.

  10. [Predisposing factors, clinical picture and mortality in volvulus of the small intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Plasencia, J; Huaynalaya, E; Rodríguez, F; Rebaza, H

    1992-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated predisposing factors, clinical picture and the methods of treatment related to morbidity and mortality of 19 small bowel volvulus (SBV) who underwent operation at Belen Hospital (Trujillo-Peru) during the last 26 years (1966-1992). The SBV was 1.6% of all cases of intestinal obstruction in this period and 10.8% of all intestinal volvulus. The median age was of 43 +/- 20.5 years (range, 6 to 78 years) and the majority of them were between 41 and 60 years. Sixteen cases (84.2%) were men from Indian and Spanish extraction and most of them were farmers and came from the Sierra of the Department of La Libertad. Two cases (10.5%) had non-related antecedents previous surgery. In six patients (31.6%) the volvulus was less than seven day's duration and in thirty (68.4%) it was more eight day's duration with previous attacks of obstruction (median: 19.3 days, range: 17 hours to 94 days). Pain, vomiting and distention were present in almost all of these cases. The most frequent abdominal finding was distention. The location of the volvulus was: ileum, 12 cases (63.2%), root of mesentery, 4 cases (21%) and jejunum, 3 cases (15.8%). Gangrenous bowel was present in six patients (31.5) and gangrenous intestine with perforation in two cases (10.5%) who underwent resection of the involved segment with primary anastomosis. In this group one patient (5.2%) died of sepsis and the wound infection rate was of 37.5%. There was no statistically significant correlation with the duration of illness and the presence of gangrenous loops or the mortality rate (p > 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. A case of a ruptured submucosal aneurysm of the small intestine identified using double-balloon enteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hirofumi; Endo, Katsuya; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Naitoh, Takeshi; Kuroha, Masatake; Kimura, Tomoya; Shiga, Hisashi; Kakuta, Yoichi; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-04-01

    A 47-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital urgently with sudden-onset hematochezia. She was temporarily in a state of hemorrhagic shock. As we strongly suspected bleeding from the small intestine, peroral double-balloon enteroscopy was performed, and indicated a 2.0-cm diameter hemispheric elevated lesion in the jejunum. Moreover, a blood clot was observed at the top of the protrusion. The site was marked by injecting India ink, without taking a biopsy specimen, to avoid further hemorrhaging. Subsequently, laparoscopic partial small bowel resection was performed. On histopathological examination, the lesion was found to be a sac-like submucosal arterial aneurysm, with a diameter of 3.5 mm, comprising several small abnormal arteries. The final diagnosis was a ruptured submucosal aneurysm of the small intestine. Ruptured submucosal aneurysms are very rarely observed in the small intestine. Only a few reports have described their endoscopic findings. Our experience indicates that small bowel enteroscopy may be useful for managing ruptured submucosal aneurysms of the small intestine.

  12. Birthdating of myenteric neuron subtypes in the small intestine of the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Annette J; Stamp, Lincon A; Gonsalvez, David G; Allison, Margaret B; Olson, David P; Myers, Martin G; Anderson, Colin R; Young, Heather M

    2014-02-15

    There are many different types of enteric neurons. Previous studies have identified the time at which some enteric neuron subtypes are born (exit the cell cycle) in the mouse, but the birthdates of some major enteric neuron subtypes are still incompletely characterized or unknown. We combined 5-ethynynl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling with antibody markers that identify myenteric neuron subtypes to determine when neuron subtypes are born in the mouse small intestine. We found that different neurochemical classes of enteric neuron differed in their birthdates; serotonin neurons were born first with peak cell cycle exit at E11.5, followed by neurofilament-M neurons, calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons (peak cell cycle exit for both at embryonic day [E]12.5-E13.5), tyrosine hydroxylase neurons (E15.5), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) neurons (E15.5), and calretinin neurons (postnatal day [P]0). The vast majority of myenteric neurons had exited the cell cycle by P10. We did not observe any EdU+/NOS1+ myenteric neurons in the small intestine of adult mice following EdU injection at E10.5 or E11.5, which was unexpected, as previous studies have shown that NOS1 neurons are present in E11.5 mice. Studies using the proliferation marker Ki67 revealed that very few NOS1 neurons in the E11.5 and E12.5 gut were proliferating. However, Cre-lox-based genetic fate-mapping revealed a small subpopulation of myenteric neurons that appears to express NOS1 only transiently. Together, our results confirm a relationship between enteric neuron subtype and birthdate, and suggest that some enteric neurons exhibit neurochemical phenotypes during development that are different from their mature phenotype.

