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Sample records for candidatus pelagibacter ubique

  1. Identification of candidate structured RNAs in the marine organism 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwalbach Michael S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic sequence data are proving to be a vast resource for the discovery of biological components. Yet analysis of this data to identify functional RNAs lags behind efforts to characterize protein diversity. The genome of 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique' HTCC 1062 is the closest match for approximately 20% of marine metagenomic sequence reads. It is also small, contains little non-coding DNA, and has strikingly low GC content. Results To aid the discovery of RNA motifs within the marine metagenome we exploited the genomic properties of 'Cand. P. ubique' by targeting our search to long intergenic regions (IGRs with relatively high GC content. Analysis of known RNAs (rRNA, tRNA, riboswitches etc. shows that structured RNAs are significantly enriched in such IGRs. To identify additional candidate structured RNAs, we examined other IGRs with similar characteristics from 'Cand. P. ubique' using comparative genomics approaches in conjunction with marine metagenomic data. Employing this strategy, we discovered four candidate structured RNAs including a new riboswitch class as well as three additional likely cis-regulatory elements that precede genes encoding ribosomal proteins S2 and S12, and the cytoplasmic protein component of the signal recognition particle. We also describe four additional potential RNA motifs with few or no examples occurring outside the metagenomic data. Conclusion This work begins the process of identifying functional RNA motifs present in the metagenomic data and illustrates how existing completed genomes may be used to aid in this task.

  2. Phylogenomic analysis of Odyssella thessalonicensis fortifies the common origin of Rickettsiales, Pelagibacter ubique and Reclimonas americana mitochondrion.

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    Kalliopi Georgiades

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The evolution of the Alphaproteobacteria and origin of the mitochondria are topics of considerable debate. Most studies have placed the mitochondria ancestor within the Rickettsiales order. Ten years ago, the bacterium Odyssella thessalonicensis was isolated from Acanthamoeba spp., and the 16S rDNA phylogeny placed it within the Rickettsiales. Recently, the whole genome of O. thessalonicensis has been sequenced, and 16S rDNA phylogeny and more robust and accurate phylogenomic analyses have been performed with 65 highly conserved proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results suggested that the O. thessalonicensis emerged between the Rickettsiales and other Alphaproteobacteria. The mitochondrial proteins of the Reclinomonas americana have been used to locate the phylogenetic position of the mitochondrion ancestor within the Alphaproteobacteria tree. Using the K tree score method, nine mitochondrion-encoded proteins, whose phylogenies were congruent with the Alphaproteobacteria phylogenomic tree, have been selected and concatenated for Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood phylogenies. The Reclinomonas americana mitochondrion is a sister taxon to the free-living bacteria Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique, and together, they form a clade that is deeply rooted in the Rickettsiales clade. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Reclinomonas americana mitochondrion phylogenomic study confirmed that mitochondria emerged deeply in the Rickettsiales clade and that they are closely related to Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique.

  3. Abundance of Two Pelagibacter ubique Bacteriophage Genotypes along a Latitudinal Transect in the North and South Atlantic Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Erin M.; Hewson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study characterizes viral and bacterial dynamics along a latitudinal transect in the Atlantic Ocean from approximately 10 N–40 S. Overall viral abundance decreased with depth, on average there were 1.64 ± 0.71 × 107 virus like particles (VLPs) in surface waters, decreasing to an average of 6.50 ± 2.26 × 105 VLPs in Antarctic Bottom Water. This decrease was highly correlated to bacterial abundance. There are six major water masses in the Southern Tropical Atlantic Ocean, and inclusion of water mass, temperature and salinity variables explained a majority of the variation in total viral abundance. Recent discovery of phages infecting bacteria of the SAR11 clade of Alphaproteobacteria (i.e., pelagiphages) leads to intriguing questions about the roles they play in shaping epipelagic communities. Viral-size fraction DNA from epipelagic water was used to quantify the abundance of two pelagiphages, using pelagiphage-specific quantitative PCR primers and probes along the transect. We found that HTVC010P, a member of a podoviridae sub-family, was most abundant in surface waters. Copy numbers ranged from an average of 1.03 ± 2.38 × 105 copies ml−1 in surface waters, to 5.79 ± 2.86 × 103 in the deep chlorophyll maximum. HTVC008M, a T4-like myovirus, was present in the deep chlorophyll maximum (5.42 ± 2.8 × 103 copies ml−1 on average), although it was not as highly abundant as HTVC010P in surface waters (6.05 ± 3.01 × 103 copies ml−1 on average). Interestingly, HTVC008M was only present at a few of the most southern stations, suggesting latitudinal biogeography of SAR11 phages. PMID:27733846

  4. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C.; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, EMily K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H.; Johnston, Andrew W.; Davie-Martin, Cleo L.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2016-05-16

    Marine phytoplankton produce ~109 tons of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year1,2, an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS)3,4. SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell’s unusual requirement for reduced sulfur5,6. Here we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol (MeSH) and that simultaneously a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a DMSP lyase, shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to DMS production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of DMS as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. These findings suggest that DMSP supply and demand relationships in Pelagibacter metabolism are important to determining rates of oceanic DMS production.

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11762-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10 ( CP000084 ) Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique HTCC1062, complete... 34 0.87 20 ( EF568108 ) Glossina pallidipes salivary gland hyper...trophy vi... 30 0.88 16 ( AF529435 ) Bombus morio 12S small subunit ribosomal RNA g

  6. Packet Reordering Procedure with Ubiquous Communication Systems

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    Giridhar Akula

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite links are going to play a vital role in the deployment of ubiquous broad band systems. Non- Geostationary (NGEO satellite communication systems are more advantageous than terrestrial satellites. This paper presents an exchange of information on cooperation status among neiboring satellites. The new explicit load balancing scheme is used to avoid congestion and packet drops at the satellite. A TTL based algorithm is used for packet reordering.

  7. Ubiquity of bisphenol A in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a suspected endocrine disruptor in the environment. However, little is known about its distribution and transport in the atmosphere. Here, the concentrations of BPA in the atmospheric aerosols from urban, rural, marine, and the polar regions were measured using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The concentrations of BPA (1-17,400 pg m-3) ranged over 4 orders of magnitude in the world with a declining trend from the continent (except for the Antarctica) to remote sites. A positive correlation was found between BPA and 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene, a tracer for plastic burning, in urban regions, indicating that the open burning of plastics in domestic waste should be a significant emission source of atmospheric BPA. Our results suggest that the ubiquity of BPA in the atmosphere may raise a requirement for the evaluation of health effects of BPA in order to control its emission sources, for example, from plastic burning. - This study gives first insight into the sources and global distributions of bisphenol A (BPA) in the atmosphere.

  8. Species in Wolbachia? Proposal for the designation of 'Candidatus Wolbachia bourtzisii', 'Candidatus Wolbachia onchocercicola', 'Candidatus Wolbachia blaxteri', 'Candidatus Wolbachia brugii', 'Candidatus Wolbachia taylori', 'Candidatus Wolbachia collembolicola' and 'Candidatus Wolbachia multihospitum' for the different species within Wolbachia supergroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Puebla, Shamayim T; Servín-Garcidueñas, Luis E; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Vera-Ponce de León, Arturo; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Delaye, Luis; Martínez, Julio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2015-09-01

    Wolbachia are highly extended bacterial endosymbionts that infect arthropods and filarial nematodes and produce contrasting phenotypes on their hosts. Wolbachia taxonomy has been understudied. Currently, Wolbachia strains are classified into phylogenetic supergroups. Here we applied phylogenomic analyses to study Wolbachia evolutionary relationships and examined metrics derived from their genome sequences such as average nucleotide identity (ANI), in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH), G+C content, and synteny to shed light on the taxonomy of these bacteria. Draft genome sequences of strains wDacA and wDacB obtained from the carmine cochineal insect Dactylopius coccus were included. Although all analyses indicated that each Wolbachia supergroup represents a distinct evolutionary lineage, we found that some of the analyzed supergroups showed enough internal heterogeneity to be considered as assemblages of more than one species. Thus, supergroups would represent supraspecific groupings. Consequently, Wolbachia pipientis nomen species would apply only to strains of supergroup B and we propose the designation of 'Candidatus Wolbachia bourtzisii', 'Candidatus Wolbachia onchocercicola', 'Candidatus Wolbachia blaxterii', 'Candidatus Wolbachia brugii', 'Candidatus Wolbachia taylorii', 'Candidatus Wolbachia collembolicola' and 'Candidatus Wolbachia multihospitis' for other supergroups. PMID:26189661

  9. Medicoscapes: on mobile ubiquity effects and ICT4D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2012-01-01

    on use of resources of the global civil society emerging in global ‘transformations’ related to migration, media and ‘the social work of the imagination’. Whereas much new media debate departs from the assumption of media ubiquity affecting our notions of reality, the article will attempt a different...... perspective. It will ponder issues of collective imagination as exerted by way of such effects, i.e. in cultural forms that emerge out of media-roles in the ‘complex connectivity’ in globalisation processes....

  10. Mammonist Capitalism – Ubiquity, Immanence, Acceleration. And the Social Consequences

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    Bo Isenberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay attempts at a general understanding of contemporary capitalism and some of its social and mental consequences. It works through combinations and variations of concepts from classical and contemporary social theory. Some key concepts are Mammonism, acceleration, ubiquity, self-dynamics, precariat, inertia, conformity, flexibility, specter of uselessness. The text refers to classical modern thinkers like Marx, Simmel, Musil, Benjamin, and to contemporary ideas in the works of Deleuze, Rosa, Crouch, Illouz, Standing, Hochschild. It is summoned up by asking some important, complex questions that regard democracy, community and autonomy.

  11. Thermodynamic Explanation for the Cosmic Ubiquity of Organic Pigments

    CERN Document Server

    Michaelian, Karo

    2016-01-01

    There is increasingly more evidence being accumulated for the occurrence of large amounts of organic material in the cosmos, particularly in the form of aromatic compounds. These molecules can be found on the surface of Earth and Mars, in the atmospheres of the larger planets and on many of their satellites, on asteroids, comets, meteorites, the atmospheres of red giant stars, interstellar nebulae, and in the spiral arms of galaxies. Many of these environments are expected to be of low temperature and pressure, implying that the Gibbs free energy for the formation of these complex molecules should be positive and large, suggesting that their existence could only be attributed to non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes. In this article we first review the evidence for the abundance of these molecules in the cosmos and then describe how the ubiquity can be explained from within the framework of non-equilibrium thermodynamics on the basis of the catalytic properties of these pigment molecules in dissipating phot...

  12. The development of web service for the Ubiquiti mFi device data access

    OpenAIRE

    Vuk, Zdenko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of thesis is to present the development of a web service which eliminates the problems when using the mFi products of the company Ubiquiti Networks, inc. The problems are mainly the limited functionality offered by the software bundled with these devices. The webservice uses the communication protocol SOAP. Additionally and we encountered a relatively unknown database management system named MongoDB. Ubiquiti mFi is a family of gadgets to monitor events in buildings. The protoc...

  13. Isolation of Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis from Ctenocephalides Fleas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce-Fedrow, Alison; Maina, Alice N; Otiang, Elkanah; Ade, Fredrick; Omulo, Sylvia; Ogola, Eric; Ochieng, Linus; Njenga, M Kariuki; Richards, Allen L

    2015-04-01

    Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis was identified molecularly in fleas collected in 2009 from Asembo, Kenya. Multilocus sequence typing using the 17-kD antigen gene, rrs, gltA, ompA, ompB, and sca4 demonstrated that Candidatus R. asemboensis is closely related to Rickettsia felis but distinct enough to be considered for separate species classification. Following this molecular characterization of Candidatus R. asemboensis, the in vitro cultivation of this bacterium was then performed. We used Ctenocephalides canis and Ctenocephalides felis fleas removed from dogs in Kenya to initiate the in vitro isolation of Candidatus R. asemboensis. Successful cultures were obtained using Drosophila melanogaster S2 and Aedes albopictus C6/36 cell lines. Cytological staining and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were used to visualize/confirm the culture of the bacteria in both cell lines. Sequencing of fragments of the 17-kD antigen gene, gltA, and ompB genes confirmed the identity of our Candidatus R. asemboensis isolates. To date, we have passaged Candidatus R. asemboensis 12 times through S2 and C6/36 cells, and active and frozen cultures are currently being maintained. This is the first time that a R. felis-like organism has been grown and maintained in culture and is therefore the first time that one of them, Candidatus R. asemboensis, has been characterized beyond molecular typing.

  14. A mathematical explanation via "intelligent" PID controllers of the strange ubiquity of PIDs

    CERN Document Server

    Novel, Brigitte D'Andrea; Join, Cédric; Mounier, Hugues; Steux, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquity of PID controllers in the industry has remained mysterious until now. We provide here a mathematical explanation of this strange phenomenon by comparing their sampling with the the one of "intelligent" PID controllers, which were recently introduced. Some computer simulations nevertheless confirm the superiority of the new intelligent feedback design.

  15. Ubiquity of non-diffusive momentum transport in JET H-modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisen, H.; Camenen, Y.; Salmi, A.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Maslov, M.; Tala, T.; Beurskens, M.; Giroud, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2012-01-01

    A broad survey of the experimental database of neutral beam heated baseline H-modes and hybrid scenarios in the JET tokamak has established the ubiquity of non-diffusive momentum transport mechanisms in rotating plasmas. As a result of their presence, the normalized angular frequency gradient R &

  16. Complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’ (Laf), strain ptsapsy, was obtained by an Illumina HiSeq 2000. The Laf genome comprises 1,192,232 nucleotides, 34.5% GC content, 1,141 predicted coding sequences, 44 tRNAs, 3 complete copies of ribosomal RNA genes (16S, 23S and 5S) ...

  17. Susceptibility of sixteen citrus genotypes to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

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    Huanglongbing (HLB) disease is the most serious threat to citrus production worldwide and in the last decade has devastated the Florida citrus industry. HLB is associated with a phloem-limited a-proteobacter Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and its insect vector the Asian citrus psyllid (Dia...

  18. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' on tomato in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April of 2012, tomato plants grown in several departments of Honduras, were observed with symptoms resembling those of “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) infection. The symptoms include overall chlorosis, severe stunting, leaf cupping, excessive branching of axillary shoots, and leaf pu...

  19. First report of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" on pepper in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2012, bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants exhibiting symptoms that resembled those of the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” infection were observed in commercial pepper fields in several departments in Honduras, including Francisco Morazán, Ocotepeque, El Paraíso, and Olancho. Man...

  20. Clues into the metagenome of huanglongbing infected citrus by analysis of ancillary sequences from Ion Torrent whole genome Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a globally devastating disease of citrus. Presently, three etiological agents are associated with HLB and include; Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), Candidatus Liberibacter americanus; and Candidatus Liberibacter africanus. Attempts to determine alternate (non-Liberi...

  1. Influence of study in hee on ubiquity and strength of students’ computer gambling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudryavtsev M.D.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to clear up effectiveness of learning-education process for counteraction of students’ harmful passion to computer games’ ubiquity. Material: 1st - 3rd year students (main health group were the objects of the research. In total they were 952 boys and 523 girls. In 1st year students’ academic groups testing was carried out ant the beginning of academic year (October; in academic groups of 1st-3rd year students the testing was at the end of academic year (May. Results: it was found that among 1st year boy students ubiquity of computer gaming as well as time losses, connected with it are higher than among girl students. Educational process is not sufficiently effective in struggle against computer gaming. For girls, this passion is not dangerous in general. In the course of study at HEE, the strength of this passion reduces independent on sex. Conclusions: for increase of educational process’s effectiveness and improvement of students’ life quality it is necessary to consider personal features of boy students as well as to organize health related measures with the help of health related physical culture means.

  2. Microbiology of ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter’ in activated sludge

    OpenAIRE

    He, Shaomei; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary ‘Candidatus Accumulibacter’ is a biotechnologically important bacterial group that can accumulate large amounts of intracellular polyphosphate, contributing to biological phosphorus removal in wastewater treatment. Since its first molecular identification more than a decade ago, this bacterial group has drawn significant research attention due to its high abundance in many biological phosphorus removal systems. In the past 6 years, our understanding of Accumulibacter microbiology and ...

  3. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma graminis' and 'Candidatus Phytoplasma caricae', two novel phytoplasmas associated with diseases of sugarcane, weeds and papaya in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocha, Yaima; López, Mercedes; Piñol, Berta; Fernández, Miriam; Picornell, Buenaventura; Almeida, Roberto; Palenzuela, Iris; Wilson, Michael R; Jones, Phil

    2005-11-01

    During 2003, surveys of sugarcane yellow leaf disease and papaya bunchy top-like disease were carried out on plantations in Havana province, Cuba, to determine the roles of weeds and Auchenorrhyncha insects in the epidemiology of these diseases. More than 250 plant and insect samples were collected and indexed by using a nested PCR for phytoplasma 16S rDNA with the generic primer pairs P1/P7 and R16F2n/R16R2. The PCR products were further characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism using HaeIII, AluI, Sau3AI, Tru9I, HhaI, HpaII and TaqI endonucleases, giving patterns that distinguished them from those of the other reference phytoplasmas analysed. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences identified the phytoplasmas present in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.), Cynodon dactylon L., Conyza canadensis L. Cronq., Sorghum halepense L. Pers., Macroptilium lathyroides L. Urb., Saccharosydne saccharivora (Westwood) and Cedusa spp., and those in papaya (Carica papaya L.) and Empoasca papayae, as two novel provisional phytoplasma species. We propose that these phytoplasmas should be given Candidatus status, as 'Candidatus Phytoplasma graminis' and 'Candidatus Phytoplasma caricae', respectively.

  4. Environmental distribution and population biology of Candidatus Accumulibacter, a primary agent of Biological Phosphorus Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, S. Brook; Warnecke, Falk; Madejska, Julita; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Members of the uncultured bacterial genus Candidatus Accumulibacter are capable of intracellular accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR), but were also recently shown to inhabit freshwater and estuarine sediments. Additionally, metagenomic sequencing of two bioreactor cultures enriched in Candidatus Accumulibacter, but housed on separate continents, revealed the potential for glob...

  5. Greigite magnetosome membrane ultrastructure in 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Fernanda P; Silva, Karen T; Farina, Marcos; Keim, Carolina N; Lins, Ulysses

    2008-06-01

    The ultrastructure of the greigite magnetosome membrane in the multicellular magnetotactic bacteria 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis' was studied. Each cell contains 80 membrane-enclosed iron-sulfide magnetosomes. Cytochemistry methods showed that the magnetosomes are enveloped by a structure whose staining pattern and dimensions are similar to those of the cytoplasmic membrane, indicating that the magnetosome membrane likely originates from the cytoplasmic membrane. Freeze-fracture showed intramembrane particles in the vesicles surrounding each magnetosome. Observations of cell membrane invaginations, the trilaminar membrane structure of immature magnetosomes, and empty vesicles together suggested that greigite magnetosome formation begins by invagination of the cell membrane, as has been proposed for magnetite magnetosomes. PMID:18645957

  6. High prevalence of "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and apparent exclusion of Rickettsia parkeri in adult Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) from Kansas and Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Christopher D; Denison, Amy M; Dryden, Michael W; Noden, Bruce H; Lash, R Ryan; Abdelghani, Sarah S; Evans, Anna E; Kelly, Aubree R; Hecht, Joy A; Karpathy, Sandor E; Ganta, Roman R; Little, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick), an aggressive, human-biting, Nearctic and Neotropical tick, is the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri in the United States. This pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia species has been identified in 8-52% of questing adult Gulf Coast ticks in the southeastern United States. To our knowledge, R. parkeri has not been reported previously from adult specimens of A. maculatum collected in Kansas or Oklahoma. A total of 216 adult A. maculatum ticks were collected from 18 counties in Kansas and Oklahoma during 2011-2014 and evaluated by molecular methods for evidence of infection with R. parkeri. No infections with this agent were identified; however, 47% of 94 ticks collected from Kansas and 73% of 122 ticks from Oklahoma were infected with "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" a spotted fever group Rickettsia species of undetermined pathogenicity. These preliminary data suggest that "Ca. R. andeanae" is well-adapted to survival in populations of A. maculatum in Kansas and Oklahoma, and that its ubiquity in Gulf Coast ticks in these states may effectively exclude R. parkeri from their shared arthropod host, which could diminish markedly or preclude entirely the occurrence of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in this region of the United States. PMID:25773931

  7. High prevalence of "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" and apparent exclusion of Rickettsia parkeri in adult Amblyomma maculatum (Acari: Ixodidae) from Kansas and Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Christopher D; Denison, Amy M; Dryden, Michael W; Noden, Bruce H; Lash, R Ryan; Abdelghani, Sarah S; Evans, Anna E; Kelly, Aubree R; Hecht, Joy A; Karpathy, Sandor E; Ganta, Roman R; Little, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    Amblyomma maculatum (the Gulf Coast tick), an aggressive, human-biting, Nearctic and Neotropical tick, is the principal vector of Rickettsia parkeri in the United States. This pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia species has been identified in 8-52% of questing adult Gulf Coast ticks in the southeastern United States. To our knowledge, R. parkeri has not been reported previously from adult specimens of A. maculatum collected in Kansas or Oklahoma. A total of 216 adult A. maculatum ticks were collected from 18 counties in Kansas and Oklahoma during 2011-2014 and evaluated by molecular methods for evidence of infection with R. parkeri. No infections with this agent were identified; however, 47% of 94 ticks collected from Kansas and 73% of 122 ticks from Oklahoma were infected with "Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae" a spotted fever group Rickettsia species of undetermined pathogenicity. These preliminary data suggest that "Ca. R. andeanae" is well-adapted to survival in populations of A. maculatum in Kansas and Oklahoma, and that its ubiquity in Gulf Coast ticks in these states may effectively exclude R. parkeri from their shared arthropod host, which could diminish markedly or preclude entirely the occurrence of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in this region of the United States.

  8. "Candidatus Phytoplasma americanum", a phytoplasma associated with a potato purple top wilt disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ing-Ming; Bottner, Kristi D; Secor, Gary; Rivera-Varas, Viviana

    2006-07-01

    Potato purple top wilt (PPT) is a devastating disease that occurs in various regions of North America and Mexico. At least three distinct phytoplasma strains belonging to three different phytoplasma groups (16SrI, 16SrII and 16SrVI) have been associated with this disease. A new disease with symptoms similar to PPT was recently observed in Texas and Nebraska, USA. Two distinct phytoplasma strain clusters were identified. One belongs to the 16SrI phytoplasma group, subgroup A, and the other is a novel phytoplasma that is most closely related to, and shares 96.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with, a member of group 16SrXII. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the novel PPT-associated phytoplasma strains, previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' organisms and other distinct unnamed phytoplasmas indicated that the novel phytoplasma, termed American potato purple top wilt (APPTW) phytoplasma, represents a distinct lineage and shares a common ancestor with stolbur phytoplasma, "Candidatus Phytoplasma australiense", "Candidatus Phytoplasma japonicum", "Candidatus Phytoplasma fragariae", bindweed yellows phytoplasma (IBS), "Candidatus Phytoplasma caricae" and "Candidatus Phytoplasma graminis". On the basis of unique 16S rRNA gene sequences and biological properties, it is proposed that the APPTW phytoplasma represents "Candidatus Phytoplasma americanum", with APPTW12-NE as the reference strain. PMID:16825635

  9. Prevalence of 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' type II under phosphate limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Hooijmans, C M; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2016-12-01

    P-limitation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) systems fed with acetate, has generally been considered as a condition leading to enrichment of organisms of the genotype' Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis' expressing the glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) phenotype. Recent studies have demonstrated in short-term experiments that organisms of the genotype 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' clade I and II, known to express the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) phenotype can switch to the GAO phenotype when poly-P is absent, but are performing the HAc-uptake at lower kinetic rates, where clade I showed the lowest rates. The objective of this study was to verify whether organisms of the genotype 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' can also be enriched under P-limiting conditions while expressing a GAO phenotype and more specifically to see which specific clade prevails. A sequencing batch reactor was inoculated with activated sludge to enrich an EBPR culture for a cultivation period of 128 days (16 times the solids retention time) under P-limiting conditions. A mixed culture was obtained comprising of 49 % 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' clade II and 46 % 'Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis'. The culture performed a full GAO metabolism for anaerobic HAc-uptake, but was still able to switch to a PAO metabolism, taking up excessive amounts of phosphate during the aerobic phase when it became available in the influent. These findings show that P-limitation, often used as strategy for enrichment of 'Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis', does not always lead to enrichment of only 'Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis'. Furthermore, it demonstrates that 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' are able to proliferate in activated sludge systems for periods of up to 128 days or longer when the influent phosphate concentrations are just enough for assimilation purposes and no poly-P is formed. The 'Candidatus Accumulibacter

  10. Characterization of an ATP/ADP translocase in the citrus huanglongbing bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a disease currently threatening the citrus industry worldwide, has been associated with three different species of Alphaproteobacteria known as Candidatus Liberibacter. A complete genome sequence was recently obtained via metagenomics for Ca. L. asiaticus (Las), the prom...

  11. Sequence analysis of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso-C) isolated from carrot psyllids collected in Scandinavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fastidious prokaryote Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso), transmitted by the tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), is associated with the Zebra Chip disease of potato. Plants infected with Liberibacter may experience significant yield losses and these plants also serve as pote...

  12. Effect of chronic feline immunodeficiency infection, and efficacy of marbofloxacin treatment, on 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Séverine; Caney, Sarah M A; Day, Michael J; Dean, Rachel S; Helps, Chris R; Knowles, Toby G; Lait, Philippa J P; Pinches, Mark D G; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, and efficacy of marbofloxacin treatment, on 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection. Six cats chronically infected with FIV-Glasgow8 (group A) and six FIV-free cats (group B) were infected with 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' on day 0 by intravenous inoculation of blood. From day 0 to 105 post-infection (pi), blood samples were collected for 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' and FIV provirus quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and haematological examination. Three of the six cats in each of the groups were randomly selected to receive marbofloxacin treatment (2mg/kg PO SID) from day 49 to day 76 pi, with the remaining cats being untreated controls. Maximum 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number was reached around day 30 pi. No overt cycling or marked variation in copy number was observed. No significant effect of FIV infection on 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number kinetics or anaemia indices was found. No correlation was found between FIV provirus copy number and 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number or haematological variables. Although marbofloxacin treatment was associated with a significant decrease in 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number, the copy number plateaued during treatment, with no negative PCR results. Additionally, after termination of marbofloxacin treatment the copy numbers of the treated cats increased to reach levels similar to those of the untreated cats within 7-10 days. This study documents, for the first time, the infection kinetics and antibiotic responsiveness of 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' infection.

  13. Rickettsia africae and Candidatus Rickettsia barbariae in ticks in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waner, Trevor; Keysary, Avi; Eremeeva, Marina E; Din, Adi Beth; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y; King, Roni; Atiya-Nasagi, Yafit

    2014-05-01

    DNA of several spotted fever group rickettsiae was found in ticks in Israel. The findings include evidence for the existence of Rickettsia africae and Candidatus Rickettsia barbariae in ticks in Israel. The DNA of R. africae was detected in a Hyalomma detritum tick from a wild boar and DNA of C. Rickettsia barbariae was detected in Rhipicephalus turanicus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus collected from vegetation. The DNA of Rickettsia massiliae was found in Rh. sanguineus and Haemaphysalis erinacei, whereas DNA of Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae was detected in a Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus. Clinicians should be aware that diseases caused by a variety of rickettsiae previously thought to be present only in other countries outside of the Middle East may infect residents of Israel who have not necessarily traveled overseas. Furthermore, this study reveals again that the epidemiology of the spotted fever group rickettsiae may not only involve Rickettsia conorii but may include other rickettsiae.

  14. Molecular Detection of Candidatus Bartonella hemsundetiensis in Bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Thomas M; Veikkolainen, Ville; Pulliainen, Arto T

    2015-11-01

    Although bats have been implicated as reservoir hosts for a number of zoonotic and life-threatening viruses, the bat bacterial flora and its zoonotic threat remain elusive. However, members of the vector-borne bacterial genera Bartonella causing various human as well as animal diseases have recently been isolated or detected from bats and their ectoparasites. In this study, we sampled 124 insectivorous microbats (Daubenton's bat, Myotis daubentonii) for peripheral blood in southwestern Finland in 2010. A Bartonella-specific PCR targeting rpoB (RNA polymerase β-subunit) was positive with blood samples from 46 bats (prevalence 37%). Scaled mass indexes of the infected and noninfected bats did not differ (p = 0.057). One rpoB sequence was identical with the rpoB sequence of B. naantaliensis strain 2574/1, previously isolated from bats in Finland. The rest of the sequences were highly similar to each other with nucleotide identity scores of 96% or higher. Nucleotide identity scores to the previously described type strain sequences of Bartonella or other database entries were no higher than 87%. Sequence analyses of another gene, gltA (citrate synthase), gave no higher than 90% nucleotide identity scores. On the basis of the conventional 95% sequence similarity cutoff in bacterial species delineation, a novel species of Bartonella was detected. We propose a species name Candidatus B. hemsundetiensis. Phylogenetic analyses based on rpoB and gltA sequences indicate that Candidatus B. hemsundetiensis clusters in a deep-branching position close to the ancestral species B. tamiae and B. bacilliformis. Our study reinforces the importance of bats as reservoirs of Bartonella.

  15. Whole-Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from Guangdong, China

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Zheng; Deng, X.; J. Chen

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain A4, isolated from a mandarin citrus in Guangdong, People’s Republic of China, is reported. The A4 strain has a genome size of 1,208,625 bp, G+C content of 36.4%, 1,107 predicted open reading frames, and 53 RNA genes.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, F.; Z. Zheng; Deng, X.; Cen, Y.; Liang, G; J. Chen

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong, China, is reported here. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter americanus” Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hong; Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; Han, Cliff S.; Lou, Binghai; Civerolo, Edwin L; Machado, Marcos A; Gupta, Goutam

    2013-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter americanus” strain PW_SP. The 1,176,071-bp genome, with 31.6% G+C content, comprises 948 open reading frames, 38 tRNAs, and three complete rRNAs.

  18. Complete Genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ obtained through metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by the citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri and Trioza erytreae), and is associated with low-titer, phloem-limited infections by any of the three uncultured species of a-Proteobacteria: 'Candidatus Liberibact...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" Strain Kam1, a Thermoacidophilic Methanotrophic Verrucomicrobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikstad, Helge-André; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2015-01-01

    "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" strain Kam1 is an aerobic methane-oxidizing thermoacidophilic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum. It was recovered from an acidic geothermal site in Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russian Federation. Its genome possesses three complete pmoCAB gene clusters encoding particulate methane monooxygenase enzymes and a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for carbon assimilation. PMID:25745002

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" Strain Kam1, a Thermoacidophilic Methanotrophic Verrucomicrobium.

    OpenAIRE

    Erikstad, Helge Andre; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2015-01-01

    "Candidatus Methylacidiphilum kamchatkense" strain Kam1 is an aerobic methane-oxidizing thermoacidophilic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum. It was recovered from an acidic geothermal site in Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russian Federation. Its genome possesses three complete pmoCAB gene clusters encoding particulate methane monooxygenase enzymes and a complete Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for carbon assimilation.

  1. Complete genome sequence of chinese strain of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ strain (Las) Guangxi-1(GX-1) was obtained by an Illumina HiSeq 2000. The GX-1 genome comprises 1,268,237 nucleotides, 36.5 % GC content, 1,141 predicted coding sequences, 44 tRNAs, 3 complete copies of ribosomal RNA genes (16S, 23S ...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bactrocera oleae Symbiont "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Frances; Gioti, Anastasia; Starns, David; Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Vontas, John; Darby, Alistair C

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola" is a Gammaproteobacterium that forms a symbiotic association with the agricultural pest Bactrocera oleae Here, we present a 2.1-Mb draft hybrid genome assembly for "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" generated from single-cell and metagenomic data. PMID:27634990

  3. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' associated with psyllid-affected carrots in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) plants with symptoms resembling those associated with the carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis and the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” were observed in 70-80% of commercial fields and experimental plots in southeastern Norway from late July to mid-September 2011; al...

  4. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' on tomato in El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April of 2012, tomato plants grown near the town of Yuroconte in the municipality of La Palma in El Salvador, were observed with symptoms resembling those of “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) infection. Disease incidence in several fields in the area ranged from 40 to 60%. Heavy infes...

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from a Citrus Tree in San Gabriel, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Kumagai, L; Liang, G; Deng, X; Zheng, Z; Keremane, M; Chen, J

    2015-12-23

    The draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain SGCA5 from an orange citrus tree in San Gabriel, California, is reported here. SGCA5 has a genome size of 1,201,445 bp, a G+C content of 36.4%, 1,152 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 42 RNA genes.

  6. SSR-based Genetic Analysis of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” isolates from Multiple Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most devastating citrus diseases that threaten citrus production worldwide. The causal agents are believed to be Candidatus Liberibacter spp. Although substantial efforts have been made toward detection of the presumed pathogens, information regarding to the patho...

  7. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ associated with citrus Huanglongbing worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. In the United States (US), HLB is typically associated with the presence of a fastidious phloem-limited bacterium named ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, though other Liberibacter species also have been associated with ...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Zheng, Z; Deng, X; Cen, Y; Liang, G; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong, China, is reported here. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs. PMID:26543132

  9. First Report of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” Associated with Huanglongbing in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most serious disease of citrus worldwide. Three different “Candidatus Liberibacter” species are associated with HLB: “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” (Las), “Ca. L. africanus” (Laf), and “Ca. L. americanus” (1). In Africa, Laf and its vector Trioza erytreae are reported in Sou...

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Viadribacter manganicus" Isolated from a German Floodplain Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Burga; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Iron- and manganese-depositing bacteria occur in many soils and all water systems, and their biogenic depositions of ochre in technical systems may cause severe clogging problems and monetary losses. "Candidatus Viadribacter manganicus" is a small coccoid, iron- and manganese-depositing bacterium isolated from the Lower Oder Valley National Park, Germany. PMID:27587815

  11. Relationship between plant vascular architecture and within-plant distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” is an important pathogen of Solanaceous crops that causes zebra chip disease of potato. This pathogen is transmitted among plants by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli. Within-plant variability in Liberibacter infection impedes the ability to detect Lib...

  12. First Report of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ Associated with Psyllid-Infested Carrots in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrot plants with symptoms resembling those associated with the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” were observed in commercial carrot fields in Lower Saxony, Germany in September 2014. The fields were infested with the carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis and the infection rate was about 50...

  13. Draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong of China is reported. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs....

  14. Transmission and Propagation of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ by Grafting with Individual Citrus Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a chronic, progressive decline disease in citrus associated with systemic infection by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). Transmission in the field is by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama. Experimental propagation of CLas is done c...

  15. Factors affecting transmission rates of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri, is an important pest because it transmits a bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas) responsible for a serious disease of citrus known as Asiatic huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). USDA-ARS researchers recently established a program...

  16. Whole genome sequence of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genome of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” strain YCPA, a symbiont of Asian citrus psyllid, from Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain chromosome was 457,565 bp with 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNA genes. The strain also contains a 5,458 bp plasmid, ...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Zheng, Z; Deng, X; Cen, Y; Liang, G; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain YCPsy from an Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in Guangdong, China, is reported here. The YCPsy strain has a genome size of 1,233,647 bp, 36.5% G+C content, 1,171 open reading frames (ORFs), and 53 RNAs.

  18. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' associated with psylllid-affected tobacco in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacco plants with symptoms resembling those associated with the psyllid Bactericera cockerelli and the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) were observed in April of 2012 in heavily B. cockerelli-infested commercial fields in the Department of El-Paraíso, Honduras; all cultivars ...

  19. First detection of tick-borne "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" in Denmark 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Mette Ely; Mølbak, Lars; Pihl, Thomas Peter Boye;

    2012-01-01

    This is the first reporting of the tick-borne zoonotic bacterium "Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis" in Denmark. A total of 2,625 Ixodes ricinus ticks from 58 locations in Denmark were collected and analysed for "Ca. Neoehrlichia mikurensis". A nested PCR revealed the presence of the bacterium...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bactrocera oleae Symbiont “Candidatus Erwinia dacicola”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blow, Frances; Gioti, Anastasia; Starns, David; Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Vontas, John

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Erwinia dacicola” is a Gammaproteobacterium that forms a symbiotic association with the agricultural pest Bactrocera oleae. Here, we present a 2.1-Mb draft hybrid genome assembly for “Ca. Erwinia dacicola” generated from single-cell and metagenomic data. PMID:27634990

  1. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' associated with psyllid-affected tobacco in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April of 2012, tobacco plants with symptoms resembling those associated with the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) were observed in commercial fields in several Departments in Nicaragua, including Esteli and Nueva Segovia; all cultivars grown were affected, at about 5 to 100%...

