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Sample records for canine coronavirus strain

  1. Feline coronavirus type II strains 79-1683 and 79-1146 originate from a double recombination between feline coronavirus type I and canine coronavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Herrewegh, A.A.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Groot, R.J. de

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the type II feline coronavirus (FCoV) strains 79-1146 and 79-1683 have arisen from a homologous RNA recombination event between FCoV type I and canine coronavirus (CCV). In both cases, the template switch apparently took place between the S and M genes, giving rise to r

  2. European surveillance for pantropic canine coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Cordonnier, Nathalie; Demeter, Zoltan; Egberink, Herman; Elia, Gabriella; Grellet, Aurélien; Le Poder, Sophie; Mari, Viviana; Martella, Vito; Ntafis, Vasileios; von Reitzenstein, Marcela; Rottier, Peter J; Rusvai, Miklos; Shields, Shelly; Xylouri, Eftychia; Xu, Zach; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2013-01-01

    Highly virulent pantropic canine coronavirus (CCoV) strains belonging to subtype IIa were recently identified in dogs. To assess the distribution of such strains in Europe, tissue samples were collected from 354 dogs that had died after displaying systemic disease in France (n = 92), Hungary (n = 75), Italy (n = 69), Greece (n = 87), The Netherlands (n = 27), Belgium (n = 4), and Bulgaria (n = 1). A total of 124 animals tested positive for CCoV, with 33 of them displaying the virus in extraintestinal tissues. Twenty-four CCoV strains (19.35% of the CCoV-positive dogs) detected in internal organs were characterized as subtype IIa and consequently assumed to be pantropic CCoVs. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the 5' end of the spike protein gene showed that pantropic CCoV strains are closely related to each other, with the exception of two divergent French viruses that clustered with enteric strains. PMID:23100349

  3. Feline and Canine Coronaviruses: Common Genetic and Pathobiological Features

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    Sophie Le Poder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new human coronavirus responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS was identified in 2003, which raised concern about coronaviruses as agents of serious infectious disease. Nevertheless, coronaviruses have been known for about 50 years to be major agents of respiratory, enteric, or systemic infections of domestic and companion animals. Feline and canine coronaviruses are widespread among dog and cat populations, sometimes leading to the fatal diseases known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP and pantropic canine coronavirus infection in cats and dogs, respectively. In this paper, different aspects of the genetics, host cell tropism, and pathogenesis of the feline and canine coronaviruses (FCoV and CCoV will be discussed, with a view to illustrating how study of FCoVs and CCoVs can improve our general understanding of the pathobiology of coronaviruses.

  4. Feline and canine coronaviruses : common genetic and pathobiological features

    OpenAIRE

    Sophie Le Poder

    2011-01-01

    A new human coronavirus responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was identified in 2003, which raised concern about coronaviruses as agents of serious infectious disease. Nevertheless, coronaviruses have been known for about 50 years to be major agents of respiratory, enteric, or systemic infections of domestic and companion animals. Feline and canine coronaviruses are widespread among dog and cat populations, sometimes leading to the fatal diseases known as feline infectious ...

  5. Canine Enteric Coronaviruses: Emerging Viral Pathogens with Distinct Recombinant Spike Proteins

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    Beth N. Licitra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Canine enteric coronavirus (CCoV is an alphacoronavirus infecting dogs that is closely related to enteric coronaviruses of cats and pigs. While CCoV has traditionally caused mild gastro-intestinal clinical signs, there are increasing reports of lethal CCoV infections in dogs, with evidence of both gastrointestinal and systemic viral dissemination. Consequently, CCoV is now considered to be an emerging infectious disease of dogs. In addition to the two known serotypes of CCoV, novel recombinant variants of CCoV have been found containing spike protein N-terminal domains (NTDs that are closely related to those of feline and porcine strains. The increase in disease severity in dogs and the emergence of novel CCoVs can be attributed to the high level of recombination within the spike gene that can occur during infection by more than one CCoV type in the same host.

  6. Genomic organization and expression of the 3' end of the canine and feline enteric coronaviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vennema, H; Rossen, J W; Wesseling, J; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1992-01-01

    The genomic organization at the 3' end of canine coronavirus (CCV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) was determined by sequence analysis and compared to that of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) of swine. Comparison of the latter two has pr

  7. Genomic organization and expression of the 3' end of the canine and feline enteric coronaviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vennema, H; Rossen, J W; Wesseling, J; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1993-01-01

    The genomic organization at the 3' end of canine coronavirus (CCV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) was determined by sequence analysis and compared to that of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) of swine. Comparison of the latter two has pr

  8. Emergence of pathogenic coronaviruses in cats by homologous recombination between feline and canine coronaviruses.

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    Yutaka Terada

    Full Text Available Type II feline coronavirus (FCoV emerged via double recombination between type I FCoV and type II canine coronavirus (CCoV. In this study, two type I FCoVs, three type II FCoVs and ten type II CCoVs were genetically compared. The results showed that three Japanese type II FCoVs, M91-267, KUK-H/L and Tokyo/cat/130627, also emerged by homologous recombination between type I FCoV and type II CCoV and their parent viruses were genetically different from one another. In addition, the 3'-terminal recombination sites of M91-267, KUK-H/L and Tokyo/cat/130627 were different from one another within the genes encoding membrane and spike proteins, and the 5'-terminal recombination sites were also located at different regions of ORF1. These results indicate that at least three Japanese type II FCoVs emerged independently. Sera from a cat experimentally infected with type I FCoV was unable to neutralize type II CCoV infection, indicating that cats persistently infected with type I FCoV may be superinfected with type II CCoV. Our previous study reported that few Japanese cats have antibody against type II FCoV. All of these observations suggest that type II FCoV emerged inside the cat body and is unable to readily spread among cats, indicating that these recombination events for emergence of pathogenic coronaviruses occur frequently.

  9. Genotypic characterization of canine coronaviruses associated with fatal canine neonatal enteritis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, Beth N; Whittaker, Gary R; Dubovi, Edward J; Duhamel, Gerald E

    2014-12-01

    Emerging canine coronavirus (CCoV) variants that are associated with systemic infections have been reported in the European Union; however, CCoV-associated disease in the United States is incompletely characterized. The purpose of this study was to correlate the clinicopathological findings and viral antigen distribution with the genotypic characteristics of CCoV in 11 puppies from nine premises in five states that were submitted for diagnostic investigation at Cornell University between 2008 and 2013. CCoV antigen was found in epithelial cells of small intestinal villi in all puppies and the colon in 2 of the 10 puppies where colon specimens were available. No evidence of systemic CCoV infection was found. Comparative sequence analyses of viral RNA extracted from intestinal tissues revealed CCoV-II genotype in 9 out of 11 puppies. Of the nine CCoV-IIs, five were subtyped as group IIa and one as IIb, while three CCoVs could not be subtyped. One of the CCoV-IIa variants was isolated in cell culture. Infection with CCoV alone was found in five puppies, of which two also had small intestinal intussusception. Concurrent infections with either parvovirus (n = 1), attaching-effacing Escherichia coli (n = 4), or protozoan parasites (n = 3) were found in the other six puppies. CCoV is an important differential diagnosis in outbreaks of severe enterocolitis among puppies between 4 days and 21 weeks of age that are housed at high population density. These findings will assist with the rapid laboratory diagnosis of enteritis in puppies and highlight the need for continued surveillance for CCoV variants and intestinal viral diseases of global significance.

  10. Coronavirus Genomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

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    Kwok-Yung Yuen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The drastic increase in the number of coronaviruses discovered and coronavirus genomes being sequenced have given us an unprecedented opportunity to perform genomics and bioinformatics analysis on this family of viruses. Coronaviruses possess the largest genomes (26.4 to 31.7 kb among all known RNA viruses, with G + C contents varying from 32% to 43%. Variable numbers of small ORFs are present between the various conserved genes (ORF1ab, spike, envelope, membrane and nucleocapsid and downstream to nucleocapsid gene in different coronavirus lineages. Phylogenetically, three genera, Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus and Gammacoronavirus, with Betacoronavirus consisting of subgroups A, B, C and D, exist. A fourth genus, Deltacoronavirus, which includes bulbul coronavirus HKU11, thrush coronavirus HKU12 and munia coronavirus HKU13, is emerging. Molecular clock analysis using various gene loci revealed that the time of most recent common ancestor of human/civet SARS related coronavirus to be 1999-2002, with estimated substitution rate of 4´10-4 to 2´10-2 substitutions per site per year. Recombination in coronaviruses was most notable between different strains of murine hepatitis virus (MHV, between different strains of infectious bronchitis virus, between MHV and bovine coronavirus, between feline coronavirus (FCoV type I and canine coronavirus generating FCoV type II, and between the three genotypes of human coronavirus HKU1 (HCoV-HKU1. Codon usage bias in coronaviruses were observed, with HCoV-HKU1 showing the most extreme bias, and cytosine deamination and selection of CpG suppressed clones are the two major independent biological forces that shape such codon usage bias in coronaviruses.

  11. Comparative properties of feline coronaviruses in vitro.

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    McKeirnan, A J; Evermann, J F; Davis, E V; Ott, R L

    1987-04-01

    Two feline coronaviruses were characterized to determine their biological properties in vitro and their antigenic relatedness to a previously recognized feline infectious peritonitis virus and canine coronavirus. The viruses, designated WSU 79-1146 and WSU 79-1683, were shown to have comparable growth curves with the prototype feline infectious peritonitis virus. Treatment of the feline infectious peritonitis virus strains with 0.25% trypsin indicated that they were relatively resistant to proteolytic inactivation when compared with the feline enteric coronavirus strain. This observation may serve as a useful in vitro marker to distinguish closely related members of the feline coronavirus group. Plaque assay results indicated that the feline infectious peritonitis virus strains produced large homogeneous plaques in comparison to the feline enteric coronavirus strain and canine coronavirus, which showed a heterogenous plaque size distribution. No naturally temperature sensitive mutants were detected in either of the feline coronavirus populations. Both of the viruses were antigenically related to feline infectious peritonitis virus and to a lesser extent to canine coronavirus by virus neutralization.

  12. Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1

    OpenAIRE

    Vicenzi, Elisa; Canducci, Filippo; Pinna, Debora; Mancini, Nicasio; Carletti, Silvia; Lazzarin, Adriano; Bordignon, Claudio; Poli, Guido; Clementi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    During the recent severe acute respiratory (SARS) outbreak, the etiologic agent was identified as a new coronavirus (CoV). We have isolated a SARS-associated CoV (SARS-CoV) strain by injecting Vero cells with a sputum specimen from an Italian patient affected by a severe pneumonia; the patient traveled from Vietnam to Italy in March 2003. Ultrastructural analysis of infected Vero cells showed the virions within cell vesicles and around the cell membrane. The full-length viral genome sequence ...

  13. Coronaviridae and SARS-associated Coronavirus Strain HSR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canducci, Filippo; Pinna, Debora; Mancini, Nicasio; Carletti, Silvia; Lazzarin, Adriano; Bordignon, Claudio; Poli, Guido; Clementi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    During the recent severe acute respiratory (SARS) outbreak, the etiologic agent was identified as a new coronavirus (CoV). We have isolated a SARS-associated CoV (SARS-CoV) strain by injecting Vero cells with a sputum specimen from an Italian patient affected by a severe pneumonia; the patient traveled from Vietnam to Italy in March 2003. Ultrastructural analysis of infected Vero cells showed the virions within cell vesicles and around the cell membrane. The full-length viral genome sequence was similar to those derived from the Hong-Kong Hotel M isolate. By using both real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay and an infectivity plaque assay, we determined that approximately 360 viral genomes were required to generate a PFU. In addition, heparin (100 μg/mL) inhibited infection of Vero cells by 50%. Overall, the molecular and biologic characteristics of the strain HSR1 provide evidence that SARS-CoV forms a fourth genetic coronavirus group with distinct genomic and biologic features. PMID:15109406

  14. Coronaviridae and SARS-associated coronavirus strain HSR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzi, Elisa; Canducci, Filippo; Pinna, Debora; Mancini, Nicasio; Carletti, Silvia; Lazzarin, Adriano; Bordignon, Claudio; Poli, Guido; Clementi, Massimo

    2004-03-01

    During the recent severe acute respiratory (SARS) outbreak, the etiologic agent was identified as a new coronavirus (CoV). We have isolated a SARS-associated CoV (SARS-CoV) strain by injecting Vero cells with a sputum specimen from an Italian patient affected by a severe pneumonia; the patient traveled from Vietnam to Italy in March 2003. Ultrastructural analysis of infected Vero cells showed the virions within cell vesicles and around the cell membrane. The full-length viral genome sequence was similar to those derived from the Hong-Kong Hotel M isolate. By using both real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay and an infectivity plaque assay, we determined that approximately 360 viral genomes were required to generate a PFU. In addition, heparin (100 microg/mL) inhibited infection of Vero cells by 50%. Overall, the molecular and biologic characteristics of the strain HSR1 provide evidence that SARS-CoV forms a fourth genetic coronavirus group with distinct genomic and biologic features. PMID:15109406

  15. Role of the lipid rafts in the life cycle of canine coronavirus.

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    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2015-02-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have evolved complex relationships with their host cells, and modulate their lipid composition, lipid synthesis and signalling. Lipid rafts, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and associated proteins, are special plasma membrane microdomains involved in several processes in viral infections. The extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to lipid rafts. Because cholesterol-rich microdomains appear to be a general feature of the entry mechanism of non-eneveloped viruses and of several coronaviruses, the purpose of this study was to analyse the contribution of lipids to the infectivity of canine coronavirus (CCoV). The CCoV life cycle is closely connected to plasma membrane cholesterol, from cell entry to viral particle production. The methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) was employed to remove cholesterol and to disrupt the lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion from the cell membrane resulted in a dose-dependent reduction, but not abolishment, of virus infectivity, and at a concentration of 15 mM, the reduction in the infection rate was about 68 %. MβCD treatment was used to verify if cholesterol in the envelope was required for CCoV infection. This resulted in a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, and at a concentration of 9 mM MβCD, infectivity was reduced by about 73 %. Since viral entry would constitute a target for antiviral strategies, inhibitory molecules interacting with viral and/or cell membranes, or interfering with lipid metabolism, may have strong antiviral potential. It will be interesting in the future to analyse the membrane microdomains in the CCoV envelope.

  16. Infection of cats with atypical feline coronaviruses harbouring a truncated form of the canine type I non-structural ORF3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Poder, Sophie; Pham-Hung d'Alexandry d'Orangiani, Anne-Laure; Duarte, Lidia; Fournier, Annie; Horhogea, Cristina; Pinhas, Carine; Vabret, Astrid; Eloit, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Feline and canine coronaviruses (FCoV and CCoV, respectively) are common pathogens of cats and dogs sometimes leading to lethal infections named feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) and canine pantropic coronavirus infection. FCoV and CCoV are each subdivided into two serotypes, FCoV-I/II and CCoV-I/II. A phylogenetic relationship is evident between, on one hand, CCoV-I/FCoV-I, and on the other hand, CCoV-II/FCoV-II, suggesting that interspecies transmission can occur. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of coronavirus (CoV)-infected cats according to their contact with dogs and to genetically analyse the CoV strains infecting cats. From 2003 to 2009, we collected 88 faecal samples from healthy cats and 11 ascitic fluids from FIP cats. We investigated the possible contact with dog in the household and collected dogs samples if appropriate. Out of 99 cat samples, 26 were coronavirus positive, with six cats living with at least one dog, thus showing that contact with dogs does not appear as a predisposing factor for cats CoV infections. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of FCoV strains were conducted using partial N and S sequences. Six divergent strains were identified with the N gene clustering with CCoV-I whereas the 3' end of S was related to FCoV-I. Further analysis on those six samples was attempted by researching the presence of the ORF3 gene, the latter being peculiar to CCoV-I to date. We succeeded to amplify the ORF3 gene in five samples out of six. Thus, our data strongly suggest the circulation of atypical FCoV strains harbouring the CCoV-I ORF3 gene among cats. Moreover, the ORF3 genes recovered from the feline strains exhibited shared deletions, never described before, suggesting that these deletions could be critical in the adaptation of these strains to the feline host. PMID:24121017

  17. Exposure of pampas fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous) from the Southern region of Brazil to Canine distemper virus (CDV), Canine parvovirus (CPV) and Canine coronavirus (CCoV)

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia de Oliveira Hübner; Felipe Geraldes Pappen; Jerônimo Lopes Ruas; Gilberto D'Ávila Vargas; Geferson Fischer; Telmo Vidor

    2010-01-01

    The exposure of 13 Brazilian free-ranging nondomestic canids (five pampas fox - Pseudalopex gymnocercus and eight crab-eating fox -Cerdocyon thous) from Southern region of Brazil, to Canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV) and Canine coronavirus (CCoV) was investigated. Antibodies against CDV were detected in 38.5% (5/13) of the samples. There were anti-CDV antibodies in 60% (3/5) of P. gymnocercus and in 25% (2/8) of C. thous. The frequency was higher among the adults and males...

  18. Serological survey on canine coronavirus antibodies in giant pandas by virus neutralization test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOJun; XIAXian-zhu; YANGSong-tao; LIDe-sheng; HUGui-xue; GAOYu-wei; SUNHe-ting; ZHAOZhong-pen; XlEZhi-jing; YANFang; HEWen-qi; HUANGGen

    2004-01-01

    In order to survey the infectious situation of canine coronavirus (CCV) in giant panda population, a virus neutralization test detecting specific antibodies against CCV in giant panda's sera was established by using two-fold dilutions of serum and 100 TCID50 of the virus. The 62 sera samples of giant pandas, which were gathered from zoos and reserve region of Sichuan Province, China were detected. The neutralization antibody titer of 1:4 was recognized as the positive criterion, 8 sera samples were detected to be positive, and the positive rate was 12.9%. The titers of neutralizing antibody ranged from 1:8 to 1:32. It was the first comprehensive investigation on neutralization antibodies against CCV in giant panda population in China. The results of study showed that the infection of CCV in giant panda population was universal, which has posed a threat to the health of giant panda. Therefore, it is incumbent on us to study safe and effective vaccines to protect giant panda against CCV infection.

  19. Co-Circulation of Canine Coronavirus I and IIa/b with High Prevalence and Genetic Diversity in Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China.

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    Xinyu Wang

    Full Text Available To trace the evolution of canine coronavirus (CCoV, 201 stool samples from diarrheic dogs in northeast China were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs targeting the partial M and S genes of CCoV, followed by an epidemiological analysis. M gene RT-PCRs showed that 28.36% (57/201 of the samples were positive for CCoV; of the 57 positive samples, CCoV-I and CCoV-II accounted for 15.79% (9/57 and 84.21% (48/57, respectively. A sequence comparison of the partial M gene revealed nucleotide homologies of 88.4%-100% among the 57 CCoV strains, and 88.7%-96.2% identity between the 57 CCoV strains and the Chinese reference strain HF3. The CCoV-I and CCoV-II strains exhibited genetic diversity when compared with reference strains from China and other countries. The 57 CCoV strains exhibited high co-infection rates with canine kobuvirus (CaKV (33.33% and canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2 (31.58%. The CCoV prevalence in diarrheic dogs differed significantly with immunization status, regions, seasons, and ages. Moreover, 28 S genes were amplified from the 57 CCoV-positive samples, including 26 CCoV-IIa strains, one CCoV-IIb strain, and one CCoV-I strain. A sequence comparison of the partial S gene revealed 86.3%-100% nucleotide identity among the 26 CCoV-IIa strains, and 89.6%-92.2% identity between the 26 CCoV-IIa strains and the Chinese reference strain V1. The 26 CCoV-IIa strains showed genetic diversity when compared with reference strains from China and other countries. Our data provide evidence that CCoV-I, CCoV-IIa, and CCoV-IIb strains co-circulate in the diarrhoetic dogs in northeast China, high co-infection rates with CaKV and CPV-2 were observed, and the CCoV-II strains exhibited high prevalence and genetic diversity.

  20. Co-Circulation of Canine Coronavirus I and IIa/b with High Prevalence and Genetic Diversity in Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Li, Chunqiu; Guo, Donghua; Wang, Xinyu; Wei, Shan; Geng, Yufei; Wang, Enyu; Wang, Zhihui; Zhao, Xiwen; Su, Mingjun; Liu, Qiujin; Zhang, Siyao; Feng, Li; Sun, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    To trace the evolution of canine coronavirus (CCoV), 201 stool samples from diarrheic dogs in northeast China were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) targeting the partial M and S genes of CCoV, followed by an epidemiological analysis. M gene RT-PCRs showed that 28.36% (57/201) of the samples were positive for CCoV; of the 57 positive samples, CCoV-I and CCoV-II accounted for 15.79% (9/57) and 84.21% (48/57), respectively. A sequence comparison of the partial M gene revealed nucleotide homologies of 88.4%–100% among the 57 CCoV strains, and 88.7%–96.2% identity between the 57 CCoV strains and the Chinese reference strain HF3. The CCoV-I and CCoV-II strains exhibited genetic diversity when compared with reference strains from China and other countries. The 57 CCoV strains exhibited high co-infection rates with canine kobuvirus (CaKV) (33.33%) and canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2) (31.58%). The CCoV prevalence in diarrheic dogs differed significantly with immunization status, regions, seasons, and ages. Moreover, 28 S genes were amplified from the 57 CCoV-positive samples, including 26 CCoV-IIa strains, one CCoV-IIb strain, and one CCoV-I strain. A sequence comparison of the partial S gene revealed 86.3%–100% nucleotide identity among the 26 CCoV-IIa strains, and 89.6%–92.2% identity between the 26 CCoV-IIa strains and the Chinese reference strain V1. The 26 CCoV-IIa strains showed genetic diversity when compared with reference strains from China and other countries. Our data provide evidence that CCoV-I, CCoV-IIa, and CCoV-IIb strains co-circulate in the diarrhoetic dogs in northeast China, high co-infection rates with CaKV and CPV-2 were observed, and the CCoV-II strains exhibited high prevalence and genetic diversity. PMID:26771312

  1. Feline and canine coronaviruses are released from the basolateral side of polarized epithelial LLC-PK1 cells expressing the recombinant feline aminopeptidase-N cDNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Kouame, J; Goedheer, A J; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    2001-01-01

    In this study feline (FECV and FIPV) and canine (CCoV) coronavirus entry into and release from polarized porcine epithelial LLC-PK1 cells, stably expressing the recombinant feline aminopeptidase-N cDNA, were investigated. Virus entry appeared to occur preferentially through the apical membrane, simi

  2. Characterisation of different forms of the accessory gp3 canine coronavirus type I protein identified in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Orengiani, Anne-Laure Pham-Hung d'Alexandry; Duarte, Lidia; Pavio, Nicole; Le Poder, Sophie

    2015-04-16

    ORF3 is a supplemental open reading frame coding for an accessory glycoprotein gp3 of unknown function, only present in genotype I canine strain (CCoV-I) and some atypical feline FCoV strains. In these latter hosts, the ORF3 gene systematically displays one or two identical deletions leading to the synthesis of truncated proteins gp3-Δ1 and gp3-Δ2. As deletions in CoV accessory proteins have already been involved in tissue or host switch, studies of these different gp3 proteins were conducted in canine and feline cell. All proteins oligomerise through covalent bonds, are N-glycosylated and are maintained in the ER in non-infected but also in CCoV-II infected cells, without any specific retention signal. However, deletions influence their level of expression. In canine cells, all proteins are expressed with similar level whereas in feline cells, the expression of gp3-Δ1 is higher than the two other forms of gp3. None of the gp3 proteins modulate the viral replication cycle of heterologous genotype II CCoV in canine cell line, leading to the conclusion that the gp3 proteins are probably advantageous only for CCoV-I and atypical FCoV strains. PMID:25665789

  3. Co-Circulation of Canine Coronavirus I and IIa/b with High Prevalence and Genetic Diversity in Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    Chunqiu Li; Donghua Guo; Xinyu Wang; Shan Wei; Yufei Geng; Enyu Wang; Zhihui Wang; Xiwen Zhao; Mingjun Su; Qiujin Liu; Siyao Zhang; Li Feng; Dongbo Sun

    2016-01-01

    To trace the evolution of canine coronavirus (CCoV), 201 stool samples from diarrheic dogs in northeast China were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) targeting the partial M and S genes of CCoV, followed by an epidemiological analysis. M gene RT-PCRs showed that 28.36% (57/201) of the samples were positive for CCoV; of the 57 positive samples, CCoV-I and CCoV-II accounted for 15.79% (9/57) and 84.21% (48/57), respectively. A sequence comparison of the part...

  4. Biofilm production by clinical staphylococci strains from canine otitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Camila Alencar; de Oliveira, Lis Christina; Mendes, Marina Silveira; Santiago, Thiago de Melo; Barros, Eduardo Bedê; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the species of 54 staphylococci isolates from canine otitis and their ability to produce biofilm through the Congo red agar method, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The most frequently identified species were S. intermedius and S. simulans. Results showed that 30% of the strains were biofilm producers.

  5. Biofilm production by clinical staphylococci strains from canine otitis

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Camila Alencar; de Oliveira, Lis Christina; Mendes, Marina Silveira; Santiago, Thiago de Melo; Barros, Eduardo Bedê; CARVALHO Cibele Barreto Mano de

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the species of 54 staphylococci isolates from canine otitis and their ability to produce biofilm through the Congo red agar method, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The most frequently identified species were S. intermedius and S. simulans. Results showed that 30% of the strains were biofilm producers.

  6. Biofilm production by clinical Staphylococci strains from canine otitis

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    Camila Alencar Moreira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the species of 54 staphylococci isolates from canine otitis and their ability to produce biofilm through the Congo red agar method, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The most frequently identified species were S. intermedius and S. simulans. Results showed that 30% of the strains were biofilm producers.

  7. Biofilm production by clinical Staphylococci strains from canine otitis

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Alencar Moreira; Lis Christina de Oliveira; Marina Silveira Mendes; Thiago de Melo Santiago; Eduardo Bedê Barros; Cibele Barreto Mano de Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the species of 54 staphylococci isolates from canine otitis and their ability to produce biofilm through the Congo red agar method, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The most frequently identified species were S. intermedius and S. simulans. Results showed that 30% of the strains were biofilm producers.

  8. A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction for detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus

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    Cui Shang-jin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A multiplex reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nPCR method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus (CDV. A pair of primers (P1 and P4 specific for CDV corresponding to the highly conserved region of the CDV genome were used as a common primer pair in the first-round PCR of the nested PCR. Primers P2 specific for CDV wild-type strains, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4 in the second round of nested PCR. Primers P3, P5 specific for CDV wild-type strain or vaccine strain, were used as the forward primer together with the common reverse primer P4+P6 in the second round of nested PCR. A fragment of 177 bp was amplified from vaccine strain genomic RNA, and a fragment of 247 bp from wild-type strain genomic RNA in the RT-nPCR, and two fragments of 247 bp and 177 bp were amplified from the mixed samples of vaccine and wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV, canine parvovirus (CPV, canine coronavirus (CCV, rabies virus (RV, or canine adenovirus (CAV. The RT-nPCR method was used to detect 30 field samples suspected of canine distemper from Heilongjiang and Jilin Provinces, and 51 samples in Shandong province. As a result of 30 samples, were found to be wild-type-like, and 5 to be vaccine-strain-like. The RT-nPCR method can be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type CDV-infected dogs from dogs vaccinated with CDV vaccine, and thus can be used in clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance.

  9. Exposure of pampas fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus and crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous from the Southern region of Brazil to Canine distemper virus (CDV, Canine parvovirus (CPV and Canine coronavirus (CCoV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Oliveira Hübner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of 13 Brazilian free-ranging nondomestic canids (five pampas fox - Pseudalopex gymnocercus and eight crab-eating fox -Cerdocyon thous from Southern region of Brazil, to Canine distemper virus (CDV, canine parvovirus (CPV and Canine coronavirus (CCoV was investigated. Antibodies against CDV were detected in 38.5% (5/13 of the samples. There were anti-CDV antibodies in 60% (3/5 of P. gymnocercus and in 25% (2/8 of C. thous. The frequency was higher among the adults and males. Eleven canids (84.6% presented antibodies against CPV, 80% (4/5 were from P. gymnocercus and 87.5% (7/8 were from C. thous. There was no difference in positivity rate against CPV between gender and age. Antibodies against CCoV were detected in 38.5% (5/13 of the samples, with 60% (3/5 of positivity in P. gymnocercus and 25% (2/8 in C. thous. The frequency of antibodies against CCoV was higher among the adults and males. The study showed that these canids were exposed to CDV, CPV and CCoV.Foi investigada a ocorrência de exposição em 13 canídeos não domésticos de vida livre (cinco graxains-do-campo - Pseudalopex gymnocercus e oito graxains-do-mato - Cerdocyon thous da região sul do Brasil ao vírus da cinomose canina (CDV, parvovírus canino (CPV e coronavírus canino (CCoV. Anticorpos contra o CDV foram detectados em 38,5% (5/13 das amostras. Haviam anticorpos anti-CDV em 60% (3/5 dos P. gymnocercus e em 25% (2/8 dos C. thous. A freqüência foi maior entre machos e adultos. Para CPV, 11 canídeos (84,6% apresentaram anticorpos, 80% (4/5 eram da espécie P. gymnocercus e 87,5% (7/8 eram C. thous. Não houve diferença de positividade para o CPV entre sexos e idades. Anticorpos contra o CCoV foram detectados em 38,5% (5/13 das amostras, sendo 60% (3/5 de positividade entre os P. gymnocercus e 25% (2/8 entre os C. thous. A freqüência de anticorpos para CCoV foi maior entre os machos e adultos. O estudo revelou que estes canídeos foram expostos ao CDV, CPV

  10. A mouse model for Betacoronavirus subgroup 2c using a bat coronavirus strain HKU5 variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Yount, Boyd L; Donaldson, Eric F; Huynh, Jeremy; Menachery, Vineet D; Gralinski, Lisa E; Graham, Rachel L; Becker, Michelle M; Tomar, Sakshi; Scobey, Trevor D; Osswald, Heather L; Whitmore, Alan; Gopal, Robin; Ghosh, Arun K; Mesecar, Andrew; Zambon, Maria; Heise, Mark; Denison, Mark R; Baric, Ralph S

    2014-03-25

    Cross-species transmission of zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs) can result in pandemic disease outbreaks. Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), identified in 2012, has caused 182 cases to date, with ~43% mortality, and no small animal model has been reported. MERS-CoV and Pipistrellus bat coronavirus (BtCoV) strain HKU5 of Betacoronavirus (β-CoV) subgroup 2c share >65% identity at the amino acid level in several regions, including nonstructural protein 5 (nsp5) and the nucleocapsid (N) protein, which are significant drug and vaccine targets. BtCoV HKU5 has been described in silico but has not been shown to replicate in culture, thus hampering drug and vaccine studies against subgroup 2c β-CoVs. We report the synthetic reconstruction and testing of BtCoV HKU5 containing the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein ectodomain (BtCoV HKU5-SE). This virus replicates efficiently in cell culture and in young and aged mice, where the virus targets airway and alveolar epithelial cells. Unlike some subgroup 2b SARS-CoV vaccines that elicit a strong eosinophilia following challenge, we demonstrate that BtCoV HKU5 and MERS-CoV N-expressing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle (VRP) vaccines do not cause extensive eosinophilia following BtCoV HKU5-SE challenge. Passage of BtCoV HKU5-SE in young mice resulted in enhanced virulence, causing 20% weight loss, diffuse alveolar damage, and hyaline membrane formation in aged mice. Passaged virus was characterized by mutations in the nsp13, nsp14, open reading frame 5 (ORF5) and M genes. Finally, we identified an inhibitor active against the nsp5 proteases of subgroup 2c β-CoVs. Synthetic-genome platforms capable of reconstituting emerging zoonotic viral pathogens or their phylogenetic relatives provide new strategies for identifying broad-based therapeutics, evaluating vaccine outcomes, and studying viral pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE The 2012 outbreak of MERS-CoV raises the specter

  11. Putative canine origin of rotavirus strain detected in a child with diarrhea, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang-Tzy; Bányai, Krisztián; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Jiang, Baoming; Gentsch, Jon R

    2012-02-01

    Rotavirus G3P[3] strains have been reported from a variety of species including humans, cats, dogs, monkeys, goats, and cows. Here, we report the characterization of the first human G3P[3] rotavirus from East Asia identified in a 2-year-old child who was treated in a hospital's emergency ward in Taiwan in February 2005. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a close genetic relationship between the VP4, VP6, VP7, and NSP4 genes of Taiwanese G3P[3] strain 04-94s51 and an Italian canine strain isolated a decade ago, suggesting a canine origin for the Taiwanese strain. In contrast, the Taiwanese strain was only moderately related to well-characterized canine-origin human G3P[3] strains Ro1845 and HCR3, suggesting a distinct origin for the rotavirus strain from Taiwan. PMID:22022813

  12. Novel canine bocavirus strain associated with severe enteritis in a dog litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodewes, Rogier; Lapp, Stefanie; Hahn, Kerstin; Habierski, André; Förster, Christine; König, Matthias; Wohlsein, Peter; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Bocaviruses are small non-enveloped viruses with a linear ssDNA genome, that belong to the genus Bocaparvovirus of the subfamiliy Parvovirinae. Bocavirus infections are associated with a wide spectrum of disease in humans and various mammalian species. Here we describe a fatal enteritis associated with infection with a novel strain of canine bocavirus 2 (CaBoV-2), that occurred in a litter of German wirehaired pointers. Necropsy performed on three puppies revealed an enteritis reminiscent of canine parvovirus associated enteritis, accompanied with signs of lymphocytolytic disease in bone marrow, spleen, lymph nodes and thymus. While other major causes of enteritis of young dogs, including canine parvovirus, were excluded, by random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel CaBoV-2 strain was detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome of this novel canine bocavirus strain indicated that this virus was indeed most closely related to group 2 canine bocaviruses. Infection with canine bocavirus was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of CaBoV-2 nucleic acid in the intestinal tract and lymphoid tissues of the dogs. In a small-scale retrospective analysis concerning the role of CaBoV-2 no additional cases were identified. The findings of this study provide novel insights into the pathogenicity of canine bocaviruses.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Austrian canine distemper virus strains from clinical samples from dogs and wild carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetka, V; Leschnik, M; Affenzeller, N; Möstl, K

    2011-04-01

    Austrian field cases of canine distemper (14 dogs, one badger [Meles meles] and one stone marten [Martes foina]) from 2002 to 2007 were investigated and the case histories were summarised briefly. Phylogenetic analysis of fusion (F) and haemagglutinin (H) gene sequences revealed different canine distemper virus (CDV) lineages circulating in Austria. The majority of CDV strains detected from 2002 to 2004 were well embedded in the European lineage. One Austrian canine sample detected in 2003, with a high similarity to Hungarian sequences from 2005 to 2006, could be assigned to the Arctic group (phocine distemper virus type 2-like). The two canine sequences from 2007 formed a clearly distinct group flanked by sequences detected previously in China and the USA on an intermediate position between the European wildlife and the Asia-1 cluster. The Austrian wildlife strains (2006 and 2007) could be assigned to the European wildlife group and were most closely related to, yet clearly different from, the 2007 canine samples. To elucidate the epidemiological role of Austrian wildlife in the transmission of the disease to dogs and vice versa, H protein residues related to receptor and host specificity (residues 530 and 549) were analysed. All samples showed the amino acids expected for their host of origin, with the exception of a canine sequence from 2007, which had an intermediate position between wildlife and canine viral strains. In the period investigated, canine strains circulating in Austria could be assigned to four different lineages reflecting both a high diversity and probably different origins of virus introduction to Austria in different years.

  14. First Genome Sequence of a Canine Distemper Virus Strain from South America

    OpenAIRE

    Sarute, Nicolás; Delgado, María V.; Carrau, Lucía; Benech, Alejandro; Francia, Lourdes; Pérez, Ruben; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus causes a severe infectious disease in carnivores worldwide. Herein, we sequenced and analyzed the genome of a new strain (Uy251/2012) isolated from a dog in Uruguay. The Uy251/2012 strain belongs to the Europe1/South America1 lineage, and constitutes the first report of a genomic sequence in South America.

  15. Canine-origin G3P[3] rotavirus strain in child with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, Simona; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Gòmara, Miren Iturriza; Ramirez, Stefania; Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Arista, Serenella

    2007-07-01

    Infection by an animal-like strain of rotavirus (PA260/97) was diagnosed in a child with gastroenteritis in Palermo, Italy, in 1997. Sequence analysis of VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes showed resemblance to a G3P[3] canine strain identified in Italy in 1996. Dogs are a potential source of human viral pathogens. PMID:18214189

  16. Canine-Origin G3P[3] Rotavirus Strain in Child with Acute Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    De Grazia, Simona; Martella, Vito; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Gòmara, Miren Iturriza; Ramirez, Stefania; Cascio, Antonio; Colomba, Claudia; Arista, Serenella

    2007-01-01

    Infection by an animal-like strain of rotavirus (PA260/97) was diagnosed in a child with gastroenteritis in Palermo, Italy, in 1997. Sequence analysis of VP7, VP4, VP6, and NSP4 genes showed resemblance to a G3P[3] canine strain identified in Italy in 1996. Dogs are a potential source of human viral pathogens.

  17. Canine coronavirus (CCoV in dogs vaccinated and unvaccinated domiciliated in Pelotas, RS, Brazil Coronavirus canino (CCoV em cães vacinados e não vacinados domiciliados em Pelotas, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geferson Fischer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Canine coronavirus (CCoV has been reported causing enteric disease mainly in young pups. In this study, to investigate immunity and exposure to CCoV, was estimated the frequency of serum antibodies to CCoV in 121 dogs in the Pelotas, South of Brazil, by serum neutralization test (SN: 22 had not been vaccinated, 69 had been vaccinated at least once, and 30 had unknown vaccination history. Antibodies were present in 47,8% (33/69 of the vaccinated dogs, in 45,5% (10/22 of the unvaccinated, and in 43,3% (13/30 of the dogs with unknown historical vaccination. There was no significant relationship between these antibodies and sex, age, habitat, and season of collection. The results proved the circulation of the CCoV among this dog population and indicated that the infection affects a significant group of animals. The large proportion of seronegative vaccinated dogs indicates failure of CCoV vaccine in inducing neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that immunizations to CCoV should be reevaluated. The authors indicate the need for further studies in order to evaluate the impact of the infection caused by CCoV, as well as to propose and evaluate preventive measures. Coronavírus canino (CCoV foi relatado como causa de doença entérica principalmente em cães jovens. Nesse estudo, para investigar imunidade e exposição ao CCoV, foi estimado a frequência de anticorpos em 121 cães de Pelotas, sul do Brasil, pelo teste de soro-neutralização (SN: 22 não haviam sido vacinados, 69 haviam sido vacinados com pelo menos uma dose, e 30 possuíam histórico de vacinação desconhecido. Foram detectados anticorpos em 47,8% (33/69 dos cães vacinados, em 45,5% (10/22 dos não vacinados, e em 43,3% (13/30 dos cães com histórico de vacinação desconhecido. Não houve associação significativa entre os anticorpos e sexo, idade, habitação e estação da coleta. Os resultados confirmam a circulação do CCoV entre essa população de cães e indicam que a infec

  18. STRAIN ELASTOGRAPHY USING DOBUTAMINE-INDUCED CAROTID ARTERY PULSATION IN CANINE THYROID GLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gahyun; Jeon, Sunghoon; Lee, Sang-Kwon; Kim, Hyunwoo; Yu, Dohyeon; Choi, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease is common in dogs and conventional ultrasonography is a standard diagnostic test for diagnosis and treatment planning. Strain elastography can provide additional information about tissue stiffness noninvasively after applying external or internal compression. However, natural carotid artery pulsations in the canine thyroid gland are too weak to maintain sufficient internal compression force. The objective of the present study was to describe the feasibility of strain elastography for evaluating the canine thyroid gland and the repeatability of dobutamine-induced carotid artery pulsation as an internal compression method. In seven healthy Beagle dogs, strain on each thyroid lobe was induced by external compression using the ultrasound probe and internal compression using carotid artery pulsation after dobutamine infusion. The thyroid appeared homogeneously green and the subcutaneous fat superficial to the thyroid lobe appeared blue. Strain values and strain ratios did not differ among dogs or between the left and right lobes. Interobserver repeatability was excellent for both compression methods. Intraobserver repeatability of the strain ratio measured using the carotid artery pulsation method (intraclass coefficient correlation = 0.933) was higher than that measured using the external compression method (0.760). Mean strain values of thyroid lobes for the external compression method (142.93 ± 6.67) differed from the internal method (147.31 ± 8.24; P thyroid stiffness in dogs. Carotid artery pulsation induced by dobutamine infusion can be used for canine thyroid strain elastography with excellent repeatability.

  19. Viable intestinal passage of a canine jejunal commensal strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yurui; Saris, Per E J

    2014-10-01

    The strain Lactobacillus acidophilus LAB20 with immunomodulatory properties was previously found dominant in the jejunal chyme of four dogs, and the novel surface layer protein of LAB20 suggested its competitive colonization in canine gut. To evaluate the persistence and survival of LAB20 in healthy dogs, LAB20 was fed to five healthy pet dogs for 3 days, at a dosage of 10(8) CFU daily as fermented milk supplement. The fecal samples, from 1 day prior to feeding, three continuous feeding days, and on day 5, 7, 14, and 21, were collected for strain-specific detection of LAB20 using real-time PCR. We found that LAB20 count was significantly increased in dog fecal samples at the second feeding day, but rapidly decreased after feeding ceased. The fecal samples from prior to feeding, during feeding, and post-cessation days were plated onto mLBS7 agar, from where LAB20 was recovered and distinguishable from other fecal lactobacilli based on its colony morphotype. Using strain-specific PCR detection, the colonies were further verified as LAB20 indicating that LAB20 can survive through the passage of the canine intestine. This study suggested that canine-derived strain LAB20 maintained at high numbers during feeding, viably transited through the dog gut, and could be identified based on its colony morphotype. PMID:24849733

  20. Coronaviruses (MERS and SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the globe have initiated studies to understand the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)—and how to stop it. Coronaviruses About Coronaviruses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) ...

  1. Canine rotavirus C strain detected in Hungary shows marked genotype diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Szilvia; Mihalov-Kovács, Eszter; Dóró, Renáta; Csata, Tünde; Fehér, Enikő; Oldal, Miklós; Jakab, Ferenc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-10-01

    Species C rotaviruses (RVC) have been identified in humans and animals, including pigs, cows and ferrets. In dogs, RVC strains have been reported anecdotally on the basis of visualization of rotavirus-like virions by electron microscopy combined with specific electrophoretic migration patterns of the genomic RNA segments. However, no further molecular characterization of these viruses was performed. Here, we report the detection of a canine RVC in the stool of a dog with enteritis. Analysis of the complete viral genome uncovered distinctive genetic features of the identified RVC strain. The genes encoding VP7, VP4 and VP6 were distantly related to those of other RVC strains and were putatively classified as G10, P8 and I8, respectively. The new strain was named RVC/Dog-wt/HUN/KE174/2012/G10P[8]. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that canine RVC was most closely related to bovine RVC strains with the exception of the NSP4 gene, which clustered together with porcine RVC strains. These findings provide further evidence for the genetic diversity of RVC strains. PMID:26297005

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Nonhemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype V Strain 1, Isolated from the Buccal Cavity of a Canine

    OpenAIRE

    Harden, Leeanne K.; Morales, Karina M.; Hughey, Jeffery R.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence from a nonhemolytic strain of Streptococcus agalactiae from the oral cavity of a canine was assembled. The genome is 2,165,968 bp, contains 2,055 genes, and is classified as group B streptococcus (GBS) serotype V, strain 1. A comparison to other S. agalactiae sequences shows high gene synteny with human and bovine strains.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Nonhemolytic Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype V Strain 1, Isolated from the Buccal Cavity of a Canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Leeanne K; Morales, Karina M; Hughey, Jeffery R

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence from a nonhemolytic strain of Streptococcus agalactiae from the oral cavity of a canine was assembled. The genome is 2,165,968 bp, contains 2,055 genes, and is classified as group B streptococcus (GBS) serotype V, strain 1. A comparison to other S. agalactiae sequences shows high gene synteny with human and bovine strains. PMID:26823579

  4. Heterogeneity within the hemagglutinin genes of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains detected in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Cirone, F.; Elia, G.;

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral pathogen causing lethal disease in dogs and other mammalians. A high degree of genetic variation is found between recent CDV strains and the old CDV isolates used in the vaccines and such genetic variation is regarded as a possible cause...... of the increasing number of CDV-related diseases in dogs. The H gene shows the greatest extent of genetic variation that allows for distinction of various lineages, according to a geographical pattern of distribution and irrespective of the species of identification. In the present study, hemagglutinin (H) genes...... obtained from field strains detected from clinical specimens of Italian dogs were analyzed genetically. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that a homogeneous group of CDV strains is widespread in Italian dogs, all which are included into the European lineage. Unexpectedly, strains 179/04 and 48/05 clustered...

  5. Molecular characteristics of a novel strain of canine minute virus associated with hepatitis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Jung, Ji-Youl; Lee, Jae-Il; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2016-08-01

    A 5-year-old female Yorkshire terrier dog died a few days following hernia and ovariohysterectomy surgeries. Necropsy performed on the dog revealed that the surgeries were not the cause of death; however, degenerative viral hepatitis, showing intranuclear inclusion bodies in hepatic cells, was observed in histopathologic examination. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for the cause of disease, and minute virus of canines (MVC) was detected in all parenchymal organs, including the liver. Other pathogens that may cause degenerative viral hepatitis were not found. Infection with MVC was confirmed by in situ hybridization, which revealed the presence of MVC nucleic acid in the liver tissue of the dog. Through sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete genome sequence, the strain was found to be distinct from other previously reported MVC strains. These results indicate that this novel MVC strain might be related to degenerative viral hepatitis in dogs. PMID:27251050

  6. Lights and shades on an historical vaccine canine distemper virus, the Rockborn strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Elia, G.;

    2011-01-01

    Both egg- and cell-adapted canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccines are suspected to retain residual virulence, especially if administered to immuno-suppressed animals, very young pups or to highly susceptible animal species. In the early 1980s, post-vaccine encephalitis was reported in dogs from...... in the sequence databases. Also, Rockborn-like strains were identified in two vaccines currently in the market. These findings indicate that Rockborn-like viruses may be recovered from dogs or other carnivores with distemper, suggesting cases of residual virulence of vaccines, or circulation of vaccine...

  7. Bovine coronavirus hemagglutinin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, B; Potts, B J; Brian, D A

    1985-02-01

    Treatment of purified bovine coronavirus (Mebus strain) with pronase destroyed the integrity of virion surface glycoproteins gp140, gp120, gp100, reduced the amount of gp26 and destroyed the hemagglutinating activity of the virus. Bromelain, on the other hand, destroyed the integrity of gp120, gp100 and gp26 but failed to remove gp140 and failed to destroy viral hemagglutinating activity. These experiments suggest that gp140 is the virion hemagglutinin. Immunoblotting studies using monospecific antiserum demonstrate that gp140 is a disulfide-linked dimeric structure reducible to monomers of 65 kDa.

  8. Full-genome sequencing of a Hungarian canine G3P[3] Rotavirus A strain reveals high genetic relatedness with a historic Italian human strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, H; Mihalov-Kovács, E; Dóró, R; Marton, S; Farkas, S L; Giammanco, G M; De Grazia, S; Martella, V; Bányai, K

    2015-04-01

    A canine Rotavirus A strain was identified in the fecal specimen of a young dog during 2012 in Hungary. The strain RVA/Dog-wt/HUN/135/2012/G3P[3] shared complete genotype constellation (G3-P[3]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A15-N2-T3-E3-H6) and high genome sequence similarity (nt, 98.8 %) with a historic human strain, RVA/Human-tc/ITA/PA260-97/1997/G3P[3]. This study provides evidence for the canine origin of the unusual NSP1 genotype, A15, and reinforces the hypothesis of direct interspecies transmission of canine rotaviruses to humans. PMID:25634124

  9. Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Strain Snyder Hill Expressing Green or Red Fluorescent Proteins Causes Meningoencephalitis in the Ferret

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludlow, M.; Nguyen, D. T.; Silin, D.; Lyubomska, O.; de Vries, R. D.; von Messling, V.; McQuaid, S.; De Swart, R. L.; Duprex, W. P.

    2012-01-01

    The propensity of canine distemper virus (CDV) to spread to the central nervous system is one of the primary features of distemper. Therefore, we developed a reverse genetics system based on the neurovirulent Snyder Hill (SH) strain of CDV (CDVSH) and show that this virus rapidly circumvents the blo

  10. Recombinant canine distemper virus strain snyder hill expressing green or red fluorescent proteins causes meningoencephalitis in the ferret

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); D.T. Nguyen (Tien); D. Silin; O. Lyubomska; R.D. de Vries (Rory); V. von Messling; S. McQuaid (Stephen); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe propensity of canine distemper virus (CDV) to spread to the central nervous system is one of the primary features of distemper. Therefore, we developed a reverse genetics system based on the neurovirulent Snyder Hill (SH) strain of CDV (CDVSH) and show that this virus rapidly circumv

  11. Humoral immune responses in rabbits induced by an experimental inactivated severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus vaccine prepared from F69 strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传海; 郭中敏; 郑焕英; 陆家海; 王一飞; 鄢心革; 赵勇; 杜雄威; 张欣; 方苓; 凌文华; 戚树源; 余新炳; 钟南山

    2004-01-01

    Background The etiologic agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been confirmed to be a novel coronavirus (CoV), namely SARS-CoV. Developing safe and effective SARS-CoV vaccines is essential for us to prevent the possible reemergence of its epidemic. Previous experiences indicate that inactivated vaccine is conventional and more hopeful to be successfully developed. Immunogenicity evaluation of an experimental inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine in rabbits was conducted and reported in this paper.Methods The large-scale cultured SARS-CoV F69 strain was inactivated with 0.4% formaldehyde and purified, then used as the immunogen combined with Freund's adjuvant. Eight adult New Zealand rabbits were immunized four times with this experimental inactivated vaccine. Twelve sets of rabbit serum were sampled from the third day to the seventy-fourth day after the first vaccination. The titers of specific anti-SARS-CoV IgG antibody were determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the neutralizing antibody titers were detected with micro-cytopathic effect neutralization test.Conclusions The inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine made from F69 strain owns strong immunogenicity, and the cross neutralization response between the two different SARS-CoV strains gives a hint of the similar neutralizing epitopes, which provide stable bases for the development of inactivated SARS-CoV vaccines.

  12. Synbiotic administration of canine-derived strain Lactobacillus fermentum CCM 7421 and inulin to healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strompfová, Viola; Lauková, Andrea; Cilik, Dušan

    2013-05-01

    The canine-derived strain Lactobacillus fermentum CCM 7421 has been demonstrated to exert certain health benefits as a probiotic in dogs. Synbiotic combinations are widely used but are rarely studied in dogs. In this study the prebiotic inulin in combination with L. fermentum CCM 7421 was tested for its effects on faecal microbial populations, faecal characteristics, and blood biochemistry in canine experiments. Healthy adult dogs (n = 36) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups (12 dogs/treatment): (i) the control group (C), (ii) the probiotic group (LF group: L. fermentum CCM 7421, 10(8) CFU/mL of Ringer buffer, 0.1 mL/kg of body mass), and (iii) the synbiotic group (LF+I group: L. fermentum CCM 7421 + inulin (I; Raftifeed IPS) added as 1% of diet). The experiment lasted for 7 weeks with a 2-week treatment period. We detected a significant increase of lactic acid bacteria (LF versus C, day 7; LF versus C and LF versus LF+I, days 28 and 49), a decrease of clostridia (LF versus C, day 14), a lower pH value (LF versus LF+I, day 28), and a higher ammonia concentration (LF versus LF+I, days 14 and 49) in faecal samples. The synbiotic LF+I combination did not intensify the probiotic L. fermentum CCM 7421 efficacy, but its slight laxative effect can be useful to prevent constipation, e.g., in senior dogs.

  13. Multiple reassortment and interspecies transmission events contribute to the diversity of feline, canine and feline/canine-like human group A rotavirus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; De Grazia, Simona; Piessens, Jan; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Giammanco, Giovanni M; Bányai, Krisztián; Buonavoglia, Canio; Ciarlet, Max; Martella, Vito; Van Ranst, Marc

    2011-08-01

    RNA-RNA hybridization assays and complete genome sequence analyses have shown that feline rotavirus (FRV) and canine rotavirus (CRV) strains display at least two distinct genotype constellations (genogroups), represented by the FRV strain RVA/Cat-tc/AUS/Cat97/1984/G3P[3] and the human rotavirus (HRV) strain RVA/Human-tc/JPN/AU-1/1982/G3P3[9], respectively. G3P[3] and G3P[9] strains have been detected sporadically in humans. The complete genomes of two CRV strains (RVA/Dog-tc/ITA/RV198-95/1995/G3P[3] and RVA/Dog-tc/ITA/RV52-96/1996/G3P[3]) and an unusual HRV strain (RVA/Human-tc/ITA/PA260-97/1997/G3P[3]) were determined to further elucidate the complex relationships among FRV, CRV and HRV strains. The CRV strains RV198-95 and RV52-96 were shown to possess a Cat97-like genotype constellation. However, 3 and 5 genes of RV198-95 and RV52-96, respectively, were found in distinct subclusters of the same genotypes, suggesting the occurrence of reassortment events among strains belonging to this FRV/CRV/HRV genogroup. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of the HRV strain PA260-97 showed that (i) 8 genome segments (VP3, VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP2-5) clustered closely with RV198-95 and/or RV52-96; (ii) 2 genome segments (VP1 and VP2) were more closely related to HRV AU-1; and (iii) 1 genome segment (NSP1) was distantly related to any other established NSP1 genotypes and was ratified as a new NSP1 genotype, A15. These findings suggest that the human strain PA260-97 has a history of zoonotic transmission and is likely a reassortant among FRV/CRV strains from the Cat97 and AU-1-like genogroups. In addition, a potential third BA222-05-like genogroup of FRV and HRV strains should be recognized, consisting of rotavirus strains with a stable genetic genotype constellation of genes also partially related to bovine rotavirus (BRV) and bovine-like rotaviruses. The detailed phylogenetic analysis indicated that three major genotype constellations exist among FRV, CRV and feline/canine-like HRV

  14. Intrahost Diversity of Feline Coronavirus: A Consensus between the Circulating Virulent/Avirulent Strains and the Internal Mutation Hypotheses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline S. Hora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the most controversial issue concerning current feline coronavirus (FCoV virology, the coexisting hypotheses of the intrahost and interhost origins of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV in regard to the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, this study aimed to assess the molecular diversity of the membrane gene FCoVs in 190 samples from 10 cats with signs of FIP and in 5 faecal samples from cats without signs of FIP. All samples from the non-FIP cats and 25.26% of the samples from the FIP cats were positive for the FCoV membrane (M gene. Mutations in this gene consisted of SNP changes randomly scattered among the sequences; few mutations resulted in amino acid changes. No geographic pattern was observed. Of the cats without FIP that harboured FECoV, the amino acid sequence identities for the M gene were 100% among cats (Cats 1–3 from the same cattery, and the overall sequence identity for the M gene was ≥91%. In one cat, two different lineages of FCoV, one enteric and one systemic, were found that segregated apart in the M gene tree. In conclusion, the in vivo mutation transition hypothesis and the circulating high virulent-low virulent FCoV hypothesis have been found to be plausible according to the results obtained from sequencing the M gene.

  15. Comparison of serological reactions of typed Fusobacterium nucleatum strains with those of isolates from humans, canines, and a Macaca mulatta monkey.

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, J W; Falkler, W A; Craig, J A

    1983-01-01

    In the present study, we compared typed F. nucleatum strains with isolates from various human periodontal diseases, canines, and a Macaca mulatta monkey. All isolates displayed biochemical reactions similar to those of the typed strains in the API 20A system (Analytab Products, Plainville, N.Y.). The human and monkey isolates displayed both type I and type II colonial morphologies on crystal violet erythromycin agar, whereas the canine isolates displayed only type I. Antigen preparations of t...