  13. The uptake of soluble and particulate antigens by epithelial cells in the mouse small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savannah E Howe

    Full Text Available Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs overlying the villi play a prominent role in absorption of digested nutrients and establish a barrier that separates the internal milieu from potentially harmful microbial antigens. Several mechanisms by which antigens of dietary and microbial origin enter the body have been identified; however whether IECs play a role in antigen uptake is not known. Using in vivo imaging of the mouse small intestine, we investigated whether epithelial cells (enterocytes play an active role in the uptake (sampling of lumen antigens. We found that small molecular weight antigens such as chicken ovalbumin, dextran, and bacterial LPS enter the lamina propria, the loose connective tissue which lies beneath the epithelium via goblet cell associated passageways. However, epithelial cells overlying the villi can internalize particulate antigens such as bacterial cell debris and inert nanoparticles (NPs, which are then found co-localizing with the CD11c+ dendritic cells in the lamina propria. The extent of NP uptake by IECs depends on their size: 20-40 nm NPs are taken up readily, while NPs larger than 100 nm are taken up mainly by the epithelial cells overlying Peyer's patches. Blocking NPs with small proteins or conjugating them with ovalbumin does not inhibit their uptake. However, the uptake of 40 nm NPs can be inhibited when they are administered with an endocytosis inhibitor (chlorpromazine. Delineating the mechanisms of antigen uptake in the gut is essential for understanding how tolerance and immunity to lumen antigens are generated, and for the development of mucosal vaccines and therapies.

  14. Birthdating of myenteric neuron subtypes in the small intestine of the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Annette J.; Stamp, Lincon A.; Gonsalvez, David G.; Allison, Margaret B.; Olson, David P.; Myers, Martin G; Anderson, Colin R.; Young, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    There are many different types of enteric neurons. Previous studies have identified the time at which some enteric neuron subtypes are born (exit the cell cycle) in the mouse, but the birthdates of some major enteric neuron subtypes are still incompletely characterized or unknown. We combined 5-ethynynl-2’-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling with antibody markers that identify myenteric neuron subtypes to determine when neuron subtypes are born in the mouse small intestine. We found that different neurochemical classes of enteric neuron differed in their birthdates; serotonin neurons were born first with peak cell cycle exit at E11.5, followed by neurofilament-M neurons, calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons (peak cell cycle exit for both at E12.5-E13.5), tyrosine hydroxylase neurons (E15.5), nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1) neurons (E15.5) and calretinin neurons (P0). The vast majority of myenteric neurons had exited the cell cycle by P10. We did not observe any EdU+/NOS1+ myenteric neurons in the small intestine of adult mice following EdU injection at E10.5 or E11.5, which was unexpected as previous studies have shown that NOS1 neurons are present in E11.5 mice. Studies using the proliferation marker, Ki67, revealed that very few NOS1 neurons in the E11.5 and E12.5 gut were proliferating. However, Cre-lox-based genetic fate-mapping revealed a small sub-population of myenteric neurons that appears to express NOS1 only transiently. Together, our results confirm a relationship between enteric neuron subtype and birthdate, and suggest that some enteric neurons exhibit neurochemical phenotypes during development that are different from their mature phenotype. PMID:23861145

  15. Serosal zinc attenuate serotonin and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced secretion in piglet small intestinal epithelium in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Sehested, Jakob; Feng, Z

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the mechanisms by which dietary zinc affects diarrhoea and aimed to study possible interactions between zinc status and the presence of zinc in vitro on secretagogue-induced secretion from piglet intestinal epithelium in Ussing chambers....