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus," a Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Pietersen, Gerhard; Han, Cliff; Read, David Alan; Lou, Binghai; Gupta, Goutam; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus" strain PTSAPSY. The 1,192,232-bp genome with 34.5% G+C content comprises 1,017 open reading frames, 44 tRNAs, and three complete rRNAs in a circular chromosome. PMID:26184931

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from a Citrus Tree in San Gabriel, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Kumagai, L; Liang, G; Deng, X; Zheng, Z; Keremane, M; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain SGCA5 from an orange citrus tree in San Gabriel, California, is reported here. SGCA5 has a genome size of 1,201,445 bp, a G+C content of 36.4%, 1,152 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 42 RNA genes. PMID:26701083

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos," a Hemotropic Mycoplasma Identified in Cattle in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Camarillo, Sergio D; Amaro-Estrada, Itzel; Quiroz-Castañeda, Rosa Estela

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of the first "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos" strain found in cattle in Mexico. This hemotropic mycoplasma causes acute and chronic disease in animals. This genome is a starting point for studying the role of this mycoplasma in coinfections and synergistic mechanisms associated with the disease. PMID:27389272

  5. Influence of nitrite accumulation on "Candidatus Accumulibacter" population structure and enhanced biological phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Li, Boxiao; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Xinlong; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-02-01

    A modified University of Cape Town (MUCT) process was used to treat real municipal wastewater with low carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N). To our knowledge, this is the first study where the influence of nitrite accumulation on "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clade-level population structure was investigated during nitritation establishment and destruction. Real time quantitative PCR assays were conducted using the polyphosphate kinase 1 gene (ppk1) as a genetic marker. Abundances of total "Candidatus Accumulibacter", the relative distributions and population structure of the five "Candidatus Accumulibacter" clades were characterized. Under complete nitrification, clade I using nitrate as electron acceptor was below 5% of total "Candidatus Accumulibacter". When the reactor was transformed into nitritation, clade I gradually disappeared. Clade IID using nitrite as electron acceptor for denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal was always the dominant "Candidatus Accumulibacter" throughout the operational period. This clade was above 90% on average in total "Candidatus Accumulibacter", even up to nearly 100%, which was associated with good performance of denitrifying P removal via nitrite pathway. The nitrite concentrations affected the abundance of clade IID. The P removal was mainly completed by anoxic P uptake of about 88%. The P removal efficiency clearly had a positive correlation with the nitrite accumulation ratio. Under nitritation, the P removal efficiency was 30% higher than that under complete nitrification, suggesting that nitrite was appropriate as electron acceptor for denitrifying P removal when treating carbon-limited wastewater. PMID:26439519

  6. Clues into the metagenome of Huanglongbing infected Citrus by analysis of ancillary sequences from Ion Torrent whole genome Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, J K; Shatters, R. G.; Stover, E; Duan, Y. P.; Moore, G. A.; Powell, C A; Jarra-Cavieres, A.; Clark, S

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a globally devastating disease of citrus.  Presently, three etiological agents are associated with HLB and include; Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), Candidatus Liberibacter americanus; and Candidatus Liberibacter africanus.  Attempts to determine alternate (non-Liberibacter) associated etiological agents of HLB have been performed, namely by metagenomic analyses with HLB phenotypic citrus of phloem tissue isolated from bark [1] and whole leaf midribs [2].  Thes...

  7. Genome-wide Expression Profiling in Ponkan Infected by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Bo; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chunzhen; Zeng, Jiwu; ZHONG, Guangyan; Yi, Ganjun

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is an economical and destructive disease of citrus in South China, such as in Guangdong, Guangxi that is caused by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. The interaction at mRNA level between pathogen and citrus (Ponkan, Citrus reticulata Blanco ) was primarily researched by Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling. Ponkan leaves at 13 weeks and 26 weeks after HLB inoculation were used for analysis. The numbers of up-regulated genes were increased from 37% in 13 wpi...

  8. Unique Features of a Japanese ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Strain Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Katoh; Shin-Ichi Miyata; Hiromitsu Inoue; Toru Iwanami

    2014-01-01

    Citrus greening (huanglongbing) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with phloem-limited bacteria of three species of α-Proteobacteria, namely, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. Recent findings suggested that some Japanese strains lack the bacteriophage-type DNA polymerase region (DNA pol), in contrast to the Floridian psy62 strain. The whole genome sequence of the pol-negative 'C...

  9. Denitrification capabilities of two biological phosphorus removal sludges dominated by different “Candidatus Accumulibacter” clades

    OpenAIRE

    Flowers, Jason J.; He, Shaomei; Yilmaz, Safak; Noguera, Daniel R.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2009-01-01

    The capability of “Candidatus Accumulibacter” to use nitrate as an electron acceptor for phosphorus uptake was investigated using two activated sludge communities. The two communities were enriched in Accumulibacter clade IA and clade IIA, respectively. By performing a series of batch experiments, we found that clade IA was able to couple nitrate reduction with phosphorus uptake, but clade IIA could not. These results agree with a previously proposed hypothesis that different populations of A...

  10. Whole-Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Profftella armatura" from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Deng, X; Liang, G; Huang, J; Cen, Y; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The genome of "Candidatus Profftella armatura" strain YCPA from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain has a chromosome of 457,565 bp, 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNAs, and a plasmid, pYCPA54, of 5,458 bp with 23.9% G+C content and 5 ORFs. PMID:26543117

  11. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma cirsii', a novel taxon from creeping thistle [Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šafárová, Dana; Zemánek, Tomáš; Válová, Pavla; Navrátil, Milan

    2016-04-01

    Creeping thistle [Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop.] and dahlia (Dahlia sp.) plants showing typical symptoms of phytoplasma infection including yellowing, stunting, inflorescence and proliferation, were sampled; the presence of phytoplasma was confirmed by standard PCR using universal primers. RFLP analysis allowed classification of the detected phytoplasma strains CirYS, CirYS1 and DahlP within the 16SrXI group, the unique restriction profile F2nR2 fragment obtained in silico by iPhyClassifier indicated that they belong to the new 16SrXI-E subgroup. Genetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the studied strains shared less than 97.5% similarity with all of the previously described 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. The closest relatives are 'Candidatus Phytoplasma cynodontis' and 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae' with 96.8% and 96.6% similarity. All strains studied bear three specific regions in the 16S rRNA gene, discriminating them from the other phytoplasma species. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA and secA genes confirmed this specificity, as the creeping thistle and dahlia phytoplasma strains clustered in a distinguishable lineage group. The uniqueness of the genetic analysis agrees with the biological characterization of the studied phytoplasma strains, their host range, and geographical distribution. The strains only infect dicotyledonous plants in Europe, contrary to their closest relatives. Based on their unique properties, it could be concluded that the studied phytoplasma strains represent a discrete group that is proposed as a novel taxon 'Candidatus Phytoplasma cirsii', with strain CirYS as a reference strain. PMID:26849880

  12. Changes in Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ through Insect Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Iwanami, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Citrus greening (huanglongbing) is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. The disease is associated with three species of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ among which ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ has the widest distribution. ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ is commonly transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. A previous study showed that isolates of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ were clearly differentiated by variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) profiles at four lo...

  13. Whole-Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Profftella armatura" from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F; Deng, X; Liang, G; Huang, J; Cen, Y; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    The genome of "Candidatus Profftella armatura" strain YCPA from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain has a chromosome of 457,565 bp, 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNAs, and a plasmid, pYCPA54, of 5,458 bp with 23.9% G+C content and 5 ORFs.

  14. Whole-Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.; Deng, X.; Huang, J.; Cen, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The genome of “Candidatus Profftella armatura” strain YCPA from Diaphorina citri in Guangdong, China, was sequenced. The strain has a chromosome of 457,565 bp, 24.3% G+C content, 364 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 38 RNAs, and a plasmid, pYCPA54, of 5,458 bp with 23.9% G+C content and 5 ORFs. PMID:26543117

  15. Changes in Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ through Insect Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Katoh; Hiromitsu Inoue; Toru Iwanami

    2015-01-01

    Citrus greening (huanglongbing) is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. The disease is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' among which 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' has the widest distribution. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is commonly transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. A previous study showed that isolates of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' were clearly differentiated by variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) profiles at four lo...

  16. XoxF-Type Methanol Dehydrogenase from the Anaerobic Methanotroph “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ming L.; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Pol, Arjan; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Mike S.M. Jetten; van Niftrik, Laura; Keltjens, Jan T.

    2014-01-01

    Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” is a newly discovered anaerobic methanotroph that, surprisingly, oxidizes methane through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. The second step in this aerobic pathway is the oxidation of methanol. In Gram-negative bacteria, the reaction is catalyzed by pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH). The genome of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” putatively encodes three different MDHs that are localized in one large gene cluster: one...

  17. 'Candidatus Competibacter'-lineage genomes retrieved from metagenomes reveal functional metabolic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Simon J; Albertsen, Mads; Andresen, Eva K; Saunders, Aaron M; Kristiansen, Rikke; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Nielsen, Kåre L; Nielsen, Per H

    2014-03-01

    The glycogen-accumulating organism (GAO) 'Candidatus Competibacter' (Competibacter) uses aerobically stored glycogen to enable anaerobic carbon uptake, which is subsequently stored as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). This biphasic metabolism is key for the Competibacter to survive under the cyclic anaerobic-'feast': aerobic-'famine' regime of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) wastewater treatment systems. As they do not contribute to phosphorus (P) removal, but compete for resources with the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), thought responsible for P removal, their proliferation theoretically reduces the EBPR capacity. In this study, two complete genomes from Competibacter were obtained from laboratory-scale enrichment reactors through metagenomics. Phylogenetic analysis identified the two genomes, 'Candidatus Competibacter denitrificans' and 'Candidatus Contendobacter odensis', as being affiliated with Competibacter-lineage subgroups 1 and 5, respectively. Both have genes for glycogen and PHA cycling and for the metabolism of volatile fatty acids. Marked differences were found in their potential for the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas and Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathways, as well as for denitrification, nitrogen fixation, fermentation, trehalose synthesis and utilisation of glucose and lactate. Genetic comparison of P metabolism pathways with sequenced PAOs revealed the absence of the Pit phosphate transporter in the Competibacter-lineage genomes--identifying a key metabolic difference with the PAO physiology. These genomes are the first from any GAO organism and provide new insights into the complex interaction and niche competition between PAOs and GAOs in EBPR systems. PMID:24173461

  18. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma lycopersici', a phytoplasma associated with 'hoja de perejil' disease in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arocha, Yaima; Antesana, Olivia; Montellano, Ernesto; Franco, Pablo; Plata, G; Jones, Phil

    2007-08-01

    New diseases known locally as 'hoja de perejil' of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) and 'brotes grandes' of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) were first recognized in surveys of production fields in Bolivia during 2000-2003. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) witches' broom and little leaf diseases of native weeds Morrenia variegata and mora-mora (Serjania perulacea) were also identified near to production fields. Phytoplasma aetiology was attributed to each of these diseases following detection and initial identification of aster yellows group (16SrI) phytoplasmas in all five diseased plant species. While potato, alfalfa and mora-mora plants contained indistinguishable 16SrI-B strains, 'hoja de perejil' (THP) and morrenia little leaf (MVLL)-associated phytoplasma strains shared 97.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris' and related strains and <95 % similarity with all other 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the THP and MVLL phytoplasmas represent a novel lineage within the aster yellows (16SrI) group and, on the basis of unique 16S rRNA gene sequences, we propose that THP and MVLL phytoplasmas represent 'Candidatus Phytoplasma lycopersici', with THP as the reference strain. PMID:17684241

  19. Isolation of the rickettsial agent genetically similar to Candidatus Rickettsia kotlanii, from Haemaphysalis megaspinosa in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Masako; Ogasawara, Yumiko; Sakata, Akiko; Ito, Takuya; Fujita, Hiromi; Kawabata, Hiroki; Ando, Shuji

    2014-09-01

    Two rickettsial isolates, HM-1 and HM-2, were isolated from Haemaphysalis megaspinosa collected in Japan in 2006 and 2011, respectively. The isolates were analyzed by DNA sequences of the outer membrane protein A gene, the outer membrane protein B gene, the citrate synthase gene, the genus Rickettsia-specific outer membrane protein 17-kDa gene, the 16S ribosome RNA gene, and the PS120 protein gene ("geneD"). HM-1 was identified as Rickettsia tamurae. HM-2 matched most closely with 'Candidatus Rickettsia kotlanii' DNA, which has only been reported from H. concinna in Hungary. This is the first report of isolation in Japan of the agent genetically similar to 'Candidatus R. kotlanii,' which belongs phylogenetically to the spotted fever group Rickettsia. Our study shows the possibility that 'Candidatus R. kotlanii' can be carried by at least two tick species. Furthermore, because the Rickettsia sp. has been found two distant countries, Hungary and Japan, it has potential for wider distribution.

  20. Molecular characterization of "Candidatus Similichlamydia latridicola" gen. nov., sp. nov. (Chlamydiales: "Candidatus Parilichlamydiaceae"), a novel Chlamydia-like epitheliocystis agent in the striped trumpeter, Latris lineata (Forster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stride, M C; Polkinghorne, A; Miller, T L; Nowak, B F

    2013-08-01

    Histological analysis of gill samples taken from individuals of Latris lineata reared in aquaculture in Tasmania, Australia, and those sampled from the wild revealed the presence of epitheliocystis-like basophilic inclusions. Subsequent morphological, in situ hybridization, and molecular analyses were performed to confirm the presence of this disease and discovered a Chlamydia-like organism associated with this condition, and the criteria set by Fredericks and Relman's postulates were used to establish disease causation. Three distinct 16S rRNA genotypes were sequenced from 16 fish, and phylogenetic analyses of the nearly full-length 16S rRNA sequences generated for this bacterial agent indicated that they were nearly identical novel members of the order Chlamydiales. This new taxon formed a well-supported clade with "Candidatus Parilichlamydia carangidicola" from the yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi). On the basis of sequence divergence over the 16S rRNA region relative to all other members of the order Chlamydiales, a new genus and species are proposed here for the Chlamydia-like bacterium from L. lineata, i.e., "Candidatus Similichlamydia latridicola" gen. nov., sp. nov. PMID:23770893

  1. The ubiquity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  2. Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Microthrix parvicella" Bio17-1, a Long-Chain-Fatty-Acid-Accumulating Filamentous Actinobacterium from a Biological Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Emilie; Pinel, Nicolás; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James M.; Lance B Price; Engelthaler, David M.; Levantesi, Caterina; Tandoi, Valter; Luong, Kkai; Baliga, Nitin S.; Korlach, Jonas; Keim, Paul S.; Wilmes, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Candidatus Microthrix” bacteria are deeply branching filamentous actinobacteria which occur at the water-air interface of biological wastewater treatment plants, where they are often responsible for foaming and bulking. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of a strain from this genus: “Candidatus Microthrix parvicella” strain Bio17-1.

  3. The Intracellular Citrus Huanglongbing Bacterium, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Encodes Two Novel Autotransporters

    OpenAIRE

    Guixia Hao; Michael Boyle; Lijuan Zhou; Yongping Duan

    2013-01-01

    Proteins secreted by the type V secretion system (T5SS), known as autotransporters, are large extracellular virulence proteins localized to the bacterial poles. In this study, we characterized two novel autotransporter proteins of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), and redesignated them as LasAI and LasAII in lieu of the previous names HyvI and HyvII. As a phloem-limited, intracellular bacterial pathogen, Las has a significantly reduced genome and causes huanglongbing (HLB), a devasta...

  4. Unique Features of a Japanese ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Strain Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Miyata, Shin-ichi; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Iwanami, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Citrus greening (huanglongbing) is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with phloem-limited bacteria of three species of α-Proteobacteria, namely, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, ‘Ca. L. americanus’, and ‘Ca. L. africanus’. Recent findings suggested that some Japanese strains lack the bacteriophage-type DNA polymerase region (DNA pol), in contrast to the Floridian psy62 strain. The whole genome sequence of the pol-negative ‘C...

  5. Characteristics of the draft genome of "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae", a facultative endosymbiont of Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hai-Wei; Lu, Jia-Bao; Ye, Yu-Xuan; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2016-06-01

    There exists a kind of symbiotic bacterium named "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae" in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens. After being filtered and assembled from the BPH genome sequencing project, the genome sequence of this bacterial symbiont was obtained. After initial analysis based on the genome, we have found its potential role to synthesize B vitamins for the host. In order to better understand the lifestyle and the genomic changes of this symbiotic bacterium after the symbiotic relationship was established, we further report the characteristics of this draft genome. Compared with several other related bacteria, "Candidatus Arsenophonus nilaparvatae" has proven to be a facultative endosymbiont at the genomic level. Concurrently, the presence of fimbriae and flagella formation related genes indicates this maternally transmitted endosymbiont is most likely to retain the capacity to invade new hosts. Through further analysis of annotated gene sets, we also find evidence of genome reduction in its secretion system and metabolic pathways. These findings reflect its evolutionary trend to be an obligate one and enable a deeper study of microbe-insect interactions. PMID:26792263

  6. Transcriptome analysis of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" in its psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Ibanez

    Full Text Available "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" (Lso is an emergent pathogen of carrots in Europe and solanaceous plants in North and Central America and New Zealand. This bacterium is closely related to other pathogenic Candidatus Liberibacter spp., all vectored by psyllids. In order to understand the molecular interaction of this pathogen and its psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli, Illumina sequencing of psyllid harboring Lso was performed to determine if this approach could be used to assess the bacterial transcriptome in this association. Prior to sequencing, psyllid RNA was purified and insect and bacterial rRNA were removed. Mapping of reads to Lso genome revealed that over 92% of the bacterial genes were expressed in the vector, and that the COG categories Translation and Post-translational modification, protein turnover, chaperone functions were the most expressed functional categories. Expression levels of selected Lso genes were confirmed by RT-qPCR. The transcriptomic analysis also helped correct Lso genome annotation by identifying the expression of genes that were not predicted in the genome sequencing effort.

  7. Whole-Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" from a Huanglongbing-Affected Citrus Tree in Central Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z; Sun, X; Deng, X; Chen, J

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" strain FL17, isolated from a huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus tree in central Florida. The FL17 genome comprised 1,227,253 bp, with a G+C content of 36.5%, 1,175 predicted open reading frames, and 53 RNA genes. PMID:25792067

  8. Whole-Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from a Huanglongbing-Affected Citrus Tree in Central Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Zheng; X. Sun; Deng, X.; J. Chen

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain FL17, isolated from a huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus tree in central Florida. The FL17 genome comprised 1,227,253 bp, with a G+C content of 36.5%, 1,175 predicted open reading frames, and 53 RNA genes.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter africanus,” a Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Hong; Pietersen, Gerhard; Han, Cliff; Read, David Alan; Lou, Binghai; Gupta, Goutam; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter africanus” strain PTSAPSY. The 1,192,232-bp genome with 34.5% G+C content comprises 1,017 open reading frames, 44 tRNAs, and three complete rRNAs in a circular chromosome.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from a Citrus Tree in San Gabriel, California

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, F.; Kumagai, L.; Liang, G; Deng, X.; Z. Zheng; Keremane, M.; J. Chen

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain SGCA5 from an orange citrus tree in San Gabriel, California, is reported here. SGCA5 has a genome size of 1,201,445 bp, a G+C content of 36.4%, 1,152 predicted open reading frames (ORFs), and 42 RNA genes.

  11. Deciphering the bacterial microbiome of citrus plants in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’-infection and antibiotic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating citrus disease worldwide, is vectored by phloem-feeding insects, and the pathogen in the USA is Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las). The bacterial microbiome of citrus after Las-infection and treatments with ampicillin (Amp) and gentamicin (Gm) was chara...

  12. Proteomic analysis of the purple sulfur bacterium Candidatus "Thiodictyon syntrophicum" strain Cad16T isolated from Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storelli, Nicola; Saad, Maged M.; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik;

    2014-01-01

    Lake Cadagno is characterised by a compact chemocline with high concentrations of purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). 2D-DIGE was used to monitor the global changes in the proteome of Candidatus "Thiodictyon syntrophicum" strain Cad16T both in the presence and absence of light. This study aimed...

  13. Novel Molecular Technique for Rapid Cloning of Unknown Sequences From Unculturable Huanglongbing (HLB) Associated Bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), previously known as citrus greening disease, is one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. Recent occurrence of citrus Huanglongbing(HLB)in Florida has dramatically increased the threat to the entire US citrus industry. The disease is associated with Candidatus Liber...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos,” a Hemotropic Mycoplasma Identified in Cattle in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Camarillo, Sergio D.; Amaro-Estrada, Itzel

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of the first “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos” strain found in cattle in Mexico. This hemotropic mycoplasma causes acute and chronic disease in animals. This genome is a starting point for studying the role of this mycoplasma in coinfections and synergistic mechanisms associated with the disease. PMID:27389272

  15. Transgenic Carrizo expressing 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' effector P235 displays huanglongbing-like symptom and alters some gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) is the agent causing destructive citrus huanglongbing worldwide. A hypothetical protein (P235) was identified in Las genome prophage region, which encodes a 123aa protein with a molecular weight of 14.19kD. Green fluorescence protein (GFP)-fused with P235 ap...

  16. Zebra Chip disease and potato biochemistry: Tuber physiological changes in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ infection over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebra chip disease (ZC), putatively caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), is of increasing concern to potato production in Mexico, the United States, and New Zealand. However, little is known about host tuber physiological changes that result in ZC symptom formation. This study exp...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae" Strain Mbita1, the Causative Agent of Napier Grass Stunt Disease in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anne; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Wambua, Lillian; Olds, Cassandra; Midega, Charles; Dickinson, Matthew; Kawicha, Praphat; Khan, Zeyaur; Masiga, Daniel; Jores, Joerg; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens with devastating impact on agricultural production worldwide. In eastern Africa, Napier grass stunt disease causes serious economic losses in the smallholder dairy industry. This draft genome sequence of " ITALIC! CandidatusPhytoplasma oryzae" strain Mbita1 provides insight into its genomic organization and the molecular basis of pathogenicity. PMID:27103722

  18. Autotrophic Carbon Dioxide Fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle by the Denitrifying Methanotroph "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasigraf, O.; Kool, D.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Ettwig, K.F.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and the most abundant hydrocarbon in the Earth's atmosphere. Methanotrophic microorganisms can use methane as their sole energy source and play a crucial role in the mitigation of methane emissions in the environment. "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is a

  19. Molecular detection of Rickettsia felis and Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis in fleas from human habitats, Asembo, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ju; Maina, Alice N; Knobel, Darryn L; Cleaveland, Sarah; Laudisoit, Anne; Wamburu, Kabura; Ogola, Eric; Parola, Philippe; Breiman, Robert F; Njenga, M Kariuki; Richards, Allen L

    2013-08-01

    The flea-borne rickettsioses murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi) and flea-borne spotted fever (FBSF) (Rickettsia felis) are febrile diseases distributed among humans worldwide. Murine typhus has been known to be endemic to Kenya since the 1950s, but FBSF was only recently documented in northeastern (2010) and western (2012) Kenya. To characterize the potential exposure of humans in Kenya to flea-borne rickettsioses, a total of 330 fleas (134 pools) including 5 species (Xenopsylla cheopis, Ctenocephalides felis, Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, and Echidnophaga gallinacea) were collected from domestic and peridomestic animals and from human dwellings within Asembo, western Kenya. DNA was extracted from the 134 pooled flea samples and 89 (66.4%) pools tested positively for rickettsial DNA by 2 genus-specific quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays based upon the citrate synthase (gltA) and 17-kD antigen genes and the Rfelis qPCR assay. Sequences from the 17-kD antigen gene, the outer membrane protein (omp)B, and 2 R. felis plasmid genes (pRF and pRFd) of 12 selected rickettsia-positive samples revealed a unique Rickettsia sp. (n=11) and R. felis (n=1). Depiction of the new rickettsia by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) targeting the 16S rRNA (rrs), 17-kD antigen gene, gltA, ompA, ompB, and surface cell antigen 4 (sca4), shows that it is most closely related to R. felis but genetically dissimilar enough to be considered a separate species provisionally named Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis. Subsequently, 81 of the 134 (60.4%) flea pools tested positively for Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis by a newly developed agent-specific qPCR assay, Rasemb. R. felis was identified in 9 of the 134 (6.7%) flea pools, and R. typhi the causative agent of murine typhus was not detected in any of 78 rickettsia-positive pools assessed using a species-specific qPCR assay, Rtyph. Two pools were found to contain both R. felis and Candidatus Rickettsia asemboensis DNA and 1 pool

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Anammox Bacterium "Candidatus Scalindua brodae," Obtained Using Differential Coverage Binning of Sequencing Data from Two Reactor Enrichments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speth, Daan R; Russ, Lina; Kartal, Boran; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Dutilh, Bas E; Jetten, Mike S M

    2015-01-01

    We present the draft genome of anammox bacterium "Candidatus Scalindua brodae," which at 282 contigs is a major improvement over the highly fragmented genome assembly of related species "Ca. Scalindua profunda" (1,580 contigs) which was previously published.

  1. Pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) and protective immunity against Rickettsia rickettsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Juan J; Moreira-Soto, Andrés; Alvarado, Gilberth; Taylor, Lizeth; Calderón-Arguedas, Olger; Hun, Laya; Corrales-Aguilar, Eugenia; Morales, Juan Alberto; Troyo, Adriana

    2015-09-01

    'Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii' is a spotted fever group rickettsia that is not considered pathogenic, although there is serologic evidence of possible infection in animals and humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pathogenic potential of a Costa Rican strain of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' in guinea pigs and determine its capacity to generate protective immunity against a subsequent infection with a local strain of Rickettsia rickettsii isolated from a human case. Six guinea pigs were inoculated with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' strain 9-CC-3-1 and two controls with cell culture medium. Health status was evaluated, and necropsies were executed at days 2, 4, and 13. Blood and tissues were processed by PCR to detect the gltA gene, and end titers of anti-'Candidatus R. amblyommii' IgG were determined by indirect immunofluorescence. To evaluate protective immunity, another 5 guinea pigs were infected with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' (IGPs). After 4 weeks, these 5 IGPs and 3 controls (CGPs) were inoculated with pathogenic R. rickettsii. Clinical signs and titers of anti-Rickettsia IgG were determined. IgG titers reached 1:512 at day 13 post-infection with 'Candidatus R. amblyommii'. On day 2 after inoculation, two guinea pigs had enlarged testicles and 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' DNA was detected in testicles. Histopathology confirmed piogranulomatous orchitis with perivascular inflammatory infiltrate in the epididymis. In the protective immunity assay, anti-Rickettsia IgG end titers after R. rickettsii infection were lower in IGPs than in CGPs. IGPs exhibited only transient fever, while CGP showed signs of severe disease and mortality. R. rickettsii was detected in testicles and blood of CGPs. Results show that the strain 9-CC-3-1 of 'Candidatus R. amblyommii' was able to generate pathology and an antibody response in guinea pigs. Moreover, its capacity to generate protective immunity against R. rickettsii may modulate the epidemiology and severity of Rocky

  2. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, Causal Agent of Citrus Huanglongbing, Is Reduced by Treatment with Brassinosteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ingrid; Portieles, Roxana; Rodríguez García, Mayra; López, Yunior; Aranguren, Miguel; Alonso, Eugenio; Delgado, Roger; Luis, Maritza; Batista, Lochy; Paredes, Camilo; Rodríguez, Meilyn; Pujol, Merardo; Ochagavia, María Elena; Falcón, Viviana; Terauchi, Ryohei; Matsumura, Hideo; Ayra-Pardo, Camilo; Llauger, Raixa; Pérez, María del Carmen; Núñez, Mirian; Borrusch, Melissa S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Silva, Yussuan; Pimentel, Eulogio; Borroto, Carlos; Borrás-Hidalgo, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) constitutes the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide, yet no established efficient management measures exist for it. Brassinosteroids, a family of plant steroidal compounds, are essential for plant growth, development and stress tolerance. As a possible control strategy for HLB, epibrassinolide was applied to as a foliar spray to citrus plants infected with the causal agent of HLB, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. The bacterial titers were reduced after treatment with epibrassinolide under both greenhouse and field conditions but were stronger in the greenhouse. Known defense genes were induced in leaves by epibrassinolide. With the SuperSAGE technology combined with next generation sequencing, induction of genes known to be associated with defense response to bacteria and hormone transduction pathways were identified. The results demonstrate that epibrassinolide may provide a useful tool for the management of HLB. PMID:26731660

  3. Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae, a spotted fever group agent infecting Amblyomma parvum ticks in two Brazilian biomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Nieri-Bastos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult ticks of the species Amblyomma parvum were collected from the vegetation in the Pantanal biome (state of Mato Grosso do Sul and from horses in the Cerrado biome (state of Piauí in Brazil. The ticks were individually tested for rickettsial infection via polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting three rickettsial genes, gltA, ompA and ompB. Overall, 63.5% (40/63 and 66.7% (2/3 of A. parvum ticks from Pantanal and Cerrado, respectively, contained rickettsial DNA, which were all confirmed by DNA sequencing to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments of the gltA, ompA and ompB genes of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae. This report is the first to describe Ca. R. andeanae in Brazil.

  4. Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae, a spotted fever group agent infecting Amblyomma parvum ticks in two Brazilian biomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri-Bastos, Fernanda Aparecida; Lopes, Marcos Gomes; Cançado, Paulo Henrique Duarte; Rossa, Giselle Ayres Razera; Faccini, João Luiz Horácio; Gennari, Solange Maria; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia

    2014-04-01

    Adult ticks of the species Amblyomma parvum were collected from the vegetation in the Pantanal biome (state of Mato Grosso do Sul) and from horses in the Cerrado biome (state of Piauí) in Brazil. The ticks were individually tested for rickettsial infection via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting three rickettsial genes, gltA, ompA and ompB. Overall, 63.5% (40/63) and 66.7% (2/3) of A. parvum ticks from Pantanal and Cerrado, respectively, contained rickettsial DNA, which were all confirmed by DNA sequencing to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments of the gltA, ompA and ompB genes of Candidatus Rickettsia andeanae. This report is the first to describe Ca. R. andeanae in Brazil.

  5. Chemical compounds effective against the citrus Huanglongbing bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Muqing; Powell, Charles A; Zhou, Lijuan; He, Zhenli; Stover, Ed; Duan, Yongping

    2011-09-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide and is threatening the survival of the Floridian citrus industry. Currently, there is no established cure for this century-old and emerging disease. As a possible control strategy for citrus HLB, therapeutic compounds were screened using a propagation test system with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'-infected periwinkle and citrus plants. The results demonstrated that the combination of penicillin and streptomycin (PS) was effective in eliminating or suppressing the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' bacterium and provided a therapeutically effective level of control for a much longer period of time than when administering either antibiotic separately. When treated with the PS, 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected periwinkle cuttings achieved 70% of regeneration rates versus citrus plants. This may provide a useful tool for the management of citrus HLB and other Liberibacter-associated diseases.

  6. Candidate gene markers for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus for detecting citrus greening disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao; Mike Irey; Stephen M Garnsey; Siddarame Gowda

    2013-06-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) also known as citrus greening is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter bacterium, vectored by the psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama and Trioza erytreae Del Guercio. Citrus plants infected by the HLB bacterium may not show visible symptoms sometimes for years following infection. The aim of this study was to develop effective gene-specific primer pairs for polymerase chain reaction based method for quick screening of HLB disease. Thirty-two different gene-specific primer pairs, across the Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus genome, were successfully developed. The possibility of these primer pairs for cross-genome amplification across `Ca. Liberibacter africanus’ and `Ca. Liberibacter americanus’ were tested. The applicability of these primer pairs for detection and differentiation of Ca Liberibacter spp. is discussed.

  7. Genome sequence of "Candidatus Walczuchella monophlebidarum" the flavobacterial endosymbiont of Llaveia axin axin (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Monophlebidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Pérez, Tania; Rosenblueth, Mónica; Rincón-Rosales, Reiner; Mora, Jaime; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2014-03-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidae) constitute a very diverse group of sap-feeding insects with a large diversity of symbiotic associations with bacteria. Here, we present the complete genome sequence, metabolic reconstruction, and comparative genomics of the flavobacterial endosymbiont of the giant scale insect Llaveia axin axin. The gene repertoire of its 309,299 bp genome was similar to that of other flavobacterial insect endosymbionts though not syntenic. According to its genetic content, essential amino acid biosynthesis is likely to be the flavobacterial endosymbiont's principal contribution to the symbiotic association with its insect host. We also report the presence of a γ-proteobacterial symbiont that may be involved in waste nitrogen recycling and also has amino acid biosynthetic capabilities that may provide metabolic precursors to the flavobacterial endosymbiont. We propose "Candidatus Walczuchella monophlebidarum" as the name of the flavobacterial endosymbiont of insects from the Monophlebidae family.

  8. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Vector Competence for the Citrus Greening Pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Walter J

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing the vector competence of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama for 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,' the pathogen causing citrus greening, is essential for understanding the epidemiology of this disease that is threatening the U.S. citrus industry. Vector competence studies have been difficult because of the biology of D. citri, the inability to culture the pathogen, and the available diagnostic methods used to detect the bacteria in plant and insect tissues. The methods employed in many studies of D. citri vector competence may have overestimated amounts of live 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in both plant and insect tissues, and it is possible that the amounts of phloem ingested by psyllids may not contain sufficient detectable pathogen using current diagnostic methods. As a result of the difficulty in characterizing D. citri vector competence, the several daunting challenges for providing D. citri that are unable to inoculate 'Ca. L. asiaticus', as a novel method to control greening are discussed. Suggestions to overcome some of these challenges are provided.

  9. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', Causal Agent of Citrus Huanglongbing, Is Reduced by Treatment with Brassinosteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Canales

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB constitutes the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide, yet no established efficient management measures exist for it. Brassinosteroids, a family of plant steroidal compounds, are essential for plant growth, development and stress tolerance. As a possible control strategy for HLB, epibrassinolide was applied to as a foliar spray to citrus plants infected with the causal agent of HLB, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. The bacterial titers were reduced after treatment with epibrassinolide under both greenhouse and field conditions but were stronger in the greenhouse. Known defense genes were induced in leaves by epibrassinolide. With the SuperSAGE technology combined with next generation sequencing, induction of genes known to be associated with defense response to bacteria and hormone transduction pathways were identified. The results demonstrate that epibrassinolide may provide a useful tool for the management of HLB.

  10. Candidate gene markers for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus for detecting citrus greening disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Irey, Mike; Garnsey, Stephen M; Gowda, Siddarame

    2013-06-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) also known as citrus greening is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter bacterium, vectored by the psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama and Trioza erytreae Del Guercio. Citrus plants infected by the HLB bacterium may not show visible symptoms sometimes for years following infection. The aim of this study was to develop effective gene-specific primer pairs for polymerase chain reaction based method for quick screening of HLB disease. Thirty-two different gene-specific primer pairs, across the Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus genome, were successfully developed. The possibility of these primer pairs for cross-genome amplification across 'Ca. Liberibacter africanus' and 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus' were tested. The applicability of these primer pairs for detection and differentiation of Ca Liberibacter spp. is discussed.

  11. Temporal progression of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection in citrus and acquisition efficiency by Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; Daugherty, Matthew P; Ferreira, Cléderson; Lopes, João R S

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, the plant disease huanglongbing (HLB) has emerged as a primary threat to citrus production worldwide. HLB is associated with infection by phloem-limited bacteria ('Candidatus Liberibacter' spp.) that are transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Transmission efficiency varies with vector-related aspects (e.g., developmental stage and feeding periods) but there is no information on the effects of host-pathogen interactions. Here, acquisition efficiency of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by D. citri was evaluated in relation to temporal progression of infection and pathogen titer in citrus. We graft inoculated sweet orange trees with 'Ca. L. asiaticus'; then, at different times after inoculation, we inspected plants for HLB symptoms, measured bacterial infection levels (i.e., titer or concentration) in plants, and measured acquisition by psyllid adults that were confined on the trees. Plant infection levels increased rapidly over time, saturating at uniformly high levels (≈10(8) copy number of 16S ribosomal DNA/g of plant tissue) near 200 days after inoculation-the same time at which all infected trees first showed disease symptoms. Pathogen acquisition by vectors was positively associated with plant infection level and time since inoculation, with acquisition occurring as early as the first measurement, at 60 days after inoculation. These results suggest that there is ample potential for psyllids to acquire the pathogen from trees during the asymptomatic phase of infection. If so, this could limit the effectiveness of tree rouging as a disease management tool and would likely explain the rapid spread observed for this disease in the field. PMID:24620723

  12. Temporal progression of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection in citrus and acquisition efficiency by Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; Daugherty, Matthew P; Ferreira, Cléderson; Lopes, João R S

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, the plant disease huanglongbing (HLB) has emerged as a primary threat to citrus production worldwide. HLB is associated with infection by phloem-limited bacteria ('Candidatus Liberibacter' spp.) that are transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Transmission efficiency varies with vector-related aspects (e.g., developmental stage and feeding periods) but there is no information on the effects of host-pathogen interactions. Here, acquisition efficiency of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by D. citri was evaluated in relation to temporal progression of infection and pathogen titer in citrus. We graft inoculated sweet orange trees with 'Ca. L. asiaticus'; then, at different times after inoculation, we inspected plants for HLB symptoms, measured bacterial infection levels (i.e., titer or concentration) in plants, and measured acquisition by psyllid adults that were confined on the trees. Plant infection levels increased rapidly over time, saturating at uniformly high levels (≈10(8) copy number of 16S ribosomal DNA/g of plant tissue) near 200 days after inoculation-the same time at which all infected trees first showed disease symptoms. Pathogen acquisition by vectors was positively associated with plant infection level and time since inoculation, with acquisition occurring as early as the first measurement, at 60 days after inoculation. These results suggest that there is ample potential for psyllids to acquire the pathogen from trees during the asymptomatic phase of infection. If so, this could limit the effectiveness of tree rouging as a disease management tool and would likely explain the rapid spread observed for this disease in the field.