  16. Genotyping and Descriptive Proteomics of a Potential Zoonotic Canine Strain of Giardia duodenalis, Infective to Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Camila Henriques; Costa, Adriana Oliveira; Silva, Ana Carolina Carvalho; Pucci, Maíra Mazzoni; Serufo, Angela Vieira; Busatti, Haendel Goncalves Nogueira Oliveira; Durigan, Maurício; Perales, Jonas; Chapeaurouge, Alex; da Silva e Silva, Daniel Almeida; Gomes, Maria Aparecida; Toledo, Juliano Simões; Singer, Steven M.; Silva-Pereira, Rosiane A.; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    The zoonotic potential of giardiasis, as proposed by WHO since the late 70's, has been largely confirmed in this century. The genetic assemblages A and B of Giardia duodenalis are frequently isolated from human and canine hosts. Most of the assemblage A strains are not infective to adult mice, which can limit the range of studies regarding to biology of G. duodenalis, including virulence factors and the interaction with host immune system. This study aimed to determine the infectivity in mice of an assemblage A Giardia duodenalis strain (BHFC1) isolated from a dog and to classify the strain in sub-assemblages (AI, AII, AIII) through the phylogenetic analysis of beta-giardin (bg), triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) genes. In addition, the proteomic profile of soluble and insoluble protein fractions of trophozoites was analyzed by 2D-electrophoresis. Accordingly, trophozoites of BHFC1 were highly infective to Swiss mice. The phylogenetic analysis of tpi and gdh revealed that BHFC1 clustered to sub-assemblage AI. The proteomic map of soluble and insoluble protein fractions led to the identification of 187 proteins of G. duodenalis, 27 of them corresponding to hypothetical proteins. Considering both soluble and soluble fractions, the vast majority of the identified proteins (n = 82) were classified as metabolic proteins, mainly associated with carbon and lipid metabolism, including 53 proteins with catalytic activity. Some of the identified proteins correspond to antigens while others can be correlated with virulence. Besides a significant complementation to the proteomic data of G. duodenalis, these data provide an important source of information for future studies on various aspects of the biology of this parasite, such as virulence factors and host and pathogen interactions. PMID:27760188

  17. Complement-Mediated Neutralization of Canine Distemper Virus In Vitro: Cross-Reaction between Vaccine Onderstepoort and Field KDK-1 Strains with Different Hemagglutinin Gene Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Mochizuki, Masami; Motoyoshi, Megumi; Maeda, Ken; Kai, Kazunari

    2002-01-01

    The properties of neutralization of antigens of canine distemper virus Onderstepoort and a recent field isolate, KDK-1, were investigated with strain-specific dog sera. A conventional neutralization assay indicated antigenic dissimilarity between the strains; however, when guinea pig complement was included in the reaction mixture, the strains were neutralized with not only the homologous but also the heterologous antibodies.

  18. Canine kobuviruses in diarrhoeic dogs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Barbara; Di Felice, Elisabetta; Ceci, Chiara; Di Profio, Federica; Marsilio, Fulvio

    2013-09-27

    Canine kobuviruses (CaKVs) are newly recognized picornaviruses recently detected in dogs in the US. By molecular analysis of the whole genome, CaKV that appeared genetically closest to the murine kobuvirus (MuKV) and to the human Aichi virus (AiV), may be classified in the Kobuvirus genus as new genotype (CaKV type 1) within the species Aichivirus A. To date, there are no information on the epidemiology of these novel viruses in other continents. In this study, by screening a collection of 256 dog fecal samples either from diarrhoeic or asymptomatic animals, CaKV was identified in six specimens with an overall prevalence of 2.34% (6/256). All the positive dogs presented diarrhea and were found to be infected by CaKV alone or in mixed infections with canine coronavirus (CCoV) and/or canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2). By molecular analysis of the partial 3D gene, all the strains detected displayed a close relatedness with the CaKVs recently identified in the US. This study provides evidence that CaKVs circulate in diarrhoeic dogs in Italy and are not geographically restricted to the North American continent, where they were first signaled. PMID:23806200

  19. Antagonistic pleiotropy and fitness trade-offs reveal specialist and generalist traits in strains of canine distemper virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko M Nikolin

    Full Text Available Theoretically, homogeneous environments favor the evolution of specialists whereas heterogeneous environments favor generalists. Canine distemper is a multi-host carnivore disease caused by canine distemper virus (CDV. The described cell receptor of CDV is SLAM (CD150. Attachment of CDV hemagglutinin protein (CDV-H to this receptor facilitates fusion and virus entry in cooperation with the fusion protein (CDV-F. We investigated whether CDV strains co-evolved in the large, homogeneous domestic dog population exhibited specialist traits, and strains adapted to the heterogeneous environment of smaller populations of different carnivores exhibited generalist traits. Comparison of amino acid sequences of the SLAM binding region revealed higher similarity between sequences from Canidae species than to sequences from other carnivore families. Using an in vitro assay, we quantified syncytia formation mediated by CDV-H proteins from dog and non-dog CDV strains in cells expressing dog, lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from dog strains produced significantly higher values with cells expressing dog SLAM than with cells expressing lion or cat SLAM. CDV-H proteins from strains of non-dog species produced similar values in all three cell types, but lower values in cells expressing dog SLAM than the values obtained for CDV-H proteins from dog strains. By experimentally changing one amino acid (Y549H in the CDV-H protein of one dog strain we decreased expression of specialist traits and increased expression of generalist traits, thereby confirming its functional importance. A virus titer assay demonstrated that dog strains produced higher titers in cells expressing dog SLAM than cells expressing SLAM of non-dog hosts, which suggested possible fitness benefits of specialization post-cell entry. We provide in vitro evidence for the expression of specialist and generalist traits by CDV strains, and fitness trade-offs across carnivore host environments caused by

  20. Establishment of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection and differentiation of canine distemper virus infected and vaccinated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Fei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Tian, Jin; Jiang, Yi-Tong; Zhang, Xiao-Zhan; Chai, Hong-Liang; Yang, Tian-Kuo; Yin, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Liu, Ming; Hua, Yu-Ping; Qu, Lian-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Although widespread vaccination against canine distemper virus (CDV) has been conducted for many decades, several canine distemper outbreaks in vaccinated animals have been reported frequently. In order to detect and differentiate the wild-type and vaccine strains of the CDV from the vaccinated animals, a novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method was developed. A set of four primers-two internal and two external-were designed to target the H gene for the specific detection of wild-type CDV variants. The CDV-H RT-LAMP assay rapidly amplified the target gene, within 60 min, using a water bath held at a constant temperature of 65°C. The assay was 100-fold more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, with a detection limit of 10(-1)TCID50ml(-1). The system showed a preference for wild-type CDV, and exhibited less sensitivity to canine parvovirus, canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2, canine coronavirus, and canine parainfluenza virus. The assay was validated using 102 clinical samples obtained from vaccinated dog farms, and the results were comparable to a multiplex nested RT-PCR assay. The specific CDV-H RT-LAMP assay provides a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for the detection of canines infected with wild-type CDV from canines vaccinated with attenuated vaccine. PMID:25769803

  1. Detection of human coronavirus strain HKU1 in a 2 years old girl with asthma exacerbation caused by acute pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Razieh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory viral infections can trigger asthma attack which may lead to sever morbidity. In this report, using molecular methods, we show the chronological association between human coronavirus - HKU1 infection and asthma exacerbation in a two years and seven months old asthmatic girl who was not under treatment and was otherwise healthy.

  2. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Bin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV, named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N, phosphoprotein (P and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China.

  3. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems for the serology and antigen detection in parvovirus, coronavirus and rotavirus infections in dogs in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Groen (Jan); H.F. Egberink (Herman); G.H.A. Borst; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractComplex trapping blocking (CTB) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect ELISAs for the detection of antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV) and rotavirus in sera of dogs were established. Double antibody sandwich ELISAs for the detection of CPV-,

  4. Recent epidemiological status of canine viral enteric infections and Giardia infection in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M; Hashimoto, M; Ishida, T

    2001-05-01

    Epidemiology of canine enteric infections was studied. Rectal swabs collected from 95 dogs presented at animal hospitals during a period from January to June of 2000 were examined for enteric pathogens, including viruses and Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia). Most frequently detected in both diarrheal and normal feces were canine coronavirus (55.4%) and G. lamblia (48.2%). Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) was specifically associated with diarrheal cases and CPV-2b was the predominant antigenic type. Although canine rotavirus, canine adenovirus, and canine distemper virus were also detected in a small number of diarrheal cases, no evidence for calicivirus infection was obtained. PMID:11411507

  5. Coronaviruses in brain tissue from patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dessau, R B; Lisby, G; Frederiksen, J L

    2001-01-01

    Brain tissue from 25 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS) and as controls brain tissue from 36 patients without neurological disease was tested for the presence of human coronaviral RNA. Four PCR assays with primers specific for N-protein of human coronavirus strain 229E...... and three PCR assays with primers specific for the nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus strain OC43 were performed. Sporadic positive PCR assays were observed in both patients and controls in some of the PCR assays. However, these results were not reproducible and there was no difference...

  6. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  7. Molecular detection and phylogenetic relationship of wild-type strains of canine distemper virus in symptomatic dogs from Uberlândia, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Headley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the occurrence of canine distemper virus (CDV by evaluating the presence of viral RNA within urine samples of dogs from Uberlândia, MG, with clinical manifestations suggestive of infection by CDV by targeting the CDV N gene. Of the clinical samples collected ( n =33, CDV viruria was detected in 45.5%. Five dogs died spontaneously; all had characteristic CDV-associated histopathological alterations and demonstrated CDV viruria. Statistical analyses revealed that the age, gender, breed, or the organ system of the dog affected had no influence on the occurrence of canine distemper. Myoclonus and motor incoordination were the most significant neurological manifestations observed. A direct association was observed between keratoconjunctivitis and dogs with CDV viruria. These findings suggest that CDV viruria in symptomatic dogs might not be age related, and that symptomatic dogs can demonstrate clinical manifestations attributed to CDV without viruria identified by RT-PCR. Additionally, the results of the sequence identities analysed have suggested that all Brazilian wild-type strains of CDV currently identified are closely related and probably originated from the same lineage of CDV. Nevertheless, phylogenetic analyses suggest that there are different clusters of wild-type strains of CDV circulating within urban canine populations in Brazil.

  8. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  9. Canine Distemper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of ... Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. And Now A Note On ...

  10. Complex evolutionary patterns of two rare human G3P[9] rotavirus strains possessing a feline/canine-like H6 genotype on an AU-1-like genotype constellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Hong; Pang, Bei-Bei; Zhou, Xuan; Ghosh, Souvik; Tang, Wei-Feng; Peng, Jin-Song; Hu, Quan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2013-06-01

    The group A rotavirus (RVA) G3P[9] is a rare VP7-VP4 genotype combination, detected occasionally in humans and cats. Other than the prototype G3P[9] strain, RVA/Human- tc/JPN/AU-l/1982/G3P3[9], the whole genomes of only two human G3P[9] RVA strains and two feline G3P[9] RVA strains have been analyzed so far, revealing complex evolutionary patterns, distinct from that of AU-1. We report here the whole genomic analyses of two human G3P[9] RVA strains, RVA/Human-tc/CHN/L621/2006/G3P[9] and RVA/Human-wt/CHN/E2451/2011/G3P[9], detected in patients with diarrhea in China. Strains L621 and E2451 possessed a H6 NSP5 genotype on an AU-1-like genotype constellation, not reported previously. However, not all the genes of L621 and E2451 were closely related to those of AU-1, or to each other, revealing different evolutionary patterns among the AU-1-like RVAs. The VP7, VP4, VP6 and NSP4 genes of E2451 and L621 were found to cluster together with human G3P[9] RVA strains believed to be of possible feline/canine origin, and feline or raccoon dog RVA strains. The VP1, VP3, NSP2 and NSP5 genes of E2451 and L621 formed distinct clusters in genotypes typically found in feline/canine RVA strains or RVA strains from other host species which are believed to be of feline/canine RVA origin. The VP2 genes of E2451 and L621, and NSP3 gene of L621 clustered among RVA strains from different host species which are believed to have a complete or partial feline/canine RVA origin. The NSP1 genes of E2451 and L621, and NSP3 gene of E2451 clustered with AU-1 and several other strains possessing a complete or partial feline RVA strain BA222-05-like genotype constellation. Taken together, these observations suggest that nearly all the eleven gene segments of G3P[9] RVA strains L621 and E2451 might have originated from feline/canine RVAs, and that reassortments may have occurred among these feline/canine RVA strains, before being transmitted to humans. PMID:23403096

  11. Canine leishmaniosis: in vitro efficacy of miltefosine and marbofloxacin alone or in combination with allopurinol against clinical strains of Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farca, Anna Maria; Miniscalco, B; Badino, P; Odore, R; Monticelli, P; Trisciuoglio, A; Ferroglio, E

    2012-06-01

    Despite the availability of different therapeutic options, canine visceral leishmaniosis (CVL) remains a challenging disease to treat. Recently miltefosine has been registered for use in dogs, and different studies have demonstrated its leishmanicidal effect. Moreover, it has been suggested that fluoroquinolones, compared to standard chemotherapeutic agents, could be an effective and pragmatic alternative to treat CVL. The efficacy of miltefosine and marbofloxacin alone or in combination with allopurinol against clinical strains of Leishmania infantum was assessed in vitro by incubating increasing concentrations of the drugs with a standard parasite inoculum. Miltefosine was significantly more efficacious than marbofloxacin (P < 0.05) against the two strains of L. infantum either alone or in combination with allopurinol. Both drugs were significantly (P < 0.05) more efficacious when associated with allopurinol than alone.

  12. Diagnostic Methods for Feline Coronavirus: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Sharif

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline coronaviruses (FCoVs are found throughout the world. Infection with FCoV can result in a diverse range of signs from clinically inapparent infections to a highly fatal disease called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP. FIP is one of the most serious viral diseases of cats. While there is neither an effective vaccine, nor a curative treatment for FIP, a diagnostic protocol for FCoV would greatly assist in the management and control of the virus. Clinical findings in FIP are non-specific and not helpful in making a differential diagnosis. Haematological and biochemical abnormalities in FIP cases are also non-specific. The currently available serological tests have low specificity and sensitivity for detection of active infection and cross-react with FCoV strains of low pathogenicity, the feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR has been used to detect FCoV and is rapid and sensitive, but results must be interpreted in the context of clinical findings. At present, a definitive diagnosis of FIP can be established only by histopathological examination of biopsies. This paper describes and compares diagnostic methods for FCoVs and includes a brief account of the virus biology, epidemiology, and pathogenesis.

  13. Amino Acid sequence analysis of the two major outer Capsid Proteins (VP7 and VP4 from human-derived canine G3P[3] Rotavirus Strain Detected in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Luchs

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A close look at the rotavirus group A (RVA genotypes in Brazil revealed the detection of a rare G3P[3] strain close related to canine strains. The aim of this study was to add to the already known genetic analysis by the description of the G3P[3] (IAL-R2638 strain amino acid characteristics. Methods: Amino acid sequence analysis and protein based trees were conducted using BioEdit and MEGA 4.0. Results: The VP7 and VP4 protein of the IAL-R2638 strain displayed the highest amino acid identity to the canine-derived human strain HCR3A (99.2%, and to the canine strain RV52/96 (96.4%, respectively. IAL-R2638 strain did not possess an extra VP7 N-linked glycosylation site at amino acid 238 recently described for some G3 strains, as well as RotaTeqTM G3 vaccine strain. The topology exhibited by phylogenetic trees in previous analysis were maintained in the present amino acid-based trees, reinforcing a stable relationship between G3P[3] strains. Conclusions: Amino acid analysis data were consistent with the previous sequence of data obtained for the IAL-R2638 strain, supporting its possible canine origin. Theoretically, RotaTeqTM vaccine could efficiently protect against G3P[3] infections based on the lack of the extra VP7 N-linked glycosylation site at amino acid 238. Phylogenetic analysis hypothesizes that all features undergo evolution independently of each other; however, unfavorable effects of nucleotide substitutions may be compensated by substitutions in other positions. The present study raises the question as to whether the amino acid-based trees could be applied as an approach to the study of RVA evolution, avoiding incorrect phylogenetic reconstructions.

  14. Soroprevalência das infecções por parvovírus, adenovírus, coronavírus canino e pelo vírus da cinomose em cães de Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Seroprevalence of parvovirus, adenovirus, coronavirus and canine distemper virus infections in dogs of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Dezengrini

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available As infecções pelo vírus da cinomose (CDV, por parvovírus (CPV, adenovírus (CAV e coronavírus (CCoV são importantes causas de morbidade e de mortalidade em cães de todo o mundo, porém pouco se sabe sobre a sua incidência e prevalência no Brasil. Para determinar-se a prevalência dessas infecções na população canina de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil, amostras de sangue foram coletadas de 817 cães não-vacinados de 14 bairros do município e testadas para a presença de anticorpos específicos. Anticorpos contra o CDV foram detectados em 27,3% (223/817 das amostras, contra o CPV em 68,7% (561/817, contra o CAV em 43% (353/817 e contra o CCoV em 50,4% (412/817 dos cães. Observou-se um aumento gradativo da prevalência de anticorpos de acordo com a idade para o CDV, o CAV e o CCoV. Os índices de positividade para o CPV, o CAV e o CCoV foram um pouco superiores entre machos, e semelhantes entre os sexos para o CDV. Os animais que convivem com outros cães em casa ou na rua apresentaram prevalência maior de anticorpos para o CDV e o CCoV do que cães sem contato ou convívio, enquanto que, para o CPV e o CAV, não houve diferença. Esses resultados demonstram que esses vírus estão difundidos na população canina dos bairros da cidade. Por outro lado, demonstram também que uma parte considerável da população é soronegativa e, portanto, está desprotegida frente a esses agentes, indicando a necessidade de se ampliar a cobertura vacinal.Canine distemper virus (CDV, parvovirus (CPV, adenovirus (CAV and coronavirus (CCoV infections have been associated with significant morbidity and mortality among dogs worldwide yet very little is known about these infections in Brazil. As to determine the prevalence of these infections in the canine population of Santa Maria, RS, Brazil, 817 blood samples were collected from non-vaccinated dogs of 14 neighborhoods and tested for specific antibodies. Antibodies to CDV were detected in 27.3% (223/817 of

  15. Coexistence of multiple coronaviruses in several bat colonies in an abandoned mineshaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xing-Yi; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Ben; Li, Bei; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Zhou, Ji-Hua; Luo, Chu-Ming; Yang, Xing-Lou; Wu, Li-Jun; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Yun; Li, Zong-Xiao; Shi, Zheng-Li

    2016-02-01

    Since the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak prompted a search for the natural reservoir of the SARS coronavirus, numerous alpha- and betacoronaviruses have been discovered in bats around the world. Bats are likely the natural reservoir of alpha- and betacoronaviruses, and due to the rich diversity and global distribution of bats, the number of bat coronaviruses will likely increase. We conducted a surveillance of coronaviruses in bats in an abandoned mineshaft in Mojiang County, Yunnan Province, China, from 2012-2013. Six bat species were frequently detected in the cave: Rhinolophus sinicus, Rhinolophus affinis, Hipposideros pomona, Miniopterus schreibersii, Miniopterus fuliginosus, and Miniopterus fuscus. By sequencing PCR products of the coronavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (RdRp), we found a high frequency of infection by a diverse group of coronaviruses in different bat species in the mineshaft. Sequenced partial RdRp fragments had 80%-99% nucleic acid sequence identity with well-characterized Alphacoronavirus species, including BtCoV HKU2, BtCoV HKU8, and BtCoV1, and unassigned species BtCoV HKU7 and BtCoV HKU10. Additionally, the surveillance identified two unclassified betacoronaviruses, one new strain of SARS-like coronavirus, and one potentially new betacoronavirus species. Furthermore, coronavirus co-infection was detected in all six bat species, a phenomenon that fosters recombination and promotes the emergence of novel virus strains. Our findings highlight the importance of bats as natural reservoirs of coronaviruses and the potentially zoonotic source of viral pathogens. PMID:26920708

  16. Titration of Human Coronaviruses Using an Immunoperoxidase Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Francine; Jacomy, Helene; Marceau, Gabriel; J. Talbot, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Calculation of infectious viral titers represents a basic and essential experimental approach for virologists. Classical plaque assays cannot be used for viruses that do not cause significant cytopathic effects, which is the case for strains 229E and OC43 of human coronavirus (HCoV). An alternative indirect immunoperoxidase assay (IPA) is herein described for the detection and titration of these viruses. Susceptible cells are inoculated with serial logarithmic dilutions of samples in a 96-wel...

  17. Clinical and serological response of wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) to vaccination against canine distemper, canine parvovirus infection and rabies

    OpenAIRE

    J. Van Heerden; J. Bingham; M. Van Vuuren; R.E.J. Burroughs; E. Stylianides

    2002-01-01

    Wild dogs Lycaon pictus (n = 8) were vaccinated 4 times against canine distemper (n = 8) (initially with inactivated and subsequently with live attenuated strains of canine distemper) and canine parvovirus infection (n = 8) over a period of 360 days. Four of the wild dogs were also vaccinated 3 times against rabies using a live oral vaccine and 4 with an inactivated parenteral vaccine. Commercially-available canine distemper, canine parvovirus and parenteral rabies vaccines, intended for use ...

  18. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 control claudin-2 expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney strain I and II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz, Joshua H; Li, Shixiong; Arisco, Amy; Balkovetz, Daniel F

    2005-02-01

    The tight junction of the epithelial cell determines the characteristics of paracellular permeability across epithelium. Recent work points toward the claudin family of tight junction proteins as leading candidates for the molecular components that regulate paracellular permeability properties in epithelial tissues. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) strain I and II cells are models for the study of tight junctions and based on transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) contain "tight" and "leaky" tight junctions, respectively. Overexpression studies suggest that tight junction leakiness in these two strains of MDCK cells is conferred by expression of the tight junction protein claudin-2. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation by hepatocyte growth factor treatment of MDCK strain II cells inhibited claudin-2 expression and transiently increased TER. This process was blocked by the ERK 1/2 inhibitor U0126. Transfection of constitutively active mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase into MDCK strain II cells also inhibited claudin-2 expression and increased TER. MDCK strain I cells have higher levels of active ERK 1/2 than do MDCK strain II cells. U0126 treatment of MDCK strain I cells decreased active ERK 1/2 levels, induced expression of claudin-2 protein, and decreased TER by approximately 20-fold. U0126 treatment also induced claudin-2 expression and decreased TER in a high resistance mouse cortical collecting duct cell line (94D). These data show for the first time that the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway negatively controls claudin-2 expression in mammalian renal epithelial cells and provide evidence for regulation of tight junction paracellular transport by alterations in claudin composition within tight junction complexes.

  19. Coronaviruses in polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Horzinek, M C; Van der Ende, A; Strous, G J; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Coronaviruses have a marked tropism for epithelial cells. In this paper the interactions of the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) with epithelial cells are compared. Porcine (LLC-PK1) and murine (mTAL) epithelial cells were grown on permeable supp

  20. Isolation and identification of a novel coronavirus from wild bird

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guihong; FU Jiadong; REN Tao; CAO Weisheng; LUO Kaijiang; XU Chenggang; XIN Chaoan; JIANG Jingwei; LIAO Ming

    2006-01-01

    A novel coronavirus strain was isolated from laryngotracheal swab of wild partridge and designated as partridge/GD/S14/2003 (S14). Its whole genomic sequence was obtained (GenBank Accession number: AY646283) through RT-PCR amplification,cloning, nucleotide sequencing, and analysis by the DNASTAR program. To investigate the origin of the virus, we further analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the main structural proteins, and compared those with other available virus isolates. Our results showed that the highest nucleotide homologies between the S1 gene of S14 strain and those of nephrogenic-type strains JX1-99 and TJ2-96 were 94.6%and 93.4 %, respectively. In addition, a relatively high genetic identity, 85 % and 84.3 %, respectively, was detected between S1 gene of S14 and those of strains QXIBV and LX4. The results suggested that the S14 strain may be originated from or related to nephrogenic-type and proventriculus-type infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). The highest nucleotide homology between the S2 gene of S14 strain and those of QXIBV and LX4 was 85 % and 84.3 %, respectively and all of them belonged to group Ⅱ coronaviruses. The highest nucleotide homology between the M gene of S14 strain and those of strains SAIB20 and GD6-98 was 90.6 % and 90.2 %, respectively by which S14 belonged to group Ⅲ. Although they displayed high level of genetic identity in S1 and S2 gene, there was lower homology of M coding sequences between S14 and BJ, and between S14 and QXIBV strains. Phylogenetic analysis of N gene indicated that group Ⅰ strains might evolve from RNA recombination between strain H52 and Gray; while group Ⅱ strains from strain H120 and D1466. S14 strain had the highest N gene homology with strain QXIBV which was 95.7%, thus classified as a group Ⅲ member. Strains SAIB20 and GD6-98 which were closely related to the M gene of S14 strain belonged to group Ⅰ and Ⅳ, respectively. A possible role of partridge S14 strain may play in the process of

  1. Isolation and identification of nine canine parvovirus CS strains%长沙9个犬细小病毒毒株的分离与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖博仁; 罗维; 刘崇灵; 李润成; 余兴龙

    2012-01-01

    从感染犬细小病毒(CPV)的长沙病犬粪便中分离CPV,采用同步接毒方式,将病毒悬液接种到猫肾细胞(F81),经PCR鉴定,从10份阳性样品中分离到9株CPV,血凝试验显示9株CPV均能凝集猪红细胞,血凝价均超过了27.为进一步分析CPV长沙毒株的VP2分子生物学特征及抗原变异规律,对9个CPV毒株的VP2基因进行克隆、测序及序列分析,结果表明:CPV长沙毒株与全国及世界各地CPV毒株相比,其VP2基因序列同源性超过97%,其VP2基因推导的氨基酸序列同源性超过94%;其VP2基因推导的氨基酸序列有独特的变异,且有独特变异的毒株在基因进化树上处于同一个分支.%Nine strains of canine parvovirus (CPV) were isolated using F81 cell from CPV positive feces collected from sick dogs in Changsha (CS), the CPV strains were confirmed by PCR and hemagglutination assay showed all the virus isolates could agglutinate red blood cell of pigs with the titers all above 27. To further identify molecular and biological characteristics and the antigen variation of these isolates, VP2 gene was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. The results showed that the identities of gene sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of CPV between the isolated strains and other reference strains were above 97% and 94%, respectively. And there were specific amino acid mutations in the VP2 of canine parvovirus CS strains.

  2. Nucleotide sequences of two fimbrial major subunit genes, pmpA and ucaA, from canine-uropathogenic Proteus mirabilis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, I G; van Dijk, L; Kusters, J G; Gaastra, W

    1995-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis strains were isolated from dogs with urinary tract infection (UTI) and fimbriae were prepared from two strains. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major fimbrial subunits were determined and both sequences appeared identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of a urinary cell adhesin (UCA) (Wray, S. K., Hull, S. I., Cook, R. G., Barrish, J. & Hull, R. A., 1986, Infect Immun 54, 43-49). The genes of two different major fimbrial subunits were cloned using oligonucleotide probes that were designed on the basis of the N-terminal UCA sequence. Nucleotide sequencing revealed the complete ucaA gene of 540 bp (from strain IVB247) encoding a polypeptide of 180 amino acids, including a 22 amino acid signal sequence peptide, and the pmpA (P. mirabilis P-like pili) gene of 549 bp (from strain IVB219) encoding a polypeptide of 183 amino acids, including a 23 amino acid signal sequence. Hybridization experiments gave clear indications of the presence of both kinds of fimbriae in many UTI-related canine P. mirabilis isolates. However, the presence of these fimbriae could not be demonstrated in P. vulgaris or other Proteus-related species. Database analysis of amino acid sequences of major subunit proteins revealed that the UcaA protein shares about 56% amino acid identity with the F17A and F111A major fimbrial subunits from bovine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In turn, the PmpA protein more closely resembled the pyelonephritis-associated pili (Pap)-like major subunit protein from UTI-related E. coli. The evolutionary relationship of UcaA, PmpA and various other fimbrial subunit proteins is presented in a phylogenetic tree.

  3. Proteolytic Activation of the Coronavirus Fusion Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicht, O.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped viruses with a positive-stranded RNA genome. They have been isolated from various mammals and birds and can cause severe diseases among farm and companion animals. Cross-species transmission of animal viruses and genuine human coronavirus infections pose a potential threa

  4. 半嵌套式PCR技术区别检测犬细小病毒疫苗株和强毒株的研究%Establishment of Polymerase Chain Reaction for Discrimination of Vaccine Strains of Canine parvovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘忠华; 钟翎; 黄韧; 程树军

    2003-01-01

    Two pairs of PCR primers were designed according to the sequances of the vaccine strain and virulent strain of CPV. Heminested PCR method was established. Result of the first PCR amplification showed the same amplified products of 574bp length, after the second PCR amplification, the virulent strain produced the length 364bp fragment, but the vaccine strain couldn'' t produce that. The products of PCR were examined by electrophoresis and restriction enzyme digestion. The result showed the length of the fragment and enzyme sites were as the same as those designed. The PCR assay of CPV was proved to be specific and sensitive. It shows that this method may be used in discriminating the vaccine strain and virulent strain of CPV or monitoring the vaccinated canine in order to aviod disease and financial losing.

  5. Antiviral Activity of Chloroquine against Human Coronavirus OC43 Infection in Newborn Mice▿

    OpenAIRE

    Keyaerts, Els; Li, Sandra; Vijgen, Leen; Rysman, Evelien; Verbeeck, Jannick; Van Ranst, Marc; Maes, Piet

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, human coronaviruses (HCoVs), such as HCoV strain OC43 (HCoV-OC43), were mainly known to cause 15 to 30% of mild upper respiratory tract infections. In recent years, the identification of new HCoVs, including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, revealed that HCoVs can be highly pathogenic and can cause more severe upper and lower respiratory tract infections, including bronchiolitis and pneumonia. To date, no specific antiviral drugs to prevent or treat HCoV infectio...

  6. Genome sequence variation analysis of two SARS coronavirus isolates after passage in Vero cell culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Weiwu; LI Ning; HU Liangxiang; DU Zhenglin; GAO Qiang; GAO Hong; NING Ye; FENG Jidong; ZHANG Jiansan; YIN Weidong

    2004-01-01

    SARS coronavirus is an RNA virus whose replication is error-prone, which provides possibility for escape of host defenses, and even leads to evolution of new viral strains during the passage or the transmission. Lots of variations have been detected among different SARS-CoV strains. And a study on these variations is helpful for development of efficient vaccine. Moreover, the test of nucleic acid characterization and genetic stability of SARS-CoV is important in the research of inactivated vaccine. The whole genome sequences of two SARS coronavirus strains after passage in Vero cell culture were determined and were compared with those of early passages, respectively. Results showed that both SARS coronavirus strains have high genetic stability, although nearly 10 generations were passed. Four nucleotide variations were observed between the second passage and the 11th passage of Sino1 strain for identification of SARS inactivated vaccine. Moreover, only one nucleotide was different between the third passage and the 10th passage of Sino3 strain for SARS inactivated vaccine. Therefore, this study suggested it was possible to develop inactivated vaccine against SARS-CoV in the future.

  7. HTCC: Broad Range Inhibitor of Coronavirus Entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Milewska

    Full Text Available To date, six human coronaviruses have been known, all of which are associated with respiratory infections in humans. With the exception of the highly pathogenic SARS and MERS coronaviruses, human coronaviruses (HCoV-NL63, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-229E, and HCoV-HKU1 circulate worldwide and typically cause the common cold. In most cases, infection with these viruses does not lead to severe disease, although acute infections in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients may progress to severe disease requiring hospitalization. Importantly, no drugs against human coronaviruses exist, and only supportive therapy is available. Previously, we proposed the cationically modified chitosan, N-(2-hydroxypropyl-3-trimethylammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC, and its hydrophobically-modified derivative (HM-HTCC as potent inhibitors of the coronavirus HCoV-NL63. Here, we show that HTCC inhibits interaction of a virus with its receptor and thus blocks the entry. Further, we demonstrate that HTCC polymers with different degrees of substitution act as effective inhibitors of all low-pathogenic human coronaviruses.

  8. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay for detecting of antibody to canine distemper virus

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarisman

    2006-01-01

    Serum neutralisation test (SNT) has been established for evaluating canine distemper vaccination, but until now SNT was rarely used due to the need for continuous tissue culture facilities and requires 3 days to perform. For detecting antibody to canine distemper virus, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is relatively simple and rapid seroassay. ELISA for canine immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV) was developed by using Onderstepoort strain of canine dis...

  9. Coexistence of different genotypes in the same bat and serological characterization of Rousettus bat coronavirus HKU9 belonging to a novel Betacoronavirus subgroup

    OpenAIRE

    Susanna K P Lau; Poon, Rosana W. S.; Wong, Beatrice H. L.; Wang, Ming; Huang, Yi; Xu, Huifang; Guo, Rongtong; Li, Kenneth S. M.; Gao, Kai; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-01-01

    Rousettus bat coronavirus HKU9 (Ro-BatCoV HKU9), a recently identified coronavirus of novel Betacoronavirus subgroup D, from Leschenault's rousette, was previously found to display marked sequence polymorphism among genomes of four strains. Among 10 bats with complete RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), spike (S), and nucleocapsid (N) genes sequenced, three and two sequence clades for all three genes were codetected in two and five bats, respectively, suggesting the coexistence of two or thr...

  10. Unraveling the Mysteries of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-03-11

    Dr. Aron Hall, a CDC coronavirus epidemiologist, discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus.  Created: 3/11/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/11/2014.

  11. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems for serology and antigen detection in parvovirus, coronavirus and rotavirus infections in dogs in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelzwaan, G F; Groen, J; Egberink, H; Borst, G H; UytdeHaag, F G; Osterhaus, A D

    1991-01-01

    Complex trapping blocking (CTB) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect ELISAs for the detection of antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV) and rotavirus in sera of dogs were established. Double antibody sandwich ELISAs for the detection of CPV-, CCV- and rotavirus antigens in fecal samples were also developed. Both the serological and antigen-detection ELISAs were used to screen samples from dogs in The Netherlands, with or without a history of acute diarrhea. It was shown that the results of the respective serological ELISAs correlated well and that CPV was the major cause of virus-induced acute diarrhea in dogs in The Netherlands. PMID:1850889

  12. Receptor-Dependent Coronavirus Infection of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brian C.; Hemmila, Erin M.; Beauchemin, Nicole; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2004-01-01

    In several mammalian species, including humans, coronavirus infection can modulate the host immune response. We show a potential role of dendritic cells (DC) in murine coronavirus-induced immune modulation and pathogenesis by demonstrating that the JAW SII DC line and primary DC from BALB/c mice and p/p mice with reduced expression of the murine coronavirus receptor, murine CEACAM1a, are susceptible to murine coronavirus infection by a receptor-dependent pathway. PMID:15113927

  13. Differentiation of canine distemper virus isolates in fur animals from various vaccine strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism according to phylogenetic relations in china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jianjun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to effectively identify the vaccine and field strains of Canine distemper virus (CDV, a new differential diagnostic test has been developed based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. We selected an 829 bp fragment of the nucleoprotein (N gene of CDV. By RFLP analysis using BamHI, field isolates were distinguishable from the vaccine strains. Two fragments were obtained from the vaccine strains by RT-PCR-RFLP analysis while three were observed in the field strains. An 829 nucleotide region of the CDV N gene was analyzed in 19 CDV field strains isolated from minks, raccoon dogs and foxes in China between 2005 and 2007. The results suggest this method is precise, accurate and efficient. It was also determined that three different genotypes exist in CDV field strains in fur animal herds of the north of China, most of which belong to Asian type. Mutated field strains, JSY06-R1, JSY06-R2 and JDH07-F1 also exist in Northern China, but are most closely related to the standard virulent strain A75/17, designated in Arctic and America-2 genetype in the present study, respectively.

  14. Potent inhibition of feline coronaviruses with peptidyl compounds targeting coronavirus 3C-like protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjeong; Mandadapu, Sivakoteswara Rao; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2013-02-01

    Feline coronavirus infection is common among domestic and exotic felid species and usually associated with mild or asymptomatic enteritis; however, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease of cats that is caused by systemic infection with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), a variant of feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). Currently, there is no specific treatment approved for FIP despite the importance of FIP as the leading infectious cause of death in young cats. During the replication process, coronavirus produces viral polyproteins that are processed into mature proteins by viral proteases, the main protease (3C-like [3CL] protease) and the papain-like protease. Since the cleavages of viral polyproteins are an essential step for virus replication, blockage of viral protease is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Previously, we reported the generation of broad-spectrum peptidyl inhibitors against viruses that possess a 3C or 3CL protease. In this study, we further evaluated the antiviral effects of the peptidyl inhibitors against feline coronaviruses, and investigated the interaction between our protease inhibitor and a cathepsin B inhibitor, an entry blocker, against a feline coronavirus in cell culture. Herein we report that our compounds behave as reversible, competitive inhibitors of 3CL protease, potently inhibited the replication of feline coronaviruses (EC(50) in a nanomolar range) and, furthermore, combination of cathepsin B and 3CL protease inhibitors led to a strong synergistic interaction against feline coronaviruses in a cell culture system.

  15. Coronavirus infection, ER stress and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TO SING eFUNG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The replication of coronavirus, a family of important animal and human pathogens, is closely associated with the cellular membrane compartments, especially the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Coronavirus infection of cultured cells was previously shown to cause ER stress and induce the unfolded protein response (UPR, a process that aims to restore the ER homeostasis by global translation shutdown and increasing the ER folding capacity. However under prolonged ER stress, UPR can also induce apoptotic cell death. Accumulating evidence from recent studies has shown that induction of ER stress and UPR may constitute a major aspect of coronavirus-host interaction. Activation of the three branches of UPR modulates a wide variety of signaling pathways, such as mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases activation, autophagy, apoptosis and innate immune response. ER stress and UPR activation may therefore contribute significantly to the viral replication and pathogenesis during coronavirus infection. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on coronavirus-induced ER stress and UPR activation, with emphasis on their cross-talking to apoptotic signaling.

  16. Use of heliox delivered via high-flow nasal cannula to treat an infant with coronavirus-related respiratory infection and severe acute air-flow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sherwin E; Vukin, Kirissa; Mosakowski, Steve; Solano, Patti; Stanton, Lolita; Lester, Lucille; Lavani, Romeen; Hall, Jesse B; Tung, Avery

    2014-11-01

    Heliox, a helium-oxygen gas mixture, has been used for many decades to treat obstructive pulmonary disease. The lower density and higher viscosity of heliox relative to nitrogen-oxygen mixtures can significantly reduce airway resistance when an anatomic upper air-flow obstruction is present and gas flow is turbulent. Clinically, heliox can decrease airway resistance in acute asthma in adults and children and in COPD. Heliox may also enhance the bronchodilating effects of β-agonist administration for acute asthma. Respiratory syndromes caused by coronavirus infections in humans range in severity from the common cold to severe acute respiratory syndrome associated with human coronavirus OC43 and other viral strains. In infants, coronavirus infection can cause bronchitis, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia in variable combinations and can produce enough air-flow obstruction to cause respiratory failure. We describe a case of coronavirus OC43 infection in an infant with severe acute respiratory distress treated with heliox inhalation to avoid intubation.

  17. Detection of feline coronavirus using microcantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velanki, Sreepriya; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2006-11-01

    This work demonstrated the feasibility of detecting severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) using microcantilever technology by showing that the feline coronavirus (FIP) type I virus can be detected by a microcantilever modified by feline coronavirus (FIP) type I anti-viral antiserum. A microcantilever modified by FIP type I anti-viral antiserum was developed for the detection of FIP type I virus. When the FIP type I virus positive sample is injected into the fluid cell where the microcantilever is held, the microcantilever bends upon the recognition of the FIP type I virus by the antiserum on the surface of the microcantilever. A negative control sample that does not contain FIP type I virus did not cause any bending of the microcantilever. The detection limit of the sensor was 0.1 µg ml-1 when the assay time was <1 h.

  18. First detection of canine parvovirus type 2c in pups with haemorrhagic enteritis in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, N; Martella, V; Desario, C; Bellacicco, A L; Camero, M; Manna, L; d'Aloja, D; Buonavoglia, C

    2006-12-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), the aetiological agent of haemorrhagic enteritis in dogs, includes three antigenic variants, types 2a, 2b and 2c. CPV-2c has been detected initially in Italy and subsequently in Vietnam. We report the first identification of this novel antigenic variant in Spain, where it caused an outbreak of fatal enteritis in basset hound pups in association with canine coronavirus type I and type II. We suggest that this new antigenic variant of CPV-2 could spread throughout Europe and that there is a subsequent need to update current CPV vaccines. PMID:17123424

  19. Antiviral Effects of Antisense Morpholino Oligomers in Murine Coronavirus Infection Models▿

    OpenAIRE

    Burrer, Renaud; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Ting, Joey P.C.; Stein, David A.; Moulton, Hong M.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Kuhn, Peter; Michael J Buchmeier

    2007-01-01

    The recent emergence of novel pathogenic human and animal coronaviruses has highlighted the need for antiviral therapies that are effective against a spectrum of these viruses. We have used several strains of murine hepatitis virus (MHV) in cell culture and in vivo in mouse models to investigate the antiviral characteristics of peptide-conjugated antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (P-PMOs). Ten P-PMOs directed against various target sites in the viral genome were tested in cell...

  20. An Outbreak of Human Coronavirus OC43 Infection and Serological Cross-Reactivity with SARS Coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In summer 2003, a respiratory outbreak was investigated in British Columbia, during which nucleic acid tests and serology unexpectedly indicated reactivity for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV.

  1. Molecular surveillance of traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Larocca, Vittorio; Losurdo, Michele; Lanave, Gianvito; Lucente, Maria Stella; Corrente, Marialaura; Catella, Cristiana; Bo, Stefano; Elia, Gabriella; Torre, Giorgio; Grandolfo, Erika; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2016-08-30

    A molecular survey for traditional and emerging pathogens associated with canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) was conducted in Italy between 2011 and 2013 on a total of 138 dogs, including 78 early acute clinically ill CIRD animals, 22 non-clinical but exposed to clinically ill CIRD dogs and 38 CIRD convalescent dogs. The results showed that canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) was the most commonly detected CIRD pathogen, followed by canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma cynos, Mycoplasma canis and canine pneumovirus (CnPnV). Some classical CIRD agents, such as canine adenoviruses, canine distemper virus and canid herpesvirus 1, were not detected at all, as were not other emerging respiratory viruses (canine influenza virus, canine hepacivirus) and bacteria (Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus). Most severe forms of respiratory disease were observed in the presence of CPIV, CRCoV and M. cynos alone or in combination with other pathogens, whereas single CnPnV or M. canis infections were detected in dogs with no or very mild respiratory signs. Interestingly, only the association of M. cynos (alone or in combination with either CRCoV or M. canis) with severe clinical forms was statistically significant. The study, while confirming CPIV as the main responsible for CIRD occurrence, highlights the increasing role of recently discovered viruses, such as CRCoV and CnPnV, for which effective vaccines are not available in the market. PMID:27527760

  2. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Irigoyen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV, are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59, a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the

  3. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joshua D.; Chung, Betty Y.-W.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global “snap-shot” of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  4. Portrait of a Canine Probiotic – from Gut to Gut

    OpenAIRE

    O'Mahony, D.; Murphy, K. Barry; MacSharry, J.; Boileau, T.; Sunvold, G.; Reinhart, G.; Kiely, B.; Shanahan, F; O'Mahony, L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The gastrointestinal environment is a complex interactive system involving the host, ingested dietary components, and numerous microbial species. We hypothesised that isolation and screening of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria adherent to healthy canine gastrointestinal tissue would yield strains with commensal activity in canines. The aims of this study were 1) to isolate a bank of commensal organisms from the canine gastrointestinal tract; 2) to screen these novel microbi...

  5. Seroprevalence of Canine Distemper Virus in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Kazuya; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Chen, Ming-Chu; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Lin, James A; Mikami, Takeshi; Kai, Chieko; TAKAHASHI, Eiji

    2001-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in Asian felids revealed that the prevalence of antibodies varied depending on region and, in some cases, exposure to dogs. The serologic pattern in cats with antibodies indicated that they had likely been exposed to field strains rather than typical CDV vaccine strains.

  6. MERS: Emergence of a novel human coronavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.S. Raj (Stalin); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractA novel coronavirus (CoV) that causes a severe lower respiratory tract infection in humans, emerged in the Middle East region in 2012. This virus, named Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, is phylogenetically related to bat CoVs, but other animal species like dromedary camels ma

  7. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  8. Coronavirus infection of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Horzinek, M C; Rottier, P J

    1995-01-01

    Epithelial cells are the first host cells to be infected by incoming c oronaviruses. Recent observations in vitro show that coronaviruses are released from a specific side of these polarized cells, and this polarized release might be important for the spread of the infection in vivo. Mechanisms for

  9. Coronavirus-induced demyelination of neural pathways triggers neurogenic bladder overactivity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    McMillan, Matthew T; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Smith, Ariana L.; Newman, Diane K.; Weiss, Susan R.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Malykhina, Anna P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE) develop neurogenic bladder dysfunction that is comparable with the neurogenic detrusor overactivity observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Adult mice (C57BL/6J, 8 wk of age, n = 146) were inoculated with a neurotropic strain of mouse hepatitis virus (A59 strain) and followed for 4 wk. Inoculation with the virus caused a significant neural deficit in mice with an average clinical sy...

  10. Molecular epidemiology of bovine coronavirus on the basis of comparative analyses of the S gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lihong; Hägglund, Sara; Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil;

    2006-01-01

    Bovine coronavirus (BCoV), a group 2 member of the genus Coronavirus in the family Coronaviridae, is an important pathogen in cattle worldwide. It causes diarrhea in adult animals (winter dysentery), as well as enteric and respiratory diseases in calves. The annual occurrence of BCoV epidemics...... and phylogenetic studies were performed. The results showed (i) identical sequences from different animals in the same herds and from paired nasal and fecal samples, suggesting a dominant virus circulating in each herd at a given time; (ii) sequence differences among four outbreaks in different years in the same...... herd, indicating new introduction of virus; (iii) identical sequences in four different Danish herds in samples obtained within 2 months, implying virus transmission between herds; and (iv) that at least two different virus strains were involved in the outbreaks of BCoV in Denmark during the spring...

  11. Detection of Coronaviruses in Bats of Various Species in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Boniotti, Maria B.; Enrica Rosti; Ana Moreno; Cristiano Sabelli; Alice Papetti; Davide Lelli

    2013-01-01

    Bats are natural reservoirs for many mammalian coronaviruses, which have received renewed interest after the discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) CoV in humans. This study describes the identification and molecular characterization of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in bats in Italy, from 2010 to 2012. Sixty-nine faecal samples and 126 carcasses were tested using pan-coronavirus RT-PCR. Coronavirus RNAs were detecte...

  12. Comparative Analysis of Human and Canine Campylobacter upsaliensis Isolates by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter; Guardabassi, Luca; Pedersen, Karl;

    2008-01-01

    Human (n = 33) and canine (n = 53) Campylobacter upsaliensis isolates from seven countries were genotyped by a new amplified fragment length polymorphism method. We observed 100% typeability and high overall diversity. The majority of human strains (23/33) clustered separately from canine strains......, indicating that dogs may not be the main source of human infection.......Human (n = 33) and canine (n = 53) Campylobacter upsaliensis isolates from seven countries were genotyped by a new amplified fragment length polymorphism method. We observed 100% typeability and high overall diversity. The majority of human strains (23/33) clustered separately from canine strains...

  13. Genetic diversity of coronaviruses in Miniopterus fuliginosus bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiang; Yang, Li; Ren, Xianwen; Zhang, Junpeng; Dong, Jie; Sun, Lilian; Zhu, Yafang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Shuyi; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Coronaviruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, pose significant public health threats. Bats have been suggested to act as natural reservoirs for both these viruses, and periodic monitoring of coronaviruses in bats may thus provide important clues about emergent infectious viruses. The Eastern bent-wing bat Miniopterus fuliginosus is distributed extensively throughout China. We therefore analyzed the genetic diversity of coronaviruses in samples of M. fuliginosus collected from nine Chinese provinces during 2011-2013. The only coronavirus genus found was Alphacoronavirus. We established six complete and five partial genomic sequences of alphacoronaviruses, which revealed that they could be divided into two distinct lineages, with close relationships to coronaviruses in Miniopterus magnater and Miniopterus pusillus. Recombination was confirmed by detecting putative breakpoints of Lineage 1 coronaviruses in M. fuliginosus and M. pusillus (Wu et al., 2015), which supported the results of topological and phylogenetic analyses. The established alphacoronavirus genome sequences showed high similarity to other alphacoronaviruses found in other Miniopterus species, suggesting that their transmission in different Miniopterus species may provide opportunities for recombination with different alphacoronaviruses. The genetic information for these novel alphacoronaviruses will improve our understanding of the evolution and genetic diversity of coronaviruses, with potentially important implications for the transmission of human diseases. PMID:27125516

  14. 犬瘟热病毒PS株的全基因组序列测定与遗传进化分析%Complete genome sequencing and genetic analysis of canine distemper virus PS strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许红丽; 易立; 王建科; 杨莘; 程世鹏

    2012-01-01

    对犬瘟热病毒(CDV)PS株基因组进行全基因组序列测定与分析,以阐明该毒株的基因特征与遗传进化情况。利用RT-PCR方法分段扩增PS株全基因组序列,分别将产物克隆入pMD18-T载体中并进行测序,将所测序列拼接获得CDV PS株的全基因组cDNA。用DNAStar软件比较PS株全基因组序列与国内外犬瘟热病毒疫苗株和野毒株全基因组序列的同源性,然后用Mega4.0软件进行系统进化分析。测序结果显示,PS株全基因组序列的长度为15 690nt,该基因组推导的某些氨基酸位点发生了突变。与GenBank中登录的国内外参考毒株的同源性比较结果显示,PS株基因组与MKY-KM08分离株的基因序列同源性高达97.9%,与其他毒株的同源性为93.0%~97.0%;与CDV3疫苗株和Onderstepoort疫苗株的同源性最低,分别为93.2%和93.0%。基于全基因组序列绘制的系统进化树表明,所有CDV分离株分为疫苗株和野毒株2支,PS株和MKY-KM08株位于同一支,属于亚洲1型。结果表明PS株为野毒株,其全基因组序列与MKY-KM08株的全基因组序列亲缘关系最近。%To sequence the full genome of canine distemper virus(CDV) PS strain and to study the genetic variation and molecular features of the PS strain, 10 fragments of the full length genome of CDV PS strain were amplified by RT-PCR,cloned into the pMD18-T vector and sequenced. The homology and evo-lutional relationship of CDV genome with reference strains were analyzed with DNAStar and Mega4.0 soft-ware. Sequence analysis showed that the complete genome was 15 690 bp in length with some amino acid site mutated. The homology analysis showed that the PS strain had a 97.9 % similarity with MKY-KM08 strain,and 93.0G to 97.0; with other strains. The PS strain had a similarity of 93.2; and 93.0; with CDV3 and Onderstepoort vaccine strains, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all CDV strains included vaccine strain and wild strain. PS strain and

  15. Feline Coronavirus 3c Protein: A Candidate for a Virulence Marker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Hora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV is highly virulent and responsible for the highly fatal disease feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, whereas feline enteric coronavirus (FECV is widespread among the feline population and typically causes asymptomatic infections. Some candidates for genetic markers capable of differentiating these two pathotypes of a unique virus (feline coronavirus have been proposed by several studies. In the present survey, in order to search for markers that can differentiate FECV and FIPV, several clones of the 3a–c, E, and M genes were sequenced from samples obtained from cats with or without FIP. All genes showed genetic diversity and suggested the presence of FCoV mutant spectrum capable of producing a virulent pathotype in an individual-specific way. In addition, all the feline coronavirus FIPV strains demonstrated a truncated 3c protein, and the 3c gene was the only observed pathotypic marker for FCoVs, showing that 3c gene is a candidate marker for the distinction between the two pathotypes when the mutant spectrum is taken into account.

  16. Sequence Analysis and Structural Prediction of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus nsp5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Hai LU; Nan-Shan ZHONG; Ding-Mei ZHANG; Guo-Ling WANG; Zhong-Min GUO; Juan LI; Bing-Yan TAN; Li-Ping OU-YANG; Wen-Hua LING; Xin-Bing YU

    2005-01-01

    The non-structural proteins (nsp or replicase proteins) of coronaviruses are relatively conserved and can be effective targets for drugs. Few studies have been conducted into the function of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nsp5. In this study, bioinformatics methods were employed to predict the secondary structure and construct 3-D models of the SARS-CoV GD strain nsp5. Sequencing and sequential comparison was performed to analyze the mutation trend of the polymerase nsp5 gene during the epidemic process using a nucleotide-nucleotide basic local alignment search tool (BLASTN) and a protein-protein basic local alignment search tool (BLASTP). The results indicated that the nsp5 gene was steady during the epidemic process and the protein was homologous with other coronavirus nsp5 proteins. The protein encoded by the nsp5 gene was expressed in COS-7 cells and analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). This study provided the foundation for further exploration of the protein's biological function, and contributed to the search for anti-SARS-CoV drugs.

  17. Design and application of 60mer oligonucleotide microarray in SARS coronavirus detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The 60mer oligonucleotide microarray was designed and applied to detecting of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus. Thirty 60mer specific oligos were designed to cover the whole genome of the first submitted coronavirus strain, according to the sequence of TOR2 (GENEBANK Accession: AY274119). These primers were synthesized and printed into a microarray with 12×12 spots. RNAs were extracted from the throat swab and gargling fluid of SARS patients and reverse-transcripted into the double strand cDNAs. The cDNAs were prepared as restricted cDNA fragments by the restriction display (RD) technique and labeled by PCR with the Cy5-universal primer. The labeled samples were then applied to the oligo microarray for hybridization. The diagnostic capability of the microarray was evaluated after the washing and scanning steps. The scanning result showed that samples of SARS patients were hybridized with multiple SARS probes on the microarray, and there is no signal on the negative and blank controls. These results indicate that the genome of SARS coronavirus can be detected in parallel by the 60mer oligonucleotide microarray, which can improve the positive ratio of the diagnosis. The oligo microarray can also be used for monitoring the behavior of the virus genes in different stages of the disease status.

  18. The role of viral population diversity in adaptation of bovine coronavirus to new host environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica K Borucki

    Full Text Available The high mutation rate of RNA viruses enables a diverse genetic population of viral genotypes to exist within a single infected host. In-host genetic diversity could better position the virus population to respond and adapt to a diverse array of selective pressures such as host-switching events. Multiple new coronaviruses, including SARS, have been identified in human samples just within the last ten years, demonstrating the potential of coronaviruses as emergent human pathogens. Deep sequencing was used to characterize genomic changes in coronavirus quasispecies during simulated host-switching. Three bovine nasal samples infected with bovine coronavirus were used to infect human and bovine macrophage and lung cell lines. The virus reproduced relatively well in macrophages, but the lung cell lines were not infected efficiently enough to allow passage of non lab-adapted samples. Approximately 12 kb of the genome was amplified before and after passage and sequenced at average coverages of nearly 950×(454 sequencing and 38,000×(Illumina. The consensus sequence of many of the passaged samples had a 12 nucleotide insert in the consensus sequence of the spike gene, and multiple point mutations were associated with the presence of the insert. Deep sequencing revealed that the insert was present but very rare in the unpassaged samples and could quickly shift to dominate the population when placed in a different environment. The insert coded for three arginine residues, occurred in a region associated with fusion entry into host cells, and may allow infection of new cell types via heparin sulfate binding. Analysis of the deep sequencing data indicated that two distinct genotypes circulated at different frequency levels in each sample, and support the hypothesis that the mutations present in passaged strains were "selected" from a pre-existing pool rather than through de novo mutation and subsequent population fixation.

  19. Canine Distemper Outbreak in Rhesus Monkeys, China

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fan, Quanshui; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Fuqiang; Wang, Wei; Liao, Guoyang; Hu, Rongliang

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, canine distemper outbreaks have occurred in rhesus monkeys at a breeding farm in Guangxi, People’s Republic of China. Approximately 10,000 animals were infected (25%–60% disease incidence); 5%–30% of infected animals died. The epidemic was controlled by vaccination. Amino acid sequence analysis of the virus indicated a unique strain.