  16. Onset of small intestinal atrophy is associated with reduced intestinal blood flow in TPN-fed neonatal piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niinikoski, Harri; Stoll, Barbara; Guan, Xinfu

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the speed of onset of total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-induced mucosal atrophy, and whether this is associated with changes in intestinal blood flow and tissue metabolism in neonatal piglets. Piglets were implanted with jugular venous and duodenal catheters and either...... 24 h of TPN, and protein mass was lower (P parenteral nutrition induced a rapid (

  17. Effects of two fluid resuscitations on the bacterial translocation and inflammatory response of small intestine in rats with hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xin-yue; REN Cong-cai; ZHOU Qiang; PANG Qing-feng; WU Chang-yi; ZENG Yin-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of two fluid resuscitations on the bacterial translocation and the inflammatory factors of small intestine in rats with hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Fifty SD healthy male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10 per group):Group A (Sham group), Group B (Ringer's solution for 1 h), Group C (Ringer's solution for 24 h), Group D (hydroxyethyl starch for 1 h) and Group E ((hydroxyethyl starch for 24 h). A model of rats with hemorrhagic shock was established. The bacterial translocation in liver, content of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and changes of myeloperoxidase enzyme (MPO) activities in small intestine were pathologically investigated after these two fluid resuscitations, respectively. Results: The bacterial translocation and the expression of TNF-α in the small intestine were detected at 1 h and 24 h after fluid resuscitation. There were significant increase in the number of translocated bacteria, TNF-α and MPO activities in Group C compared with Group B, significant decrease in Group E compared with Group D and in Group B compared with Group D. The number of translocated bacteria and TNF-α expression significantly decreased in Group E as compared with Group C.Conclusions: The bacterial translocation and the expression of TNF-α in the small intestine exist 24 h after fluid resuscitation. 6% hydroxyethyl starch can improve the intestinal mucosa barrier function better than the Ringer's solution.

  18. Mucosal necrosis of the small intestine in myopathy,encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keita Fukuyama; Yasuhide Ishikawa; Tetsuro Ogino; Hidenobu Inoue; Ryoya Yamaoka; Tetsuro Hirose; Tomohiko Nishihira

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a case of massive mucosal necrosis of the small intestine in a patient with mitochondrial myopathy,encephalopathy,lactic acidosis,and stroke-like episodes (MELAS),which particularly affects the brain,nervous system and muscles.A 45-year-old Japanese female,with an established diagnosis of MELAS,presented with vomiting.Computed tomography showed portomesenteric venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis.She underwent a resection of the small intestine.A microscopic study showed necrosis of the mucosa and vacuolar degeneration of smooth muscle cells in the arterial wall.Immunohistochemistry showed anti-mitochondrial antibody to be highly expressed in the crypts adjacent the necrotic mucosa.The microscopic and immunohistochemical findings suggested the presence of a large number of abnormal mitochondria in MELAS to be closely linked to mucosal necrosis of the small intestine.

  19. Is rumen development in newborn calves affected by different liquid feeds and small intestine development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P; Kotunia, A; Jagusiak, W; Zabielski, R

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of different liquid feeds on calf small intestine and rumen development. Twenty-one bull calves (5 ± 1 d old) were randomly allocated to 3 groups and fed whole milk (WM), milk replacer (MR; 22% CP and 17.5% fat), or MR supplemented with sodium butyrate (MR+SB; 0.3% as fed). Liquid feed dry matter intake was equal between treatments and amounted to 1% of BW at the beginning of the trial. Starter diet was offered ad libitum. Animals were slaughtered at 26 (± 1) d of age. Calves fed WM had higher average daily gain in the whole trial and higher starter diet dry matter intake between d 15 to 21 of the trial as compared with calves fed MR and MR+SB. Calves fed MR lost on average 1.4 kg of BW within first 14 d of the trial and their BW tended to be lower at d 7, 14, and 21 of the study as compared with calves fed MR+SB. The empty jejunum and ileum weight, crypt depth, mitotic index in the middle jejunum were higher, and apoptotic index tended to be lower in calves fed WM as compared with calves fed MR and MR+SB. Calves fed WM also had higher aminopeptidase N activity in the middle jejunum and tended to have higher maltase activity in the distal jejunum as compared with calves fed MR and MR+SB. The mitotic index was higher and apoptotic index was lower in the middle jejunum, and aminopeptidase A activity tended to be higher in the distal jejunum of calves fed MR+SB as compared with those fed MR. Calves fed WM had greater papillae length and width, and tended to have greater muscle layer thickness as compared with calves fed MR and MR+SB. Reticulorumen weight, reticulorumen weight expressed as percent of whole stomach weight, and papillae length and width were higher in calves fed MR+SB as compared with those fed MR. Additionally, calves fed WM had higher plasma glucose and urea in the whole trial period as compared with calves fed MR and MR+SB, and plasma glucose was higher in calves fed MR+SB as compared with those