  13. A Novel Study of Interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana With Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous When Transmitted by psyllid Bactericera cockerelli to Develop a Chemical Genomics Based Approach That can aid in Development of Control Strategies for Huanglongbing Disease in Citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Zadgaonkar, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a bacterial disease associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), Candidatus Liberibacter americanus, and Candidatus Liberibacter africanus. These bacterial species are transmitted by hemipteran psyllids. For many years, this disease has caused substantial damage to citrus around the world and in recent years, it has significantly impacted citrus production in the U.S.A. The lack of effective control and curative measures against psyllids and the pathogen ar...

  14. Molecular characterization of "Candidatus Parilichlamydia carangidicola," a novel Chlamydia-like epitheliocystis agent in yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi (Valenciennes), and the proposal of a new family, "Candidatus Parilichlamydiaceae" fam. nov. (order Chlamydiales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stride, M C; Polkinghorne, A; Miller, T L; Groff, J M; Lapatra, S E; Nowak, B F

    2013-03-01

    Three cohorts of farmed yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) from South Australia were examined for Chlamydia-like organisms associated with epitheliocystis. To characterize the bacteria, 38 gill samples were processed for histopathology, electron microscopy, and 16S rRNA amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Microscopically, the presence of membrane-enclosed cysts was observed within the gill lamellae. Also observed was hyperplasia of the epithelial cells with cytoplasmic vacuolization and fusion of the gill lamellae. Transmission electron microscopy revealed morphological features of the reticulate and intermediate bodies typical of members of the order Chlamydiales. A novel 1,393-bp 16S chlamydial rRNA sequence was amplified from gill DNA extracted from fish in all cohorts over a 3-year period that corresponded to the 16S rRNA sequence amplified directly from laser-dissected cysts. This sequence was only 87% similar to the reported "Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis" (AY462244) from Atlantic salmon and Arctic charr. Phylogenetic analysis of this sequence against 35 Chlamydia and Chlamydia-like bacteria revealed that this novel bacterium belongs to an undescribed family lineage in the order Chlamydiales. Based on these observations, we propose this bacterium of yellowtail kingfish be known as "Candidatus Parilichlamydia carangidicola" and that the new family be known as "Candidatus Parilichlamydiaceae." PMID:23275507

  15. Dominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yanping Mao; Graham, David W.; Hideyuki Tamaki; Tong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Here we employed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) and 16S rRNA genes to assess relative abundances of dominant clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (referred to Accumulibacter) in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from six countries. Accumulibacter were not only detected in the 6 WWTPs performing biological phosphorus removal, but also inhabited in the other 11 WWTPs employing conventional activated sludg...

  16. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Lijuan Zhou; Powell, Charles A.; Wenbin Li; Mike Irey; Yongping Duan

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by s...

  17. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus causes damage to citrus fibrous roots before visual decline of Huanglongbing-infected citrus trees

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, J. H.; Johnson, E. G.; Gottwald, T. R.; Irey, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), was first detected in Florida in late 2005 and is now widely distributed throughout the commercial citrus-growing regions. In recent seasons, concurrent with freeze and drought episodes, symptomatic HLB-infected trees were much more affected by the extremes of temperature and moisture than trees without HLB. Symptoms exhibited by the stressed trees were excessive leaf loss and premature fruit drop even when HLB-infe...

  18. Prophage-Mediated Dynamics of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations, the Destructive Bacterial Pathogens of Citrus Huanglongbing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A.; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by s...

  19. Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in ticks and rodents from urban and natural habitats of South-Western Slovakia

    OpenAIRE

    Svitálková, Zuzana Hamšíková; Haruštiaková, Danka; Mahríková, Lenka; Mojšová, Michala; Berthová, Lenka; Slovák, Mirko; Kocianová, Elena; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Kazimírová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    Background Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (CNM) is an emerging tick-borne pathogen causing severe disease in immunocompromised patients. In Europe, Ixodes ricinus is the primary vector and rodents act as reservoir hosts. New data on the prevalence of CNM in ticks and rodents contribute to the knowledge on the distribution of endemic areas and circulation of the bacterium in natural foci. Methods Questing ticks were collected and rodents were trapped in urban/suburban and natural habitats ...

  20. Identification of genes differentially expressed during interaction of Mexican lime tree infected with "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekouei Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia", is the causative agent of witches' broom disease in Mexican lime trees (Citrus aurantifolia L., and is responsible for major losses of Mexican lime trees in Southern Iran and Oman. The pathogen is strictly biotrophic, and thus is completely dependent on living host cells for its survival. The molecular basis of compatibility and disease development in this system is poorly understood. Therefore, we have applied a cDNA- amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP approach to analyze gene expression in Mexican lime trees infected by "Ca. Phytoplasma aurantifolia". Results We carried out cDNA-AFLP analysis on grafted infected Mexican lime trees of the susceptible cultivar at the representative symptoms stage. Selective amplifications with 43 primer combinations allowed the visualisation of 55 transcript-derived fragments that were expressed differentially between infected and non-infected leaves. We sequenced 51 fragments, 36 of which were identified as lime tree transcripts after homology searching. Of the 36 genes, 70.5% were down-regulated during infection and could be classified into various functional groups. We showed that Mexican lime tree genes that were homologous to known resistance genes tended to be repressed in response to infection. These included the genes for modifier of snc1 and autophagy protein 5. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes involved in metabolism, transcription, transport and cytoskeleton was observed, which included the genes for formin, importin β 3, transducin, L-asparaginase, glycerophosphoryl diester phosphodiesterase, and RNA polymerase β. In contrast, genes that encoded a proline-rich protein, ubiquitin-protein ligase, phosphatidyl glycerol specific phospholipase C-like, and serine/threonine-protein kinase were up-regulated during the infection. Conclusion The present study identifies a number of candidate genes that might be involved in the

  1. Genome reconstruction and gene expression of "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" Clade IB performing biological phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanping; Yu, Ke; Xia, Yu; Chao, Yuanqing; Zhang, Tong

    2014-09-01

    We report the first integrated metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analysis of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) sludge. A draft genome of Candidatus Accumulibacter spp. strain HKU-1, a member of Clade IB, was retrieved. It was estimated to be ∼90% complete and shared average nucleotide identities of 83% and 88% with the finished genome CAP IIA UW-1 and the draft genome CAP IA UW-2, respectively. Different from CAP IIA UW-1, the phosphotransferase (pap) in polyphosphate metabolism and V-ATPase in orthophosphate transport were absent from CAP IB HKU-1. Additionally, unlike CAP IA UW-2, CAP IB HKU-1 carried the genes for carbon fixation and nitrogen fixation. Despite these differences, the key genes required for acetate uptake, glycolysis and polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis were conserved in all these Accumulibacter genomes. The preliminary metatranscriptomic results revealed that the most significantly up-regulated genes of CAP IB HKU-1 from the anaerobic to the aerobic phase were responsible for assimilatory sulfate reduction, genetic information processing and phosphorus absorption, while the down-regulated genes were related to N2O reduction, PHA synthesis and acetyl-CoA formation. This study yielded another important Accumulibacter genome, revealed the functional difference within the Accumulibacter Type I, and uncovered the genetic responses to EBPR stimuli at a higher resolution. PMID:25089581

  2. Symbiotic adaptation drives genome streamlining of the cyanobacterial sponge symbiont "Candidatus Synechococcus pongiarum"

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhao-Ming

    2014-04-01

    "Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarum" is a cyanobacterial symbiont widely distributed in sponges, but its functions at the genome level remain unknown. Here, we obtained the draft genome (1.66 Mbp, 90% estimated genome recovery) of "Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum" strain SH4 inhabiting the Red Sea sponge Carteriospongia foliascens. Phylogenomic analysis revealed a high dissimilarity between SH4 and free-living cyanobacterial strains. Essential functions, such as photosynthesis, the citric acid cycle, and DNA replication, were detected in SH4. Eukaryoticlike domains that play important roles in sponge-symbiont interactions were identified exclusively in the symbiont. However, SH4 could not biosynthesize methionine and polyamines and had lost partial genes encoding low-molecular-weight peptides of the photosynthesis complex, antioxidant enzymes, DNA repair enzymes, and proteins involved in resistance to environmental toxins and in biosynthesis of capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. These genetic modifications imply that "Ca. Synechococcus spongiarum" SH4 represents a low-light-adapted cyanobacterial symbiont and has undergone genome streamlining to adapt to the sponge\\'s mild intercellular environment. 2014 Gao et al.

  3. "Candidatus Mesochlamydia elodeae" (Chlamydiae: Parachlamydiaceae), a novel chlamydia parasite of free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Daniele; Müller, Karl-Dieter; Wingender, Jost; Michel, Rolf

    2013-02-01

    Vannella sp. isolated from waterweed Elodea sp. was found infected by a chlamydia-like organism. This organism behaves like a parasite, causing the death through burst of its host. Once the vannellae degenerated, the parasite was successfully kept in laboratory within a Saccamoeba sp. isolated from the same waterweed sample, which revealed in fine through electron microscopy to harbor two bacterial endosymbionts: the chlamydial parasite we introduce and another endosymbiont initially and naturally present in the host. Herein, we provide molecular-based identification of both the amoeba host and its two endosymbionts, with special focus on the chlamydia parasite. High sequence similarity values of the 18S rDNA permitted to assign the amoeba to the species Saccamoeba lacustris (Amoebozoa, Tubulinea). The bacterial endosymbiont naturally harbored by the host belonged to Sphingomonas koreensis (Alpha-Proteobacteria). The chlamydial parasite showed a strict specificity for Saccamoeba spp., being unable to infect a variety of other amoebae, including Acanthamoeba, and it was itself infected by a bacteriophage. Sequence similarity values of the 16S rDNA and phylogenetic analysis indicated that this strain is a new member of the family Parachlamydiaceae, for which we propose the name "Candidatus Mesochlamydia elodeae."

  4. Transmission and Propagation of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by Grafting with Individual Citrus Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilf, Mark E; Lewis, Reid S

    2016-05-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a chronic, progressive decline disease in citrus associated with a systemic infection by the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. Transmission of the bacterium in the field is by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Experimental propagation of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is done primarily by grafting pieces of bud wood from an infected plant. To produce a small-scale model system for investigation of pathogen biology, we investigated grafting single leaves from infected citrus plants as sources of inoculum for propagation of the bacterium. In total, 162 plants ranging in age from 3 to 18 months were grafted. Grafting with intact asymptomatic and HLB-symptomatic leaves resulted in 61 of 78 (78%) and 35 of 41 (85%) of the plants infected with 'Ca. L. asiaticus', respectively. Inoculum consisting of the leaf petiole only or only an inoculum tissue remnant under the bark of the receptor tree resulted in 6 of 12 (50%) and 7 of 31 (23%) infected trees, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays verified the infection in plants, a majority of which developed the foliar blotchy mottle symptom considered diagnostic for HLB, while some plants also displayed the stunted, chlorotic shoots for which the disease is named. The qPCR data together with the symptoms displayed demonstrated that individual leaves from infected trees can serve as effective inoculum sources for transmission and propagation of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' via grafting.

  5. Localization of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' and Evidence for Surface Appendages in the Potato Psyllid Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, J M; Fisher, T W; Brown, J K

    2016-02-01

    The potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli is implicated as the vector of the causal agent of zebra chip of potato and vein-greening of tomato diseases. Until now, visual identification of bacteria in the genus 'Candidatus Liberibacter' has relied on direct imaging by light and electron microscopy without labeling, or with whole-organ fluorescence labeling only. In this study, aldehyde fixative followed by a coagulant fixative, was used to process adult psyllids for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) colloidal gold in situ hybridization experiments. Results indicated that 'Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum' (CLso)-specific DNA probes annealed to a bacterium that formed extensive, monocultural biofilms on gut, salivary gland, and oral region tissues, confirming that it is one morphotype of potentially others, that is rod-shaped, approximately 2.5 µm in diameter and of variable length, and has a rough, granular cytosol. In addition, CLso, prepared from shredded midguts, and negatively stained for TEM, possessed pili- and flagella-like surface appendages. Genes implicating coding capacity for both types of surface structures are encoded in the CLso genome sequence. Neither type was seen for CLso associated with biofilms within or on digestive organs, suggesting that their production is stimulated only in certain environments, putatively, in the gut during adhesion leading to multiplication, and in hemolymph to afford systemic invasion. PMID:26551449

  6. Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) Vector Competence for the Citrus Greening Pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Walter J

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing the vector competence of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama for 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,' the pathogen causing citrus greening, is essential for understanding the epidemiology of this disease that is threatening the U.S. citrus industry. Vector competence studies have been difficult because of the biology of D. citri, the inability to culture the pathogen, and the available diagnostic methods used to detect the bacteria in plant and insect tissues. The methods employed in many studies of D. citri vector competence may have overestimated amounts of live 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in both plant and insect tissues, and it is possible that the amounts of phloem ingested by psyllids may not contain sufficient detectable pathogen using current diagnostic methods. As a result of the difficulty in characterizing D. citri vector competence, the several daunting challenges for providing D. citri that are unable to inoculate 'Ca. L. asiaticus', as a novel method to control greening are discussed. Suggestions to overcome some of these challenges are provided. PMID:26470202

  7. Changes in Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' through Insect Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Iwanami, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Citrus greening (huanglongbing) is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. The disease is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' among which 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' has the widest distribution. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is commonly transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. A previous study showed that isolates of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' were clearly differentiated by variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) profiles at four loci in the genome. In this study, the VNTR analysis was further validated by assessing the stability of these repeats after multiplication of the pathogen upon host-to-host transmission using a 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strain from Japan. The results showed that some tandem repeats showed detectable changes after insect transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that the repeat numbers VNTR 002 and 077 of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' change through psyllid transmission. VNTRs in the recipient plant were apparently unrelated to the growing phase of the vector. In contrast, changes in the number of tandem repeats increased with longer acquisition and inoculation access periods, whereas changes were not observed through psyllid transmission after relatively short acquisition and inoculation access periods, up to 20 and 19 days, respectively. PMID:26402645

  8. Transmission and Propagation of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by Grafting with Individual Citrus Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilf, Mark E; Lewis, Reid S

    2016-05-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a chronic, progressive decline disease in citrus associated with a systemic infection by the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. Transmission of the bacterium in the field is by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama. Experimental propagation of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is done primarily by grafting pieces of bud wood from an infected plant. To produce a small-scale model system for investigation of pathogen biology, we investigated grafting single leaves from infected citrus plants as sources of inoculum for propagation of the bacterium. In total, 162 plants ranging in age from 3 to 18 months were grafted. Grafting with intact asymptomatic and HLB-symptomatic leaves resulted in 61 of 78 (78%) and 35 of 41 (85%) of the plants infected with 'Ca. L. asiaticus', respectively. Inoculum consisting of the leaf petiole only or only an inoculum tissue remnant under the bark of the receptor tree resulted in 6 of 12 (50%) and 7 of 31 (23%) infected trees, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays verified the infection in plants, a majority of which developed the foliar blotchy mottle symptom considered diagnostic for HLB, while some plants also displayed the stunted, chlorotic shoots for which the disease is named. The qPCR data together with the symptoms displayed demonstrated that individual leaves from infected trees can serve as effective inoculum sources for transmission and propagation of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' via grafting. PMID:26807818

  9. Development of Quantitative Real-time PCR Assays for Different Clades of “Candidatus Accumulibacter”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, An Ni; Mao, Yanping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-05-01

    We designed novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primers for the polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) gene, targeting eight individual “Candidatus Accumulibacter” (referred to as Accumulibacter) clades. An evaluation of primer sets was conducted regarding the coverage, specificity, and PCR efficiency. (i) All primer sets were designed to cover all available sequences of the target clade. (ii) The phylogenetic analysis of the sequences retrieved from the qPCR products by each primer set demonstrated a high level of specificity. (iii) All calibration curves presented high PCR efficiencies in the range of 85–112% (R2 = 0.962–0.998). In addition, the possible interference of non-target amplicons was individually examined using the qPCR assay for 13 Accumulibacter clades, which were either undetected or showed negligible detection. With the primers designed by other research groups, a highly selective and sensitive qPCR-based method was developed to quantify all Accumulibacter clades, with the exception of Clade IE, in one assay, which enables more comprehensive insights into the community dynamics. The applicability to environmental samples was demonstrated by profiling the Accumulibacter clades in activated sludge samples of nine full-scale wastewater treatment plants.

  10. Transcriptional Analyses of Mandarins Seriously Infected by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Dai, Zehan; Tao, Yang; Deng, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    A range of leaf symptoms, including blotchy mottle, yellowing, and small, upright leaves with a variety of chlorotic patterns resembling those induced by zinc deficiencies, are associated with huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a worldwide destructive citrus disease. HLB is presumably caused by the phloem-limited fastidious prokaryotic α-proteobacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter spp.’ Previous studies focused on the proteome and transcriptome analyses of citrus 5 to 35 weeks after ‘Ca. L. spp.’ inoculation. In this study, gene expression profiles were analyzed from mandarin Citrus reticulate Blanco cv. jiaogan leaves after a 2 year infection with ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’. The Affymetrix microarray analysis explored 2,017 differentially expressed genes. Of the 1,364 genes had known functions, 938 (46.5%) were up-regulated. Genes related to photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolic, and structure were mostly down-regulated, with rates of 92.7%, 61.0%, and 80.2%, respectively. Genes associated with oxidation-reduction and transport were mostly up-regulated with the rates of 75.0% and 64.6%, respectively. Our data analyses implied that the infection of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ could alter hormone crosstalk, inducing the jasmine acid pathway and depressing the ethylene and salicylic acid pathways in the citrus host. This study provides an enhanced insight into the host response of citrus to ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ infection at a two-years infection stage. PMID:26196297

  11. Latent period and transmission of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae.

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    Venkatesan G Sengoda

    Full Text Available "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" (Lso is an economically important pathogen of solanaceous crops and the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. This pathogen is transmitted to solanaceous species by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc, but many aspects of the acquisition and transmission processes have yet to be elucidated. The present study was conducted to assess the interacting effects of acquisition access period, incubation period, and host plant on Lso titer in psyllids, the movement of Lso from the alimentary canal to the salivary glands of the insect, and the ability of psyllids to transmit Lso to non-infected host plants. Following initial pathogen acquisition, the probability of Lso presence in the alimentary canal remained constant from 0 to 3 weeks, but the probability of Lso being present in the salivary glands increased with increasing incubation period. Lso copy numbers in psyllids peaked two weeks after the initial pathogen acquisition and psyllids were capable of transmitting Lso to non-infected host plants only after a two-week incubation period. Psyllid infectivity was associated with colonization of insect salivary glands by Lso and with Lso copy numbers >10,000 per psyllid. Results of our study indicate that Lso requires a two-week latent period in potato psyllids and suggest that acquisition and transmission of Lso by psyllids follows a pattern consistent with a propagative, circulative, and persistent mode of transmission.

  12. Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis clades enriched under cyclic anaerobic and microaerobic conditions simultaneously use different electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camejo, Pamela Y; Owen, Brian R; Martirano, Joseph; Ma, Juan; Kapoor, Vikram; Santo Domingo, Jorge; McMahon, Katherine D; Noguera, Daniel R

    2016-10-01

    Lab- and pilot-scale simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal-sequencing batch reactors were operated under cyclic anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions. The use of oxygen, nitrite, and nitrate as electron acceptors by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis during the micro-aerobic stage was investigated. A complete clade-level characterization of Accumulibacter in both reactors was performed using newly designed qPCR primers targeting the polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk1). In the lab-scale reactor, limited-oxygen conditions led to an alternated dominance of Clade IID and IC over the other clades. Results from batch tests when Clade IC was dominant (i.e., >92% of Accumulibacter) showed that this clade was capable of using oxygen, nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors for P uptake. A more heterogeneous distribution of clades was found in the pilot-scale system (Clades IIA, IIB, IIC, IID, IA, and IC), and in this reactor, oxygen, nitrite and nitrate were also used as electron acceptors coupled to phosphorus uptake. However, nitrite was not an efficient electron acceptor in either reactor, and nitrate allowed only partial P removal. The results from the Clade IC dominated reactor indicated that either organisms in this clade can simultaneously use multiple electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions, or that the use of multiple electron acceptors by Clade IC is due to significant microdiversity within the Accumulibacter clades defined using the ppk1 gene. PMID:27340814

  13. 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola', a coevolved symbiotic bacterium of the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Gmelin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo, Caterina; Firrao, Giuseppe; Mazzon, Luca; Squartini, Andrea; Girolami, Vincenzo

    2005-07-01

    The taxonomic identity of the hereditary prokaryotic symbiont of the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Diptera: Tephritidae) was investigated. In order to avoid superficial microbial contaminants and loosely associated saprophytic biota, flies were surface-sterilized at the larval stage and reared under aseptic conditions until adult emergence. B. oleae flies originating from different geographical locations and collected at different times of the year were tested. Bacterial isolation was undertaken from the cephalic oesophageal bulb, which is known to be a specific site of accumulation for the hosted microsymbionts in the adult insect. Despite evidence of multiplication cycles taking place within the insect, attempts at cultivation of the isolated bacteria ex situ were not productive at any stage, leading to the choice of unculturable status definition. PCR amplification and nucleotide sequencing of the entire 16S rRNA gene consistently yielded a single sequence that displayed marked similarity with enterobacterial lineages, with closest matches (97%) to Erwinia persicina and Erwinia rhapontici. The novel taxon differs from common intestinal bacterial species of fruit flies and from instances of culturable bacteria previously described in B. oleae raised without sterility precautions, which we also observed as minority occupants or occasional contaminants. The symbiont's identity is also distinct from Pseudomonas savastanoi. In all observations, the numerically dominant inhabitant of the olive fly oesophageal organ was the same unculturable organism, whose presence at later stages was also regularly observed in the midgut. A novel species is proposed, by virtue of its unique properties, under the designation 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola'.

  14. Changes in Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ through Insect Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Citrus greening (huanglongbing) is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. The disease is associated with three species of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ among which ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ has the widest distribution. ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ is commonly transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. A previous study showed that isolates of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ were clearly differentiated by variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) profiles at four loci in the genome. In this study, the VNTR analysis was further validated by assessing the stability of these repeats after multiplication of the pathogen upon host-to-host transmission using a ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strain from Japan. The results showed that some tandem repeats showed detectable changes after insect transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that the repeat numbers VNTR 002 and 077 of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ change through psyllid transmission. VNTRs in the recipient plant were apparently unrelated to the growing phase of the vector. In contrast, changes in the number of tandem repeats increased with longer acquisition and inoculation access periods, whereas changes were not observed through psyllid transmission after relatively short acquisition and inoculation access periods, up to 20 and 19 days, respectively. PMID:26402645

  15. Unique features of a Japanese 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' strain revealed by whole genome sequencing.

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    Hiroshi Katoh

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with phloem-limited bacteria of three species of α-Proteobacteria, namely, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. Recent findings suggested that some Japanese strains lack the bacteriophage-type DNA polymerase region (DNA pol, in contrast to the Floridian psy62 strain. The whole genome sequence of the pol-negative 'Ca. L. asiaticus' Japanese isolate Ishi-1 was determined by metagenomic analysis of DNA extracted from 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllids and leaf midribs. The 1.19-Mb genome has an average 36.32% GC content. Annotation revealed 13 operons encoding rRNA and 44 tRNA genes, but no typical bacterial pathogenesis-related genes were located within the genome, similar to the Floridian psy62 and Chinese gxpsy. In contrast to other 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains, the genome of the Japanese Ishi-1 strain lacks a prophage-related region.

  16. Changes in Variable Number of Tandem Repeats in 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' through Insect Transmission.

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    Hiroshi Katoh

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (huanglongbing is the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. The disease is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' among which 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' has the widest distribution. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is commonly transmitted by a phloem-feeding insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri. A previous study showed that isolates of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' were clearly differentiated by variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR profiles at four loci in the genome. In this study, the VNTR analysis was further validated by assessing the stability of these repeats after multiplication of the pathogen upon host-to-host transmission using a 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strain from Japan. The results showed that some tandem repeats showed detectable changes after insect transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that the repeat numbers VNTR 002 and 077 of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' change through psyllid transmission. VNTRs in the recipient plant were apparently unrelated to the growing phase of the vector. In contrast, changes in the number of tandem repeats increased with longer acquisition and inoculation access periods, whereas changes were not observed through psyllid transmission after relatively short acquisition and inoculation access periods, up to 20 and 19 days, respectively.

  17. The complete genome sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter americanus', associated with Citrus huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Nelson A; Zhang, Shujian; Setubal, João C; Almeida, Nalvo F; Martins, Elaine C; Harakava, Ricardo; Kumar, Dibyendu; Rangel, Luiz Thiberio; Foissac, Xavier; Bové, Joseph M; Gabriel, Dean W

    2014-02-01

    Liberibacter spp. form a Rhizobiaceae clade of phloem-limited pathogens of limited host range. Two obligately parasitic species have been sequenced: 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', which causes citrus huanglongbing (HLB) worldwide, and 'Ca. L. solanacearum', which causes potato "zebra chip" disease. A third (proposed) species, Liberibacter crescens, was isolated from mountain papaya, grown in axenic culture, and sequenced. In an effort to identify common host determinants, the complete genomic DNA sequence of a second HLB species, 'Ca. L. americanus' strain 'São Paulo' was determined. The circular genome of 1,195,201 bp had an average 31.12% GC content and 983 predicted protein encoding genes, 800 (81.4%) of which had a predicted function. There were 658 genes common to all sequenced Liberibacter spp. and only 8 genes common to 'Ca. L. americanus' and 'Ca. L. asiaticus' but not found in 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. Surprisingly, most of the lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic genes were missing from the 'Ca. L. americanus' genome, as well as OmpA and a key regulator of flagellin, all indicating a 'Ca. L. americanus' strategy of avoiding production of major pathogen-associated molecular patterns present in 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. As with 'Ca. L. asiaticus', one of two 'Ca. L. americanus' prophages replicated as an excision plasmid and carried potential lysogenic conversion genes that appeared fragmentary or degenerated in 'Ca. L. solanacearum'.

  18. Complete genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' obtained through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yongping; Zhou, Lijuan; Hall, David G; Li, Wenbin; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Lin, Hong; Liu, Li; Vahling, Cheryl M; Gabriel, Dean W; Williams, Kelly P; Dickerman, Allan; Sun, Yijun; Gottwald, Tim

    2009-08-01

    Citrus huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with a low-titer, phloem-limited infection by any of three uncultured species of alpha-Proteobacteria, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. A complete circular 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome has been obtained by metagenomics, using the DNA extracted from a single 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllid. The 1.23-Mb genome has an average 36.5% GC content. Annotation revealed a high percentage of genes involved in both cell motility (4.5%) and active transport in general (8.0%), which may contribute to its virulence. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have a limited ability for aerobic respiration and is likely auxotrophic for at least five amino acids. Consistent with its intracellular nature, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' lacks type III and type IV secretion systems as well as typical free-living or plant-colonizing extracellular degradative enzymes. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have all type I secretion system genes needed for both multidrug efflux and toxin effector secretion. Multi-protein phylogenetic analysis confirmed 'Ca. L. asiaticus' as an early-branching and highly divergent member of the family Rhizobiaceae. This is the first genome sequence of an uncultured alpha-proteobacteria that is both an intracellular plant pathogen and insect symbiont.

  19. Molecular characterization of 'Candidatus Rickettsia vini' in Ixodes arboricola from the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Marketa; Bulkova, Alexandra; Costa, Francisco B; Kristin, Anton; Krist, Milos; Krause, Frantisek; Liznarova, Eva; Labruna, Marcelo B; Literak, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of rickettsiae in the tree-hole tick Ixodes arboricola in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. During May to September of 2009 and 2013, bird boxes belonging to three different areas were screened for ticks. In total, 454 nestlings and 109 nests of 10 hole-breeding bird species were examined. Ticks were found on Ficedula albicollis, Parus major, Cyanistes caeruleus and Sitta europaea and/or in their nests. In total, 166 ticks (17 nymphs, 10 males and 139 females) were found at 3 areas (arithmetic mean±standard error: 55.3±45.9). All ticks were tested for the presence of Rickettsia species by polymerase chain reaction targeting the rickettsial genes gltA, ompA, ompB and htrA and amplicon sequencing. All individuals except 3 nymphs were infected with 'Candidatus Rickettsia vini'. Multilocus sequence typing showed closest proximity to Rickettsia japonica and Rickettsia heilongjiangensis cluster. The presence of 'Ca. R. vini' is reported for the first time in Slovakia.

  20. The complete genome sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter americanus', associated with Citrus huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Nelson A; Zhang, Shujian; Setubal, João C; Almeida, Nalvo F; Martins, Elaine C; Harakava, Ricardo; Kumar, Dibyendu; Rangel, Luiz Thiberio; Foissac, Xavier; Bové, Joseph M; Gabriel, Dean W

    2014-02-01

    Liberibacter spp. form a Rhizobiaceae clade of phloem-limited pathogens of limited host range. Two obligately parasitic species have been sequenced: 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', which causes citrus huanglongbing (HLB) worldwide, and 'Ca. L. solanacearum', which causes potato "zebra chip" disease. A third (proposed) species, Liberibacter crescens, was isolated from mountain papaya, grown in axenic culture, and sequenced. In an effort to identify common host determinants, the complete genomic DNA sequence of a second HLB species, 'Ca. L. americanus' strain 'São Paulo' was determined. The circular genome of 1,195,201 bp had an average 31.12% GC content and 983 predicted protein encoding genes, 800 (81.4%) of which had a predicted function. There were 658 genes common to all sequenced Liberibacter spp. and only 8 genes common to 'Ca. L. americanus' and 'Ca. L. asiaticus' but not found in 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. Surprisingly, most of the lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic genes were missing from the 'Ca. L. americanus' genome, as well as OmpA and a key regulator of flagellin, all indicating a 'Ca. L. americanus' strategy of avoiding production of major pathogen-associated molecular patterns present in 'Ca. L. asiaticus' and 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. As with 'Ca. L. asiaticus', one of two 'Ca. L. americanus' prophages replicated as an excision plasmid and carried potential lysogenic conversion genes that appeared fragmentary or degenerated in 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. PMID:24200077

  1. Similarities and differences in physiological responses to 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' infection among different potato cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, C M; Rashed, A; Wallingford, A K; Paetzold, L; Workneh, F; Rush, C M

    2014-02-01

    Zebra chip disease (ZC), putatively caused by the fastidious bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', is a threat to potato growers worldwide. However, little is known about biochemical shifts in different potato genotypes in response to 'Ca. L. solanacearum' infection. To address this, 'Red La Soda', 'Russet Norkotah', and 'FL 1867' potato were infected with 'Ca. L. solanacearum' 4, 3, 2, and 1 weeks before harvest to observe variability in cultivar responses to 'Ca. L. solanacearum' infection. ZC symptoms, 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titers, and tuber biochemistry were assessed. Red La Soda tubers exhibited greater symptoms when infected for 4 weeks than Russet Norkotah or FL 1867 tubers. 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titers did not vary among cultivars. Tuber levels of amino acids, carbohydrates, and phenolics varied among cultivars but no consistent trends were observed. Individual amino acids and phenolics were greater in FL 1867 than Red La Soda, whereas others were greater in Red La Soda or Russet Norkotah than FL 1867. Most amino acids, carbohydrates, and phenolics were positively associated with infection duration and symptoms regardless of cultivar. Associations between most of the evaluated compounds and 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer were positive in Red La Soda. However, no associations between 'Ca. L. solanacearum' quantity and compounds were observed in FL 1867 and Russet Norkotah. PMID:23941779

  2. Cell adhesion, multicellular morphology, and magnetosome distribution in the multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Fernanda; Silva, Karen Tavares; Leão, Pedro; Guedes, Iame Alves; Keim, Carolina Neumann; Farina, Marcos; Lins, Ulysses

    2013-06-01

    Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis is an uncultured magnetotactic multicellular prokaryote composed of 17-40 Gram-negative cells that are capable of synthesizing organelles known as magnetosomes. The magnetosomes of Ca. M. multicellularis are composed of greigite and are organized in chains that are responsible for the microorganism's orientation along magnetic field lines. The characteristics of the microorganism, including its multicellular life cycle, magnetic field orientation, and swimming behavior, and the lack of viability of individual cells detached from the whole assembly, are considered strong evidence for the existence of a unique multicellular life cycle among prokaryotes. It has been proposed that the position of each cell within the aggregate is fundamental for the maintenance of its distinctive morphology and magnetic field orientation. However, the cellular organization of the whole organism has never been studied in detail. Here, we investigated the magnetosome organization within a cell, its distribution within the microorganism, and the intercellular relationships that might be responsible for maintaining the cells in the proper position within the microorganism, which is essential for determining the magnetic properties of Ca. M. multicellularis during its life cycle. The results indicate that cellular interactions are essential for the determination of individual cell shape and the magnetic properties of the organism and are likely directly associated with the morphological changes that occur during the multicellular life cycle of this species. PMID:23551897

  3. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M; Cano, Liliana M; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus "Las" is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  4. Relación entre Bactericera cockerelli y presencia de Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous en lotes comerciales de papa Relation between Bactericera cockerelli and presence of Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous in commercial fields of potato

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    Oswaldo Ángel Rubio-Covarrubias

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available La brotación anormal de los tubérculos (sin brotes o brotes ahilados y el pardeamiento interno de los tubérculos, son síntomas de una enfermedad que está afectando la producción de papa en México, en el suroeste de Estados Unidos y América central. Esta enfermedad ha sido asociada con el psilido de la papa Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. Con el objetivo de dilucidar las causas de esta enfermedad, en 2007 se llevó a cabo un muestreo en 11 lotes comerciales de papa localizados en un transecto altitudinal entre 2 600 y 3 500 m en la región productora de papa de Toluca. La población de B. cockerelli fue determinada mediante muestreos semanales de los insectos adultos atrapados en trampas amarillas pegajosas. Al final del periodo de crecimiento del cultivo, los tubérculos producidos en cada lote fueron muestreados y almacenados por 6 meses. Después de este tiempo, se determinó el porcentaje de tubérculos con brotación anormal y se hicieron análisis con PCR para determinar la presencia de Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous y de fitoplasmas en los tubérculos. Los resultados indican que la población de B. cockerelli y de los síntomas de la punta morada de la papa disminuyeron con la altura, en alturas superiores a 3 200 msnm no se presentaron problemas significativas de la enfermedad. El 36% de los tubérculos con brotes finos presentó el pardeamiento interno y 58% de los tubérculos sin brotes presentó el mismo síntoma. El 54% de los tubérculos con brotación anormal fue positivo a Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous y sólo 3.5% a fitoplasmas. Estos resultados indican que Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous está asociada con los síntomas de la punta morada de la papa en la región de Toluca.The abnormal sprouting of tubers (without sprouts or with threadlike sprouts and the internal browning of the potatoes are symptoms of a disease which is affecting the potato production in Mexico, in southwestern United States and Central

  5. Effective antibiotics against 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in HLB-affected citrus plants identified via the graft-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Muqing; Guo, Ying; Powell, Charles A; Doud, Melissa S; Yang, Chuanyu; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB), caused by three species of fastidious, phloem-limited 'Candidatus Liberibacter', is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. To date, there is no established cure for this century-old and yet, newly emerging disease. As a potential control strategy for citrus HLB, 31 antibiotics were screened for effectiveness and phytotoxicity using the optimized graft-based screening system with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las)-infected citrus scions. Actidione and Oxytetracycline were the most phytotoxic to citrus with less than 10% of scions surviving and growing; therefore, this data was not used in additional analyses. Results of principal component (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analyses (HCA) demonstrated that 29 antibiotics were clustered into 3 groups: highly effective, partly effective, and not effective. In spite of different modes of actions, a number of antibiotics such as, Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, Penicillin, Cefalexin, Rifampicin and Sulfadimethoxine were all highly effective in eliminating or suppressing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus indicated by both the lowest Las infection rate and titers of the treated scions and inoculated rootstock. The non-effective group, including 11 antibiotics alone with three controls, such as Amikacin, Cinoxacin, Gentamicin, Kasugamycin, Lincomycin, Neomycin, Polymixin B and Tobramycin, did not eliminate or suppress Las in the tested concentrations, resulting in plants with increased titers of Las. The other 12 antibiotics partly eliminated or suppressed Las in the treated and graft-inoculated plants. The effective and non-phytotoxic antibiotics could be potential candidates for control of citrus HLB, either for the rescue of infected citrus germplasm or for restricted field application.