  20. PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES FOR SELECTED CANINE PATHOGENS AMONG WOLVES (CANIS LUPUS) FROM THE ALASKA PENINSULA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Dominique E; Benson, Anna-Marie

    2016-07-01

    We collected blood samples from wolves ( Canis lupus ) on the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, US, 2006-11 and tested sera for antibodies to canine adenovirus (CAV), canine coronavirus (CCV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine herpesvirus (CHV), canine parainfluenza (CPI), canine parvovirus (CPV), Neospora caninum , and Toxoplasma gondii . Detected antibody prevalence was 90% for CAV, 28% for CCV, 12% for CDV, 93% for CHV, 0% for CPI, 20% for CPV, 0% for N. caninum, and 86% for T. gondii . Prevalence of CCV antibodies suggested a seasonal pattern with higher prevalence during spring (43%) than in fall (11%). Prevalence of CCV antibodies also declined during the 6-yr study with high prevalence during spring 2006-08 (80%, n=24) and low prevalence during spring 2009-11 (4%, n=24). Prevalence of N. caninum and T. gondii antibodies were highly variable in the study area during 2006-11. Results suggested that some pathogens might be enzootic on the Alaska Peninsula (e.g., CAV and CHV) while others may be epizootic (e.g., CCV, N. caninum , T. gondii ). PMID:27195683

  1. Assessment of Retrograde Coronary Venous Infusion of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Combined with Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor in Canine Myocardial Infarction Using Strain Values Derived from Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-Wei; Zhen, Lei; Wang, Qin; Sun, Yan; Yang, Jiao; Li, Yi-Jia; Li, Rong-Juan; Ma, Ning; Li, Zhi-An; Wang, Lu-Ya; Nie, Shao-Ping; Yang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Speckle-tracking echocardiography was used to assess retrograde coronary venous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a canine model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Coronary venous retroperfusion was performed at 1 wk after AMI. Twenty-eight animals were randomized into four groups: saline, bFGF+saline, saline+MSCs and bFGF+MSCs. Echocardiography was performed before AMI, at 7 d post-AMI and 40 d after retroperfusion. Apoptotic cardiomyocytes in the border zone of the ischemic region were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling. Vascular endothelial growth factor and factor VIII concentrations were measured by western blotting. The left ventricular end-systolic volume increased significantly, whereas the left ventricular ejection fraction and global and segmental strain values decreased significantly after AMI. After retroperfusion, the strain values of the infarct zone, but not conventional echocardiographic parameters, were significantly different between control and bFGF+MSC groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis decreased, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor and factor VIII concentrations were higher in the bFGF+MSC, bFGF and MSC groups. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was well correlated with the strain values. Although retrograde coronary venous infusion of bFGF and MSCs promoted neo-vascularization of the infarcted myocardium and inhibited apoptosis, there was only a slight strain improvement without a substantial increase in global cardiac functions.

  2. Depletion of Blood-Borne Macrophages Does Not Reduce Demyelination in Mice Infected with a Neurotropic Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Shurong; Sun, Ning; van Rooijen, Nico; Perlman, Stanley

    1999-01-01

    Mice infected with the neurotropic coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM (MHV-JHM) develop a chronic demyelinating disease with symptoms of hindlimb paralysis. Histological examination of the brains and spinal cords of these animals reveals the presence of large numbers of activated macrophages/microglia. In two other experimental models of demyelination, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination, depletion of hematogenou...

  3. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Vermeulen, Ben L; Sebastiaan Theuns; Nádia Conceição-Neto; Mark Zeller; Inge D. M. Roukaerts; Acar, Delphine D; Dominique A. J. Olyslaegers; Marc Van Ranst; Jelle Matthijnssens; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a high...

  4. Bystander CD8 T-Cell-Mediated Demyelination is Interferon-γ-Dependent in a Coronavirus Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dandekar, Ajai A.; Anghelina, Daniela; Perlman, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    Mice infected with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus, strain JHM (JHM) develop a disease that shares many histological characteristics with multiple sclerosis. We previously demonstrated that JHM-infected mice that only have CD8 T cells specific for an epitope not in the virus develop demyelination on specific activation of these cells. Herein we show that this process of bystander T-cell-mediated demyelination is interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-dependent. The absence of IFN-γ abrogated demyelinatio...

  5. Genome Sequence of Canine Herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos V Papageorgiou

    Full Text Available Canine herpesvirus is a widespread alphaherpesvirus that causes a fatal haemorrhagic disease of neonatal puppies. We have used high-throughput methods to determine the genome sequences of three viral strains (0194, V777 and V1154 isolated in the United Kingdom between 1985 and 2000. The sequences are very closely related to each other. The canine herpesvirus genome is estimated to be 125 kbp in size and consists of a unique long sequence (97.5 kbp and a unique short sequence (7.7 kbp that are each flanked by terminal and internal inverted repeats (38 bp and 10.0 kbp, respectively. The overall nucleotide composition is 31.6% G+C, which is the lowest among the completely sequenced alphaherpesviruses. The genome contains 76 open reading frames predicted to encode functional proteins, all of which have counterparts in other alphaherpesviruses. The availability of the sequences will facilitate future research on the diagnosis and treatment of canine herpesvirus-associated disease.

  6. Heparan sulfate is a selective attachment factor for the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus Beaudette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Ikenna G; Chu, Victor C; Lee, Hwajin; Regan, Andrew D; Bauman, Beverley E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2007-03-01

    The avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) strain Beaudette is an embryo-adapted virus that has extended species tropism in cell culture. In order to understand the acquired tropism of the Beaudette strain, we compared the S protein sequences of several IBV strains. The Beaudette strain was found to contain a putative heparan sulfate (HS)-binding site, indicating that the Beaudette virus may use HS as a selective receptor. To ascertain the requirements of cell-surface HS for Beaudette infectivity, we assayed for infectivity in the presence of soluble heparin as a competitor and determined infectivity in mutant cell lines with no HS or glycosaminoglycan expression. Our results indicate that HS plays a role as an attachment factor for IBV, working in concert with other factors like sialic acid to mediate virus binding to cells, and may explain in part the extended tropism of IBV Beaudette.

  7. Stability of SARS Coronavirus in Human Specimens and Environment and Its Sensitivity to Heating and UV Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU-MING DUAN; XIAO-PING DONG; SARS RESEARCH TEAM; XIN-SHENG ZHAO; RUI-FU WEN; JING-JING HUANG; GUO-HUA PI; SU-XIANG ZHANG; JUN HAN; SHENG-LI BI; LI RUAN

    2003-01-01

    The causal agent for SARS is considered as a novel coronavirus that has never been described both in human and animals previously. The stability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and in environments was studied. Methods Using a SARS coronavirus strain CoV-P9,which was isolated from pharyngeal swab of a probable SARS case in Beijing, its stability in mimic human specimens and in mimic environment including surfaces of commonly used materials or in household conditions, as well as its resistances to temperature and UV irradiation were analyzed. A total of 106 TCID50 viruses were placed in each tested condition, and changes of the viral infectivity in samples after treatments were measured by evaluating cytopathic effect (CPE) in cell line Vero-E6 at 48 h after infectionn. Results The results showed that SARS coronavirus in the testing condition could survive in serum, 1:20 diluted sputum and feces for at least 96 h, whereas it could remain alive in urine for at least 72 h with a low level of infectivity. The survival abilities on the surfaces of eight different materials and in water were quite comparable, revealing reduction of infectivity after 72 to 96 h exposure. Viruses stayed stable at 4℃, at room temperature (20℃) and at 37℃ for at least 2 h without remarkable change in the infectious ability in cells, but were convened to be non-infectious after 90-, 60- and 30-min exposure at 56℃, at 67℃ and at 75℃, respectively. Irradiation of UV for 60 min on the virus in culture medium resulted in the destruction of viral infectivity at an undetectable level. Conclusion The survival ability of SARS coronavirus in human specimens and in environments seems to be relatively strong. Heating and UV irradiation can efficiently eliminate the viral infectivity.

  8. Epidemiological investigation reveals genetic diversity and high co-infection rate of canine bocavirus strains circulating in Heilongjiang province, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Donghua; Wang, Zhihui; Yao, Shuang; Li, Chunqiu; Geng, Yufei; Wang, Enyu; Zhao, Xiwen; Su, Mingjun; Wei, Shan; Wang, Xinyu; Feng, Li; Chang, Yung-Fu; Sun, Dongbo

    2016-06-01

    To trace evolution of CBoV in Northeast China, 201 fecal samples from rectal swabs of diarrheic dogs collected from May 2014 to April 2015 were investigated using PCR targeting partial NS1 gene (440bp). Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of the identified CBoV strains was conducted using nucleotide sequences of the partial NS1 gene. The results indicated that 15 of 201 fecal samples (7.5%) were positive for CBoV; the partial NS1 genes of the 15 CBoV strains exhibited 83.1%-100% nucleotide identity, and 75.8%-100% amino acid identity; the entire VP2 gene of five selected CBoV strains exhibited 82.9%-96.8% nucleotide identity, and 90.4%-99.1% amino acid identity. The 15 CBoV strains exhibited high co-infection rates with CPV-2 (40%), CCoV (20%), and CaKV (26.67%). Phylogenetic analysis of the partial NS1 gene revealed that the 15 CBoV strains were divided into different subgroups of CBoV-2 when compared with CBoV-2 strains from South Korea, USA, Germany, and Hong Kong in China. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of the VP2 gene indicated that five selected CBoV strains were divided into three different genetic groups of CBoV-2, involving in CBoV-2HK group, CBoV-2C group, and CBoV-2B group. The recombination analysis using the entire VP2 gene revealed three potential recombination events that occurred among five selected strains in our study. These data demonstrated that the CBoV strains circulating in Heilongjiang province, Northeast China showed genetic diversities, potential recombination events, and high co-infection rate. Further studies will be required to address the potential pathogenic role of these diverse CBoV strains. PMID:27234529

  9. Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C S; de Jong, C E; Meers, J; Henning, J; Wang, L- F; Field, H E

    2016-03-01

    Following the SARS outbreak, extensive surveillance was undertaken globally to detect and identify coronavirus diversity in bats. This study sought to identify the diversity and prevalence of coronaviruses in bats in the Australasian region. We identified four different genotypes of coronavirus, three of which (an alphacoronavirus and two betacoronaviruses) are potentially new species, having less than 90% nucleotide sequence identity with the most closely related described viruses. We did not detect any SARS-like betacoronaviruses, despite targeting rhinolophid bats, the putative natural host taxa. Our findings support the virus-host co-evolution hypothesis, with the detection of Miniopterus bat coronavirus HKU8 (previously reported in Miniopterus species in China, Hong Kong and Bulgaria) in Australian Miniopterus species. Similarly, we detected a novel betacoronavirus genotype from Pteropus alecto which is most closely related to Bat coronavirus HKU9 identified in other pteropodid bats in China, Kenya and the Philippines. We also detected possible cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses, and the apparent enteric tropism of these viruses. Thus, our findings are consistent with a scenario wherein the current diversity and host specificity of coronaviruses reflects co-evolution with the occasional host shift. PMID:27048154

  10. Coronavirus Infection and Diversity in Bats in the Australasian Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C S; de Jong, C E; Meers, J; Henning, J; Wang, L- F; Field, H E

    2016-03-01

    Following the SARS outbreak, extensive surveillance was undertaken globally to detect and identify coronavirus diversity in bats. This study sought to identify the diversity and prevalence of coronaviruses in bats in the Australasian region. We identified four different genotypes of coronavirus, three of which (an alphacoronavirus and two betacoronaviruses) are potentially new species, having less than 90% nucleotide sequence identity with the most closely related described viruses. We did not detect any SARS-like betacoronaviruses, despite targeting rhinolophid bats, the putative natural host taxa. Our findings support the virus-host co-evolution hypothesis, with the detection of Miniopterus bat coronavirus HKU8 (previously reported in Miniopterus species in China, Hong Kong and Bulgaria) in Australian Miniopterus species. Similarly, we detected a novel betacoronavirus genotype from Pteropus alecto which is most closely related to Bat coronavirus HKU9 identified in other pteropodid bats in China, Kenya and the Philippines. We also detected possible cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses, and the apparent enteric tropism of these viruses. Thus, our findings are consistent with a scenario wherein the current diversity and host specificity of coronaviruses reflects co-evolution with the occasional host shift.

  11. Novel Coronaviruses and Astroviruses in Bats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel K. W. Chu; J. S. Malik Peiris; Leo L. M. Poon

    2009-01-01

    Zoonotic transmissions of emerging pathogens from wildlife to human have shaped the history of mankind. These events have also highlighted our poor understanding of microorganisms circulated in wild animals. Coronaviruses and astroviruses, which can be found from a wide range of mammals, were recently detected in bats. Strikingly, these bat viruses are genetically highly diverse and these interesting findings might help to better understand the evolution and ecology of these viruses. The discoveries of these novel bats viruses not only suggested that bats are important hosts for these virus families, but also reiterated the role of bats as a reservoir of viruses that might pose a zoonotic threat to human health.

  12. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in children

    OpenAIRE

    Thabet, Farah; Chehab, May; Bafaqih, Hind; AlMohaimeed, Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is a new human disease caused by a novel coronavirus (CoV). The disease is reported mainly in adults. Data in children are scarce. The disease caused by MERS-CoV in children presents with a wide range of clinical manifestations, and it is associated with a lower mortality rate compared with adults. Poor outcome is observed mainly in admitted patients with medical comorbidities. We report a new case of MERS-CoV infection in a 9-month-old child compli...

  13. Inhibition, Escape, and Attenuated Growth of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Treated with Antisense Morpholino Oligomers†

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Benjamin W.; Stein, David A.; Kroeker, Andrew D.; Churchill, Michael J.; Kim, Alice M.; Kuhn, Peter; Dawson, Philip; Moulton, Hong M.; Bestwick, Richard K.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Michael J Buchmeier

    2005-01-01

    The recently emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a potent pathogen of humans and is capable of rapid global spread. Peptide-conjugated antisense morpholino oligomers (P-PMO) were designed to bind by base pairing to specific sequences in the SARS-CoV (Tor2 strain) genome. The P-PMO were tested for their capacity to inhibit production of infectious virus as well as to probe the function of conserved viral RNA motifs and secondary structures. Several virus-targete...

  14. Isolation,Identification and Sequence Analysis of Complete Genome of Canine Parvovirus JL-M13 Strain%犬细小病毒 JL-M13株的分离鉴定及全基因组序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仝明薇; 易立; 程世鹏

    2015-01-01

    We inoculated canine parvovirus positive samples into F 81 cells and isolated a virus strain named JL‐M13 by three passages .Five nucleotide sequences were amplified from the DNA extracted from canine parvovirus wild strain by overlapping PCR .Splicing and analysis of the sequences showed that the genome length of the strain were 4621bp ,the identity with other canine parvovirus was 98 .2%‐99 .4% .Phyloge‐netic tree analysis showed that the similarity rate of JL‐M13 with CPV‐2 (EF011664 .1)was the highest and was significantly lower with canine parvovirus type‐2 vaccine strain .%将检测为犬细小病毒(CPV )阳性的病料经处理后接种F81细胞盲传3代并获得一株细小病毒,命名为JL‐M13。运用重叠PCR技术从JL‐M13中扩增出5条核苷酸序列,拼接后进行序列分析。结果表明,所获病毒核酸基因组大小为4621 bp ,与其他犬细小病毒的基因相似性为98.2%~99.4%。系统发育树分析表明,JL‐M13与CPV‐2毒株(EF011664.1)相似率最高,与 Type‐2型犬细小病毒疫苗株相距较远。

  15. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjeong Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV. The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for

  16. Reversal of the Progression of Fatal Coronavirus Infection in Cats by a Broad-Spectrum Coronavirus Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjeong; Liu, Hongwei; Galasiti Kankanamalage, Anushka C; Weerasekara, Sahani; Hua, Duy H; Groutas, William C; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Pedersen, Niels C

    2016-03-01

    Coronaviruses infect animals and humans causing a wide range of diseases. The diversity of coronaviruses in many mammalian species is contributed by relatively high mutation and recombination rates during replication. This dynamic nature of coronaviruses may facilitate cross-species transmission and shifts in tissue or cell tropism in a host, resulting in substantial change in virulence. Feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) causes inapparent or mild enteritis in cats, but a highly fatal disease, called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), can arise through mutation of FECV to FIP virus (FIPV). The pathogenesis of FIP is intimately associated with immune responses and involves depletion of T cells, features shared by some other coronaviruses like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus. The increasing risks of highly virulent coronavirus infections in humans or animals call for effective antiviral drugs, but no such measures are yet available. Previously, we have reported the inhibitors that target 3C-like protease (3CLpro) with broad-spectrum activity against important human and animal coronaviruses. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of our 3CLpro inhibitor in laboratory cats with FIP. Experimental FIP is 100% fatal once certain clinical and laboratory signs become apparent. We found that antiviral treatment led to full recovery of cats when treatment was started at a stage of disease that would be otherwise fatal if left untreated. Antiviral treatment was associated with a rapid improvement in fever, ascites, lymphopenia and gross signs of illness and cats returned to normal health within 20 days or less of treatment. Significant reduction in viral titers was also observed in cats. These results indicate that continuous virus replication is required for progression of immune-mediated inflammatory disease of FIP. These findings may provide important insights into devising therapeutic strategies and selection of antiviral compounds for further

  17. Rapid inactivation of SARS-like coronaviruses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapil, Sanjay (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Oberst, R. D. (Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS); Bieker, Jill Marie; Tucker, Mark David; Souza, Caroline Ann; Williams, Cecelia Victoria

    2004-03-01

    Chemical disinfection and inactivation of viruses is largely understudied, but is very important especially in the case of highly infectious viruses. The purpose of this LDRD was to determine the efficacy of the Sandia National Laboratories developed decontamination formulations against Bovine Coronavirus (BCV) as a surrogate for the coronavirus that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in humans. The outbreak of SARS in late 2002 resulted from a highly infectious virus that was able to survive and remain infectious for extended periods. For this study, preliminary testing with Escherichia coli MS-2 (MS-2) and Escherichia coli T4 (T4) bacteriophages was conducted to develop virucidal methodology for verifying the inactivation after treatment with the test formulations following AOAC germicidal methodologies. After the determination of various experimental parameters (i.e. exposure, concentration) of the formulations, final testing was conducted on BCV. All experiments were conducted with various organic challenges (horse serum, bovine feces, compost) for results that more accurately represent field use condition. The MS-2 and T4 were slightly more resistant than BCV and required a 2 minute exposure while BCV was completely inactivated after a 1 minute exposure. These results were also consistent for the testing conducted in the presence of the various organic challenges indicating that the test formulations are highly effective for real world application.

  18. Quarantine protects Falkland Islands (Malvinas) cats from feline coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; McDonald, Mike; Audhuy, Stéphane; Burr, Paul; Hollins, Jonathan; Kovacic, Rémi; Lutz, Hans; Luxton, Zoe; Mazar, Shlomit; Meli, Marina L

    2012-02-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Since 2002, when 20 cats on the Falkland Islands were found to be FCoV seronegative, only seronegative cats could be imported. Between 2005-2007, 95 pet and 10 feral cats tested negative by indirect immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) analysis using two strains of type II FCoV, two transmissible gastroenteritis virus assays, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and rapid immunomigration test. Twenty-four samples (23%) showed non-specific fluorescence, mostly attributable to anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). The reason for ANA was unclear: reactive samples were negative for Erhlichia canis antibodies; seven were feline immunodeficiency virus positive, but 15 were negative. It was not possible to determine retrospectively whether the cats had autoimmune disease, hyperthyroidism treatment, or recent vaccination which may also cause ANA. The FCoV/ FIP-free status of the Falkland Islands cats should be maintained by FCoV testing incoming cats. However, ANA can complicate interpretation of IFA tests.

  19. SARS and MERS: recent insights into emerging coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Emmie; van Doremalen, Neeltje; Falzarano, Darryl; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 marked the second introduction of a highly pathogenic coronavirus into the human population in the twenty-first century. The continuing introductions of MERS-CoV from dromedary camels, the subsequent travel-related viral spread, the unprecedented nosocomial outbreaks and the high case-fatality rates highlight the need for prophylactic and therapeutic measures. Scientific advancements since the 2002-2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) pandemic allowed for rapid progress in our understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of MERS-CoV and the development of therapeutics. In this Review, we detail our present understanding of the transmission and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, and discuss the current state of development of measures to combat emerging coronaviruses. PMID:27344959

  20. Regulation of Stress Responses and Translational Control by Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, To Sing; Liao, Ying; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Similar to other viruses, coronavirus infection triggers cellular stress responses in infected host cells. The close association of coronavirus replication with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the ER stress responses, which impose a challenge to the viruses. Viruses, in turn, have come up with various mechanisms to block or subvert these responses. One of the ER stress responses is inhibition of the global protein synthesis to reduce the amount of unfolded proteins inside the ER lumen. Viruses have evolved the capacity to overcome the protein translation shutoff to ensure viral protein production. Here, we review the strategies exploited by coronavirus to modulate cellular stress response pathways. The involvement of coronavirus-induced stress responses and translational control in viral pathogenesis will also be briefly discussed. PMID:27384577

  1. Regulation of Stress Responses and Translational Control by Coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To Sing Fung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Similar to other viruses, coronavirus infection triggers cellular stress responses in infected host cells. The close association of coronavirus replication with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER results in the ER stress responses, which impose a challenge to the viruses. Viruses, in turn, have come up with various mechanisms to block or subvert these responses. One of the ER stress responses is inhibition of the global protein synthesis to reduce the amount of unfolded proteins inside the ER lumen. Viruses have evolved the capacity to overcome the protein translation shutoff to ensure viral protein production. Here, we review the strategies exploited by coronavirus to modulate cellular stress response pathways. The involvement of coronavirus-induced stress responses and translational control in viral pathogenesis will also be briefly discussed.

  2. An Outbreak of Human Coronavirus OC43 Infection and Serological Cross-reactivity with SARS Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    David M Patrick; Martin Petric; Danuta M Skowronski; Roland Guasparini; Timothy F Booth; Mel Krajden; Patrick McGeer; Nathalie Bastien; Larry Gustafson; Janet Dubord; Diane MacDonald; David, Samara T; Leila F Srour; Robert Parker; Anton Andonov

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In summer 2003, a respiratory outbreak was investigated in British Columbia, during which nucleic acid tests and serology unexpectedly indicated reactivity for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV).METHODS: Cases at a care facility were epidemiologically characterized and sequentially investigated for conventional agents of respiratory infection, SARS-CoV and other human CoVs. Serological cross-reactivity between SARS-CoV and human CoV-OC43 (HCoV-OC43) was inves...

  3. Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Strain E140, an ST71 European-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Arshnee; Riley, Matthew C; Kania, Stephen A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2013-03-07

    We report the first genome sequence of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) strain E140, isolated from a canine bite wound infection in Denmark. This strain represents the dominant clonal lineage associated with canine MRSP infections in Europe.

  4. A coronavirus detected in the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Brandão

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the identification of a group 2 coronavirus (BatCoV DR/2007 in a Desmodus rotundus vampire bat in Brazil. Phylogenetic analysis of ORF1b revealed that BatCoV DR/2007 originates from a unique lineage in the archetypical group 2 coronaviruses, as described for bat species elsewhere with putative importance in Public Health.

  5. Experimental infection of young rabbits with a rabbit enteric coronavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Descôteaux, J P; Lussier, G.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical signs and lesions caused by the rabbit enteric coronavirus (RECV) were studied in young rabbits orally inoculated with a suspension containing RECV particles. The inoculated animals were observed daily for evidence of diarrhea. Fecal samples and specimens from the small intestine and from the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) were collected from 2 h to 29 days postinoculation (PI) and processed for immune electron microscopy (IEM) and light microscopy. Coronavirus particles w...

  6. Isolation and Biological Characterization of Local Canine Parvovirus Strains%犬细小病毒地方株的分离与生物学特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟凡进; 于志海; 邱昌伟

    2014-01-01

    为调查潍坊地区犬细小病毒的生物学特性和基因变异情况,收集了该地区2005年-2013年16份不同来源的犬细小病毒病料,通过 F81细胞分离、PCR 扩增、电镜观察、血凝试验、人工感染、VP2基因克隆测序等方法进行了生物学特性和分子流行病学调查。结果显示,分离到的5个地方毒株的生物学特性并未改变:能够凝集猪红细胞,对其他动物红细胞不凝集;5个毒株均能导致试验犬感染发病;2个毒株的基因型为 CPV-2a,3个毒株为 CPV-2b,氨基酸同源性和进化树分析表明,5个地方毒株与国际参考毒株的同源性在96%以上,与国内北京分离株亲缘关系最近,说明该地区的毒株进化与世界范围内其他毒株保持了同步和一致。%To research the biological characteristics and gene variation of canine parvovirus (CPV)in Wei-fang surroundings,16 specimens from different dogs infected with CPV were collected during 2005 to 2013 and they were studied by series of experiments such as viral isolation in F81,PCR,electronic microscope, HA/HI test,experimental infection and gene sequencing of vp2.Five local CPV strains were isolated from these specimens,in which two strains were proved to be CPV-2a and other three strains were CPV-2b. These 5 virus strains could agglutinate 1% swine erythrocyte.The experimental dogs showed typical clini-cal symptoms by artificial infection with five local strains.Conpared with other international reference strains,the amino acid homology of these five local strains were higher than 96% and shared the highest homology with Beijing isolate(CPV-02/09).Results showed that CPV in Weifang areas keeped the same mutation pace and mode with other strains in worldwide.

  7. [New coronavirus infection: new challenges, new legacies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro; Vargas-Valerio, Alfredo; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: emergió una nueva enfermedad por coronavirus. Su historia natural y sus determinantes todavía se están investigando. Se carece de una publicación que estudie todos los casos identificados en el mundo, por lo que el objetivo de este artículo estriba en describir los casos y defunciones por el nuevo coronavirus. Métodos: se revisaron las publicaciones en línea de la Organización Mundial de la Salud, del Centro Europeo para el Control y Prevención de Enfermedades y de la Eurosurveillance. Se realizó un análisis descriptivo de los casos, se calcularon los límites para proporciones con un alfa del 0.05 por prueba de Wilson y una prueba t de Student para diferencia de medias. Resultados: son 17 casos confirmados y 11 defunciones en varios países de Asia y Europa; predominaron los pacientes masculinos. La tasa de letalidad fue de 64.70 %; los que fallecieron se hospitalizaron cinco días después de los primeros síntomas. Se carece de publicaciones que describan la historia natural de la enfermedad; sin embargo, lo descrito en las publicaciones de Europa coincide con los resultados de este estudio. Conclusión: es necesario continuar con la vigilancia epidemiológica y la realización de nuevos estudios para evaluar el impacto de esta enfermedad en la salud pública internacional.

  8. Antigenic typing Polish isolates of canine parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizak, B. [National Veterinary Research Institute, Pulawy (Poland); Plucienniczak, A. [Polish Academy ofd Sciences. Microbiology and Virology Center, Lodz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Polish strains of canine parvovirus isolated between 1982 and 1993 were examined to determine the extent to which the virus has evolved antigenically and genetically over eleven years. Two CPV isolates obtained in Warsaw in 1982 and Pulawy in 1993, were examined using monoclonal antibody typing, restriction analysis and sequencing VP-2 protein gene. Five other isolates from Warsaw and Pulawy were tested with the panel of monoclonal antibodies specific to CPV-2, CPV-2a and common for canine parvovirus, feline panleukopenia virus and milk enteritis virus. Results of the studies demonstrated that all isolates tested represented CPV-2a antigenic type. Rapid antigenic strain replacement recorded by Parrish and Senda in the U.S.A and Japan was not confirmed in Poland. (author). 30 refs, 2 tabs.

  9. Microbiological and histopathological aspects of canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    Coggan, Jennifer Anne; Melville, Priscilla Anne; de Oliveira, Clair Motos; Faustino, Marcelo; Moreno, Andréa Micke; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2008-01-01

    As pyometra is recognized as one of the main causes of disease and death in the bitch the purposes of this study were to evaluate microbiological and histopathological aspects of canine pyometra and to research the virulence factors of the E. coli isolates identifying possible risks to human health. The microbiological isolation from the intrauterine contents of 100 dogs with pyometra was carried out and the virulence factors in the E. coli strains were identified using PCR method. This study...

  10. Periodontal ligament distraction: A simplified approach for rapid canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis is a method of inducing new bone formation by applying mechanical strains on preexisting bone. The process of osteogenesis in the periodontal ligament during orthodontic tooth movement is similar to the osteogenesis in the midpalatal suture during rapid palatal expansion. A new concept of "distracting the periodontal ligament" is proposed to elicit rapid canine retraction in two weeks. At the time of first premolar extraction, the interseptal bone distal to the canine was undermined with a bone bur, grooving vertically inside the extraction socket along the buccal and lingual sides and extending obliquely toward the socket base. Then, a tooth-borne, custom-made, intraoral distraction device was placed to distract the canine distally into the extraction space. It was activated 0.5 mm/day, immediately after the extraction. Canine was distracted 6.5 mm into the extraction space within two weeks.

  11. SARS冠状病毒的病原生物学分析及其启示%Analysis of pathogenic biology of SARS - associated coronavirus and its implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾耀英

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is the first new epidemic of the twenty - first century. A novel coronavirus (SARS - CoV) has been identified as the causative agent of SAP, S. The genome of SARS - CoV has 29,727 nucleatides in length. The genome organization, with 11 open reading flames, is similar to that of conronaviruses.Phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons showed that SARS- CoV is not closely related to any of the known coronaviruses, indicating neither a mutant nor recombinant of well -characterized coronaviruses. It is a complete new coronavirus from nonhuman hostPathological studies show that severe immune response, associated to cytokine dysregulation, may be related to the lung damage of fatal SRAS. Recombination of genomes of wild - type strains with vaccine coronavirus is a potential risk associated with the application of living attenuated coronavirus vaccines. The proteinases, controlling the activities of the SARS- CoV replication, and spike protein, involved in viral entry and pathogenesis, represent attractive targets of anti- SARS drug development. Comparative full-length genome sequence analysis of 14 SARS coronavirus isolates suggests a remarkable genetic conservation of the virus. Anti - SARS vaccine and drug development will benefit from this genetic conservation. SARS-CoV is not likely to change rapidly and thus may not readily mutate to a benign infection. The progress in anti - SARS research has been impressive. However, one of the most effective tools in the control of the SARS is quickly tracing and isolating the contacts of stricken patients before they spread the virus further.

  12. Development of a SARS Coronavirus Vaccine from Recombinant Spike Protein Plus Delta Inulin Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Clifton; Chubet, Richard; Holtz, Kathy; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Barnard, Dale; Cox, Manon; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Given periodic outbreaks of fatal human infections caused by coronaviruses, development of an optimal coronavirus vaccine platform capable of rapid production is an ongoing priority. This chapter describes the use of an insect cell expression system for rapid production of a recombinant vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS). Detailed methods are presented for expression, purification, and release testing of SARS recombinant spike protein antigen, followed by adjuvant formulation and animal testing. The methods herein described for rapid development of a highly protective SARS vaccine are equally suited to rapid development of vaccines against other fatal human coronavirus infections, e.g., the MERS coronavirus.

  13. Coronaviruses: emerging and re-emerging pathogens in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Chan, Jasper F W

    2015-12-22

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) epidemics have proven the ability of coronaviruses to cross species barrier and emerge rapidly in humans. Other coronaviruses such as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) are also known to cause major disease epidemics in animals with huge economic loss. This special issue in Virology Journal aims to highlight the advances and key discoveries in the animal origin, viral evolution, epidemiology, diagnostics and pathogenesis of the emerging and re-emerging coronaviruses in both humans and animals.

  14. SARS-like cluster of circulating bat coronavirus pose threat for human emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Yount, Boyd L.; Debbink, Kari; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Plante, Jessica A.; Graham, Rachel L.; Scobey, Trevor; Ge, Xing-Yi; Donaldson, Eric F.; Randell, Scott H.; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Marasco, Wayne A.; Shi, Zhengli-Li; Baric, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)-CoV underscores the threat of cross-species transmission events leading to outbreaks in humans. In this study, we examine the disease potential for SARS-like CoVs currently circulating in Chinese horseshoe bat populations. Utilizing the SARS-CoV infectious clone, we generated and characterized a chimeric virus expressing the spike of bat coronavirus SHC014 in a mouse adapted SARS-CoV backbone. The results indicate that group 2b viruses encoding the SHC014 spike in a wild type backbone can efficiently utilize multiple ACE2 receptor orthologs, replicate efficiently in primary human airway cells, and achieve in vitro titers equivalent to epidemic strains of SARS-CoV. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrate replication of the chimeric virus in mouse lung with notable pathogenesis. Evaluation of available SARS-based immune-therapeutic and prophylactic modalities revealed poor efficacy; both monoclonal antibody and vaccine approaches failed to neutralize and protect from CoVs utilizing the novel spike protein. Importantly, based on these findings, we synthetically rederived an infectious full length SHC014 recombinant virus and demonstrate robust viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the work highlights a continued risk of SARS-CoV reemergence from viruses currently circulating in bat populations. PMID:26552008

  15. Despre babesioza canină

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Nanu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this bibliographic essay, addressed both to veterinary clinicians and researchers, is to bring to mind the disease in terms of etiology, clinical manifestations and therapeutic and prophylactic management, as well as to remind the issues arising from recent researches. Depending on the virulence of the parasite species, body's immune response and therapeutic management approached, the plateau of disease evolution can be quite wide - from a favorable prognosis to a lethal outcome of the animal. The complexity of the pathogenic mechanism in babesiosis is due to soluble parasite antigens (SPA which, according to recent studies, have been obtained in vitro and then used as immunological product in disease prevention. Producing a vaccine against canine babesiosis with parasite antigens of local strains could play an important role to prevent the clinical expression of this disease in Romania.

  16. Clinical and serological response of wild dogs (Lycaon pictus to vaccination against canine distemper, canine parvovirus infection and rabies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Van Heerden

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Wild dogs Lycaon pictus (n = 8 were vaccinated 4 times against canine distemper (n = 8 (initially with inactivated and subsequently with live attenuated strains of canine distemper and canine parvovirus infection (n = 8 over a period of 360 days. Four of the wild dogs were also vaccinated 3 times against rabies using a live oral vaccine and 4 with an inactivated parenteral vaccine. Commercially-available canine distemper, canine parvovirus and parenteral rabies vaccines, intended for use in domestic dogs, were used. None of the vaccinated dogs showed any untoward clinical signs. The inactivated canine distemper vaccine did not result in seroconversion whereas the attenuated live vaccine resulted in seroconversion in all wild dogs. Presumably protective concentrations of antibodies to canine distemper virus were present in all wild dogs for at least 451 days. Canine parvovirus haemagglutination inhibition titres were present in all wild dogs prior to the administration of vaccine and protective concentrations persisted for at least 451 days. Vaccination against parvovirus infection resulted in a temporary increase in canine parvovirus haemagglutination inhibition titres in most dogs. Administration of both inactivated parenteral and live oral rabies vaccine initially resulted in seroconversion in 7 of 8 dogs. These titres, however, dropped to very low concentrations within 100 days. Booster administrations resulted in increased antibody concentrations in all dogs. It was concluded that the vaccines were safe to use in healthy subadult wild dogs and that a vaccination protocol in free-ranging wild dogs should at least incorporate booster vaccinations against rabies 3-6 months after the first inoculation.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Dromedary Camel Coronavirus UAE-HKU23 from Dromedaries of the Middle East: Minimal Serological Cross-Reactivity between MERS Coronavirus and Dromedary Camel Coronavirus UAE-HKU23

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Y. Woo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported the discovery of a dromedary camel coronavirus UAE-HKU23 (DcCoV UAE-HKU23 from dromedaries in the Middle East. In this study, DcCoV UAE-HKU23 was successfully isolated in two of the 14 dromedary fecal samples using HRT-18G cells, with cytopathic effects observed five days after inoculation. Northern blot analysis revealed at least seven distinct RNA species, corresponding to predicted subgenomic mRNAs and confirming the core sequence of transcription regulatory sequence motifs as 5′-UCUAAAC-3′ as we predicted previously. Antibodies against DcCoV UAE-HKU23 were detected in 58 (98.3% and 59 (100% of the 59 dromedary sera by immunofluorescence and neutralization antibody tests, respectively. There was significant correlation between the antibody titers determined by immunofluorescence and neutralization assays (Pearson coefficient = 0.525, p < 0.0001. Immunization of mice using recombinant N proteins of DcCoV UAE-HKU23 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, respectively, and heat-inactivated DcCoV UAE-HKU23 showed minimal cross-antigenicity between DcCoV UAE-HKU23 and MERS-CoV by Western blot and neutralization antibody assays. Codon usage and genetic distance analysis of RdRp, S and N genes showed that the 14 strains of DcCoV UAE-HKU23 formed a distinct cluster, separated from those of other closely related members of Betacoronavirus 1, including alpaca CoV, confirming that DcCoV UAE-HKU23 is a novel member of Betacoronavirus 1.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Dromedary Camel Coronavirus UAE-HKU23 from Dromedaries of the Middle East: Minimal Serological Cross-Reactivity between MERS Coronavirus and Dromedary Camel Coronavirus UAE-HKU23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Fan, Rachel Y. Y.; Lau, Candy C. Y.; Wong, Emily Y. M.; Joseph, Sunitha; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Wernery, Renate; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Wernery, Ulrich; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported the discovery of a dromedary camel coronavirus UAE-HKU23 (DcCoV UAE-HKU23) from dromedaries in the Middle East. In this study, DcCoV UAE-HKU23 was successfully isolated in two of the 14 dromedary fecal samples using HRT-18G cells, with cytopathic effects observed five days after inoculation. Northern blot analysis revealed at least seven distinct RNA species, corresponding to predicted subgenomic mRNAs and confirming the core sequence of transcription regulatory sequence motifs as 5′-UCUAAAC-3′ as we predicted previously. Antibodies against DcCoV UAE-HKU23 were detected in 58 (98.3%) and 59 (100%) of the 59 dromedary sera by immunofluorescence and neutralization antibody tests, respectively. There was significant correlation between the antibody titers determined by immunofluorescence and neutralization assays (Pearson coefficient = 0.525, p < 0.0001). Immunization of mice using recombinant N proteins of DcCoV UAE-HKU23 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), respectively, and heat-inactivated DcCoV UAE-HKU23 showed minimal cross-antigenicity between DcCoV UAE-HKU23 and MERS-CoV by Western blot and neutralization antibody assays. Codon usage and genetic distance analysis of RdRp, S and N genes showed that the 14 strains of DcCoV UAE-HKU23 formed a distinct cluster, separated from those of other closely related members of Betacoronavirus 1, including alpaca CoV, confirming that DcCoV UAE-HKU23 is a novel member of Betacoronavirus 1. PMID:27164099

  19. Molecular phylogeny of coronaviruses including human SARS-CoV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Phylogenetic tree of coronaviruses (CoVs) including the human SARS-associated virus is reconstructed from complete genomes by using our newly developed K- string composition approach. The relation of the human SARS-CoV to other coronaviruses, i.e. the rooting of the tree is suggested by choosing an appropriate outgroup. SARS-CoV makes a separate group closer but still distant from G2 (CoVs in mammalian host). The relation between different isolates of the human SARS virus is inferred by first constructing an ultrametric distance matrix from counting sequence variations in the genomes. The resulting tree is consistent with clinic relations between the SARS-CoV isolates. In addition to a larger variety of coronavirus genomes these results provide phylogenetic knowledge based on independent novel methodology as compared to recent phylogenetic studies on SARS-CoV.

  20. Oncolytic virotherapy in veterinary medicine: current status and future prospects for canine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Sandeep S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oncolytic viruses refer to those that are able to eliminate malignancies by direct targeting and lysis of cancer cells, leaving non-cancerous tissues unharmed. Several oncolytic viruses including adenovirus strains, canine distemper virus and vaccinia virus strains have been used for canine cancer therapy in preclinical studies. However, in contrast to human studies, clinical trials with oncolytic viruses for canine cancer patients have not been reported. An 'ideal' virus has yet to be identified. This review is focused on the prospective use of oncolytic viruses in the treatment of canine tumors - a knowledge that will undoubtedly contribute to the development of oncolytic viral agents for canine cancer therapy in the future.

  1. Enhanced adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius sequence type 71 to canine and human corneocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latronico, Francesca; Moodley, Arshnee; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose;

    2014-01-01

    adherence properties between MRSP and methicillin-susceptible (MSSP) strains. Four MRSP, including a human and a canine strain belonging to ST71 and two canine non-ST71 strains, and three genetically unrelated MSSP were tested on corneocytes collected from five dogs and six humans. All strains were fully......The recent worldwide spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) in dogs is a reason for concern due to the typical multidrug resistance patterns displayed by some MRSP lineages such as sequence type (ST) 71. The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro....... pseudintermedius adherence to canine corneocytes was significantly higher compared to human corneocytes (p human origin adhered equally well to canine and human corneocytes, suggesting that MRSP ST71 may be able to adapt to human skin. The genetic basis of the enhanced...

  2. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Foroughi-Parvar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL. The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now.

  3. Molecular analysis of the bovine coronavirus S1 gene by direct sequencing of diarrheic fecal specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Takiuchi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bovine coronavirus (BCoV causes severe diarrhea in newborn calves, is associated with winter dysentery in adult cattle and respiratory infections in calves and feedlot cattle. The BCoV S protein plays a fundamental role in viral attachment and entry into the host cell, and is cleaved into two subunits termed S1 (amino terminal and S2 (carboxy terminal. The present study describes a strategy for the sequencing of the BCoV S1 gene directly from fecal diarrheic specimens that were previously identified as BCoV positive by RT-PCR assay for N gene detection. A consensus sequence of 2681 nucleotides was obtained through direct sequencing of seven overlapping PCR fragments of the S gene. The samples did not undergo cell culture passage prior to PCR amplification and sequencing. The structural analysis was based on the genomic differences between Brazilian strains and other known BCoV from different geographical regions. The phylogenetic analysis of the entire S1 gene showed that the BCoV Brazilian strains were more distant from the Mebus strain (97.8% identity for nucleotides and 96.8% identity for amino acids and more similar to the BCoV-ENT strain (98.7% for nucleotides and 98.7% for amino acids. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the hypervariable region of the S1 subunit, these strains clustered with the American (BCoV-ENT, 182NS and Canadian (BCQ20, BCQ2070, BCQ9, BCQ571, BCQ1523 calf diarrhea and the Canadian winter dysentery (BCQ7373, BCQ2590 strains, but clustered on a separate branch of the Korean and respiratory BCoV strains. The BCoV strains of the present study were not clustered in the same branch of previously published Brazilian strains (AY606193, AY606194. These data agree with the genealogical construction and suggest that at least two different BCoV strains are circulating in Brazil.

  4. Development of a Canine Adenovirus Type 1 Vaccine Strain E3-deleted Based Expression Vector%犬腺病毒1型疫苗株E3缺失表达载体的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎皓; 唐七义; 张云; 王树蕙; 郭彩云

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate canine adenovirus type 1 vaccine strain (Cannaught Laboratory Limited,CLL) as recombinant vaccine and gene transfer vector. Methods Recombinant virus CLLEGFP which contains enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP) reporter gene was constructed. CLLEGFP was used to infect various human derived cell lines (293, Hela, CO, SW, Hep-2 and CAM) by inoculating intraperitoneally(IP), intravenously(IV)and intramuscularly (IM)to Kunming mice other than oral administration. Various tissue samples of the mice were collected at multitime point for observing EGFP green fluorescence. Anti-EGFP antibodies were detected by Western blot analysis in the sera after 4 weeks. Results CLLEGFP can infect various human derived cell lines and express EGFP. EGFP green fluorescence were observed in liver tissue cells after IP transducing 3 days. All immune inoculation ways above could induce Kunming mice producing anti-EGFP antibodies which were identified by Western blot analysis. Conclusions These resluts indicate that CLL possess powerful potential as recombinant vaccine and gene transfer vector.%探索以犬腺病毒1型疫苗株(Cannaught Laboratory Limited.CLL)作为病毒重组疫苗和基因转移载体的可行性。方法构建带增强型绿色荧光蛋白(enhanced green fluorescent protein,EGFP)报告基因的E3缺失重组病毒CLLEGFP。将CLLEGFP感染各种人源细胞,并以灌胃、腹腔注射、尾静脉注射和肌肉注射等不同途径接种昆明小鼠。多时间点取小鼠组织标本,冷冻干燥切片,观察EGFP的表达。4周后采集小鼠血清,以Western blot分析抗EGFP 抗体的产生。结果 CLLEGFP能够感染各种人源细胞并表达EGFP。在腹腔接种CLLEGFP 3 d的小鼠肝组织细胞中可见转导的EGFP。Western blot分析显示,以各种途径免疫接种重组病毒4周后的小鼠血清中均存在抗EGFP特异抗体。结论 CLL具有开发成为病毒重组疫苗和基因转移载体的潜力。

  5. Molecular and antigenic characterization of bovine Coronavirus circulating in Argentinean cattle during 1994-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, M; Miño, S; Rodriguez, D; Badaracco, A; Nuñes, I; Souza, S P; Bilbao, G; Louge Uriarte, E; Galarza, R; Vega, C; Odeon, A; Saif, L J; Parreño, V

    2015-12-31

    Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is an important viral pathogen associated with neonatal calf diarrhea. Our aim was to investigate the incidence of BCoV in diarrhea outbreaks in beef and dairy herds from Argentina during 1994-2010. A total of 5.365 fecal samples from diarrheic calves were screened for BCoV diagnosis by ELISA. The virus was detected in 1.71% (92/5365) of the samples corresponding to 5.95% (63/1058) of the diarrhea cases in 239 beef and 324 dairy farms. The detection rate of BCoV was significantly higher in dairy than in beef herds: 12.13% (29/239) vs. 4.32% (14/324) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the hypervariable S1 region of seven representative samples (from different husbandry systems, farm locations and years of sampling) indicated that BCoV strains circulating in Argentinean beef and dairy herds formed a cluster distinct from other geographical regions. Interestingly, Argentinean strains are distantly related (at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels) with the Mebus historic reference BCoV strain included in the vaccines currently available in Argentina. However, Mebus-induced antibodies were capable of neutralizing the BCoV Arg95, a field strain adapted to grow in vitro, and vice versa, indicating that both strains belong to the same CoV serotype reported in cattle. This work represents the first large survey describing BCoV circulation in Argentinean cattle.

  6. Molecular and antigenic characterization of bovine Coronavirus circulating in Argentinean cattle during 1994-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, M; Miño, S; Rodriguez, D; Badaracco, A; Nuñes, I; Souza, S P; Bilbao, G; Louge Uriarte, E; Galarza, R; Vega, C; Odeon, A; Saif, L J; Parreño, V

    2015-12-31

    Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is an important viral pathogen associated with neonatal calf diarrhea. Our aim was to investigate the incidence of BCoV in diarrhea outbreaks in beef and dairy herds from Argentina during 1994-2010. A total of 5.365 fecal samples from diarrheic calves were screened for BCoV diagnosis by ELISA. The virus was detected in 1.71% (92/5365) of the samples corresponding to 5.95% (63/1058) of the diarrhea cases in 239 beef and 324 dairy farms. The detection rate of BCoV was significantly higher in dairy than in beef herds: 12.13% (29/239) vs. 4.32% (14/324) respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the hypervariable S1 region of seven representative samples (from different husbandry systems, farm locations and years of sampling) indicated that BCoV strains circulating in Argentinean beef and dairy herds formed a cluster distinct from other geographical regions. Interestingly, Argentinean strains are distantly related (at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels) with the Mebus historic reference BCoV strain included in the vaccines currently available in Argentina. However, Mebus-induced antibodies were capable of neutralizing the BCoV Arg95, a field strain adapted to grow in vitro, and vice versa, indicating that both strains belong to the same CoV serotype reported in cattle. This work represents the first large survey describing BCoV circulation in Argentinean cattle. PMID:26520931

  7. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. PMID:24966245

  8. Transmission of MERS-coronavirus in household contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drosten, Christian; Meyer, Benjamin; Müller, Marcel A; Corman, Victor M; Al-Masri, Malak; Hossain, Raheela; Madani, Hosam; Sieberg, Andrea; Bosch, Berend Jan; Lattwein, Erik; Alhakeem, Raafat F; Assiri, Abdullah M; Hajomar, Waleed; Albarrak, Ali M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Zumla, Alimuddin I; Memish, Ziad A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strategies to contain the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) depend on knowledge of the rate of human-to-human transmission, including subclinical infections. A lack of serologic tools has hindered targeted studies of transmission. METHODS: We studied 26 index patien

  9. [Nosocomial infections due to human coronaviruses in the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneur, A; Legrand, M C; Picard, B; Baron, R; Talbot, P J; de Parscau, L; Sizun, J

    2002-01-01

    Human coronaviruses, with two known serogroups named 229-E and OC-43, are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses. The large RNA is surrounded by a nucleoprotein (protein N). The envelop contains 2 or 3 glycoproteins: spike protein (or protein S), matrix protein (or protein M) and a hemagglutinin (or protein HE). Their pathogen role remains unclear because their isolation is difficult. Reliable and rapid methods as immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction allow new researches on epidemiology. Human coronaviruses can survive for as long as 6 days in suspension and 3 hours after drying on surfaces, suggesting that they could be a source of hospital-acquired infections. Two prospective studies conducted in a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit demonstrated a significant association of coronavirus-positive nasopharyngal samples with respiratory illness in hospitalised preterm neonates. Positive samples from staff suggested either a patient-to-staff or a staff-to-patient transmission. No cross-infection were observed from community-acquired respiratory-syncitial virus or influenza-infected children to neonates. Universal precautions with hand washing and surface desinfection could be proposed to prevent coronavirus transmission.

  10. Neotropical Bats from Costa Rica harbour Diverse Coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Soto, A; Taylor-Castillo, L; Vargas-Vargas, N; Rodríguez-Herrera, B; Jiménez, C; Corrales-Aguilar, E

    2015-11-01

    Bats are hosts of diverse coronaviruses (CoVs) known to potentially cross the host-species barrier. For analysing coronavirus diversity in a bat species-rich country, a total of 421 anal swabs/faecal samples from Costa Rican bats were screened for CoV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene sequences by a pancoronavirus PCR. Six families, 24 genera and 41 species of bats were analysed. The detection rate for CoV was 1%. Individuals (n = 4) from four different species of frugivorous (Artibeus jamaicensis, Carollia perspicillata and Carollia castanea) and nectivorous (Glossophaga soricina) bats were positive for coronavirus-derived nucleic acids. Analysis of 440 nt. RdRp sequences allocated all Costa Rican bat CoVs to the α-CoV group. Several CoVs sequences clustered near previously described CoVs from the same species of bat, but were phylogenetically distant from the human CoV sequences identified to date, suggesting no recent spillover events. The Glossophaga soricina CoV sequence is sufficiently dissimilar (26% homology to the closest known bat CoVs) to represent a unique coronavirus not clustering near other CoVs found in the same bat species so far, implying an even higher CoV diversity than previously suspected.

  11. The SARS-coronavirus-host interactome: identification of cyclophilins as target for pan-coronavirus inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Pfefferle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses (CoVs are important human and animal pathogens that induce fatal respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in 2002/2003 has demonstrated human vulnerability to (Coronavirus CoV epidemics. Neither vaccines nor therapeutics are available against human and animal CoVs. Knowledge of host cell proteins that take part in pivotal virus-host interactions could define broad-spectrum antiviral targets. In this study, we used a systems biology approach employing a genome-wide yeast-two hybrid interaction screen to identify immunopilins (PPIA, PPIB, PPIH, PPIG, FKBP1A, FKBP1B as interaction partners of the CoV non-structural protein 1 (Nsp1. These molecules modulate the Calcineurin/NFAT pathway that plays an important role in immune cell activation. Overexpression of NSP1 and infection with live SARS-CoV strongly increased signalling through the Calcineurin/NFAT pathway and enhanced the induction of interleukin 2, compatible with late-stage immunopathogenicity and long-term cytokine dysregulation as observed in severe SARS cases. Conversely, inhibition of cyclophilins by cyclosporine A (CspA blocked the replication of CoVs of all genera, including SARS-CoV, human CoV-229E and -NL-63, feline CoV, as well as avian infectious bronchitis virus. Non-immunosuppressive derivatives of CspA might serve as broad-range CoV inhibitors applicable against emerging CoVs as well as ubiquitous pathogens of humans and livestock.

  12. Vaccines for canine leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisa B. Palatnik-De-Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global-warming, co-infection with immunosuppressive diseases and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost-effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans

  13. Human coronavirus EMC does not require the SARS-coronavirus receptor and maintains broad replicative capability in mammalian cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Müller (Marcel); V.S. Raj (V. Stalin); D. Muth; B. Meyer (Bernhard); S. Kallies (Stephan); S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Wollny (Robert); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); S. Specht (Sabine); T. Suliman (Tasnim); K. Zimmermann (Kathrin); T. Binger (Tabea); I. Eckerle; M. Tschapka (Marco); A.M. Zaki (Ali); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); C. Drosten (Christian)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA new human coronavirus (hCoV-EMC) has emerged very recently in the Middle East. The clinical presentation resembled that of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as encountered during the epidemic in 2002/2003. In both cases, acute renal failure was observed in humans. HCoV-EMC i

  14. Characterization of the Coronavirus M Protein and Nucleocapsid Interaction in Infected Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Krishna; Maeda, Akihiko; Maeda, Junko; Makino, Shinji

    2000-01-01

    Coronavirus contains three envelope proteins, M, E and S, and a nucleocapsid, which consists of genomic RNA and N protein, within the viral envelope. We studied the macromolecular interactions involved in coronavirus assembly in cells infected with a murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). Coimmunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated an interaction between N protein and M protein in infected cells. Pulse-labeling experiments showed that newly synthesized, unglycosylated M protein inte...

  15. Detection of an Antigenic Group 2 Coronavirus in an Adult Alpaca with Enteritis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Simpson, Katharine M.; Kapil, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Antigenic group 2 coronavirus was detected in a fecal sample of an adult alpaca by reverse transcription-PCR. The presence of alpaca coronavirus (ApCoV) in the small intestine was demonstrated by immune histochemistry with an antinucleocapsid monoclonal antibody that reacts with group 2 coronaviruses. Other common causes of diarrhea in adult camelids were not detected. We conclude that nutritional stress may have predisposed the alpaca to severe ApCoV infection.

  16. Effect of coronavirus infection on reproductive performance of turkey hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, Olusegun O; Ali, Ahmed; Elaish, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Murgia, Maria; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-09-01

    Turkey coronavirus (TCoV) infection causes enteritis in turkeys of varying ages with high mortality in young birds. In older birds, field evidence indicates the possible involvement of TCoV in egg-production drops in turkey hens. However, no experimental studies have been conducted to demonstrate TCoV pathogenesis in turkey hens and its effect on reproductive performance. In the present study, we assessed the possible effect of TCoV on the reproductive performance of experimentally infected turkey hens. In two separate trials, 29- to 30-wk-old turkey hens in peak egg production were either mock-infected or inoculated orally with TCoV (Indiana strain). Cloacal swabs and intestinal and reproductive tissues were collected and standard reverse-transcription PCR was conducted to detect TCoV RNA. In the cloacal swabs, TCoV was detected consistently at 3, 5, 7, and 12 days postinoculation (DPI) with higher rates of detection after 5 DPI (> 90%). All intestinal samples were also positive for TCoV at 7 DPI, and microscopic lesions consisting of severe enteritis with villous atrophy were observed in the duodenum and jejunum of TCoV-infected hens. In one of the trials TCoV was detected from the oviduct of two birds at 7 DPI; however, no or mild microscopic lesions were present. In both experimental trials an average of 28%-29% drop in egg production was observed in TCoV-infected turkey hens between 4 and 7 DPI. In a separate trial we also confirmed that TCoV can efficiently transmit from infected to contact control hens. Our results show that TCoV infection can affect the reproductive performance in turkey hens, causing a transient drop in egg production. This drop in egg production most likely occurred as consequence of the severe enteritis produced by the TCoV. However, the potential replication of TCoV in the oviduct and its effect on pathogenesis should be considered and further investigated.

  17. Human Coronavirus-Associated Influenza-Like Illness in the Community Setting in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razuri, Hugo; Malecki, Monika; Tinoco, Yeny; Ortiz, Ernesto; Guezala, M Claudia; Romero, Candice; Estela, Abel; Breña, Patricia; Morales, Maria-Luisa; Reaves, Erik J; Gomez, Jorge; Uyeki, Timothy M; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Bausch, Daniel G; Schildgen, Verena; Schildgen, Oliver; Montgomery, Joel M

    2015-11-01

    We present findings describing the epidemiology of non-severe acute respiratory syndrome human coronavirus-associated influenza-like illness from a population-based active follow-up study in four different regions of Peru. In 2010, the prevalence of infections by human coronaviruses 229E, OC43, NL63, or HKU1 was 6.4% in participants with influenza-like illness who tested negative for influenza viruses. Ten of 11 human coronavirus infections were identified in the fall-winter season. Human coronaviruses are present in different regions of Peru and are relatively frequently associated with influenza-like illness in Peru.

  18. The canine vomeronasal organ.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, D. R.; Wiekamp, M D

    1984-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ was studied in mature dogs with the optical, transmission electron, and scanning electron microscopes. The canine vomeronasal complex is structurally well developed. Large blood vessels are present deep to both the lateral, 'non-receptor' and medial, 'receptor' epithelia. In addition to the unmyelinated vomeronasal nerves in the lamina propria deep to the 'receptor' epithelium, numerous nerves containing both myelinated and unmyelinated fibres are present deep to the 'no...