  20. Fluid absorption in the small intestine of healthy game birds and those infected with Spironucleus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, S; Irvine, K L; Eves, S M; Gibson, J S

    2005-06-01

    Absorption of fluid by the small intestine of 4-week-old to 12-week-old farmed pheasants and partridges has been studied using an inverted sac technique. The mean rate of absorption was 54 +/- 4 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) microl/g dry tissue/min in pheasants and 49 +/- 3 microl/g dry tissue/min in partridges. Use of inhibitors and ion substitution suggested transepithelial transport driven by baso-lateral Na+/K+ pumps, in combination with mucosal Na+-coupled transporters, including Cl(-)-coupled transporters. Absorption was more than halved to 17 +/- 2 microl/g dry tissue/min (P intestine and showing a syndrome of diarrhoea, depression and loss of weight to severe emaciation. Birds carrying light to moderate levels of infection with Spironucleus had very variable rates of absorption that were statistically similar to the controls. Doubling the glucose concentration in the buffer to 40 mM significantly enhanced absorption.

  1. Microscopic modeling of País grape seed extract absorption in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Cristian; Roeckel, Marlene; Fernández, Katherina

    2014-02-01

    The concentration profiles and the absorbed fraction (F) of the País grape seed extract in the human small intestine were obtained using a microscopic model simulation that accounts for the extracts' dissolution and absorption. To apply this model, the physical and chemical parameters of the grape seed extract solubility (C s), density (ρ), global mass transfer coefficient between the intestinal and blood content (k) (effective permeability), and diffusion coefficient (D) were experimentally evaluated. The diffusion coefficient (D = 3.45 × 10(-6) ± 5 × 10(-8) cm(2)/s) was approximately on the same order of magnitude as the coefficients of the relevant constituents. These results were chemically validated to discover that only the compounds with low molecular weights diffused across the membrane (mainly the (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin compounds). The model demonstrated that for the País grape seed extract, the dissolution process would proceed at a faster rate than the convective process. In addition, the absorbed fraction was elevated (F = 85.3%). The global mass transfer coefficient (k = 1.53 × 10(-4) ± 5 × 10(-6) cm/s) was a critical parameter in the absorption process, and minor changes drastically modified the prediction of the extract absorption. The simulation and experimental results show that the grape seed extract possesses the qualities of a potential phytodrug.

  2. THE ETHIOPATOGENESIS AND THE ANALYSIS OF AN ANTIBIOTIC TREATMENT OF A SMALL INTESTINE BACTERIAL OVERGROWTH SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Martynov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is attempt of the critical analysis of modern approaches to treatment of a small intestine bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO. SIBO now is one of the major problems in gastroenterology. At the same time, the bacterial overgrowth is cause and consequence of many diseases of digestive system and extradigestive manifestations. Many researches testify to prevalence of SIBO in patients with digestive diseases. However, pathogenesis of a disease is studied insufficiently today. Nevertheless, the available data of scientific researches allow to belong to the offered ways of diagnostics and treatment critically.Data on physiology of microbiota of the digestive tract of the healthy person are provided in a review. Mechanisms of antimicrobic resistance of a microbiota of intestines are considered. Interrelations between an antibiotikassociated degeneration of normal flora and bacterial overgrowth are presented. The analysis of an antibiotiktherapi of SIBO indicates low efficiency and also possible ways became chronicle diseaseand frequent recurrence of an illness. The multiple-factors and complexity of pathogenesis of SIBO are leaded authors to a conclusion to use ethiopathogenesis approaches for solution of SIBO.