  6. Effective antibiotics against 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in HLB-affected citrus plants identified via the graft-based evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Citrus huanglongbing (HLB, caused by three species of fastidious, phloem-limited 'Candidatus Liberibacter', is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. To date, there is no established cure for this century-old and yet, newly emerging disease. As a potential control strategy for citrus HLB, 31 antibiotics were screened for effectiveness and phytotoxicity using the optimized graft-based screening system with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las-infected citrus scions. Actidione and Oxytetracycline were the most phytotoxic to citrus with less than 10% of scions surviving and growing; therefore, this data was not used in additional analyses. Results of principal component (PCA and hierarchical clustering analyses (HCA demonstrated that 29 antibiotics were clustered into 3 groups: highly effective, partly effective, and not effective. In spite of different modes of actions, a number of antibiotics such as, Ampicillin, Carbenicillin, Penicillin, Cefalexin, Rifampicin and Sulfadimethoxine were all highly effective in eliminating or suppressing Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus indicated by both the lowest Las infection rate and titers of the treated scions and inoculated rootstock. The non-effective group, including 11 antibiotics alone with three controls, such as Amikacin, Cinoxacin, Gentamicin, Kasugamycin, Lincomycin, Neomycin, Polymixin B and Tobramycin, did not eliminate or suppress Las in the tested concentrations, resulting in plants with increased titers of Las. The other 12 antibiotics partly eliminated or suppressed Las in the treated and graft-inoculated plants. The effective and non-phytotoxic antibiotics could be potential candidates for control of citrus HLB, either for the rescue of infected citrus germplasm or for restricted field application.

  7. Proteomic analysis of the purple sulfur bacterium Candidatus “Thiodictyon syntrophicum” strain Cad16T isolated from Lake Cadagno

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    Nicola Storelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lake Cadagno is characterised by a compact chemocline with high concentrations of purple sulfur bacteria (PSB. 2D-DIGE was used to monitor the global changes in the proteome of Candidatus “Thiodictyon syntrophicum” strain Cad16T both in the presence and absence of light. This study aimed to disclose details regarding the dark CO2 assimilation of the PSB, as this mechanism is often observed but is not yet sufficiently understood. Our results showed the presence of 17 protein spots that were more abundant in the dark, including three enzymes that could be part of the autotrophic dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle, normally observed in archaea.

  8. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyserman, Ben O; Noguera, Daniel R; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; McMahon, Katherine D

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobic acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. This analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms. PMID:26555245

  9. Identifying Potential Mechanisms Enabling Acidophily in the Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Gallois, Nicolas; Schouten, Stefan; Stein, Lisa Y; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step in nitrification and is dominated by two distinct groups of microorganisms in soil: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOA are often more abundant than AOB and dominate activity in acid soils. The mechanism of ammonia oxidation under acidic conditions has been a long-standing paradox. While high rates of ammonia oxidation are frequently measured in acid soils, cultivated ammonia oxidizers grew only at near-neutral pH when grown in standard laboratory culture. Although a number of mechanisms have been demonstrated to enable neutrophilic AOB growth at low pH in the laboratory, these have not been demonstrated in soil, and the recent cultivation of the obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer "Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra" provides a more parsimonious explanation for the observed high rates of activity. Analysis of the sequenced genome, transcriptional activity, and lipid content of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" reveals that previously proposed mechanisms used by AOB for growth at low pH are not essential for archaeal ammonia oxidation in acidic environments. Instead, the genome indicates that "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" contains genes encoding both a predicted high-affinity substrate acquisition system and potential pH homeostasis mechanisms absent in neutrophilic AOA. Analysis of mRNA revealed that candidate genes encoding the proposed homeostasis mechanisms were all expressed during acidophilic growth, and lipid profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) demonstrated that the membrane lipids of "Ca Nitrosotalea devanaterra" were not dominated by crenarchaeol, as found in neutrophilic AOA. This study for the first time describes a genome of an obligately acidophilic ammonia oxidizer and identifies potential mechanisms enabling this unique phenotype for future biochemical characterization. PMID:26896134

  10. Genetic diversity of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus based on two hypervariable effector genes in Thailand.

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    Thamrongjet Puttamuk

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB, also known as citrus greening, is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. HLB is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' with 'Ca. L. asiaticus' (Las being the most widely distributed around the world, and the only species detected in Thailand. To understand the genetic diversity of Las bacteria in Thailand, we evaluated two closely-related effector genes, lasAI and lasAII, found within the Las prophages from 239 infected citrus and 55 infected psyllid samples collected from different provinces in Thailand. The results indicated that most of the Las-infected samples collected from Thailand contained at least one prophage sequence with 48.29% containing prophage 1 (FP1, 63.26% containing prophage 2 (FP2, and 19.38% containing both prophages. Interestingly, FP2 was found to be the predominant population in Las-infected citrus samples while Las-infected psyllids contained primarily FP1. The multiple banding patterns that resulted from amplification of lasAI imply extensive variation exists within the full and partial repeat sequence while the single band from lasAII indicates a low amount of variation within the repeat sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of Las-infected samples from 22 provinces in Thailand suggested that the bacterial pathogen may have been introduced to Thailand from China and the Philippines. This is the first report evaluating the genetic variation of a large population of Ca. L. asiaticus infected samples in Thailand using the two effector genes from Las prophage regions.

  11. Sexual transmission of a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, between conspecific insect vectors during mating.

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    Rajinder S Mann

    Full Text Available Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a fastidious, phloem-inhabiting, gram-negative bacterium transmitted by Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae. The bacterium is the presumed causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB, one of the most destructive and economically important diseases of citrus. We investigated whether Las is transmitted between infected and uninfected D. citri adults during courtship. Our results indicate that Las was sexually transmitted from Las-infected male D. citri to uninfected females at a low rate (<4% during mating. Sexual transmission was not observed following mating of infected females and uninfected males or among adult pairs of the same sex. Las was detected in genitalia of both sexes and also in eggs of infected females. A latent period of 7 days or more was required to detect the bacterium in recipient females. Rod shaped as well as spherical structures resembling Las were observed in ovaries of Las-infected females with transmission electron microscopy, but were absent in ovaries from uninfected D. citri females. The size of the rod shaped structures varied from 0.39 to 0.67 µm in length and 0.19 to 0.39 µm in width. The spherical structures measured from 0.61 to 0.80 µm in diameter. This investigation provides convincing evidence that a plant pathogenic bacterium is sexually transmitted from male to female insects during courtship and established evidence that bacteria persist in reproductive organs. Moreover, these findings provide an alternative sexually horizontal mechanism for the spread of Las within populations of D. citri, even in the absence of infected host trees.

  12. The transcriptional activator LdtR from 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' mediates osmotic stress tolerance.

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    Fernando A Pagliai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The causal agent of Huanglongbing disease, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', is a non-culturable, gram negative, phloem-limited α-proteobacterium. Current methods to control the spread of this disease are still limited to the removal and destruction of infected trees. In this study, we identified and characterized a regulon from 'Ca. L. asiaticus' involved in cell wall remodeling, that contains a member of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators (ldtR, and a predicted L,D-transpeptidase (ldtP. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, mutation of ldtR resulted in morphological changes (shortened rod-type phenotype and reduced tolerance to osmotic stress. A biochemical approach was taken to identify small molecules that modulate LdtR activity. The LdtR ligands identified by thermal shift assays were validated using DNA binding methods. The biological impact of LdtR inactivation by the small molecules was then examined in Sinorhizobium meliloti and Liberibacter crescens, where a shortened-rod phenotype was induced by growth in presence of the ligands. A new method was also developed to examine the effects of small molecules on the viability of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus', using shoots from HLB-infected orange trees. Decreased expression of ldtRLas and ldtPLas was observed in samples taken from HLB-infected shoots after 6 h of incubation with the LdtR ligands. These results provide strong proof of concept for the use of small molecules that target LdtR, as a potential treatment option for Huanglongbing disease.

  13. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis

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    Oyserman, Ben O; Noguera, Daniel R; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; McMahon, Katherine D

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobic acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. This analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms. PMID:26555245

  14. The intracellular citrus huanglongbing bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' encodes two novel autotransporters.

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    Guixia Hao

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by the type V secretion system (T5SS, known as autotransporters, are large extracellular virulence proteins localized to the bacterial poles. In this study, we characterized two novel autotransporter proteins of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las, and redesignated them as LasAI and LasAII in lieu of the previous names HyvI and HyvII. As a phloem-limited, intracellular bacterial pathogen, Las has a significantly reduced genome and causes huanglongbing (HLB, a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that LasAI and LasAII share the structural features of an autotransporter family containing large repeats of a passenger domain and a unique C-terminal translocator domain. When fused to the GFP gene and expressed in E. coli, the LasAI C-terminus and the full length LasAII were localized to the bacterial poles, similar to other members of autotransporter family. Despite the absence of a typical signal peptide, LasAI was found to localize at the cell surface by immuno-dot blot using a monoclonal antibody against the partial LasAI protein. Its surface localization was also confirmed by the removal of the LasAI antigen using a proteinase K treatment of the intact bacterial cells. When co-inoculated with a P19 gene silencing suppressor and transiently expressed in tobacco leaves, the GFP-LasAI translocator targeted to the mitochondria. This is the first report that Las encodes novel autotransporters that target to mitochondria when expressed in the plants. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this intracellular bacterium.

  15. Molecular characterization of a mosaic locus in the genome of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'

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    Wang Xuefeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huanglongbing (HLB is a highly destructive disease of citrus production worldwide. 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', an unculturable alpha proteobacterium, is a putative pathogen of HLB. Information about the biology and strain diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is currently limited, inhibiting the scope of HLB research and control. Results A genomic region (CLIBASIA_05640 to CLIBASIA_05650 of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' showing hyper-sequence variation or locus mosaicism was identified and investigated using 262 bacterial strains (188 from China and 74 from Florida. Based on the characteristic electrophoretic profiles of PCR amplicons generated by a specific primer set, eight electrophoretic types (E-types were identified, six E-types (A, B, C, D, E, and F in China and four E-types (A, C, G, and H in Florida. The 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains from China consisted predominately of E-type A (71.3% and E-type B (19.7%. In contrast, the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' strains from Florida was predominated by E-type G (82.4%. Diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in China was also evidenced. Strains from the high altitude Yunnan Province consisted of five E-types with E-type B being the majority (62.8%, whereas strains from the low altitude coastal Guangdong Province consisted of only two E-types with E-type A as the majority (97.0%. Sequence analyses revealed that variation of DNA amplicons was due to insertion/deletion events at CLIBASIA_05650 and the downstream intergenic region. Conclusions This study demonstrated the genomic mosaicism of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' resulted from active DNA insertion/deletion activities. Analyses of strain variation depicted the significant inter- and intra-continent diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'.

  16. Prophage-mediated dynamics of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of citrus huanglongbing.

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    Lijuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB, a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and

  17. The complete genome sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease.

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    Hong Lin

    Full Text Available Zebra Chip (ZC is an emerging plant disease that causes aboveground decline of potato shoots and generally results in unusable tubers. This disease has led to multi-million dollar losses for growers in the central and western United States over the past decade and impacts the livelihood of potato farmers in Mexico and New Zealand. ZC is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', a fastidious alpha-proteobacterium that is transmitted by a phloem-feeding psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. Research on this disease has been hampered by a lack of robust culture methods and paucity of genome sequence information for 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. Here we present the sequence of the 1.26 Mbp metagenome of 'Ca. L. solanacearum', based on DNA isolated from potato psyllids. The coding inventory of the 'Ca. L. solanacearum' genome was analyzed and compared to related Rhizobiaceae to better understand 'Ca. L. solanacearum' physiology and identify potential targets to develop improved treatment strategies. This analysis revealed a number of unique transporters and pathways, all potentially contributing to ZC pathogenesis. Some of these factors may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Taxonomically, 'Ca. L. solanacearum' is related to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', a suspected causative agent of citrus huanglongbing, yet many genome rearrangements and several gene gains/losses are evident when comparing these two Liberibacter. species. Relative to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', 'Ca. L. solanacearum' probably has reduced capacity for nucleic acid modification, increased amino acid and vitamin biosynthesis functionalities, and gained a high-affinity iron transport system characteristic of several pathogenic microbes.

  18. Prophage-mediated dynamics of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of citrus huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lijuan; Powell, Charles A; Li, Wenbin; Irey, Mike; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las) Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB), a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and disease development.

  19. Candidatus Bartonella merieuxii, a potential new zoonotic Bartonella species in canids from Iraq.

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    Bruno B Chomel

    Full Text Available Bartonellae are emerging vector-borne pathogens infecting erythrocytes and endothelial cells of various domestic and wild mammals. Blood samples were collected from domestic and wild canids in Iraq under the United States Army zoonotic disease surveillance program. Serology was performed using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for B. henselae, B. clarridgeiae, B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. bovis. Overall seroprevalence was 47.4% in dogs (n = 97, 40.4% in jackals (n = 57 and 12.8% in red foxes (n = 39. Bartonella species DNA was amplified from whole blood and representative strains were sequenced. DNA of a new Bartonella species similar to but distinct from B. bovis, was amplified from 37.1% of the dogs and 12.3% of the jackals. B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was also amplified from one jackal and no Bartonella DNA was amplified from foxes. Adjusting for age, the odds of dogs being Bartonella PCR positive were 11.94 times higher than for wild canids (95% CI: 4.55-31.35, suggesting their role as reservoir for this new Bartonella species. This study reports on the prevalence of Bartonella species in domestic and wild canids of Iraq and provides the first detection of Bartonella in jackals. We propose Candidatus Bartonella merieuxii for this new Bartonella species. Most of the Bartonella species identified in sick dogs are also pathogenic for humans. Therefore, seroprevalence in Iraqi dog owners and bacteremia in Iraqi people with unexplained fever or culture negative endocarditis requires further investigation as well as in United States military personnel who were stationed in Iraq. Finally, it will also be essential to test any dog brought back from Iraq to the USA for presence of Bartonella bacteremia to prevent any accidental introduction of a new Bartonella species to the New World.

  20. "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica" Detected from a Febrile Traveller Returning to Germany from Vacation in Southern Africa.

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    Volker Fingerle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 26 year-old female patient presented to the Tropical Medicine outpatient unit of the Ludwig Maximilians-University in Munich with febrile illness after returning from Southern Africa, where she contracted a bite by a large mite-like arthropod, most likely a soft-tick. Spirochetes were detected in Giemsa stained blood smears and treatment was started with doxycycline for suspected tick-borne relapsing fever. The patient eventually recovered after developing a slight Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction during therapy. PCR reactions performed from EDTA-blood revealed a 16S rRNA sequence with 99.4% similarity to both, Borrelia duttonii, and B. parkeri. Further sequences obtained from the flagellin gene (flaB demonstrated genetic distances of 0.066 and 0.097 to B. parkeri and B. duttonii, respectively. Fragments of the uvrA gene revealed genetic distance of 0.086 to B. hermsii in genetic analysis and only distant relations with classic Old World relapsing fever species. This revealed the presence of a novel species of tick-borne relapsing fever spirochetes that we propose to name "Candidatus Borrelia kalaharica", as it was contracted from an arthropod bite in the Kalahari Desert belonging to both, Botswana and Namibia, a region where to our knowledge no relapsing fever has been described so far. Interestingly, the novel species shows more homology to New World relapsing fever Borrelia such as B. parkeri or B. hermsii than to known Old World species such as B. duttonii or B. crocidurae.

  1. Search for potential vectors of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’: population dynamics in host crops

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    Gabriela Teresani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ has recently been reported to be associated with vegetative disorders and economic losses in carrot and celery crops in Spain. The bacterium is a carrot seedborne pathogen and it is transmitted by psyllid vector species. From 2011 to 2014 seasonal and occasional surveys in carrot, celery and potato plots were performed. The sticky plant method was used to monitor the arthropods that visited the plants. The collected arthropods were classified into Aphididae and Cicadellidae, and the superfamily Psylloidea was identified to the species level. The superfamily Psylloidea represented 35.45% of the total arthropods captured on celery in Villena and 99.1% on carrot in Tenerife (Canary Islands. The maximum flight of psyllid species was in summer, both in mainland Spain and the Canary Islands, reaching a peak of 570 specimens in August in Villena and 6,063 in July in Tenerife. The main identified psyllid species were as follows: Bactericera trigonica Hodkinson, B. tremblayi Wagnerand B. nigricornis Förster. B. trigonica represented more than 99% of the psyllids captured in the Canary Islands and 75% and 38% in 2011 and 2012 in Villena, respectively. In addition, Trioza urticae Linnaeus, Bactericera sp.,Ctenarytaina sp., Cacopsylla sp., Trioza sp. and Psylla sp. were captured. ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ targets were detected by squash real-time PCR in 19.5% of the psyllids belonging to the different Bactericera species. This paper reports at least three new psyllid species that carry the bacterium and can be considered as potential vectors.

  2. The ubiquity of conservative translations

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    Jeřábek, Emil

    2011-01-01

    We study the notion of conservative translation between logics introduced by Feitosa and D'Ottaviano. We show that classical propositional logic (CPC) is universal in the sense that every finitary consequence relation over a countable set of formulas can be conservatively translated into CPC. The translation is computable if the consequence relation is decidable. More generally, we show that one can take instead of CPC a broad class of logics (extensions of a certain fragment of full Lambek calculus FL) including most nonclassical logics studied in the literature, hence in a sense, (almost) any two reasonable deductive systems can be conservatively translated into each other. We also provide some counterexamples, in particular the paraconsistent logic LP is not universal.

  3. Natural variation in SAR11 marine bacterioplankton genomes inferred from metagenomic data

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    Wilhelm Larry J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One objective of metagenomics is to reconstruct information about specific uncultured organisms from fragmentary environmental DNA sequences. We used the genome of an isolate of the marine alphaproteobacterium SAR11 ('Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'; strain HTCC1062, obtained from the cold, productive Oregon coast, as a query sequence to study variation in SAR11 metagenome sequence data from the Sargasso Sea, a warm, oligotrophic ocean gyre. Results The average amino acid identity of SAR11 genes encoded by the metagenomic data to the query genome was only 71%, indicating significant evolutionary divergence between the coastal isolates and Sargasso Sea populations. However, an analysis of gene neighbors indicated that SAR11 genes in the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data match the gene order of the HTCC1062 genome in 96% of cases (> 85,000 observations, and that rearrangements are most frequent at predicted operon boundaries. There were no conserved examples of genes with known functions being found in the coastal isolates, but not the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data, or vice versa, suggesting that core regions of these diverse SAR11 genomes are relatively conserved in gene content. However, four hypervariable regions were observed, which may encode properties associated with variation in SAR11 ecotypes. The largest of these, HVR2, is a 48 kb region flanked by the sole 5S and 23S genes in the HTCC1062 genome, and mainly encodes genes that determine cell surface properties. A comparison of two closely related 'Candidatus Pelagibacter' genomes (HTCC1062 and HTCC1002 revealed a number of "gene indels" in core regions. Most of these were found to be polymorphic in the metagenomic data and showed evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that the same "polymorphic gene indels" are maintained in physically isolated SAR11 populations. Conclusion These findings suggest that natural selection has conserved many core features of SAR11

  4. Genetic diversity of European phytoplasmas of the 16SrV taxonomic group and proposal of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma rubi'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malembic-Maher, Sylvie; Salar, Pascal; Filippin, Luisa; Carle, Patricia; Angelini, Elisa; Foissac, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    In addition to the grapevine flavescence dorée phytoplasmas, other members of taxonomic group 16SrV phytoplasmas infect grapevines, alders and species of the genera Clematis and Rubus in Europe. In order to investigate which phytoplasmas constitute discrete, species-level taxa, several strains were analysed by comparing their 16S rRNA gene sequences and a set of five housekeeping genes. Whereas 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values were >97.5 %, the proposed threshold to distinguish two 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' taxa, phylogenetic analysis of the combined sequences of the tuf, rplV-rpsC, rplF-rplR, map and uvrB-degV genetic loci showed that two discrete phylogenetic clusters could be clearly distinguished. The first cluster grouped flavescence dorée (FD) phytoplasmas, alder yellows (AldY) phytoplasmas, Clematis (CL) phytoplasmas and the Palatinate grapevine yellows (PGY) phytoplasmas. The second cluster comprised Rubus stunt (RS) phytoplasmas. In addition to the specificity of the insect vector, the Rubus stunt phytoplasma contained specific sequences in the 16S rRNA gene. Hence, the Rubus stunt phytoplasma 16S rRNA gene was sufficiently differentiated to represent a novel putative taxon: 'Candidatus Phytoplasma rubi'. PMID:20889771

  5. Systematic relationships and cospeciation of bacterial endosymbionts and their carpenter ant host species: proposal of the new taxon Candidatus Blochmannia gen. nov.

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    Sauer, C; Stackebrandt, E; Gadau, J; Hölldobler, B; Gross, R

    2000-09-01

    The systematic relationships of intracellular bacteria of 13 Camponotus species (carpenter ants) from America and Europe were compared to those of their hosts. Phylogenetic trees of the bacteria and the ants were based on 16S rDNA (rrs) gene sequences and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences, respectively. The bacterial endosymbionts of Camponotus spp. form a distinct lineage in the y-subclass of the Proteobacteria. The taxa most closely related to these bacteria are endosymbionts of aphids and the tsetse fly. The bacterial and host phylogenies deduced from the sequence data show a high degree of congruence, providing significant evidence for cospeciation of the bacteria and the ants and a maternal transmission route of the symbionts. The cloned rrs genes of the endosymbionts contain putative intervening sequences (IVSs) with a much lower G+C content than the mean of the respective rrs genes. By in situ hybridization specific 16S rDNA oligonucleotide probes verified the presence of the bacteria within tissues of three of the eukaryotic hosts. It is proposed that the endosymbionts of these three carpenter ants be assigned to a new taxon 'Candidatus Blochmannia gen. nov.' with the symbionts of the individual ants being species named according to their host, 'Candidatus Blochmannia floridanus sp. nov.', 'Candidatus Blochmannia herculeanus sp. nov.' and 'Candidatus Blochmannia rufipes sp. nov.'. PMID:11034499

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae” Strain Mbita1, the Causative Agent of Napier Grass Stunt Disease in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anne; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Wambua, Lillian; Olds, Cassandra; Midega, Charles; Dickinson, Matthew; Kawicha, Praphat; Khan, Zeyaur; Masiga, Daniel; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are bacterial plant pathogens with devastating impact on agricultural production worldwide. In eastern Africa, Napier grass stunt disease causes serious economic losses in the smallholder dairy industry. This draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae” strain Mbita1 provides insight into its genomic organization and the molecular basis of pathogenicity. PMID:27103722

  7. A single prophage carrying a CRISPR/cas system in ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ strain A4 from Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas) is an unculturable a-proteobacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease that affects citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remain...

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of the Obligate Symbionts "Candidatus Sulcia muelleri" and "Ca. Nasuia deltocephalinicola" from the Pestiferous Leafhopper Macrosteles quadripunctulatus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gordon M; Abbà, Simona; Kube, Michael; Marzachì, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial symbionts of the European pest leafhopper, Macrosteles quadripunctulatus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), were fully sequenced. "Candidatus Sulcia muelleri" and "Ca. Nasuia deltocephalinicola" represent two of the smallest known bacterial genomes at 190 kb and 112 kb, respectively. Genome sequences are nearly identical to strains reported from the closely related host species, M. quadrilineatus.

  9. The potential role of 'Candidatus Microthrix parvicella' in phosphorus removal during sludge bulking in two full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Qi, Rong; Liu, Miaomiao; Li, Qian; Bao, Haipeng; Li, Yaming; Wang, Shen; Tandoi, Valter; Yang, Min

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial community compositions and phosphorus removal performance under sludge bulking and non-bulking conditions in two biological wastewater treatment systems (conventional A²/O (anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic) and inverted A²/O (anoxic/anaerobic/aerobic) processes) receiving the same raw wastewater. Sludge bulking resulted in significant shift in bacterial compositions from Proteobacteria dominance to Actinobacteria dominance, characterized by the significant presence of filamentous 'Candidatus Microthrix parvicella'. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed that the relative abundance of 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis', a key polyphosphate-accumulating organism responsible for phosphorus removal, with respect to 16s rRNA genes of total bacteria was 0.8 and 0.7%, respectively, for the conventional and inverted A²/O systems when sludge bulking occurred, which increased to 8.2 and 12.3% during the non-bulking period. However, the total phosphorus removal performance during the bulking period (2-week average: 97 ± 1 and 96 ± 1%, respectively) was not adversely affected comparable to that during the non-bulking period (2-week average: 96 ± 1 and 96 ± 1%, respectively). Neisser staining revealed the presence of large polyphosphate granules in 'Candidatus Microthrix parvicella', suggesting that this microbial group might have been responsible for phosphorus removal during the sludge bulking period when 'Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis' was excluded from the systems. PMID:25051486

  10. Zinc treatment increases the titre of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Huanglongbing-affected citrus plants while affecting the bacterial microbiomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus often display zinc deficiency symptoms. In this study, supplemental zinc was applied to citrus to determine its effect on Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) titer, HLB symptoms, and leaf microbiome. HLB-affected citrus were treated with various amounts of zi...

  11. Use of Electrical Penetration Graph Technology to Examine Transmission of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ to Potato by Three Haplotypes of Potato Psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli; Hemiptera: Triozidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a vector of the phloem-limited bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. Little is known about how potato psyllid transmits Lso to potato. We used ele...

  12. Systematic relationships and cospeciation of bacterial endosymbionts and their carpenter ant host species: proposal of the new taxon Candidatus Blochmannia gen. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, C; Stackebrandt, E; Gadau, J; Hölldobler, B; Gross, R

    2000-09-01

    The systematic relationships of intracellular bacteria of 13 Camponotus species (carpenter ants) from America and Europe were compared to those of their hosts. Phylogenetic trees of the bacteria and the ants were based on 16S rDNA (rrs) gene sequences and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences, respectively. The bacterial endosymbionts of Camponotus spp. form a distinct lineage in the y-subclass of the Proteobacteria. The taxa most closely related to these bacteria are endosymbionts of aphids and the tsetse fly. The bacterial and host phylogenies deduced from the sequence data show a high degree of congruence, providing significant evidence for cospeciation of the bacteria and the ants and a maternal transmission route of the symbionts. The cloned rrs genes of the endosymbionts contain putative intervening sequences (IVSs) with a much lower G+C content than the mean of the respective rrs genes. By in situ hybridization specific 16S rDNA oligonucleotide probes verified the presence of the bacteria within tissues of three of the eukaryotic hosts. It is proposed that the endosymbionts of these three carpenter ants be assigned to a new taxon 'Candidatus Blochmannia gen. nov.' with the symbionts of the individual ants being species named according to their host, 'Candidatus Blochmannia floridanus sp. nov.', 'Candidatus Blochmannia herculeanus sp. nov.' and 'Candidatus Blochmannia rufipes sp. nov.'.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus” sp. 1R26, Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order

    OpenAIRE

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, Tim; Poulsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of “Candidatus Methanomethylophilus” sp. 1R26, a member of the newly described Methanomassiliicoccales order of Euryarcheaota. The enrichment culture was established from bovine rumen contents and produced methane from trimethylamine and methanol. The draft genome contains genes for methanogenesis from methylated compounds.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methanomethylophilus" sp. 1R26, Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, Tim; Poulsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome of "Candidatus Methanomethylophilus" sp. 1R26, a member of the newly described Methanomassiliicoccales order of Euryarcheaota. The enrichment culture was established from bovine rumen contents and produced methane from trimethylamine and methanol. The draft genome contains genes for methanogenesis from methylated compounds. PMID:26893425

  15. Single-Cell (Meta-Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly E. Flood

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The genus Thiomargarita includes the world’s largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria.Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs. In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsr

  16. Single-Cell (Meta-)Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Beverly E.; Fliss, Palmer; Jones, Daniel S.; Dick, Gregory J.; Jain, Sunit; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Winkel, Matthias; Mußmann, Marc; Bailey, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsrA. The dsrA group

  17. Distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' Above and Below Ground in Texas Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, Eliezer S; Vazquez, Omar Ed; Braswell, W Evan; Yanev, George; Devanaboina, Madhavi; Kunta, Madhurababu

    2016-07-01

    Detection of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' represents one of the most difficult, yet critical, steps of controlling Huanglongbing disease. Efficient detection relies on understanding the underlying distribution of bacteria within trees. To that end, we studied the distribution of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in leaves of 'Rio Red' grapefruit trees and in roots of 'Valencia' sweet orange trees grafted onto sour orange rootstock. We performed two sets of leaf collection on grapefruit trees; the first a selective sampling targeting symptomatic leaves and their neighbors and the second a systematic collection disregarding symptomology. From uprooted orange trees, we exhaustively sampled fibrous roots. In this study, the presence of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was detected in leaves using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S ribosomal gene and in roots using the rpIJ/rpIL ribosomal protein genes and was confirmed with conventional PCR and sequencing of the rpIJ/rpIL gene in both tissues. Among randomly collected leaves, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was distributed in a patchy fashion. Detection of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' varied with leaf symptomology with symptomatic leaves showing the highest frequency (74%) followed by their neighboring asymptomatic leaves (30%), while randomly distributed asymptomatic leaves had the lowest frequency (20%). Among symptomatic leaves, we found statistically significant differences in mean number of bacterial cells with respect to both increasing distance of the leaf from the trunk and cardinal direction. The titer of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' cells was significantly greater on the north side of trees than on the south and west sides. Moreover, these directions showed different spatial distributions of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' with higher titers near the trunk on the south and west sides as opposed to further from the trunk on the north side. Similarly, we found spatial variation in 'Ca. L. asiaticus' distribution among root samples. 'Ca. L. asiaticus

  18. Single-Cell (Meta-)Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Beverly E; Fliss, Palmer; Jones, Daniel S; Dick, Gregory J; Jain, Sunit; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Winkel, Matthias; Mußmann, Marc; Bailey, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsrA. The dsrA group

  19. The linear chromosome of the plant-pathogenic mycoplasma 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migdoll Alexander M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted, uncultivable bacterial plant pathogens that cause diseases in hundreds of economically important plants. They represent a monophyletic group within the class Mollicutes (trivial name mycoplasmas and are characterized by a small genome with a low GC content, and the lack of a firm cell wall. All mycoplasmas, including strains of 'Candidatus (Ca. Phytoplasma asteris' and 'Ca. P. australiense', examined so far have circular chromosomes, as is the case for almost all walled bacteria. Results Our work has shown that 'Ca. Phytoplasma mali', the causative agent of apple proliferation disease, has a linear chromosome. Linear chromosomes were also identified in the closely related provisional species 'Ca. P. pyri' and 'Ca. P. prunorum'. The chromosome of 'Ca. P. mali' strain AT is 601,943 bp in size and has a GC content of 21.4%. The chromosome is further characterized by large terminal inverted repeats and covalently closed hairpin ends. Analysis of the protein-coding genes revealed that glycolysis, the major energy-yielding pathway supposed for 'Ca. P. asteris', is incomplete in 'Ca. P. mali'. Due to the apparent lack of other metabolic pathways present in mycoplasmas, it is proposed that maltose and malate are utilized as carbon and energy sources. However, complete ATP-yielding pathways were not identified. 'Ca. P. mali' also differs from 'Ca. P. asteris' by a smaller genome, a lower GC content, a lower number of paralogous genes, fewer insertions of potential mobile DNA elements, and a strongly reduced number of ABC transporters for amino acids. In contrast, 'Ca. P. mali' has an extended set of genes for homologous recombination, excision repair and SOS response than 'Ca. P. asteris'. Conclusion The small linear chromosome with large terminal inverted repeats and covalently closed hairpin ends, the extremely low GC content and the limited metabolic capabilities reflect unique features of 'Ca

  20. The frontier between cell and organelle: genome analysis of Candidatus Carsonella ruddii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peretó Juli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial symbioses are widespread among insects. The early establishment of such symbiotic associations has probably been one of the key factors for the evolutionary success of insects, since it may have allowed access to novel ecological niches and to new imbalanced food resources, such as plant sap or blood. Several genomes of bacterial endosymbionts of different insect species have been recently sequenced, and their biology has been extensively studied. Recently, the complete genome sequence of Candidatus Carsonella ruddii, considered the primary endosymbiont of the psyllid Pachpsylla venusta, has been published. This genome consists of a circular chromosome of 159,662 bp and has been proposed as the smallest bacterial endosymbiont genome known to date. Results The detailed analysis of the gene content of C. ruddii shows that the extensive degradation of the genome is not compatible with its consideration as a mutualistic endosymbiont and, even more, as a living organism. The ability to perform most essential functions for a cell to be considered alive is heavily impaired by the lack of genes involved in DNA replication, transcription and translation. Furthermore, the shortening of genes causes, in some cases, the loss of essential domains and functional residues needed to fulfill such vital functions. In addition, at least half of the pathways towards the biosynthesis of essential amino acids, its proposed symbiotic function, are completely or partially lost. Conclusion We propose that this strain of C. ruddii can be viewed as a further step towards the degeneration of the former primary endosymbiont and its transformation in a subcellular new entity between living cells and organelles. Although the transition of genes from C. ruddii to the host nucleus has been proposed, the amount of genes that should have been transferred to the germinal line of the insect would be so big that it would be more plausible to consider

  1. Single-Cell (Meta-)Genomics of a Dimorphic Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii Reveals Genomic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Beverly E; Fliss, Palmer; Jones, Daniel S; Dick, Gregory J; Jain, Sunit; Kaster, Anne-Kristin; Winkel, Matthias; Mußmann, Marc; Bailey, Jake

    2016-01-01

    The genus Thiomargarita includes the world's largest bacteria. But as uncultured organisms, their physiology, metabolism, and basis for their gigantism are not well understood. Thus, a genomics approach, applied to a single Candidatus Thiomargarita nelsonii cell was employed to explore the genetic potential of one of these enigmatic giant bacteria. The Thiomargarita cell was obtained from an assemblage of budding Ca. T. nelsonii attached to a provannid gastropod shell from Hydrate Ridge, a methane seep offshore of Oregon, USA. Here we present a manually curated genome of Bud S10 resulting from a hybrid assembly of long Pacific Biosciences and short Illumina sequencing reads. With respect to inorganic carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation pathways, the Ca. T. nelsonii Hydrate Ridge Bud S10 genome was similar to marine sister taxa within the family Beggiatoaceae. However, the Bud S10 genome contains genes suggestive of the genetic potential for lithotrophic growth on arsenite and perhaps hydrogen. The genome also revealed that Bud S10 likely respires nitrate via two pathways: a complete denitrification pathway and a dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia pathway. Both pathways have been predicted, but not previously fully elucidated, in the genomes of other large, vacuolated, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Surprisingly, the genome also had a high number of unusual features for a bacterium to include the largest number of metacaspases and introns ever reported in a bacterium. Also present, are a large number of other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequence (IS) transposable elements and miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In some cases, mobile genetic elements disrupted key genes in metabolic pathways. For example, a MITE interrupts hupL, which encodes the large subunit of the hydrogenase in hydrogen oxidation. Moreover, we detected a group I intron in one of the most critical genes in the sulfur oxidation pathway, dsrA. The dsrA group

  2. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' associated with citrus Huanglongbing worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md-Sajedul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huanglongbing (HLB is one of the most destructive citrus diseases in the world. The disease is associated with the presence of a fastidious, phloem-limited α- proteobacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. Liberibacter africanus' or 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus'. HLB-associated Liberibacters have spread to North America and South America in recent years. While the causal agents of HLB have been putatively identified, information regarding the worldwide population structure and epidemiological relationships for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is limited. The availability of the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome sequence has facilitated development of molecular markers from this bacterium. The objectives of this study were to develop microsatellite markers and conduct genetic analyses of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' from a worldwide collection. Two hundred eighty seven isolates from USA (Florida, Brazil, China, India, Cambodia, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, and Japan were analyzed. Results A panel of seven polymorphic microsatellite markers was developed for 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Microsatellite analyses across the samples showed that the genetic diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is higher in Asia than Americas. UPGMA and STRUCTURE analyses identified three major genetic groups worldwide. Isolates from India were genetically distinct. East-southeast Asian and Brazilian isolates were generally included in the same group; a few members of this group were found in Florida, but the majority of the isolates from Florida were clustered separately. eBURST analysis predicted three founder haplotypes, which may have given rise to three groups worldwide. Conclusions Our results identified three major genetic groups of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' worldwide. Isolates from Brazil showed similar genetic makeup with east-southeast Asian dominant group, suggesting the possibility of a common origin. However, most of the isolates recovered from Florida were clustered in a

  3. Genetic variability of Rickettsia spp. in Ixodes persulcatus/Ixodes trianguliceps sympatric areas from Western Siberia, Russia: Identification of a new Candidatus Rickettsia species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igolkina, Yana P; Rar, Vera A; Yakimenko, Valeriy V; Malkova, Marina G; Tancev, Aleksey K; Tikunov, Artem Yu; Epikhina, Tamara I; Tikunova, Nina V

    2015-08-01

    Rickettsia spp. are the causative agents of a number of diseases in humans. These bacteria are transmitted by arthropods, including ixodid ticks. DNA of several Rickettsia spp. was identified in Ixodes persulcatus ticks, however, the association of Ixodes trianguliceps ticks with Rickettsia spp. is unknown. In our study, blood samples of small mammals (n=108), unfed adult I. persulcatus ticks (n=136), and I. persulcatus (n=12) and I. trianguliceps (n=34) ticks feeding on voles were collected in two I. persulcatus/I. trianguliceps sympatric areas in Western Siberia. Using nested PCR, ticks and blood samples were studied for the presence of Rickettsia spp. Three distinct Rickettsia species were found in ticks, but no Rickettsia species were found in the blood of examined voles. Candidatus Rickettsia tarasevichiae DNA was detected in 89.7% of unfed I. persulcatus, 91.7% of engorged I. persulcatus and 14.7% of I. trianguliceps ticks. Rickettsia helvetica DNA was detected in 5.9% of I. trianguliceps ticks. In addition, a new Rickettsia genetic variant was found in 32.4% of I. trianguliceps ticks. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, gltA, ompA, оmpB and sca4 genes was performed and, in accordance with genetic criteria, a new Rickettsia genetic variant was classified as a new Candidatus Rickettsia species. We propose to name this species Candidatus Rickettsia uralica, according to the territory where this species was initially identified. Candidatus Rickettsia uralica was found to belong to the spotted fever group. The data obtained in this study leads us to propose that Candidatus Rickettsia uralica is associated with I. trianguliceps ticks.