  19. Mast cells in Canine parvovirus-2-associated enteritis with crypt abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldemeskel, M W; Saliki, J T; Blas-Machado, U; Whittington, L

    2013-11-01

    The role of mast cells (MCs) in allergic reactions and parasitic infections is well established. Their involvement in host immune response against bacterial and viral infections is reported. In this study, investigation is made to determine if MCs are associated with Canine parvovirus-2 (CPV-2)-induced enteritis with crypt abscess (ECA). Mast cell count (MCC) was made on toluidine blue-stained intestinal sections from a total of 34 dogs. These included 16 dogs exhibiting ECA positive for CPV-2 and negative for Canine distemper virus and Canine coronavirus by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent antibody test, 12 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 6 non-ECA/non-IBD (control) dogs. The average total MCC per high-power field in ECA (40.8 ± 2.2) and IBD (24.7 ± 2.1) was significantly higher (P .05), MCC was also higher in ECA than in IBD. The present study for the first time has documented significantly increased MCs in CPV-2-associated ECA as was previously reported for IBD, showing that MCs may also play an important role in CPV-2-associated ECA. Further studies involving more CPV-infected dogs are recommended to substantiate the findings.

  20. Alphacoronaviruses Detected in French Bats Are Phylogeographically Linked to Coronaviruses of European Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffard, Anne; Demanche, Christine; Arthur, Laurent; Pinçon, Claire; Michaux, Johan; Dubuisson, Jean

    2015-12-02

    Bats are a reservoir for a diverse range of viruses, including coronaviruses (CoVs). To determine the presence of CoVs in French bats, fecal samples were collected between July and August of 2014 from four bat species in seven different locations around the city of Bourges in France. We present for the first time the presence of alpha-CoVs in French Pipistrellus pipistrellus bat species with an estimated prevalence of 4.2%. Based on the analysis of a fragment of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, phylogenetic analyses show that alpha-CoVs sequences detected in French bats are closely related to other European bat alpha-CoVs. Phylogeographic analyses of RdRp sequences show that several CoVs strains circulate in European bats: (i) old strains detected that have probably diverged a long time ago and are detected in different bat subspecies; (ii) strains detected in Myotis and Pipistrellus bat species that have more recently diverged. Our findings support previous observations describing the complexity of the detected CoVs in bats worldwide.

  1. Coronavirus infection in mink (Mustela vison). Serological evidence of infection with a coronavirus related to transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, P; Moving, V; Svansson, V;

    1992-01-01

    Antibodies to a transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV)-related coronavirus have been demonstrated in mink sera by indirect immunofluorescence, peroxidase-linked antibody assays and immunoblotting. This is the first serological evidence of a specific coronavirus infection in mink. The putative......-reacted with N and M polypeptides of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Thus MCV may occupy an intermediate position between the TGEV group of coronaviruses and PEDV. The possibility that MCV may be associated with syndromes of acute enteritis in preweaning mink is discussed....

  2. Prevalence of Korean cats with natural feline coronavirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Myoung-Heon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline coronavirus is comprised of two pathogenic biotypes consisting of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV, which are both divided into two serotypes. To examine the prevalence of Korean cats infected with feline coronavirus (FCoV type I and II, fecal samples were obtained from 212 cats (107 pet and 105 feral in 2009. Results Fourteen cats were FCoV-positive, including infections with type I FCoV (n = 8, type II FCoV (n = 4, and types I and II co-infection (n = 2. Low seroprevalences (13.7%, 29/212 of FCoV were identified in chronically ill cats (19.3%, 16/83 and healthy cats (10.1%, 13/129. Conclusions Although the prevalence of FCoV infection was not high in comparison to other countries, there was a higher prevalence of type I FCoV in Korean felines. The prevalence of FCoV antigen and antibody in Korean cats are expected to gradually increase due to the rising numbers of stray and companion cats.

  3. Design of wide-spectrum inhibitors targeting coronavirus main proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Yang

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The genus Coronavirus contains about 25 species of coronaviruses (CoVs, which are important pathogens causing highly prevalent diseases and often severe or fatal in humans and animals. No licensed specific drugs are available to prevent their infection. Different host receptors for cellular entry, poorly conserved structural proteins (antigens, and the high mutation and recombination rates of CoVs pose a significant problem in the development of wide-spectrum anti-CoV drugs and vaccines. CoV main proteases (M(pros, which are key enzymes in viral gene expression and replication, were revealed to share a highly conservative substrate-recognition pocket by comparison of four crystal structures and a homology model representing all three genetic clusters of the genus Coronavirus. This conclusion was further supported by enzyme activity assays. Mechanism-based irreversible inhibitors were designed, based on this conserved structural region, and a uniform inhibition mechanism was elucidated from the structures of Mpro-inhibitor complexes from severe acute respiratory syndrome-CoV and porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus. A structure-assisted optimization program has yielded compounds with fast in vitro inactivation of multiple CoV M(pros, potent antiviral activity, and extremely low cellular toxicity in cell-based assays. Further modification could rapidly lead to the discovery of a single agent with clinical potential against existing and possible future emerging CoV-related diseases.

  4. Detection of Coronaviruses in Bats of Various Species in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B. Boniotti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bats are natural reservoirs for many mammalian coronaviruses, which have received renewed interest after the discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS CoV in humans. This study describes the identification and molecular characterization of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in bats in Italy, from 2010 to 2012. Sixty-nine faecal samples and 126 carcasses were tested using pan-coronavirus RT-PCR. Coronavirus RNAs were detected in seven faecal samples and nine carcasses. A phylogenetic analysis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence fragments aided in identifying two alphacoronaviruses from Kuhl’s pipistrelle (Pipistrellus kuhlii, three clade 2b betacoronaviruses from lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros, and 10 clade 2c betacoronaviruses from Kuhl’s pipistrelle, common noctule (Nyctalus noctula, and Savi’s pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii. This study fills a substantive gap in the knowledge on bat-CoV ecology in Italy, and extends the current knowledge on clade 2c betacoronaviruses with new sequences obtained from bats that have not been previously described as hosts of these viruses.

  5. Detection of coronaviruses in bats of various species in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Davide; Papetti, Alice; Sabelli, Cristiano; Rosti, Enrica; Moreno, Ana; Boniotti, Maria B

    2013-11-01

    Bats are natural reservoirs for many mammalian coronaviruses, which have received renewed interest after the discovery of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) CoV in humans. This study describes the identification and molecular characterization of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in bats in Italy, from 2010 to 2012. Sixty-nine faecal samples and 126 carcasses were tested using pan-coronavirus RT-PCR. Coronavirus RNAs were detected in seven faecal samples and nine carcasses. A phylogenetic analysis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence fragments aided in identifying two alphacoronaviruses from Kuhl's pipistrelle (Pipistrellus kuhlii), three clade 2b betacoronaviruses from lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros), and 10 clade 2c betacoronaviruses from Kuhl's pipistrelle, common noctule (Nyctalus noctula), and Savi's pipistrelle (Hypsugo savii). This study fills a substantive gap in the knowledge on bat-CoV ecology in Italy, and extends the current knowledge on clade 2c betacoronaviruses with new sequences obtained from bats that have not been previously described as hosts of these viruses. PMID:24184965

  6. Biological Characteristics and Etiological Significance of Porcine Respiratory Coronavirus(PRCV)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiuping; FENG Li; SHI Hongyan; CHEN Jianfei

    2009-01-01

    Porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV), a spike (S) gene natural deletion mutant of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), causes porcine respiratory disease complex. Research advances on porcine respiratory coronavirus were reviewed from four aspects of biological character, the model function for SARS-CoV research, contribution of the immunity to PRCV to protection against TGEV challenge exposure and other etiological significance.

  7. Design and Construction of Chimeric VP8-S2 Antigen for Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza; Zibaee, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus are the most important causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in some other species such as pigs and sheep. Rotavirus VP8 subunit is the major determinant of the viral infectivity and neutralization. Spike glycoprotein of coronavirus is responsible for induction of neutralizing antibody response.

  8. Canine Distemper Viral Inclusions in Blood Cells of Four Vaccinated Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Bruce G.; Adams, Pamela S.; Cornell, William D.; Elkins, A. Darrel

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of canine distemper were detected by the presence of numerous cytoplasmic inclusions in various circulating blood cells. Fluorescent antibody techniques and electron microscopy confirmed the identity of the viral inclusions. The cases occurred in the same geographic area and within a short time span. All four dogs had been vaccinated against canine distemper, but stress or other factors may have compromised their immune status. The possibility of an unusually virulent virus strain ...

  9. Coronavirus non-structural protein 1 is a major pathogenicity factor: implications for the rational design of coronavirus vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Züst

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Attenuated viral vaccines can be generated by targeting essential pathogenicity factors. We report here the rational design of an attenuated recombinant coronavirus vaccine based on a deletion in the coding sequence of the non-structural protein 1 (nsp1. In cell culture, nsp1 of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV, like its SARS-coronavirus homolog, strongly reduced cellular gene expression. The effect of nsp1 on MHV replication in vitro and in vivo was analyzed using a recombinant MHV encoding a deletion in the nsp1-coding sequence. The recombinant MHV nsp1 mutant grew normally in tissue culture, but was severely attenuated in vivo. Replication and spread of the nsp1 mutant virus was restored almost to wild-type levels in type I interferon (IFN receptor-deficient mice, indicating that nsp1 interferes efficiently with the type I IFN system. Importantly, replication of nsp1 mutant virus in professional antigen-presenting cells such as conventional dendritic cells and macrophages, and induction of type I IFN in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, was not impaired. Furthermore, even low doses of nsp1 mutant MHV elicited potent cytotoxic T cell responses and protected mice against homologous and heterologous virus challenge. Taken together, the presented attenuation strategy provides a paradigm for the development of highly efficient coronavirus vaccines.

  10. Serological comparison of canine rotavirus with various simian and human rotaviruses by plaque reduction neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, Y; R G Wyatt; Greenberg, H B; Kalica, A R; Flores, J.; Kapikian, A Z

    1983-01-01

    By the plaque reduction neutralization test, the CU-1 strain of canine rotavirus was similar, if not identical, to three strains (no. 14, no. 15, and P) of the tentatively designated third human rotavirus serotype. In addition, strain CU-1 demonstrated a one-way antigenic relationship with two other strains (M and B) of the third human rotavirus serotype. The CU-1 strain of canine rotavirus hemagglutinated human group O, rhesus monkey, dog, sheep, and guinea pig erythrocytes. A two-way antige...

  11. Coronavirus bovino: Infecciones neumoentéricas (Bovine coronavirus:Neumoenteric infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betancourt, Martell, Alexander|

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronavirus bovino (BCoV es reconocido como un importante agente patógeno del ganado bovino, el cual está asociado a tres síndromes clínicos diferentes, Síndrome diarreico neonatal del ternero, caracterizado en terneros recién nacidos por diarreas líquidas profusas, en ocasiones hemorrágicas, anorexia, deshidratación y frecuentemente la muerte; Disentería de Invierno, la cual ocurre primariamente en bovinos adultos y cursa con severas diarreas, algunas veces con restos de sangre y mucus, decrecimiento de laproducción láctea, depresión, anorexia y descargas nasolagrimales; y finalmente como causa de infecciones respiratorias en vacas, incluida la Fiebre de Embarque. En todos los casos el diagnóstico requiere deensayos de laboratorio para la confirmación de BCoV, debido que resulta imposible su reconocimiento basado en elementos clínicos y anatomopatológicos por su similitud con otras enfermedades. Hasta elmomento todos los aislados de BCoV, tanto de cuadros entéricos como respiratorios pertenecen a un solo serotipo, pero con dos o tres subtipos identificados por seroneutralización empleando anticuerposmonoclonales. En adición, diferencias genéticas (por mutaciones puntuales, no delecciones han sido detectadas en el gen S, diferenciando entre aislados entéricos y respiratorios. No obstante, numerosos experimentos han demostrado la protección cruzada experimentada por terneros recién nacidos, privados de calostro ygnotobióticos, inoculados con aislados de BCoV obtenidos a partir de cuadros entéricos y respiratorios de terneros y bovinos adultos, los cuales resultaron protegidos al desafío subsiguiente con cepas de BCoV asociadas a diarrea.

  12. Jaundice and bilirubinemia as manifestations of canine distemper in raccoons and ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilham, L.; Habermann, R.T.; Herman, C.M.

    1956-01-01

    1) Two strains of distemper virus have been isolated from wild raccoons and one strain from ferrets. 2) All strains isolated have induced bilirubinemia in raccoons and ferrets. Many raccoons with bilirubinemia also had jaundice. 3) Identification of these strains as members of the canine distemper virus complex has been by clinical and pathological findings consistent with this diagnosis as well as by cross-immunity tests.

  13. Human Cell Tropism and Innate Immune System Interactions of Human Respiratory Coronavirus EMC Compared to Those of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Zielecki, F.; Weber, M.; Eickmann, M.; Spiegelberg, L.; Zaki, A. M.; Matrosovich, M.; Becker, S.; Weber, F.

    2013-01-01

    Infections with human coronavirus EMC (HCoV-EMC) are associated with severe pneumonia. We demonstrate that HCoV-EMC resembles severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in productively infecting primary and continuous cells of the human airways and in preventing the induction of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3)-mediated antiviral alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) responses. However, HCoV-EMC was markedly more sensitive to the antiviral state established by ectopic IFN. Thus,...

  14. Genetic characterization of canine rotavirus isolated from a puppy in Korea and experimental reproduction of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo Kyu; Song, Dae Sub; Jung, Kwon Il; Lee, Chul Seung; Park, Sung Jun; Oh, Jin Sik; An, Dong Jun; Yang, Jeong Sun; Moon, Hyoung Joon; Lee, Sang Sun; Yoon, Young Dhuk; Park, Bong Kyun

    2007-01-01

    Canine rotavirus was isolated from feces of a Korean Jindo dog with mild diarrhea, and the isolate was genetically characterized. Rotaviral antigen was detected in the feces using a commercial rotavirus antigen detection kit and cytopathic effects were observed in a cell line inoculated with the feces. The virus isolate (GC/KS05) was identified as subtype G3P[3] using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The strain displayed 98% and 90% identity with the VP7 genes of a canine rotavirus isolate (RV52/96) from Italy and the simian rotavirus strain (RRV) respectively. However, the GC/KS05 isolate exhibited only 83% and 82% identity, respectively, with the G3 serotype canine strains, RV198/95 and K9. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP7 and VP4 genes of GC/KS05 strain led to the classification of VP7 in a different cluster than other canine rotavirus VP7 genes, and VP4 within the cluster of canine rotavirus VP4 genes. The Korean isolate was thus more closely related to the RV52/96 isolate than the other isolates for which sequence data is available. Detailed analysis of the VP7 region revealed 6 amino acid variations between the new isolate and RV52/96. After 5 passages in cell culture, the GC/KS05 strain remained pathogenic for young pups, in which inoculation resulted in diarrhea and virus shedding in the feces. PMID:17459836

  15. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Canine Distemper Virus HLJ1-06, Isolated from Foxes in China

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Qian; Hu, Xiaoliang; Ge, Yanhua; Lin, Huan; Jiang, Yong; Liu, Jiasen; Guo, Dongchun; Si, Changde; Qu, Liandong

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of canine distemper virus, HLJ1-06, has been isolated from foxes in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that HLJ1-06 belongs to the Asia-1 cluster and has low identity to the vaccine strain.

  16. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of Canine Distemper Virus CDV-PS, Isolated from Dogs in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Li; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Jianke; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Hailing; Yan, Xijun; Cheng, Shipeng

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of canine distemper virus, CDV-PS, has been isolated from dogs in China, and its complete genome has been sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that CDV-PS belongs to the Asia-1 cluster and has low identity to the vaccine strain.

  17. Recent transmission of a novel alphacoronavirus, bat coronavirus HKU10, from Leschenault's rousettes to pomona leaf-nosed bats: first evidence of interspecies transmission of coronavirus between bats of different suborders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susanna K P; Li, Kenneth S M; Tsang, Alan K L; Shek, Chung-Tong; Wang, Ming; Choi, Garnet K Y; Guo, Rongtong; Wong, Beatrice H L; Poon, Rosana W S; Lam, Carol S F; Wang, Sylvia Y H; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Woo, Patrick C Y; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-11-01

    Although coronaviruses are known to infect various animals by adapting to new hosts, interspecies transmission events are still poorly understood. During a surveillance study from 2005 to 2010, a novel alphacoronavirus, BatCoV HKU10, was detected in two very different bat species, Ro-BatCoV HKU10 in Leschenault's rousettes (Rousettus leschenaulti) (fruit bats in the suborder Megachiroptera) in Guangdong and Hi-BatCoV HKU10 in Pomona leaf-nosed bats (Hipposideros pomona) (insectivorous bats in the suborder Microchiroptera) in Hong Kong. Although infected bats appeared to be healthy, Pomona leaf-nosed bats carrying Hi-BatCoV HKU10 had lower body weights than uninfected bats. To investigate possible interspecies transmission between the two bat species, the complete genomes of two Ro-BatCoV HKU10 and six Hi-BatCoV HKU10 strains were sequenced. Genome and phylogenetic analyses showed that Ro-BatCoV HKU10 and Hi-BatCoV HKU10 represented a novel alphacoronavirus species, sharing highly similar genomes except in the genes encoding spike proteins, which had only 60.5% amino acid identities. Evolution of the spike protein was also rapid in Hi-BatCoV HKU10 strains from 2005 to 2006 but stabilized thereafter. Molecular-clock analysis dated the most recent common ancestor of all BatCoV HKU10 strains to 1959 (highest posterior density regions at 95% [HPDs], 1886 to 2002) and that of Hi-BatCoV HKU10 to 1986 (HPDs, 1956 to 2004). The data suggested recent interspecies transmission from Leschenault's rousettes to Pomona leaf-nosed bats in southern China. Notably, the rapid adaptive genetic change in BatCoV HKU10 spike protein by ~40% amino acid divergence after recent interspecies transmission was even greater than the ~20% amino acid divergence between spike proteins of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related Rhinolophus bat coronavirus (SARSr-CoV) in bats and civets. This study provided the first evidence for interspecies transmission of coronavirus between bats of different

  18. Speckle tracking imaging in evaluation of radial strain of subendocardial and epicardial myocardium in canine acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion%斑点追踪技术评价犬急性心肌缺血及再灌注心内膜下心肌和心外膜下心肌径向应变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋平梅; 任卫东; 马春燕; 王秀芹; 乔伟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the radial strain function of subendocardial and epicardial myocardium in acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion canine with speckle tracking imaging. Methods The first diagonal branch of left coronary artery of 20 adult healthy hybrid dogs were ligated. Radial strain of subendocardial and epicardial myocardium at basal, apical and papillary muscle level were compared by speckle tracking imaging before ligation, ligation immediately, 60,120, 180 min after ligation, reperfusion immediately, and 60, 120 min after reperfusion, respectively. Results Radial strain of basal level elevated by compensatory role in canine acute ischemic process. Radial strain of apical and papillary muscle level decreased obviously. Myocardial reverse movement was even found at apical level. In acute ischemia and reperfusion process, subendocardial myocardium was more sensitive to ischemia. After reperfusion, radial strain of subendocardial and epicardial myocardium at apical and papillary muscle level were still lower than that in basic status. Conclusion Speckle tracking imaging can objectively quantify regional and overall heart function and transmural extent of myocardial infarction in canine.%目的 应用斑点追踪技术检测犬急性心肌缺血及再灌注不同时间点心内膜下心肌和心外膜下心肌的径向应变.方法 选取20只健康成年杂种犬,结扎左冠状动脉第一对角支,分别对结扎前、结扎即刻、60、120和180 min及再灌注即刻、60和120 min基底水平、乳头肌水平和心尖水平心内膜下和心外膜下心肌的径向应变进行比较.结果 在急性缺血过程中,基底水平心肌起代偿作用,其径向应变上升;乳头肌水平和心尖水平心肌下降明显,心尖水平心肌甚至出现反向运动.在急性缺血及再灌注过程中,心内膜下心肌对缺血更加敏感.再灌注后,乳头肌水平和心尖水平心内膜下和心外膜下心肌及跨壁的径向应变

  19. The sialic acid binding activity of the S protein facilitates infection by porcine transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjuanes Luis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV has a sialic acid binding activity that is believed to be important for enteropathogenicity, but that has so far appeared to be dispensable for infection of cultured cells. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of sialic acid binding for the infection of cultured cells under unfavorable conditions, and comparison of TGEV strains and mutants, as well as the avian coronavirus IBV concerning their dependence on the sialic acid binding activity. Methods The infectivity of different viruses was analyzed by a plaque assay after adsorption times of 5, 20, and 60 min. Prior to infection, cultured cells were either treated with neuraminidase to deplete sialic acids from the cell surface, or mock-treated. In a second approach, pre-treatment of the virus with porcine intestinal mucin was performed, followed by the plaque assay after a 5 min adsorption time. A student's t-test was used to verify the significance of the results. Results Desialylation of cells only had a minor effect on the infection by TGEV strain Purdue 46 when an adsorption period of 60 min was allowed for initiation of infection. However, when the adsorption time was reduced to 5 min the infectivity on desialylated cells decreased by more than 60%. A TGEV PUR46 mutant (HAD3 deficient in sialic acid binding showed a 77% lower titer than the parental virus after a 5 min adsorption time. After an adsorption time of 60 min the titer of HAD3 was 58% lower than that of TGEV PUR46. Another TGEV strain, TGEV Miller, and IBV Beaudette showed a reduction in infectivity after neuraminidase treatment of the cultured cells irrespective of the virion adsorption time. Conclusions Our results suggest that the sialic acid binding activity facilitates the infection by TGEV under unfavorable environmental conditions. The dependence on the sialic acid binding activity for an efficient infection differs in the analyzed TGEV strains.

  20. Phylogenetic evidence of canine distemper virus in Serengeti's lions.

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Timm; Kenter, Marcel; Appel, Max; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Barrett, Thomas,; Osterhaus, Albert

    1995-01-01

    textabstractRecently an epizootic, reported to be due to a morbillivirus infection, affected the lion population of the Tanzanian Serengeti National Park. A morbillivirus phosphoprotein (P) gene fragment was amplified by PCR from tissue samples of several affected lions. Sequencing of the amplificates and subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed that a wild-type strain of canine distemper morbillivirus (CDV) was involved. Vaccination of the local domestic dog population with proven safe CDV ...

  1. Evolutionary Relationships between Bat Coronaviruses and Their Hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Jie; Han, Naijian; Streicker, Daniel; Li, Gang; Tang, Xianchun; Shi, Zhengli; Hu, Zhihong; Zhao, Guoping; Fontanet, Arnaud; Guan, Yi; Wang, Linfa; Jones, Gareth; Field, Hume E.; Daszak, Peter; Zhang, Shuyi

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that bats are the natural reservoir of a range of coronaviruses (CoVs), and that rhinolophid bats harbor viruses closely related to the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV, which caused an outbreak of respiratory illness in humans during 2002–2003. We examined the evolutionary relationships between bat CoVs and their hosts by using sequence data of the virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene and the bat cytochrome b gene. Phylogenetic analyses showed mul...

  2. Understanding Viral Transmission Behavior via Protein Intrinsic Disorder Prediction: Coronaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard Kian-Meng Goh; A. Keith Dunker; Vladimir N Uversky

    2012-01-01

    Besides being a common threat to farm animals and poultry, coronavirus (CoV) was responsible for the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2002–4. However, many aspects of CoV behavior, including modes of its transmission, are yet to be fully understood. We show that the amount and the peculiarities of distribution of the protein intrinsic disorder in the viral shell can be used for the efficient analysis of the behavior and transmission modes of CoV. The proposed model a...

  3. A Coronavirus Associated with Runting Stunting Syndrome in Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Rüdiger; Gallardo, Rodrigo A; Woolcock, Peter R; Shivaprasad, H L

    2016-06-01

    Runting stunting syndrome (RSS) is a disease condition that affects broilers and causes impaired growth and poor feed conversion because of enteritis characterized by pale and distended small intestines with watery contents. The etiology of the disease is multifactorial, and a large variety of viral agents have been implicated. Here we describe the detection and isolation of an infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) -like coronavirus from the intestines of a flock of 60,000 14-day-old brown/red broiler chicks. The birds showed typical clinical signs of RSS including stunting and uneven growth. At necropsy, the small intestines were pale and distended with watery contents. Histopathology of the intestines revealed increased cellularity of the lamina propria, blunting of villi, and cystic changes in the crypts. Negative stain electron microscopy of the intestinal contents revealed coronavirus particles. Transmission electron microscopy of the intestine confirmed coronavirus in the cytoplasm of enterocytes. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), IBV antigen was detected in the intestinal epithelial cells as well as in the proventriculus and pancreas. There were no lesions in the respiratory system, and no IBV antigen was detected in trachea, lung, air sac, conjunctiva, and cecal tonsils. A coronavirus was isolated from the intestine of chicken embryos but not from the allantoic sac inoculated with the intestinal contents of the broiler chicks. Sequencing of the S1 gene showed nucleic acid sequence identities of 93.8% to the corresponding region of IBV California 99 and of 85.7% to IBV Arkansas. Nucleic acid sequence identities to other IBV genotypes were lower. The histopathologic lesions in the intestines were reproduced after experimental infection of specific-pathogen-free chickens inoculated in the conjunctiva and nares. Five days after infection, six of nine investigated birds showed enteritis associated with IBV antigen as detected by IHC. In contrast to the field

  4. Diversity of coronavirus in bats from Eastern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Duengkae, Prateep; Rodpan, Apaporn; Kaewpom, Thongchai; Maneeorn, Patarapol; Kanchanasaka, Budsabong; Yingsakmongkon, Sangchai; Sittidetboripat, Nuntaporn; Chareesaen, Chaiyaporn; Khlangsap, Nathawat; Pidthong, Apisit; Leadprathom, Kumron; Ghai, Siriporn; Jonathan H Epstein; Daszak, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Bats are reservoirs for a diverse range of coronaviruses (CoVs), including those closely related to human pathogens such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) CoV and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome CoV. There are approximately 139 bat species reported to date in Thailand, of which two are endemic species. Due to the zoonotic potential of CoVs, standardized surveillance efforts to characterize viral diversity in wildlife are imperative. Findings A total of 626 bats from 19 d...

  5. The Paradox of Feline Coronavirus Pathogenesis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Wanderley Myrrha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Feline coronavirus (FCoV is an enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, of the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. FCoV is an important pathogen of wild and domestic cats and can cause a mild or apparently symptomless enteric infection, especially in kittens. FCoV is also associated with a lethal, systemic disease known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP. Although the precise cause of FIP pathogenesis remains unclear, some hypotheses have been suggested. In this review we present results from different FCoV studies and attempt to elucidate existing theories on the pathogenesis of FCoV infection.

  6. The paradox of feline coronavirus pathogenesis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrrha, Luciana Wanderley; Silva, Fernanda Miquelitto Figueira; Peternelli, Ethel Fernandes de Oliveira; Junior, Abelardo Silva; Resende, Maurício; de Almeida, Márcia Rogéria

    2011-01-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is an enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, of the family Coronaviridae and the order Nidovirales. FCoV is an important pathogen of wild and domestic cats and can cause a mild or apparently symptomless enteric infection, especially in kittens. FCoV is also associated with a lethal, systemic disease known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). Although the precise cause of FIP pathogenesis remains unclear, some hypotheses have been suggested. In this review we present results from different FCoV studies and attempt to elucidate existing theories on the pathogenesis of FCoV infection.

  7. Antigen profiling analysis of vaccinia virus injected canine tumors: oncolytic virus efficiency predicted by boolean models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Alexander; Gentschev, Ivaylo; Adelfinger, Marion; Nolte, Ingo; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy on the basis of oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is a novel approach for cancer therapy. In this study we describe for the first time the use of dynamic boolean modeling for tumor growth prediction of vaccinia virus GLV-1h68-injected canine tumors including canine mammary adenoma (ZMTH3), canine mammary carcinoma (MTH52c), canine prostate carcinoma (CT1258), and canine soft tissue sarcoma (STSA-1). Additionally, the STSA-1 xenografted mice were injected with either LIVP 1.1.1 or LIVP 5.1.1 vaccinia virus strains.   Antigen profiling data of the four different vaccinia virus-injected canine tumors were obtained, analyzed and used to calculate differences in the tumor growth signaling network by type and tumor type. Our model combines networks for apoptosis, MAPK, p53, WNT, Hedgehog, TK cell, Interferon, and Interleukin signaling networks. The in silico findings conform with in vivo findings of tumor growth. Boolean modeling describes tumor growth and remission semi-quantitatively with a good fit to the data obtained for all cancer type variants. At the same time it monitors all signaling activities as a basis for treatment planning according to antigen levels. Mitigation and elimination of VACV- susceptible tumor types as well as effects on the non-susceptible type CT1258 are predicted correctly. Thus the combination of Antigen profiling and semi-quantitative modeling optimizes the therapy already before its start.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Neisseria weaveri Strain NCTC13585

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Russell, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria weaveri is a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity and an occasional opportunistic human pathogen which is associated with dog bite wounds. Here we report the first complete genomic sequence of the N. weaveri NCTC13585 (CCUG30381) strain, which was originally isolated from a patient with a canine bite wound. PMID:27563039

  9. Coronavirus 3CL(pro) proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Lund, Ole; Brunak, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    . Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results: We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network...... was trained to recognise the cleavage sites in the genomes obtaining a sensitivity of 87.0% and a specificity of 99.0%. Several proteins known to be cleaved by other viruses were submitted to prediction as well as proteins suspected relevant in coronavirus pathology. Cleavage sites were predicted in proteins...

  10. Preparation and application of SARS-associated coronavirus spike protein antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibody against SARS-associated coronavirus spike protein were obtained and at same time the polyclonal antibodies were also got by immunizing sheep, goats and rabbits with SARS-associated coronavirus spike protein respectively. Immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were established using above Abs for detecting SARS-associated coronavirus, and best assay results were observed when McAb CS4C11 was used as labeled Ab and PcAb (sheep) as capture Ab. (author)

  11. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell... hepatitis, the test is inconclusive and may be repeated. (B) If at least 19 of the 20 vaccinates do...

  12. Perfil de restrição de um fragmento do gene da hemaglutinina amplificado pela RT-PCR a partir de estirpes vacinais e selvagens do vírus da cinomose canina Restriction pattern of a hemagglutinin gene amplified by RT-PCR from vaccine strains and wild-type canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Negrão

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fragmentos com 721 pares de bases do gene da hemaglutinina (H do vírus da cinomose canina (CDV, amplificados pela RT-PCR a partir de três estirpes vacinais (Snyder Hill, Onderstepoort e Rockborn e de 27 amostras de campo, provenientes de cães com cinomose, foram clivados com as endonucleases Hinf I and Rsa I. A seleção das enzimas foi realizada por meio de análises in silico de seqüências do CDV depositadas em bases públicas de dados. Tanto as estirpes vacinais quanto as amostras selvagens do CDV apresentaram com a enzima Hinf I o mesmo perfil de restrição, confirmando a identidade do fragmento amplificado pela RT-PCR, uma vez que todas as estirpes com seqüências disponíveis (GenBank têm sítios de restrição para essa enzima nas mesmas posições. O perfil de restrição das estirpes vacinais Snyder Hill e Onderstepoort, que diferem entre si, foi confirmado com a enzima Rsa I que também clivou a estirpe Rockborn nas mesmas posições que a estirpe Snyder Hill. Todas as 27 amostras de campo do CDV apresentaram com a enzima Rsa I o mesmo perfil de restrição, indicando conservar os mesmos sítios de restrição para essa enzima. O perfil das amostras de campo foi diferente daquele obtido nas três estirpes vacinais. Os perfis de restrição do gene que codifica a hemaglutinina do CDV, gerados pela enzima Rsa I, sugerem diferenças moleculares entre as estirpes vacinais e as selvagens circulantes na região norte do estado do Paraná e abrem a perspectiva da elaboração de análises moleculares comparativas mais complexas, como o seqüenciamento de todo o gene H, de estirpes do CDV identificadas em diferentes regiões brasileiras.The restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP assay of a 721 bp fragment from hemagglutinin (H gene of canine distemper virus (CDV amplified by RT-PCR was analyzed with Hinf I and Rsa I enzymes. Clinical samples from 27 dogs with natural canine distemper infection, and three vaccine (Snyder Hill

  13. Effect of simulated stages of the canine oestrous cycle on Escherichia coli binding to canine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekeler, N; Lodge, K M; Anderson, G A; Browning, G F; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-12-01

    Pyometra, a prevalent infectious uterine disease that affects intact middle-aged bitches, is typically associated with Escherichia coli. Our hypotheses were (i) that bacterial adhesion to canine endometrium differs between different stages of the oestrous cycle and (ii) that the adhesin FimH facilitates this adhesion. Twelve post-pubertal, ovariectomized greyhound bitches were treated with exogenous hormones to simulate different stages of the oestrous cycle. Tissue samples from each uterus were incubated with a pathogenic E. coli strain carrying the fimH gene, but no other adhesin genes (P4-wt)--or an E. coli strain in which fimH was insertionally inactivated (P4-∆fimH::kan)--or with phosphate-buffered saline as a negative control. After washing, tissue samples were homogenized for quantification of adherent bacteria. The differences in binding to canine endometrium at different stages of the oestrous cycle were not significant. However, the mean difference in binding of the P4-wt and the P4-∆fimH::kan across all stages of the simulated oestrous cycle was significant (p dogs might suggest genetic variations or epigenetic differences in FimH receptor expression by the endometrium, unrelated to the stage of the oestrous cycle. PMID:23279531

  14. Inactivation and safety testing of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mia; Mazur, Steven; Ork, Britini L; Postnikova, Elena; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B; Johnson, Reed; Holbrook, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a recently emerged virus that has caused a number of human infections and deaths, primarily in the Middle East. The transmission of MERS-CoV to humans has been proposed to be as a result of contact with camels, but evidence of human-to-human transmission also exists. In order to work with MERS-CoV in a laboratory setting, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined that MERS-CoV should be handled at a biosafety level (BSL) 3 (BSL-3) biocontainment level. Many processes and procedures used to characterize MERS-CoV and to evaluate samples from MERS-CoV infected animals are more easily and efficiently completed at BSL-2 or lower containment. In order to complete experimental work at BSL-2, demonstration or proof of inactivation is required before removal of specimens from biocontainment laboratories. In the studies presented here, we evaluated typical means of inactivating viruses prior to handling specimens at a lower biocontainment level. We found that Trizol, AVL buffer and gamma irradiation were effective at inactivating MERS-CoV, that formaldehyde-based solutions required at least 30 min of contact time in a cell culture system while a mixture of methanol and acetone required 60 min to inactivate MERS-CoV. Together, these data provide a foundation for safely inactivating MERS-CoV, and potentially other coronaviruses, prior to removal from biocontainment facilities. PMID:26190637

  15. Coronavirus envelope (E) protein remains at the site of assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatagopalan, Pavithra [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Daskalova, Sasha M. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Lopez, Lisa A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Dolezal, Kelly A. [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Microbiology Graduate Program, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); Hogue, Brenda G., E-mail: Brenda.Hogue@asu.edu [The Biodesign Institute, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States); School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-5401 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) assemble at endoplasmic reticulum Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and egress from cells in cargo vesicles. Only a few molecules of the envelope (E) protein are assembled into virions. The role of E in morphogenesis is not fully understood. The cellular localization and dynamics of mouse hepatitis CoV A59 (MHV) E protein were investigated to further understanding of its role during infection. E protein localized in the ERGIC and Golgi with the amino and carboxy termini in the lumen and cytoplasm, respectively. E protein does not traffic to the cell surface. MHV was genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag at the carboxy end of E. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) showed that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes. Correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) confirmed the presence of E in Golgi cisternae. The results provide strong support that E proteins carry out their function(s) at the site of budding/assembly. - Highlights: • Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV-CoV) E protein localizes in the ERGIC and Golgi. • MHV-CoV E does not transport to the cell surface. • MHV-CoV can be genetically engineered with a tetracysteine tag appended to E. • First FRAP and correlative light electron microscopy of a CoV E protein. • Live-cell imaging shows that E is mobile in ERGIC/Golgi membranes.

  16. Identification of a new genotype of canine distemper virus circulating in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz, César; Martella, Vito; Ulloa, Raúl; Fajardo, Raúl; Quijano-Hernandéz, Israel; Martínez, Simón

    2011-08-01

    Canine Distemper is a highly contagious viral systemic disease that affects a wide variety of terrestrial carnivores. Canine Distemper virus (CDV) appears genetically heterogeneous, markedly in the hemagglutinin protein (H), showing geographic patterns of diversification that are useful to monitor CDV molecular epidemiology. In Mexico the activity of canine distemper remains high in dogs, likely because vaccine prophylaxis coverage in canine population is under the levels required to control effectively the disease. By phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleoprotein (N) and on the H genes, Mexican CDV strains collected between 2007 and 2010 were distinguished into several genovariants, all which constituted a unique group, clearly distinct from field and vaccine strains circulating worldwide, but resembling a CDV strain, 19876, identified in Missouri, USA, 2004, that was genetically unrelated to other North-American CDV strains. Gathering information on the genetic heterogeneity of CDV on a global scale appears pivotal in order to investigate the origin and modalities of introduction of unusual/novel CDV strains, as well as to understand if vaccine breakthroughs or disease epidemics may be somewhat related to genetic/antigenic or biological differences between field and vaccine strains.

  17. Identification of a new genotype of canine distemper virus circulating in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámiz, César; Martella, Vito; Ulloa, Raúl; Fajardo, Raúl; Quijano-Hernandéz, Israel; Martínez, Simón

    2011-08-01

    Canine Distemper is a highly contagious viral systemic disease that affects a wide variety of terrestrial carnivores. Canine Distemper virus (CDV) appears genetically heterogeneous, markedly in the hemagglutinin protein (H), showing geographic patterns of diversification that are useful to monitor CDV molecular epidemiology. In Mexico the activity of canine distemper remains high in dogs, likely because vaccine prophylaxis coverage in canine population is under the levels required to control effectively the disease. By phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleoprotein (N) and on the H genes, Mexican CDV strains collected between 2007 and 2010 were distinguished into several genovariants, all which constituted a unique group, clearly distinct from field and vaccine strains circulating worldwide, but resembling a CDV strain, 19876, identified in Missouri, USA, 2004, that was genetically unrelated to other North-American CDV strains. Gathering information on the genetic heterogeneity of CDV on a global scale appears pivotal in order to investigate the origin and modalities of introduction of unusual/novel CDV strains, as well as to understand if vaccine breakthroughs or disease epidemics may be somewhat related to genetic/antigenic or biological differences between field and vaccine strains. PMID:21713437

  18. Preparation and development of equine hyperimmune globulin F(ab')2 against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-hai LU; Bing L WONG; Nan-shan ZHONG; Zhong-min GUO; Wen-yu HAN; Guo-ling WANG; Ding-mei ZHANG; Yi-fei WANG; Sheng-yun SUN; Qin-he YANG; Huan-ying ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The resurgence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is still a threat because the causative agent remaining in animal reservoirs is not fully understood,and sporadic cases continue to be reported. Developing high titers of anti-SARS hyperimmune globulin to provide an alternative pathway for emergent future prevention and treatment of SARS. Methods: SARS coronavirus (CoV)F69 (AY313906)and Z2-Y3 (AY394989) were isolated and identified from 2 different Cantonese onset SARS patients. Immunogen was prepared from SARS-CoV F69 strain. Six health horses were immunized 4 times and serum was collected periodically to measure the profile of specific IgG and neutralizing antibodies using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a microneutralization test. Sera were collected in large amounts at the peak, where IgG was precipitated using ammonium sulphate and subsequently digested with pepsin. The product was then purified using anion-exchange chromatography to obtain F(ab')2 fragments. Results: The specific IgG and neutralizing antibody titers peaked at approximately week 7 after the first immunization, with a maximum value of 1:14210. The sera collected at the peak were then purified. Fragment of approximately 15 g F(ab')2 was obtained from 1 litre antiserum and the purity was above 90% with the titer of 1:5120, which could neutralize the other strain (SARS-CoV Z2-Y3) as well. Conclusion: This research provides a viable strategy for the prevention and treatment of SARS coronavirus infection with equine hyperimmune globulin, with the purpose of combating any resurgence of SARS.

  19. In vitro inhibition of feline coronavirus replication by small interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2011-06-01

    Infection with virulent biotypes of feline coronavirus (FCoV) can result in the development of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a typically fatal immune mediated disease for which there is currently no effective antiviral treatment. In this study we demonstrate the ability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated RNA interference (RNAi) to inhibit the replication of virulent FCoV strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 in an immortalised feline cell line. A panel of eight synthetic siRNAs targeting four different regions of the FCoV genome were tested for antiviral effects. Efficacy was determined by qRT-PCR of intracellular viral genomic and messenger RNA, TCID50 infectivity assay of extracellular virus, and direct IFA for viral protein expression. All siRNAs demonstrated an inhibitory effect on viral replication in vitro. The two most effective siRNAs, targeting the untranslated 5' leader sequence (L2) and the nucleocapsid gene (N1), resulted in a >95% reduction in extracellular viral titre. Further characterisation of these two siRNAs demonstrated their efficacy when used at low concentrations and in cells challenged with high viral loads. Taken together these findings provide important information for the potential therapeutic application of RNAi in treating FIP.

  20. Synergistic antiviral effect of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and nelfinavir against feline coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Li-En; Lin, Chao-Nan; Su, Bi-Ling; Jan, Tong-Rong; Chen, Chi-Min; Wang, Ching-Ho; Lin, Dah-Sheng; Lin, Chung-Tien; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal disease in domestic and nondomestic felids caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV). Currently, no effective vaccine is available for the prevention of this disease. In searching for agents that may prove clinically effective against FCoV infection, 16 compounds were screened for their antiviral activity against a local FCoV strain in Felis catus whole fetus-4 cells. The results showed that Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and nelfinavir effectively inhibited FCoV replication. When the amount of virus preinoculated into the test cells was increased to mimic the high viral load present in the target cells of FIP cats, GNA and nelfinavir by themselves lost their inhibitory effect. However, when the two agents were added together to FCoV-infected cells, a synergistic antiviral effect defined by complete blockage of viral replication was observed. These results suggest that the combined use of GNA and nelfinavir has therapeutic potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of cats with early-diagnosed FIP.

  1. Protein Subcellular Localization Prediction and Genomic Polymorphism Analysis of the SARS Coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季星来; 柳树群; 李岭; 孙之荣

    2004-01-01

    The cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has been identified as a new coronavirus (CoV).Several sequences of the complete genome of SARS-CoV have been determined.The subcellular localization (SubLocation) of annotated open-reading frames of the SARS-CoV genome was predicted using a support vector machine.Several gene products were predicted to locate in the Golgi body and cell nucleus.The SubLocation information was combined with predicted transmembrane information to develop a model of the viral life cycle.The results show that this information can be used to predict the functions of genes and even the virus pathogenesis.In addition,the entire SARS viral genome sequences currently available in GenBank were compared to identify the sequence variations among different isolates.Some variations in the Hong Kong strains may be related to the special clinical manifestations and provide clues for understanding the relationship between gene functions and evolution.These variations reflect the evolution of the SARS virus in human populations and may help development of a vaccine.

  2. Reverse genetics of SARS-related coronavirus using vaccinia virus-based recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjoerd H E van den Worm

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a zoonotic disease caused by SARS-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV that emerged in 2002 to become a global health concern. Although the original outbreak was controlled by classical public health measures, there is a real risk that another SARS-CoV could re-emerge from its natural reservoir, either in its original form or as a more virulent or pathogenic strain; in which case, the virus would be difficult to control in the absence of any effective antiviral drugs or vaccines. Using the well-studied SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849, we developed a vaccinia virus-based SARS-CoV reverse genetic system that is both robust and biosafe. The SARS-CoV genome was cloned in separate vaccinia virus vectors, (vSARS-CoV-5prime and vSARS-CoV-3prime as two cDNAs that were subsequently ligated to create a genome-length SARS-CoV cDNA template for in vitro transcription of SARS-CoV infectious RNA transcripts. Transfection of the RNA transcripts into permissive cells led to the recovery of infectious virus (recSARS-CoV. Characterization of the plaques produced by recSARS-CoV showed that they were similar in size to the parental SARS-CoV isolate HKU-39849 but smaller than the SARS-CoV isolate Frankfurt-1. Comparative analysis of replication kinetics showed that the kinetics of recSARS-CoV replication are similar to those of SARS-CoV Frankfurt-1, although the titers of virus released into the culture supernatant are approximately 10-fold less. The reverse genetic system was finally used to generate a recSARS-CoV reporter virus expressing Renilla luciferase in order to facilitate the analysis of SARS-CoV gene expression in human dendritic cells (hDCs. In parallel, a Renilla luciferase gene was also inserted into the genome of human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E. Using this approach, we demonstrate that, in contrast to HCoV-229E, SARS-CoV is not able to mediate efficient heterologous gene expression in hDCs.

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of type I and type II feline coronavirus in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Amer Alazawy; Siti Suri Arshad; Abdul Rahman Omar; Mohd Hair Bejo; Faruku Bande; Saeed Sharif; Tengku Azmi Tengku Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) are two important coronaviruses of domestic cat worldwide. Although FCoV is prevalent among cats; the fastidious nature of type I FCoV to grow on cell culture has limited further studies on tissue tropism and pathogenesis of FCoV. While several studies reported serological evidence for FCoV in Malaysia, neither the circulating FCoV isolated nor its biotypes determined. This study for the first...

  4. 犬瘟热病毒SH株N蛋白基因序列分析%The Sequence Analysis of N Protein Coding Gene of SH Strain of Canine Distemper Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永霞; 王金福; 江立方; 孟和

    2009-01-01

    根据GenBank中犬瘟热病毒(Canine distemper virus,CDV)N蛋白基因序列,设计合成1对特异性引物,以CDV SH株的总RNA为模板,RT-PCR扩增N蛋白基因,并进行克隆与序列分析.结果显示:CDV SH株N蛋白基因序列与CDV TN株、 A75/17 株、2 544/Han95株、98~2 654 株、5 804株、Onderstepoort疫苗株的同源性分别为98.9%,97.6%,96.7%,96.9%,96.6%,93.9%;编码氨基酸的同源性分别为99.0%,98.7%,98.1%,97.9%,97.9%,96.9%.推测N蛋白是一个保守性非常强的结构蛋白.

  5. Identification of SARS-like coronaviruses in horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihtaric, Danijela; Hostnik, Peter; Steyer, Andrej; Grom, Joze; Toplak, Ivan

    2010-04-01

    Bats have been identified as a natural reservoir for an increasing number of emerging zoonotic viruses, such as Hendra virus, Nipah virus, Ebola virus, Marburg virus, rabies and other lyssaviruses. Recently, a large number of viruses closely related to members of the genus Coronavirus have been associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and detected in bat species. In this study, samples were collected from 106 live bats of seven different bat species from 27 different locations in Slovenia. Coronaviruses were detected by RT-PCR in 14 out of 36 horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus hipposideros) fecal samples, with 38.8% virus prevalence. Sequence analysis of a 405-nucleotide region of the highly conserved RNA polymerase gene (pol) showed that all coronaviruses detected in this study are genetically closely related, with 99.5-100% nucleotide identity, and belong to group 2 of the coronaviruses. The most closely related virus sequence in GenBank was SARS bat isolate Rp3/2004 (DQ071615) within the SARS-like CoV cluster, sharing 85% nucleotide identity and 95.6% amino acid identity. The potential risk of a new group of bat coronaviruses as a reservoir for human infections is highly suspected, and further molecular epidemiologic studies of these bat coronaviruses are needed. PMID:20217155

  6. Prevalence and phylogeny of coronaviruses in wild birds from the Bering Strait area (Beringia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaman Muradrasoli

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses (CoVs can cause mild to severe disease in humans and animals, their host range and environmental spread seem to have been largely underestimated, and they are currently being investigated for their potential medical relevance. Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV belongs to gamma-coronaviruses and causes a costly respiratory viral disease in chickens. The role of wild birds in the epidemiology of IBV is poorly understood. In the present study, we examined 1,002 cloacal and faecal samples collected from 26 wild bird species in the Beringia area for the presence of CoVs, and then we performed statistical and phylogenetic analyses. We detected diverse CoVs by RT-PCR in wild birds in the Beringia area. Sequence analysis showed that the detected viruses are gamma-coronaviruses related to IBV. These findings suggest that wild birds are able to carry gamma-coronaviruses asymptomatically. We concluded that CoVs are widespread among wild birds in Beringia, and their geographic spread and frequency is higher than previously realised. Thus, Avian CoV can be efficiently disseminated over large distances and could be a genetic reservoir for future emerging pathogenic CoVs. Considering the great animal health and economic impact of IBV as well as the recent emergence of novel coronaviruses such as SARS-coronavirus, it is important to investigate the role of wildlife reservoirs in CoV infection biology and epidemiology.

  7. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  8. The role of Type 1, P and S fimbriae in binding of Escherichia coli to the canine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2013-06-28

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most commonly isolated infectious agent causing pyometra in bitches. Many E. coli strains isolated from the uteri of infected dogs carry several adhesin genes (fimH, papGIII and sfa). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of each adhesin gene product, acting alone or expressed in combination, in the bacterial binding to canine endometrium. E. coli strain P3, which was isolated from a uterus of a bitch naturally affected with pyometra, was shown by PCR to carry all three known fimbrial adhesin genes fimH, papGIII and sfa. Knockout (KO) mutants of this wildtype (P3-wt) strain were generated using insertional inactivation. Adhesion assays on anoestrous uteri of three post-pubertal bitches were undertaken. Overall, the number of bacteria adhering to canine endometrial biopsies was comparable between strains and no significant difference in the number of bound bacteria was found between the P3-wt strain and the single or double KO-strains. However, the triple knockout strain displayed less binding to the canine endometrium compared with the P3-wt strain. This study shows that a pathogenic E. coli strain (P3) isolated from the uterus of a bitch with pyometra was able to fully compensate for the loss of two of its three known adhesin genes. It was necessary to inactivate all three known adhesin genes in order to see a significant decrease in binding to canine endometrium. PMID:23523172

  9. High-yield expression of recombinant SARS coronavirus nucleocapsid protein in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Shi Liu; Kun-Yu Yang; Jian Lin; Yi-Wei Lin; Zhi-Hong Zhang; Jun Zhang; Ning-Shao Xia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Nucleocapsid (N) protein plays an important role in reproduction and pathological reaction of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SCoV), theantigenicity of the protein is better than spike (S) protein.This study was to find a highly specific and antigenic recombinant SCoV nucleocapsid (rSCoVN) protein, and to provide a basis for further researches on early diagnosis of SARS.METHODS: Full length cDNA of SCoV nucleocapsid (SCoVN)protein was amplified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into yeast expression vector pPIC3.5K to construct plasmid of pPIC3.5K-SCoVN. The plasmid was linearized and then transformed into Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) GS115 (HisMut+) by electroporation. His+Mut+recombinant strains were identified by PCR and cultivated on MM/MD plates. The influence of different factors on biomass and rSCoVN protein production during induction phase, such as various induction media, dissolved oxygen (DO) and different final concentrations of methanol, was subsequently studied. The expression level and activation were detected by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot respectively.RESULTS: All of the recombinants were His+Mut+ aftertransformation of P. pastoriswith linearized plasmids. The BMMY medium was optimal for recombinant ScoVN (rSCoVN)protein expression and growth of the recombinant strains.The final optimal concentration of methanol was 20 mL/L,the DO had a significant effect on rSCoVN protein expression and growth of recombinant strains. The rSCoVN protein expressed in recombinant strains was about 8% of the total cell protein, 520 mg/L of rSCoVN protein was achieved,and a maximum cell ,A at 600 nm of 62 was achieved in shake flask culture. The rSCoVN protein had a high specificity against mouse-anti-SARS-CoVN-mAb and SARS positive sera, but had no cross-reaction with normal human serum.The biological activity of rSCoVN expressed in P. pastoris was about 4-fold higher than that expressed in E.coliwhen the same rSCoVN protein

  10. Shihezi region field strains of canine parvovirus by PCR and preliminary study of genetic variation%石河子地区犬细小病毒野毒株的PCR检测与遗传变异初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娜; 张银国

    2012-01-01

    To explore the differences of the field strains of CPV in Shihezi, the study collected Shihezi area and the natural incidence of dog droppings and dead dog organiza- tion, extract the virus genome, the use of PCR incanine parvovirus VP2 gene fragment was amplified, the amplified fragments were cloned and sequenced, strains with different geo- graphical VP2 gene for comparison, analysis of their differences. In this study, VP2 gene was successfully cloned, andsequence analysis revealed a point mutation in strains exist 114 sites and five of its lack of sites, there are seven other strains of mutant sites. After genotyping, the genotype of these two strains WereCPY-2a type. The study areas of Xin- jiang Shihezi the prevalence of canine parvovirus and molecular characteristics of study provides some basis.%为探索石河子地区的cpv毒株是否发生遗传变异,本试验收集石河子地区自然发病犬及病死犬的粪便和组织,提取其病毒基因组,利用PCR技术对犬细小病毒VP2基因片段进行扩增,对扩增片段进行克隆和测序,并与不同地域流行株VP2基因进行比对,分析其差异。结果显示,本试验成功克隆了VP2基因,且序列分析结果显示一毒株存在14个点突变位点其和5个缺失位点,另一毒株存在7个突变位点。经基因型鉴定,野毒株的基因型均为CPV-2a型。

  11. Expression and Purification of SARS Coronavirus Membrane Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴五星; 雷明军; 吴少庭; 陈智浩; 梁靓; 潘晖榕; 秦莉; 高士同; 袁仕善; 张仁利

    2004-01-01

    To construct a recombinant plasmid Pet23a-M, the gene encoding severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus membrane protein was amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into the expression plasmid Pet23a. Results of restriction endonuclease analysis, PCR detection and DNA sequencing analysis revealed that the cloned DNA sequence was the same as that reported. The re combinants were transformed into Escherichia coli (E. Coli) BL21 (DE3) and induced by Isopropylβ-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The expression of 27 kD (1 kD=0. 992 1 ku) protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and pured by metal chelated chromatography. Results of Western-blot showed that this expressed protein could react with antibodies in sera of SARS patients during convalescence. This provided the basis for the further study on SARS virus vaccine and diagnostic agents.

  12. Identification of an epitope of SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING LIN; JIN WANG; HONG XIA WANG; HUA LIANG JIANG; JIAN HUA SHEN; YOU HUA XIE; YUAN WANG; GANG PEI; BEI FEN SHEN; JIA RUI WU; BING SUN; XU SHEN; RUI FU YANG; YI XUE LI; YONG YONG JI; YOU YU HE; MUDE SHI; WEI LU; TIE LIU SHI

    2003-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a majorvirion structural protein. In this study, two epitopes (N1 and N2) of the N protein of SARS-CoV werepredicted by bioinformatics analysis. After immunization with two peptides, the peptides-specific antibodieswere isolated from the immunized rabbits. The further experiments demonstrated that N1 peptide-inducedpolyclonal antibodies had a high affinity to bind to E. coli expressed N protein of SARS-CoV. Furthermore, itwas confirmed that N1 peptide-specific IgG antibodies were detectable in the sera of severe acute respiratorysyndrome (SARS) patients. The results indicated that an epitope of the N protein has been identified andN protein specific Abs were produced by peptide immunization, which will be useful for the study of SARS-CoV.