  3. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Therrien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT. A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P < 0.01. The proportion of positive LBTs was significantly higher in CP patients (38.7 versus 2.5%: P < 0.01. A trend toward a higher proportion of positive LBTs in women compared with men was observed (66.6 versus 27.3%; P = 0.056. The subgroups with positive and negative LBTs were comparable in demographic and clinical characteristics, use of opiates, pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy (PERT, and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO.

  4. The effect of nanoparticle permeation on the bulk rheological properties of mucus from the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, M D; Van Rooij, L K; Chater, P I; Pereira de Sousa, I; Pearson, J P

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of delivering oral therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleotides is often hindered by the protective mucus barrier that covers mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Encapsulation of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in nanocarriers is a potential strategy to protect the cargo but they still have to pass the mucus barrier. Decorating nanoparticles with proteolytic enzymes has been shown to increase the permeation through mucus. Here we investigate the effect of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (BRO), a proteolytic enzyme from pineapple stem, on the bulk rheology of mucus as well as non-decorated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. Porcine intestinal mucus from the small intestine was incubated for 30min in the presence of PLGA nanoparticles or polyacrylic nanoparticles decorated with bromelain (PAA-BRO). The effect of nanoparticles on the rheological properties, weight of gel, released glycoprotein content from mucus as well as the viscosity of liquid removed was assessed. Treatment with nanoparticles decreased mucus gel strength with PAA-BRO reducing it the most. PAA-BRO nanoparticles resulted in the release of increased glycoprotein from the gel network whereas mucus remained a gel and exhibited a similar breakdown stress to control mucus. Therefore it would be possible to use bromelain to increase the permeability of nanoparticles through mucus without destroying the gel and leaving the underlying mucosa unprotected.

  5. Small Intestinal Obstruction with Intussusception due to Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Kini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is known to precede the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML and can be the only clinical manifestation. Gastrointestinal involvement by AML is rare with the commonest site being small intestine. Patients present with vague abdominal pain and/or obstruction. Prognosis is usually poor as most of them rapidly progress to AML. We report a case of 25-year-old man with complaints of abdominal pain and vomiting of one-year duration. OGD scopy revealed infiltration of lesser curvature of stomach. Subsequently patient came back within a week with signs and symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction for which an ileal resection was done. Although the histology of stomach biopsy and ileal segments showing similar features were thought to be non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma. Bone marrow investigations confirmed involvement by AML. Patient succumbed to the disease due to extensive involvement of AML. This case highlights the primary gastrointestinal manifestation of AML which can often prove to be a diagnostic difficulty clinically and histologically. Prompt diagnosis is essential to hasten the management.

  6. Inhibition of small-intestinal sugar absorption mediated by sodium orthovanadate Na3VO4 in rats and its mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ai; Jie Du; Ning Wang; Zhi-Min Du; Bao-Feng Yang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of sodium orthovanadate on small-intestinal glucose and maltose absorption in rats and its mechanism.METHODS: Normal Wistar rats were lavaged with sodium orthovanadate (16 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg) for 6 d.Blood glucose values were measured after fasting and 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 h after glucose and maltose feeding with oxidation-enzyme method. α-glucosidase was abstracted from the upper small intestine, and its activity was examined.mRNA expression of α-glucosidase and glucose-transporter 2 (GLUT2) in epithelial cells of the small intestine was observed by in situ hybridization.RESULTS: Sodium orthovanadate could delay the increase of plasma glucose concentration after glucose and maltose loading, area under curve (AUC) in these groups was lower than that in control group. Sodium orthovanadate at dosages of 10 μmol/L, 100 μmol/L and 1000 μmol/L could suppress the activity of α-glucosidase in the small intestine of normal rats, with an inhibition rate of 68.18%, 87.22% and 91.91%,respectively. Sodium orthovanadate reduced mRNA expression of α-glucosidase and GLUT2 in epithelial cells of small intestine.CONCLUSION: Sodium orthovanadate can reduce and delay the absorption of glucose and maltose. The mechanism may be that it can inhibit the activity and mRNA expression of α-glucosidase, as well as mRNA expression of GLUT2 in small intestine.