  4. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals signifcant abundance but low diversity of Candidatus Scalindua marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    laura eVillanueva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to Candidatus Scalindua species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by Candidatus Scalindua profunda became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones. Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep and center (600 m area of the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of Candidatus Scalindua profunda served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV analysis was performed to assess diversity of the Candidatus Scalindua populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh, while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA and ACS had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that Candidatus Scalindua is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low.

  5. One carbon metabolism in SAR11 pelagic marine bacteria.

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    Jing Sun

    Full Text Available The SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria are the most abundant heterotrophs in the oceans and are believed to play a major role in mineralizing marine dissolved organic carbon. Their genomes are among the smallest known for free-living heterotrophic cells, raising questions about how they successfully utilize complex organic matter with a limited metabolic repertoire. Here we show that conserved genes in SAR11 subgroup Ia (Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique genomes encode pathways for the oxidation of a variety of one-carbon compounds and methyl functional groups from methylated compounds. These pathways were predicted to produce energy by tetrahydrofolate (THF-mediated oxidation, but not to support the net assimilation of biomass from C1 compounds. Measurements of cellular ATP content and the oxidation of (14C-labeled compounds to (14CO(2 indicated that methanol, formaldehyde, methylamine, and methyl groups from glycine betaine (GBT, trimethylamine (TMA, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO, and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP were oxidized by axenic cultures of the SAR11 strain Ca. P. ubique HTCC1062. Analyses of metagenomic data showed that genes for C1 metabolism occur at a high frequency in natural SAR11 populations. In short term incubations, natural communities of Sargasso Sea microbial plankton expressed a potential for the oxidation of (14C-labeled formate, formaldehyde, methanol and TMAO that was similar to cultured SAR11 cells and, like cultured SAR11 cells, incorporated a much larger percentage of pyruvate and glucose (27-35% than of C1 compounds (2-6% into biomass. Collectively, these genomic, cellular and environmental data show a surprising capacity for demethylation and C1 oxidation in SAR11 cultures and in natural microbial communities dominated by SAR11, and support the conclusion that C1 oxidation might be a significant conduit by which dissolved organic carbon is recycled to CO(2 in the upper ocean.

  6. Dominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanping; Graham, David W.; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Zhang, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Here we employed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) and 16S rRNA genes to assess relative abundances of dominant clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (referred to Accumulibacter) in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from six countries. Accumulibacter were not only detected in the 6 WWTPs performing biological phosphorus removal, but also inhabited in the other 11 WWTPs employing conventional activated sludge (AS) with abundances ranging from 0.02% to 7.0%. Among the AS samples, clades IIC and IID were found to be dominant among the five Accumulibacter clades. The relative abundance of each clade in the Accumulibacter lineage significantly correlated (p biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) WWTPs. The results deepened our understanding of the Accumulibacter diversity in environmental samples.

  7. Candidatus Renichlamydia lutjani, a Gram-negative bacterium in internal organs of blue striped snapper Lutjanus kasmira from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Daniele; Work, Thierry M.

    2012-01-01

    The blue-striped snapper Lutjanus kasmira (Perciformes, Lutjanidae) are cosmopolitan in the Indo-Pacific but were introduced into Oahu, Hawaii, USA, in the 1950s and have since colonized most of the archipelago. Studies of microparasites in blue-striped snappers from Hawaii revealed chlamydia-like organisms (CLO) infecting the spleen and kidney, characterized by intracellular basophilic granular inclusions containing Gram-negative and Gimenez-positive bacteria similar in appearance to epitheliocysts when seen under light microscopy. We provide molecular evidence that CLO are a new member of Chlamydiae, i.e. Candidatus Renichlamydia lutjani, that represents the first reported case of chlamydial infection in organs other than the gill in fishes.

  8. Dominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanping; Graham, David W.; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Zhang, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Here we employed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) and 16S rRNA genes to assess relative abundances of dominant clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (referred to Accumulibacter) in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from six countries. Accumulibacter were not only detected in the 6 WWTPs performing biological phosphorus removal, but also inhabited in the other 11 WWTPs employing conventional activated sludge (AS) with abundances ranging from 0.02% to 7.0%. Among the AS samples, clades IIC and IID were found to be dominant among the five Accumulibacter clades. The relative abundance of each clade in the Accumulibacter lineage significantly correlated (p phosphorus removal (EBPR) WWTPs. The results deepened our understanding of the Accumulibacter diversity in environmental samples.

  9. Genetic Diversity of the Indian Populations of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' Based on the Tandem Repeat Variability in a Genomic Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Bhose, Sumit; Motghare, Manali; Warghane, Ashish; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Ghosh, Dipak Kumar; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Ladaniya, Milind Shivratan; Gowda, Siddarame

    2015-08-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening disease) is an extremely destructive disease affecting citrus and causes severe economic loss to the crop yield worldwide. The disease is caused by a phloem-limited, noncultured, gram-negative bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter spp., the widely present and most destructive species being 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'. Although the disease has been reported from almost all citrus growing regions of India, knowledge on the molecular variability of the pathogen 'Ca. L. asiaticus' populations from different geographical regions and cultivars is limited. In the present study, variability of the Indian 'Ca. L. asiaticus' based on the tandem repeats at the genomic locus CLIBASIA_01645 was characterized and categorized into four classes based on the tandem repeat number (TRN); Class I (TRN≤5), Class II (TRN>5≤10), Class III (TRN>10≤15), and Class IV (TRN>15). The study revealed that the Indian population of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is more diverse than reported for Florida and Guangdong populations, which showed less diversity. While Florida and Guangdong populations were dominated by a TRN5 and TRN7 genotype, respectively, the Indian 'Ca. L. asiaticus' populations with TRN copy numbers 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 were widely distributed throughout the country. Additionally, TRN2 and TRN17 genotypes were also observed among the Indian 'Ca. L. asiaticus' populations. The predominant 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genotypes from the northeastern region of India were TRN6 and TRN7 (53.12%) and surprisingly similar to neighboring South China populations. Preliminary results showed absence of preference of citrus cultivars to any specific 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genotype. PMID:25760522

  10. Deciphering the bacterial microbiome of citrus plants in response to 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus'-infection and antibiotic treatments.

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    Muqing Zhang

    Full Text Available The bacterial microbiomes of citrus plants were characterized in response to 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las-infection and treatments with ampicillin (Amp and gentamicin (Gm by Phylochip-based metagenomics. The results revealed that 7,407 of over 50,000 known Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs in 53 phyla were detected in citrus leaf midribs using the PhyloChip™ G3 array, of which five phyla were dominant, Proteobacteria (38.7%, Firmicutes (29.0%, Actinobacteria (16.1%, Bacteroidetes (6.2% and Cyanobacteria (2.3%. The OTU62806, representing 'Candidatus Liberibacter', was present with a high titer in the plants graft-inoculated with Las-infected scions treated with Gm at 100 mg/L and in the water-treated control (CK1. However, the Las bacterium was not detected in the plants graft-inoculated with Las-infected scions treated with Amp at 1.0 g/L or in plants graft-inoculated with Las-free scions (CK2. The PhyloChip array demonstrated that more OTUs, at a higher abundance, were detected in the Gm-treated plants than in the other treatment and the controls. Pairwise comparisons indicated that 23 OTUs from the Achromobacter spp. and 12 OTUs from the Methylobacterium spp. were more abundant in CK2 and CK1, respectively. Ten abundant OTUs from the Stenotrophomonas spp. were detected only in the Amp-treatment. These results provide new insights into microbial communities that may be associated with the progression of citrus huanglongbing (HLB and the potential effects of antibiotics on the disease and microbial ecology.

  11. "Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis": A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon J; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Karst, Søren M; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater by wasting the biomass. However, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) may reduce the EBPR efficiency as they compete for substrates with PAOs, but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate. PAOs and GAOs are thought to be phylogenetically unrelated, with the model PAO being the betaproteobacterial "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" (Accumulibacter) and the model GAO being the gammaproteobacterial "Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis". Here, we report the discovery of a GAO from the genus Propionivibrio, which is closely related to Accumulibacter. Propionivibrio sp. are targeted by the canonical fluorescence in situ hybridization probes used to target Accumulibacter (PAOmix), but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate in situ. A laboratory scale reactor, operated to enrich for PAOs, surprisingly contained co-dominant populations of Propionivibrio and Accumulibacter. Metagenomic sequencing of multiple time-points enabled recovery of near complete population genomes from both genera. Annotation of the Propionivibrio genome confirmed their potential for the GAO phenotype and a basic metabolic model is proposed for their metabolism in the EBPR environment. Using newly designed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, analyses of full-scale EBPR plants revealed that Propionivibrio is a common member of the community, constituting up to 3% of the biovolume. To avoid overestimation of Accumulibacter abundance in situ, we recommend the use of the FISH probe PAO651 instead of the commonly applied PAOmix probe set. PMID:27458436

  12. Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis”: A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon J.; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Karst, Søren M.; Nielsen, Per H.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater by wasting the biomass. However, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) may reduce the EBPR efficiency as they compete for substrates with PAOs, but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate. PAOs and GAOs are thought to be phylogenetically unrelated, with the model PAO being the betaproteobacterial “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” (Accumulibacter) and the model GAO being the gammaproteobacterial “Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis”. Here, we report the discovery of a GAO from the genus Propionivibrio, which is closely related to Accumulibacter. Propionivibrio sp. are targeted by the canonical fluorescence in situ hybridization probes used to target Accumulibacter (PAOmix), but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate in situ. A laboratory scale reactor, operated to enrich for PAOs, surprisingly contained co-dominant populations of Propionivibrio and Accumulibacter. Metagenomic sequencing of multiple time-points enabled recovery of near complete population genomes from both genera. Annotation of the Propionivibrio genome confirmed their potential for the GAO phenotype and a basic metabolic model is proposed for their metabolism in the EBPR environment. Using newly designed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, analyses of full-scale EBPR plants revealed that Propionivibrio is a common member of the community, constituting up to 3% of the biovolume. To avoid overestimation of Accumulibacter abundance in situ, we recommend the use of the FISH probe PAO651 instead of the commonly applied PAOmix probe set. PMID:27458436

  13. An abundant 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani' tuf b strain is associated with grapevine, stinging nettle and Hyalesthes obsoletus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, A; Brader, G; Mörtel, J; Pastar, M; Riedle-Bauer, M

    2014-10-01

    Bois noir (BN) associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma solani' (Stolbur) is regularly found in Austrian vine growing regions. Investigations between 2003 and 2008 indicated sporadic presence of the confirmed disease vector Hyalesthes obsoletus and frequent infections of bindweed and grapevine. Infections of nettles were rare. In contrast present investigations revealed a mass occurrence of H. obsoletus almost exclusively on stinging nettle. The high population densities of H. obsoletus on Urtica dioica were accompanied by frequent occurrence of 'Ca. P. solani' in nettles and planthoppers. Sequence analysis of the molecular markers secY, stamp, tuf and vmp1 of stolbur revealed a single genotype named CPsM4_At1 in stinging nettles and more than 64 and 90 % abundance in grapevine and H. obsoletus, respectively. Interestingly, this genotype showed tuf b type restriction pattern previously attributed to bindweed associated 'Ca. P. solani' strains, but a different sequence assigned as tuf b2 compared to reference tuf b strains. All other marker genes of CPsM4_At1 clustered with tuf a and nettle derived genotypes verifying distinct nettle phytoplasma genotypes. Transmission experiments with H. obsoletus and Anaceratagallia ribauti resulted in successful transmission of five different strains including the major genotype to Catharanthus roseus and in transmission of the major genotype to U. dioica. Altogether, five nettle and nine bindweed associated genotypes were described. Bindweed types were verified in 34 % of grapevine samples, in few positive Reptalus panzeri, rarely in bindweeds and occasionally in Catharanthus roseus infected by H. obsoletus or A. ribauti. 'Candidatus Phytoplasma convolvuli' (bindweed yellows) was ascertained in nettle and bindweed samples. PMID:25309042

  14. 巴西柑橘黄龙病相关细菌“Candidatus Liberibacter americanus”的基因组草图序列

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Lin; Helvecio D.Coletta-Filho; Cliff S.Han; 娄兵海; Edwin L.Civerolo; Marcos A.Machado; Goutam Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Hong Lin,Helvecio D.Coletta-Filho,CliffS.Han,Binghai Lou,EdwinL.Civerolo,Marcos A.Machado,and Goutam Gupta.Draft genome sequence of"Candidatus Liberibacter americanus" bacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing in Brazil.Genome Announcements,2013,1(3):e00275-13.在此,我们报道“Candidatus Liberibacter americanus" PW_SP株系基因组草图序列.大小为1,176,071bp的基因组,G+C含量为31.6%,包含948个开放阅读框,38个tRNA,3个完整的rRNA.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of “Candidatus Tremblaya princeps” Strain PCVAL, an Intriguing Translational Machine below the Living-Cell Status

    OpenAIRE

    López-Madrigal, Sergio; Latorre, Amparo; Porcar, Manuel; Moya, Andrés; Gil Benso, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    The sequence of the genome of “Candidatus Tremblaya princeps” strain PCVAL, the primary endosymbiont of the citrus mealybug Planococcus citri, has been determined. “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” presents an unusual nested endosymbiosis and harbors a gammaproteobacterial symbiont within its cytoplasm in all analyzed mealybugs. The genome sequence reveals that “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” cannot be considered an independent organism but that the consortium with its gammaproteobacterial symbiotic associat...

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of the Obligate Symbionts “Candidatus Sulcia muelleri” and “Ca. Nasuia deltocephalinicola” from the Pestiferous Leafhopper Macrosteles quadripunctulatus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbà, Simona; Kube, Michael; Marzachì, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Two bacterial symbionts of the European pest leafhopper, Macrosteles quadripunctulatus (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), were fully sequenced. “Candidatus Sulcia muelleri” and “Ca. Nasuia deltocephalinicola” represent two of the smallest known bacterial genomes at 190 kb and 112 kb, respectively. Genome sequences are nearly identical to strains reported from the closely related host species, M. quadrilineatus. PMID:26798106

  17. Molecular detection and occurrence of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' in dairy cattle of Southern Brazil Detecção molecular e ocorrência de 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' em bovinos de leite do Sul do Brasil

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    Aline Girotto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine hemoplasmas are bacteria found on the erythrocyte surface or free in the plasma of cattle. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' ('C. M. haemobos' in Holstein and Jersey cattle raised in Londrina and surroundings, northern region of the State of Parana, Southern Brazil. PCR testing directed to 16S rRNA gene fragment was performed to investigate the occurrence and characterize the molecular identity of 'C. M. haemobos'. A total of 264/433 (60.97% blood samples were positive by PCR. Further alignment of 500-bp amplicons to available sequences at the GenBank database showed high identity (100% to 'C. M. haemobos'. To the author's knowledge, this is the first molecular confirmation of the hemoplasma 'C. M. haemobos' in cattle from Brazil. Moreover, 'C. M. haemobos' was observed in high occurrence in dairy cattle, and may have significant impact in livestock production.Hemoplasmas de bovinos são bactérias encontradas na superfície de hemácias, ou livre no plasma de bovinos. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a ocorrência de Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' ('C. M. haemobos' em bovinos das raças Holandesa e Jersey da região de Londrina, norte do Paraná, sul do Brasil. Para investigar a ocorrência e caracterizar a identidade molecular do 'C. M haemobos' uma PCR baseada no fragmento do gene 16S rRNA foi realizada. A PCR identificou como positivas 264/433 (61% amostras de sangue testadas. O alinhamento deste fragmento de 500 pb com seqüências disponíveis no GenBank mostrou 100% de identidade 'C. M. haemobos'. Pela bibliografia consultada, esta é a primeira confirmação molecular do hemoplasma 'C. M. haemobos' em bovinos no Brasil. Além disso, foi observada uma alta prevalência deste hemoplasma em bovinos de leite, que pode ter um impacto importante na pecuária bovina.

  18. Convenient detection of the citrus greening (huanglongbing bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' by direct PCR from the midrib extract.

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    Takashi Fujikawa

    Full Text Available A phloem-limited bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las is a major pathogen of citrus greening (huanglongbing, one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. The rapid identification and culling of infected trees and budwoods in quarantine are the most important control measures. DNA amplification including conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR has commonly been used for rapid detection and identification. However, long and laborious procedures for DNA extraction have greatly reduced the applicability of this method. In this study, we found that the Las bacterial cells in the midribs of infected leaves were extracted rapidly and easily by pulverization and centrifugation with mini homogenization tubes. We also found that the Las bacterial cells in the midrib extract were suitable for highly sensitive direct PCR. The performance of direct PCR using this extraction method was not inferior to that of conventional PCR. Thus, the direct PCR method described herein is characterized by its simplicity, sensitivity, and robustness, and is applicable to quarantine testing.

  19. Morphological abnormalities and cell death in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) midgut associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, Murad; Fattah-Hosseini, Somayeh; Levy, Amit; Cilia, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited, gram-negative, fastidious bacterium that is associated with the development of citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB). CLas is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri, in a circulative manner. Two major barriers to transmission within the insect are the midgut and the salivary glands. We performed a thorough microscopic analysis within the insect midgut following exposure to CLas-infected citrus trees. We observed changes in nuclear architecture, including pyknosis and karyorrhexis as well as changes to the actin cytoskeleton in CLas-exposed midgut cells. Further analyses showed that the changes are likely due to the activation of programmed cell death as assessed by Annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation assays. These results suggest that exposure to CLas-infected trees induces apoptotic responses in the psyllid midgut that should be further investigated. Understanding the adaptive significance of the apoptotic response has the potential to create new approaches for controlling HLB. PMID:27630042

  20. Amino acid-assimilating phototrophic heliobacteria from soda lake environments: Heliorestis acidaminivorans sp. nov. and 'Candidatus Heliomonas lunata'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Marie; Takaichi, Shinichi; Madigan, Michael T

    2012-07-01

    Two novel taxa of heliobacteria, Heliorestis acidaminivorans sp. nov. strain HR10B(T) and 'Candidatus Heliomonas lunata' strain SLH, were cultured from shoreline sediments/soil of Lake El Hamra (Egypt) and lake water/benthic sediments of Soap Lake (USA), respectively; both are highly alkaline soda lakes. Cells of strain HR10B were straight rods, while cells of strain SLH were curved rods. Both organisms were obligate anaerobes, produced bacteriochlorophyll g, and lacked intracytoplasmic photosynthetic membrane systems. Although the absorption spectrum of strain HR10B was typical of other heliobacteria, that of strain SLH showed unusually strong absorbance of the OH-chlorophyll a component. Major carotenoids of both organisms were OH-diaponeurosporene glucosyl esters, as in other alkaliphilic heliobacteria, and both displayed an alkaliphilic and mesophilic phenotype. Strain HR10B was remarkable among heliobacteria in its capacity to photoassimilate a number of carbon sources, including several amino acids. Nitrogenase activity was observed in strain HR10B, but not in strain SLH. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene tree placed strain HR10B within the genus Heliorestis, but distinct from other described species. By contrast, strain SLH was phylogenetically more closely related to neutrophilic heliobacteria and is the first alkaliphilic heliobacterium known outside of the genus Heliorestis. PMID:22588563

  1. Manipulation of plant defense responses by the tomato psyllid (Bactericerca cockerelli and its associated endosymbiont Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous.

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    Clare L Casteel

    Full Text Available Some plant pathogens form obligate relationships with their insect vector and are vertically transmitted via eggs analogous to insect endosymbionts. Whether insect endosymbionts manipulate plant defenses to benefit their insect host remains unclear. The tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli (Sulc, vectors the endosymbiont "Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous" (Lps during feeding on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.. Lps titer in psyllids varied relative to the psyllid developmental stage with younger psyllids harboring smaller Lps populations compared to older psyllids. In the present study, feeding by different life stages of B. cockerelli infected with Lps, resulted in distinct tomato transcript profiles. Feeding by young psyllid nymphs, with lower Lps levels, induced tomato genes regulated by jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA (Allene oxide synthase, Proteinase inhibitor 2, Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 5, Pathogenesis-related protein 1 compared to feeding by older nymphs and adults, where higher Lps titers were found. In addition, inoculation of Lps without insect hosts suppressed accumulation of these defense transcripts. Collectively, these data suggest that the endosymbiont-like pathogen Lps manipulates plant signaling and defensive responses to benefit themselves and the success of their obligate insect vector on their host plant.

  2. Horizontal Transmission of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" by Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae on Convolvulus and Ipomoea (Solanales: Convolvulaceae.

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    Glenda L Torres

    Full Text Available "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" (Proteobacteria is an important pathogen of solanaceous crops (Solanales: Solanaceae in North America and New Zealand, and is the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. This phloem-limited pathogen is transmitted to potato and other solanaceous plants by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae. While some plants in the Convolvulaceae (Solanales are also known hosts for B. cockerelli, previous efforts to detect Liberibacter in Convolvulaceae have been unsuccessful. Moreover, studies to determine whether Liberibacter can be acquired from these plants by B. cockerelli are lacking. The goal of this study was to determine whether horizontal transmission of Liberibacter occurs among potato psyllids on two species of Convolvulaceae, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas and field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis, which grows abundantly in potato growing regions of the United States. Results indicated that uninfected psyllids acquired Liberibacter from both I. batatas and C. arvensis if infected psyllids were present on plants concurrently with the uninfected psyllids. Uninfected psyllids did not acquire Liberibacter from plants if the infected psyllids were removed from the plants before the uninfected psyllids were allowed access. In contrast with previous reports, PCR did detect the presence of Liberibacter DNA in some plants. However, visible amplicons were faint and did not correspond with acquisition of the pathogen by uninfected psyllids. None of the plants exhibited disease symptoms. Results indicate that horizontal transmission of Liberibacter among potato psyllids can occur on Convolvulaceae, and that the association between Liberibacter and Convolvulaceae merits additional attention.

  3. Genome sequence of Candidatus Arsenophonus lipopteni, the exclusive symbiont of a blood sucking fly Lipoptena cervi (Diptera: Hippoboscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nováková, Eva; Hypša, Václav; Nguyen, Petr; Husník, Filip; Darby, Alistair C

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Arsenophonus lipopteni (Enterobacteriaceae, Gammaproteobacteria) is an obligate intracellular symbiont of the blood feeding deer ked, Lipoptena cervi (Diptera: Hippoboscidae). The bacteria reside in specialized cells derived from host gut epithelia (bacteriocytes) forming a compact symbiotic organ (bacteriome). Compared to the closely related complex symbiotic system in the sheep ked, involving four bacterial species, Lipoptena cervi appears to maintain its symbiosis exclusively with Ca. Arsenophonus lipopteni. The genome of 836,724 bp and 24.8 % GC content codes for 667 predicted functional genes and bears the common characteristics of sequence economization coupled with obligate host-dependent lifestyle, e.g. reduced number of RNA genes along with the rRNA operon split, and strongly reduced metabolic capacity. Particularly, biosynthetic capacity for B vitamins possibly supplementing the host diet is highly compromised in Ca. Arsenophonus lipopteni. The gene sets are complete only for riboflavin (B2), pyridoxine (B6) and biotin (B7) implying the content of some B vitamins, e.g. thiamin, in the deer blood might be sufficient for the insect metabolic needs. The phylogenetic position within the spectrum of known Arsenophonus genomes and fundamental genomic features of Ca. Arsenophonus lipopteni indicate the obligate character of this symbiosis and its independent origin within Hippoboscidae. PMID:27660670

  4. Morphological abnormalities and cell death in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) midgut associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, Murad; Fattah-Hosseini, Somayeh; Levy, Amit; Cilia, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited, gram-negative, fastidious bacterium that is associated with the development of citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB). CLas is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri, in a circulative manner. Two major barriers to transmission within the insect are the midgut and the salivary glands. We performed a thorough microscopic analysis within the insect midgut following exposure to CLas-infected citrus trees. We observed changes in nuclear architecture, including pyknosis and karyorrhexis as well as changes to the actin cytoskeleton in CLas-exposed midgut cells. Further analyses showed that the changes are likely due to the activation of programmed cell death as assessed by Annexin V staining and DNA fragmentation assays. These results suggest that exposure to CLas-infected trees induces apoptotic responses in the psyllid midgut that should be further investigated. Understanding the adaptive significance of the apoptotic response has the potential to create new approaches for controlling HLB.

  5. Extraction of DNA from orange juice, and detection of bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jinhe; Baldwin, Elizabeth; Liao, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Wei; Kostenyuk, Igor; Burns, Jacqueline; Irey, Mike

    2013-10-01

    Orange juice processed from Huanglongbing (HLB) affected fruit is often associated with bitter taste and/or off-flavor. HLB disease in Florida is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), a phloem-limited bacterium. The current standard to confirm CLas for citrus trees is to take samples from midribs of leaves, which are rich in phloem tissues, and use a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test to detect the 16S rDNA gene of CLas. It is extremely difficult to detect CLas in orange juice because of the low CLas population, high sugar and pectin concentration, low pH, and possible existence of an inhibitor to DNA amplification. The objective of this research was to improve extraction of DNA from orange juice and detection of CLas by qPCR. Homogenization using a sonicator increased DNA yield by 86% in comparison to mortar and pestle extraction. It is difficult to separate DNA from pectin; however, DNA was successfully extracted by treating the juice with pectinase. Application of an elution column successfully removed the unidentified inhibitor to DNA amplification. This work provided a protocol to extract DNA from whole orange juice and detect CLas in HLB-affected fruit.

  6. The destructive citrus pathogen, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' encodes a functional flagellin characteristic of a pathogen-associated molecular pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huasong Zou

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is presently the most devastating citrus disease worldwide. As an intracellular plant pathogen and insect symbiont, the HLB bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las, retains the entire flagellum-encoding gene cluster in its significantly reduced genome. Las encodes a flagellin and hook-associated protein (Fla of 452 amino acids that contains a conserved 22 amino acid domain (flg22 at positions 29 to 50 in the N-terminus. The phenotypic alteration in motility of a Sinorhizobium meliloti mutant lacking the fla genes was partially restored by constitutive expression of Fla(Las. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression in planta revealed that Fla(Las induced cell death and callose deposition in Nicotiana benthamiana, and that the transcription of BAK1 and SGT1, which are associated with plant innate immunity, was upregulated. Amino acid substitution experiments revealed that residues 38 (serine and 39 (aspartate of Fla(Las were essential for callose induction. The synthetic flg22(Las peptide could not induce plant cell death but retained the ability to induce callose deposition at a concentration of 20 µM or above. This demonstrated that the pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP activity of flg22 in Las was weaker than those in other well-studied plant pathogenic bacteria. These results indicate that Fla(Las acts as a PAMP and may play an important role in triggering host plant resistance to the HLB bacteria.

  7. rRNA operons and genome size of 'Candidatus Liberibacter americanus', a bacterium associated with citrus huanglongbing in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, N A; Eveillard, S; Foissac, X; Ayres, A J; Bové, J-M

    2009-08-01

    Huanglongbing is one of the most severe diseases of citrus worldwide and is associated with 'Candidatus (Ca.) Liberibacter africanus' in Africa, 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' in Asia and the Americas (Brazil, USA and Cuba) and 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus' (Lam) in Brazil. In the absence of axenic cultures, genetic information on liberibacters is scarce. The sequences of the entire 23S rRNA and 5S rRNA genes from Lam have now been obtained, using a consensus primer designed on known tRNAMet sequences of rhizobia. The size of the Lam genome was determined by PFGE, using Lam-infected periwinkle plants for bacterial enrichment, and was found to be close to 1.31 Mbp. In order to determine the number of ribosomal operons on the Lam genome, probes designed to detect the 16S rRNA gene and the 3' end of the 23S rRNA gene were developed and used for Southern hybridization with I-CeuI-treated genomic DNA. Our results suggest that there are three ribosomal operons in a circular genome. Lam is the first liberibacter species for which such data are available.

  8. Isolation of ‘Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus’, a novel ureolytic soil archaeal ammonia oxidiser with tolerance to high ammonia concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E.; Ross, Jenna; Hink, Linda; Weber, Eva B.; Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Thion, Cécile; Prosser, James I.; Nicol, Graeme W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the distribution of ammonia oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) suggest distinct ecological niches characterised by ammonia concentration and pH, arising through differences in substrate affinity and ammonia tolerance. AOA form five distinct phylogenetic clades, one of which, the ‘Nitrososphaera sister cluster’, has no cultivated isolate. A representative of this cluster, named ‘Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus’, was isolated from a pH 7.5 arable soil and we propose a new cluster name: ‘Nitrosocosmicus’. While phylogenetic analysis of amoA genes indicates its association with the Nitrososphaera sister cluster, analysis of 16S rRNA genes provided no support for a relative branching that is consistent with a ‘sister cluster’, indicating placement within a lineage of the order Nitrososphaerales. ‘Ca. N. franklandus’ is capable of ureolytic growth and its tolerances to nitrite and ammonia are higher than in other AOA and similar to those of typical soil AOB. Similarity of other growth characteristics of ‘Ca. N. franklandus’ with those of typical soil AOB isolates reduces support for niche differentiation between soil AOA and AOB and suggests that AOA have a wider physiological diversity than previously suspected. In particular, the high ammonia tolerance of ‘Ca. N. franklandus’ suggests potential contributions to nitrification in fertilised soils. PMID:26976843

  9. Isolation of 'Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus', a novel ureolytic soil archaeal ammonia oxidiser with tolerance to high ammonia concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtovirta-Morley, Laura E; Ross, Jenna; Hink, Linda; Weber, Eva B; Gubry-Rangin, Cécile; Thion, Cécile; Prosser, James I; Nicol, Graeme W

    2016-05-01

    Studies of the distribution of ammonia oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) suggest distinct ecological niches characterised by ammonia concentration and pH, arising through differences in substrate affinity and ammonia tolerance. AOA form five distinct phylogenetic clades, one of which, the 'Nitrososphaera sister cluster', has no cultivated isolate. A representative of this cluster, named 'Candidatus Nitrosocosmicus franklandus', was isolated from a pH 7.5 arable soil and we propose a new cluster name:'Nitrosocosmicus' While phylogenetic analysis of amoA genes indicates its association with the Nitrososphaera sister cluster, analysis of 16S rRNA genes provided no support for a relative branching that is consistent with a 'sister cluster', indicating placement within a lineage of the order Nitrososphaerales 'Ca.N. franklandus' is capable of ureolytic growth and its tolerances to nitrite and ammonia are higher than in other AOA and similar to those of typical soil AOB. Similarity of other growth characteristics of 'Ca.N. franklandus' with those of typical soil AOB isolates reduces support for niche differentiation between soil AOA and AOB and suggests that AOA have a wider physiological diversity than previously suspected. In particular, the high ammonia tolerance of 'Ca.N. franklandus' suggests potential contributions to nitrification in fertilised soils. PMID:26976843

  10. Biological Consequences of Ancient Gene Acquisition and Duplication in the Large Genome of Candidatus Solibacter usitatus Ellin6076

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F [ORNL; Eichorst, Stephanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kuske, Cheryl R [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Members of the bacterial phylum Acidobacteria are widespread in soils and sediments worldwide, and are abundant in many soils. Acidobacteria are challenging to culture in vitro, and many basic features of their biology and functional roles in the soil have not been determined. Candidatus Solibacter usitatus strain Ellin6076 has a 9.9 Mb genome that is approximately 2 5 times as large as the other sequenced Acidobacteria genomes. Bacterial genome sizes typically range from 0.5 to 10 Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Our comparative genome analyses indicate that the Ellin6076 large genome has arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and/or plasmid-mediated transduction, and widespread small-scale gene duplications, resulting in an increased number of paralogs. Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members, and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in regions containing similar groups of paralogs, suggest that most of the paralogs are not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of additional cultured Acidobacteria strains were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 3 had larger genomes than those of subdivision 1, but none were as large as the Ellin6076 genome. The large genome of Ellin6076 may not be typical of the phylum, and encodes traits that could provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the soil environment.

  11. The olive fly endosymbiont, "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola," switches from an intracellular existence to an extracellular existence during host insect development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Anne M; Hearn, David J; Bronstein, Judith L; Pierson, Elizabeth A

    2009-11-01

    As polyphagous, holometabolous insects, tephritid fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) provide a unique habitat for endosymbiotic bacteria, especially those microbes associated with the digestive system. Here we examine the endosymbiont of the olive fly [Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae)], a tephritid of great economic importance. "Candidatus Erwinia dacicola" was found in the digestive systems of all life stages of wild olive flies from the southwestern United States. PCR and microscopy demonstrated that "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" resided intracellularly in the gastric ceca of the larval midgut but extracellularly in the lumen of the foregut and ovipositor diverticulum of adult flies. "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" is one of the few nonpathogenic endosymbionts that transitions between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles during specific stages of the host's life cycle. Another unique feature of the olive fly endosymbiont is that unlike obligate endosymbionts of monophagous insects, "Ca. Erwinia dacicola" has a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of closely related plant-pathogenic and free-living bacteria. These two characteristics of "Ca. Erwinia dacicola," the ability to transition between intracellular and extracellular lifestyles and a G+C nucleotide composition similar to those of free-living relatives, may facilitate survival in a changing environment during the development of a polyphagous, holometabolous host. We propose that insect-bacterial symbioses should be classified based on the environment that the host provides to the endosymbiont (the endosymbiont environment).