  13. Stillbirth during infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Daniel C; Iblan, Ibrahim; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Al Nsour, Mohannad; Rha, Brian; Tohme, Rania A; Abedi, Glen R; Farag, Noha H; Haddadin, Aktham; Al Sanhouri, Tarek; Jarour, Najwa; Swerdlow, David L; Jamieson, Denise J; Pallansch, Mark A; Haynes, Lia M; Gerber, Susan I; Al Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa

    2014-06-15

    We conducted an epidemiologic investigation among survivors of an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in Jordan. A second-trimester stillbirth occurred during the course of an acute respiratory illness that was attributed to MERS-CoV on the basis of exposure history and positive results of MERS-CoV serologic testing. This is the first occurrence of stillbirth during an infection with MERS-CoV and may have bearing upon the surveillance and management of pregnant women in settings of unexplained respiratory illness potentially due to MERS-CoV. Future prospective investigations of MERS-CoV should ascertain pregnancy status and obtain further pregnancy-related data, including biological specimens for confirmatory testing. PMID:24474813

  14. Development of Medical Countermeasures to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeki, Timothy M; Erlandson, Karl J; Korch, George; O'Hara, Michael; Wathen, Michael; Hu-Primmer, Jean; Hojvat, Sally; Stemmy, Erik J; Donabedian, Armen

    2016-07-01

    Preclinical development of and research on potential Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) medical countermeasures remain preliminary; advancements are needed before most countermeasures are ready to be tested in human clinical trials. Research priorities include standardization of animal models and virus stocks for studying disease pathogenesis and efficacy of medical countermeasures; development of MERS-CoV diagnostics; improved access to nonhuman primates to support preclinical research; studies to better understand and control MERS-CoV disease, including vaccination studies in camels; and development of a standardized clinical trial protocol. Partnering with clinical trial networks in affected countries to evaluate safety and efficacy of investigational therapeutics will strengthen efforts to identify successful medical countermeasures. PMID:27191188

  15. Stillbirth During Infection With Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Daniel C.; Iblan, Ibrahim; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Al Nsour, Mohannad; Rha, Brian; Tohme, Rania A.; Abedi, Glen R.; Farag, Noha H.; Haddadin, Aktham; Sanhouri, Tarek Al; Jarour, Najwa; Swerdlow, David L.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Pallansch, Mark A.; Haynes, Lia M.; Gerber, Susan I.; Al Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an epidemiologic investigation among survivors of an outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in Jordan. A second-trimester stillbirth occurred during the course of an acute respiratory illness that was attributed to MERS-CoV on the basis of exposure history and positive results of MERS-CoV serologic testing. This is the first occurrence of stillbirth during an infection with MERS-CoV and may have bearing upon the surveillance and management of pregnant women in settings of unexplained respiratory illness potentially due to MERS-CoV. Future prospective investigations of MERS-CoV should ascertain pregnancy status and obtain further pregnancy-related data, including biological specimens for confirmatory testing. PMID:24474813

  16. Development of Medical Countermeasures to Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Karl J.; Korch, George; O’Hara, Michael; Wathen, Michael; Hu-Primmer, Jean; Hojvat, Sally; Stemmy, Erik J.; Donabedian, Armen

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical development of and research on potential Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) medical countermeasures remain preliminary; advancements are needed before most countermeasures are ready to be tested in human clinical trials. Research priorities include standardization of animal models and virus stocks for studying disease pathogenesis and efficacy of medical countermeasures; development of MERS-CoV diagnostics; improved access to nonhuman primates to support preclinical research; studies to better understand and control MERS-CoV disease, including vaccination studies in camels; and development of a standardized clinical trial protocol. Partnering with clinical trial networks in affected countries to evaluate safety and efficacy of investigational therapeutics will strengthen efforts to identify successful medical countermeasures. PMID:27191188

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus persistence in Vero cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustavo Palacios; Omar Jabado; Neil Renwick; Thomas Briese; W. Ian Lipkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Several coronaviruses establish persistent infections in vitro and in vivo, however it is unknown whether persistence is a feature of the severe acute respiratory syndorme coronavirus (SARS-CoV) life cycle. This study was conducted to investigate viral persistence.Methods We inoculated confluent monolayers of Vero cells with SARS-CoV at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 TCID50 and passaged the remaining cells every 4 to 8 days for a total of 11 passages. Virus was titrated at each passage by limited dilution assay and nucleocapsid antigen was detected by Western blot and immunofluoresence assays. The presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells was assessed by electron microscopy. Changes in viral genomic sequences during persistent infection were examined by DNA sequencing. Results Cytopathic effect was extensive after initial inoculation but diminished with serial passages. Infectious virus was detected after each passage and viral growth curves were identical for parental virus stock and virus obtained from passage 11 cells. Nucleocapsid antigen was detected in the majority of cells after initial inoculation but in only 10%-40% of cells at passages 2-11. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells. Sequence analysis at passage 11 revealed fixed mutations in the spike (S) gene and ORFs 7a-8b but not in the nucleocapsid (N) gene. Conclusions SARS-CoV can establish a persistent infection in vitro. The mechanism for viral persistence is consistent with the formation of a carrier culture whereby a limited number of cells are infected with each round of virus replication and release. Persistence is associated with selected mutations in the SARS-CoV genome. This model may provide insight into SARS-related lung pathology and mechanisms by which humans and animals can serve as reservoirs for infection.

  18. Complete genomic sequence analysis of infectious bronchitis virus Ark DPI strain and its evolution by recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammayappan, Arun; Upadhyay, Chitra; Gelb, Jack; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2008-12-22

    An infectious bronchitis virus Arkansas DPI (Ark DPI) virulent strain was sequenced, analyzed and compared with many different IBV strains and coronaviruses. The genome of Ark DPI consists of 27,620 nucleotides, excluding poly (A) tail, and comprises ten open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of Ark DPI with other IBV strains shows striking similarity to the Conn, Gray, JMK, and Ark 99, which were circulating during that time period. Furthermore, comparison of the Ark genome with other coronaviruses demonstrates a close relationship to turkey coronavirus. Among non-structural genes, the 5'untranslated region (UTR), 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro) and the polymerase (RdRp) sequences are 100% identical to the Gray strain. Among structural genes, S1 has 97% identity with Ark 99; S2 has 100% identity with JMK and 96% to Conn; 3b 99%, and 3C to N is 100% identical to Conn strain. Possible recombination sites were found at the intergenic region of spike gene, 3'end of S1 and 3a gene. Independent recombination events may have occurred in the entire genome of Ark DPI, involving four different IBV strains, suggesting that genomic RNA recombination may occur in any part of the genome at number of sites. Hence, we speculate that the Ark DPI strain originated from the Conn strain, but diverged and evolved independently by point mutations and recombination between field strains.

  19. Complete genomic sequence analysis of infectious bronchitis virus Ark DPI strain and its evolution by recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelb Jack

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An infectious bronchitis virus Arkansas DPI (Ark DPI virulent strain was sequenced, analyzed and compared with many different IBV strains and coronaviruses. The genome of Ark DPI consists of 27,620 nucleotides, excluding poly (A tail, and comprises ten open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of Ark DPI with other IBV strains shows striking similarity to the Conn, Gray, JMK, and Ark 99, which were circulating during that time period. Furthermore, comparison of the Ark genome with other coronaviruses demonstrates a close relationship to turkey coronavirus. Among non-structural genes, the 5'untranslated region (UTR, 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro and the polymerase (RdRp sequences are 100% identical to the Gray strain. Among structural genes, S1 has 97% identity with Ark 99; S2 has 100% identity with JMK and 96% to Conn; 3b 99%, and 3C to N is 100% identical to Conn strain. Possible recombination sites were found at the intergenic region of spike gene, 3'end of S1 and 3a gene. Independent recombination events may have occurred in the entire genome of Ark DPI, involving four different IBV strains, suggesting that genomic RNA recombination may occur in any part of the genome at number of sites. Hence, we speculate that the Ark DPI strain originated from the Conn strain, but diverged and evolved independently by point mutations and recombination between field strains.

  20. Current developments in canine genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Yvonne; Distl, Ottmar

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, canine genetics had made huge progress. In 1999 the first complete karyotype and ideogram of the dog was published. Several linkage and RH maps followed. Using these maps, sets of microsatellite markers for whole genome scans were compiled. In 2003 the sequencing of the DNA of a female Boxer began. Now the second version of the dog genome assembly has been put online, and recently, a microchip SNP array became available. Parallel to these developments, some causal mutations for different traits have been identified. Most of the identified mutations were responsible for monogenic canine hereditary diseases. With the tools available now, it is possible to use the advantages of the population structure of the various dog breeds to unravel complex genetic traits. Furthermore, the dog is a suitable model for the research of a large number of human hereditary diseases and particularly for cancer genetics, heart and neurodegenerative diseases. There are some examples where it was possible to benefit from the knowledge of canine genetics for human research. The search for quantitative trait loci (QTL), the testing of candidate genes and genome-wide association studies can now be performed in dogs. QTL for skeletal size variations and for canine hip dysplasia have been already identified and for these complex traits the responsible genes and their possible interactions can now be identified. PMID:20690545

  1. Prognostic markers of canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    M.C. Sant'Anna; L.G.P. Giordano; K.K.M.C. Flaiban; Muller, E.E.; M.I.M. Martins

    2014-01-01

    The pyometra is a disease that affects middle age and elderly female dogs during diestrus. Hormonal, microbiological, biochemical and hematological aspects are well described. However, few studies have evaluated the role of each in the prognosis of canine pyometra. The aim of this study was to identify markers associated with clinical worsening of dogs with pyometra. We prospectively evaluated 80 dogs with pyometra tre...

  2. Surgical innovations in canine gonadectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Bart

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis some recent technological developments in human surgery are evaluated for their potential use in veterinary medicine by introducing them as surgical innovations for canine gonadectomy. Barbed sutures achieve wound apposition without surgical knot tying and thus avoid knot-associated n

  3. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  4. Coronavirus spike protein inhibits host cell translation by interaction with eIF3f.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xiao

    Full Text Available In response to viral infection, the expression of numerous host genes, including predominantly a number of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, is usually up-regulated at both transcriptional and translational levels. It was noted that in cells infected with coronavirus, transcription and translation of some of these genes were differentially induced. Drastic induction of their expression at the transcriptional level was observed in cells infected with coronavirus. However, induction of the same genes at the translational level was usually found to be minimal to moderate. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, yeast two-hybrid screen was carried out using SARS-CoV proteins as baits, revealing that a subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3, eIF3f, may interact with the N-terminal region of the SARS-CoV spike (S protein. This interaction was subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, parallel experiments confirmed that eIF3f could also interact with the S protein of another coronavirus, the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. These interactions led to the inhibition of translation of a reporter gene in both in vitro expression system and intact cells. Interestingly, IBV-infected cells stably expressing a Flag-tagged eIF3f showed much higher translation of IL-6 and IL-8, suggesting that the interaction between coronavirus S protein and eIF3f plays a functional role in controlling the expression of host genes, especially genes that are induced during coronavirus infection cycles. This study reveals a novel mechanism exploited by coronavirus to regulate viral pathogenesis.

  5. Coronavirus 3CLpro proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blom Nikolaj

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the passing of more than a year since the first outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, efficient counter-measures are still few and many believe that reappearance of SARS, or a similar disease caused by a coronavirus, is not unlikely. For other virus families like the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection. Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network was trained to recognise the cleavage sites in the genomes obtaining a sensitivity of 87.0% and a specificity of 99.0%. Several proteins known to be cleaved by other viruses were submitted to prediction as well as proteins suspected relevant in coronavirus pathology. Cleavage sites were predicted in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-1, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage candidates were identified which might be important to elucidate coronavirus pathology. Furthermore, the method might assist in design of proteinase inhibitors for treatment of SARS and possible future diseases caused by coronaviruses. It is made available for public use at our website: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCorona/.

  6. Anti-SARS virus antibody responses against human SARS-associated coronavirus and animal SARS-associated coronavirus-like virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鸣; 徐慧芳; 莫自耀; 郑伯健; 高阳; 顾菁; 秦鹏哲; 张周斌; 邹晓忠; 梁彩云; 赵宇腾; 高凯

    2004-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an infectious disease first recognized in November 2002 in Guangdong province, China. It was spread to many countries all over the world within a few months.1,2 By April 2003, SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was found to be the etiological agent.

  7. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundin, A.; Dijkman, R.; Bergstrom, T.; Kann, N.; Adamiak, B.; Hannoun, C.; Kindler, E.; Jonsdottir, H.R.; Muth, D.; Kint, J.; Forlenza, M.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound corona

  8. Structure of the C-terminal domain of nsp4 from feline coronavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Wojdyla, Justyna A.; Panjikar, Santosh [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E. [Molecular Virology Laboratory, Department of Medical Microbiology, Center of Infectious Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Berglind, Hanna; Nordlund, Pär [Division of Biophysics, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Scheeles väg 2, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Coutard, Bruno [Laboratoire Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, UMR 6098, AFMB-CNRS-ESIL, Case 925, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Tucker, Paul A., E-mail: tucker@embl-hamburg.de [EMBL Hamburg Outstation, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-08-01

    The structure of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of nonstructural protein 4 from feline coronavirus has been determined and analyzed. Coronaviruses are a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses that includes important pathogens of humans and other animals. The large coronavirus genome (26–31 kb) encodes 15–16 nonstructural proteins (nsps) that are derived from two replicase polyproteins by autoproteolytic processing. The nsps assemble into the viral replication–transcription complex and nsp3, nsp4 and nsp6 are believed to anchor this enzyme complex to modified intracellular membranes. The largest part of the coronavirus nsp4 subunit is hydrophobic and is predicted to be embedded in the membranes. In this report, a conserved C-terminal domain (∼100 amino-acid residues) has been delineated that is predicted to face the cytoplasm and has been isolated as a soluble domain using library-based construct screening. A prototypical crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution was obtained using nsp4 from feline coronavirus. Unmodified and SeMet-substituted proteins were crystallized under similar conditions, resulting in tetragonal crystals that belonged to space group P4{sub 3}. The phase problem was initially solved by single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS), followed by molecular replacement using a SIRAS-derived composite model. The structure consists of a single domain with a predominantly α-helical content displaying a unique fold that could be engaged in protein–protein interactions.

  9. A simple and rapid approach for screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes: an evaluation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yongjie

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS was a newly emerged infectious disease which caused a global epidemic in 2002–2003. Sequence analysis of SARS-coronavirus isolates revealed that specific genotypes predominated at different periods of the epidemic. This information can be used as a footprint for tracing the epidemiology of infections and monitor viral evolution. However, direct sequencing analysis of a large number of clinical samples is cumbersome and time consuming. We present here a simple and rapid assay for the screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes based on the use of fluorogenic oligonucleotide probes for allelic discrimination. Methods Thirty SARS patients were recruited. Allelic discrimination assays were developed based on the use of fluorogenic oligonucleotide probes (TaqMan. Genotyping of the SARS-coronavirus isolates obtained from these patients were carried out by the allelic discrimination assays and confirmed by direct sequencing. Results Genotyping based on the allelic discrimination assays were fully concordant with direct sequencing. All of the 30 SARS-coronavirus genotypes studied were characteristic of genotypes previously documented to be associated with the latter part of the epidemic. Seven of the isolates contained a previously reported major deletion but in patients not epidemiologically related to the previously studied cohort. Conclusion We have developed a simple and accurate method for the characterization and screening of SARS-coronavirus genotypes. It is a promising tool for the study of epidemiological relationships between documented cases during an outbreak.

  10. Genomic Analysis and Surveillance of the Coronavirus Dominant in Ducks in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ye Zhuang

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity, evolution, distribution, and taxonomy of some coronaviruses dominant in birds other than chickens remain enigmatic. In this study we sequenced the genome of a newly identified coronavirus dominant in ducks (DdCoV, and performed a large-scale surveillance of coronaviruses in chickens and ducks using a conserved RT-PCR assay. The viral genome harbors a tandem repeat which is rare in vertebrate RNA viruses. The repeat is homologous to some proteins of various cellular organisms, but its origin remains unknown. Many substitutions, insertions, deletions, and some frameshifts and recombination events have occurred in the genome of the DdCoV, as compared with the coronavirus dominant in chickens (CdCoV. The distances between DdCoV and CdCoV are large enough to separate them into different species within the genus Gammacoronavirus. Our surveillance demonstrated that DdCoVs and CdCoVs belong to different lineages and occupy different ecological niches, further supporting that they should be classified into different species. Our surveillance also demonstrated that DdCoVs and CdCoVs are prevalent in live poultry markets in some regions of China. In conclusion, this study shed novel insight into the genetic diversity, evolution, distribution, and taxonomy of the coronaviruses circulating in chickens and ducks.

  11. Stability of bovine coronavirus on lettuce surfaces under household refrigeration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullis, Lisa; Saif, Linda J.; Zhang, Yongbin; Zhang, Xuming; Azevedo, Marli S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Fecal suspensions with an aerosol route of transmission were responsible for a cluster of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) cases in 2003 in Hong Kong. Based on that event, the World Health Organization recommended that research be implemented to define modes of transmission of SARS coronavirus through sewage, feces, food and water. Environmental studies have shown that animal coronaviruses remain infectious in water and sewage for up to a year depending on the temperature and humidity. In this study, we examined coronavirus stability on lettuce surfaces. A cell culture adapted bovine coronavirus, diluted in growth media or in bovine fecal suspensions to simulate fecal contamination was used to spike romaine lettuce. qRT-PCR detected viral RNA copy number ranging from 6.6 × 104 to 1.7 × 106 throughout the experimental period of 30 days. Whereas infectious viruses were detected for at least 14 days, the amount of infectious virus varied, depending upon the diluent used for spiking the lettuce. UV and confocal microscopic observation indicated attachment of residual labeled virions to the lettuce surface after the elution procedure, suggesting that rates of inactivation or detection of the virus may be underestimated. Thus, it is possible that contaminated vegetables may be potential vehicles for coronavirus zoonotic transmission to humans. PMID:22265299

  12. Laboratory investigation and phylogenetic analysis of an imported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus case in Greece.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Kossyvakis

    Full Text Available Rapid and reliable laboratory diagnosis of persons suspected of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV infection is important for timely implementation of infection control practices and disease management. In addition, monitoring molecular changes in the virus can help elucidate chains of transmission and identify mutations that might influence virus transmission efficiency. This was illustrated by a recent laboratory investigation we conducted on an imported MERS-CoV case in Greece. Two oropharyngeal swab specimens were collected on the 1st and 2nd day of patient hospitalization and tested using two real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR assays targeting the UpE and Orf-1a regions of the MERS-CoV genome and RT-PCR and partial sequencing of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid genes. Serum specimens were also collected and serological test were performed. Results from the first swab sample were inconclusive while the second swab was strongly positive for MERS-CoV RNA by rRT-PCR and confirmed positive by RT-PCR and partial gene sequencing. Positive serologic test results further confirmed MERS-CoV infection. Full-length nucleocapsid and spike gene coding sequences were later obtained from the positive swab sample. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the virus was closely related to recent human-derived MERS-CoV strains obtained in Jeddah and Makkah, Saudi Arabia, in April 2014 and dromedary camels in Saudi Arabia and Qatar. These findings were consistent with the patient's history. We also identified a unique amino acid substitution in the spike receptor binding domain that may have implications for receptor binding efficiency. Our initial inconclusive rRT-PCR results highlight the importance of collecting multiple specimens from suspect MERS-CoV cases and particularly specimens from the lower respiratory tract.

  13. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): animal to human interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Ali S; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel enzootic betacoronavirus that was first described in September 2012. The clinical spectrum of MERS-CoV infection in humans ranges from an asymptomatic or mild respiratory illness to severe pneumonia and multi-organ failure; overall mortality is around 35.7%. Bats harbour several betacoronaviruses that are closely related to MERS-CoV but more research is needed to establish the relationship between bats and MERS-CoV. The seroprevalence of MERS-CoV antibodies is very high in dromedary camels in Eastern Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. MERS-CoV RNA and viable virus have been isolated from dromedary camels, including some with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, near-identical strains of MERS-CoV have been isolated from epidemiologically linked humans and camels, confirming inter-transmission, most probably from camels to humans. Though inter-human spread within health care settings is responsible for the majority of reported MERS-CoV cases, the virus is incapable at present of causing sustained human-to-human transmission. Clusters can be readily controlled with implementation of appropriate infection control procedures. Phylogenetic and sequencing data strongly suggest that MERS-CoV originated from bat ancestors after undergoing a recombination event in the spike protein, possibly in dromedary camels in Africa, before its exportation to the Arabian Peninsula along the camel trading routes. MERS-CoV serosurveys are needed to investigate possible unrecognized human infections in Africa. Amongst the important measures to control MERS-CoV spread are strict regulation of camel movement, regular herd screening and isolation of infected camels, use of personal protective equipment by camel handlers and enforcing rules banning all consumption of unpasteurized camel milk and urine. PMID:26924345

  14. Structural bases of coronavirus attachment to host aminopeptidase N and its inhibition by neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Reguera

    Full Text Available The coronaviruses (CoVs are enveloped viruses of animals and humans associated mostly with enteric and respiratory diseases, such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome and 10-20% of all common colds. A subset of CoVs uses the cell surface aminopeptidase N (APN, a membrane-bound metalloprotease, as a cell entry receptor. In these viruses, the envelope spike glycoprotein (S mediates the attachment of the virus particles to APN and subsequent cell entry, which can be blocked by neutralizing antibodies. Here we describe the crystal structures of the receptor-binding domains (RBDs of two closely related CoV strains, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and porcine respiratory CoV (PRCV, in complex with their receptor, porcine APN (pAPN, or with a neutralizing antibody. The data provide detailed information on the architecture of the dimeric pAPN ectodomain and its interaction with the CoV S. We show that a protruding receptor-binding edge in the S determines virus-binding specificity for recessed glycan-containing surfaces in the membrane-distal region of the pAPN ectodomain. Comparison of the RBDs of TGEV and PRCV to those of other related CoVs, suggests that the conformation of the S receptor-binding region determines cell entry receptor specificity. Moreover, the receptor-binding edge is a major antigenic determinant in the TGEV envelope S that is targeted by neutralizing antibodies. Our results provide a compelling view on CoV cell entry and immune neutralization, and may aid the design of antivirals or CoV vaccines. APN is also considered a target for cancer therapy and its structure, reported here, could facilitate the development of anti-cancer drugs.

  15. Establishment of a Rescue System for Canine Distemper Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Gassen, Uta; Collins, Fergal M.; Duprex, W. Paul; Rima, Bert K.

    2000-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) has been rescued from a full-length cDNA clone. Besides Measles virus (MV) and Rinderpest virus, a third morbillivirus is now available for genetic analysis using reverse genetics. A plasmid p(+)CDV was constructed by sequential cloning using the Onderstepoort vaccine strain large-plaque-forming variant. The presence of a T7 promoter allowed transcription of full-length antigenomic RNA by a T7 RNA polymerase, which was provided by a host range mutant of vaccinia v...

  16. Surgical innovations in canine gonadectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Van Goethem, Bart

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis some recent technological developments in human surgery are evaluated for their potential use in veterinary medicine by introducing them as surgical innovations for canine gonadectomy. Barbed sutures achieve wound apposition without surgical knot tying and thus avoid knot-associated negative consequences (lengthy placement, impaired wound healing around bulky knots, and the effect of unsightly knots on cosmetics). A study in 9 dogs found that celiotomy closure was easily achiev...

  17. Discovery of Anti-SARS Coronavirus Drug Based on Molecular Docking and Database Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN,Hai-Feng(陈海峰); YAO,Jian-Hua(姚建华); SUN,Jing(孙晶); LI,Qiang(李强); LI,Feng(李丰); FAN,Bo-Tao(范波涛); YUAN,Shen-Gang(袁身刚)

    2004-01-01

    The active site of 3CL proteinase (3CLpro) for coronavirus was identified by comparing the crystal structures of human and porcine coronavirus. The inhibitor of the main protein of rhinovirus (Ag7088) could bind with 3CLpro of human coronavirus, then it was selected as the reference for molecular docking and database screening. The ligands from two databases were used to search potential lead structures with molecular docking. Several structures from natural products and ACD-SC databases were found to have lower binding free energy with 3CLpro than that of Ag7088. These structures have similar hydrophobicity to Ag7088. They have complementary electrostatic potential and hydrogen bond acceptor and donor with 3CLpro, showing that the strategy of anti-SARS drug design based on molecular docking and database screening is feasible.

  18. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay for detecting of antibody to canine distemper virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarisman

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum neutralisation test (SNT has been established for evaluating canine distemper vaccination, but until now SNT was rarely used due to the need for continuous tissue culture facilities and requires 3 days to perform. For detecting antibody to canine distemper virus, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA is relatively simple and rapid seroassay. ELISA for canine immunoglobulin (Ig G antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV was developed by using Onderstepoort strain of canine distemper virus as coating antigen. Rabbit anti canine IgG labelled with horse radish peroxidase was used as the conjugate, while phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD was used as the substrate. The ELISA results were then compared with the results of the SNT, using the sera of 312 random-source dogs from West Java. The two test-results had a high degree of correlation. Very few discrepancies occurred and most of these were at the lower limits of each test. When the sera were tested at 1 : 100 dilutions, there was a 95.5% agreement between the ELISA and SNT. Their sensitivity and spesificity were 83.9 and 98.4%. Titrated SNT and ELISA also were performed on sera from 7 dogs whose lifetime medical histories were known. The antibodies were inclining up after two months of post vaccination, where the titre was not in zero/lower position at the day of vaccination. However, antibody zero or low position were found at 28 days post vaccination. All of the results indicated that ELISA can be used for evaluating antibody to canine distemper virus response, replacing the SNT.

  19. Immunological Responses against SARS-Coronavirus Infection in Humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun Xu; Xiao-Ming Gao

    2004-01-01

    Since the outbreak of a SARS epidemic last year, significant advances have been made on our understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between the SARS coronavirus (CoV) and the immune system. Strong humoral responses have been found in most patients following SARS-CoV infection, with high titers of neutralizing Abspresent in their convalescent sera. The nucleocapsid (N) and spike (S) proteins of SARS-CoV appear to be the dominant antigens recognized by serum Abs. CD4+ T cell responses against the N protein have been observed in SARS patients and an HLA-A2-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope in the S protein has been identified.It is likely that the immune responses induced by SARS-CoV infection could also cause pathological damage to the host, especially in the case of proinflammatory cytokines. There is also evidence suggesting that SARS-CoV might be able to directly invade cells of the immune system. Our understanding on the interaction between SARS-CoV, the immune system and local tissues is essential to future diagnosis, control and treatment of this very contagious disease.

  20. Suppression of feline coronavirus replication in vitro by cyclosporin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yoshikazu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV is a member of the feline coronavirus family that causes FIP, which is incurable and fatal in cats. Cyclosporin A (CsA, an immunosuppressive agent that targets the nuclear factor pathway of activated T-cells (NF-AT to bind cellular cyclophilins (CyP, dose-dependently inhibited FIPV replication in vitro. FK506 (an immunosuppressor of the pathway that binds cellular FK506-binding protein (FKBP but not CyP did not affect FIPV replication. Neither cell growth nor viability changed in the presence of either CsA or FK506, and these factors did not affect the NF-AT pathway in fcwf-4 cells. Therefore, CsA does not seem to exert inhibitory effects via the NF-AT pathway. In conclusion, CsA inhibited FIPV replication in vitro and further studies are needed to verify the practical value of CsA as an anti-FIPV treatment in vivo.

  1. Suppression of feline coronavirus replication in vitro by cyclosporin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Osawa, Shuichi; Inoue, Mai; Tanaka, Satoka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2012-04-30

    The feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) is a member of the feline coronavirus family that causes FIP, which is incurable and fatal in cats. Cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressive agent that targets the nuclear factor pathway of activated T-cells (NF-AT) to bind cellular cyclophilins (CyP), dose-dependently inhibited FIPV replication in vitro. FK506 (an immunosuppressor of the pathway that binds cellular FK506-binding protein (FKBP) but not CyP) did not affect FIPV replication. Neither cell growth nor viability changed in the presence of either CsA or FK506, and these factors did not affect the NF-AT pathway in fcwf-4 cells. Therefore, CsA does not seem to exert inhibitory effects via the NF-AT pathway. In conclusion, CsA inhibited FIPV replication in vitro and further studies are needed to verify the practical value of CsA as an anti-FIPV treatment in vivo.

  2. Dissection of SARS Coronavirus Spike Protein into Discrete Folded Fragments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shuang; CAI Zhen; CHEN Yong; LIN Zhanglin

    2006-01-01

    The spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) mediates cell fusion by binding to target cell surface receptors. This paper reports a simple method for dissecting the viral protein and for searching for foldable fragments in a random but systematic manner. The method involves digestion by DNase I to generate a pool of short DNA segments, followed by an additional step of reassembly of these segments to produce a library of DNA fragments with random ends but controllable lengths. To rapidly screen for discrete folded polypeptide fragments, the reassembled gene fragments were further cloned into a vector as N-terminal fusions to a folding reporter gene which was a variant of green fluorescent protein. Two foldable fragments were identified for the SARS-CoV spike protein, which coincide with various anti-SARS peptides derived from the hepated repeat (HR) region 2 of the spike protein. The method should be applicable to other viral proteins to isolate antigen or vaccine candidates, thus providing an alternative to the full-length proteins (subunits) or linear short peptides.

  3. Enhanced surveillance and investigation of coronavirus: what is required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebody, R G; Nicoll, A; Buchholz, U; Zambon, M; Mounts, A

    2013-01-01

    Following the discovery in September 2012 of 2 patients, both with links to the Eastern Mediterranean Region, with serious respiratory illness due to novel coronavirus, all countries have instigated surveillance and laboratory activities to detect further cases, with intensive case-contact investigations undertaken on laboratory confirmation of cases. A total of 30 cases, of whom 18 have died, and at least 3 clusters have been detected to date (1 cluster among health-care workers and another 2 clusters among family members). To date, transmission studies have shown a low risk of onward human transmission, with clinical presentation remaining severe for the majority. Many questions remain including the zoonotic source and geographical extent of infection. Surveillance has been extended to include clusters of cases or health-care workers with severe, undiagnosed respiratory illness regardless of travel history. Environmental studies, on-going surveillance and linked case-contact investigations will provide a critical role in answering some of these issues. PMID:23888796

  4. First genome sequences of buffalo coronavirus from water buffaloes in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, S K P; Tsang, A K L; Shakeel Ahmed, S; Mahbub Alam, M; Ahmed, Z; Wong, P-C; Yuen, K-Y; Woo, P C Y

    2016-05-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of a buffalo coronavirus (BufCoV HKU26) detected from the faecal samples of two domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Bangladesh. They possessed 98-99% nucleotide identities to bovine coronavirus (BCoV) genomes, supporting BufCoV HKU26 as a member of Betacoronavirus 1. Nevertheless, BufCoV HKU26 possessed distinct accessory proteins between spike and envelope compared to BCoV. Sugar-binding residues in the N-terminal domain of S protein in BCoV are conserved in BufCoV HKU26. PMID:27274850

  5. First genome sequences of buffalo coronavirus from water buffaloes in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, S K P; Tsang, A.K.L.; Shakeel Ahmed, S.; Mahbub Alam, M.; Z. Ahmed; P.-C. Wong; K.-Y. Yuen; Woo, P. C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequences of a buffalo coronavirus (BufCoV HKU26) detected from the faecal samples of two domestic water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Bangladesh. They possessed 98–99% nucleotide identities to bovine coronavirus (BCoV) genomes, supporting BufCoV HKU26 as a member of Betacoronavirus 1. Nevertheless, BufCoV HKU26 possessed distinct accessory proteins between spike and envelope compared to BCoV. Sugar-binding residues in the N-terminal domain of S protein in BCoV ...

  6. 9 CFR 113.306 - Canine Distemper Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine. 113.306... Virus Vaccines § 113.306 Canine Distemper Vaccine. Canine Distemper Vaccine shall be prepared from virus... distemper virus, each of five canine distemper susceptible ferrets shall be injected with a sample of...

  7. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures.

  8. [Diagnostic tools for canine parvovirus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, A L; Hartmann, K

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection is one of the most important and common infectious diseases in dogs, in particular affecting young puppies when maternal antibodies have waned and vaccine-induced antibodies have not yet developed. The mortality rate remains high. Therefore, a rapid and safe diagnostic tool is essential to diagnose the disease to 1) provide intensive care treatment and 2) to identify virus-shedding animals and thus prevent virus spread. Whilst the detection of antibodies against CPV is considered unsuitable to diagnose the disease, there are several different methods to directly detect complete virus, virus antigen or DNA. Additionally, to test in commercial laboratories, rapid in-house tests based on ELISA are available worldwide. The specificity of the ELISA rapid in-house tests is reported to be excellent. However, results on sensitivity vary and high numbers of false-negative results are commonly reported, which potentially leads to misdiagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a very sensitive and specific diagnostic tool. It also provides the opportunity to differentiate vaccine strains from natural infection when sequencing is performed after PCR.

  9. Human monoclonal antibody combination against SARS coronavirus: synergy and coverage of escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan ter Meulen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental animal data show that protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV infection with human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs is feasible. For an effective immune prophylaxis in humans, broad coverage of different strains of SARS-CoV and control of potential neutralization escape variants will be required. Combinations of virus-neutralizing, noncompeting mAbs may have these properties. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human mAb CR3014 has been shown to completely prevent lung pathology and abolish pharyngeal shedding of SARS-CoV in infected ferrets. We generated in vitro SARS-CoV variants escaping neutralization by CR3014, which all had a single P462L mutation in the glycoprotein spike (S of the escape virus. In vitro experiments confirmed that binding of CR3014 to a recombinant S fragment (amino acid residues 318-510 harboring this mutation was abolished. We therefore screened an antibody-phage library derived from blood of a convalescent SARS patient for antibodies complementary to CR3014. A novel mAb, CR3022, was identified that neutralized CR3014 escape viruses, did not compete with CR3014 for binding to recombinant S1 fragments, and bound to S1 fragments derived from the civet cat SARS-CoV-like strain SZ3. No escape variants could be generated with CR3022. The mixture of both mAbs showed neutralization of SARS-CoV in a synergistic fashion by recognizing different epitopes on the receptor-binding domain. Dose reduction indices of 4.5 and 20.5 were observed for CR3014 and CR3022, respectively, at 100% neutralization. Because enhancement of SARS-CoV infection by subneutralizing antibody concentrations is of concern, we show here that anti-SARS-CoV antibodies do not convert the abortive infection of primary human macrophages by SARS-CoV into a productive one. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of two noncompeting human mAbs CR3014 and CR3022 potentially controls immune escape and extends the breadth of protection. At

  10. Alpha-1-antitrypsin studies: canine serum and canine surfactant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine serum alpha-1-antitrypsin was isolated by gel filtration and affinity chromatography and characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis. Measurement of the trypsin inhibitory capacity of the separated protein indicated a ninefold concentration of functional trypsin inhibitor during the isolation procedure. Electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of a single protein with alpha-globulin mobility and a molecular weight near that of human alpha-1-antitrypsin. The trypsin inhibitory capacity of pulmonary surfactant protein from five Beagle dogs was measured, related to total surfactant protein concentration, and compared with similar measurements on whole serum from the same animals. Results indicated a variable concentration of trypsin inhibitor in the canine pulmonary surfactant protein. However, the concentration in the surfactant protein was always significantly higher than that in the corresponding serum sample. Preliminary experiments designed to separate the trypsin inhibitory fraction(s) from the other surfactant proteins by gel filtration chromatography indicated that the trypsin inhibitor was probably a single protein with a molecular weight near that of alpha-1-antitrypsin. (U.S.)

  11. MERS Coronavirus Neutralizing Antibodies in Camels, Eastern Africa, 1983-1997

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Marcel A; Corman, Victor Max; Jores, Joerg; Meyer, Benjamin; Younan, Mario; Liljander, Anne; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Lattwein, Erik; Hilali, Mosaad; Musa, Bakri E; Bornstein, Set; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the distribution of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-seropositive dromedary camels in eastern Africa, we tested 189 archived serum samples accumulated during the past 30 years. We identified MERS-CoV neutralizing antibodies in 81.0% of samples from the main camel-ex

  12. Antibodies against MERS coronavirus in dromedaries, United Arab Emirates, 2003 and 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Benjamin; Müller, Marcel A.; Corman, Victor M.; Reusken, Chantal B E M; Ritz, Daniel; Godeke, Gert Jan; Lattwein, Erik; Kallies, Stephan; Siemens, Artem; van Beek, Janko; Drexler, Jan F.; Muth, Doreen; Bosch, Berend Jan; Wernery, Ulrich; Koopmans, Marion P G; Wernery, Renate; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has caused an ongoing outbreak of severe acute respiratory tract infection in humans in the Arabian Peninsula since 2012. Dromedary camels have been implicated as possible viral reservoirs. We used serologic assays to analyze 651 dromedary came

  13. Inhibition of middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection by anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ohnuma (Kei); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); R. Hatano (Ryo); V.S. Raj (Stalin); H. Mou (Huihui); S. Iwata (Satoshi); R.L. Dang (Rong); B.J. Bosch (Berend Jan); C. Morimoto (Chikao)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe identified the domains of CD26 involved in the binding of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) using distinct clones of anti-CD26 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). One clone, named 2F9, almost completely inhibited viral entry. The humanized anti-CD26 MAb YS110 also sign

  14. Human Infection with MERS coronavirus after exposure to infected camels, Saudi Arabia, 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Memish, Ziad A.; Cotten, Matthew; Meyer, Benjamin; Watson, Simon J.; Alsahafi, Abdullah J.; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A.; Corman, Victor Max; Sieberg, Andrea; Makhdoom, Hatem Q.; Assiri, Abdullah; Al Masri, Malaki; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend Jan; Beer, Martin; Müller, Marcel A.; Kellam, Paul; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a case of human infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) after exposure to infected camels. Analysis of the whole human-derived virus and 15% of the camel-derived virus sequence yielded nucleotide polymorphism signatures suggestive of cross-species trans

  15. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in dromedary camels: An outbreak investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.L. Haagmans (Bart); S.H.S. Al Dhahiry (Said); C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); V.S. Raj (Stalin); M. Galiano (Monica); R.H. Myers (Richard); G-J. Godeke (Gert-Jan); M. Jonges (Marcel); E. Farag (Elmoubasher); A. Diab (Ayman); H. Ghobashy (Hazem); F. Alhajri (Farhoud); M. Al-Thani (Mohamed); S.A. Al-Marri (Salih); H.E. Al Romaihi (Hamad); A. Al Khal (Abdullatif); A. Bermingham (Alison); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); M.M. AlHajri (Mohd); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe lower respiratory tract infection in people. Previous studies suggested dromedary camels were a reservoir for this virus. We tested for the presence of MERS-CoV in dromedary camels from a farm in Qatar link

  16. Targeting non-human coronaviruses to human cancer cells using a bispecific single-chain antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Würdinger, T; Verheije, M H; Raaben, M; Bosch, B J; de Haan, C A M; van Beusechem, V W; Rottier, P J M; Gerritsen, W R

    2005-01-01

    To explore the potential of using non-human coronaviruses for cancer therapy, we first established their ability to kill human tumor cells. We found that the feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and a felinized murine hepatitis virus (fMHV), both normally incapable of infecting human cells, co

  17. A novel glycoprotein of feline infectious peritonitis coronavirus contains a KDEL like endoplasmic reticulum retention signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vennema, H.; Heijnen, L.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Spaan, W.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new protein of feline infectious peritonitis coronavirus (FIPV) was discovered in lysates of [35S]cysteine-labeled infected cells. Expression of open reading frame (ORF) 6b of FIPV in recombinant vaccinia virus-infected cells was used to identify it as the 6b protein. Further characterization reve

  18. Intracellular transport of recombinant coronavirus spike proteins: implications for virus assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vennema, H.; Heijnen, L.; Zijderveld, A.; Spaan, W.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Coronavirus spike protein genes were expressed in vitro by using the recombinant vaccinia virus expression system. Recombinant spike proteins were expressed at the cell surface and induced cell fusion in a host-cell-dependent fashion. The intracellular transport of recombinant spike proteins was stu

  19. In vitro and in vivo expression of foreign genes by transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus-derived minigenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, S.; Sola, I.; Teifke, J.P.; Reimann, I.; Izeta, A.; Balasch, M.; Plana Duran, J.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Enjuanes, L.

    2002-01-01

    A helper-dependent expression system based on transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) has been developed using a minigenome of 3·9 kb (M39). Expression of the reporter gene {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) (2–8 µg per 106 cells) and the porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV)

  20. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infec

  1. First Case of Systemic Coronavirus Infection in a Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo) in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescano, J; Quevedo, M; Gonzales-Viera, O; Luna, L; Keel, M K; Gregori, F

    2015-12-01

    A domestic ferret from Lima, Peru, died after ten days of non-specific clinical signs. Based on pathology, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis, ferret systemic coronavirus (FRSCV)-associated disease was diagnosed for the first time in South America. This report highlights the potential spread of pathogens by the international pet trade.

  2. The viral spike protein is not involved in the polarized sorting of coronaviruses in epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; de Beer, R; Godeke, G J; Raamsman, M J; Horzinek, M C; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    1998-01-01

    Coronaviruses are assembled by budding into a pre-Golgi compartment from which they are transported along the secretory pathway to leave the cell. In cultured epithelial cells, they are released in a polarized fashion; depending on the virus and cell type, they are sorted preferentially either to th

  3. Entry and release of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus are restricted to apical surfaces of polarized epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J W; Bekker, C P; Voorhout, W F; Strous, G J; van der Ende, A; Rottier, P J

    1994-01-01

    The transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) infects the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract of pigs, resulting in a high mortality rate in piglets. This study shows the interaction of TGEV with a porcine epithelial cell line. To determine the site of viral entry, LLC-PK1 cells were gro

  4. A Structural analysis of M protein in coronavirus assembly and morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Neuman, Benjamin; Kiss, Gabriella; H. Kunding, Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    The M protein of coronavirus plays a central role in virus assembly, turning cellular membranes into workshops where virus and host factors come together to make new virus particles. We investigated how M structure and organization is related to virus shape and size using cryo-electron microscopy...

  5. Characterization of a novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Rota (Paul); M.S. Oberste (Steven); S.S. Monroe (Stephan); W.A. Nix (Allan); R. Campagnoli (Ray); J.P. Icenogle (Joseph); S. Penaranda; B. Bankamp (Bettina); K. Maher (Kaija); M.H. Chen (Min-hsin); S. Tong (Suxiong); A. Tamin (Azaibi); L. Lowe (Luis); M. Frace (Michael); J.L. DeRisi (Joseph); Q. Chen (Qi); D. Wang (David); D.D. Erdman (Dean); T.C. Peret (Teresa); C. Burns (Cara); T.G. Ksiazek (Thomas); P.E. Rollin (Pierre); A. Sanchez (Berenguer); S. Liffick (Stephanie); B. Holloway (Brian); J. Limor (Josef); K. McCaustland (Karen); M. Olsen-Rasmussen (Mellissa); S. Gunther; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); C. Drosten (Christian); M.A. Pallansch (Mark); L.J. Anderson (Larry); W.J. Belline; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn March 2003, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was discovered in association with cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The sequence of the complete genome of SARS-CoV was determined, and the initial characterization of the viral genome is presented in this report. The geno

  6. Intranasal interferon as protection against experimental respiratory coronavirus infection in volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, P. G.; Phillpotts, R J; Scott, G. M.; Wallace, J; Bernhardt, L L; Tyrrell, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, self-administered intranasal human interferon alpha A produced by recombinant DNA technology was given both before and after virus challenge with a respiratory coronavirus. The incidence of colds, the severity of symptoms and signs, and virus replication were all reduced in subjects receiving interferon as compared with those given placebo.

  7. Circulation of Group 2 Coronaviruses in a Bat Species Common to Urban Areas in Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusken, C.B.E.M.; Lina, P.H.C.; Pielaat, A.; Vries, de A.; Dam-Deisz, C.; Adema, J.; Drexler, J.F.; Drosten, C.; Kooi, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    Fecal samples of 211 bats representing 13 different bat species from 31 locations in the Netherlands were analyzed for the presence of coronaviruses (CoV) using a genus-wide reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction. CoVs are known for their high potential for interspecies transmission, i

  8. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  9. Enhanced MERS Coronavirus Surveillance of Travelers from the Middle East to England

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Helen Lucy; Zhao, Hongxin; Helen K. Green; Boddington, Nicola L.; Carvalho, Carlos F.A.; Osman, Husam K.; Sadler, Carol; Zambon, Maria; Bermingham, Alison; Pebody, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    During the first year of enhanced MERS coronavirus surveillance in England, 77 persons traveling from the Middle East had acute respiratory illness and were tested for the virus. Infection was confirmed in 2 travelers with acute respiratory distress syndrome and 2 of their contacts. Patients with less severe manifestations tested negative.

  10. Enhanced MERS coronavirus surveillance of travelers from the Middle East to England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Helen Lucy; Zhao, Hongxin; Green, Helen K; Boddington, Nicola L; Carvalho, Carlos F A; Osman, Husam K; Sadler, Carol; Zambon, Maria; Bermingham, Alison; Pebody, Richard G

    2014-09-01

    During the first year of enhanced MERS coronavirus surveillance in England, 77 persons traveling from the Middle East had acute respiratory illness and were tested for the virus. Infection was confirmed in 2 travelers with acute respiratory distress syndrome and 2 of their contacts. Patients with less severe manifestations tested negative. PMID:25148267

  11. The SARS-coronavirus papain-like protease: structure, function and inhibition by designed antiviral compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez-Santos, Yahira M; St John, Sarah E; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Over 10 years have passed since the deadly human coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) emerged from the Guangdong Province of China. Despite the fact that the SARS-CoV pandemic infected over 8500 individuals, claimed over 800 lives and cost billions of dollars in economic loss worldwide, there still are no clinically approved antiviral drugs, vaccines or monoclonal antibody therapies to treat SARS-CoV infections. The recent emergence of the deadly human coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) is a sobering reminder that new and deadly coronaviruses can emerge at any time with the potential to become pandemics. Therefore, the continued development of therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasures to potentially deadly coronaviruses is warranted. The coronaviral proteases, papain-like protease (PLpro) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro), are attractive antiviral drug targets because they are essential for coronaviral replication. Although the primary function of PLpro and 3CLpro are to process the viral polyprotein in a coordinated manner, PLpro has the additional function of stripping ubiquitin and ISG15 from host-cell proteins to aid coronaviruses in their evasion of the host innate immune responses. Therefore, targeting PLpro with antiviral drugs may have an advantage in not only inhibiting viral replication but also inhibiting the dysregulation of signaling cascades in infected cells that may lead to cell death in surrounding, uninfected cells. This review provides an up-to-date discussion on the SARS-CoV papain-like protease including a brief overview of the SARS-CoV genome and replication followed by a more in-depth discussion on the structure and catalytic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLpro, the multiple cellular functions of SARS-CoV PLpro, the inhibition of SARS-CoV PLpro by small molecule inhibitors, and the prospect of inhibiting papain-like protease from other coronaviruses. This paper forms part of a series of

  12. Prognostic markers of canine pyometra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Sant'Anna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pyometra is a disease that affects middle age and elderly female dogs during diestrus. Hormonal, microbiological, biochemical and hematological aspects are well described. However, few studies have evaluated the role of each in the prognosis of canine pyometra. The aim of this study was to identify markers associated with clinical worsening of dogs with pyometra. We prospectively evaluated 80 dogs with pyometra treated surgically. Group 1 consisted of dogs that were discharged within 48 hours after surgery and Group 2 consisted of those who required prolonged hospitalization or died. The findings of hematological, biochemical and blood lactate levels were compared between groups and variables such as bacterial multidrug resistance, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, hyperlactatemia and increased creatinine were analyzed through the dispersion of frequencies between groups. Among the variables studied, the presence of SIRS and elevated serum creatinine >2.5mg/mL were effective in predicting the worsening of the disease and can be used as prognostic markers of canine pyometra.

  13. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Vermeulen, Ben L.; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Acar, Delphine D.; Olyslaegers, Dominique A. J.; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a highly neutralising antibody response from 9 dpi, and no major abnormalities in leukocyte numbers. Faecal shedding lasted for 28–56 days, but virus shed during this stage was less infectious in enterocyte cultures and affected by mutations. Remarkably, in the other cat neither clinical signs nor acute shedding were seen, but virus was detected in blood cells from 3 dpi, and shedding of non-enterotropic, mutated viruses suddenly occurred from 14 dpi onwards. Neutralising antibodies arose from 21 dpi. Leukocyte numbers were not different compared to the other cats, except for the CD8+ regulatory T cells. These data indicate that FECV can infect immune cells even in the absence of intestinal replication and raise the hypothesis that the gradual adaptation to these cells can allow non-enterotropic mutants to arise. PMID:26822958

  14. 犬细小病毒PCR诊断方法的建立及对大熊猫粪便的检测%Establishment of PCR for detection of canine parvovirus and investigation into giant pandas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玲; 杨绍林; 张志和; 陈世界; 阳爱国; 李德生; 王成东; 刘丹; 刘杰

    2013-01-01

    根据GenBank中登录的犬细小病毒(CPV) VP2基因序列,设计合成1对特异性引物;以CPV疫苗株为模板,建立了一种快速检测CPV的PCR检测方法,并应用于CPV诊断.结果显示,以此对引物进行PCR扩增能得到与理论设计值大小一致的342 bp的特异性条带,对犬瘟热病毒(CDV)、犬冠状病毒(CCV)、狂犬病病毒(RV)、新城疫病毒(NDV)和猫泛白细胞减少症病毒(FPV)扩增结果均为阴性;最低可检出约1.4 pg的病毒核酸;重复性试验结果表明,其检测重复性好;对45份临床宠物犬病料进行检测,并与免疫胶体金抗原检测拭纸捡测结果进行比较,吻合率为90.0%.将此方法初步应用于大熊猫粪便中细小病毒的检测,结果表明,从熊猫基地采集的52份正常大熊猫粪便样品中有8份为细小病毒阳性,阳性率为15.3%.大熊猫是通过自然感染还是弱毒苗感染细小病毒的机制还不清楚.%Based on the published sequence of the VP2 gene of canine parvovirus(CPV) in GenBank,a pair of specific primers was designed for the detection of CPV.As a template of the CPV vaccine strain,and after optimization of the reaction system,a rapid PCR detection method for CPV was established.A expected fragment of 342 bp was amplified from the template.As little as 1.4 pg DNA of CPV could be detected accurately and rapidly.This method had good reproducibility and stability.There was no cross reaction to canine distemper virus,canine coronavirus,rabies virus,Newcastle disease virus and feline panleukopenia virus.Suspected disease materials had been tested by PCR,and the PCR results were compared with immune colloidal goldtechnique and the coincidence rate was up to 90.0%.Eight of the 52 normal giant pandas from the Research Center for the Giant Panda were detected infection with the virus,the morbidity rate was 64.7 %.The route of infection with these pathogens via natural exposure or from modified live vaccines in giant pandas is

  15. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Lundin; Ronald Dijkman; Tomas Bergström; Nina Kann; Beata Adamiak; Charles Hannoun; Eveline Kindler; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R; Doreen Muth; Joeri Kint; Maria Forlenza; Müller, Marcel A.; Christian Drosten; Volker Thiel; Edward Trybala

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hall...

  16. First full length sequences of the S gene of European isolates reveal further diversity among turkey coronaviruses.

    OpenAIRE

    MAUREL, Stéphan; Toquin, Didier; BRIAND, François-Xavier; QUEGUINER, Maryline; ALLEE, Chantal; BERTIN, Joel; RETAUX, Charlotte; TURBLIN, Vincent; Morvan, Hervé; Eterradossi, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An increasing incidence of enteric disorders clinically evocative of the poult enteritis complex has been observed in turkeys in France since 2003. Using a newly designed real-time RT-PCR assay specific for the nucleocapsid (N) gene of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and turkey coronaviruses (TCoV), coronaviruses were identified in 37 % of the intestinal samples collected from diseased turkey flocks. The full length Spike (S) gene of these viruses was amplified, cloned a...

  17. The United Kingdom public health response to an imported laboratory confirmed case of a novel coronavirus in September 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebody, R G; Chand, M A; Thomas, H L; Green, H K; Boddington, N L; Carvalho, C; Brown, C S; Anderson, S R; Rooney, C; Crawley-Boevey, E; Irwin, D J; Aarons, E; Tong, C; Newsholme, W; Price, N; Langrish, C; Tucker, D; Zhao, H; Phin, N; Crofts, J; Bermingham, A; Gilgunn-Jones, E; Brown, K E; Evans, B; Catchpole, M; Watson, J M

    2012-01-01

    On 22 September 2012, a novel coronavirus, very closely related to that from a fatal case in Saudi Arabia three months previously, was detected in a previously well adult transferred to intensive care in London from Qatar with severe respiratory illness. Strict respiratory isolation was instituted. Ten days after last exposure, none of 64 close contacts had developed severe disease, with 13 of 64 reporting mild respiratory symptoms. The novel coronavirus was not detected in 10 of 10 symptomatic contacts tested. PMID:23078799

  18. Interaction of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) spike glycoprotein with receptor glycoprotein MHVR is required for infection with an MHV strain that expresses the hemagglutinin-esterase glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagneten, S; Gout, O; Dubois-Dalcq, M; Rottier, P; Rossen, J; Holmes, K V

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the spike (S) glycoprotein that binds to carcinoembryonic antigen-related receptors on the host cell membrane, some strains of mouse coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus [MHV]) express a hemagglutinin esterase (HE) glycoprotein with hemagglutinating and acetylesterase activity. Virions

  19. Human coronavirus ocurrence in different populations of Sao Paulo: a comprehensive nine-year study using a pancoronavirus RT-PCR assay

    OpenAIRE

    Cabeça, Tatiane K.; Ana Maria Passos; Celso Granato; Nancy Bellei

    2013-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are considered one of the most common respiratory viruses associated with respiratory tract illnesses. An emergent human coronavirus was identified as the causal agent of an epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) during 2002–2003. The severity of the disease combined with its rapid spread requires the continuous surveillance of coronaviruses in worldwide populations. Epidemiological and clinical data of HCoVs infectious in the Brazilian population are...

  20. Extrusion processing : effects on dry canine diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, Q.D.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: Extrusion, Canine diet, Protein, Lysine, Starch gelatinization, Palatability, Drying. Extrusion cooking is a useful and economical tool for processing animal feed. This high temperature, short time processing technology causes chemical and physical changes that alter the nutritional and

  1. Triple bone labeling of canine mandibles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinholt, E M; Kwon, P H

    1990-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy was used for evaluation of new bone formation in 16 canine mandibles augmented with hydroxylapatite (HA) granules. Three fluorochromes were injected at different time intervals during therapeutic radiation treatment. Oxytetracycline, DCAF, and alizarin-complexone were give...

  2. Canine babesiosis: from molecular taxonomy to control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Peter J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Canine babesiosis is a clinically significant emerging vector-borne disease caused by protozoan haemoparasites. This review article considers recent literature pertaining to the taxonomic classification of Babesia and Theileria species affecting dogs and the geographical distribution of these parasites. The diagnosis of canine babesiosis by traditional, molecular and serological methods is reviewed, together with recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of piroplasmosis, and of the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  3. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment. PMID:2638021

  4. Systemic inflammarory response in canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    Fransson, Boel

    2003-01-01

    Research efforts have focused mainly on the hormonal aspects of canine pyometra for more than 6 decades. However, this disease is often manifested as systemic illness in response to the bacterial uterine infection. Studies I-II were undertaken to clarify bacteriological aspects of canine pyometra; i.e. the origin of the infecting bacteria, the infecting bacteria’s impact on severity of the systemic illness and the presence of bacterial endotoxin in the systemic circulation. Study I, a bacteri...

  5. [Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of an invaginated canine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Guerrero, F; Miñana Laliga, R; Bullon Fernandez, P

    1989-01-01

    We present a case of a maxillary canine with a dens invaginatus treated successfully. The patient had pain, swelling and a sinus tract coming from the inmature apex of the canine. The canals were enlarged and cleaned and the main canal was filled with Calcium Hydroxide to allow the root development. Seven months later, the patient was asymptomatic and the tooth was obturated with guttapercha. One year later it was confirm the success in the treatment.

  6. Treatment modalities of palatal impacted canines

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Ristoska, Sonja; Kovacevska, Ivona

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canine remains a challenge to today’s clinicians. The treatment of this clinical entity usually involves surgical exposure of the impacted tooth, followed by orthodontic traction to guide and align it into the dental arch. The impacted palatal canine requires a combination of both treatment modalities: orthodontic management and oral surgical treatment. Two types of approach are commonly used: simple exposure, or exposure with brac...

  7. Proliferative histiocytic disorders of canine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, D J

    1997-06-01

    Proliferative histiocytic disorders of canine skin present a clinical spectrum from the innocuous self-limiting solitary dermal lesion of cutaneous histiocytoma, through the recurrent deep dermal nodules of cutaneous histiocytosis to the generally fatal condition of Bernese Mountain Dogs termed systemic histiocytosis, in which visceral involvement is commonly encountered. Immunocytochemical characterization of the constituent histiocytic cells and accompanying lymphoid infiltrate using canine species specific reagents has elucidated considerably the mechanism by which these conditions exhibit their various biologic behaviours.

  8. Nectin4 Is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Canine Distemper Virus and Involved in Neurovirulence

    OpenAIRE

    Pratakpiriya, Watanyoo; Seki, Fumio; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakai, Kouji; FUKUHARA, HIDEO; Katamoto, Hiromu; HIRAI, Takuya; Maenaka, Katsumi; Techangamsuwan, Somporn; LAN, Nguyen Thi; Takeda, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2012-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) uses signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), expressed on immune cells, as a receptor. However, epithelial and neural cells are also affected by CDV in vivo. Wild-type CDV strains showed efficient replication with syncytia in Vero cells expressing dog nectin4, and the infection was blocked by an anti-nectin4 antibody. In dogs with distemper, CDV antigen was preferentially detected in nectin4-positive neurons and epithelial cells, suggesting that nectin4 i...

  9. Canine Distemper Virus Uses both the Anterograde and the Hematogenous Pathway for Neuroinvasion

    OpenAIRE

    Rudd, Penny A.; Cattaneo, Roberto; Von Messling, Veronika

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a member of the Morbillivirus genus that also includes measles virus, frequently causes neurologic complications, but the routes and timing of CDV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) are poorly understood. To characterize these events, we cloned and sequenced the genome of a neurovirulent CDV (strain A75/17) and produced an infectious cDNA that expresses the green fluorescent protein. This virus fully retained its virulence in ferrets: the course and sig...