  7. A New Marmoset P450 4F12 Enzyme Expressed in Small Intestines and Livers Efficiently Metabolizes Antihistaminic Drug Ebastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yuki, Yukako; Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) are attracting attention as animal models in preclinical studies for drug development. However, cytochrome P450s (P450s), major drug-metabolizing enzymes, have not been fully identified and characterized in marmosets. In this study, based on the four novel P450 4F genes found on the marmoset genome, we successfully isolated P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 cDNAs in marmoset livers. Deduced amino acid sequences of the four marmoset P450 4F forms exhibited high sequence identities (87%-93%) to the human and cynomolgus monkey P450 4F homologs. Marmoset P450 4F3B and 4F11 mRNAs were predominantly expressed in livers, whereas marmoset P450 4F2 and 4F12 mRNAs were highly expressed in small intestines and livers. Four marmoset P450 4F proteins heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed the ω-hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 In addition, marmoset P450 4F12 effectively catalyzed the hydroxylation of antiallergy drug ebastine, a human P450 2J/4F probe substrate. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by small intestine and liver microsomes from marmosets and cynomolgus monkeys showed greatly higher values than those of humans. Ebastine hydroxylation activities by marmoset and cynomolgus monkey small intestine microsomes were inhibited (approximately 60%) by anti-P450 4F antibodies, unlike human small intestine microsomes, suggesting that contribution of P450 4F enzymes for ebastine hydroxylation in the small intestine might be different between marmosets/cynomolgus monkeys and humans. These results indicated that marmoset P450 4F2, 4F3B, 4F11, and 4F12 were expressed in livers and/or small intestines and were functional in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds, similar to those of cynomolgus monkeys and humans.

  8. Length and site of the small intestine exposed to fat influences hunger and food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljaars, P W Jeroen; Peters, Harry P F; Kodde, Andrea; Geraedts, Maartje; Troost, Fred J; Haddeman, Edward; Masclee, Ad A M

    2011-11-01

    The site of intestinal fat delivery affects satiety and may affect food intake in humans. Animal data suggest that the length of the small intestine exposed to fat is also relevant. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether increasing the areas of intestinal fat exposure and the way it is exposed would affect satiety parameters and food intake. In the present single-blind, randomised, cross-over study, fifteen volunteers, each intubated with a naso-ileal tube, received four treatments on consecutive days. The oral control (control treatment) was a liquid meal (LM) containing 6 g fat ingested at t = 0 min, with saline infusion at t = 30-120 min. Experimental treatments were a fat-free LM at t = 0 min, with either 6 g oil delivered sequentially (2 g duodenal, t = 30-60 min; 2 g jejunal, t = 60-90 min; 2 g ileal, t = 90-120 min), simultaneously (2 g each to all sites, t = 30-120 min) or ileal only (6 g ileal, t = 30-120 min). Satiety parameters (hunger and fullness) and cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY) secretion were measured until t = 180 min, when ad libitum food intake was assessed. Only the ileum treatment reduced food intake significantly over the control treatment. The ileum and simultaneous treatments significantly reduced hunger compared with the control treatment. Compared with control, no differences were observed for PYY, CCK and GLP-1 with regard to 180 min integrated secretion. Ileal fat infusion had the most pronounced effect on food intake and satiety. Increasing the areas of intestinal fat exposure only affected hunger when fat was delivered simultaneously, not sequentially, to the exposed areas. These results demonstrate that ileal brake activation offers an interesting target for the regulation of ingestive behaviour.

  9. Diet effects on glucose absorption in the small intestine of neonatal calves: importance of intestinal mucosal growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Zitnan, Rudolf; Schönhusen, Ulrike; Pfannkuche, Helga; Hudakova, Monika; Metges, Cornelia C; Hammon, Harald M