  12. Zebra chip disease and potato biochemistry: tuber physiological changes in response to 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' infection over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, A; Wallis, C M; Paetzold, L; Workneh, F; Rush, C M

    2013-05-01

    Zebra chip disease, putatively caused by the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', is of increasing concern to potato production in Mexico, the United States, and New Zealand. However, little is known about the etiology of this disease and changes that occur within host tubers that result in its symptoms. Previous studies found that increased levels of phenolics, amino acids, defense proteins, and carbohydrates in 'Ca. L. solanacearum'-infected tubers are associated with symptoms of zebra chip. This study was conducted to quantify variations in levels of these biochemical components in relation to the time of infestation, symptom severity, and 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer. Levels of phenolics, peroxidases, polyphenol oxidases, and reducing sugars (glucose and, to some extent, fructose) changed during infection, with higher levels occurring in tubers infected at least 5 weeks before harvest than in those infected only a week before harvest and those of controls. Compared with the apical tuber ends, greater levels of phenolics, peroxidases, and sucrose occurred at the basal (stolon attachment) end of infected tubers. With the exception of phenolics, concentrations of the evaluated compounds were not associated with 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer. However, there were significant associations between biochemical responses and symptom severity. The lack of a linear correlation between most plant biochemical responses and 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer suggests that shifts in metabolic profiles are independent of variations in 'Ca. L. solanacearum' levels. PMID:23425237

  13. Spatiotemporal distribution of the magnetotactic multicellular prokaryote Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis in a Brazilian hypersaline lagoon and in microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Juliana L; Silveira, Thais S; Abreu, Fernanda; de Almeida, Fernando P; Rosado, Alexandre S; Lins, Ulysses

    2012-09-01

    Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis is an unusual morphotype of magnetotactic prokaryotes. These microorganisms are composed of a spherical assemblage of gram-negative prokaryotic cells capable of swimming as a unit aligned along a magnetic field. While they occur in many aquatic habitats around the world, high numbers of Ca. M. multicellularis have been detected in Araruama Lagoon, a large hypersaline lagoon near the city of Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil. Here, we report on the spatiotemporal distribution of one such population in sediments of Araruama Lagoon, including its annual distribution and its abundance compared with the total bacterial community. In microcosm experiments, Ca. M. multicellularis was unable to survive for more than 45 days: the population density gradually decreased coinciding with a shift to the upper layers of the sediment. Nonetheless, Ca. M. multicellularis was detected throughout the year in all sites studied. Changes in the population density seemed to be related to the input of organic matter as well as to salinity. The population density of Ca. M. multicellularis did not correlate with the total bacterial counts; instead, changes in the microbial community structure altered their counts in the environment.

  14. Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium involved in the thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukenberg, Viola; Harding, Katie; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Adam, Birgit; Berg, Jasmine S; Knittel, Katrin; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2016-09-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their specific partner bacteria. In thermophilic AOM consortia enriched from Guaymas Basin, members of the ANME-1 clade are associated with bacteria of the HotSeep-1 cluster, which likely perform direct electron exchange via nanowires. The partner bacterium was enriched with hydrogen as sole electron donor and sulfate as electron acceptor. Based on phylogenetic, genomic and metabolic characteristics we propose to name this chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii. Ca. D. auxilii grows on hydrogen at temperatures between 50°C and 70°C with an activity optimum at 60°C and doubling time of 4-6 days. Its genome draft encodes for canonical sulfate reduction, periplasmic and soluble hydrogenases and autotrophic carbon fixation via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. The presence of genes for pili formation and cytochromes, and their similarity to genes of Geobacter spp., indicate a potential for syntrophic growth via direct interspecies electron transfer when the organism grows in consortia with ANME. This first ANME-free enrichment of an AOM partner bacterium and its characterization opens the perspective for a deeper understanding of syntrophy in anaerobic methane oxidation. PMID:26971539

  15. Molecular detection of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" in a lion (Panthera leo from a brazilian zoological garden Detecção molecular do "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" em um leão (Panthera leo de um zoológico brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. S. Guimaraes

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Mycoplasma haemofelis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" infections have been reported in wild cats from United States, their presence among native and captive wild cats in Brazil is still unknown. A 12 year old healthy male lion (Panthera leo from the Zoological Garden of Curitiba, Brazil was anesthetized for transportation and dental evaluation. A blood sample was obtained for a complete blood cell count (CBC and PCR analysis. DNA was extracted and fragments of Mycoplasma haemofelis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" 16S ribosomal RNA gene were amplified in PCR assays. CBC results were within reference intervals. A weak band of 192 pb for "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" was observed, and no band was amplified from Mycoplasma haemofelis reaction. A weak PCR band associated with normal CBC results and without visible parasitemia or clinical signs may suggest a chronic subclinical infection with "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum". The lack of clinical signs may also represent the low pathogenicity of this organism; however, it is noteworthy that immune suppression caused by management and/or corticoids treatment may induce parasitemia and anemia in this animal. This detection suggests further studies in captive wild cats in Brazilian Zoological Gardens.Embora a infecção por Mycoplasma haemofelis e "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" tenha sido reportada em felinos selvagens dos Estados Unidos, sua presença entre felinos selvagens de vida livre e de cativeiro no Brasil ainda é desconhecida. Um leão macho, saudável, com 12 anos de idade, residente no Zoológico de Curitiba, Brasil, foi anestesiado para transporte e avaliação dentária. Uma amostra de sangue foi coletada para a realização do hemograma completo e análise pela Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase (PCR. O DNA foi extraído e fragmentos do gene 16SrRNA do Mycoplasma haemofelis e "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" foram submetidos à metodologia da

  16. Molecular detection of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" in a lion (Panthera leo) from a brazilian zoological garden Detecção molecular do "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" em um leão (Panthera leo) de um zoológico brasileiro

    OpenAIRE

    Guimaraes, Ana M. S.; Manoel L. Javorouski; Marcelo Bonat; Oneida Lacerda; Bruna Balbinotti; Lucyenne G.P.B. Queiroz; Jorge Timenetsky; Alexander W Biondo; Messick, Joanne B.

    2007-01-01

    Although Mycoplasma haemofelis and "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum" infections have been reported in wild cats from United States, their presence among native and captive wild cats in Brazil is still unknown. A 12 year old healthy male lion (Panthera leo) from the Zoological Garden of Curitiba, Brazil was anesthetized for transportation and dental evaluation. A blood sample was obtained for a complete blood cell count (CBC) and PCR analysis. DNA was extracted and fragments of Mycoplasma h...

  17. Disrupt the bacterial growth in the insect vector to block the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus to citrus, the causal agent of citrus greening disease

    OpenAIRE

    Killiny, N.; Hajeri, S.; Gowda, S.; Davis, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    The genome of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) reveals the presence of luxR, encodingLuxR protein, one of a two component cell-to-cell communication system. However, the genome lacks the second component, luxl, that produces acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), suggesting that CLas has a solo LuxR system. Interestingly, we detected compounds that may act as AHLs in the insect vector (psyllids) that are healthy or infected with CLas, but not in the citrus plants. This finding suggests that...

  18. Phylogenetic analysis identifies a 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae'-related strain associated with yellow leaf disease of areca palm (Areca catechu L.) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Manimekalai; Nair, Smita; Soumya, V P; Thomas, George V

    2013-04-01

    Yellow leaf disease (YLD) with phytoplasmal aetiology is a serious disease of arecanut palm in India. The present study was undertaken to characterize the 16S rRNA and secA gene sequences of the Indian arecanut YLD phytoplasma for 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species assignment and 16Sr group/subgroup classification. Phytoplasma 16S rRNA genes were amplified using three sets of semi-nested/nested primers, 1F7/7R3-1F7/7R2, 4Fwd/3Rev-4Fwd/5Rev and P1/P7-R16F2n/R16R2, producing amplicons of 491, 1150 and 1250 bp, respectively, from diseased samples. The amplicons were cloned and sequenced. A blast search showed that the sequences had 99 % similarity with sugar cane white leaf phytoplasma (16SrXI) and Napier grass stunt phytoplasma (16SrXI). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed the clustering of YLD phytoplasma with the rice yellow dwarf and Bermuda grass white leaf groups. The YLD phytoplasma F2nR2 sequence shared 97.5 % identity with that of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae' and 97.8 % identity with that of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma cynodontis'. Hence, for finer differentiation, we examined the secA gene-based phylogeny, where the YLD phytoplasma clustered with Napier grass stunt and sugar cane grassy shoot phytoplasmas, both belonging to the rice yellow dwarf group. Hence, we are assigning the Indian arecanut YLD phytoplasma as a 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae'-related strain. Virtual RFLP analysis of a 1.2 kb fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (F2nR2 region) identified the Indian arecanut YLD phytoplasma as a member of 16SrXI-B subgroup. We name the phytoplasma Indian yellow leaf disease phytoplasma, to differentiate it from the Hainan YLD phytoplasma, which belongs to group 16SrI. PMID:22843718

  19. Assessing the Likelihood of Transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum to Carrot by Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyaneza, Joseph E; Mustafa, Tariq; Fisher, Tonja W; Sengoda, Venkatesan G; Horton, David R

    2016-01-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' (Lso) is a phloem-limited bacterium that severely affects important Solanaceae and Apiaceae crops, including potato, tomato, pepper, tobacco, carrot and celery. This bacterium is transmitted to solanaceous species by potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, and to Apiaceae by carrot psyllids, including Trioza apicalis and Bactericera trigonica. Five haplotypes of Lso have so far been described, two are associated with solanaceous species and potato psyllids, whereas the other three are associated with carrot and celery crops and carrot psyllids. Little is known about cross-transmission of Lso to carrot by potato psyllids or to potato by carrot psyllids. Thus, the present study assessed whether potato psyllid can transmit Lso to carrot and whether Lso haplotypes infecting solanaceous species can also infect carrot and lead to disease symptom development. In addition, the stylet probing behavior of potato psyllid on carrot was assessed using electropenetrography (EPG) technology to further elucidate potential Lso transmission to Apiaceae by this potato insect pest. Results showed that, while potato psyllids survived on carrot for several weeks when confined on the plants under controlled laboratory and field conditions, the insects generally failed to infect carrot plants with Lso. Only three of the 200 carrot plants assayed became infected with Lso and developed characteristic disease symptoms. Lso infection in the symptomatic carrot plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction assay and Lso in the carrots was determined to be of the haplotype B, which is associated with solanaceous species. EPG results further revealed that potato psyllids readily feed on carrot xylem but rarely probe into the phloem tissue, explaining why little to no Lso infection occurred during the controlled laboratory and field cage transmission trials. Results of our laboratory and field transmission studies, combined with our EPG results, suggest

  20. Protection from reinfection in “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis”-infected cats and characterization of the immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novacco Marilisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis” (CMt is a hemoplasma species of felids. Recent evidence has shown that cats that overcome bacteremia may be protected from reinfection. The purposes of this study were to (1 re-inoculate ostensibly recovered cats, (2 evaluate the immune response and (3 assess CMt tissue loads. Fifteen specified pathogen-free cats were subcutaneously inoculated with CMt: 10 cats (group A had previously undergone bacteremia and recovered, and 5 naïve cats (group B served as controls. CMt infections were monitored by real-time PCR using blood and tissue, and the humoral immune response was assessed using DnaK ELISA. Cytokine mRNA expression levels were measured by real-time PCR, and lymphocyte subsets were detected by flow cytometry. The cats in group A were protected from reinfection (no detectable bacteremia and showed a transient decrease in antibodies. Eosinophilia was noted in cats from group A. The cats from group B became PCR-positive and seroconverted. All of the tissues analyzed from the cats in group B but none of the tissues analyzed from the cats in group A were CMt PCR-positive. Significant changes were observed in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, interleukin-4 and the Th2/Th1 ratio in both groups. The cats from group A occasionally showed higher numbers of CD4+, CD8+, CD4+CD25+ and CD5+MHCII+ T lymphocytes than the control cats. In conclusion, this study describes, for the first time, the occurrence of immunological protection within the same hemoplasma species. Furthermore, the immune response during CMt infections appeared to be skewed toward the Th2 type.

  1. Structural model and spectroscopic characteristics of the FMO antenna protein from the aerobic chlorophototroph, Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jianzhong; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Gross, Michael L; Bryant, Donald A; Blankenship, R. E.

    The Fenna–Matthews–Olson protein (FMO) binds seven or eight bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules and is an important model antenna system for understanding pigment-protein interactions and mechanistic aspects of photosynthetic light harvesting. FMO proteins of green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiales) have been extensively studied using a wide range of spectroscopic and theoretical approaches because of their stability, the spectral resolution of their pigments, their water-soluble nature, and the availability of high-resolution structural data. We obtained new structural and spectroscopic insights by studying the FMO protein from the recently discovered, aerobic phototrophic acidobacterium, Candidatus Chloracidobacterium thermophilum. Native C. thermophilum FMO is a trimer according to both analytical gel filtration and native-electrospray mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the mass of intact FMO trimer is consistent with the presence of 21–24 BChl a in each. Homology modeling of the C. thermophilum FMO was performed by using the structure of the FMO protein from Chlorobaculum tepidum as a template. C. thermophilum FMO differs from C. tepidum FMO in two distinct regions: the baseplate, CsmA-binding region and a region that is proposed to bind the reaction center subunit, PscA. C. thermophilum FMO has two fluorescence emission peaks at room temperature but only one at 77 K. Temperature-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the two room-temperature emission peaks result from two excited-state BChl a populations that have identical fluorescence lifetimes. Modeling of the data suggests that the two populations contain 1–2 BChl and 5–6 BChl a molecules and that thermal equilibrium effects modulate the relative population of the two emitting states.

  2. 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an endosymbiont of termite gut flagellates, is the first representative of a deep-branching clade of Deltaproteobacteria and a putative homoacetogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohtsubo, Wakako; Strassert, Jürgen F H; Köhler, Tim; Mikaelyan, Aram; Gregor, Ivan; McHardy, Alice C; Tringe, Susannah Green; Hugenholtz, Phil; Radek, Renate; Brune, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Termite gut flagellates are typically colonized by specific bacterial symbionts. Here we describe the phylogeny, ultrastructure and subcellular location of 'Candidatus Adiutrix intracellularis', an intracellular symbiont of Trichonympha collaris in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. It represents a novel, deep-branching clade of uncultured Deltaproteobacteria widely distributed in intestinal tracts of termites and cockroaches. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy localized the endosymbiont near hydrogenosomes in the posterior part and near the ectosymbiont 'Candidatus Desulfovibrio trichonymphae' in the anterior part of the host cell. The draft genome of 'Ca. Adiutrix intracellularis' obtained from a metagenomic library revealed the presence of a complete gene set encoding the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, including two homologs of fdhF encoding hydrogenase-linked formate dehydrogenases (FDHH ) and all other components of the recently described hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase (HDCR) complex, which substantiates previous claims that the symbiont is capable of reductive acetogenesis from CO2 and H2 . The close phylogenetic relationship between the HDCR components and their homologs in homoacetogenic Firmicutes and Spirochaetes suggests that the deltaproteobacterium acquired the capacity for homoacetogenesis via lateral gene transfer. The presence of genes for nitrogen fixation and the biosynthesis of amino acids and cofactors indicate the nutritional nature of the symbiosis. PMID:26914459

  3. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” Strains in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Bao, Minli; Wu, Fengnian; Chen, Jianchi; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas) is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like) and Type 2 (SC2-like), A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86). An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2) in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187). CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes) system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the “Ca. Liberibacter” genera. PMID:26741827

  4. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" Strains in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Bao, Minli; Wu, Fengnian; Chen, Jianchi; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like) and Type 2 (SC2-like), A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86). An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2) in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187). CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes) system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the "Ca. Liberibacter" genera.

  5. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" Strains in Southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zheng

    Full Text Available "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease, a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like and Type 2 (SC2-like, A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86. An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2 in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187. CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the "Ca. Liberibacter" genera.

  6. Predominance of Single Prophage Carrying a CRISPR/cas System in "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" Strains in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Bao, Minli; Wu, Fengnian; Chen, Jianchi; Deng, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is an uncultureable α-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease), a highly destructive disease affecting citrus production worldwide. HLB was observed in Guangdong Province of China over a hundred years ago and remains endemic there. Little is known about CLas biology due to its uncultureable nature. This study began with the genome sequence analysis of CLas Strain A4 from Guangdong in the prophage region. Within the two currently known prophage types, Type 1 (SC1-like) and Type 2 (SC2-like), A4 genome contained only a Type 2 prophage, CGdP2, namely. An analysis on CLas strains collected in Guangdong showed that Type 2 prophage dominated the bacterial population (82.6%, 71/86). An extended survey covering five provinces in southern China also revealed the predominance of single prophage (Type 1 or Type 2) in the CLas population (90.4%, 169/187). CLas strains with two and no prophage types accounted for 7.2% and 2.8%, respectively. In silico analyses on CGdP2 identified a CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/cas (CRISPR-associated protein genes) system, consisting of four 22 bp repeats, three 23 bp spacers and 9 predicted cas. Similar CRISPR/cas systems were detected in all 10 published CLas prophages as well as 13 CLas field strains in southern China. Both Type 1 and Type 2 prophages shared almost identical sequences in spacer 1 and 3 but not spacer 2. Considering that the function of a CRISPR/cas system was to destroy invading DNA, it was hypothesized that a pre-established CLas prophage could use its CRISPR/cas system guided by spacer 1 and/or 3 to defeat the invasion of the other phage/prophage. This hypothesis explained the predominance of single prophage type in the CLas population in southern China. This is the first report of CRISPR/cas system in the "Ca. Liberibacter" genera. PMID:26741827

  7. The ubiquity of small-world networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesford, Qawi K; Joyce, Karen E; Hayasaka, Satoru; Burdette, Jonathan H; Laurienti, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Small-world networks, according to Watts and Strogatz, are a class of networks that are "highly clustered, like regular lattices, yet have small characteristic path lengths, like random graphs." These characteristics result in networks with unique properties of regional specialization with efficient information transfer. Social networks are intuitive examples of this organization, in which cliques or clusters of friends being interconnected but each person is really only five or six people away from anyone else. Although this qualitative definition has prevailed in network science theory, in application, the standard quantitative application is to compare path length (a surrogate measure of distributed processing) and clustering (a surrogate measure of regional specialization) to an equivalent random network. It is demonstrated here that comparing network clustering to that of a random network can result in aberrant findings and that networks once thought to exhibit small-world properties may not. We propose a new small-world metric, ω (omega), which compares network clustering to an equivalent lattice network and path length to a random network, as Watts and Strogatz originally described. Example networks are presented that would be interpreted as small-world when clustering is compared to a random network but are not small-world according to ω. These findings have important implications in network science because small-world networks have unique topological properties, and it is critical to accurately distinguish them from networks without simultaneous high clustering and short path length. PMID:22432451

  8. The ubiquity of small-world networks

    CERN Document Server

    Telesford, Qawi K; Hayasaka, Satoru; Burdette, Jonathan H; Laurienti, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Small-world networks by Watts and Strogatz are a class of networks that are highly clustered, like regular lattices, yet have small characteristic path lengths, like random graphs. These characteristics result in networks with unique properties of regional specialization with efficient information transfer. Social networks are intuitive examples of this organization with cliques or clusters of friends being interconnected, but each person is really only 5-6 people away from anyone else. While this qualitative definition has prevailed in network science theory, in application, the standard quantitative application is to compare path length (a surrogate measure of distributed processing) and clustering (a surrogate measure of regional specialization) to an equivalent random network. It is demonstrated here that comparing network clustering to that of a random network can result in aberrant findings and networks once thought to exhibit small-world properties may not. We propose a new small-world metric, {\\omega}...

  9. "Candidatus Phlomobacter fragariae" Is the Prevalent Agent of Marginal Chlorosis of Strawberry in French Production Fields and Is Transmitted by the Planthopper Cixius wagneri (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danet, Jean-Luc; Foissac, Xavier; Zreik, Leyla; Salar, Pascal; Verdin, Eric; Nourrisseau, Jean-Georges; Garnier, Monique

    2003-06-01

    ABSTRACT Marginal chlorosis has affected strawberry production in France for about 15 years. A phloem-restricted uncultured bacterium, "Candidatus Phlomobacter fragariae," is associated with the disease. A large-scale survey for marginal chlorosis in French strawberry production fields and nurseries by polymerase chain reaction amplification of "Ca. P. fragariae" 16S rDNA revealed that symptoms of marginal chlorosis were not always induced by "Ca. P. fragariae" and that the stolbur phytoplasma could induce identical symptoms. "Ca. P. fragariae" was found to be predominant in strawberry production fields, whereas the stolbur phytoplasma was predominantly detected in nurseries. Two transmission periods of the disease, one in spring and the other from late summer to early fall, were evident. Cixius wagneri planthoppers captured on infected strawberry plants were demonstrated to be efficient vectors of "Ca. P. fragariae." The involvement in natural disease spread of the whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum, previously shown to acquire and multiply "Ca. P. fragariae" under greenhouse conditions, remains uncertain.

  10. The Mitochondrial Genomes of the Zoonotic Canine Filarial Parasites Dirofilaria (Nochtiella) repens and Candidatus Dirofilaria (Nochtiella) Honkongensis Provide Evidence for Presence of Cryptic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Esra; Fritzenwanker, Moritz; Pantchev, Nikola; Lendner, Mathias; Wongkamchai, Sirichit; Otranto, Domenico; Kroidl, Inge; Dennebaum, Martin; Le, Thanh Hoa; Anh Le, Tran; Ramünke, Sabrina; Schaper, Roland; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Poppert, Sven; Krücken, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Cutaneous dirofilariosis is a canine mosquito-borne zoonosis that can cause larva migrans disease in humans. Dirofilaria repens is considered an emerging pathogen occurring with high prevalence in Mediterranean areas and many parts of tropical Asia. In Hong Kong, a second species, Candidatus Dirofilaria hongkongensis, has been reported. The present study aimed to compare mitochondrial genomes from these parasites and to obtain population genetic information. Methods and Findings Complete mitochondrial genomes were obtained by PCR and Sanger sequencing or ILLUMINA sequencing for four worms. Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 sequences identified three as D. repens (all from Europe) and one as C. D. hongkongensis (from India). Mitochondrial genomes have the same organization as in other spirurid nematodes but a higher preference for thymine in the coding strand. Phylogenetic analysis was in contradiction to current taxonomy of the Onchocercidae but in agreement with a recent multi-locus phylogenetic analysis using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. D. repens and C. D. hongkongensis sequences clustered together and were the common sister group to Dirofilaria immitis. Analysis of a 2.5 kb mitochondrial genome fragment from macrofilaria or canine blood samples from Europe (42), Thailand (2), India (1) and Vietnam (1) revealed only small genetic differences in the D. repens samples including all European and the Vietnam sample. The Indian C. D. hongkongensis and the two Thai samples formed separate clusters and differences were comparatively large. Conclusion Genetic differences between Dirofilaria spp. causing cutaneous disease can be considerable whereas D. repens itself was genetically quite homogenous. C. D. hongkongensis was identified for the first time from the Indian subcontinent. The full mitochondrial genome sequence strengthens the hypothesis that it represents an independent species and the Thai samples might represent another cryptic species

  11. Pattern of association between endemic Hawaiian fruit flies (Diptera, Tephritidae) and their symbiotic bacteria: Evidence of cospeciation events and proposal of "Candidatus Stammerula trupaneae".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, E; Martinez-Sañudo, I; Brown, J M; Simonato, M; Girolami, V; Squartini, A; Bressan, A; Faccoli, M; Mazzon, L

    2015-09-01

    Several insect lineages have evolved mutualistic association with symbiotic bacteria. This is the case of some species of mealybugs, whiteflies, weevils, tsetse flies, cockroaches, termites, carpenter ants, aphids and fruit flies. Some species of Tephritinae, the most specialized subfamily of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae), harbour co-evolved vertically transmitted, bacterial symbionts in their midgut, known as "Candidatus Stammerula spp.". The 25 described endemic species of Hawaiian tephritids, plus at least three undescribed species, are taxonomically distributed among three genera: the cosmopolitan genus Trupanea (21 described spp.), the endemic genus Phaeogramma (2 spp.) and the Nearctic genus Neotephritis (2 spp.). We examined the presence of symbiotic bacteria in the endemic tephritids of the Hawaiian Islands, which represent a spectacular example of adaptive radiation, and tested the concordant evolution between host and symbiont phylogenies. We detected through PCR assays the presence of specific symbiotic bacteria, designated as "Candidatus Stammerula trupaneae", from 35 individuals of 15 species. The phylogeny of the insect host was reconstructed based on two regions of the mitochondrial DNA (16S rDNA and COI-tRNALeu-COII), while the bacterial 16S rRNA was used for the symbiont analysis. Host and symbiont phylogenies were then compared and evaluated for patterns of cophylogeny and strict cospeciation. Topological congruence between Hawaiian Tephritinae and their symbiotic bacteria phylogenies suggests a limited, but significant degree of host-symbiont cospeciation. We also explored the character reconstruction of three host traits, as island location, host lineage, and host tissue attacked, based on the symbiont phylogenies under the hypothesis of cospeciation. PMID:25959751

  12. Pattern of association between endemic Hawaiian fruit flies (Diptera, Tephritidae) and their symbiotic bacteria: Evidence of cospeciation events and proposal of "Candidatus Stammerula trupaneae".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viale, E; Martinez-Sañudo, I; Brown, J M; Simonato, M; Girolami, V; Squartini, A; Bressan, A; Faccoli, M; Mazzon, L

    2015-09-01

    Several insect lineages have evolved mutualistic association with symbiotic bacteria. This is the case of some species of mealybugs, whiteflies, weevils, tsetse flies, cockroaches, termites, carpenter ants, aphids and fruit flies. Some species of Tephritinae, the most specialized subfamily of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae), harbour co-evolved vertically transmitted, bacterial symbionts in their midgut, known as "Candidatus Stammerula spp.". The 25 described endemic species of Hawaiian tephritids, plus at least three undescribed species, are taxonomically distributed among three genera: the cosmopolitan genus Trupanea (21 described spp.), the endemic genus Phaeogramma (2 spp.) and the Nearctic genus Neotephritis (2 spp.). We examined the presence of symbiotic bacteria in the endemic tephritids of the Hawaiian Islands, which represent a spectacular example of adaptive radiation, and tested the concordant evolution between host and symbiont phylogenies. We detected through PCR assays the presence of specific symbiotic bacteria, designated as "Candidatus Stammerula trupaneae", from 35 individuals of 15 species. The phylogeny of the insect host was reconstructed based on two regions of the mitochondrial DNA (16S rDNA and COI-tRNALeu-COII), while the bacterial 16S rRNA was used for the symbiont analysis. Host and symbiont phylogenies were then compared and evaluated for patterns of cophylogeny and strict cospeciation. Topological congruence between Hawaiian Tephritinae and their symbiotic bacteria phylogenies suggests a limited, but significant degree of host-symbiont cospeciation. We also explored the character reconstruction of three host traits, as island location, host lineage, and host tissue attacked, based on the symbiont phylogenies under the hypothesis of cospeciation.

  13. High genetic variation and recombination events in the vicinity of non-autonomous transposable elements from ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xue-feng; CHEN Jiao-yue; TAN Jin; DUAN Suo; DENG Xiao-ling; CHEN Jian-chi; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2015-01-01

    Two miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), MCLas-A and MCLas-B, were recently identiifed from ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ known to be associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yelow shoot disease). MCLas-A was suggested as an active MITE because of its mobility. The immediate upstream gene of the two MITEs was predicted to be a putative transposase. The goal of this study is to analyze the sequence variation in the upstream putative transposase of MITEs and explore the possible correlation between sequence variation of transposase gene and MITE activity. PCR and sequence analysis showed that 12 sequence types were found in six major amplicon types from 43 representative ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ isolates from China, the United States and Brazil. Out of the 12 sequence types, three (T4, T5-2, T6) were reported for the ifrst time. Recombination events were found in the two unique sequence types (T5-2 and T6) which were detected in al Brazilian isolates. Notably, no sequence variation or recombination events were detected in the upstream putative transposase gene of MCLas-A, suggesting the conservation of the transposase gene might be closely related with the MITE activity. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated two wel supported clades including ifve subclades were identiifed, clearly relfecting the geographical origins of isolates, especialy that of Ruili isolates, São Paulo isolates and a few Florida isolates.

  14. Detection of citrus huanglongbing-associated 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in citrus and Diaphorina citri in Pakistan, seasonal variability, and implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi, Muhammad F; Keremane, Manjunath L; Ramadugu, Chandrika; Roose, Mikeal; Khan, Iqrar A; Lee, Richard F

    2014-03-01

    We report the detection of the huanglongbing (HLB)-associated bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' from both plants and insects in Pakistan and the seasonal variability in the numbers of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri. Our studies showed that 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was detectable from trees in areas with maximum temperatures reaching nearly 50°C (average maximum of 42°C). However, the bacterium was present at very low levels in psyllids both in summer (June to August) and autumn (September to November) in contrast to reports from Florida, where the bacterium was detectable at very high levels during October to November. We hypothesize that hot summer temperatures in Pakistan may interfere with acquisition and replication of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in psyllids and may lead to dead or non transmissible 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in plants. Psyllid counts were very low in both summer and winter, showed a population peak ('Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive vectors) in spring, and showed a larger peak ('Ca. L. asiaticus'-free psyllids) in autumn. Natural thermotherapy during hot summers and a low vector population during environmental extremes may have played a major role in long-term survival of the citrus industry in Pakistan. These results may be useful in developing management strategies for U.S. citrus industries in Texas and California.

  15. Detection of citrus huanglongbing-associated 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in citrus and Diaphorina citri in Pakistan, seasonal variability, and implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi, Muhammad F; Keremane, Manjunath L; Ramadugu, Chandrika; Roose, Mikeal; Khan, Iqrar A; Lee, Richard F

    2014-03-01

    We report the detection of the huanglongbing (HLB)-associated bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' from both plants and insects in Pakistan and the seasonal variability in the numbers of 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive psyllid vector, Diaphorina citri. Our studies showed that 'Ca. L. asiaticus' was detectable from trees in areas with maximum temperatures reaching nearly 50°C (average maximum of 42°C). However, the bacterium was present at very low levels in psyllids both in summer (June to August) and autumn (September to November) in contrast to reports from Florida, where the bacterium was detectable at very high levels during October to November. We hypothesize that hot summer temperatures in Pakistan may interfere with acquisition and replication of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in psyllids and may lead to dead or non transmissible 'Ca. L. asiaticus' in plants. Psyllid counts were very low in both summer and winter, showed a population peak ('Ca. L. asiaticus'-positive vectors) in spring, and showed a larger peak ('Ca. L. asiaticus'-free psyllids) in autumn. Natural thermotherapy during hot summers and a low vector population during environmental extremes may have played a major role in long-term survival of the citrus industry in Pakistan. These results may be useful in developing management strategies for U.S. citrus industries in Texas and California. PMID:24134720

  16. A Rapid Protocol of Crude RNA/DNA Extraction for RT-qPCR Detection and Quantification of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguzzi, Stefano; Terlizzi, Federica; Lanzoni, Chiara; Poggi Pollini, Carlo; Ratti, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts have been made to develop a rapid and sensitive method for phytoplasma and virus detection. Taking our cue from previous works, different rapid sample preparation methods have been tested and applied to Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum ('Ca. P. prunorum') detection by RT-qPCR. A duplex RT-qPCR has been optimized using the crude sap as a template to simultaneously amplify a fragment of 16S rRNA of the pathogen and 18S rRNA of the host plant. The specific plant 18S rRNA internal control allows comparison and relative quantification of samples. A comparison between DNA and RNA contribution to qPCR detection is provided, showing higher contribution of the latter. The method presented here has been validated on more than a hundred samples of apricot, plum and peach trees. Since 2013, this method has been successfully applied to monitor 'Ca. P. prunorum' infections in field and nursery. A triplex RT-qPCR assay has also been optimized to simultaneously detect 'Ca. P. prunorum' and Plum pox virus (PPV) in Prunus. PMID:26742106

  17. Better Together: Association With ‘Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus’ Increases the Reproductive Fitness of Its Insect Vector, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz-Stelinski, K. S.; Killiny, N.

    2016-01-01

    The duration of the evolutionary association between a pathogen and vector can be inferred based on the strength of their mutualistic interactions. A well-adapted pathogen is likely to confer some benefit or, at a minimum, exhibit low pathogenicity toward its host vector. Coevolution of the two toward a mutually beneficial association appears to have occurred between the citrus greening disease pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), and its insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Kuwayama). To better understand the dynamics facilitating transmission, we evaluated the effects of Las infection on the fitness of its vector. Diaphorina citri harboring Las were more fecund than their uninfected counterparts; however, their nymphal development rate and adult survival were comparatively reduced. The finite rate of population increase and net reproductive rate were both greater among Las-infected D. citri as compared with uninfected counterparts, indicating that overall population fitness of infected psyllids was improved given the greater number of offspring produced. Previous reports of transovarial transmission, in conjunction with increased fecundity and population growth rates of Las-positive D. citri found in the current investigation, suggest a long evolutionary relationship between pathogen and vector. The survival of Las-infected adult D. citri was lower compared with uninfected D. citri, which suggests that there may be a fitness trade-off in response to Las infection. A beneficial effect of a plant pathogen on vector fitness may indicate that the pathogen developed a relationship with the insect before secondarily moving to plants. PMID:27418697

  18. A Rapid Protocol of Crude RNA/DNA Extraction for RT-qPCR Detection and Quantification of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Minguzzi

    Full Text Available Many efforts have been made to develop a rapid and sensitive method for phytoplasma and virus detection. Taking our cue from previous works, different rapid sample preparation methods have been tested and applied to Candidatus Phytoplasma prunorum ('Ca. P. prunorum' detection by RT-qPCR. A duplex RT-qPCR has been optimized using the crude sap as a template to simultaneously amplify a fragment of 16S rRNA of the pathogen and 18S rRNA of the host plant. The specific plant 18S rRNA internal control allows comparison and relative quantification of samples. A comparison between DNA and RNA contribution to qPCR detection is provided, showing higher contribution of the latter. The method presented here has been validated on more than a hundred samples of apricot, plum and peach trees. Since 2013, this method has been successfully applied to monitor 'Ca. P. prunorum' infections in field and nursery. A triplex RT-qPCR assay has also been optimized to simultaneously detect 'Ca. P. prunorum' and Plum pox virus (PPV in Prunus.

  19. Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in rodents in an area with sympatric existence of the hard ticks Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor reticulatus, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silaghi Cornelia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (CNM has been described in the hard tick Ixodes ricinus and rodents as well as in some severe cases of human disease. The aims of this study were to identify DNA of CNM in small mammals, the ticks parasitizing them and questing ticks in areas with sympatric existence of Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor reticulatus in Germany. Methods Blood, transudate and organ samples (spleen, kidney, liver, skin of 91 small mammals and host-attached ticks from altogether 50 small mammals as well as questing I. ricinus ticks (n=782 were screened with a real-time PCR for DNA of CNM. Results 52.7% of the small mammals were positive for CNM-DNA. The majority of the infected animals were yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis and bank voles (Myodes glareolus. Small mammals with tick infestation were more often infected with CNM than small mammals without ticks. Compared with the prevalence of ~25% in the questing I. ricinus ticks, twice the prevalence in the rodents provides evidence for their role as reservoir hosts for CNM. Conclusion The high prevalence of this pathogen in the investigated areas in both rodents and ticks points towards the need for more specific investigation on its role as a human pathogen.

  20. Serological detection of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' in citrus, and identification by GeLC-MS/MS of a chaperone protein responding to cellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fang; Duan, Yongping; Yuan, Qing; Shao, Jonathan; Hartung, John S

    2016-01-01

    We describe experiments with antibodies against 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus used to detect the pathogen in infected plants. We used scFv selected to bind epitopes exposed on the surface of the bacterium in tissue prints, with secondary monoclonal antibodies directed at a FLAG epitope included at the carboxyl end of the scFv. Unexpectedly, the anti-FLAG secondary antibody produced positive results with CaLas diseased samples when the primary scFv were not used. The anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody (Mab) also identified plants infected with other vascular pathogens. We then identified a paralogous group of secreted chaperone proteins in the HSP-90 family that contained the amino acid sequence DDDDK identical to the carboxy-terminal sequence of the FLAG epitope. A rabbit polyclonal antibody against one of the same epitopes combined with a goat anti-rabbit secondary antibody produced very strong purple color in individual phloem cells, as expected for this pathogen. These results were entirely specific for CaLas-infected citrus. The simplicity, cost and ability to scale the tissue print assay makes this an attractive assay to complement PCR-based assays currently in use. The partial FLAG epitope may itself be useful as a molecular marker for the rapid screening of citrus plants for the presence of vascular pathogens. PMID:27381064

  1. "Candidatus Similichlamydia laticola", a novel Chlamydia-like agent of epitheliocystis in seven consecutive cohorts of farmed Australian barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan C Stride

    Full Text Available Six consecutively hatched cohorts and one cohort of pre-hatch eggs of farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer from south Australia were examined for Chlamydia-like organisms associated with epitheliocystis. To identify and characterise the bacteria, 59 gill samples and three pre-hatch egg samples were processed for histology, in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA amplification, sequencing and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis. Cases of epitheliocystis were observed microscopically and characterised by membrane-enclosed basophilic cysts filled with a granular material that caused hypertrophy of the epithelial cells. In situ hybridisation with a Chlamydiales-specific probe lead to specific labelling of the epitheliocystis inclusions within the gill epithelium. Two distinct but closely related 16S rRNA chlamydial sequences were amplified from gill DNA across the seven cohorts, including from pre-hatch eggs. These genotype sequences were found to be novel, sharing 97.1 - 97.5% similarity to the next closest 16S rRNA sequence, Ca. Similichlamydia latridicola, from Australian striped trumpeter. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these genotype sequences against representative members of the Chlamydiales order and against other epitheliocystis agents revealed these Chlamydia-like organisms to be novel and taxonomically placed them within the recently proposed genus Ca. Similichlamydia. Following Fredricks and Relman's molecular postulates and based on these observations, we propose the epitheliocystis agents of barramundi to be known as "Candidatus Similichlamydia laticola" (sp. nov..