  10. Lymphocyte-mediated immune cytotoxicity in dogs infected with virulent canine distemper virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, M J; Shek, W R; Summers, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    Immune lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity (ILMC) was evaluated in dogs after intranasal exposure to one of the following three virulent strains of canine distemper virus: Cornell A75/17, Ohio R252, and Snyder Hill. Cytotoxicity was tested with peripheral blood lymphocytes as effector cells and primary dog testicle cells that were matched for histocompatibility as target cells. A strong correlation was found between ILMC and the course of the infection. Dogs that succumbed to encephalitis with a...

  11. Genogroup IV and VI Canine Noroviruses Interact with Histo-Blood Group Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Caddy, Sarah ,; Breiman, Adrien; Le Pendu, Jacques; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNV) are a significant cause of viral gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HuNV attaches to cell surface carbohydrate structures known as histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) prior to internalization, and HBGA polymorphism among human populations is closely linked to susceptibility to HuNV. Noroviruses are divided into 6 genogroups, with human strains grouped into genogroups I (GI), II, and IV. Canine norovirus (CNV) is a recently discovered pathogen in dogs, with s...

  12. Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversa, Donato; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Di Cesare, Angela; La Torre, Francesco; Drake, Jason; Pietrobelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

  13. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  14. CANINE: a robotic mine dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancil, Brian A.; Hyams, Jeffrey; Shelley, Jordan; Babu, Kartik; Badino, Hernán.; Bansal, Aayush; Huber, Daniel; Batavia, Parag

    2013-01-01

    Neya Systems, LLC competed in the CANINE program sponsored by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) which culminated in a competition held at Fort Benning as part of the 2012 Robotics Rodeo. As part of this program, we developed a robot with the capability to learn and recognize the appearance of target objects, conduct an area search amid distractor objects and obstacles, and relocate the target object in the same way that Mine dogs and Sentry dogs are used within military contexts for exploration and threat detection. Neya teamed with the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University to develop vision-based solutions for probabilistic target learning and recognition. In addition, we used a Mission Planning and Management System (MPMS) to orchestrate complex search and retrieval tasks using a general set of modular autonomous services relating to robot mobility, perception and grasping.

  15. A new method for rapid Canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Khavari A

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis method (Do in bone lengthening and rapid midpalatal expansion have shown the great ability of osteognic tissues for rapid bone formation under distraction force and special protocol with optimum rate of one millimeter per day. Periodontal membrane of teeth (PDM is the extension of periostium in the alveolar socked. Orthodontic force distracts PDM fibers in the tension side and then bone formation will begin.Objects: Rapid retraction of canine tooth into extraction space of first premolar by DO protocol in order to show the ability of the PDM in rapid bone formation. The other objective was reducing total orthodontic treatment time of extraction cases.Patients and Methods: Tweleve maxillary canines in six patients were retracted rapidly in three weeks by a custom-made tooth-born appliance. Radiographic records were taken to evaluate the effects of heavy applied force on canine and anchorage teeth.Results: Average retraction was 7.05 mm in three weeks (2.35 mm/week. Canines rotated distal- in by mean 3.5 degrees.Anchorage loss was from 0 to 0.8 mm with average of 0.3 mm.Root resorption of canines was negligible, and was not significant clinically. Periodontium was normal after rapid retraction. No hazard for pulp vitality was observed.Discussion: PDM responded well to heavy distraction force by Do protocol. Rapid canine retraction seems to be a safe method and can considerabely reduce orthodontic time.

  16. Human coronaviruses: insights into environmental resistance and its influence on the development of new antiseptic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Chloé; Varbanov, Mihayl; Duval, Raphaël E

    2012-11-12

    The Coronaviridae family, an enveloped RNA virus family, and, more particularly, human coronaviruses (HCoV), were historically known to be responsible for a large portion of common colds and other upper respiratory tract infections. HCoV are now known to be involved in more serious respiratory diseases, i.e. bronchitis, bronchiolitis or pneumonia, especially in young children and neonates, elderly people and immunosuppressed patients. They have also been involved in nosocomial viral infections. In 2002-2003, the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), due to a newly discovered coronavirus, the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV); led to a new awareness of the medical importance of the Coronaviridae family. This pathogen, responsible for an emerging disease in humans, with high risk of fatal outcome; underline the pressing need for new approaches to the management of the infection, and primarily to its prevention. Another interesting feature of coronaviruses is their potential environmental resistance, despite the accepted fragility of enveloped viruses. Indeed, several studies have described the ability of HCoVs (i.e. HCoV 229E, HCoV OC43 (also known as betacoronavirus 1), NL63, HKU1 or SARS-CoV) to survive in different environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and humidity), on different supports found in hospital settings such as aluminum, sterile sponges or latex surgical gloves or in biological fluids. Finally, taking into account the persisting lack of specific antiviral treatments (there is, in fact, no specific treatment available to fight coronaviruses infections), the Coronaviridae specificities (i.e. pathogenicity, potential environmental resistance) make them a challenging model for the development of efficient means of prevention, as an adapted antisepsis-disinfection, to prevent the environmental spread of such infective agents. This review will summarize current knowledge on the capacity of human coronaviruses to survive in the

  17. 犬瘟热病毒株的分离鉴定及遗传变异分析%Isolation and Identification of Canine Distemper Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马丽敏; 王玉平; 张庆明; 雷连成

    2011-01-01

    [目的]分离鉴定吉林地区一株犬瘟热病毒,为犬瘟热的防治提供依据.[方法]应用Vero细胞从疑是患犬瘟热藏獒脏器组织中分离病毒,并进行分子病毒学鉴定,进一步对该犬瘟热病毒株的血凝素蛋白(H)基因序列进行分析.[结果]确定该犬瘟热分离株为Asia-Ⅰ型犬瘟热,命名为ZA1O-JL.[结论]对进一步研究犬瘟热,预防以及流行病学调查都有重要的参考作用.%[Objective] A canine distemper virus in Jilin in isolated and identified, so as to provide the basis for the prevention and treatment of canine distemper. [ Method ] Vero cells suspected to be suffering from canine distemper Tibetan Mastiff virus isolated tissues were applied, and molecular virology was identified, and strains on the canine distemper virus hemagglutinin (H) gene sequence were expounded. [ Result] The strains of canine distemper virus as Asia- I type were determined and named as ZA10-JL. [ Conclusion ] The successful isolation of ZA10-JL provided a basis for further study, epidemiology on canine distemper virus.

  18. Three-dimensional canine loop for management of buccally erupted canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Mehrotra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary canines are known as the cornerstones of mouth. They are considered to be important for esthetics and for functional occlusion. Any disturbance in the eruption process leading to an aberrant position will hamper esthetics as well as function. Orthodontic tooth movement of total buccally blocked-out canine is usually difficult as it is related with the problems of severe crowding, midline deviation, involvement of long root movement and risk of gingival recession. Such conditions can be treated orthodontically in various ways, but this clinical innovation helps to correct the buccally placed canines into the arch with a precise control of the canine in all the Three-dimensions (3D of space as well as providing maximum comfort to the patient by placing the canine loop on the palatal surface of the tooth, reducing soreness on the labial mucosa. It can be easily fabricated and activated at chairside for either simultaneous or sequential control in 3D.

  19. Short communication: isolation and phylogenetic analysis of an avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus in dog shelter, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shuo; Yuan, Ziguo; Chen, Jidang; Xie, Jiexiong; Li, Huatao; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Minze; Du, Guohao; Chen, Zhongming; Tu, Liqing; Zou, Yufei; Miao, Junhao; Wang, Hui; Jia, Kun; Li, Shoujun

    2013-06-01

    A H3N2 canine influenza virus, A/canine/Guangdong/3/2011 (H3N2), was isolated from roaming dogs in rural China. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of eight gene segments revealed that the A/canine/Guangdong/3/2011 (H3N2) was most similar to a recent H3N2 canine influenza virus isolated in cats from South Korea, which originated from an avian strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an avian-origin H3N2 CIV which was isolated from roaming dogs in China. The epidemiologic information provided herein suggests that continued study is required to determine if this virus could be established in the roaming dog population in rural China and pose potential threats to public health.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of canine parvovirus in southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vivek Srinivas,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to isolate and characterize canine parvovirus circulating in Southern India by genetic analysis of VP2 capsid protein gene.Materials and Methods: In this study, 128 samples were collected from nine different locations covering five Southern Indian states (Pondicherry, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka . Out of 128 samples, 69 samples were found to be positive by PCR assay. Out of 69 positive samples, 36 were randomly selected and processed for virus isolation. Twenty viruses could be isolated successfully and 18 randomly selected isolate were subjected to VP2 gene sequence analysis along with 6 random clinical samples.Result: Seventeen isolates and 5 clinical samples were characterized as New CPV-2a (CPV2a with 297-Ser→Ala. But one isolate and one clinical sample had amino acids variations which were characteristics of New CPV-2b. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that one of the field isolates was found to be phylogenetically closely related to New CPV-2b strains of India; rest other sequences was found to share ancestral origins with New CPV-2a reference strains of Japan, China, Thailand and India.Conclusion: The present study revealed that the predominant CPV strain circulating in Southern India is New CPV-2a. There is also enough indication of New CPV-2b strain from different states of Southern India.

  1. Antiviral activity of cepharanthine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan-hai; XIONG Sheng; LI Jiu-xiang; QI Shu-yuan; WANG Yi-fei; LIU Xin-jian; LU Jia-hai; QIAN Chui-wen; WAN Zhuo-yue; YAN Xin-ge; ZHENG Huan-ying; ZHANG Mei-ying

    2005-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is the first severe viral epidemic we encountered this century, which once spread in more than thirty countries in 2003.1 The etiological agent of SARS has been confirmed to be a novel coronavirus, namely SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV),2,3 and the first outbreak of SARS has been successfully controlled worldwide, but the identification of SARS-CoV isolated from wild animals, the emergence of some sporadic SARS cases later after that outbreak, all suggest that the recurrence of such an epidemic is not unlikely in the future. In this case, development of SARS vaccines and specific drugs is undoubtedly essential to the control and prevention from the possible outbreak.4,5

  2. Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on the Nucleocapsid Protein of SARS-Like Coronaviruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-fa YUAN; Yan LI; Hua-jun ZHANG; Peng ZHOU; Zhen-hua KE; Yun-zhi ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2009-01-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (N) is a major structural protein of coronaviruses. The N protein of bat SARS-like coronavirus (SL-CoV) has a high similarity with that of SARS-CoV. In this study, the SL-CoV N protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and used as antigen. An Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (indirect ELISA) was developed for detection of SARS- or SL-CoV infections in bat populations. The detection of 573 bat sera with this indirect ELISA demonstrated that SL-CoVs consistently circulate in Rhinilophus species, further supporting the proposal that bats are natural reservoirs of SL-CoVs. This method uses 1-2 μl of serum sample and can be used for preliminary screening of infections by SARS- or SL-CoV with a small amount of serum sample.

  3. The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV does not replicate in Syrian hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmie de Wit

    Full Text Available In 2012 a novel coronavirus, MERS-CoV, associated with severe respiratory disease emerged in the Arabian Peninsula. To date, 55 human cases have been reported, including 31 fatal cases. Several of the cases were likely a result of human-to-human transmission. The emergence of this novel coronavirus prompts the need for a small animal model to study the pathogenesis of this virus and to test the efficacy of potential intervention strategies. In this study we explored the use of Syrian hamsters as a small animal disease model, using intratracheal inoculation and inoculation via aerosol. Clinical signs of disease, virus replication, histological lesions, cytokine upregulation nor seroconversion were observed in any of the inoculated animals, indicating that MERS-CoV does not replicate in Syrian hamsters.

  4. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) origin and animal reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Hamzah A; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel coronavirus discovered in 2012 and is responsible for acute respiratory syndrome in humans. Though not confirmed yet, multiple surveillance and phylogenetic studies suggest a bat origin. The disease is heavily endemic in dromedary camel populations of East Africa and the Middle East. It is unclear as to when the virus was introduced to dromedary camels, but data from studies that investigated stored dromedary camel sera and geographical distribution of involved dromedary camel populations suggested that the virus was present in dromedary camels several decades ago. Though bats and alpacas can serve as potential reservoirs for MERS-CoV, dromedary camels seem to be the only animal host responsible for the spill over human infections. PMID:27255185

  5. Inhibiting severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus by small interfering RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仁礼; 郭中敏; 陆家海; 孟锦绣; 周灿权; 詹希美; 黄冰; 余新炳; 黄民; 潘兴华; 凌文华; 陈系古; 万卓越; 郑焕英; 鄢心革; 王一飞; 冉延超; 刘新健; 马俊鑫; 王承宇; 张必良

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of small interfering RNA (siRNA) on inhibiting severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus replication, and to lay bases for the future clinical application of siRNA for the treatment of viral infectious diseases.Methods Vero-E6 cells was transfected with siRNA before SARS virus infection, and the effectiveness of siRNA interference was evaluated by observing the cytopathic effect (CPE) on Vero-E6 cells.Results Five pairs of siRNA showed ability to reduce CPE dose dependently, and two of them had the best effect. Conclusion siRNA may be effective in inhibiting SARS-associated coronavirus replication.

  6. Variation analysis of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus putative non-structural protein 2 gene and construction of three-dimensional model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jia-hai; CHEN Wei-qing; LING Wen-hua; YU Xin-bing; ZHONG Nan-shan; ZHANG Ding-mei; WANG Guo-ling; GUO Zhong-min; ZHANG Chuan-hai; TAN Bing-yan; OUYANG Li-ping; LIN Li; LIU Yi-min

    2005-01-01

    Background The rapid transmission and high mortality rate made severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) a global threat for which no efficacious therapy is available now. Without sufficient knowledge about the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), it is impossible to define the candidate for the anti-SARS targets. The putative non-structural protein 2 (nsp2) (3CLpro, following the nomenclature by Gao et al, also known as nsp5 in Snidjer et al) of SARS-CoV plays an important role in viral transcription and replication, and is an attractive target for anti-SARS drug development, so we carried on this study to have an insight into putative polymerase nsp2 of SARS-CoV Guangdong (GD) strain.Methods The SARS-CoV strain was isolated from a SARS patient in Guangdong, China, and cultured in Vero E6 cells. The nsp2 gene was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo (pCI-neo/nsp2). Then the recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pCI-neo/nsp2 was transfected into COS-7 cells using lipofectin reagent to express the nsp2 protein. The expressive protein of SARS-CoV nsp2 was analyzed by 7% sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The nucleotide sequence and protein sequence of GD nsp2 were compared with that of other SARS-CoV strains by nucleotide-nucleotide basic local alignment search tool (BLASTN) and protein-protein basic local alignment search tool (BLASTP) to investigate its variance trend during the transmission. The secondary structure of GD strain and that of other strains were predicted by Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson (GOR) Secondary Structure Prediction. Three-dimensional-PSSM Protein Fold Recognition (Threading) Server was employed to construct the three-dimensional model of the nsp2 protein.Results The putative polymerase nsp2 gene of GD strain was amplified by RT-PCR. The eukaryotic expression vector (pCI-neo/nsp2) was constructed and expressed the protein in COS-7

  7. Recommendations from workshops of the second international feline coronavirus/feline infectious peritonitis symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; Paltrinieri, Saverio; Pedersen, Niels C

    2004-04-01

    In August 2002, scientists and veterinarians from all over the world met in Scotland to discuss feline coronavirus (FCoV) and feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The conference ended with delegates dividing into three workshops to draw up recommendations for FCoV control, diagnosis and treatment and future research. The workshops were chaired by the three authors and the recommendations are presented in this paper.

  8. Bovine coronavirus in naturally and experimentally exposed calves; viral shedding and the potential for transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Oma, Veslemøy Sunniva; Tråvén, Madeleine; Alenius, Stefan; Myrmel, Mette; Stokstad, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is a widely distributed pathogen, causing disease and economic losses in the cattle industry worldwide. Prevention of virus spread is impeded by a lack of basic knowledge concerning viral shedding and transmission potential in individual animals. The aims of the study were to investigate the duration and quantity of BCoV shedding in feces and nasal secretions related to clinical signs, the presence of virus in blood and tissues and to test the hypothesis t...

  9. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 7a Accessory Protein Is a Viral Structural Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Cheng; Ito, Naoto; Tseng, Chien-Te K.; Makino, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SCoV) 7a protein is one of the viral accessory proteins. In expressing cells, 7a protein exhibits a variety of biological activities, including induction of apoptosis, activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, inhibition of host protein translation, and suppression of cell growth progression. Analysis of SCoV particles that were purified by either sucrose gradient equilibrium centrifugation or a virus capture assay, in...

  10. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Outbreak in the Republic of Korea, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in the Republic of Korea started from the index case who developed fever after returning from the Middle East. He infected 26 cases in Hospital C, and consecutive nosocomial transmission proceeded throughout the nation. We provide an epidemiologic description of the outbreak, as of July 2015. Methods Epidemiological research was performed by direct interview of the confirmed patients and reviewing med...

  11. Genetic diversity of bats coronaviruses in the Atlantic Forest hotspot biome, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góes, Luiz Gustavo Bentim; Campos, Angélica Cristine de Almeida; Carvalho, Cristiano de; Ambar, Guilherme; Queiroz, Luzia Helena; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo Pereira; Munir, Muhammad; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2016-10-01

    Bats are notorious reservoirs of genetically-diverse and high-profile pathogens, and are playing crucial roles in the emergence and re-emergence of viruses, both in human and in animals. In this report, we identified and characterized previously unknown and diverse genetic clusters of bat coronaviruses in the Atlantic Forest Biome, Brazil. These results highlight the virus richness of bats and their possible roles in the public health. PMID:27473780

  12. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus during Pregnancy, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Asim; El Masry, Karim Medhat; Ravi, Mini; Sayed, Falak

    2016-03-01

    As of June 19, 2015, the World Health Organization had received 1,338 notifications of laboratory-confirmed infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Little is known about the course of or treatment for MERS-CoV in pregnant women. We report a fatal case of MERS-CoV in a pregnant woman administered combination ribavirin-peginterferon-α therapy.

  13. Multiple Sequence Alignment of the M Proteinin SARS—Associated and Other Known Coronaviruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史定华; 周晖杰; 王斌宾; 顾燕红; 王翼飞

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we report a multiple sequence alignment result on the basis of 10 amino acid sequences of the M protein,which come from different coronaviruses (4 SARS-associated and 6 others known). The alignment model was based on the profile HMM (Hidden Markov Model), and the model training was implemented through the SAHMM (Self-Adapting Hidden Markov Model)software developed by the authors.

  14. Core Structure of S2 from the Human Coronavirus NL63 Spike Glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng,Q.; Deng, Y.; Liu, J.; van der Hoek, L.; Berkhout, B.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) has recently been identified as a causative agent of acute respiratory tract illnesses in infants and young children. The HCoV-NL63 spike (S) protein mediates virion attachment to cells and subsequent fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. This viral entry process is a primary target for vaccine and drug development. HCoV-NL63 S is expressed as a single-chain glycoprotein and consists of an N-terminal receptor-binding domain (S1) and a C-terminal transmembrane fusion domain (S2). The latter contains two highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) sequences that are each extended by 14 amino acids relative to those of the SARS coronavirus or the prototypic murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus. Limited proteolysis studies of the HCoV-NL63 S2 fusion core identify an {alpha}-helical domain composed of a trimer of the HR segments N57 and C42. The crystal structure of this complex reveals three C42 helices entwined in an oblique and antiparallel manner around a central triple-stranded coiled coil formed by three N57 helices. The overall geometry comprises distinctive high-affinity conformations of interacting cross-sectional layers of the six helices. As a result, this structure is unusually stable, with an apparent melting temperature of 78 {sup o}C in the presence of the denaturant guanidine hydrochloride at 5 M concentration. The extended HR regions may therefore be required to prime the group 1 S glycoproteins for their fusion-activating conformational changes during viral entry. Our results provide an initial basis for understanding an intriguing interplay between the presence or absence of proteolytic maturation among the coronavirus groups and the membrane fusion activity of their S glycoproteins. This study also suggests a potential strategy for the development of improved HCoV-NL63 fusion inhibitors.

  15. Canine distemper virus detection in asymptomatic and non vaccinated dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Del Puerto, Helen L; Vasconcelos, Anilton C.; Luciana Moro; Fabiana Alves; Braz, Gissandra F; Almir S. Martins

    2010-01-01

    A quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed canine distemper virus presence in peripheral blood samples from asymptomatic and non vaccinated dogs. Samples from eleven domestic dogs with no signs of canine distemper and not vaccinated at the month of collection were used. Canine distemper virus vaccine samples in VERO cells were used as positive controls. RNA was isolated with Trizol®, and treated with a TURBO DNA-free kit. Primers were designed for canine distemper virus...

  16. Isolation and identification of Helicobacter spp, from canine and feline gastric mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalava, K.; On, Stephen L.W.; VanDamme, P.A.R.;

    1998-01-01

    It is known that virtually all healthy adult dogs and cats harbor spiral helicobacters in their gastric mucosa, Three species, Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter bizzozeronii, and Helicobacter salomonis have been isolated in vitro from the gastric mucosa of these animals. The aims of this study were...... conventional phenotypic tests, whole-cell protein profiling, and ultrastructural analysis in identifying the different species isolated from canine and feline gastric mucose. We cultured 95 and 22 gastric mucosal biopsies from dogs and cats, respectively. Twenty-one H. bizzozeronii strains, 8 H. felis strains......, 8 H. salomonis strains, 3 mixed cultures, 2 "Flexispira rappini"-like organisms, and 3 as get uncharacterized strains were isolated from the dogs, and 3 H. felis strains were isolated from the cats. The methods used here yielded Helicobacter isolation rates of 51% from dogs and 13.6% from cats...

  17. Depletion of alveolar macrophages ameliorates virus-induced disease following a pulmonary coronavirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey M Hartwig

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses cause respiratory disease in humans that can range from mild to severe. However, the pathogenesis of pulmonary coronavirus infections is poorly understood. Mouse hepatitis virus type 1 (MHV-1 is a group 2 coronavirus capable of causing severe morbidity and mortality in highly susceptible C3H/HeJ mice. We have previously shown that both CD4 and CD8 T cells play a critical role in mediating MHV-1-induced disease. Here we evaluated the role of alveolar macrophages (AM in modulating the adaptive immune response and subsequent disease. Depletion of AM using clodronate liposomes administered prior to MHV-1 infection was associated with a significant amelioration of MHV-1-induced morbidity and mortality. AM depletion resulted in a decreased number of virus-specific CD4 T cells in the lung airways. In addition, a significant increase in the frequency and total number of Tregs in the lung tissue and lung airways was observed following MHV-1 infection in mice depleted of AM. Our results indicate that AM play a critical role in modulating MHV-1-induced morbidity and mortality.

  18. Mutation in spike protein cleavage site and pathogenesis of feline coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licitra, Beth N; Millet, Jean K; Regan, Andrew D; Hamilton, Brian S; Rinaldi, Vera D; Duhamel, Gerald E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2013-07-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses.

  19. Characterization of the Role of Hexamer AGUAAA and Poly(A) Tail in Coronavirus Polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu-Hui; Lin, Ching-Houng; Lin, Chao-Nan; Lo, Chen-Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Wu, Hung-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to eukaryotic mRNA, the positive-strand coronavirus genome of ~30 kilobases is 5’-capped and 3’-polyadenylated. It has been demonstrated that the length of the coronaviral poly(A) tail is not static but regulated during infection; however, little is known regarding the factors involved in coronaviral polyadenylation and its regulation. Here, we show that during infection, the level of coronavirus poly(A) tail lengthening depends on the initial length upon infection and that the minimum length to initiate lengthening may lie between 5 and 9 nucleotides. By mutagenesis analysis, it was found that (i) the hexamer AGUAAA and poly(A) tail are two important elements responsible for synthesis of the coronavirus poly(A) tail and may function in concert to accomplish polyadenylation and (ii) the function of the hexamer AGUAAA in coronaviral polyadenylation is position dependent. Based on these findings, we propose a process for how the coronaviral poly(A) tail is synthesized and undergoes variation. Our results provide the first genetic evidence to gain insight into coronaviral polyadenylation. PMID:27760233

  20. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable. PMID:26954467

  1. Cytological diagnostic of canine transmissible venereal tumor - Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulčar Igor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine Transmissible Venereal Tumor (CTVT is a benign reticuloendothelial (histiocytic tumor of the dog that mainly affects the external genitalia. This tumor was found in male 2 years old mongrel dog. According the anamnestic data, there was no visible change of its general clinical status, except spontaneous bleeding with blood drops on the praeputium and the presence of blood in the urine. With clinical examination a multilobular mass on radix penis mucosa was found, which actually caused pseudohemorrhagia. The material for cytological diagnostic was taken with the imprint method and 4 cytological films were prepared and strained. The conclusion of the cytological diagnosis was CTVT. The tumor cause only local disturbances, and the differential diagnosis of the other "round cells tumors", histiocytomas, plasmacytomas, lymphoma, some melanomas and especially lymphosarcomas, which could be located on the external genitalia, had a big significance. Although some authors are mentioning spontaneous regression, however, because this is invasive tumor, a complete chirurgical excision was made.

  2. 9 CFR 113.201 - Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.201 Canine Distemper Vaccine, Killed Virus. Canine Distemper...

  3. Canine hypothyroidism. A diagnostic challenge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrinopathies in dogs. Clinical symptoms and hematological and biochemical parameters lead to a first suspicion. To confirm diagnosis can be challenging, however. Determination of total serum T4 concentration is accepted as the primary screening test for the disease, and low serum T4 concentrations are intuitively suggestive of hypothyroidism. However it is well known that low T4 concentrations are frequently encountered in euthyroid dogs with various nonthyroidal diseases and in dogs receiving certain pharmacologic agents. Since assessment of endogenous TSH (canine TSH) using current canine TSH assays shows normal values in a high percentage of hypothyroid dogs (up to 40%), its diagnostic value is only limited. The TSH-stimulation test can still be recognized as the gold standard for the diagnosis of hypothyroidism in dogs. Determination of circulating T4 concentration before and 6 hours after the administration of exogenous TSH (recombinant human TSH, Thyrogen registered) provides an assessment of the functional reserve capacity of the thyroid gland with minimal change in post-TSH T4 concentration, compared with the basal concentration, expected in dogs with hypothyroidism. Also this test can be influenced by nonthyroidal illness and by medications known to affect thyroid function. This suppressing influence seems to be less pronounced using a higher dose of TSH. Therefore, to improve the discriminatory power of the TSH stimulation test to differentiate between euthyroid-sick and primary hypothyroidism, the higher dose should be used in cases in which testing cannot be delayed. More recently, ultrasonography and scintigraphy have been used for the diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism. Using ultrasonography, a sensitivity of 98% was reported if size and echogenicity of the gland were combined. However, specificity was as low as 77%. and care must be taken when measuring the gland because of a relatively high interobserver

  4. The V Protein of Canine Distemper Virus Is Required for Virus Replication in Human Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Noriyuki Otsuki; Yuichiro Nakatsu; Toru Kubota; Tsuyoshi Sekizuka; Fumio Seki; Kouji Sakai; Makoto Kuroda; Ryoji Yamaguchi; Makoto Takeda

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at posit...

  5. Short communication. Occurrence of different Canine distemper virus lineages in Italian dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Balboni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the sequence analysis of the H gene of 7 Canine distemper virus (CDV strains identified in dogs in Italy between years 2002-2012. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the CDV strains belonged to 2 clusters: 6 viruses were identified as Arctic‑like lineage and 1 as Europe 1 lineage. These data show a considerable prevalence of Arctic‑like‑CDVs in the analysed dogs. The dogs and the 3 viruses more recently identified showed 4 distinctive amino acid mutations compared to all other Arctic CDVs.

  6. 19例犬细小病毒病的诊疗报告%The Diagnosis and Treatment of Nineteen Cases of Canine Parvovirus Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李博岩; 陆曼

    2015-01-01

    Nineteen cases of enteritis type canine parvovirus disease in an animal hospital were diagnosed based on the analysis of the treatment protocol and experience. Among the cases, two of them were mixed infection with parasite, four of them were mixed infection with coronavirus, and other 13 cases were simple infection of parvovirus. The sufficient and prompt employment of antiviral drugs combining with anti-inflammation, fluid infusion and correcting the unbalance between acid and alkali were effective treatment measures for canine parvovirus disease.%对某动物医院确诊的19例犬细小病毒病患犬的治疗方法和经验进行汇总、归纳和分析,发现19例均为肠炎型。其中,与寄生虫混合感染的有2例,与冠状病毒感染的有4例,其余13例为单纯犬细小病毒感染。对于细小病毒病患犬要尽早、足量使用抗病毒药物治疗,并配合采取消炎、补液、纠正酸碱失衡等措施是保证疗效的关键。

  7. Transmigration of mandibular canine – case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmigration is a phenomenon of movement of an unerupted tooth in the bone across the midline. This anomaly is not often found. Transmigration is more prevalent in females than in males, and more often encountered in the mandible than maxilla, it affects mostly canines. The aim of this study was to present a case report of a mandibular canine transmigration in a patient aged 12. Intraoral examination determined hypodontia of right second premolar and delayed eruption of left second premolar in maxilla, as well as persistent deciduous teeth: right second molar, left canine and second molar. The patient was referred for a Cone-Beam CT examination, which allowed precise visualization of the transmigrating canine as well as ruled out resorption of roots of mandibular incisors. The treatment with a maxillary fixed orthodontic appliance was finished after obtaining a satisfactory result. Proper alignment of the incisors in the anterior-posterior plane and correct midline position were accepted by the patient. Transmigrating canine after consultation with the surgeon was designed to further radiological observation

  8. Screening of an FDA-approved compound library identifies four small-molecule inhibitors of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus replication in cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. de Wilde (Adriaan); D. Jochmans (Dirk); C.C. Posthuma (Clara); J.C. Zevenhoven-Dobbe (Jessika); S. van Nieuwkoop (Stefan); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); J. Neyts; E.J. Snijder (Eric)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractCoronaviruses can cause respiratory and enteric disease in a wide variety of human and animal hosts. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first demonstrated the potentially lethal consequences of zoonotic coronavirus infections in humans. In 2012, a similar previ

  9. Cleavage of group 1 coronavirus spike proteins: how furin cleavage is traded off against heparan sulfate binding upon cell culture adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de C.A.M.; Haijema, B.J.; Schellen, P.; Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Lintelo, te E.; Vennema, H.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A longstanding enigmatic feature of the group 1 coronaviruses is the uncleaved phenotype of their spike protein, an exceptional property among class I fusion proteins. Here, however, we show that some group 1 coronavirus spike proteins carry a furin enzyme recognition motif and can actually be cleav

  10. Severe respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, in a patient transferred to the United Kingdom from the Middle East, September 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Bermingham, Alison; Chand, M.A.; Brown, C S; Aarons, E.; Tong, C; Langrish, C; Hoschler, K; Brown, Kevin; Galiano, Monica; Myers, Richard; Pebody, R. G.; Green, H.K.; Boddington, N.L.; Gopal, Robin; Price, N

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCoronaviruses have the potential to cause severe transmissible human disease, as demonstrated by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2003. We describe here the clinical and virological features of a novel coronavirus infection causing severe respiratory illness in a patient transferred to London, United Kingdom, from the Gulf region of the Middle East.

  11. Severe respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, in a patient transferred to the United Kingdom from the Middle East, September 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, A; Chand, M A; Brown, C S; Aarons, E; Tong, C; Langrish, C; Hoschler, K; Brown, K; Galiano, M; Myers, R; Pebody, R G; Green, H K; Boddington, N L; Gopal, R; Price, N; Newsholme, W; Drosten, C; Fouchier, R A; Zambon, M

    2012-01-01

    Coronaviruses have the potential to cause severe transmissible human disease, as demonstrated by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2003. We describe here the clinical and virological features of a novel coronavirus infection causing severe respiratory illness in a patient transferred to London, United Kingdom, from the Gulf region of the Middle East. PMID:23078800

  12. Composite mandibular allografts in canines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of transplanting composite mandibular allografts to repair large mandibular defects. Methods: Three composite mandibular transplantation models were established. The first model consisted of hemimandible with the attached teeth, muscle and skin, and oral mucosa. The second model was transplanted in the same way with the first one excluding oral mucosa and some teeth, and third one excluding the oral mucosa and all dental crowns. Fourteen transplanting operations were performed in canines. Cyclosporine A and methylprednisone were given for immunosuppression. Results: The composite mandibular organs had an effective and closed return circuit. Transplantation of vascularized allograft of mandibular compound organs was feasible. Two longest time survivors of 67 d and 76 d were in the third model group. Cyclosporine A was successful in suppressing rejection of transplanted composite allograft and prolonging survival time of transplantation models. Conclusions: The composite mandibular allografts were available with large block of living composite tissue,and helpful in restoration of appearance and function for severe mandibular defects.

  13. Transmission of SARS and MERS coronaviruses and influenza virus in healthcare settings: the possible role of dry surface contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Donskey, C; Yezli, S; Douthwaite, S; Goldenberg, S D; Weber, D J

    2016-03-01

    Viruses with pandemic potential including H1N1, H5N1, and H5N7 influenza viruses, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)/Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses (CoV) have emerged in recent years. SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and influenza virus can survive on surfaces for extended periods, sometimes up to months. Factors influencing the survival of these viruses on surfaces include: strain variation, titre, surface type, suspending medium, mode of deposition, temperature and relative humidity, and the method used to determine the viability of the virus. Environmental sampling has identified contamination in field-settings with SARS-CoV and influenza virus, although the frequent use of molecular detection methods may not necessarily represent the presence of viable virus. The importance of indirect contact transmission (involving contamination of inanimate surfaces) is uncertain compared with other transmission routes, principally direct contact transmission (independent of surface contamination), droplet, and airborne routes. However, influenza virus and SARS-CoV may be shed into the environment and be transferred from environmental surfaces to hands of patients and healthcare providers. Emerging data suggest that MERS-CoV also shares these properties. Once contaminated from the environment, hands can then initiate self-inoculation of mucous membranes of the nose, eyes or mouth. Mathematical and animal models, and intervention studies suggest that contact transmission is the most important route in some scenarios. Infection prevention and control implications include the need for hand hygiene and personal protective equipment to minimize self-contamination and to protect against inoculation of mucosal surfaces and the respiratory tract, and enhanced surface cleaning and disinfection in healthcare settings. PMID:26597631

  14. Transmission of SARS and MERS coronaviruses and influenza virus in healthcare settings: the possible role of dry surface contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otter, J A; Donskey, C; Yezli, S; Douthwaite, S; Goldenberg, S D; Weber, D J

    2016-03-01

    Viruses with pandemic potential including H1N1, H5N1, and H5N7 influenza viruses, and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)/Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses (CoV) have emerged in recent years. SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and influenza virus can survive on surfaces for extended periods, sometimes up to months. Factors influencing the survival of these viruses on surfaces include: strain variation, titre, surface type, suspending medium, mode of deposition, temperature and relative humidity, and the method used to determine the viability of the virus. Environmental sampling has identified contamination in field-settings with SARS-CoV and influenza virus, although the frequent use of molecular detection methods may not necessarily represent the presence of viable virus. The importance of indirect contact transmission (involving contamination of inanimate surfaces) is uncertain compared with other transmission routes, principally direct contact transmission (independent of surface contamination), droplet, and airborne routes. However, influenza virus and SARS-CoV may be shed into the environment and be transferred from environmental surfaces to hands of patients and healthcare providers. Emerging data suggest that MERS-CoV also shares these properties. Once contaminated from the environment, hands can then initiate self-inoculation of mucous membranes of the nose, eyes or mouth. Mathematical and animal models, and intervention studies suggest that contact transmission is the most important route in some scenarios. Infection prevention and control implications include the need for hand hygiene and personal protective equipment to minimize self-contamination and to protect against inoculation of mucosal surfaces and the respiratory tract, and enhanced surface cleaning and disinfection in healthcare settings.

  15. Oncolytic Virotherapy of Canine and Feline Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death in companion animals such as dogs and cats. Despite recent progress in the diagnosis and treatment of advanced canine and feline cancer, overall patient treatment outcome has not been substantially improved. Virotherapy using oncolytic viruses is one promising new strategy for cancer therapy. Oncolytic viruses (OVs preferentially infect and lyse cancer cells, without causing excessive damage to surrounding healthy tissue, and initiate tumor-specific immunity. The current review describes the use of different oncolytic viruses for cancer therapy and their application to canine and feline cancer.

  16. Tooth fractures in canine clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooth fractures constitute a considerable fraction of all tooth diseases. Out of the 5,370 dogs treated during four years, 492 were presented with dental problems and 28.3 % of the latter were treated for tooth fractures. Canines were the most frequently affected teeth (38.8 %), followed by premolars (33.1 %), incisors (25.9 %), and molars (2.2 %), 55.4 % of the patients with canine and incisor fractures being large breed dogs. Fractures of premolars (mostly of 108, 208) were divided evenly irrespective of breed or body size. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment yielded good therapeutic results in most cases, but repeated treatment was necessary in some patients

  17. A Study of Transmigrated Canine in an Indian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagpal, Archna

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of transmigrated canines in a north Indian population and association with gender, side, associated pathologies, and dental anomalies. Subjects and methods. The prospective study consisted of panoramic radiographs of 3000 patients from two dental colleges in north India. The panoramic radiographs were screened for radiographically identified position of the transmigrated tooth, retained canine, and other coexisting dental anomalies. Results. The overall prevalence of transmigrated canines (15 mandibular and 5 maxillary) was 0.66%. The prevalence of mandibular transmigrated canine was 0.5% and maxillary transmigrated canine was 0.16%. All the transmigrated canines were unilateral. The age range was 15–53 years (average age 24.1 years) and there were 12 males (60%) and 8 females (40%). Type 1 mandibular canine transmigration was the commonest type found in our study (10 cases), followed by types 2 and 4 (2 cases each) and 1 case of type 5 transmigration. Conclusion. The prevalence of transmigrated canines in the north Indian population was 0.66% and no gender predilection was evident. The transmigrated canines have a low complication rate (10.0%) and no correlation with other dental anomalies was found. Type 3 canine is the rarest form of mandibular canine transmigration. PMID:27433532

  18. Prevalence of genes for enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and exfoliative toxin among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from canine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jang W; Lee, Gi-Jong; Lee, So-Young; Park, Chul; Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2010-10-01

    A total of 74 Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains were isolated from the 99 clinical cases of canine pyoderma or chronic otitis in our veterinary teaching hospital during May 2006-February 2008. In this study, we examined the genetic distribution of staphylococcal pyogenic toxins such as staphylococcal enterotoxins A (sea), B (seb), C (sec), D (sed), E (see), and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst) as well as the previously characterized S. intermedius exfoliative toxin (siet) among those isolates. The polymerase chain reaction analyses with the toxin gene-specific primers revealed that 18 (24.3%) of 74 S. pseudintermedius isolates carried the sec genes, but none of the sea, seb, sed, see and tst genes. Further DNA sequencing analysis of the amplified sec genes revealed that they all belonged to the canine type C staphylococcal enterotoxin (SEC(canine) ) whose superantigenic activity has been demonstrated. In addition to the sec(canine) genes, our polymerase chain reaction results showed that all the 74 isolates carried the siet gene. Since both SEC(canine) and SIET toxins are known to be biologically active, it would be interesting to investigate how those toxins are involved in the pathogenesis of the canine diseases by S. pseudintermedius such as pyoderma or chronic otitis.

  19. Prevalence of rotavirus (GARV) and coronavirus (BCoV) associated with neonatal diarrhea in calves in western Algeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selles Sidi Mohammed Ammar; Kouidri Mokhtaria; Belhamiti Belkacem Tahar; Ait Amrane Amar; Benia Ahmed Redha; Bellik Yuva; Hammoudi Si Mohamed; Niar Abdellatif; Boukra Laid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the prevalence of bovine group A rotavirus (GARV) and bovine coronavirus (BCoV) in diarrheic feces from calves and the sensitive’s parameters such as age group and sex.Methods:Feces samples from 82 diarrheic dairy calves from farms around Tiaret (Western Algeria) were collected. These samples were tested by ELISA assay.Results:The present study demonstrates that the both BCoV and GARV are involved in the (12.2% alone and 2.43% associated with bovine coronavirus) and 20.73% (18.3% alone and 2.43%associated with GARV), respectively.Conclusions:The results showed that the prevalence of rotavirus and coronavirus infection are 14.63%neonatal calves’ diarrhea, where the frequency of BCoV is clearly higher than that of GARV.

  20. IFITM Proteins Inhibit Entry Driven by the MERS-Coronavirus Spike Protein: Evidence for Cholesterol-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wrensch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1, 2 and 3 inhibit the host cell entry of several enveloped viruses, potentially by promoting the accumulation of cholesterol in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 is essential for control of influenza virus infection in mice and humans. In contrast, the role of IFITM proteins in coronavirus infection is less well defined. Employing a retroviral vector system for analysis of coronavirus entry, we investigated the susceptibility of human-adapted and emerging coronaviruses to inhibition by IFITM proteins. We found that entry of the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV is sensitive to inhibition by IFITM proteins. In 293T cells, IFITM-mediated inhibition of cellular entry of the emerging MERS- and SARS-CoV was less efficient than blockade of entry of the globally circulating human coronaviruses 229E and NL63. Similar differences were not observed in A549 cells, suggesting that cellular context and/or IFITM expression levels can impact inhibition efficiency. The differential IFITM-sensitivity of coronaviruses observed in 293T cells afforded the opportunity to investigate whether efficiency of entry inhibition by IFITMs and endosomal cholesterol accumulation correlate. No such correlation was observed. Furthermore, entry mediated by the influenza virus hemagglutinin was robustly inhibited by IFITM3 but was insensitive to accumulation of endosomal cholesterol, indicating that modulation of cholesterol synthesis/transport did not account for the antiviral activity of IFITM3. Collectively, these results show that the emerging MERS-CoV is a target of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins and demonstrate that mechanisms other than accumulation of endosomal cholesterol can contribute to viral entry inhibition by IFITMs.

  1. Targeting membrane-bound viral RNA synthesis reveals potent inhibition of diverse coronaviruses including the middle East respiratory syndrome virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lundin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs, a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6, a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV, and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections.

  2. Experimental Forelimb Allotransplantation in Canine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    As reconstructive transplantation is gaining popularity as a viable alternative for upper limb amputees, it is becoming increasingly important for plastic surgeons to renew surgical skills and knowledge of this area. Forelimb allotransplantation research has been performed previously in rodent and swine models. However, preclinical canine forelimb allotransplantation studies are lacking in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the surgical skills necessary to successfully perform forelimb transplantation in canines as a means to prepare for clinical application. A total of 18 transplantation operations on canines were performed. The recipient limb was shortened at the one-third proximal forearm level. The operation was performed in the following order: bones (two reconstructive plates), muscles and tendons (separately sutured), nerves (median, ulnar, and radial nerve), arteries (two), and veins (two). The total mean time of transplantation was 5 hours ± 30 minutes. All of the animals that received transplantation were treated with FK-506 (tacrolimus, 2 mg/kg) for 7 days after surgery. Most allografts survived with perfect viability without vascular problems during the early postoperative period. The canine forelimb allotransplantation model is well qualified to be a suitable training model for standard transplantation and future research work. PMID:27597952

  3. Experimental Forelimb Allotransplantation in Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sa-Hyeok; Eun, Seok-Chan

    2016-01-01

    As reconstructive transplantation is gaining popularity as a viable alternative for upper limb amputees, it is becoming increasingly important for plastic surgeons to renew surgical skills and knowledge of this area. Forelimb allotransplantation research has been performed previously in rodent and swine models. However, preclinical canine forelimb allotransplantation studies are lacking in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the surgical skills necessary to successfully perform forelimb transplantation in canines as a means to prepare for clinical application. A total of 18 transplantation operations on canines were performed. The recipient limb was shortened at the one-third proximal forearm level. The operation was performed in the following order: bones (two reconstructive plates), muscles and tendons (separately sutured), nerves (median, ulnar, and radial nerve), arteries (two), and veins (two). The total mean time of transplantation was 5 hours ± 30 minutes. All of the animals that received transplantation were treated with FK-506 (tacrolimus, 2 mg/kg) for 7 days after surgery. Most allografts survived with perfect viability without vascular problems during the early postoperative period. The canine forelimb allotransplantation model is well qualified to be a suitable training model for standard transplantation and future research work. PMID:27597952

  4. Overexpression of vimentin in canine prostatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, M M P; Rema, A; Gärtner, F;

    2011-01-01

    is associated with the invasive phenotype of human prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to characterize immunohistochemically the expression of vimentin by canine prostatic carcinomas. Primary carcinomas and metastatic tumour foci both showed vimentin expression. This finding suggests...

  5. Canine specific ELISA for coagulation factor VII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Tom; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Tranholm, Mikael;

    2011-01-01

    available to date. In this study, a canine specific ELISA for measurement of FVII:Ag in plasma was developed and validated. The FVII:Ag ELISA correctly diagnosed homozygous and heterozygous hereditary FVII deficiency. Together with activity based assays, such as FVII:C, the FVII:Ag ELISA should be valuable...

  6. Canine notoedric mange: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Federico

    2007-04-01

    Notoedric mange is a cutaneous ectoparasitic disease of cats caused by Notoedres cati, a mite belonging to the Sarcoptidae family. The disease occurs in felids, occasionally in other mammals and in humans. The canine form, even if cited by some authors, has never been documented. This report describes for the first time a case of notoedric mange in a dog.

  7. Canine retraction with J hook headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Perez, C; de Alba, J A; Caputo, A A; Chaconas, S J

    1980-11-01

    Several methods have been described for accomplishing distal movement of canines without losing posterior anchorage. An accepted method in canine retraction is the use of headgear with J hooks. Since it incorporates extraoral anchorage, it is most effective in maximum-anchorage cases. It was the purpose of this study to analyze the distribution of force transmitted to the alveolus and surrounding structures by means of photoelastic visualization, utilizing J hook headgear for maxillary canine retraction. A three-dimensional model representing a human skull was used. This model was constructed with different birefringent materials to simulate bone, teeth, and periodontal membranes. Three different vectors of force were applied representing high-, medium-, and low-pull headgear, which were placed at angles of 40, 20, and 0 degrees to the occlusal plane. The photoelastic analysis was made by means of a circular-transmission polariscope arrangement, and the photoelastic data were recorded photographically. The stress areas created by the three different vectors of force were associated with various degrees of canine tipping. This effect was greater with the low-pull force component than with the medium-pull traction. The high-pull headgear produced the least tipping tendency, being closer to a bodily movemment effect. Further, stresses were transmitted to deeper structures of the simulated facial bones; these regions were the frontozygomatic, zygomaticomaxillary, and zygomaticotemporal sutures.

  8. A phylogenetically distinct Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus detected in a dromedary calf from a closed dairy herd in Dubai with rising seroprevalence with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; El Rasoul, I Hassab; Wong, Emily Y M; Joseph, Marina; Chen, Yixin; Jose, Shanty; Tsang, Alan K L; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Chen, Honglin; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Joseph, Sunitha; Xia, Ningshao; Wernery, Renate; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-12-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was detected by monoclonal antibody-based nucleocapsid protein-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), RNA detection, and viral culture from the nasal sample of a 1-month-old dromedary calf in Dubai with sudden death. Whole genome phylogeny showed that this MERS-CoV strain did not cluster with the other MERS-CoV strains from Dubai that we reported recently. Instead, it formed a unique branch more closely related to other MERS-CoV strains from patients in Qatar and Hafr-Al-Batin in Saudi Arabia, as well as the MERS-CoV strains from patients in the recent Korean outbreak, in which the index patient acquired the infection during travel in the eastern part of the Arabian Peninsula. Non-synonymous mutations, resulting in 11 unique amino acid differences, were observed between the MERS-CoV genome from the present study and all the other available MERS-CoV genomes. Among these 11 unique amino acid differences, four were found in ORF1ab, three were found in the S1 domain of the spike protein, and one each was found in the proteins encoded by ORF4b, ORF5, envelope gene, and ORF8. MERS-CoV detection for all other 254 dromedaries in this closed dairy herd was negative by nucleocapsid protein-capture ELISA and RNA detection. MERS-CoV IgG sero-positivity gradually increased in dromedary calves with increasing age, with positivity rates of 75% at zero to three months, 79% at four months, 89% at five to six months, and 90% at seven to twelve months. The development of a rapid antigen detection kit for instantaneous diagnosis is warranted.Emerging Microbes & Infections (2015) 4, e74; doi:10.1038/emi.2015.74; published online 2 December 2015.

  9. High Prevalence and Putative Lineage Maintenance of Avian Coronaviruses in Scandinavian Waterfowl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wille

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses (CoVs are found in a wide variety of wild and domestic animals, and constitute a risk for zoonotic and emerging infectious disease. In poultry, the genetic diversity, evolution, distribution and taxonomy of some coronaviruses have been well described, but little is known about the features of CoVs in wild birds. In this study we screened 764 samples from 22 avian species of the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes in Sweden collected in 2006/2007 for CoV, with an overall CoV prevalence of 18.7%, which is higher than many other wild bird surveys. The highest prevalence was found in the diving ducks--mainly Greater Scaup (Aythya marila; 51.5%--and the dabbling duck Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos; 19.2%. Sequences from two of the Greater Scaup CoV fell into an infrequently detected lineage, shared only with a Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula CoV. Coronavirus sequences from Mallards in this study were highly similar to CoV sequences from the sample species and location in 2011, suggesting long-term maintenance in this population. A single Black-headed Gull represented the only positive sample from the order Charadriiformes. Globally, Anas species represent the largest fraction of avian CoV sequences, and there seems to be no host species, geographical or temporal structure. To better understand the eitiology, epidemiology and ecology of these viruses more systematic surveillance of wild birds and subsequent sequencing of detected CoV is imperative.

  10. High Prevalence and Putative Lineage Maintenance of Avian Coronaviruses in Scandinavian Waterfowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Michelle; Muradrasoli, Shaman; Nilsson, Anna; Järhult, Josef D

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are found in a wide variety of wild and domestic animals, and constitute a risk for zoonotic and emerging infectious disease. In poultry, the genetic diversity, evolution, distribution and taxonomy of some coronaviruses have been well described, but little is known about the features of CoVs in wild birds. In this study we screened 764 samples from 22 avian species of the orders Anseriformes and Charadriiformes in Sweden collected in 2006/2007 for CoV, with an overall CoV prevalence of 18.7%, which is higher than many other wild bird surveys. The highest prevalence was found in the diving ducks--mainly Greater Scaup (Aythya marila; 51.5%)--and the dabbling duck Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos; 19.2%). Sequences from two of the Greater Scaup CoV fell into an infrequently detected lineage, shared only with a Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) CoV. Coronavirus sequences from Mallards in this study were highly similar to CoV sequences from the sample species and location in 2011, suggesting long-term maintenance in this population. A single Black-headed Gull represented the only positive sample from the order Charadriiformes. Globally, Anas species represent the largest fraction of avian CoV sequences, and there seems to be no host species, geographical or temporal structure. To better understand the eitiology, epidemiology and ecology of these viruses more systematic surveillance of wild birds and subsequent sequencing of detected CoV is imperative. PMID:26938459

  11. Structure and inhibition of the SARS coronavirus envelope protein ion channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Pervushin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The envelope (E protein from coronaviruses is a small polypeptide that contains at least one alpha-helical transmembrane domain. Absence, or inactivation, of E protein results in attenuated viruses, due to alterations in either virion morphology or tropism. Apart from its morphogenetic properties, protein E has been reported to have membrane permeabilizing activity. Further, the drug hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not amiloride, inhibited in vitro ion channel activity of some synthetic coronavirus E proteins, and also viral replication. We have previously shown for the coronavirus species responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV that the transmembrane domain of E protein (ETM forms pentameric alpha-helical bundles that are likely responsible for the observed channel activity. Herein, using solution NMR in dodecylphosphatidylcholine micelles and energy minimization, we have obtained a model of this channel which features regular alpha-helices that form a pentameric left-handed parallel bundle. The drug HMA was found to bind inside the lumen of the channel, at both the C-terminal and the N-terminal openings, and, in contrast to amiloride, induced additional chemical shifts in ETM. Full length SARS-CoV E displayed channel activity when transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293 cells in a whole-cell patch clamp set-up. This activity was significantly reduced by hexamethylene amiloride (HMA, but not by amiloride. The channel structure presented herein provides a possible rationale for inhibition, and a platform for future structure-based drug design of this potential pharmacological target.

  12. Canine visceral leishmaniasis in Sicily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndorff, G R; Cooper, B A; Smith, W; Ryan, J R

    2000-01-01

    The Sicilian province of Catania is an active foci for human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Mediterranean area. Approximately 10 to 15 cases of VL are diagnosed via hospital admissions each year in this community. Recently, an increase in VL case reporting by Sicilian physicians was noted, with 38 and 37 VL cases in 1996 and 1997, respectively. Before 1995, there were no reported VL cases among U.S. military personnel or their family members living in Sicily. However, since 1996, there have been four cases referred to Walter Reed Army Medical Center for diagnosis and treatment, all involving the children of personnel assigned to Naval Air Station Sigonella. Exposure histories for all infected individuals excluded exposure to Leishmania parasites outside of Sicily. All patients lived in areas where vectoring sandflies are present. All had dogs as family pets. To evaluate the level of infection among dogs owned by Navy personnel and their families, U.S. Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit 7, in a collaborative study with the U.S. Army Veterinary Clinic, Naval Air Station Sigonella, and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, performed clinical evaluation and serological testing of 50 dogs residing with U.S. personnel assigned to Naval Air Station Sigonella. The data indicate a high exposure rate to Leishmania (60% of the animals tested had elevated immunoglobulin M antibody levels) in the study population, suggesting that they were infected with Leishmania infantum. Distribution of seropositive dogs by sex was equal. Most of the dogs studied appeared to be in good health. However, inapparent infection of dogs, seen by Italian veterinarians, has been observed throughout all areas of Catania. Sandflies responsible for vectoring L. infantum were trapped in the same locations as the dogs sampled in this study. The level of subclinical infection was 75% among seropositive dogs. The overall level of canine infection observed was higher than expected

  13. Action mechanisms of lithium chloride on cell infection by transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ren

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV is a porcine coronavirus. Lithium chloride (LiCl has been found to be effective against several DNA viruses, such as Herpes simplex virus and vaccinia virus. Recently, we and others have reported the inhibitory effect of LiCl on avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus (IBV infection, an RNA virus. In the current study, the action mechanism of LiCl on cell infection by TGEV was investigated. Plaque assays and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazo(-z-y1-3,5-di-phenyl tetrazoliumbromide (MTT assays showed that the cell infection by TGEV was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, when LiCl was added to virus-infected cells; the cell infection was not affected when either cells or viruses were pretreated with the drug. The inhibition of TGEV infection in vitro by LiCl was observed at different virus doses and with different cell lines. The inhibitory effect of LiCl against TGEV infection and transcription was confirmed by RT-PCR and real-time PCR targeting viral S and 3CL-protease genes. The time-of-addition effect of the drug on TGEV infection indicated that LiCl acted on the initial and late stage of TGEV infection. The production of virus was not detected at 36 h post-infection due to the drug treatment. Moreover, immunofluorescence (IF and flow cytometry analyses based on staining of Annexin V and propidium iodide staining of nuclei indicated that early and late cell apoptosis induced by TGEV was inhibited efficiently. The ability of LiCl to inhibit apoptosis was investigated by IF analysis of caspase-3 expression. Our data indicate that LiCl inhibits TGEV infection by exerting an anti-apoptotic effect. The inhibitory effect of LiCl was also observed with porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus. Together with other reports concerning the inhibitory effect of lithium salts on IBV in cell culture, our results indicate that LiCl may be a potent agent against porcine and avian coronaviruses.

  14. Mutational dynamics of the SARS coronavirus in cell culture and human populations isolated in 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Ooi Eng; Kolatkar Prasanna R; Zhang Tao; Tang Kin; Se-Thoe Su; Wei Chia; Lee Wah; Liu Jianjun; Ruan Yijun; Vega Vinsensius B; Ling Ai; Stanton Lawrence W; Long Philip M; Liu Edison T

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The SARS coronavirus is the etiologic agent for the epidemic of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. The recent emergence of this new pathogen, the careful tracing of its transmission patterns, and the ability to propagate in culture allows the exploration of the mutational dynamics of the SARS-CoV in human populations. Methods We sequenced complete SARS-CoV genomes taken from primary human tissues (SIN3408, SIN3725V, SIN3765V), cultured isolates (SIN848, SIN846, SIN842,...

  15. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Antibody Reactors Among Camels in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandersen, S; Kobinger, G P; Soule, G; Wernery, U

    2014-01-01

    We tested, using a low starting dilution, sequential serum samples from dromedary camels, sheep and horses collected in Dubai from February/April to October of 2005 and from dromedary camels for export/import testing between Canada and USA in 2000–2001. Using a standard Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) neutralization test, serial sera from three sheep and three horses were all negative while sera from 9 of 11 dromedary camels from Dubai were positive for antibodies supp...