    2014-10-01

    Colostrum (C) feeding in neonatal calves improves glucose status and stimulates intestinal absorptive capacity, leading to greater glucose absorption when compared with milk-based formula feeding. In this study, diet effects on gut growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters were investigated in several gut segments of the small intestine. Fourteen male German Holstein calves received either C of milkings 1, 3, and 5 (d 1, 2, and 3 in milk) or respective formulas (F) twice daily from d 1 to d 3 after birth. Nutrient content, and especially lactose content, of C and respective F were the same. On d 4, calves were fed C of milking 5 or respective F and calves were slaughtered 2h after feeding. Tissue samples from duodenum and proximal, mid-, and distal jejunum were taken to measure villus size and crypt depth, mucosa and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were taken to determine protein content, and mRNA expression and activity of lactase and mRNA expression of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) were determined from mucosal tissue. Additionally, protein expression of SGLT1 in BBMV and GLUT2 in crude mucosal membranes and BBMV were determined, as well as immunochemically localized GLUT2 in the intestinal mucosa. Villus circumference, area, and height were greater, whereas crypt depth was smaller in C than in F. Lactase activity tended to be greater in C than in F. Protein expression of SGLT1 was greater in F than in C. Parameters of villus size, lactase activity, SGLT1 protein expression, as well as apical and basolateral GLUT2 localization in the enterocytes differed among gut segments. In conclusion, C feeding, when compared with F feeding, enhances glucose absorption in neonatal calves primarily by stimulating mucosal growth and increasing absorptive capacity in the small intestine, but not by stimulating abundance of intestinal glucose transporters.

  10. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    a continuous basal lamina, caveolae, intermediate filaments, dense bodies, dense bands, and a well-developed subsurface smooth endoplasmic reticulum), but the arrangement of organelles was clearly different, and cisternae of granular endoplasmic reticulum were abundant. Interstitial cells of Cajal were......Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... for identification and further physiological or pathological studies. The deep muscular plexus was sandwiched between a thin inner layer of smooth muscle (one to five cells thick) and the bulk of the circular muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal in this region very much resembled smooth muscle cells (with...

  11. C1 Inhibitor Deficiency and Angioedema of the Small Intestine Masquerading as Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly W Burak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of C1 inhibitor deficiency presenting as localized edema of the small intestine is described. A 16-year-old, previously healthy woman presented with recurrent attacks of abdominal pain and vomiting following minor abdominal trauma. Investigations including computed tomography scan and barium studies confirmed localized edema of the jejunum. At laparoscopy, Crohn’s disease was suspected; however, a subsequent enteroscopy was normal. Complement levels revealed a low C4 level, and C1 inhibitor deficiency was later confirmed. Attacks of abdominal pain began after starting oral contraceptives and have not returned since stopping the birth control pill. This rare cause of abdominal pain is examined, and C1 inhibitor deficiency and angioedema are reviewed.

  12. Small intestinal strangulation due to a rare type of primary internal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Makoto; Ohnuki, Yoshinori; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kubota, Osamu; Ohishi, Kousuke

    2013-01-01

    Internal hernias in which the gate is located in the paracolic gutter are rare. A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe epigastric pain without past history of laparotomy and/or trauma. He was diagnosed with strangulation of the ileum by the findings of computed tomography, and the operation was performed. During laparotomy, the small intestine was found to be strangulated and to enter the retroperitoneum from the right paracolic gutter near the hepatic flexure. The patient was diagnosed with an internal hernia, which differed from a pericecal hernia in that the hernia gate was located along the paracolic gutter near the hepatic flexure far from the cecum. Hence, it was considered to be a rare type of internal hernia. We report the clinical presentation and imaging findings of this rare internal hernia.

  13. Circadian phenomena and irradiation. Modifications of enzyme activity in the small intestine after sublethal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becciolini, A.; Giache, V.; Scubla, E.; D' Abbondio, D.

    1987-01-01

    Irradiation effects after a 3 Gy dose administered at four different times of a 24 h light/darkness cycle were studied: The modifications in the brush border enzyme activity of epithelial cells of the small intestine were determined. In controls the activity of these enzymes showed circadian oscillations with the maximum during the dark period and the minimum during the light period. The trend after irradiation in the various groups was very similar but some differences were present specially at the initial intervals when the effect appeared to be different depending on the enzyme level at the time of exposure. Lactase activity in animals irradiated at 0.00 and 18.00 o'clock returned to control levels later than in the other groups.