  2. The ubiquity of consciousness: The ubiquity of consciousness, cognition and intelligence in life

    OpenAIRE

    Trewavas, Anthony J; Baluška, František

    2011-01-01

    Our definitions of consciousness and intelligence are largely anthropocentric, potentially skewing research. In fact, consciousness in its many forms could well be ubiquitous, even down to the simplest of organisms.

  3. How Clonal Is Clonal? Genome Plasticity across Multicellular Segments of a “Candidatus Marithrix sp.” Filament from Sulfidic, Briny Seafloor Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman-Carvalho, Verena; Fadeev, Eduard; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Marithrix” is a recently described lineage within the group of large sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoaceae, Gammaproteobacteria). This genus of bacteria comprises vacuolated, attached-living filaments that inhabit the sediment surface around vent and seep sites in the marine environment. A single filament is ca. 100 μm in diameter, several millimeters long, and consists of hundreds of clonal cells, which are considered highly polyploid. Based on these characteristics, “Candidatus Marithrix” was used as a model organism for the assessment of genomic plasticity along segments of a single filament using next generation sequencing to possibly identify hotspots of microevolution. Using six consecutive segments of a single filament sampled from a mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico, we recovered ca. 90% of the “Candidatus Marithrix” genome in each segment. There was a high level of genome conservation along the filament with average nucleotide identities between 99.98 and 100%. Different approaches to assemble all reads into a complete consensus genome could not fill the gaps. Each of the six segment datasets encoded merely a few hundred unique nucleotides and 5 or less unique genes—the residual content was redundant in all datasets. Besides the overall high genomic identity, we identified a similar number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the clonal segments, which are comparable to numbers reported for other clonal organisms. An increase of SNPs with greater distance of filament segments was not observed. The polyploidy of the cells was apparent when analyzing the heterogeneity of reads within a segment. Here, a strong increase in single nucleotide variants, or “intrasegmental sequence heterogeneity” (ISH) events, was observed. These sites may represent hotspots for genome plasticity, and possibly microevolution, since two thirds of these variants were not co-localized across the genome copies of the multicellular filament. PMID

  4. Genome sequence of Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis from group I.1b enriched from Everglades soil reveals novel genomic features of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna V Zhalnina

    Full Text Available The activity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA leads to the loss of nitrogen from soil, pollution of water sources and elevated emissions of greenhouse gas. To date, eight AOA genomes are available in the public databases, seven are from the group I.1a of the Thaumarchaeota and only one is from the group I.1b, isolated from hot springs. Many soils are dominated by AOA from the group I.1b, but the genomes of soil representatives of this group have not been sequenced and functionally characterized. The lack of knowledge of metabolic pathways of soil AOA presents a critical gap in understanding their role in biogeochemical cycles. Here, we describe the first complete genome of soil archaeon Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis, which has been reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a highly enriched culture obtained from an agricultural soil. The AOA enrichment was sequenced with the high throughput next generation sequencing platforms from Pacific Biosciences and Ion Torrent. The de novo assembly of sequences resulted in one 2.95 Mb contig. Annotation of the reconstructed genome revealed many similarities of the basic metabolism with the rest of sequenced AOA. Ca. N. evergladensis belongs to the group I.1b and shares only 40% of whole-genome homology with the closest sequenced relative Ca. N. gargensis. Detailed analysis of the genome revealed coding sequences that were completely absent from the group I.1a. These unique sequences code for proteins involved in control of DNA integrity, transporters, two-component systems and versatile CRISPR defense system. Notably, genomes from the group I.1b have more gene duplications compared to the genomes from the group I.1a. We suggest that the presence of these unique genes and gene duplications may be associated with the environmental versatility of this group.

  5. Use of Electrical Penetration Graph Technology to Examine Transmission of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' to Potato by Three Haplotypes of Potato Psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli; Hemiptera: Triozidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Mustafa

    Full Text Available The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc (Hemiptera: Triozidae, is a vector of the phloem-limited bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' (Lso, the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. Little is known about how potato psyllid transmits Lso to potato. We used electrical penetration graph (EPG technology to compare stylet probing behaviors and efficiency of Lso transmission of three haplotypes of potato psyllid (Central, Western, Northwestern. All haplotypes exhibited the full suite of stylet behaviors identified in previous studies with this psyllid, including intercellular penetration and secretion of the stylet pathway, xylem ingestion, and phloem activities, the latter comprising salivation and ingestion. The three haplotypes exhibited similar frequency and duration of probing behaviors, with the exception of salivation into phloem, which was of higher duration by psyllids of the Western haplotype. We manipulated how long psyllids were allowed access to potato ("inoculation access period", or IAP to examine the relationship between phloem activities and Lso transmission. Between 25 and 30% of psyllids reached and salivated into phloem at an IAP of 1 hr, increasing to almost 80% of psyllids as IAP was increased to 24 h. Probability of Lso-transmission was lower across all IAP levels than probability of phloem salivation, indicating that a percentage of infected psyllids which salivated into the phloem failed to transmit Lso. Logistic regression showed that probability of transmission increased as a function of time spent salivating into the phloem; transmission occurred as quickly as 5 min following onset of salivation. A small percentage of infected psyllids showed extremely long salivation events but nonetheless failed to transmit Lso, for unknown reasons. Information from these studies increases our understanding of Lso transmission by potato psyllid, and demonstrates the value of EPG technology in

  6. The effect of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. Results This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. Conclusions This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on

  7. Molecular and physiological properties associated with zebra complex disease in potatoes and its relation with Candidatus Liberibacter contents in psyllid vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veria Y Alvarado

    Full Text Available Zebra complex (ZC disease on potatoes is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLs, an α-proteobacterium that resides in the plant phloem and is transmitted by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc. The name ZC originates from the brown striping in fried chips of infected tubers, but the whole plants also exhibit a variety of morphological features and symptoms for which the physiological or molecular basis are not understood. We determined that compared to healthy plants, stems of ZC-plants accumulate starch and more than three-fold total protein, including gene expression regulatory factors (e.g. cyclophilin and tuber storage proteins (e.g., patatins, indicating that ZC-affected stems are reprogrammed to exhibit tuber-like physiological properties. Furthermore, the total phenolic content in ZC potato stems was elevated two-fold, and amounts of polyphenol oxidase enzyme were also high, both serving to explain the ZC-hallmark rapid brown discoloration of air-exposed damaged tissue. Newly developed quantitative and/or conventional PCR demonstrated that the percentage of psyllids in laboratory colonies containing detectable levels of CLs and its titer could fluctuate over time with effects on colony prolificacy, but presumed reproduction-associated primary endosymbiont levels remained stable. Potato plants exposed in the laboratory to psyllid populations with relatively low-CLs content survived while exposure of plants to high-CLs psyllids rapidly culminated in a lethal collapse. In conclusion, we identified plant physiological biomarkers associated with the presence of ZC and/or CLs in the vegetative potato plant tissue and determined that the titer of CLs in the psyllid population directly affects the rate of disease development in plants.

  8. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Meenal; Fisher, Tonja W; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission.

  9. New excised-leaf assay method to test inoculativity of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus associated with citrus huanglongbing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Walter, Abigail J; Hall, David G

    2013-02-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) associated with huanglongbing, or citrus greening, the most devastating citrus (Citrus spp.) disease worldwide. Here, we developed a new "excised-leaf assay" that can speed up Las-inoculativity tests on Asian citrus psyllid from the current 3-12 mo (when using whole citrus seedlings for inoculation) to only 2-3 wk. Young adults of Asian citrus psyllid that had been reared on Las-infected plants were caged on excised healthy sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] leaves for a 1-2-wk inoculation access periods (IAP), and then both psyllids and leaves were tested later by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). When single adults were tested per leaf, percentages of Las-positive leaves averaged 2-6% by using HLBaspr primers and 10-20% by using the more sensitive LJ900 primers. Higher proportions of Las-positive leaves were obtained with 1) higher densities of inoculating psyllids (5-10 adults per leaf), 2) longer IAPs, and 3) incubation of leaves for 1 wk postinoculation before PCR. Logistic regression analysis indicated a positive correlation between Las titer in Asian citrus psyllid adults tested singly and the probability of detecting Las in the inoculated leaves, correlations that can be very useful in epidemiological studies. Comparison between excised leaves and whole seedlings, inoculated consecutively for 1 wk each by one or a group of psyllids, indicated no significant difference between Las detection in excised leaves or whole plants. This new excised-leaf assay method saves considerable time, materials, and greenhouse space, and it may enhance vector relation and epidemiological studies on Las and potentially other Liberibacter spp. associated with huanglongbing disease.

  10. Herbivory by the insect diaphorina citri induces greater change in citrus plant volatile profile than does infection by the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Faraj; El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2013-10-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) profile in plant leaves often changes after biotic and abiotic stresses. Monitoring changes in VOCs in plant leaves could provide valuable information about multitrophic interactions. In the current study, we investigated the effect of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) infestation, citrus greening pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus [CLas]) infection, and simultaneous attack by ACP and CLas on the VOC content of citrus leaves. Leaf volatiles were extracted using hexane and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although ACP is a phloem-sucking insect that causes minimal damage to plant tissues, the relative amount of 21 out of the 27 VOCs increased 2- to 10-fold in ACP-infested plants. The relative amount of d-limonene, β-phelandrene, citronellal, and undecanal were increased 4- to 20- fold in CLas-infected plants. A principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) showed that VOC patterns of ACP-infested and CLas-infected plants were different from each other and were also different from the controls, while the VOC pattern of double-attacked plants was more like that of the controls than that of ACP-infested or CLas-infected plants. VOC amounts from leaves were compromised when plants were attacked by ACP and CLas. The results of this study showed that a simple direct extraction of citrus leaf volatiles could be successfully used to discriminate between healthy and CLas-infected plants. Information about the effects of insect and pathogen attack on the VOC content profile of plants might contribute to a better understanding of biotic stress. PMID:23857364

  11. Nested-quantitative PCR approach with improved sensitivity for the detection of low titer levels of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, M R; Hoffmann, M; Kingdom Gibbard, H N; Kuhns, E H; Pelz-Stelinski, K S; Stelinski, L L

    2014-07-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited bacterium transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, and the presumptive causal agent of citrus greening disease. The current method of detection for CLas within plant and insect samples is by a presence/absence qPCR assay using the CLas 16S rDNA gene target. Although qPCR is highly sensitive, low bacterial titers or suboptimal qPCR conditions can result in false-negatives. Using a nested qPCR assay, we determined the false-negative rate of the 16S presence/absence qPCR assay was greater than 50%. Studies to determine the performance parameters of the qPCR assays for CLas 16S and Wingless (Wg), the D. citri endogenous gene, using plasmid and psyllid DNA, revealed suboptimal and variable performance of the 16S assay in psyllid samples. Average efficiencies and sensitivity limits of the plasmid assays were 99.0% and 2.7 copies of template for Wg, respectively, and 98.5% and 2.2-22.1 copies for 16S, respectively. Variability in efficiency was significantly greater in psyllid samples for both gene targets compared to the corresponding plasmid assays, and efficiencies as low as 76% were obtained for 16S. A secondary structure analysis revealed the formation of two stem-loop structures that block the forward and probe binding sites in the 16S template, which could hinder amplification. In summary, our results suggest that suboptimal qPCR efficiency is not uncommon for the 16S presence/absence qPCR assay, which combined with lowCLas titers in some samples, could contribute significantly to the under-reporting of CLas infection in psyllid and plant samples. PMID:24769405

  12. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Meenal; Fisher, Tonja W; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission. PMID

  13. Methods for rapid and effective PCR-based detection of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' from the insect vector Bactericera cockerelli: streamlining the DNA extraction/purification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Julien; Hancock, Joseph; Ravindran, Aravind; Gross, Dennis; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia; Pierson, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    This study provides a protocol for rapid DNA isolation from psyllid vectors (Bactericera cockerelli and Diaphorina citri) that can be used directly with DNA-based methods for the detection of 'Candidatus (Ca.) Liberibacter solanacearum,' the bacterial causal agent of potato zebra chip disease and eventually for 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' the causal agent of huanglongbing disease in citrus. The fast DNA extraction protocol was designed to work with conventional polymerase chain reaction (cPCR) DNA amplification as well as Loop mediated PCR DNA amplification. Direct cPCR of the psyllid 28S rDNA gene from samples prepared using the fast DNA extraction method was as reliable as from samples prepared using standard DNA purification (> 97% from live insects) as tested in B. cockerelli. However, samples prepared using the fast DNA extraction method had to be diluted 1:100 in sterile water for reliable amplification, presumably to dilute PCR inhibitors in the crude extract. Similarly, both cPCR and loop mediated PCR DNA amplification detected 'Ca. Liberibacter' in psyllids infected with either the zebra chip or huanglongbing pathogen equally well from diluted samples prepared using the fast DNA extraction method or from samples prepared using a DNA purification step. In addition to being reliable, the time required to complete the fast DNA extraction for 10 samples was on average approximately 5 min and required no special reagents or laboratory equipment. Thus, the fast DNA extraction method shows strong promise as a rapid, reliable, and expedient method when coupled with PCR-based analyses for detection of 'Ca. Liberibacter' pathogens in psyllids. PMID:23865212

  14. The phloem-sap feeding mealybug (Ferrisia virgata) carries 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations that do not cause disease in host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitino, Marco; Hoffman, Michele T; Zhou, Lijuan; Hall, David G; Stocks, Ian C; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las) is the primary causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. There are three known insect vectors of the HLB-associated bacteria, and all are members of the Hemiptera: Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae), Trioza erytreae (Triozidae), and Cacopsylla (Psylla) citrisuga (Psyllidae). In this study, we found that another hemipteran, the striped mealybug Ferrisia virgata (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), was able to acquire and retain Las bacteria. The bacterial titers were positively correlated with the feeding acquisition time on Las-infected leaf discs, with a two-weeks feeding period resulting in Ct values ranging from 23.1 to 36.1 (8.24 × 10(7) to 1.07 × 10(4) Las cells per mealybug). We further discovered that the prophage/phage populations of Las in the mealybugs were different from those of Las in psyllids based on Las prophage-specific molecular markers: infected psyllids harbored the Las populations with prophage/phage FP1 and FP2, while infected mealybugs carried the Las populations with the iFP3 being the dominant prophage/phage. As in the psyllids, Las bacteria were shown to move through the insect gut wall to the salivary glands after being ingested by the mealybug based on a time-course quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay of the dissected digestive systems. However, Las populations transmitted by the mealybugs did not cause disease in host plants. This is the first evidence of genetic difference among Las populations harbored by different insect vectors and difference among Las populations with respect to whether or not they cause disease in host plants. PMID:24465578

  15. Effect of Cyantraniliprole, a Novel Insecticide, on the Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing by the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Hall, David G; Alvarez, Juan M

    2015-04-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is the principal vector of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) associated with huanglongbing (HLB), the most serious citrus disease worldwide. New control measures including pesticides are urgently needed to combat HLB, especially to protect young or newly planted citrus trees from CLas-inoculation by vector psyllids. Here, we tested CLas-inoculation by D. citri adults (CLas-exposed, reared on infected plants) by feeding them for 7 d on excised healthy citrus leaves with dry residues of cyantraniliprole (Exirel), a novel insecticide, in comparison with fenpropathrin (Danitol 2.4EC), an insecticide commonly used against D. citri. Fewer adults settled (putatively feeding or probing) on leaves treated with cyantraniliprole than those treated with fenpropathrin or water controls. Also, psyllid adults died at a slower rate on leaves treated with cyantraniliprole than those treated with fenpropathrin, although the final cumulative mortality did not differ between the two treatments. In quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction tests, 59.0-65.3% of the CLas-exposed psyllid adults were proven to be CLas-positive. Inoculation rates of CLas (using 10 adults per leaf) into untreated healthy citrus leaves (47.5-85%) were significantly higher than rates into leaves treated with cyantraniliprole or fenpropathrin (2.5-12.5%). Reduced inoculation rates to leaves treated with cyantraniliprole probably occurred as a result of reduced feeding or probing by D. citri. The excised leaf assay method, which took only a few weeks compared with up to a year or longer using whole plants, can be an effective tool for testing the effect of new pesticides or other treatments in reducing CLas inoculation or transmission by psyllid vectors. PMID:26470150

  16. The phloem-sap feeding mealybug (Ferrisia virgata carries 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations that do not cause disease in host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pitino

    Full Text Available 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las is the primary causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB, the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. There are three known insect vectors of the HLB-associated bacteria, and all are members of the Hemiptera: Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae, Trioza erytreae (Triozidae, and Cacopsylla (Psylla citrisuga (Psyllidae. In this study, we found that another hemipteran, the striped mealybug Ferrisia virgata (Cockerell (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae, was able to acquire and retain Las bacteria. The bacterial titers were positively correlated with the feeding acquisition time on Las-infected leaf discs, with a two-weeks feeding period resulting in Ct values ranging from 23.1 to 36.1 (8.24 × 10(7 to 1.07 × 10(4 Las cells per mealybug. We further discovered that the prophage/phage populations of Las in the mealybugs were different from those of Las in psyllids based on Las prophage-specific molecular markers: infected psyllids harbored the Las populations with prophage/phage FP1 and FP2, while infected mealybugs carried the Las populations with the iFP3 being the dominant prophage/phage. As in the psyllids, Las bacteria were shown to move through the insect gut wall to the salivary glands after being ingested by the mealybug based on a time-course quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay of the dissected digestive systems. However, Las populations transmitted by the mealybugs did not cause disease in host plants. This is the first evidence of genetic difference among Las populations harbored by different insect vectors and difference among Las populations with respect to whether or not they cause disease in host plants.

  17. The Phloem-Sap Feeding Mealybug (Ferrisia virgata) Carries ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ Populations That Do Not Cause Disease in Host Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitino, Marco; Hoffman, Michele T.; Zhou, Lijuan; Hall, David G.; Stocks, Ian C.; Duan, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) is the primary causal agent of huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. There are three known insect vectors of the HLB-associated bacteria, and all are members of the Hemiptera: Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae), Trioza erytreae (Triozidae), and Cacopsylla (Psylla) citrisuga (Psyllidae). In this study, we found that another hemipteran, the striped mealybug Ferrisia virgata (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), was able to acquire and retain Las bacteria. The bacterial titers were positively correlated with the feeding acquisition time on Las-infected leaf discs, with a two-weeks feeding period resulting in Ct values ranging from 23.1 to 36.1 (8.24×107 to 1.07×104 Las cells per mealybug). We further discovered that the prophage/phage populations of Las in the mealybugs were different from those of Las in psyllids based on Las prophage-specific molecular markers: infected psyllids harbored the Las populations with prophage/phage FP1 and FP2, while infected mealybugs carried the Las populations with the iFP3 being the dominant prophage/phage. As in the psyllids, Las bacteria were shown to move through the insect gut wall to the salivary glands after being ingested by the mealybug based on a time-course quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay of the dissected digestive systems. However, Las populations transmitted by the mealybugs did not cause disease in host plants. This is the first evidence of genetic difference among Las populations harbored by different insect vectors and difference among Las populations with respect to whether or not they cause disease in host plants. PMID:24465578

  18. Nested-quantitative PCR approach with improved sensitivity for the detection of low titer levels of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coy, M R; Hoffmann, M; Kingdom Gibbard, H N; Kuhns, E H; Pelz-Stelinski, K S; Stelinski, L L

    2014-07-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a phloem-limited bacterium transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, and the presumptive causal agent of citrus greening disease. The current method of detection for CLas within plant and insect samples is by a presence/absence qPCR assay using the CLas 16S rDNA gene target. Although qPCR is highly sensitive, low bacterial titers or suboptimal qPCR conditions can result in false-negatives. Using a nested qPCR assay, we determined the false-negative rate of the 16S presence/absence qPCR assay was greater than 50%. Studies to determine the performance parameters of the qPCR assays for CLas 16S and Wingless (Wg), the D. citri endogenous gene, using plasmid and psyllid DNA, revealed suboptimal and variable performance of the 16S assay in psyllid samples. Average efficiencies and sensitivity limits of the plasmid assays were 99.0% and 2.7 copies of template for Wg, respectively, and 98.5% and 2.2-22.1 copies for 16S, respectively. Variability in efficiency was significantly greater in psyllid samples for both gene targets compared to the corresponding plasmid assays, and efficiencies as low as 76% were obtained for 16S. A secondary structure analysis revealed the formation of two stem-loop structures that block the forward and probe binding sites in the 16S template, which could hinder amplification. In summary, our results suggest that suboptimal qPCR efficiency is not uncommon for the 16S presence/absence qPCR assay, which combined with lowCLas titers in some samples, could contribute significantly to the under-reporting of CLas infection in psyllid and plant samples.

  19. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenal Vyas

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB. The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt, classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/. Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas

  20. Herbivory by the insect diaphorina citri induces greater change in citrus plant volatile profile than does infection by the bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Faraj; El-Shesheny, Ibrahim; Killiny, Nabil

    2013-10-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) profile in plant leaves often changes after biotic and abiotic stresses. Monitoring changes in VOCs in plant leaves could provide valuable information about multitrophic interactions. In the current study, we investigated the effect of Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) infestation, citrus greening pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus [CLas]) infection, and simultaneous attack by ACP and CLas on the VOC content of citrus leaves. Leaf volatiles were extracted using hexane and analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Although ACP is a phloem-sucking insect that causes minimal damage to plant tissues, the relative amount of 21 out of the 27 VOCs increased 2- to 10-fold in ACP-infested plants. The relative amount of d-limonene, β-phelandrene, citronellal, and undecanal were increased 4- to 20- fold in CLas-infected plants. A principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) showed that VOC patterns of ACP-infested and CLas-infected plants were different from each other and were also different from the controls, while the VOC pattern of double-attacked plants was more like that of the controls than that of ACP-infested or CLas-infected plants. VOC amounts from leaves were compromised when plants were attacked by ACP and CLas. The results of this study showed that a simple direct extraction of citrus leaf volatiles could be successfully used to discriminate between healthy and CLas-infected plants. Information about the effects of insect and pathogen attack on the VOC content profile of plants might contribute to a better understanding of biotic stress.

  1. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M.; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A.; Crow, John A.; Soderlund, Carol A.; Gang, David R.; Brown, Judith K.

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission. PMID

  2. Effect of Cyantraniliprole, a Novel Insecticide, on the Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing by the Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Hall, David G; Alvarez, Juan M

    2015-04-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is the principal vector of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas) associated with huanglongbing (HLB), the most serious citrus disease worldwide. New control measures including pesticides are urgently needed to combat HLB, especially to protect young or newly planted citrus trees from CLas-inoculation by vector psyllids. Here, we tested CLas-inoculation by D. citri adults (CLas-exposed, reared on infected plants) by feeding them for 7 d on excised healthy citrus leaves with dry residues of cyantraniliprole (Exirel), a novel insecticide, in comparison with fenpropathrin (Danitol 2.4EC), an insecticide commonly used against D. citri. Fewer adults settled (putatively feeding or probing) on leaves treated with cyantraniliprole than those treated with fenpropathrin or water controls. Also, psyllid adults died at a slower rate on leaves treated with cyantraniliprole than those treated with fenpropathrin, although the final cumulative mortality did not differ between the two treatments. In quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction tests, 59.0-65.3% of the CLas-exposed psyllid adults were proven to be CLas-positive. Inoculation rates of CLas (using 10 adults per leaf) into untreated healthy citrus leaves (47.5-85%) were significantly higher than rates into leaves treated with cyantraniliprole or fenpropathrin (2.5-12.5%). Reduced inoculation rates to leaves treated with cyantraniliprole probably occurred as a result of reduced feeding or probing by D. citri. The excised leaf assay method, which took only a few weeks compared with up to a year or longer using whole plants, can be an effective tool for testing the effect of new pesticides or other treatments in reducing CLas inoculation or transmission by psyllid vectors.

  3. Suppression of aggressive strains of 'Candidatus phytoplasma mali' by mild strains in Catharanthus roseus and Nicotiana occidentalis and indication of similar action in apple trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bernd; Sule, Sandor; Jelkmann, Wilhelm; Seemüller, Erich

    2014-05-01

    To study antagonistic interactions of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma mali' strains, graft inoculation of Catharanthus roseus and Nicotiana occidentalis was performed with mild strains 1/93Vin and 1/93Tab as suppressors and three aggressive strains as challengers. Inoculation of the suppressors was carried out in either the cross-protection modus prior to grafting of the challengers or by co-inoculating suppressors and challengers. Monitoring using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that, in long-term cross-protection trials with C. roseus, suppressor 1/93Vin was present in all root and randomly collected stem samples over the entire observation period. In contrast, the challengers were never detected in such stem samples and rarely in the roots. Following simultaneous inoculation, the suppressor successively colonized all stem and root regions whereas detection of challenger AT steadily decreased. However, this strain remained detectable in up to 13 and 27% of stem and root samples, respectively. The cross-protection trials with N. occidentalis yielded results similar to that of the cross-protection experiments with C. roseus. Comparison of the symptomatology of infected apple trees with the presence of putatively suppressive strains indicated that suppression of severe strains also occurs in apple. Phylogenetic analysis using a variable fragment of AAA+ ATPase gene AP460 of 'Ca. P. mali' revealed that suppressors 1/93Vin and 1/93Tab, together with several other mild strains maintained in apple, cluster distantly from obviously nonsuppressive strains that were predominantly highly virulent. PMID:24724815

  4. Evidence of two lineages of the symbiont 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola' in Italian populations of Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Claudia; Mazzon, Luca; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Simonato, Mauro; Squartini, Andrea; Girolami, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The close association between the olive fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) (Diptera: Tephritidae) and bacteria has been known for more than a century. Recently, the presence of a host-specific, hereditary, unculturable symbiotic bacterium, designated 'Candidatus Erwinia dacicola', has been described inside the cephalic organ of the fly, called the oesophageal bulb. In the present study, the 16S rRNA gene sequence variability of 'Ca. E. dacicola' was examined within and between 26 Italian olive fly populations sampled across areas where olive trees occur in the wild and areas where cultivated olive trees have been introduced through history. The bacterial contents of the oesophageal bulbs of 314 olive flies were analysed and a minimum of 781 bp of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. The corresponding host fly genotype was assessed by sequencing a 776 bp portion of the mitochondrial genome. Two 'Ca. E. dacicola' haplotypes were found (htA and htB), one being slightly more prevalent than the other (57%). The two haplotypes did not co-exist in the same individuals, as confirmed by cloning. Interestingly, the olive fly populations of the two main Italian islands, Sicily and Sardinia, appeared to be represented exclusively by the htB and htA haplotypes, respectively, while peninsular populations showed both bacterial haplotypes in different proportions. No significant correlation emerged between the two symbiont haplotypes and the 16 host fly haplotypes observed, suggesting evidence for a mixed model of vertical and horizontal transmission of the symbiont during the fly life cycle.

  5. Are Apodemus spp. mice and Myodes glareolus reservoirs for Borrelia miyamotoi, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Rickettsia helvetica, R. monacensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, C; Schumann, O; Schumann, C; Gern, L

    2014-04-01

    In Europe, in addition to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus, other zoonotic pathogens, like B. miyamotoi, a species related to the relapsing fever spirochaetes, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (N. mikurensis), Rickettsia helvetica, Rickettsia monacensis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum have been reported in the ixodid tick Ixodes ricinus. No study was conducted to identify reservoir hosts for these pathogens. Here, we investigated the role played by wild rodents in the natural transmission cycle of B. miyamotoi, N. mikurensis, R. helvetica, R. monacensis, and A. phagocytophilum in Switzerland. In 2011 and 2012, small mammals were captured in an area where these pathogens occur in questing ticks. Ixodes ricinus ticks infesting captured small mammals were analysed after their moult by PCR followed by reverse line blot to detect the different pathogens. Xenodiagnostic larvae were used to evaluate the role of rodents as reservoirs and analysed after their moult. Most of the 108 captured rodents (95.4%) were infested by I. ricinus ticks; 4.9%, 3.9%, 24.0%, and 0% of the rodents were infested by Borrelia, N. mikurensis, Rickettsia spp., and A. phagocytophilum-infected larvae, respectively. Borrelia afzelii, B. miyamotoi, N. mikurensis, Rickettsia spp., and A. phagocytophilum were detected in 2.8%, 0.17%, 2.6%, 6.8%, and 0% of the ticks attached to rodents, respectively. Borrelia afzelii was transmitted by 4 rodents to 41.2% of the xenodiagnostic ticks, B. miyamotoi by 3 rodents to 23.8%, and N. mikurensis was transmitted by 6 rodents to 41.0% of the xenodiagnostic ticks. None of the tested rodent transmitted Rickettsia spp. or A. phagocytophilum to I. ricinus xenodiagnostic larvae. This study showed that rodents are reservoir hosts for B. miyamotoi and N. mikurensis in Europe. PMID:24582511

  6. Acquisition, Replication and Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus following Various Acquisition Periods on Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus by Nymphs and Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Ramos, John E; Hall, David G; Dawson, William O; Shatters, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) implicated as causative agent of citrus huanglongbing (citrus greening), currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Las is transmitted by D. citri in a persistent-circulative manner, but the question of replication of this bacterium in its psyllid vector has not been resolved. Thus, we studied the effects of the acquisition access period (AAP) by nymphs and adults of D. citri on Las acquisition, multiplication and inoculation/transmission. D. citri nymphs or adults (previously non-exposed to Las) were caged on Las-infected citrus plants for an AAP of 1, 7 or 14 days. These 'Las-exposed' psyllids were then transferred weekly to healthy citrus or orange jasmine plants, and sampled via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis 1-42 days post-first access to diseased plants (padp); all tested nymphs became adults 7-14 days padp. Our results indicate that following 1 or 7 day AAP as nymphs 49-59% of Las-exposed psyllids became Las-infected (qPCR-positive), whereas only 8-29% of the psyllids were infected following 1-14 day AAP as adults. Q-PCR analysis also indicated that Las titer in the Las-exposed psyllids (relative to that of the psyllid S20 ribosomal protein gene) was: 1) significantly higher, and increasing at a faster rate, following Las acquisition as nymphs compared to that following Las acquisition as adults; 2) higher as post-acquisition time of psyllids on healthy plants increased reaching a peak at 14-28 days padp for nymphs and 21-35 days padp for adults, with Las titer decreasing or fluctuating after that; 3) higher with longer AAP on infected plants, especially with acquisition as adults. Our results strongly suggest that Las multiplies in both nymphs and adults of D. citri but attains much higher levels in a shorter period of time post-acquisition when acquired by nymphs than when acquired by adults

  7. Acquisition, Replication and Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus following Various Acquisition Periods on Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus by Nymphs and Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Desouky Ammar

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae, is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las implicated as causative agent of citrus huanglongbing (citrus greening, currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Las is transmitted by D. citri in a persistent-circulative manner, but the question of replication of this bacterium in its psyllid vector has not been resolved. Thus, we studied the effects of the acquisition access period (AAP by nymphs and adults of D. citri on Las acquisition, multiplication and inoculation/transmission. D. citri nymphs or adults (previously non-exposed to Las were caged on Las-infected citrus plants for an AAP of 1, 7 or 14 days. These 'Las-exposed' psyllids were then transferred weekly to healthy citrus or orange jasmine plants, and sampled via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR analysis 1-42 days post-first access to diseased plants (padp; all tested nymphs became adults 7-14 days padp. Our results indicate that following 1 or 7 day AAP as nymphs 49-59% of Las-exposed psyllids became Las-infected (qPCR-positive, whereas only 8-29% of the psyllids were infected following 1-14 day AAP as adults. Q-PCR analysis also indicated that Las titer in the Las-exposed psyllids (relative to that of the psyllid S20 ribosomal protein gene was: 1 significantly higher, and increasing at a faster rate, following Las acquisition as nymphs compared to that following Las acquisition as adults; 2 higher as post-acquisition time of psyllids on healthy plants increased reaching a peak at 14-28 days padp for nymphs and 21-35 days padp for adults, with Las titer decreasing or fluctuating after that; 3 higher with longer AAP on infected plants, especially with acquisition as adults. Our results strongly suggest that Las multiplies in both nymphs and adults of D. citri but attains much higher levels in a shorter period of time post-acquisition when acquired by nymphs than when acquired by

  8. Acquisition, Replication and Inoculation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus following Various Acquisition Periods on Huanglongbing-Infected Citrus by Nymphs and Adults of the Asian Citrus Psyllid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, El-Desouky; Ramos, John E; Hall, David G; Dawson, William O; Shatters, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), is the primary vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) implicated as causative agent of citrus huanglongbing (citrus greening), currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Las is transmitted by D. citri in a persistent-circulative manner, but the question of replication of this bacterium in its psyllid vector has not been resolved. Thus, we studied the effects of the acquisition access period (AAP) by nymphs and adults of D. citri on Las acquisition, multiplication and inoculation/transmission. D. citri nymphs or adults (previously non-exposed to Las) were caged on Las-infected citrus plants for an AAP of 1, 7 or 14 days. These 'Las-exposed' psyllids were then transferred weekly to healthy citrus or orange jasmine plants, and sampled via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis 1-42 days post-first access to diseased plants (padp); all tested nymphs became adults 7-14 days padp. Our results indicate that following 1 or 7 day AAP as nymphs 49-59% of Las-exposed psyllids became Las-infected (qPCR-positive), whereas only 8-29% of the psyllids were infected following 1-14 day AAP as adults. Q-PCR analysis also indicated that Las titer in the Las-exposed psyllids (relative to that of the psyllid S20 ribosomal protein gene) was: 1) significantly higher, and increasing at a faster rate, following Las acquisition as nymphs compared to that following Las acquisition as adults; 2) higher as post-acquisition time of psyllids on healthy plants increased reaching a peak at 14-28 days padp for nymphs and 21-35 days padp for adults, with Las titer decreasing or fluctuating after that; 3) higher with longer AAP on infected plants, especially with acquisition as adults. Our results strongly suggest that Las multiplies in both nymphs and adults of D. citri but attains much higher levels in a shorter period of time post-acquisition when acquired by nymphs than when acquired by adults

  9. Genome sequence of Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi, endosymbiont of chimpanzee lice, and genomic comparison of recently acquired endosymbionts from human and chimpanzee lice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Bret M; Allen, Julie M; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Reed, David L

    2014-11-01

    The obligate-heritable endosymbionts of insects possess some of the smallest known bacterial genomes. This is likely due to loss of genomic material during symbiosis. The mode and rate of this erosion may change over evolutionary time: faster in newly formed associations and slower in long-established ones. The endosymbionts of human and anthropoid primate lice present a unique opportunity to study genome erosion in newly established (or young) symbionts. This is because we have a detailed phylogenetic history of these endosymbionts with divergence dates for closely related species. This allows for genome evolution to be studied in detail and rates of change to be estimated in a phylogenetic framework. Here, we sequenced the genome of the chimpanzee louse endosymbiont (Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi) and compared it with the closely related genome of the human body louse endosymbiont. From this comparison, we found evidence for recent genome erosion leading to gene loss in these endosymbionts. Although gene loss was detected, it was not significantly greater than in older endosymbionts from aphids and ants. Additionally, we searched for genes associated with B-vitamin synthesis in the two louse endosymbiont genomes because these endosymbionts are believed to synthesize essential B vitamins absent in the louse's diet. All of the expected genes were present, except those involved in thiamin synthesis. We failed to find genes encoding for proteins involved in the biosynthesis of thiamin or any complete exogenous means of salvaging thiamin, suggesting there is an undescribed mechanism for the salvage of thiamin. Finally, genes encoding for the pantothenate de novo biosynthesis pathway were located on a plasmid in both taxa along with a heat shock protein. Movement of these genes onto a plasmid may be functionally and evolutionarily significant, potentially increasing production and guarding against the deleterious effects of mutation. These data add to a growing

  10. 柑桔黄龙病的鉴定和柯赫氏定理%"Candidatus Liberibacter Species": Without Koch's Postulates Completed, Can the Bacterium be Considered as the Causal Agent of Citrus Huanglongbing (Yellow Shoot Disease) ?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen J; Deng X; Civerolo E L; Lee R F; Jones J B; Zhou C; Hartung J S; Manjunath K L; Brlansky R H

    2011-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease) has been a destructive disease of citrus around the world for over a century, yet the etiology of the disease has not been definitively established. Based mainly on assays for 16S rRNA gene sequences, fastidious bacteria known as "Candidatus Liberibacter species" have been .ssociated with HLB. We are concerned that some current literature frequendy refers to "Ca. Liberibacter spp." as the causal or etiological agent of HLB. However, Koch' s postulates, either sensu stricto or modified, have not yet been completely fulfilled to establish that "Ca. Liberibacter spp." are the cause of HLB.Direct pathological interactions between the bacteria and citrus host have not been conclusively documented.We suggest there is a need for the literature to be precise on this point until the etiology of HLB is firmly established.%黄龙(梢)病被认为是世界柑橘生产上的毁灭性病害已超过一个世纪,但该病害的病原学至今还没有清晰地建立起来.根据16S rRNA基因序列分析,一组被称为"Candidatus Liberibacter species"的难培养细菌被认为与黄龙病相关.然而,要确定"Ca.Liberibacter spp."是黄龙病病原的柯赫氏定理并没有真正完成.令我们担忧的是,近年来有些文献频频指出"Ca.Liberibacter spp."是黄龙病的病原,其实该细菌与柑橘寄主的直接病理反应还没有完全确定.我们建议,在黄龙病病原学清楚之前,文献报道在这方面需要有准确的阐述.