  16. Candidates in Astroviruses, Seadornaviruses, Cytorhabdoviruses and Coronaviruses for +1 frame overlapping genes accessed by leaky scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes are common in RNA viruses where they serve as a mechanism to optimize the coding potential of compact genomes. However, annotation of overlapping genes can be difficult using conventional gene-finding software. Recently we have been using a number of complementary approaches to systematically identify previously undetected overlapping genes in RNA virus genomes. In this article we gather together a number of promising candidate new overlapping genes that may be of interest to the community. Results Overlapping gene predictions are presented for the astroviruses, seadornaviruses, cytorhabdoviruses and coronaviruses (families Astroviridae, Reoviridae, Rhabdoviridae and Coronaviridae, respectively.

  17. NMR assignments of the macro domain from Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Ping; Cho, Chao-Cheng; Chang, Chi-Fon; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The newly emerging human pathogen, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), contains a macro domain in the highly conserved N-terminal region of non-structural protein 3. Intense research has shown that macro domains bind ADP-ribose and other derivatives, but it still remains intangible about their exact function. In this study we report the preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the MERS-CoV macro domain. The near complete NMR assignments of MERS-CoV macro domain provide the basis for subsequent structural and biochemical investigation in the context of protein function.

  18. Effects of canine serum collected from dogs at different estrous cycle stages on in vitro nuclear maturation of canine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Fibrianto, Yuda Heru; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Hossein, M Shamim; Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2005-08-01

    Canine oocytes are ovulated at prophase of the first meiotic division and undergo maturation in the distal part of the oviduct for at least 48-72 h. Because of these differences from other domestic mammals, the efficiency of in vitro maturation (IVM) of canine oocyte is very low. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of canine serum on IVM of canine oocytes recovered from ovaries in various reproductive states (follicular, luteal or anestrous stages). Oocytes were recovered by mincing ovaries from bitches presented for ovariohysterectomy at various stages of the estrous cycle. Heat-inactivated canine serum was prepared with blood taken from dogs at the anestrous, estrous or diestrous stage of the estrous cycle as determined by progesterone concentration and vaginal cytology. Oocytes were cultured for 72 h in tissue culture medium (TCM)-199 supplemented with 10% canine anestrous, estrous or diestrous serum or fetal bovine serum (FBS) (experiment 1), or supplemented with 0 (control), 5%, 10% or 20% canine estrous serum (experiment 2). In experiment 1, IVM of oocytes collected at the follicular stage of the estrous cycle to metaphase II (MII) stage was higher (p < 0.05) with canine estrous serum (14.2%) than with canine anestrous (5.2%) or diestrous serum (6.3%), FBS (2.2%) or in the control (2.2%). In experiment 2, oocytes collected at the follicular stage of the estrous cycle cultured in TCM-199 with 10% canine estrous serum showed a higher maturation rate to MII stage (13.5%, p < 0.05) compared with those cultured with 5% (1.3% MII) or 20% canine estrous serum (5.1% MII) or the control (2.7% MII). In conclusion, our results demonstrate that supplementing culture medium with 10% canine estrous serum improves IVM of canine follicular stage oocytes. PMID:16261767

  19. Morphometric analysis of the thymus of puppies infected with the Snyder Hill Strain of canine distemper virus Análise morfométrica do timo de cães filhotes infectados com a amostra Snyder Hill do vírus de cinomose canina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Alves

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The thymic morphometry analysis was used for determining apoptosis and atrophy of the thymus of eight puppies inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV. Three healthy dogs were used as negative controls. Sections, 5µm thick, were stained by HE and Shorr, and the latter were evaluated by morphometry. CDV nucleoprotein was detected by immunohistochemistry. Morphometric results confirmed lymphoid hypotrophy in CDV inoculated dog thymuses, more stroma, less parenchyma and higher apoptotic index/field than negative control (not inoculated puppies. Apoptosis plays a role in the mechanism of thymus atrophy that develops in canine distemper.Determinaram-se a apoptose e a atrofia no timo de oito cães novos, inoculados experimentalmente com o vírus de cinomose. Três cães saudáveis foram usados como controle negativo. Secções coradas pelo Shorr foram avaliadas por morfometria. A nucleoproteína viral foi detectada por imunoistoquímica. Os resultados morfométricos confirmaram a hipotrofia e mostraram que o timo dos cães inoculados tinha mais estroma, menos parênquima e maior índice apoptótico/campo que o dos animais-controle. Pode-se concluir que a apoptose desempenha importante papel no mecanismo de hipotrofia tímica que se desenvolve na cinomose.

  20. Two G3 feline rotavirus strains lacking cross-neutralization reactions represent distinct subtypes of serotype G3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M; Nakagomi, O

    1994-01-01

    Two feline rotavirus strains, FRV-1 and FRV64, that have been shown to lack cross-neutralization reactions despite the sharing of serotype G3 were examined by plaque-reduction neutralization assays in relation to other G3 strains originating from cats, dogs, humans and monkeys. While FRV-1 and human G3 strains constituted one subtype (G3A), FRV64, canine strains and simian strains constituted another subtype (G3B). PMID:8078427

  1. Combined orthodontic-surgical management of a transmigrated mandibular canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, Serena; Matarese, Giovanni; Isola, Gaetano; Abdolreza, Jamilian; Femiano, Felice; Perillo, Letizia

    2016-07-01

    The presence of an impacted mandibular canine is one of the most difficult challenges that an orthodontist will meet. Orthodontic treatment is planned on an individual basis after thoroughly considering the patient's overall facial and dentoskeletal characteristics; the duration, risks, and costs of treatment; patient preferences; and the orthodontist's experience. This article reports an orthodontic treatment of a boy, age 12.9 years, with an impacted mandibular canine in the permanent dentition that was successfully managed. Radiographic analysis indicated a transmigration of the mandibular right canine. The orthodontic treatment plan included extraction of the deciduous right canine followed by surgical exposure and ligation of the permanent canine. Eruption was properly guided, and the correct position of the tooth was achieved. This challenging treatment approach is described in detail, including the mechanics used to align the impacted canine. PMID:26502299

  2. Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets as a model for testing Morbillivirus vaccine strategies: NYVAC- and ALVAC-based CDV recombinants protect against symptomatic infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephensen, C B; Welter, J; Thaker, S R; Taylor, J; Tartaglia, J; Paoletti, E.

    1997-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) infection of ferrets causes an acute systemic disease involving multiple organ systems, including the respiratory tract, lymphoid system, and central nervous system (CNS). We have tested candidate CDV vaccines incorporating the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins in the highly attenuated NYVAC strain of vaccinia virus and in the ALVAC strain of canarypox virus, which does not productively replicate in mammalian hosts. Juvenile ferrets were vaccinated twice ...

  3. Canine oral biofilms: Cultural, molecular, and in vitro studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, D. R.

    2006-01-01

    The canine oral microbiota is poorly understood compared to that of humans. The aim of this work was to improve understanding of the canine oral microbiota. This was achieved by surveying the canine oral microbiota, determining coaggregation interactions between its members, and developing a laboratory microcosm. Bacteria were isolated from the dental plaque and saliva of dogs, and isolates were identified by comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing. From 339 isolates, 84 phylotypes belonging to ...

  4. Differential sensitivity of bat cells to infection by enveloped RNA viruses: coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses, filoviruses, and influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Bats (Chiroptera host major human pathogenic viruses including corona-, paramyxo, rhabdo- and filoviruses. We analyzed six different cell lines from either Yinpterochiroptera (including African flying foxes and a rhinolophid bat or Yangochiroptera (genera Carollia and Tadarida for susceptibility to infection by different enveloped RNA viruses. None of the cells were sensitive to infection by transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, a porcine coronavirus, or to infection mediated by the Spike (S protein of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV incorporated into pseudotypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The resistance to infection was overcome if cells were transfected to express the respective cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N for TGEV or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 for SARS-CoV. VSV pseudotypes containing the S proteins of two bat SARS-related CoV (Bg08 and Rp3 were unable to infect any of the six tested bat cell lines. By contrast, viral pseudotypes containing the surface protein GP of Marburg virus from the family Filoviridae infected all six cell lines though at different efficiency. Notably, all cells were sensitive to infection by two paramyxoviruses (Sendai virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus and three influenza viruses from different subtypes. These results indicate that bat cells are more resistant to infection by coronaviruses than to infection by paramyxoviruses, filoviruses and influenza viruses. Furthermore, these results show a receptor-dependent restriction of the infection of bat cells by CoV. The implications for the isolation of coronaviruses from bats are discussed.

  5. Presence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus antibodies in Saudi Arabia : a nationwide, cross-sectional, serological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Marcel A; Meyer, Benjamin; Corman, Victor M; Al-Masri, Malak; Turkestani, Abdulhafeez; Ritz, Daniel; Sieberg, Andrea; Aldabbagh, Souhaib; Bosch, Berend-J; Lattwein, Erik; Alhakeem, Raafat F; Assiri, Abdullah M; Albarrak, Ali M; Al-Shangiti, Ali M; Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Wikramaratna, Paul; Alrabeeah, Abdullah A; Drosten, Christian; Memish, Ziad A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scientific evidence suggests that dromedary camels are the intermediary host for the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). However, the actual number of infections in people who have had contact with camels is unknown and most index patients cannot recall any such cont

  6. Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein delivered by modified vaccinia virus ankara efficiently induces virus-neutralizing antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Song (Fei); R. Fux (Robert); L.B.V. Provacia (Lisette); A. Volz (Asisa); M. Eickmann; S. Becker (Stephan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); G. Suttera (Gerd)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has recently emerged as a causative agent of severe respiratory disease in humans. Here, we constructed recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing full-length MERS-CoV spike (S) protein (MVA-MERS-S). The genetic sta

  7. Assembly of spikes into coronavirus particles is mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of the spike protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godeke, G J; de Haan, C A; Rossen, J W; Vennema, H; Rottier, P J

    2000-01-01

    The type I glycoprotein S of coronavirus, trimers of which constitute the typical viral spikes, is assembled into virions through noncovalent interactions with the M protein. Here we demonstrate that incorporation is mediated by the short carboxy-terminal segment comprising the transmembrane and end

  8. Detection by radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of coronavirus antibodies in bovine serum and lacteal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, L; Babiuk, L A; Acres, S D

    1982-07-01

    The sensitivity of a radioimmunoassay (RIA), an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and a serum neutralization assay (SN) for detecting antibodies to bovine coronavirus in serum and colostrum were compared. Although there proved to be a good correlation among all three assays (r = 0.915 and 0.964 for RIA with SN and ELISA, respectively), RIA and ELISA proved to be at least 10 times more sensitive than neutralization tests. By using these techniques, it was possible to detect a time-dependent decrease in antibody levels in bovine colostrum after parturition. Using ELISA, we demonstrated that 12 of 12 herds in Saskatchewan, and 109 of 110 animals tested, and antibody to bovine coronavirus. There was no elevated antibody response in serum or lacteal secretions of cows vaccinated once or twice with a commercially available modified live rota-coronavirus vaccine. In addition to being more sensitive than SN, ELISA and RIA proved to have other advantages for measuring antibody levels to bovine coronavirus and therefore warrant wider use as tools in diagnostic virology.

  9. Infectious bronchitis coronavirus limits interferon production by inducing a host shutoff that requires accessory protein 5b

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kint, Joeri; Langereis, Martijn A.; Maier, Helena J.; Britton, Paul; Kuppeveld, van Frank J.; Koumans, Joseph; Wiegertjes, Geert F.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    During infection of their host cells, viruses often inhibit the production of host proteins, a process that is referred to as host shutoff. By doing this, viruses limit the production of antiviral proteins and increase production capacity for viral proteins. Coronaviruses from the genera Alphacor

  10. Further Report on Carcinogenesis or Tumorigenicity of MDCK Canine Kidney Cell(CKC) Lines and Analysis of Their Chromosome Karyotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG De-li; FANG Fu-de; XIA Geng-tian; HE Xu-yu; GAO Bu-xian; BAI Xiao-hong; LI Liu-jin; HUANG Gao-sheng; LIU Shang-gao; YEN Lung-fei

    2002-01-01

    Using Hela cell cultures as positive control and primary canine kidney cell (CKC) or feline kidney cell (FKC) cultures purified in vitro on passage 3 as negative control, the tumorigenicity of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells was tested in >273 nude mice, and colony formation in soft agarose and haemagglutination under different concentration of plant lectins of these cells were carried out at the same time. Subsequently, very low tumorigenicity strains of MDCK line were successfully selected; these were evaluated for the production of canine or feline combination viral vaccines, free of infectious agents, and of known cytogenetic and tumorigenic. It is thus evident that MDCK cell of M, JB, JC, WB or H strain can be approved as substrate for the preparation of attenuated viral vaccines, but MDCK cell of YA, YB and KA strains can not be approved as substrate for the preparation of attenuated viral vaccines. The heritable character of these cell sub-lines is comparatively stable, and shows little significant difference between passages.

  11. Inhibition of genes expression of SARS coronavirus by synthetic small interfering RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi SHI; De Hua YANG; Jie XIONG; Jie JIA; Bing HUANG; You Xin JIN

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is triggered by the presence of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and results in the silencing of homologous gene expression through the specific degradation of an mRNA containing the same sequence. dsRNAmediated RNAi can be used in a wide variety of eucaryotes to induce the sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression.Synthetic 21-23 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) with 2 nt 3' overhangs was recently found to mediate efficient sequence-specific mRNA degradation in mammalian cells. Here, we studied the effects of synthetic siRNA duplexes targeted to SARS coronavirus structural proteins E, M, and N in a cell culture system. Among total 26 siRNA duplexes, we obtained 3 siRNA duplexes which could sequence-specifically reduce target genes expression over 80% at the concentration of 60 nM in Vero E6 cells. The downregulation effect was in correlation with the concentrations of the siRNA duplexes in a range of 0~60 nM. Our results also showed that many inactive siRNA duplexes may be brought to life simply by unpairing the 5' end of the antisense strands. Results suggest that siRNA is capable of inhibiting SARS coronavirus genes expression and thus may be a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of SARS.

  12. Neonatal diarrhea by bovine coronavirus (BCoV in beef cattle herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Lorenzetti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bovine coronavirus (BCoV is the second most important viral agent involved in neonatal diarrhea in calves worldwide. The reports on the frequency of BCoV infection in beef cattle herds under extensive management are uncommon in Brazil. The present study analyzed 93 diarrheic fecal samples of calves up to 60 days of age from 13 commercial beef cattle herds located in the states of Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Paraná, and Rondônia. The fecal samples were collected during 2009-2012 and were previously analyzed for the presence of bovine rotavirus group A (BoRVA, with negative results. The presence of BCoV in the fecal samples was evaluated by the partial amplification of the N gene by using the semi-nested PCR technique. The expected products of 251 bp length were amplified 33.3% (31/93 of the analyzed diarrheic fecal samples. The results revealed that coronaviruses has important participation in the neonatal diarrhea complex of beef cattle herds reared extensively from the different geographical regions of Brazil.

  13. Identification of Immunogenic Determinants of the Spike Protein of SARS-like Coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhou; Zhenggang Han; Lin-Fa Wang; Zhengli Shi

    2013-01-01

    Bat SARS-like coronavirus (SL-CoV) has a genome organization almost identical to that of SARS-CoV,but the N-terminus of the Spike (S) proteins,which interacts with host receptor and is a major target of neutralizing antibodies against CoVs,of the two viruses has only 63-64% sequence identity.Although there have been reports studying the overall immunogenicity of SSL,knowledge on the precise location of immunodominant determinants for SSL is still lacking.In this study,using a series of truncated expressed SSL fragments and SsL specific mouse sera,we identified two immunogenic determinants for SSL.Importantly,one of the two regions seems to be located in a region not shared by known immunogenic determinants of the SSARS.This finding will be of potential use in future monitoring of SL-CoV infection in bats and spillover animals and in development of more effective vaccine to cover broad protection against this new group of coronaviruses.

  14. Insectivorous bats carry host specific astroviruses and coronaviruses across different regions in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Kerstin; Zeus, Veronika; Kwasnitschka, Linda; Kerth, Gerald; Haase, Martin; Groschup, Martin H; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Recently several infectious agents with a zoonotic potential have been detected in different bat species. However, there is still a lack of knowledge on the transmission dynamics within and between bat species, as well as from bats to other mammals. To better understand these processes, it is important to compare the phylogenetic relationships between different agents to that of their respective hosts. In this study, we analysed more than 950 urine, faeces and oral swab samples collected from 653 bats from mainly four species (Myotis nattereri, Myotis bechsteinii, Myotis daubentonii, and Plecotus auritus) for the presence of coronavirus, paramyxovirus and astrovirus related nucleic acids located in three different regions of Germany. Using hemi-nested reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR amplification of fragments within the highly conserved regions of the respective RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) genes, we detected astrovirus sequences at an overall detection rate of 25.8% of the analysed animals, with a maximum of 65% in local populations. The detection rates for coronaviruses and paramyxoviruses were distinctly lower, ranging between 1.4% and 3.1%. Interestingly, the sequence similarities in samples collected from the same bat species in different geographical areas were distinctly larger than the sequence similarities between samples from different species sampled at the same location. This indicates that host specificity may be more important than host ecology for the presence of certain viruses in bats.

  15. Survey of feline leukemia virus and feline coronaviruses in captive neotropical wild felids from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimaraes, Ana M S; Brandão, Paulo E; de Moraes, Wanderlei; Cubas, Zalmir S; Santos, Leonilda C; Villarreal, Laura Y B; Robes, Rogério R; Coelho, Fabiana M; Resende, Mauricio; Santos, Renata C F; Oliveira, Rosangela C; Yamaguti, Mauricio; Marques, Lucas M; Neto, Renata L; Buzinhani, Melissa; Marques, Regina; Messick, Joanne B; Biondo, Alexander W; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2009-06-01

    A total of 57 captive neotropical felids (one Leopardus geoffroyi, 14 Leopardus pardalis, 17 Leopardus wiedii, 22 Leopardus tigrinus, and three Puma yagouaroundi) from the Itaipu Binacional Wildlife Research Center (Refúgio Bela Vista, Southern Brazil) were anesthetized for blood collection. Feces samples were available for 44 animals, including one L. geoffroyi, eight L. pardalis, 14 L. wiedii, 20 L. tigrinus, and one P. yagouaroundi. Total DNA and RNA were extracted from blood and feces, respectively, using commercial kits. Blood DNA samples were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) proviral DNA, whereas reverse transcriptase-PCR was run on fecal samples for detection of coronavirus RNA. None of the samples were positive for coronaviruses. A male L. pardalis and a female L. tigrinus were positive for FeLV proviral DNA, and identities of PCR products were confirmed by sequencing. This is the first evidence of FeLV proviral DNA in these species in Southern Brazil. PMID:19569487

  16. Study on Substrate Specificity at Subsites for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 3CL Protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fei SHAN; Gen-Jun XU

    2005-01-01

    Autocleavage assay and peptide-based cleavage assay were used to study the substrate specificity of 3CL protease from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. It was found that the recognition between the enzyme and its substrates involved many positions in the substrate, at least including residues from P4 to P2'. The deletion of either P4 or P2' residue in the substrate would decrease its cleavage efficiency dramatically. In contrast to the previous suggestion that only small residues in substrate could be accommodated to the S 1' subsite, we have found that bulky residues such as Tyr and Trp were also acceptable.In addition, based on both peptide-based assay and autocleavage assay, Ile at the P1' position could not be hydrolyzed, but the mutant L27A could hydrolyze the Ile peptide fragment. It suggested that there was a stereo hindrance between the S 1' subsite and the side chain of Ile in the substrate. All 20 amino acids except Pro could be the residue at the P2' position in the substrate, but the cleavage efficiencies were clearly different. The specificity information of the enzyme is helpful for potent anti-virus inhibitor design and useful for other coronavirus studies.

  17. Validation of commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold;

    2014-01-01

    with a human CRP assay previously validated for canine CRP determination. Samples from 40 healthy dogs were analyzed to establish a reference interval. RESULTS: Total imprecision was ..., there was good agreement between the validated human CRP assay and the new canine-specific assay. Healthy dogs had CRP concentrations that were less than the limit of quantification of the Gentian cCRP method (6.8 mg/L). CONCLUSIONS: The new canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP assay is a reliable and rapid......BACKGROUND: Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. OBJECTIVE...

  18. An experimental in-vivo canine model for adult shunt infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procop Gary

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed human studies of the mechanisms and development of shunt infection in real time are not possible, and we have developed a canine hydrocephalus model to overcome this. The intention of this pilot study was to show that the canine hydrocephalus model could be shunted using conventional "human" shunts, and that a shunt infection could be established so that further studies could then be planned. Methods Hydrocephalus was induced in seven dogs (Canis familiaris by fourth ventricle obstruction. Four weeks later they were shunted using a Hakim Precision valve. Four of the dogs received shunts whose ventricular catheter had been inoculated with Staphylococcus epidermidis, and three were uninoculated controls. Four weeks after shunting the dogs were sacrificed and necropsy was performed. Removed shunts and tissue samples were examined microbiologically and isolates were subjected to detailed identification and genomic comparison. Results All the dogs remained well after shunting. Examination of removed shunt components revealed S. epidermidis in the brain and throughout the shunt system in the four inoculated animals, but in two of these Staphylococcus intermedius was also found. S. intermedius was also isolated from all three "negative" controls. There were slight differences between S. intermedius strains suggesting endogenous infection rather than cross- infection from a point source. Conclusion Shunt infection was established in the canine model, and had the experiment been extended beyond four weeks the typical microbiological, pathological and clinical features might have appeared. The occurrence of unplanned shunt infections in control animals due to canine normal skin flora reflects human clinical experience and underlines the usual source of bacteria causing shunt infection.

  19. Breed predisposition to canine gastric carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seim-Wikse, Tonje; Jörundsson, Einar; Nødtvedt, Ane;

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated a breed predisposition to gastric carcinoma in dogs. However, results to date are inconsistent since several studies have failed to prove such a predisposition. Better knowledge of breeds at risk could facilitate early detection of gastric carcinoma in dogs. The ai...... of the study was to retrospectively investigate the proportion and possible breed predisposition to canine gastric carcinoma using the Norwegian Canine Cancer Register for calculations of proportional morbidity ratios (PMRs) for the period 1998-2009.......Previous research has indicated a breed predisposition to gastric carcinoma in dogs. However, results to date are inconsistent since several studies have failed to prove such a predisposition. Better knowledge of breeds at risk could facilitate early detection of gastric carcinoma in dogs. The aim...

  20. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A.; Schjærff, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total...... of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10...... cases). Small colony variants of this species were also observed. Other coryneform isolates were identified as Corynebacterium amycolatum (3 cases), Corynebacterium freneyi (2 cases) and an Arcanobacterium-like species (1 case). The coryneform bacteria were in all cases isolated together with other...

  1. Canine granulocytic anaplasmosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrade, D D; Foley, J E; Borjesson, D L; Sykes, J E

    2009-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen of humans, horses, and dogs worldwide that is transmitted by Ixodid ticks and maintained in a variety of small wild mammal species. Recent studies suggest that multiple strains of A. phagocytophilum may be circulating in wild and domestic animal populations, and these strains may have differential host tropisms and pathogenicity. The organism infects and survives within neutrophils by disabling key neutrophil functions, including neutrophil motility, phagocytosis, the oxidative burst mechanism, and neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions, as well as interfering with neutrophil apoptosis. Coinfections with other tick-borne pathogens may occur, especially Borrelia burgdorferi. A. phagocytophilum causes an acute febrile illness in dogs with lethargy and inappetence. Less frequent signs include lameness, coughing, polydipsia, intermittent vomiting, and hemorrhages. Diagnosis is based on finding morulae within granulocytes in the peripheral blood, the combination of acute and convalescent serology using immunofluorescent antibody techniques, and detection of the DNA of A. phagocytophilum using specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Whether persistent infection or reinfection with A. phagocytophilum occurs after natural infection requires additional study, with most reports suggesting that anaplasmosis is a self-limiting disease in dogs that responds well to a 2-week course of doxycycline therapy.

  2. Extrusion processing : effects on dry canine diets

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Q.D.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: Extrusion, Canine diet, Protein, Lysine, Starch gelatinization, Palatability, Drying. Extrusion cooking is a useful and economical tool for processing animal feed. This high temperature, short time processing technology causes chemical and physical changes that alter the nutritional and physical quality of the product. Effects of extrusion on the feed quality for other animals than pets have been well recognized. Our studies investigated to what extent extrusion and/or drying of a c...

  3. Cardiac troponin I levels in canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    Hagman Ragnvi; Lagerstedt Anne-Sofie; Fransson Boel A; Bergström Annika; Häggström Jens

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Myocardial injury may contribute to unexpected deaths due to pyometra. To detect myocardial damage, measurement of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is currently the most sensitive and specific method. The aims of the present study were to evaluate presence of myocardial damage in canine pyometra by analysis of cTnI, to explore whether myocardial injury was associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and to evaluate whether other clinical or laboratory parameter...

  4. Remote detection of explosives using trained canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of dogs is a search method which combines high probability of detection, speed of search, and low cost. It was concluded that the canine could be used for explosive screening of personnel, but that it was imperative that the dog be in a position remote from employees and employee traffic. A study was made of the design of booths and air flow for this purpose. Results of tests and conclusions are given and discussed

  5. Treatment of canine scabies with milbemycin oxime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W H; de Jaham, C; Scott, D W; Cayatte, S M; Bagladi, M S; Buerger, R G

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of orally administered milbemycin oxime in the treatment of canine scabies. Forty dogs were treated. Mean drug dosage for all dogs was approximately 2 mg/kg body weight. Twenty-seven dogs received 3 doses separated by 7 d, and 13 dogs received 2 doses separated by 14 d. All dogs were clinically normal following treatment and no adverse reactions were detected.

  6. Microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Padhy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections. Materials and Methods: The total wound samples (n=172 taken from both traumatic (140 and post-surgical (32 persistent wounds in canines were processed for routine microbial isolation and identification during a period of 15 months. Results: Staphylococcus intermedius was found to be the predominant isolate from all types of wounds under study. It was followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli, Pasteurella spp., Corynaebacterium spp. and Bacillus spp. From different traumatic wounds of dogs, S. intermedius (92/140=65.7% and from surgical wounds, P. aeruginosa (24/32=75% were found to be the predominant isolates recovered whereas the most commonly isolated bacterial genus in both traumatic and surgical wounds of dogs was Staphylococcus spp. Conclusion: Canine wounds are polymicrobial in nature. Hence proper microbial laboratory diagnosis and presence of multiple organisms in a wound are to be taken into consideration for effective treatment of persistent wound infections in dogs.

  7. Cytodiagnostics of canine lymphomas - possibilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapierzyński, R; Kliczkowska-Klarowicz, K; Jankowska, U; Jagielski, D

    2016-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas are one of the most common malignant tumours occurring in dogs. The basic method of lymphoma diagnosis in human, as well as in canine oncology is histopathology supported by immunohistochemistry. It was suggested that in veterinary medicine excisional biopsy of lymph node and histopathology should be considered only where the cytologic diagnosis is equivocal or needs to be confirmed. There are at least three basic reasons for which cytological examination ought to be accepted as a sufficient and reliable diagnostic method for lymphoma in dogs. Firstly, most dog owners consider the fine-needle biopsy as an acceptable non-harmful method of sample collection. Secondly, an increasing number of studies recommend cytology as an accurate test for diagnosing and subtyping canine lymphoma. Finally, the vast majority of canine lymphoma subtypes belong to 4-5 categories characterized by a typical cytological picture. Immunocytochemical staining of cytological smears gives new diagnostic possibilities, such as detection of markers better characterizing given growth or a potential goal for target therapy in individual cases (for example inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor). PMID:27487521

  8. Establishment of a fluorescent polymerase chain reaction method for the detection of the SARS-associated coronavirus and its clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴新伟; 程钢; 狄飚; 尹爱华; 何蕴韶; 王鸣; 周新宇; 何丽娟; 罗凯; 杜琳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To establish a fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (F-PCR) method for detecting the coronavirus related to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and to evaluate its value for clinical application. Methods The primers and the fluorescence-labeled probe were designed and synthesized according to the published sequence of the SARS-associated coronavirus genes. A F-PCR diagnosis kit for detecting the coronavirus was developed, and 115 clinical nasopharyngeal gargling liquid samples were tested. Results The sequence of PCR amplified products completely matched the related sequence of the SARS-associated coronavirus genome. Forty-nine out of 67 samples from identified SARS patients and 8 of 18 samples from persons having close contact with SARS patients showed positive results. All 30 samples from healthy controls were negative. Conclusion The F-PCR method established may be a rapid, accurate and efficient way for screening and for the early diagnosis of SARS patients.

  9. 犬瘟热病毒上海分离株M蛋白编码基因的克隆与序列分析%The Cloning and Sequence Analysis of M Protein Coding Gene of SH Strain of Canine Distemper Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永霞; 王金福; 张似青

    2008-01-01

    本研究以犬瘟热病毒(canine distemper virus,CDV)上海分离株的总RNA为模板,根据GenBank中已报道的CDVM蛋白基因序列,设计合成1对特异性引物,RT-PCR扩增M蛋白基因,并进行克隆与序列分析.结果显示,CDV上海分离株M蛋白基因序列与CDV A75/17株、Onderstepoort疫苗株等其它7株的同源性在95%以上;编码氨基酸的同源性也高于97%.推测M蛋白是一个保守性非常强的结构蛋白.

  10. Early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of Canine distemper virus induces robust protection against distemper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent;

    2009-01-01

    Young mink kits (n = 8)were vaccinated withDNA plasmids encoding the viral haemagglutinin protein (H) of a vaccine strain of Canine distemper virus (CDV). Virus neutralising (VN) antibodieswere induced after 2 immunisations and after the third immunisation all kits had high VN antibody titres....... The VN antibody titres remained high for more than 4 months and the mink were protected against viraemia, lymphopenia, clinical disease and changes in the percentage of IFN- producing peripheral blood leucocytes after challenge inoculation with a recent wild type strain of CDV. Essentially, these results...

  11. 9 CFR 113.317 - Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). 113.317... Virus Vaccines § 113.317 Parvovirus Vaccine (Canine). Parvovirus Vaccine recommended for use in dogs... parvovirus susceptible dogs (20 vaccinates and 5 controls) shall be used as test animals. Blood samples...

  12. Stroma and extracellular matrix proteins in canine tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, studies on temporal and spatial changes in stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in canine gastrointestinal (GIT) tumours and canine transmissible venereal (CTVT) tumours are described. The mechanisms involved in the phenotypic transformation of fibroblasts to myofib

  13. Canine evolution in sabretoothed carnivores: natural selection or sexual selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randau, Marcela; Carbone, Chris; Turvey, Samuel T

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable elongated upper canines of extinct sabretoothed carnivorous mammals have been the subject of considerable speculation on their adaptive function, but the absence of living analogues prevents any direct inference about their evolution. We analysed scaling relationships of the upper canines of 20 sabretoothed feliform carnivores (Nimravidae, Barbourofelidae, Machairodontinae), representing both dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, and 33 non-sabretoothed felids in relation to body size in order to characterize and identify the evolutionary processes driving their development, using the scaling relationships of carnassial teeth in both groups as a control. Carnassials display isometric allometry in both sabretooths and non-sabretooths, supporting their close relationship with meat-slicing, whereas the upper canines of both groups display positive allometry with body size. Whereas there is no statistical difference in allometry of upper canine height between dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, the significantly stronger positive allometry of upper canine height shown by sabretooths as a whole compared to non-sabretooths reveals that different processes drove canine evolution in these groups. Although sabretoothed canines must still have been effective for prey capture and processing by hypercarnivorous predators, canine morphology in these extinct carnivores was likely to have been driven to a greater extent by sexual selection than in non-sabretooths. Scaling relationships therefore indicate the probable importance of sexual selection in the evolution of the hypertrophied sabretooth anterior dentition. PMID:23951334

  14. Canine evolution in sabretoothed carnivores: natural selection or sexual selection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Randau

    Full Text Available The remarkable elongated upper canines of extinct sabretoothed carnivorous mammals have been the subject of considerable speculation on their adaptive function, but the absence of living analogues prevents any direct inference about their evolution. We analysed scaling relationships of the upper canines of 20 sabretoothed feliform carnivores (Nimravidae, Barbourofelidae, Machairodontinae, representing both dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, and 33 non-sabretoothed felids in relation to body size in order to characterize and identify the evolutionary processes driving their development, using the scaling relationships of carnassial teeth in both groups as a control. Carnassials display isometric allometry in both sabretooths and non-sabretooths, supporting their close relationship with meat-slicing, whereas the upper canines of both groups display positive allometry with body size. Whereas there is no statistical difference in allometry of upper canine height between dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, the significantly stronger positive allometry of upper canine height shown by sabretooths as a whole compared to non-sabretooths reveals that different processes drove canine evolution in these groups. Although sabretoothed canines must still have been effective for prey capture and processing by hypercarnivorous predators, canine morphology in these extinct carnivores was likely to have been driven to a greater extent by sexual selection than in non-sabretooths. Scaling relationships therefore indicate the probable importance of sexual selection in the evolution of the hypertrophied sabretooth anterior dentition.

  15. Apicotomy: surgical management of maxillary dilacerated or ankylosed canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Eustáquio A; Araújo, Cristiana V; Tanaka, Orlando M

    2013-12-01

    This clinical article reports a technique, apicotomy, for managing dilacerated or ankylosed canines. The records of 3 patients successfully treated with apicotomy are presented. Orthodontists observe clinically significant incidences of impacted maxillary canines in their daily practices. Several procedures have been described to bring an ankylosed, impacted tooth into occlusion. Luxation is the most widely used solution, but there are risks involved with that approach, and the success rate is low. Surgical repositioning has also been used, but morbidity is high, and the aggressiveness of the procedure might also contraindicate it. Ankylosis might be related to the anatomic position of the canine's root apex and its adjacent anatomic structures. Apicotomy is a guided fracture of a canine root apex, followed by its orthodontic traction. It is a conservative surgical alternative for treating impacted canines with dilacerations or apical root ankylosis. PMID:24286914

  16. Morphology and immunoreactivity of canine and feline extramedullary plasmacytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikiewicz, M; Otrocka-Domagała, I; Paździor-Czapula, K; Gesek, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of morphology and immunophenotype of canine (19 cases) and feline (7 cases) extramedullary plasmacytomas. Tumours, located in skin, oral cavity and spleen were surgically excised, fixed and processed for histopathology and immunohistochemistry (CD79α, CD18, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, metallothionein). Histologically, tumours were classified into mature, cleaved, asynchronous, polymorphous blastic, hyalin, or monomorphous blastic type. All evaluated tumours showed cytoplasmic expression of CD79α antigen. The expression of CD18 was observed in canine cutaneous and splenic tumours. In canine tumours expression of metallothionein was low to moderate, while in feline plasmacytomas - absent or low. In canine tumours, the mitotic index and proliferating cell nuclear antigen index were positively correlated with the expression of metallothionein. In feline tumours no correlation between mitotic index, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and metallothionein was found. This is the first study describing expression of metallothionein in canine and feline extramedullary plasmacytoma. PMID:27487508

  17. Canine gastric emptying of polycarbophil: an indigestible, particulate substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J; Bass, P

    1985-08-01

    We tested whether indigestible solids could empty from the canine stomach independently of gastric burst motor activity. Test meals contained polycarbophil, an indigestible particulate (1-3 mm diameter) substance. Test meals were slurries of 30 or 90 g of radiolabeled polycarbophil particles in saline. Meals were administered via an oral gastric tube. After 4 h, the stomach was drained via a gastric cannula, and the percentage of meal that had emptied into the duodenum was calculated. Antroduodenal motor responses to the meals were monitored with strain-gage force transducers. The motor responses to polycarbophil meals were compared with those after canned food and saline meals. Fifty percent of the 90-g polycarbophil meal emptied by 4 h; this occurred independently of gastric burst motor activity. Both polycarbophil and canned food elicited similar indexed motor responses and both delayed the postprandial reappearance of gastric burst motor activity. We conclude that small indigestible particles can stimulate fed state-like motility and empty from the stomach independently of gastric burst activity.

  18. Microbiota and probiotics in canine and feline welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grześkowiak, Łukasz; Endo, Akihito; Beasley, Shea; Salminen, Seppo

    2015-08-01

    Dogs and cats have been cohabiting with us for thousands of years. They are the major human companions. Today, dogs and cats live in urban areas. Cats and most dogs are on high carbohydrate diets and face similar life-style challenges as the human beings. The health and well-being of companion animals, just as their owners, depends on the gut microbes. Providing a proper care and nutritionally balanced diet to companion animals is recognised as a part of our responsibility to maintain the health and well being of our pet. However, as microbiota differences may facilitate exposure to pathogens and harmful environmental influences, it is prudent to search for novel tools to protect dogs and cats and at the same time the human owners from pathogens. Specific probiotic strains and/or their defined combinations may be useful in the canine and feline nutrition, therapy, and care. Probiotic supplementations have been successful in the prevention and treatment of acute gastroenteritis, treatment of IBD, and prevention of allergy in companion animals. New challenges for probiotic applications include maintenance of obesity and overweight, urogenital tract infections, Helicobacter gastritis and parasitic infections. The probiotics of human origin appear to be among the new promising tools for the maintenance of pets' health. However, the host-derived microorganisms might be the most appropriate probiotic source. Therefore, more controlled trials are needed to characterise new and safe probiotic preparations with an impact on general health and well being as well as health maintenance in dogs and cats.

  19. Conservation of nucleotide sequences for molecular diagnosis of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Furuse

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection due to the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV is widespread. The present study was performed to assess the protocols used for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV by analyzing the nucleotide sequences of viruses detected between 2012 and 2015, including sequences from the large outbreak in eastern Asia in 2015. Although the diagnostic protocols were established only 2 years ago, mismatches between the sequences of primers/probes and viruses were found for several of the assays. Such mismatches could lead to a lower sensitivity of the assay, thereby leading to false-negative diagnosis. A slight modification in the primer design is suggested. Protocols for the molecular diagnosis of viral infections should be reviewed regularly after they are established, particularly for viruses that pose a great threat to public health such as MERS-CoV.

  20. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  1. Infection, Replication, and Transmission of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adney, Danielle R; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Hartwig, Airn E; Bowen, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus is a recently emerged pathogen associated with severe human disease. Zoonotic spillover from camels appears to play a major role in transmission. Because of logistic difficulties in working with dromedaries in containment, a more manageable animal model would be desirable. We report shedding and transmission of this virus in experimentally infected alpacas (n = 3) or those infected by contact (n = 3). Infectious virus was detected in all infected animals and in 2 of 3 in-contact animals. All alpacas seroconverted and were rechallenged 70 days after the original infection. Experimentally infected animals were protected against reinfection, and those infected by contact were partially protected. Necropsy specimens from immunologically naive animals (n = 3) obtained on day 5 postinfection showed virus in the upper respiratory tract. These data demonstrate efficient virus replication and animal-to-animal transmission and indicate that alpacas might be useful surrogates for camels in laboratory studies. PMID:27070385

  2. The Mink Model Establishment of Canine Distemper Virus%水貂犬瘟热动物模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜乐; 王铮; 郑学星; 杨松涛; 黄耕; 赵永坤; 高玉伟; 夏咸柱; 王铁成; 冯娜; 李元果; 于志君; 丁洁; 许薇薇; 忻悦; 岳秀芳

    2012-01-01

    目的 建立水貂犬瘟热动物模型,并利用水貂犬瘟热模型评价不同犬瘟热强毒株的毒力,为水貂犬瘟热病毒疫苗的研究奠定基础.方法 从猴、藏獒、犬的病料中分离犬瘟热病毒,测定犬瘟热病毒的毒力,并进行传代培养.利用犬的犬瘟热动物模型筛选稳定的犬瘟热强毒株,进行水貂犬瘟热动物模型的建立及其毒力评估.结果 筛选出了稳定的犬瘟热强毒株并进行了家犬动物实验,同时表现出了强烈的临床症状,并利用不同的代次毒进行了犬瘟热动物模型的建立.结论 成功建立了犬瘟热动物模型并对不同来源的犬瘟热病毒毒力进行了评估.%Objective To establish a mink model of canine distemper virus , and different canine distemper virulent strain virulence was evaluated by the mink animal model for laying the foundation for the study of the canine distemper virus. Methods Different canine distemper viruses were separated from specimens , cell-cultured, passaged and determined virulence of CDV. And we compared the virulence of different generation virulent strains , stable virulent strains were used for establishing mink canine distemper animal model and evaluated their virulence . Results We screened 3 canine distemper virulent strains and made dog animal experiments , the three viruses infected dogs and they showed a strong clinical symptoms , and mink animal model was established using different generations . Conclusion we successfully established the canine distemper animal model and evaluated virulence of CDV .

  3. Plaque assay for human coronavirus NL63 using human colon carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drosten Christian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronaviruses cause a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. Human coronavirus (hCoV NL63 is associated with up to 10% of common colds. Viral plaque assays enable the characterization of virus infectivity and allow for purifying virus stock solutions. They are essential for drug screening. Hitherto used cell cultures for hCoV-NL63 show low levels of virus replication and weak and diffuse cytopathogenic effects. It has not yet been possible to establish practicable plaque assays for this important human pathogen. Results 12 different cell cultures were tested for susceptibility to hCoV-NL63 infection. Human colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2 replicated virus more than 100 fold more efficiently than commonly used African green monkey kidney cells (LLC-MK2. CaCo-2 cells showed cytopathogenic effects 4 days post infection. Avicel, agarose and carboxymethyl-cellulose overlays proved suitable for plaque assays. Best results were achieved with Avicel, which produced large and clear plaques from the 4th day of infection. The utility of plaque assays with agrose overlay was demonstrated for purifying virus, thereby increasing viral infectivity by 1 log 10 PFU/mL. Conclusion CaCo-2 cells support hCoV-NL63 better than LLC-MK2 cells and enable cytopathogenic plaque assays. Avicel overlay is favourable for plaque quantification, and agarose overlay is preferred for plaque purification. HCoV-NL63 virus stock of increased infectivity will be beneficial in antiviral screening, animal modelling of disease, and other experimental tasks.

  4. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs. Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV. Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  5. Isolation and molecular characterization of type I and type II feline coronavirus in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Alazawy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV are two important coronaviruses of domestic cat worldwide. Although FCoV is prevalent among cats; the fastidious nature of type I FCoV to grow on cell culture has limited further studies on tissue tropism and pathogenesis of FCoV. While several studies reported serological evidence for FCoV in Malaysia, neither the circulating FCoV isolated nor its biotypes determined. This study for the first time, describes the isolation and biotypes determination of type I and type II FCoV from naturally infected cats in Malaysia. Findings Of the total number of cats sampled, 95% (40/42 were RT-PCR positive for FCoV. Inoculation of clinical samples into Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK, and Feline catus whole fetus-4 cells (Fcwf-4, show cytopathic effect (CPE characterized by syncytial cells formation and later cell detachment. Differentiation of FCoV biotypes using RT-PCR assay revealed that, 97.5% and 2.5% of local isolates were type I and type II FCoV, respectively. These isolates had high sequence homology and phylogenetic similarity with several FCoV isolates from Europe, South East Asia and USA. Conclusions This study reported the successful isolation of local type I and type II FCoV evident with formation of cytopathic effects in two types of cell cultures namely the CrFK and Fcwf-4 , where the later cells being more permissive. However, the RT-PCR assay is more sensitive in detecting the antigen in suspected samples as compared to virus isolation in cell culture. The present study indicated that type I FCoV is more prevalent among cats in Malaysia.

  6. Design and Construction of Chimeric VP8-S2 Antigen for Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Khadijeh; Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Haghparast, Alireza; Zibaee, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Bovine Rotavirus and Bovine Coronavirus are the most important causes of diarrhea in newborn calves and in some other species such as pigs and sheep. Rotavirus VP8 subunit is the major determinant of the viral infectivity and neutralization. Spike glycoprotein of coronavirus is responsible for induction of neutralizing antibody response. Methods: In the present study, several prediction programs were used to predict B and T-cells epitopes, secondary and tertiary structures, antigenicity ability and enzymatic degradation sites. Finally, a chimeric antigen was designed using computational techniques. The chimeric VP8-S2 antigen was constructed. It was cloned and sub-cloned into pGH and pET32a(+) expression vector. The recombinant pET32a(+)-VP8-S2 vector was transferred into E.oli BL21CodonPlus (DE3) as expression host. The recombinant VP8-S2 protein was purified by Ni-NTA chromatography column. Results: The results of colony PCR, enzyme digestion and sequencing showed that the VP8-S2 chimeric antigen has been successfully cloned and sub-cloned into pGH and pET32a(+).The results showed that E.coli was able to express VP8-S2 protein appropriately. This protein was expressed by induction of IPTG at concentration of 1mM and it was confirmed by Ni–NTA column, dot-blotting analysis and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that E.coli can be used as an appropriate host to produce the recombinant VP8-S2 protein. This recombinant protein may be suitable to investigate to produce immunoglobulin, recombinant vaccine and diagnostic kit in future studies after it passes biological activity tests in vivo in animal model and or other suitable procedure. PMID:27123423

  7. Structures of Two Coronavirus Main Proteases: Implications for Substrate Binding and Antiviral Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongwei; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Fei; Wu, Zhixin; Shen, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhe; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe (SCAU); (Tsinghua); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-07-21

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can infect humans and multiple species of animals, causing a wide spectrum of diseases. The coronavirus main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for anti-CoV drug design. In this study, the crystal structures of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) MP{sup pro} and a severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) M{sup pro} mutant (H41A), in complex with an N-terminal autocleavage substrate, were individually determined to elucidate the structural flexibility and substrate binding of M{sup pro}. A monomeric form of IBV M{sup pro} was identified for the first time in CoV M{sup pro} structures. A comparison of these two structures to other available M{sup pro} structures provides new insights for the design of substrate-based inhibitors targeting CoV M{sup pro}s. Furthermore, a Michael acceptor inhibitor (named N3) was cocrystallized with IBV M{sup pro} and was found to demonstrate in vitro inactivation of IBV M{sup pro} and potent antiviral activity against IBV in chicken embryos. This provides a feasible animal model for designing wide-spectrum inhibitors against CoV-associated diseases. The structure-based optimization of N3 has yielded two more efficacious lead compounds, N27 and H16, with potent inhibition against SARS-CoV M{sup pro}.

  8. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals. PMID:25764477

  9. Extraglandular and intraglandular vascularization of canine prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Miroslav

    2004-03-01

    The literature on the vascularization of the canine prostate is reviewed and the clinical significance of prostate morphology is described. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), combined with improved corrosion casting methods, reveal new morphological details that promise better diagnostics and treatment but also require expansion of clinical nomenclature. A proposal is made for including two previously unnamed veins in Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (NAV). The canine prostate has two lobes with independent vascularization. Each lobe is supplied through the left and right a. prostatica, respectively. The a. prostatica sprouts three small vessels (cranial, middle, and caudal) towards the prostate gland. A. prostatica is a small-size artery whose wall structure is similar to the arteries of the muscular type. V. prostatica is a small-size valved vein. The canine prostate has capsular, parenchymal, and urethral vascular zones. The surface vessels of the capsule are predominantly veins and the diameter of arterial vessels is larger than that of the veins. The trabecular vessels are of two types: direct and branched. The prostate parenchyma is supplied by branches of the trabecular vessels. The periacinary capillaries are fenestrated and form a net in a circular pattern. The processes of the myoepithelial cells embrace both the acins and the periacinar capillaries. In the prostate ductal system. there are spermatozoa. The prostatic part of the urethra is supplied by an independent branch of a. prostatica. The prostatic urethral part is drained by v. prostatica, the vein of the urethral bulb and the ventral prostate veins. M. urethralis begins as early as the urethral prostatic part. The greater part of the white muscle fibers in m. urethralis suggest an enhanced anaerobic metabolism.

  10. Diagnostic performance of a rapid in-clinic test for the detection of Canine Parvovirus under different storage conditions and vaccination status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantere, Maria C; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Kontos, Vassilios; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios C; Tsokana, Constantina N; Billinis, Charalambos

    2015-04-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common causes of acute haemorrhagic enteritis in young dogs, while clinical diagnosis is often indecisive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an in-clinic rapid test in the detection of CPV infection in dogs. To this end, we compared the Rapid Diagnostic Kit of Canine Parvovirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus antigen (Quicking(®)) to PCR, which is considered as the most reliable diagnostic method. A total of 78 duplicated faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic dogs. Vaccination history within a month prior to the onset of diarrhoea was reported for 12 of the sampled dogs. The rapid diagnostic test was performed in 23 of the faecal samples directly, while the rest were placed into a sterile cotton tipped swab suitable for collection and transportation of viruses (Sigma Σ-VCM(®)) and stored at -20 °C. The sensitivity of the Quicking rapid diagnostic test compared to PCR in the total number of samples, in samples from non-vaccinated dogs and in samples tested directly after collection were 22.22% (95% CI: 13.27-33.57%), 26.67% (95% CI: 16.08-39.66%) and 76.47% (95% CI: 50.10-93.04%) respectively, while the specificity of the test was 100% in any case. In conclusion, negative results do not exclude parvoenteritis from the differential diagnosis, especially in dogs with early vaccination history, but a positive result almost certainly indicates CPV infection. An improved sensitivity may be expected when the test is performed immediately.

  11. Diagnostic performance of a rapid in-clinic test for the detection of Canine Parvovirus under different storage conditions and vaccination status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantere, Maria C; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Kyriakis, Constantinos S; Kontos, Vassilios; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios C; Tsokana, Constantina N; Billinis, Charalambos

    2015-04-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common causes of acute haemorrhagic enteritis in young dogs, while clinical diagnosis is often indecisive. The aim of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an in-clinic rapid test in the detection of CPV infection in dogs. To this end, we compared the Rapid Diagnostic Kit of Canine Parvovirus, Coronavirus and Rotavirus antigen (Quicking(®)) to PCR, which is considered as the most reliable diagnostic method. A total of 78 duplicated faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic dogs. Vaccination history within a month prior to the onset of diarrhoea was reported for 12 of the sampled dogs. The rapid diagnostic test was performed in 23 of the faecal samples directly, while the rest were placed into a sterile cotton tipped swab suitable for collection and transportation of viruses (Sigma Σ-VCM(®)) and stored at -20 °C. The sensitivity of the Quicking rapid diagnostic test compared to PCR in the total number of samples, in samples from non-vaccinated dogs and in samples tested directly after collection were 22.22% (95% CI: 13.27-33.57%), 26.67% (95% CI: 16.08-39.66%) and 76.47% (95% CI: 50.10-93.04%) respectively, while the specificity of the test was 100% in any case. In conclusion, negative results do not exclude parvoenteritis from the differential diagnosis, especially in dogs with early vaccination history, but a positive result almost certainly indicates CPV infection. An improved sensitivity may be expected when the test is performed immediately. PMID:25707551

  12. Creation of distal canine limb lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.C.; Pribaz, J.J.; O' Brien, B.M.; Knight, K.R.; Morrison, W.A.

    1989-06-01

    A canine model of distal limb lymphedema was established in order to study the treatment of this condition by lymph node transfer. This model was more difficult to establish than whole-limb lymphedema. Significant edema was achieved by a combination of preoperative irradiation and circumferential removal of skin from the irradiated areas followed by removal of the contents of the popliteal fossa. Despite these measures, it was not possible to produce lymphedema in every case, possibly because of the presence of lymphaticovenous shunts and panvascular compensation mechanisms.

  13. Lactoferrin in canine sera: a pyometra study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoskova, A; Adlerova, L; Kudlackova, H; Leva, L; Vitasek, R; Faldyna, M

    2009-07-01

    The concentration of lactoferrin was measured in canine sera from groups of healthy male dogs as well as pregnant and non-pregnant female dogs and was compared with that of bitches with pyometra. Lactoferrin concentrations were higher in bitches with pyometra. The role of elevated lactoferrin concentrations in the suppression of lymphocyte activity was examined in sera from bitches with pyometra in a series of investigations. Although the sera from bitches with pyometra were capable of suppressing lymphocyte activity, lactoferrin was not found to be involved in this action. PMID:19754566

  14. Definition, Classification, and Pathophysiology of Canine Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzirani, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Glaucoma is a common ocular condition in humans and dogs leading to optic nerve degeneration and irreversible blindness. Primary glaucoma is a group of spontaneous heterogeneous diseases. Multiple factors are involved in its pathogenesis and these factors vary across human ethnic groups and canine breeds, so the clinical phenotypes are numerous and their classification can be challenging and remain superficial. Aging and oxidative stress are major triggers for the manifestation of disease. Multiple, intertwined inflammatory and biochemical cascades eventually alter cellular and extracellular physiology in the optic nerve and trabecular meshwork and lead to vision loss. PMID:26456751

  15. Sialic Acid Binding Properties of Soluble Coronavirus Spike (S1 Proteins: Differences between Infectious Bronchitis Virus and Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Winter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spike proteins of a number of coronaviruses are able to bind to sialic acids present on the cell surface. The importance of this sialic acid binding ability during infection is, however, quite different. We compared the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and the spike protein of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV. Whereas sialic acid is the only receptor determinant known so far for IBV, TGEV requires interaction with its receptor aminopeptidase N to initiate infection of cells. Binding tests with soluble spike proteins carrying an IgG Fc-tag revealed pronounced differences between these two viral proteins. Binding of the IBV spike protein to host cells was in all experiments sialic acid dependent, whereas the soluble TGEV spike showed binding to APN but had no detectable sialic acid binding activity. Our results underline the different ways in which binding to sialoglycoconjugates is mediated by coronavirus spike proteins.

  16. The Cloning and Sequence Analysis of N Protein Coding Gene of SH Strain of Canine Distemper Virus%犬瘟热病毒上海株N蛋白编码基因的克隆与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永霞; 王金福; 郁金观; 顾剑新; 孙维平

    2007-01-01

    根据GenBank中犬瘟热病毒(canine distemper virus,CDV)核蛋白(N)基因序列,设计合成1对特异性引物,以CDV上海(SH)株的总RNA为模板,RT-PCR扩增N蛋白基因,并进行克隆与序列分析.结果显示:CDV SH株N蛋白基因序列与CDV TN株、 A75/17 株、2544/Han95株、98-2654 株、5804株、Onderstepoort疫苗株的同源性分别为98.9%、97.6%、96.7%、96.9%、96.6%、93.9%;编码氨基酸的同源性分别为99.0%、98.7%、98.1%、97.9%、97.9%、96.9%.推测N蛋白是一个保守性非常强的结构蛋白.

  17. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. PMID:27449079

  18. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV.

  19. Proteomic analysis of chicken embryonic trachea and kidney tissues after infection in ovo by avian infectious bronchitis coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhongzan; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Geng, Heyuan; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2011-01-01

    Background Avian infectious bronchitis (IB) is one of the most serious diseases of economic importance in chickens; it is caused by the avian infectious coronavirus (IBV). Information remains limited about the comparative protein expression profiles of chicken embryonic tissues in response to IBV infection in ovo. In this study, we analyzed the changes of protein expression in trachea and kidney tissues from chicken embryos, following IBV infection in ovo, using two-dimensional gel electropho...

  20. Kinetics of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Coronavirus-Specific Antibodies in 271 Laboratory-Confirmed Cases of SARS

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhongping; Dong, Qingming; Zhuang, Hui; Song, Shujing; Peng, Guoai; Luo, Guangxiang; Dwyer, Dominic E.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivities and specificities of an immunofluorescence assay and an enzyme immunoassay for detection of antibodies specific for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) were compared for 148 laboratory-confirmed SARS cases. The appearance and persistence of SARS-CoV-specific antibodies were assessed, with immunoglobulin G detected in 59% of samples collected within 14 days and persisting for 60 to 95 days after the onset of illness.

  1. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase and Nonstructural Proteins 2, 3, and 8 Are Incorporated into Viral Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Nogales, Aitor; Márquez-Jurado, Silvia; Galán, Carmen; Enjuanes, Luis; Almazán, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Coronavirus replication and transcription are processes mediated by a protein complex, with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) as a main component. Proteomic analysis of highly purified transmissible gastroenteritis virus showed the RdRp to be a component of the viral particles. This finding was confirmed by Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and immunoelectron microscopy analyses. Interestingly, the replicase nonstructural proteins 2, 3, and 8 colocalized with the RdRp in the viral f...

  2. Stabilization of a Full-Length Infectious cDNA Clone of Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus by Insertion of an Intron

    OpenAIRE

    González, José M; Pénzes, Zoltan; Almazán, Fernando; Calvo, Enrique; Enjuanes, Luis

    2002-01-01

    The stable propagation of a full-length transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) cDNA in Escherichia coli cells as a bacterial artificial chromosome has been considerably improved by the insertion of an intron to disrupt a toxic region identified in the viral genome. The viral RNA was expressed in the cell nucleus under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter and the intron was efficiently removed during translocation of this RNA to the cytoplasm. The insertion in two different po...