  14. Lipid raft organization and function in the small intestinal brush border

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, Gert Helge

    2008-01-01

    The enterocyte brush border of the small intestine is a highly specialized membrane designed to function both as a high capacity digestive/absorptive surface of dietary nutrients and a permeability barrier towards lumenal pathogens. It is characterized by an unusually high content of glycolipids...... (approximately 30% of the total microvillar membrane lipid), enabling the formation of liquid ordered microdomains, better known as lipid rafts. The glycolipid rafts are stabilized by galectin-4, a 36 kDa divalent lectin that cross-links galactosyl (and other carbohydrate) residues present on membrane lipids...... proteinases, are protected from untimely release into the gut lumen. Finally, anti-glycosyl antibodies, synthesized by plasma cells locally in the gut, are deposited on the brush border glycolipid rafts, protecting the epithelium from lumenal pathogens that exploit lipid rafts as portals for entry...

  15. Small intestinal tubular adenoma in a pediatric patient with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Ying; Chen, Lian; Zheng, Shan; Dong, Kui-Ran

    2013-04-07

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a female chromosomal disorder caused by the lack of an X chromosome. The loss of this chromosome may result in the deficiency of tumor-suppressive or DNA repair genes, leading to tumorigenesis. Recombinant human growth hormone (GH) has been popularly used for treatment in TS patients for growth promotion. Although treatment with GH has been correlated with precancerous and cancerous lesions in TS children, its associations with gastric or colonic tumors, especially ileal tubular adenomas, have not been reported frequently. We here report a case of a 16-year-old patient with TS and tubular adenoma of the small intestine. Whether the ileal adenoma was caused by TS itself or GH therapy was discussed.

  16. Growth of and valine production by a Bacillus subtilis mutant in the small intestine of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canibe, Nuria; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Nørgaard, Jan Værum;

    2016-01-01

    :Lys of 0.63:1 (Neg), 2) the Neg diet with added Bacillus subtilis-valine (1.28 × 108 cfu/g feed) (+Bac), and 3) the Neg diet with added L-Val to a Val:Lys of 0.69:1 (+Val). Eighteen gilts (6 on each treatment) with initial weights of ∼15 kg were fed the diets for 23 d before the animals were euthanized...... and samples from the small intestine were obtained. The number of B. subtilis cfu in digesta was higher in the +Bac group than in the Neg group (P ... concentrations were measured in the +Bac group. Short-term in vitro incubations of digesta showed a decrease (P ≤ 0.03) in the number of B. subtilis cfu over time for the +Bac group and no difference in the rate of Val production compared to that in the Neg group. In conclusion, more B. subtilis cfu were present...

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Glucose-Stimulated GLP-1 Secretion From Perfused Rat Small Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune E.; Frost, Charlotte R.; Svendsen, Berit;

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w...... (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did...... not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations...

  18. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effect of mycotoxins in human small intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Sørensen, Izel Fourie; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of foods and feeds with mycotoxins is of significant concern due to their adverse effects on pig productivity and on animal and human health. Development of scientifically sound in vitro systems for toxicological screening for mycotoxins is important for improvement of food safety...... for consumers and for animal health and welfare. The aim of the present study was to determine the cytotoxicity of several mycotoxins potentially present in feed and food in a sensitive screening assay with normal human small intestinal cells (FHs 74 Int.). For cytotoxicity studies, cells were treated...... with mycotoxins for 72 h, and viability was measured by AlamarBlue reduction. For apoptosis studies, cells were treated with mycotoxins for 24 h, and apoptosis was measured by caspase 3/7 activation. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of mycotoxins was calculated from sigmoidal dose-response plots...

  19. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire...... and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions...

  20. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. II. Ultrastructural studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L; Mikkelsen, H B

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructure of plexus muscularis profundus (PMP) of the mouse small intestine was investigated subsequent to vascular perfusion with ruthenium red-containing and routine aldehyde fixatives. Four types of nerve terminals were revealed. Type I: numerous 500-A agranular vesicles and few 1,000-A...... A), synapse-like contacts to interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-III). Presynaptic densities were frequent in type I endings. A direct innervation of muscle cells via PMP was only very occasionally suggested. ICC-III possessed a basal lamina and numerous caveolae associated with subsurface SER......, and the lack of caveolae and a basal lamina. FLC never participated in synaptic arrangements or gap junctions. Macrophage-like cells were occasionally encountered. It is concluded that possible efferent and afferent nerve terminals in PMP may chiefly, if not exclusively, innervate ICC-III, the ultrastructure...