  3. Molecular signature of clinical severity in recovering patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Ting-Shu; Chiang Ping-Cherng; Eng Hock-Liew; Liu Jien-Wei; Wang Yi-Hsi; Lin Meng-Chih; Yang Kuender D; Chen Lung-Kun; Wei Min-Li; Chen En-Shih; Chao Angel; Chen Chun-Houh; Lee Yun-Shien; Tsao Kuo-Chein; Huang Chung-Guei

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a recent epidemic human disease, is caused by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV). First reported in Asia, SARS quickly spread worldwide through international travelling. As of July 2003, the World Health Organization reported a total of 8,437 people afflicted with SARS with a 9.6% mortality rate. Although immunopathological damages may account for the severity of respiratory distress, little is known about how the genome-wide gene expr...

  4. Evaluation of a novel strain of infectious bronchitis virus emerged as a result of spike gene recombination between two highly diverged parent strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Kylie A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Devlin, Joanne M; Browning, Glenn F; Schultz, Bridie K; Ignjatovic, Jagoda

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of new variant strains of the poultry pathogen infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is continually reported worldwide, owing to the labile nature of the large single-stranded RNA IBV genome. High resolution melt curve analysis previously detected a variant strain, N1/08, and the present study confirmed that this strain had emerged as a result of recombination between Australian subgroup 2 and 3 strains in the spike gene region, in a similar manner reported for turkey coronaviruses. The S1 gene for N1/08 had highest nucleotide similarity with subgroup 2 strains, which is interesting considering subgroup 2 strains have not been detected since the early 1990s. SimPlot analysis of the 7.2-kb 3' end of the N1/08 genome with the same region for other Australian reference strains identified the sites of recombination as immediately upstream and downstream of the S1 gene. A pathogenicity study in 2-week-old chickens found that N1/08 had similar pathogenicity for chicken respiratory tissues to that reported for subgroup 2 strains rather than subgroup 3 strains. The results of this study demonstrate that recombination is a mechanism utilized for the emergence of new strains of IBV, with the ability to alter strain pathogenicity in a single generation.

  5. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota [Dept. of Endodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Paulista State University, Aracatuba(Brazil); Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores [School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Oliveira Santos, Christiano [Dept. of Stomatology, Oral Public Health, and Forensic Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Neves, Frederico Sampaio [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  7. The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-coronavirus 3a protein may function as a modulator of the trafficking properties of the spike protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yee-Joo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent publication reported that a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal, present in cytoplasmic tail of the spike protein of most coronaviruses, mediates the intracellular retention of the spike protein. This motif is missing from the spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, resulting in high level of surface expression of the spike protein when it is expressed on its own in vitro. Presentation of the hypothesis It has been shown that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus genome contains open reading frames that encode for proteins with no homologue in other coronaviruses. One of them is the 3a protein, which is expressed during infection in vitro and in vivo. The 3a protein, which contains a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain, is expressed on the cell surface and can undergo internalization. In addition, 3a can bind to the spike protein and through this interaction, it may be able to cause the spike protein to become internalized, resulting in a decrease in its surface expression. Testing the hypothesis The effects of 3a on the internalization of cell surface spike protein can be examined biochemically and the significance of the interplay between these two viral proteins during viral infection can be studied using reverse genetics methodology. Implication of the hypothesis If this hypothesis is proven, it will indicate that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus modulates the surface expression of the spike protein via a different mechanism from other coronaviruses. The interaction between 3a and S, which are expressed from separate subgenomic RNA, would be important for controlling the trafficking properties of S. The cell surface expression of S in infected cells significantly impacts viral assembly, viral spread and viral pathogenesis. Modulation by this unique pathway could confer certain advantages during the replication of the severe

  8. Establishment of a sensitized canine model for kidney transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Sen; XIA Sui-sheng; TANG Li-gong; CHENG Jun; CHEN Zhi-shui; ZHENG Shan-gen

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To establish a sensitized canine model for kidney transplantation. Methods:12 male dogs were averagely grouped as donors and recipients. A small number of donor canine lymphocytes was infused into different anatomic locations of a paired canine recipient for each time and which was repeated weekly. Specific immune sensitization was monitored by means of Complement Dependent Cytotoxicity (CDC) and Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) test. When CDC test conversed to be positive and MLC test showed a significant proliferation of reactive lymphocytes of canine recipients, the right kidneys of the paired dogs were excised and transplanted to each other concurrently. Injury of renal allograft function was scheduled determined by ECT dynamic kidney photography and pathologic investigation. Results :CDC test usually conversed to be positive and reactive lymphocytes of canine recipients were also observed to be proliferated significantly in MLC test after 3 to 4 times of canine donor lymphocyte infusions. Renal allograft function deterioration occurred 4 d post-operatively in 4 of 6 canine recipients, in contrast to none in control dogs. Pathologic changes suggested antibody-mediated rejection (delayed) or acute rejection in 3 excised renal allograft of sensitized dogs. Seven days after operation, all sensitized dogs had lost graft function, pathologic changes of which showed that the renal allografts were seriously rejected. 2 of 3 dogs in control group were also acutely rejected. Conclusion:A convenient method by means of repeated stimulation of canine lymphocyte may induce specific immune sensitization in canine recipients. Renal allografts in sensitized dogs will be earlier rejected and result in a more deteriorated graft function.

  9. Coronavirus MHV-A59 infects the lung and causes severe pneumonia in C57BL/6 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangsheng; Yang; Jun; Du; Gang; Chen; Jie; Zhao; Xuanming; Yang; Lishan; Su; Genhong; Cheng; Hong; Tang

    2014-01-01

    It remains challenging to develop animal models of lung infection and severe pneumonia by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus(SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome cornavirus(MERS-Co V) without high level of containment. This inevitably hinders understanding of virushost interaction and development of appropriate countermeasures. Here we report that intranasal inoculation of sublethal doses of murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus A-59(MHV-A59), a hepatic and neuronal tropic coronavirus, can induce acute pneumonia and severe lung injuries in C57BL/6 mice. Inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, hemorrhages and fibrosis of alveolar walls can be observed 2-11 days after MHV-A59 infection. This pathological manifestation is associated with dramatical elevation of tissue IP-10 and IFN-γ and moderate increase of TNF-α and IL-1β, but inability of anti-viral type I interferon response. These results suggest that intranasal infection of MHV-A59 would serve as a surrogate mouse model of acute respiratory distress syndrome by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV infections.

  10. Construct design, biophysical, and biochemical characterization of the fusion core from mouse hepatitis virus (a coronavirus) spike protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanhui; Cole, David K; Lou, Zhiyong; Liu, Yiwei; Qin, Lan; Li, Xu; Bai, Zhihong; Yuan, Fang; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F

    2004-11-01

    Membrane fusion between virus and host cells is the key step for enveloped virus entry and is mediated by the viral envelope fusion protein. In murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), the spike (S) protein mediates this process. Recently, the formation of anti-parallel 6-helix bundle of the MHV S protein heptad repeat (HR) regions (HR1 and HR2) has been confirmed, implying coronavirus has a class I fusion protein. This bundle is also called fusion core. To facilitate the solution of the crystal structure of this fusion core, we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to express the HR1 and HR2 regions linked together by a flexible linker as a single chain (named 2-helix). This 2-helix polypeptide subsequently assembled into a typical 6-helix bundle. This bundle has been analyzed by a series of biophysical and biochemical techniques and confirmed that the design technique can be used for coronavirus as we successfully used for members of paramyxoviruses.

  11. Detection of canine echinococcosis by coproantigen ELISA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DeS; PanD; BeraAK; SreevatsavaV; DasSK; DasS; RanaT; BandyopadhyayS; BhattacharyaD

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To study the canine echinococcosis by coproantigen ELISA method. Methods:During the present investigation experimental infection was established using evaginated worms of Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus). To check cross reactivity two pups were infected with Taenia hydatigena(T. hydatigena). In order to detect the presence of antigen, hyperimmune sera were raised against excretory-secretory products of adult worms E. chinococcus granulosus. Faecal sample collected either from experimentally infected pups or from other sources were heated at 70℃to detect heat stable soluble antigen. Results:Pups harbouring less than 104 worms showed negative results. Samples collected from 14 days onwards from experimentally infected animals harbouring more than 104 worms showed positive value. The maximum positive samples were detected in samples collected from in and around slaughter house and the least number of samples were detected positive maintained by dog squad. Conclusions:The affinity purified IgG exhibited promising results for detection of canine echinococcosis by indirect ELISA.

  12. Seroepidemiology of Canine parvovirus infection in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Canine parvovirus is an acute and fatal viral disease in dogs. A total of 209 local, cross breed and breed dogs sera from Kodya Bogor, Kabupaten Bogor, Sukabumi, and Jakarta, had been tested using Haemagglutination Inhibition Test (HI with pig red blood cells. A total of 64 breed and cross breed dogs from Sukabumi and Kodya Bogor, were used as a sentinel dogs to study the epidemiology of Canine parvovirus (CPV infection and its immunological responses caused by vaccination. The results indicated that 78% (95 breed and cross bred dogs and 59% (51 local dogs had antibody to CPV. Sentinel dogs results indicated that dogs had been vaccinated showed antibody response with the varied titre dependant upon prevaccination titre. Low prevaccinated titre gave better response than protective level titre. From 19 puppies observed, Maternal antibodi were still detected until 5 weeks old puppies. First vaccination given at less than 3 months old, should be boosted after 3 months old puppied. Antibodi titre produced by natural infection will keep untill 2 years. These data concluded that the dog condition and time of vaccination will affect the optimum antibody response.

  13. Phylodynamics analysis of canine parvovirus in Uruguay: evidence of two successive invasions by different variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Leticia; Calleros, Lucía; Francia, Lourdes; Hernández, Martín; Iraola, Gregorio; Panzera, Yanina; Sosa, Katia; Pérez, Ruben

    2013-06-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) comprises three antigenic variants (2a, 2b, and 2c) with different frequencies and genetic variability among countries. Current CPV populations are considered to be spatially structured with relatively little movement of viruses between geographical areas. Here we describe the evolution and population dynamics of CPV in Uruguay from 2006-2011 using full-length capsid viral protein 2 (VP2) sequences. CPV-2c was the predominant variant in Uruguay for 4 years (2006-2009). The estimated time to the most recent common ancestor suggested that the CPV-2c variant appeared in Uruguay around 2004-2005. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that South American CPV-2c strains did not emerge de novo but may have a European origin. In 2010, a remarkable epidemiological change occurred as a consequence of the emergence of a novel CPV-2a strain in the previously homogeneous CPV-2c population. The frequency of the novel CPV-2a strain increased to 85 % in 2011, representing the first example of a CPV-2a strain replacing a predominant CPV-2c strain in a dog population. The CPV-2a strains detected in 2010-2011 were not phylogenetically related to any other strain collected on the American continent but were identical to Asiatic strains, suggesting that its emergence was a consequence of a migration event. Taken together, our findings suggest that in the last decade, Uruguay has experienced two successive invasions by CPV-2c and CPV-2a variants of European and Asiatic origins, respectively. These results support the hypothesis that CPV invasion events are not rare in certain geographic regions and indicate that some current strains may exhibit an unexpectedly high invasion and replacement capability.

  14. A custom made jig for individual canine retraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Kumar Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We face difficulty in individual canine retraction in the bracket system lacking power arms on the canines. When orthodontic force is applied through the center of resistance (CR, then, tooth translation ensues. Forces applied at a distance from the CR create a moment that tends to rotate and tip the tooth. The tendency of tipping is increased in the bracket system lacking power arm, since, force is applied more occlusally. Hence, we have designed a chair side custom made jig to retract the canines individually.

  15. Canine pluripotent stem cells: Are they ready for clinical applications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Harvey Betts

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The derivation of canine embryonic stem cells and generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells are significant achievements that have unlocked the potential for developing novel cell-based disease models, drug discovery platforms and transplantation therapies in the dog. A progression from concept to cure in this clinically relevant companion animal will not only help our canine patients but also help advance human regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, many issues remain to be resolved before pluripotent cells can be used clinically in a safe and reproducible manner.

  16. Enhanced replication of avian-origin H3N2 canine influenza virus in eggs, cell cultures and mice by a two-amino acid insertion in neuraminidase stalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Xie, Xing; Zhao, Yanbing; Kalhoro, Dildar Hussain; Lu, Chengping; Liu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Canine influenza virus (CIV) is a newly identified, highly contagious respiratory pathogen in dogs. Recent studies indicate that avian-origin H3N2 CIV are circulating in Chinese dogs. To investigate the effects of a two-amino acid (2-aa) insertion naturally occurring at the distal end of the neuraminidase (NA) stalk found in Chinese isolates since 2010 on virus replication and virulence, we rescued the CIV strain, A/canine/Jiangsu/06/2011(H3N2) and its NA mutant without the 2-aa insertion using reverse genetics. The NA stalk length affected virus growth in cell culture. Compared to the short stalk strain (without 2-aa insertion), the long stalk strain (with 2-aa insertion) exhibited higher peak titers and greater yields in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, chicken embryo fibroblasts and canine bronchiolar epithelial cells, as well as much larger plaques in MDCK cell monolayers. Furthermore, mice inoculated with the long stalk strain showed more severe pathologic damage in lung and higher proportion of detectable viral RNA in tissues. The long stalk strain induced local IFN-γ production with faster kinetics and higher levels in mice. However, in chickens, the two viral strains showed no significant difference with nearly the same proportion of detectable viral RNA loads in tissues. These observations suggest that the 2-aa insertion in the NA stalk acquired by avian-origin H3N2 CIV helps to enhance viral replication and is likely a result of adaptive evolution in canine hosts. PMID:27160077

  17. Propagation of Asian isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV in hamster cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi Ryoji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds The aim of this study was to confirm the propagation of various canine distemper viruses (CDV in hamster cell lines of HmLu and BHK, since only a little is known about the possibility of propagation of CDV in rodent cells irrespective of their epidemiological importance. Methods The growth of CDV in hamster cell lines was monitored by titration using Vero.dogSLAMtag (Vero-DST cells that had been proven to be susceptible to almost all field isolates of CDV, with the preparations of cell-free and cell-associated virus from the cultures infected with recent Asian isolates of CDV (13 strains and by observing the development of cytopathic effect (CPE in infected cultures of hamster cell lines. Results Eleven of 13 strains grew in HmLu cells, and 12 of 13 strains grew in BHK cells with apparent CPE of cell fusion in the late stage of infection. Two strains and a strain of Asia 1 group could not grow in HmLu cells and BHK cells, respectively. Conclusion The present study demonstrates at the first time that hamster cell lines can propagate the majority of Asian field isolates of CDV. The usage of two hamster cell lines suggested to be useful to characterize the field isolates biologically.

  18. Case Report: Canine Fossa Abscess; A Rare Etiological Factor: The Lower Canine Tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Agacayak, K. Serkan; Atılgan, S. Serhat; GORGUN, Belgin; Yaman, Ferhan; Ucan, M. Can; Atalay, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Odontogenic infection may be dangerous; especially when life-threatening complications occur. Infection spreads through the bone and periosteum toward nearby or more distant structures and spaces. Canine fossa abscess is an odontogenic infection that can lead to life-threatening complications. Successful treatment requires early recognition, determination of etiological factors, and proper medical and surgical management. The aim of this paper is to emphasize different and rare etiological fa...

  19. Pathologic and Molecular Virologic Characterization of a Canine Distemper Outbreak in Farmed Civets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techangamsuwan, S; Banlunara, W; Radtanakatikanon, A; Sommanustweechai, A; Siriaroonrat, B; Lombardini, E D; Rungsipipat, A

    2015-07-01

    In October 2011, a fatal disease outbreak occurred in 3 civet species farmed for their use in the coffee industry in Thailand. The disease quickly killed 20 animals in a mixed population of Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus; n = 18), a masked palm civet (Paguma larvata; n = 1), and small Indian civet (Viverricula indica; n = 1). Clinical signs consisted of severe lethargy, weakness, vomiting, and diarrhea with associated dehydration, dyspnea, nasal and footpad hyperkeratosis, and seizures. All civets were positive for canine morbillivirus using the commercial canine distemper virus (CDV) antigen test kit. Consistently observed necropsy findings consisted of severe pneumonia and hemorrhagic enteritis. Microscopic examination revealed severe gastroenteritis, bronchointerstitial pneumonia, lymphadenitis, necrotizing dermatitis, nonsuppurative polioencephalitis, and characteristic intranuclear/intracytoplasmic eosinophilic viral inclusions in multiple tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed immunoreactivity of varying intensity, while virus isolation demonstrated typical cytopathic effects. To confirm CDV infection, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction against fusion (F), phosphoprotein (P), and hemagglutinin (H) genes showed bands of expected size using conjunctival swabs (9 civets, 1 dog [Canis lupus familiaris] living on the farm). Phylogenetic analyses and restriction fragment length polymorphism results indicated that the civets were infected by the Asia-1 strain of CDV commonly found in dogs in Thailand. The deduced amino acid sequences of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule binding region of the CDV-H proteins revealed a Y549H mutation in both CDV-infected Asian palm civets (n = 4) and a co-located dog. We report a canine distemper outbreak in a civet colony with lineage classification and a Y549H mutation in noncanid species in Thailand. PMID:25253065

  20. Emerging perspectives on hereditary glomerulopathies in canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littman MP

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Meryl P LittmanDepartment of Clinical Studies – Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Familial glomerulopathies have been described in more than two dozen dog breeds. These canine spontaneous cases of glomerular disease are good models for their human counterparts. The dogs present clinically with protein-losing nephropathy and variable signs of hypertension, thromboembolic events, edema/effusions/nephrotic syndrome, or eventually with signs of renal disease such as anorexia, vomiting, weight loss, and/or polyuria/polydipsia. Laboratory changes include proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, and eventually azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, anemia, and isosthenuria. Renal biopsies examined with transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and thin section light microscopy may show ultrastructural glomerular basement membrane abnormalities, glomerulosclerosis, amyloidosis, non-amyloid fibrillary deposition, or breed-associated predispositions for immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Genome-wide association studies and fine sequencing of candidate genes have led to the discovery of variant alleles associated with disease in some breeds; eg, 1 glomerular basement membrane ultrastructural abnormalities due to defective collagen type IV, caused by different premature stop codons in each of four breeds; ie, in COL4A5 in Samoyeds and Navasota mix breed dogs (X-linked, and in COL4A4 in English Cocker Spaniels and English Springer Spaniels (autosomal recessive; and 2 glomerulosclerosis-related podocytopathy with slit diaphragm protein anomalies of both nephrin and Neph3/filtrin due to non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in conserved regions of their encoding genes, NPHS1 and KIRREL2, in Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers and Airedale Terriers, with a complex mode of inheritance. Age at onset and progression to end-stage renal disease vary depending on the model. Genetic

  1. Death of a wild wolf from canine parvovirus enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.; Kurtz, H.J.; Goyal, S.

    1997-01-01

    A 9-mo-old female wolf (Canis lupus) in the Superior National Forest of Minnesota (USA) died from a canine parvovirus (CPV) infection. This is the first direct evidence that this infection effects free-ranging wild wolves.

  2. Canine index – A tool for sex determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar M. Bakkannavar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teeth are most useful tools in victim identification in the living as well as the dead in the field of forensic investigations. Their ability to survive in situations like mass disasters makes them constructive devices. Many authors have measured crowns of teeth in both males and females and found certain variations. Canines, reported to survive in air crash and hurricane disasters, are perhaps the most stable teeth in the oral cavity because of the labiolingual thickness of the crown and the root anchorage in the alveolar process of jaws. Measurement of mesiodistal width of the mandibular canines and inter-canine distance of the mandible provides good evidence of sex identification due to dimorphism. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of canine index (CI in the determination of sex.

  3. Severe canine distemper outbreak in unvaccinated dogs in Mozambique

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    Julieta Zacarias

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although significant animal suffering caused by preventable diseases is frequently seen in developing countries, reports of this are scarce. This report describes avoidable animal suffering owing to a suspected canine distemper (CD outbreak in unvaccinated dogs owned by low-income families in Mozambique that killed approximately 200 animals. Affected dogs exhibited clinical signs, and gross and microscopic lesions compatible with CD. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of canine distemper virus (CDV in the kidney of one dog from the cohort. This brief communication again illustrates that large outbreaks of CDV in unvaccinated dogs occur and that large-scale avoidable suffering and threats to the health of dogs and wild canines continue. Mass vaccination supported by government and non-government organisations is recommended.Keywords: Canine distemper; dogs; outbreak; animal welfare; Mozambique

  4. Canine distemper virus in Lake Baikal seals (Phoca sibirica).

    OpenAIRE

    Mamaev, L.V.; Visser, Ilona; Belikov, S.I.; Denikina, N.N.; Harder, Timm; Goatley, L.; Rima, B.; Edginton, B.; Osterhaus, Albert; Barrett, Thomas,

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe virus epizootic which resulted in significant mortality in Siberian seals (Phoca sibirica) in Lake Baikal during 1987/88 was caused by canine distemper virus. Sequence analysis of the virus glycoprotein genes revealed that it was most closely related to recent European field isolates of canine distemper virus. This paper presents evidence that the same virus continued to circulate in seals in Lake Baikal after the initial epizootic. Three out of 45 brain tissue samples collect...

  5. Immunopathogenic and Neurological Mechanisms of Canine Distemper Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Otávio Valério Carvalho; Clarisse Vieira Botelho; Caroline Gracielle Torres Ferreira; Paulo Oldemar Scherer; Jamária Adriana Pinheiro Soares-Martins; Márcia Rogéria de Almeida; Abelardo Silva Júnior

    2012-01-01

    Canine distemper is a highly contagious viral disease caused by the canine distemper virus (CDV), which is a member of the Morbillivirus genus, Paramyxoviridae family. Animals that most commonly suffer from this disease belong to the Canidae family; however, the spectrum of natural hosts for CDV also includes several other families of the order Carnivora. The infectious disease presents worldwide distribution and maintains a high incidence and high levels of lethality, despite the availabilit...

  6. Characterization of a Canine Homolog of Human Aichivirus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, A; Simmonds, P.; Dubovi, E J; Qaisar, N.; Henriquez, J. A.; J. Medina; S Shields; Lipkin, W. I.

    2011-01-01

    Many of our fatal "civilization" infectious diseases have arisen from domesticated animals. Although picornaviruses infect most mammals, infection of a companion animal is not known. Here we describe the identification and genomic characterization of the first canine picornavirus. Canine kobuvirus (CKoV), identified in stool samples from dogs with diarrhea, has a genomic organization typical of a picornavirus and encodes a 2,469-amino-acid polyprotein flanked by 5' and 3' untranslated regions...

  7. Permanent Maxillary Canine Agenesis: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Halaswamy V Kambalimath; Jain, Somya; Patil, Raju Umaji; Asokan, Alexander; Kambalimath, Deepashri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Congenitally missing teeth (CMT) are among one of the commonly known dental anomalies. The most frequently missing teeth in the permanent dentition, excluding the third molars, are mandibular second premolars and maxillary lateral incisors. Exclusive agenesis of both maxillary canines is an extremely rare occurrence and only a few cases have been reported. Previous studies showed that the prevalence of maxillary canine agenesis varies between 0.07 and 0.13%. In recent studies on Indi...

  8. Genomic instability and telomere fusion of canine osteosarcoma cells.

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    Junko Maeda

    Full Text Available Canine osteosarcoma (OSA is known to present with highly variable and chaotic karyotypes, including hypodiploidy, hyperdiploidy, and increased numbers of metacentric chromosomes. The spectrum of genomic instabilities in canine OSA has significantly augmented the difficulty in clearly defining the biological and clinical significance of the observed cytogenetic abnormalities. In this study, eight canine OSA cell lines were used to investigate telomere fusions by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using a peptide nucleotide acid probe. We characterized each cell line by classical cytogenetic studies and cellular phenotypes including telomere associated factors and then evaluated correlations from this data. All eight canine OSA cell lines displayed increased abnormal metacentric chromosomes and exhibited numerous telomere fusions and interstitial telomeric signals. Also, as evidence of unstable telomeres, colocalization of γ-H2AX and telomere signals in interphase cells was observed. Each cell line was characterized by a combination of data representing cellular doubling time, DNA content, chromosome number, metacentric chromosome frequency, telomere signal level, cellular radiosensitivity, and DNA-PKcs protein expression level. We have also studied primary cultures from 10 spontaneous canine OSAs. Based on the observation of telomere aberrations in those primary cell cultures, we are reasonably certain that our observations in cell lines are not an artifact of prolonged culture. A correlation between telomere fusions and the other characteristics analyzed in our study could not be identified. However, it is important to note that all of the canine OSA samples exhibiting telomere fusion utilized in our study were telomerase positive. Pending further research regarding telomerase negative canine OSA cell lines, our findings may suggest telomere fusions can potentially serve as a novel marker for canine OSA.

  9. Canine Evolution in Sabretoothed Carnivores: Natural Selection or Sexual Selection?

    OpenAIRE

    Marcela Randau; Chris Carbone; Turvey, Samuel T.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable elongated upper canines of extinct sabretoothed carnivorous mammals have been the subject of considerable speculation on their adaptive function, but the absence of living analogues prevents any direct inference about their evolution. We analysed scaling relationships of the upper canines of 20 sabretoothed feliform carnivores (Nimravidae, Barbourofelidae, Machairodontinae), representing both dirk-toothed and scimitar-toothed sabretooth ecomorphs, and 33 non-sabretoothed felids...

  10. Transmigration of mandibular canine: report of four cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagpal, Archna

    2011-01-01

    Transmigration of canine is a rare phenomenon. The prevalence of transmigration of mandibular canine has been found to be only 0.14%-0.31%. The treatment of impacted transmigrated canine is very complicated if it is diagnosed at a later stage. We report 4 cases of transmigration of mandibular canine and review the literature regarding the etiology and treatment. Panoramic radiograph should be taken during the mixed dentition period if the mandibular canine has not erupted from more than one year from its normal chronological age of eruption as intraoral periapical radiograph examination will not always detect an impacted or transmigrated canine. PMID:22570797

  11. Transmigration of Mandibular Canine: Report of Four Cases and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmigration of canine is a rare phenomenon. The prevalence of transmigration of mandibular canine has been found to be only 0.14%–0.31%. The treatment of impacted transmigrated canine is very complicated if it is diagnosed at a later stage. We report 4 cases of transmigration of mandibular canine and review the literature regarding the etiology and treatment. Panoramic radiograph should be taken during the mixed dentition period if the mandibular canine has not erupted from more than one year from its normal chronological age of eruption as intraoral periapical radiograph examination will not always detect an impacted or transmigrated canine.

  12. Detection of Canine Distemper Virus Nucleoprotein RNA by Reverse Transcription-PCR Using Serum, Whole Blood, and Cerebrospinal Fluid from Dogs with Distemper

    OpenAIRE

    Frisk, A. L.; König, M.; Moritz, A; Baumgärtner, W.

    1999-01-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) was used to detect canine distemper virus (CDV) nucleoprotein (NP) RNA in serum, whole blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 38 dogs with clinically suspected distemper. Results were correlated to clinical findings, anti-CDV neutralizing antibody titers, postmortem findings, and demonstration of CDV NP antigen by immunohistochemistry. The specificity of the RT-PCR was ensured by amplification of RNA from various laboratory CDV strains, restrictio...

  13. Canine vector-borne diseases in Brazil

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    Dantas-Torres Filipe

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Canine vector-borne diseases (CVBDs are highly prevalent in Brazil and represent a challenge to veterinarians and public health workers, since some diseases are of great zoonotic potential. Dogs are affected by many protozoa (e.g., Babesia vogeli, Leishmania infantum, and Trypanosoma cruzi, bacteria (e.g., Anaplasma platys and Ehrlichia canis, and helminths (e.g., Dirofilaria immitis and Dipylidium caninum that are transmitted by a diverse range of arthropod vectors, including ticks, fleas, lice, triatomines, mosquitoes, tabanids, and phlebotomine sand flies. This article focuses on several aspects (etiology, transmission, distribution, prevalence, risk factors, diagnosis, control, prevention, and public health significance of CVBDs in Brazil and discusses research gaps to be addressed in future studies.

  14. Canine distemper in endangered Ethiopian wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher H; Banyard, Ashley C; Hussein, Alo; Laurenson, M Karen; Malcolm, James R; Marino, Jorgelina; Regassa, Fekede; Stewart, Anne-Marie E; Fooks, Anthony R; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio

    2015-05-01

    The Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis) is the world's rarest canid; ≈500 wolves remain. The largest population is found within the Bale Mountains National Park (BMNP) in southeastern Ethiopia, where conservation efforts have demonstrated the negative effect of rabies virus on wolf populations. We describe previously unreported infections with canine distemper virus (CDV) among these wolves during 2005-2006 and 2010. Death rates ranged from 43% to 68% in affected subpopulations and were higher for subadult than adult wolves (83%-87% vs. 34%-39%). The 2010 CDV outbreak started 20 months after a rabies outbreak, before the population had fully recovered, and led to the eradication of several focal packs in BMNP's Web Valley. The combined effect of rabies and CDV increases the chance of pack extinction, exacerbating the typically slow recovery of wolf populations, and represents a key extinction threat to populations of this highly endangered carnivore. PMID:25898177

  15. A canine model of multiple portosystemic shunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, L M; Boothe, H W; Miller, M W; Boothe, D M

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and describe an experimental canine model of multiple acquired portosystemic shunts (PSS) similar in nature to spontaneously occurring PSS. Sixteen dogs were used and were divided into a control (n = 6) and a diseased group (n = 10). Dogs of the diseased group were administered dimethylnitrosamine (2 mg/kg of body weight, po) twice weekly, and clinicopathologic, ultrasonographic, and hepatic scintigraphic findings were recorded during the development of hepatic disease and PSS. Surgery was then performed to permit visual verification of multiple shunts, catheter placement for portography examination, and biopsy of the liver. All diseased dogs developed severe hepatic disease and multiple PSS as documented visually at surgery and on portography. Based on this study, dimethylnitrosamine-induced portosystemic shunting appears to be an appropriate model for spontaneously occurring multiple PSS secondary to portal hypertension. PMID:10741951

  16. Why segment the maxilla between laterals and canines?

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    Lucas Senhorinho Esteves

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maxillary surgery on a bone segment enables movement in the sagittal and vertical planes. When performed on multiple segments, it further provides movement in the transverse plane. Typical sites for interdental osteotomies are between laterals and canines, premolars and canines, or between incisors. Additionally, osteotomies can be bilateral, unilateral or asymmetric. The ability to control intercanine width, buccolingual angulation of incisors, and correct Bolton discrepancy are some of the advantages of maxillary segmentation between laterals and canines. Objective: This article describes important features to be considered in making a clinical decision to segment the maxilla between laterals and canines when treating a dentoskeletal deformity. It further discusses the history of this surgical approach, the indications for its clinical use, the technique used to implement it, as well as its advantages, disadvantages, complications and stability. It is therefore hoped that this paper will contribute to disseminate information on this topic, which will inform the decision-making process of those professionals who wish to make use of this procedure in their clinical practice. Conclusions: Segmental maxillary osteotomy between laterals and canines is a versatile technique with several indications. Furthermore, it offers a host of advantages compared with single-piece osteotomy, or between canines and premolars.

  17. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. METHODS: Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental...... fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. RESULTS: The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P ... exposure of the canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0...

  18. Chlamydia in canine or feline coronary arteriosclerotic lesions

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    Grabarevic Zeljko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are numerous reports linking Chlamydia infection to human coronary atherosclerosis. However, there is a lack of data regarding this correlation in dogs and cats, and there are no reports investigating coronary arteriosclerosis and Chlamydia in these species. The aim of the present study was to examine whether there is a correlation between canine and feline spontaneous atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis and the presence of Chlamydia. Archived histopathological samples of dogs (n = 16 and cats (n = 13 with findings of atherosclerosis or arteriosclerosis in heart tissue were examined for the presence of Chlamydiaceae using real-time PCR, ArrayTube Microarray and immunohistochemistry. Additionally, arteriosclerotic lesions of all cases were histologically classified and graded. Results Both canine atherosclerotic cases, and all 14 canine arteriosclerotic cases were negative for Chlamydia. Only one of the 13 arteriosclerotic feline cases was positive for Chlamydia by real-time PCR, revealing C. abortus by ArrayTube Microarray. To our knowledge, this is the first description of C. abortus in a cat. Overall, the type and grade of canine and feline arteriosclerotic lesions revealed similarities, and were predominantly moderate and hyperplastic. Conclusions These findings suggest that there is no obvious correlation between canine and feline coronary arteriosclerosis and the presence of Chlamydia. In order to draw final conclusions about the correlation between Chlamydia and canine atherosclerosis, examination of more samples is required.

  19. Molecular analyses of H3N2 canine influenza viruses isolated from Korea during 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, EunJung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Bo-Hye; Song, Jae-Young; Cho, In-Soo; Shin, Yeun-Kyung

    2016-04-01

    Canine influenza A virus (CIV) causes a respiratory disease among dog populations and is prevalent in North America and Asia. Recently, Asian H3N2 CIV infection has been of particular concern, with recent reports related to reassortants with pandemic 2009 strains, direct transmission from a human H3N2, a possibility of H3N2 CIV transmission to other mammals, and even the first outbreak of H3N2 CIVs in North America in April 2015. However, despite these global concerns, our understanding of how influenza A virus transmission impacts the overall populations of H3N2 CIVs remains incomplete. Hence, we investigated the evolutionary history of the most recent two Korean CIV isolates, A/canine/Korea/BD-1/2013 and A/canine/Korea/DG1/2014, along with 57 worldwide CIVs, using comprehensive molecular analyses based on genomic genotyping. This study presents that the new Korean CIV isolates are closely related to the predominantly circulating H3N2 CIVs with genotypes K, G, E, 3B, F, 2D, F, and 1E, carrying several mutations in antigenic and host determinant sites. Also, our findings show that the genome-wide genetic variations within the H3N2 CIVs are low; however, two antigenic protein (HA and NA) analysis demonstrates genetic diversification of the H3N2 CIVs, which evolves independently between Korea and China.

  20. Canine brucellosis: Epizootiological characteristics, therapy and control of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojičić Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes different aspects of canine brucellosis caused by Brucella canis. The disease is present in a large number of countries all over the world, where it inflicts severe economic damages, in particular in the commercial breeding and major dog breeding facilities. The disease was discovered in 1966 in the United States of America, but there were no data about its presence or distribution in our country until 1999. It was established, following the initial investigations, that the prevalence of the disease is extremely high, and that it amounted to 4.27% among pet dogs in the territory of Belgrade. Investigations of stray dogs in the territory of Podgorica showed that the seroprevalence (an equal titer or higher than 1/200 was 9.37%, while the prevalence among stray dogs in the territory of Belgrade was 10.87%. Data for other parts of Serbia are mostly lacking, and the seroprevalence for stray dogs in the Municipality of Pozarevac amounted to over 15%, while not a single serologically positive case was found among pet dogs. In addition to the epizootiological specificities of the disease established in our country, isolates of B. canis from the territory of Serbia also indicate digressions in the test of resistance to colors with respect to the referent strain RM6/66. All isolates (SR1-SR-7 are resistant to base fuchsine, and it is probable that this characteristic could also be an important epizootiological marker. Even though the isolation of the cause is the most reliable diagnostic method, it is not possible to achieve this in most cases. That is why one of the most important tasks is to define the most ideal tests for the serological diagnostics of the disease, and the obligation of reporting the disease makes it imperative that wider-scale investigations are conducted and that measures are taken toward reducing the number of positive cases in our country. .

  1. Detection of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Like, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Like Bat Coronaviruses and Group H Rotavirus in Faeces of Korean Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H K; Yoon, S-W; Kim, D-J; Koo, B-S; Noh, J Y; Kim, J H; Choi, Y G; Na, W; Chang, K-T; Song, D; Jeong, D G

    2016-08-01

    Bat species around the world have recently been recognized as major reservoirs of several zoonotic viruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Nipah virus and Hendra virus. In this study, consensus primer-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) and high-throughput sequencing were performed to investigate viruses in bat faecal samples collected at 11 natural bat habitat sites from July to December 2015 in Korea. Diverse coronaviruses were first detected in Korean bat faeces, including alphacoronaviruses, SARS-CoV-like and MERS-CoV-like betacoronaviruses. In addition, we identified a novel bat rotavirus belonging to group H rotavirus which has only been described in human and pigs until now. Therefore, our results suggest the need for continuing surveillance and additional virological studies in domestic bat. PMID:27213718

  2. Comparative activity of pradofloxacin and marbofloxacin against coagulase-positive staphylococci in a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model based on canine pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber-Irrgang, B; Wetzstein, H-G; Bagel-Trah, S; Hafner, D; Kresken, M

    2012-12-01

    Pradofloxacin (PRA), a novel veterinary 8-cyano-fluoroquinolone (FQ), is active against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, the primary cause of canine pyoderma. An in vitro pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model was used to compare the activities of PRA and marbofloxacin (MAR) against three clinical isolates of S. pseudintermedius and reference strain Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538. Experiments were performed involving populations of 10(10) CFU corresponding to an inoculum density of approximately 5 × 10(7) CFU/mL. The time course of free drug concentrations in canine serum was modelled, resulting from once daily standard oral dosing of 3 mg of PRA/kg and 2 mg of MAR/kg. In addition, experimentally high doses of 6 mg of PRA/kg and 16 mg of MAR/kg were tested against the least susceptible strain. Viable counts were monitored over 24 h. At concentrations associated with standard doses, PRA caused a faster and more sustained killing than MAR of all strains. The ratios of free drug under the concentration-time curve for 24 h over MIC and the maximum concentration of free drug over MIC were at least 90 and 26, and 8.5 and 2.1 for PRA and MAR, respectively. At experimentally high doses, PRA was superior to MAR in terms of immediate killing. Subpopulations with reduced susceptibility to either FQ did not emerge. We conclude that PRA is likely to be an efficacious therapy of canine staphylococcal infections.

  3. Production and purification of non replicative canine adenovirus type 2 derived vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelechowski, Marion; Bergeron, Corinne; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Klonjkowski, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) derived vectors have been widely used for short or long-term gene transfer, both for gene therapy and vaccine applications. Because of the frequent pre-existing immunity against the classically used human adenovirus type 5, canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2) has been proposed as an alternative vector for human gene transfer. The well-characterized biology of CAV2, together with its ease of genetic manipulation, offer major advantages, notably for gene transfer into the central nervous system, or for inducing a wide range of protective immune responses, from humoral to cellular immunity. Nowadays, CAV2 represents one of the most appealing nonhuman adenovirus for use as a vaccine vector. This protocol describes a simple method to construct, produce and titer recombinant CAV2 vectors. After cloning the expression cassette of the gene of interest into a shuttle plasmid, the recombinant genomic plasmid is obtained by homologous recombination in the E. coli BJ5183 bacterial strain. The resulting genomic plasmid is then transfected into canine kidney cells expressing the complementing CAV2-E1 genes (DK-E1). A viral amplification enables the production of a large viral stock, which is purified by ultracentrifugation through cesium chloride gradients and desalted by dialysis. The resulting viral suspension routinely has a titer of over 10(10) infectious particles per ml and can be directly administrated in vivo. PMID:24326926

  4. Detection of Arctic and European cluster of canine distemper virus in north and center of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namroodi, Somayeh; Rostami, Amir; Majidzadeh-Ardebili, Keyvan; Ghalyanchi Langroudi, Arash; Morovvati, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) creates a very contagious viral multi-systemic canine distemper (CD) disease that affects most species of Carnivora order. The virus is genetically heterogeneous, particularly in section of the hemagglutinin (H) gene. Sequence analysis of the H gene can be useful to investigate distinction of various lineages related to geographical distribution and CDV molecular epidemiology. Since vaccination program is conducted only in large cities of Iran, CD still remains as one of the major causes of death in dogs in this country. In order to monitor H gene, CDV has been detected in 14 out of 19 sampled dogs through the amplification of nucleoprotein (NP) gene in nested-PCR assay. In the next step 665 bp of H gene was amplified in 9 out of 14 NP-gene positive dogs. Phylogenetic analysis distinguished two distinct CDV genotypes in Iran. JN941238 has been embedded in European cluster and JN941239 has been embedded in Arctic cluster. Nucleic analysis has been shown high difference among both Iranian CDV lineages with CDV vaccine strains. PMID:26893808

  5. Isolation and sequence analysis of a canine distemper virus from a raccoon dog in Jilin Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Zhang, Miao; Zhao, Jianjun; Shao, Xiqun; Ma, Zengjun; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Wu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a major pathogen not only in raccoon dogs but also in a variety of carnivorous animals, including domesticated animals, particularly if they have not been vaccinated. In this study, a wild-type strain of CDV was isolated from lung tissue from a raccoon dog kept at a fur farm in Jilin Province, China. Cytopathic effects typical of CDV infection were observed after three blind passages in Vero cells, yielding a virus titer of 10(4.6) TCID50/mL. Virus identification was carried out by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and genome sequencing. The results showed that the isolated virus, termed the SY strain, corresponded to the Asia-1 genotype of CDV and has a genome of 15,690 nucleotides. This represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of a CDV strain circulating in raccoon dogs in China. PMID:26265248

  6. Human rotavirus HCR3 possesses a genomic RNA constellation indistinguishable from that of feline and canine rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O

    2000-01-01

    Infection and spread of group A rotaviruses under natural conditions are mostly limited to one animal host species. However, rare molecular evidence exists for interspecies transmission by whole virions of animal rotaviruses to humans. Human rotavirus strain HCR3, which was isolated in 1984 from a healthy infant in Philadelphia, U.S.A. was shown by RNA-RNA hybridization to form 11 hybrid bands with feline rotavirus strain FRV64 and canine rotavirus strains CU-1 and K9, but not with rotaviruses commonly found in humans. Thus, HCR3 was concluded to be originally a rotavirus circulating in cats and dogs and accidental interspecies transmission by whole virions to humans was likely to have occurred in the past. PMID:11205126

  7. Absence of E protein arrests transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus maturation in the secretory pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recombinant transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (rTGEV) in which E gene was deleted (rTGEV-ΔE) has been engineered. This deletion mutant only grows in cells expressing E protein (E+ cells) indicating that E was an essential gene for TGEV replication. Electron microscopy studies of rTGEV-ΔE infected BHK-pAPN-E- cells showed that only immature intracellular virions were assembled. These virions were non-infectious and not secreted to the extracellular medium in BHK-pAPN-E- cells. RNA and protein composition analysis by RNase-gold and immunoelectron microscopy showed that rTGEV-ΔE virions contained RNA and also all the structural TGEV proteins, except the deleted E protein. Nevertheless, full virion maturation was blocked. Studies of the rTGEV-ΔE subcellular localization by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy in infected E- cells showed that in the absence of E protein virus trafficking was arrested in the intermediate compartment. Therefore, the absence of E protein in TGEV resulted in two actions, a blockade of virus trafficking in the membranes of the secretory pathway, and prevention of full virus maturation

  8. Antiseptic properties of two calix[4]arenes derivatives on the human coronavirus 229E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, C; Fontanay, S; Mourer, M; Dibama, H Massimba; Regnouf-de-Vains, J-B; Finance, C; Duval, R E

    2010-12-01

    Facing the lack in specific antiviral treatment, it is necessary to develop new means of prevention. In the case of the Coronaviridae this family is now recognized as including potent human pathogens causing upper and lower respiratory tract infections as well as nosocomial ones. Within the purpose of developing new antiseptics molecules, the antiseptic virucidal activity of two calix[4]arene derivatives, the tetra-para-sulfonato-calix[4]arene (C[4]S) and the 1,3-bis(bithiazolyl)-tetra-para-sulfonato-calix[4]arene (C[4]S-BTZ) were evaluated toward the human coronavirus 229E (HCoV 229E). Comparing these results with some obtained previously with chlorhexidine and hexamidine, (i) these two calixarenes did not show any cytotoxicity contrary to chlorhexidine and hexamidine, (ii) C[4]S showed as did hexamidine, a very weak activity against HCoV 229E, and (iii) the C[4]S-BTZ showed a stronger activity than chlorhexidine, i.e. 2.7 and 1.4log₁₀ reduction in viral titer after 5min of contact with 10⁻³mol L⁻¹ solutions of C[4]S-BTZ and chlorhexidine, respectively. Thus, the C[4]S-BTZ appeared as a promising virucidal (antiseptic) molecule.

  9. Identification and characterisation of small molecule inhibitors of feline coronavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2014-12-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a feline coronavirus (FCoV) induced disease, is almost invariably fatal with median life expectancy measured in days. Current treatment options are, at best, palliative. The objectives of this study were to evaluate a panel of nineteen candidate compounds for antiviral activity against FCoV in vitro to determine viable candidates for therapy. A resazurin-based cytopathic effect inhibition assay, which detects viable cells through their reduction of the substrate resazurin to fluorescent resorufin, was developed for screening compounds for antiviral efficacy against FCoV. Plaque reduction and virus yield reduction assays were performed to confirm antiviral effects of candidate compounds identified during screening, and the possible antiviral mechanisms of action of these compounds were investigated using virucidal suspension assays and CPE inhibition and IFA-based time of addition assays. Three compounds, chloroquine, mefloquine, and hexamethylene amiloride demonstrated marked inhibition of virus induced CPE at low micromolar concentrations. Orthogonal assays confirmed inhibition of CPE was associated with significant reductions in viral replication. Selectivity indices calculated based on in vitro cytotoxicity screening and reductions in extracellular viral titre were 217, 24, and 20 for chloroquine, mefloquine, and hexamethylene amiloride respectively. Preliminary experiments performed to inform the antiviral mechanism of the compounds demonstrated all three acted at an early stage of viral replication. These results suggest that these direct acting antiviral compounds, or their derivatives, warrant further investigation for clinical use in cats with FIP.

  10. Field trial evaluation of a reo-coronavirus calf diarrhea vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, E T; Bass, E P; Beckenhauer, W H

    1977-01-01

    Field trials were conducted using an experimental, modified live virus, oral vaccine for prevention of reo- and coronavirus calf diarrhea. Prior to the trials, one or both of the specific causative agents were identified from affected calves in each participating herd. In 21 herds, sequential trials were conducted in which results of uninterrupted vaccination were compared with disease rates during a preceding or subsequent control period. In these herds there was a statistically significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality from disease in 1,598 vaccinates compared with the rates in 829 prevaccination control calves. Morbidity and mortality in 206 post-vaccination control calves rose marginally above the rates in the same vaccinates. In 26 other herds, where double blind trials were conducted, rates of morbidity and mortality from disease were virtually the same for 1,080 vaccinated calves and 355 placebo calves. Vaccinates in the sequential trials had the lowest morbidity and mortality rates of any test group in either field trial format. In a selected dairy herd, both field trial formats were implemented and the results compared. In the double blind trial, vaccinates and placebo calves had comparable rates of morbidity and mortality from disease. When a sequential trial was later implemented, a statistically significant reduction in morbidity and mortality occurred in vaccinates compared with rates in control calves. PMID:193622

  11. Immune Responses and Histopathological Changes in Rabbits Immunized with Inactivated SARS Coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the immunogenicity of inactivated SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), three groups of rabbits were immunized three times at 2-week intervals with inactivated vaccine + adjuvant, adjuvant,and normal saline respectively. Eight batchs of serum were sampled from the auricular vein at day 7 to day 51, and specific IgG antibody titers and neutralizing antibody titers were detected by indirect ELISA and micro-cytopathic effect neutralizing test. Antibody specificity was identified by proteinchip assay.Histopathological changes were detected by H&E staining. The results showed that, rabbits in the experimental group immunized with inactivated SARS-CoV all generated specific IgG antibodies with neutralizing activity, which suggested the inactivated SARS-CoV could preserve its antigenicity well and elicit an effective humoral immune responses. The peak titer value of specific IgG antibody and neutralizing antibody reached 1:40960 and 1:2560 respectively. In the experimental group, no obvious histopathological changes was detected in the H&E stained slides of heart, spleen, kidney and testis samples, but the livers had slight histopathological changes, and the lungs presented remarkable histopathological changes. These findings are of importance for SARS-CoV inactivated vaccine development.

  12. SARS coronavirus entry into host cells through a novel clathrin- and caveolae-independent endocytic pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Wang; Peng Yang; Kangtai Liu; Feng Guo; Yanli Zhang; Gongyi Zhang; Chengyu Jiang

    2008-01-01

    While severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)fwas initially thought to enter cells through direct fusion with the plasma membrane, more recent evidence suggests that virus entry may also involve endocytosis. We have found that SARS-CoV enters cells via pH- and receptor-dependent endocytosis. Treatment of cells with either SARS-CoV spike protein or spike-bearing pseudoviruses resulted in the translocation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor of SARS-CoV, from the cell surface to endosomes. In addition, the spike-bearing pseudoviruses and early endosome antigen 1 were found to colocalize in endosomes. Further analyses using specific endocytic pathway inhibitors and dominant-negative Eps15 as well as caveolin-1 colocalization study suggested that virus entry was mediated by a clathrin- and caveolae-independent mechanism. Moreover, cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich lipid raft microdomains in the plasma membrane, which have been shown to act as platforms for many physiological signaling pathways, were shown to be involved in virus entry. Endocytic entry of SARS-CoV may expand the cellular range of SARS-CoV infection, and our findings here contribute to the understanding of SARS-CoV pathogenesis, providing new information for anti-viral drug research.

  13. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roh C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Changhyun RohDivision of Biotechnology, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, Jeongeup, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV nucleocapsid (N protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 µg mL–1, (--catechin gallate and (--gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.Keywords: SARS, RNA oligonucleotide, quantum dots, inhibitor, screening

  14. Protein-Protein Interactions of Viroporins in Coronaviruses and Paramyxoviruses: New Targets for Antivirals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Torres

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Viroporins are members of a rapidly growing family of channel-forming small polypeptides found in viruses. The present review will be focused on recent structural and protein-protein interaction information involving two viroporins found in enveloped viruses that target the respiratory tract; (i the envelope protein in coronaviruses and (ii the small hydrophobic protein in paramyxoviruses. Deletion of these two viroporins leads to viral attenuation in vivo, whereas data from cell culture shows involvement in the regulation of stress and inflammation. The channel activity and structure of some representative members of these viroporins have been recently characterized in some detail. In addition, searches for protein-protein interactions using yeast-two hybrid techniques have shed light on possible functional roles for their exposed cytoplasmic domains. A deeper analysis of these interactions should not only provide a more complete overview of the multiple functions of these viroporins, but also suggest novel strategies that target protein-protein interactions as much needed antivirals. These should complement current efforts to block viroporin channel activity.

  15. Severe respiratory illness associated with a novel coronavirus--Saudi Arabia and Qatar, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    CDC is working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) and other partners to better understand the public health risk presented by a recently detected, novel coronavirus. This virus has been identified in two patients, both previously healthy adults who suffered severe respiratory illness. The first patient, a man aged 60 years from Saudi Arabia, was hospitalized in June 2012 and died; the second patient, a man aged 49 years from Qatar with onset of symptoms in September 2012 was transported to the United Kingdom for intensive care. He remains hospitalized on life support with both pulmonary and renal failure. Person-to-person or health-care-associated transmission has not been identified to date. Interim case definitions based on acute respiratory illness and travel history were issued by WHO on September 29 and include criteria for "patient under investigation," "probable case," and "confirmed case". This information is current as of October 4. Updates on the investigation and the WHO case definition are available at http://www.who.int/csr/don/en/index.html. PMID:23051613

  16. Antibodies against MERS coronavirus in dromedary camels, United Arab Emirates, 2003 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Benjamin; Müller, Marcel A; Corman, Victor M; Reusken, Chantal B E M; Ritz, Daniel; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Lattwein, Erik; Kallies, Stephan; Siemens, Artem; van Beek, Janko; Drexler, Jan F; Muth, Doreen; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Wernery, Ulrich; Koopmans, Marion P G; Wernery, Renate; Drosten, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has caused an ongoing outbreak of severe acute respiratory tract infection in humans in the Arabian Peninsula since 2012. Dromedary camels have been implicated as possible viral reservoirs. We used serologic assays to analyze 651 dromedary camel serum samples from the United Arab Emirates; 151 of 651 samples were obtained in 2003, well before onset of the current epidemic, and 500 serum samples were obtained in 2013. Recombinant spike protein-specific immunofluorescence and virus neutralization tests enabled clear discrimination between MERS-CoV and bovine CoV infections. Most (632/651, 97.1%) camels had antibodies against MERS-CoV. This result included all 151 serum samples obtained in 2003. Most (389/651, 59.8%) serum samples had MERS-CoV-neutralizing antibody titers >1,280. Dromedary camels from the United Arab Emirates were infected at high rates with MERS-CoV or a closely related, probably conspecific, virus long before the first human MERS cases.

  17. Immunohistochemistry Assay to Detect Turkey Coronavirus (TCoV from Experimentally Infected Poults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Larissa L. Castanheira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop a direct immunohistochemical assay to detect TCoV antigens in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections prepared from experimentally infected poults. The sections of ileo, ileo-cecal junction and ceca regions from intestine were prepared and submitted to two different primary antibodies, first the non-biotin labeled polyclonal antibody for the indirect method, and second the biotin-labeled polyclonal antibody, both raised against IBV by immunized specific pathogen free chickens. All sections were submitted to immufluorescent assay (IFA, a conventional method, and the results compared. The direct immunohistochemical technique showed a higher frequency of antigen in tissues, especially from the ileo-cecal junction with no difference between results obtained by the conventional method. Finally, the immunofluorescence and all modalities of molecular approaches have been played an important role to the diagnosis and prevention of TCoV infections, although to be precise on infectious disease diagnosis, it is necessary complementary techniques. Here, was standardized the biotin labeled polyclonal antibody as reliable tool to be used as an alternative detection of Turkey Coronavirus.

  18. Peptide Mimicrying Between SARS Coronavirus Spike Protein and Human Proteins Reacts with SARS Patient Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-Y. Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mimicry, defined as similar structures shared by molecules from dissimilar genes or proteins, is a general strategy used by pathogens to infect host cells. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a new human respiratory infectious disease caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV. The spike (S protein of SARS-CoV plays an important role in the virus entry into a cell. In this study, eleven synthetic peptides from the S protein were selected based on its sequence homology with human proteins. Two of the peptides D07 (residues 927–937 and D08 (residues 942–951 were recognized by the sera of SARS patients. Murine hyperimmune sera against these peptides bound to proteins of human lung epithelial cells A549. Another peptide D10 (residues 490–502 stimulated A549 to proliferate and secrete IL-8. The present results suggest that the selected S protein regions, which share sequence homology with human proteins, may play important roles in SARS-CoV infection.

  19. Transient dominant selection for the modification and generation of recombinant infectious bronchitis coronaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keep, Sarah M; Bickerton, Erica; Britton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a reverse genetics system for the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in which a full-length cDNA corresponding to the IBV genome is inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a T7 promoter sequence. Vaccinia virus as a vector for the full-length IBV cDNA has the advantage that modifications can be introduced into the IBV cDNA using homologous recombination, a method frequently used to insert and delete sequences from the vaccinia virus genome. Here, we describe the use of transient dominant selection as a method for introducing modifications into the IBV cDNA; this has been successfully used for the substitution of specific nucleotides, deletion of genomic regions, and the exchange of complete genes. Infectious recombinant IBVs are generated in situ following the transfection of vaccinia virus DNA, containing the modified IBV cDNA, into cells infected with a recombinant fowlpox virus expressing T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

  20. Excretion and detection of SARS coronavirus and its nucleic acid from digestive system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Wei Wang; Xiao-Ming Wu; Wen-Jun Xiao; Xiu-Mei Zhu; Chang-Qing Gu; Jing Yin; Wei Wei; Wei Yao; Chao Liu; Jian-Feng Li; Guo-Rong Ou; Jin-Song Li; Min-Nian Wang; Tong-Yu Fang; Gui-Jie Wang; Yao-Hui Qiu; Huai-Huan Wu; Fu-Huan Chao; Jun-Wen Li; Ting-Kai Guo; Bei Zhen; Qing-Xin Kong; Bin Yi; Zhong Li; Nong Song; Min Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study whether severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) could be excreted from digestive system.METHODS: Cell culture and semi-nested RT-PCR were used to detect SARS-CoV and its RNA from 21 stool and urine samples, and a kind of electropositive filter media particles was used to concentrate the virus in 10 sewage samples from two hospitals receiving SAPS patients in Beijing in China.RESULTS: It was demonstrated that there was no live SARS-CoV in all samples collected, but the RNA of SARS-CoV could be detected in seven stool samples from SARS patients with any one of the symptoms of fever, malaise,cough, or dyspnea, in 10 sewage samples before disinfection and 3 samples after disinfection from the two hospitals.The RNA could not be detected in urine and stool samples from patients recovered from SARS.CONCLUSION: Nucleic acid of SARS-CoV can be excreted through the stool of patients into sewage system, and the possibility of SARS-CoV transmitting through digestive system cannot be excluded.