  11. Characterization of copy numbers of 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and the implication in detection in planta using quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB is one of the most devastating diseases on citrus and is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter spp.. The pathogens are phloem limited and have not been cultured in vitro. The current management strategy of HLB is to remove infected citrus trees and reduce psyllid populations with insecticides to prevent the spreading. This strategy requires sensitive and reliable diagnostic methods for early detection. Results We investigated the copy numbers of the 16S rDNA and 16S rRNA of the HLB pathogen and the implication of improving the diagnosis of HLB for early detection using Quantitative PCR. We compared the detection of HLB with different Quantitative PCR based methods with primers/probe targeting either 16S rDNA, beta-operon DNA, 16S rRNA, or beta-operon RNA. The 16S rDNA copy number of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus was estimated to be three times of that of the beta-operon region, thus allowing detection of lower titer of Ca. L. asiaticus. Quantitative reverse transcriptional PCR (QRT-PCR indicated that the 16S rRNA averaged 7.83 times more than that of 16S rDNA for the same samples. Dilution analysis also indicates that QRT-PCR targeting 16S rRNA is 10 time more sensitive than QPCR targeting 16S rDNA. Thus QRT-PCR was able to increase the sensitivity of detection by targeting 16S rRNA. Conclusion Our result indicates that Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus contains three copies of 16S rDNA. The copy number of 16S rRNA of Ca. L. asiaticus in planta averaged about 7.8 times of 16S rDNA for the same set of samples tested in this study. Detection sensitivity of HLB could be improved through the following approaches: using 16S rDNA based primers/probe in the QPCR assays; and using QRT-PCR assays targeting 16S rRNA.

  12. Molecular Identification of Multilocus of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" in Psylla citrisuga%柚木虱体内韧皮部杆菌亚洲种多基因位点的分子鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周汶静; 蒲雪莲; 张丽娜; 岑伊静; 邓晓玲

    2012-01-01

    Four pairs of primers for 16S rDNA gene, β-operon ribosomal protein gene, outer membrane protein gene, and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer gene of "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus", were used to amplify the corresponding baterial genes from Psylla citrisuga, Diaphorina citri collected from lemon orchards in Ruili, Yunnan province. The amplicons were collected, purified, and ligated into PEASY-T3 vector and the constructs were transformed into E. coli Trans 1-T1. Positive clones were sequenced and the sequences were analyzed using NCBI Blastn and MEGA5. 05. Results showed that the sequences on the four gene loci shared 99% of identity with those of "Ca. L. asiaticus" str. psy62 in GenBank, suggesting that Psylla citrisuga is a new host of "Ca. L. asiaticus".%利用与柑桔黄龙病相关的韧皮部杆菌(“Candidatus Liberibacter sp.”,简称Ca.L.sp.)16S rDNA基因、β-操纵子核糖体蛋白基因、外膜蛋白基因以及16S-23S rRNA间隔转录区基因位点的4对特异性引物,对采自云南瑞丽柠檬园的柚木虱(Psylla citrisuga)DNA样品进行PCR扩增,将扩增产物进行纯化、回收,连接至PEASY-T3载体并转化大肠杆菌感受态细胞Trans1-T1,筛选阳性克隆进行测序,利用NCBI Blastn软件以及MEGA5.05软件对所克隆的序列进行同源性分析与聚类分析.结果表明:柚木虱体内韧皮部杆菌亚洲种在这4个基因位点与已报道的Ca.L.asiaticus psy62株系全基因组相应基因位点的同源率均为99%.本研究证实柚木虱能够携带韧皮部杆菌亚洲种,是该菌新的昆虫宿主.

  13. Ubiquity of Exciton Localization in Cryogenic Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Matthias S.; Noé, Jonathan; Kneer, Alexander; Crochet, Jared J.; Högele, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We present photoluminescence studies of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes at room and cryogenic temperatures. From the analysis of spatial and spectral features of nanotube photoluminescence, we identify characteristic signatures of unintentional exciton localization. Moreover, we quantify the energy scale of exciton localization potentials as ranging from a few to a few tens of millielectronvolts and stemming from both environmental disorder and shallow covalent side-wal...

  14. Ubiquity of Exciton Localization in Cryogenic Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias S; Noé, Jonathan; Kneer, Alexander; Crochet, Jared J; Högele, Alexander

    2016-05-11

    We present photoluminescence studies of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes at room and cryogenic temperatures. From the analysis of spatial and spectral features of nanotube photoluminescence, we identify characteristic signatures of unintentional exciton localization. Moreover, we quantify the energy scale of exciton localization potentials as ranging from a few to a few tens of millielectronvolts and stemming from both environmental disorder and shallow covalent side-wall defects. Our results establish disorder-induced crossover from the diffusive to the localized regime of nanotube excitons at cryogenic temperatures as a ubiquitous phenomenon in micelle-encapsulated and as-grown carbon nanotubes. PMID:27105355

  15. Prosomes. Ubiquity and inter-species structural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins de Sa, C; Grossi de Sa, M F; Akhayat, O; Broders, F; Scherrer, K; Horsch, A; Schmid, H P

    1986-02-20

    The "prosomes", a novel type of ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein particle of extraordinary stability and of defined electron microscopical structure, have been characterized in several cell types and species. Identified as a 19 S sub-component of free mRNA-protein complexes, including globin and other repressed mRNA, in the cytoplasm of duck, mouse and HeLa cells, they were previously found to inhibit protein synthesis in vitro. In all cells studied, electron microscopy shows an identical, seemingly ring-like but rather raspberry-shaped particle of 12 nm diameter, resistant to EDTA and 1% (w/v) Sarkosyl. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of prosomal proteins shows a characteristic pattern in the 19,000 to 35,000 Mr range of pI 4 to 7, with an additional 56,000 Mr component specific to avian species. The prosomes found in globin mRNA-protein complexes contain about 25 protein components, 16 of which have identical molecular weight and pI values in duck and mouse, and which are also found in the prosomes of the heterogeneous free mRNPs of HeLa cells. Seral and monoclonal antibodies raised in mice against the prosomes of duck erythroblasts cross-react with some of the proteins of the mouse and HeLa cell particles. Prosomes isolated from duck and mouse globin mRNP, both contain small cytoplasmic RNAs of 70 to 90 nucleotides, which represent about 15% of the particle mass. The molecular weight and the 3'-terminal oligonucleotide of each one of these small cytoplasmic RNAs are identical in the two animal species; fingerprints of their oligonucleotides generated by RNase T1 show that more than 80% of spots are identical. In contrast, the prosomes of HeLa cells, associated with a large population of repressed mRNA, contain at least 12 small cytoplasmic RNA species. All prosomal RNAs tested so far hybridize to mRNA. The data available indicate that prosomes constitute a novel class of ubiquitous cellular ribonucleoprotein complexes, present in the nucleus and cytoplasm that, in its structural variations shown here, reflects function and species. PMID:2423694

  16. Communication and control in reproduction: the ubiquity of periodic phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, P E

    1985-02-01

    Two statements will be presented and defended in this paper. First, it is claimed that oscillations are common in all biological systems. From the subcellular to the organismic levels of organization, oscillations are the normal operational mode for many biochemical and physiological control networks. Second, it will be demonstrated that periodic control offers several functional advantages over steady-state control. PMID:3971010

  17. Ubiquity of motor networks in the spinal cord of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalets, J R; Bertrand, S

    2000-11-15

    In a recent paper, we found that it is possible to record motor activity in sacral segments in the in vitro neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. This motor activity recorded in segments that are not innervating hindlimbs is driven by the lumbar locomotor network. Indeed, compartimentalizations of the cord with Vaseline walls or section experiments, reveals that the sacral segments possess their own rhythmogenic capabilities but that in an intact spinal cord they are driven by the lumbar locomotor network. In this review, these recent findings are placed in the context of spinal motor network interactions. As previously suspected, the motor networks do not operate in isolation but interact with each other according to behavioural needs. These interactions provide some insight into the discrepancies observed in several studies dealing with the localization of the lumbar locomotor network in the neonatal rat spinal cord. In conclusion, the spinal cord of quadrupeds appears as an heterogeneous structure where it is possible to identify neuronal networks that are crucial for the genesis of locomotor-related activities. PMID:11165798

  18. Ubiquity of Exciton Localization in Cryogenic Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias S; Noé, Jonathan; Kneer, Alexander; Crochet, Jared J; Högele, Alexander

    2016-05-11

    We present photoluminescence studies of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes at room and cryogenic temperatures. From the analysis of spatial and spectral features of nanotube photoluminescence, we identify characteristic signatures of unintentional exciton localization. Moreover, we quantify the energy scale of exciton localization potentials as ranging from a few to a few tens of millielectronvolts and stemming from both environmental disorder and shallow covalent side-wall defects. Our results establish disorder-induced crossover from the diffusive to the localized regime of nanotube excitons at cryogenic temperatures as a ubiquitous phenomenon in micelle-encapsulated and as-grown carbon nanotubes.

  19. Focused Ubiquity: A Purposeful Approach to Providing Students with Laptops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppler, Mike; Weiler, Spencer C.; Maas, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Laptops have been introduced into classroom across the nation as a way to improve teaching and learning. In 2007 Littleton Public Schools (LPS) introduced a focused approach to providing all students with a laptop at a significantly lower cost to the traditional ubiquitous laptop programs. The purpose of this study was to document the LPS model…

  20. Ubiquity and diversity of human-associated Demodex mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan S Thoemmes

    Full Text Available Demodex mites are a group of hair follicle and sebaceous gland-dwelling species. The species of these mites found on humans are arguably the animals with which we have the most intimate interactions. Yet, their prevalence and diversity have been poorly explored. Here we use a new molecular method to assess the occurrence of Demodex mites on humans. In addition, we use the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA to assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of Demodex lineages. Within our samples, 100% of people over 18 years of age appear to host at least one Demodex species, suggesting that Demodex mites may be universal associates of adult humans. A phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA reveals intraspecific structure within one of the two named human-associated Demodex species, D. brevis. The D. brevis clade is geographically structured, suggesting that new lineages are likely to be discovered as humans from additional geographic regions are sampled.

  1. Ubiquity of Benfords law and emergence of the reciprocal distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Friar, J L; Perez-Mercader, J

    2016-01-01

    We apply the Law of Total Probability to the construction of scale-invariant probability distribution functions (pdfs), and require that probability measures be dimensionless and unitless under a continuous change of scales. If the scale-change distribution function is scale invariant then the constructed distribution will also be scale invariant. Repeated application of this construction on an arbitrary set of (normalizable) pdfs results again in scale-invariant distributions. The invariant function of this procedure is given uniquely by the reciprocal distribution, suggesting a kind of universality. We separately demonstrate that the reciprocal distribution results uniquely from requiring maximum entropy for size-class distributions with uniform bin sizes.

  2. On the utility and ubiquity of atomic collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is divided into three parts. In the introduction, we discuss the history and makeup of ICPEAC. In the second part, we discuss the extent of applicability of atomic collision physics. In the third part, we chose one subject (dielectronic excitation) to show the interrelationship of various sub-branches of atomic collision physics. 28 refs., 14 figs

  3. Ubiquity and specificity of reinforcement signals throughout the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Timothy J; Chun, Marvin M; Lee, Daeyeol

    2011-10-01

    Reinforcements and punishments facilitate adaptive behavior in diverse domains ranging from perception to social interactions. A conventional approach to understanding the corresponding neural substrates focuses on the basal ganglia and its dopaminergic projections. Here, we show that reinforcement and punishment signals are surprisingly ubiquitous in the gray matter of nearly every subdivision of the human brain. Humans played either matching-pennies or rock-paper-scissors games against computerized opponents while being scanned using fMRI. Multivoxel pattern analysis was used to decode previous choices and their outcomes, and to predict upcoming choices. Whereas choices were decodable from a confined set of brain structures, their outcomes were decodable from nearly all cortical and subcortical structures. In addition, signals related to both reinforcements and punishments were recovered reliably in many areas and displayed patterns not consistent with salience-based explanations. Thus, reinforcement and punishment might play global modulatory roles in the entire brain.

  4. Ubiquity and Diversity of Human-Associated Demodex Mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoemmes, Megan S.; Fergus, Daniel J.; Urban, Julie; Trautwein, Michelle; Dunn, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Demodex mites are a group of hair follicle and sebaceous gland-dwelling species. The species of these mites found on humans are arguably the animals with which we have the most intimate interactions. Yet, their prevalence and diversity have been poorly explored. Here we use a new molecular method to assess the occurrence of Demodex mites on humans. In addition, we use the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) to assess the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of Demodex lineages. Within our samples, 100% of people over 18 years of age appear to host at least one Demodex species, suggesting that Demodex mites may be universal associates of adult humans. A phylogenetic analysis of 18S rDNA reveals intraspecific structure within one of the two named human-associated Demodex species, D. brevis. The D. brevis clade is geographically structured, suggesting that new lineages are likely to be discovered as humans from additional geographic regions are sampled. PMID:25162399

  5. The Ubiquity of Frequency Effects in First Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambridge, Ben; Kidd, Evan; Rowland, Caroline F.; Theakston, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    This review article presents evidence for the claim that frequency effects are pervasive in children's first language acquisition, and hence constitute a phenomenon that any successful account must explain. The article is organized around four key domains of research: children's acquisition of single words, inflectional morphology, simple…

  6. The Ubiquity of Coeval Starbursts in Massive Galaxy Cluster Progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Casey, Caitlin M

    2016-01-01

    The Universe's largest galaxy clusters likely built the majority of their massive $>10^{11} M_\\odot$ galaxies in simultaneous, short-lived bursts of activity well before virialization. This conclusion is reached from emerging datasets on $z>2$ proto-clusters and the characteristics of their member galaxies, in particular, rare starbursts and ultraluminous active galactic nuclei (AGN). The most challenging observational hurdle in identifying such structures is their very large volumes, $\\sim10^{4}$ comoving Mpc$^3$ at $z>2$, subtending areas $\\sim$half a degree on the sky. Thus the contrast afforded by an overabundance of very rare galaxies in comparison to the background can more easily distinguish overdense structures from the surrounding, normal density field. Five $210^{15} M_\\odot$ galaxy clusters in the nearby Universe, a factor of five larger than expected in some simulations. Some tension yet exists between measurements of their volume density of starburst-rich proto-clusters and the expectation that t...

  7. Saturn's Titan: A strict test for life's cosmic ubiquity

    OpenAIRE

    Lunine, J. I.

    2009-01-01

    Is life a common outcome of physical and chemical processes in the universe? Within our own solar system, a successful search for even primitive life, were it to have an origin independent from life on Earth, would dramatically advance a positive answer. The most stringent test for a second independent origin of life on Earth would come from examination of either the most physically remote from Earth, or the most exotic type, of planetary environments in which one might plausibly imagine a fo...

  8. Prosomes. Ubiquity and inter-species structural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins de Sa, C; Grossi de Sa, M F; Akhayat, O; Broders, F; Scherrer, K; Horsch, A; Schmid, H P

    1986-02-20

    The "prosomes", a novel type of ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein particle of extraordinary stability and of defined electron microscopical structure, have been characterized in several cell types and species. Identified as a 19 S sub-component of free mRNA-protein complexes, including globin and other repressed mRNA, in the cytoplasm of duck, mouse and HeLa cells, they were previously found to inhibit protein synthesis in vitro. In all cells studied, electron microscopy shows an identical, seemingly ring-like but rather raspberry-shaped particle of 12 nm diameter, resistant to EDTA and 1% (w/v) Sarkosyl. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of prosomal proteins shows a characteristic pattern in the 19,000 to 35,000 Mr range of pI 4 to 7, with an additional 56,000 Mr component specific to avian species. The prosomes found in globin mRNA-protein complexes contain about 25 protein components, 16 of which have identical molecular weight and pI values in duck and mouse, and which are also found in the prosomes of the heterogeneous free mRNPs of HeLa cells. Seral and monoclonal antibodies raised in mice against the prosomes of duck erythroblasts cross-react with some of the proteins of the mouse and HeLa cell particles. Prosomes isolated from duck and mouse globin mRNP, both contain small cytoplasmic RNAs of 70 to 90 nucleotides, which represent about 15% of the particle mass. The molecular weight and the 3'-terminal oligonucleotide of each one of these small cytoplasmic RNAs are identical in the two animal species; fingerprints of their oligonucleotides generated by RNase T1 show that more than 80% of spots are identical. In contrast, the prosomes of HeLa cells, associated with a large population of repressed mRNA, contain at least 12 small cytoplasmic RNA species. All prosomal RNAs tested so far hybridize to mRNA. The data available indicate that prosomes constitute a novel class of ubiquitous cellular ribonucleoprotein complexes, present in the nucleus and cytoplasm that, in its structural variations shown here, reflects function and species.

  9. The ubiquity of model-based reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Bradley B; Simon, Dylan A; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2012-12-01

    The reward prediction error (RPE) theory of dopamine (DA) function has enjoyed great success in the neuroscience of learning and decision-making. This theory is derived from model-free reinforcement learning (RL), in which choices are made simply on the basis of previously realized rewards. Recently, attention has turned to correlates of more flexible, albeit computationally complex, model-based methods in the brain. These methods are distinguished from model-free learning by their evaluation of candidate actions using expected future outcomes according to a world model. Puzzlingly, signatures from these computations seem to be pervasive in the very same regions previously thought to support model-free learning. Here, we review recent behavioral and neural evidence about these two systems, in attempt to reconcile their enigmatic cohabitation in the brain.

  10. Denitrifying phosphorus removal from municipal wastewater and dynamics of "Candidatus Accumulibacter" and denitrifying bacteria based on genes of ppk1, narG, nirS and nirK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Anqi; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-05-01

    Relevance of clade-level population dynamics of "Candidatus Accumulibacter" to performance of denitrifying phosphorus (P) removal from municipal wastewater was investigated. Stable denitrifying P removal in anoxic zone of continuous-flow reactor was achieved, accounting for 90% of total P removal. Clades IIC and IIF affiliated with Accumulibacter lineage were the dominant clades during denitrifying P removal, reaching 90% of ppk1 clone library. NarG gene library indicated Gamma and Beta-proteobacteria played an important role in nitrate reduction. Diversity and abundance of nirS library was much more than nirK, and thus became the main functional gene to execute nitrite reduction. Based on abundance of nirS, nirK and ppk1, the ratio of Accumulibacter capable of denitrifying P removal to total Accumulibacter was 22%. No matter whether Accumulibacter had narG gene or not, high abundance of narG at a level of 10(9)cells/(g dried-sludge) promoted nitrate reduced to nitrite, ensuring performance of denitrifying P removal. PMID:26896717

  11. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-06-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus," and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 10(3) to 10(7) bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼ 10(3) bacteria per insect, increasing up to 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼ 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected insects suggested that (i) "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼ 10(6) bacteria per insect) of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These findings provide

  12. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,” and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 103 to 107 bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼103 bacteria per insect, increasing up to 106 to 107 bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 105 to 106 bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼106 to 107 bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-infected insects suggested that (i) “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼106 bacteria per insect) of “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits “Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus” to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These

  13. Infection Density Dynamics of the Citrus Greening Bacterium "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" in Field Populations of the Psyllid Diaphorina citri and Its Relevance to the Efficiency of Pathogen Transmission to Citrus Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukuda-Hosokawa, Rie; Sadoyama, Yasutsune; Kishaba, Misaki; Kuriwada, Takashi; Anbutsu, Hisashi; Fukatsu, Takema

    2015-06-01

    Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, is a devastating disease of citrus plants recently spreading worldwide, which is caused by an uncultivable bacterial pathogen, "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus," and vectored by a phloem-sucking insect, Diaphorina citri. We investigated the infection density dynamics of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" in field populations of D. citri with experiments using field-collected insects to address how "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection density in the vector insect is relevant to pathogen transmission to citrus plants. Of 500 insects continuously collected from "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected citrus trees with pathological symptoms in the spring and autumn of 2009, 497 (99.4%) were "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" positive. The infections were systemic across head-thorax and abdomen, ranging from 10(3) to 10(7) bacteria per insect. In spring, the infection densities were low in March, at ∼ 10(3) bacteria per insect, increasing up to 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in April and May, and decreasing to 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria per insect in late May, whereas the infection densities were constantly ∼ 10(6) to 10(7) bacteria per insect in autumn. Statistical analysis suggested that several factors, such as insect sex, host trees, and collection dates, may be correlated with "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" infection densities in field D. citri populations. Inoculation experiments with citrus seedlings using field-collected "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-infected insects suggested that (i) "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus"-transmitting insects tend to exhibit higher infection densities than do nontransmitting insects, (ii) a threshold level (∼ 10(6) bacteria per insect) of "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" density in D. citri is required for successful transmission to citrus plants, and (iii) D. citri attaining the threshold infection level transmits "Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus" to citrus plants in a stochastic manner. These findings provide

  14. Validation of 'variable number of tandem repeat'-based approach for examination of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' diversity and its applications for the analysis of the pathogen populations in the areas of recent introduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A Matos

    Full Text Available Citrus greening (Huanglongbing, HLB is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus worldwide. In South Asia HLB has been known for more than a century, while in Americas the disease was found relatively recently. HLB is associated with three species of 'Candidatus Liberibacter' among which 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas has most wide distribution. Recently, a number of studies identified different regions in the CLas genome with variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs that could be used for examination of CLas diversity. One of the objectives of the work presented here was to further validate the VNTR analysis-based approach by assessing the stability of these repeats upon multiplication of the pathogen in a host over an extended period of time and upon its passaging from a host to a host using CLas populations from Florida. Our results showed that the numbers of tandem repeats in the four loci tested display very distinguishable "signature profiles" for the two Florida-type CLas haplotype groups. Remarkably, the profiles do not change upon passage of the pathogen in citrus and psyllid hosts as well as after its presence within a host over a period of five years, suggesting that VNTR analysis-based approach represents a valid methodology for examination of the pathogen populations in various geographical regions. Interestingly, an extended analysis of CLas populations in different locations throughout Florida and in several countries in the Caribbean and Central America regions and in Mexico where the pathogen has been introduced recently demonstrated the dispersion of the same haplotypes of CLas. On the other hand, these CLas populations appeared to differ significantly from those obtained from locations where the disease has been present for a much longer time.

  15. Population Structure of‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in China Revealed by SSR Markers%基于SSR标记的中国亚洲韧皮杆菌种群结构研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄爱军; 苏华楠; 王雪峰; 唐科志; 李中安; 周常勇

    2014-01-01

    目的亚洲韧皮部杆菌是柑橘黄龙病病原。通过筛选SSR(Simple sequence repeat)位点,分析中国境内亚洲韧皮部杆菌(‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’)的群体结构。方法根据已报道亚洲韧皮部杆菌基因组上的25个SSR位点,使用中国不同地理来源的样品,对报道的SSR位点进行筛选,找出其中适宜进行中国样品群体结构分析的位点。应用PCR的方法,对收集的中国境内的285个亚洲韧皮部杆菌相应SSR位点进行扩增,聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳。所得电泳图导入软件Quantity One 4.5.0读取产物的碱基数。通过PopGen version 1.31软件评估选出的位点和不同地理来源的样品的多态性,分别使用软件Powermarker 3.25和structure 2.3.4进行聚类分析。结果共选出5个SSR位点可用于中国种群结构研究,Nei's多样性指数0.1542—0.9556。其中LasA位点多态性最高,有效等位基因数NE=22.5,Nei's多样性指数H=0.9556。通过这5个位点分析中国境内8个不同地理来源的样品,发现云南省样品存在较高多态性,NE=5.7,H=0.6580。8个地理种群间的遗传距离0.0236—0.5786,遗传相似度0.5607—0.9767,广西和四川遗传距离最大,遗传相似度最小。Powermarker软件以UPGMA方法进行聚类分析的结果显示,所有样品分为两个组群,四川和云南为一个组群;福建、浙江、贵州、广东、广西和江西为一个组群。Structure软件分析也得出了相似的结果,云南和四川样品的种群构成较为单一,90%以上个体为同一组群,而其他6个地理来源不同程度的为两个组群的混合。结论基于5个SSR位点分析中国境内的Ca. L. asiaticus表明其可能存在两种不同的群体结构,为进一步研究中国柑橘黄龙病的发生和流行规律提供了有价值的线索。%[Objective] ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ is the pathogeny of Citrus Huanglongbing. The purpose

  16. Genetic variation analysis of an outer membrane protein gene of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus%柑橘黄龙病菌亚洲种外膜蛋白基因的遗传变异分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鹿连明; 杜丹超; 程保平; 胡秀荣; 张利平; 陈国庆

    2014-01-01

    为了解柑橘黄龙病菌亚洲种(Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus)的遗传多样性,对来源于国内外7个不同地区和浙江台州地区11个不同寄主品种的 Ca.L.asiaticus 的外膜蛋白(outer membrane protein,OMP)基因进行聚合酶链反应限制性片段长度多态性分析(polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism,PCR-RFLP).PCR 产物经克隆测序后,利用 NCBI Blast 和 DNAMAN 软件对 omp 基因序列进行多重比对,并用 MEGA 软件构建系统发育树.结果显示:在浙江台州地区不同寄主品种上 Ca.L.asiaticus 各分离物的 omp 基因的酶切片段长度不具有多态性,其基因序列也完全一致;而不同地理来源的 Ca.L.asiaticus 的omp 基因经限制性内切酶消化后可产生不同的 RFLP 指纹图谱,其核酸序列和氨基酸序列均存在变异,表明 Ca. L.asiaticus 存在种内遗传多样性.在系统发育树上,所有的 Ca.L.asiaticus 分离物聚为1个分支,而 Ca.L. africanus 和 Ca.L.solanacearum 分别处于不同的分支上.%Summary Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease that represents a major threat to the world citrus industry.It was first reported from Chaoshan area of Guangdong Province in the early 20th century,and is now known to occur in next to 40 different Asian,African,Oceanian,South and North American countries and areas. Its pathogen is a phloem-limited,non-cultured,Gram-negative bacterium which belongs to the genus Candidatus Liberibacter.Three species,i.e.,Ca. L.asiaticus,Ca. L.americanus,and Ca. L.africanus with Ca. L. africanus subsp.capensis are currently known.So far,the pathogen of HLB disease discovered in China is only Ca.L.asiaticus,which distributes widely in almost all major citrus growing areas such as Guangdong,Guangxi, Fujian,Yunnan,Zhejiang and so on.This pathogen can be transmitted by grafting and Diaphorina citri and infect almost all fruit trees of Citrus Fortunella and Poncirus

  17. 柑橘木虱黄龙病菌携带量与其内生菌群相关性%Correlation of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and the Endophytic Community in Diaphorina citri

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙丽琴; 殷幼平; 王芳; 吴晓芳; 王中康

    2014-01-01

    【目的】分析柑橘木虱(Diaphorinacitri)体内可能与黄龙病菌(CandidatusLiberibacter asiaticus)互作的内生细菌,为黄龙病菌的人工培养及其病害防控奠定基础。【方法】首先通过传统分离培养方法比较不同地理来源带黄龙病菌(带菌)和不带菌黄龙病菌(不带菌)的木虱中可培养内生细菌的差异。其次将带菌状况不同的木虱分别分为头、胸、腹3部分,经PCR扩增其16S rDNA的V6-V8区,用变性梯度凝胶电泳(PCR-DGGE)方法,比较带菌状况不同的木虱内生细菌的差异和木虱不同部位内生细菌的差异。选择3种差异的内生细菌:Bacillus sp.、Salmonella sp.、Enterobacter sp.,在8份带菌状况不同的木虱样品中通过q-PCR分别对其进行实时荧光定量分析,再以总细菌量为校正计算包括黄龙病菌在内的4种细菌的相对含量,数据经LSD检验,以各种细菌相对含量的-lg值作图,先比较同一样品中3种细菌分别与黄龙病菌的相对含量关系,再比较同种细菌在不同样品中的特性,分析3种内生细菌和黄龙病菌的互作关系。【结果】不带菌木虱中可培养内生菌菌落丰富度和菌落形成单位均大于带菌木虱中。在不带菌木虱中共获得14株形态不同的菌株,分属于芽孢杆菌属(Bacillus,3株)、欧文氏菌属(Erwinia,1株)、克雷伯氏杆菌属(Klebsiella,1株)、葡萄球菌属(Staphylococcus,2株)、节杆菌属(Arthrobacter,1株)、泛菌属(Pantoea,2株)、果胶杆菌属(Pectobacterium,1株)、沙门氏菌属等(Salmonella,1株)、链霉菌属(Streptomyces,1株)、Massilia brevitalea(1株)等10个细菌属。在带菌木虱中分得的4株细菌在不带菌木虱中均分离到,分属于克雷伯氏菌属、芽孢杆菌属、果胶杆菌属。其中Dc-11(嗜气芽孢杆菌属)在带菌木虱和不带菌木虱中分

  18. Effect of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus Infection on Carbohydrate Metabolism in Citrus sinensis%柑橘黄龙病菌侵染对甜橙叶片糖代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴越; 苏华楠; 黄爱军; 周彦; 李中安; 刘金香; 周常勇

    2015-01-01

    【目的】研究甜橙(Citrus sinensis)在柑橘黄龙病菌(Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus)侵染下不同时期糖代谢的变化,以探讨其与柑橘叶片中淀粉积累间的关系,为进一步阐明柑橘黄龙病的发病机理提供理论依据。【方法】以甜橙为供试材料,采用腹接接种病原的方法,试验组植株用感染黄龙病菌的芽条进行嫁接,对照组植株用健康芽条进行接种,每个植株均嫁接3个芽条。在检测到感病的植株中选取生长状况良好且接近的3株作为后续试验材料,每月采集1次成熟叶片,至10月份结束。采集的叶片立即抽提 DNA 和 RNA,并进行可溶性糖及淀粉含量的测定,其余叶片用液氮速冻后保存于-80℃用于测定糖代谢过程中关键酶活性的变化,同时利用实时荧光定量 PCR 技术比较二者关键酶基因表达量的差异。【结果】随着病原菌胁迫时间的延长,可溶性糖和淀粉含量总体呈升高趋势,均在6月达到峰值,分别为对照的1.59和3.73倍,在感病后期开始有所下降;通过对二者的比值分析发现,感病植株的比值随时间的延长不断下降。在黄龙病菌侵染的不同阶段,各种酶的作用程度有所不同。感病植株的蔗糖磷酸合成酶(SPS)活性在感病初期迅速上升至顶峰,高达58.44μg·g-1·min-1,至后期已略微低于对照;酸性转化酶(AI)总体显示出较高活性,各个时期均有显著性差异(P<0.05),感病中期活性最高为对照的2.91倍;中性转化酶(NI)活性在感病和对照中均维持较低水平,且变化趋势基本一致;可溶性淀粉合成酶(SSs)与束缚性淀粉合成酶(GBSS)协调作用,共同参与淀粉合成的调控;淀粉酶活性在感病不同时期均有所下降,在感病中期低至0.38 U·g-1。定量 PCR 分析表明,蔗糖磷酸合成酶基因 SPS1表达量显著升高,与其酶活

  19. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics a superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly non-causal processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the non-causal. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That

  20. STED Nanoscopy Reveals the Ubiquity of Subcortical Cytoskeleton Periodicity in Living Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa D’Este

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the axons of cultured hippocampal neurons, actin forms various structures, including bundles, patches (involved in the preservation of neuronal polarity, and a recently reported periodic ring-like structure. Nevertheless, the overlaying organization of actin in neurons and in the axon initial segment (AIS is still unclear, due mainly to a lack of adequate imaging methods. By harnessing live-cell stimulated emission depletion (STED nanoscopy and the fluorescent probe SiR-Actin, we show that the periodic subcortical actin structure is in fact present in both axons and dendrites. The periodic cytoskeleton organization is also found in the peripheral nervous system, specifically at the nodes of Ranvier. The actin patches in the AIS co-localize with pre-synaptic markers. Cytosolic actin organization strongly depends on the developmental stage and subcellular localization. Altogether, the results of this study reveal unique neuronal cytoskeletal features.

  1. Good faith and the ubiquity of the “relational” contract

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, David

    2014-01-01

    The judgment of Leggatt J in Yam Seng Pte Ltd v International Trade Corporation Ltd shows the common belief that the English law of contract does not have a doctrine of good faith to be mistaken. That law does not have a general principle of good faith, but its doctrine of good faith, articulated through numerous specific duties, is more suitable for the interpretation of contracts according to the intentions of the parties than a general principle which invites the imposition of exogenous st...

  2. Ubiquity of parasporin-1 producers in Bacillus thuringiensis natural populations of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemori, Akiko; Maeda, Minoru; Yasutake, Koichi; Ohgushi, Akira; Kagoshima, Kumiko; Mizuki, Eiichi; Ohba, Michio

    2007-01-01

    Parasporin, a Bacillus thuringiensis parasporal protein, is unique in having a strong cytocidal activity preferential for human cancer cells. In this study, we characterized parasporin activities associated with three novel geographical isolates of B. thuringiensis. Parasporal inclusion proteins of the three isolates were highly toxic to human uterus cervix cancer cells (HeLa), but not to non-cancer uterine smooth muscle cells (UtSMC). Inclusions of the isolates lacked insect toxicity and hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes. Ouchterlony immunodiffusion tests revealed that the proteins of the three isolates are immunologically closely related to parasporin-1 (Cry31A), but dissimilar to the three other existing parasporin groups. Our results provide evidence that the parasporin-1-producing organism is a common member in B. thuringiensis populations occurring in natural environments of Japan.

  3. Ubiquity of density slope oscillations in the central regions of galaxy and cluster-sized systems

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Anthony M; Hjorth, Jens

    2016-01-01

    One usually thinks of a radial density profile as having a monotonically changing logarithmic slope, such as in NFW or Einasto profiles. However, in two different classes of commonly used systems, this is often not the case. These classes exhibit non-monotonic changes in their density profile slopes which we call oscillations for short. We analyze these two unrelated classes separately. Class 1 consists of systems that have density oscillations and that are defined through their distribution function $f(E)$, or differential energy distribution $N(E)$, such as isothermal spheres, King profiles, or DARKexp, a theoretically derived model for relaxed collisionless systems. Systems defined through $f(E)$ or $N(E)$ generally have density slope oscillations. Class 1 system oscillations can be found at small, intermediate, or large radii but we focus on a limited set of Class 1 systems that have oscillations in the central regions, usually at $\\log(r/r_{-2})\\lesssim -2$, where $r_{-2}$ is the largest radius where $d\\...

  4. A novel nutritional predictor links microbial fastidiousness with lowered ubiquity, growth rate, and cooperativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarecki, Raphy; Oberhardt, Matthew A; Reshef, Leah; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2014-07-01

    Understanding microbial nutritional requirements is a key challenge in microbiology. Here we leverage the recent availability of thousands of automatically generated genome-scale metabolic models to develop a predictor of microbial minimal medium requirements, which we apply to thousands of species to study the relationship between their nutritional requirements and their ecological and genomic traits. We first show that nutritional requirements are more similar among species that co-habit many ecological niches. We then reveal three fundamental characteristics of microbial fastidiousness (i.e., complex and specific nutritional requirements): (1) more fastidious microorganisms tend to be more ecologically limited; (2) fastidiousness is positively associated with smaller genomes and smaller metabolic networks; and (3) more fastidious species grow more slowly and have less ability to cooperate with other species than more metabolically versatile organisms. These associations reflect the adaptation of fastidious microorganisms to unique niches with few cohabitating species. They also explain how non-fastidious species inhabit many ecological niches with high abundance rates. Taken together, these results advance our understanding microbial nutrition on a large scale, by presenting new nutrition-related associations that govern the distribution of microorganisms in nature. PMID:25033033

  5. Ubiquity and Diversity of Heterotrophic Bacterial nasA Genes in Diverse Marine Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Xuexia Jiang; Hongyue Dang; Nianzhi Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large ...

  6. Ubiquity and impact of thin mid-level clouds in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica M L; Igel, Matthew R; Krejci, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    Clouds are crucial for Earth's climate and radiation budget. Great attention has been paid to low, high and vertically thick tropospheric clouds such as stratus, cirrus and deep convective clouds. However, much less is known about tropospheric mid-level clouds as these clouds are challenging to observe in situ and difficult to detect by remote sensing techniques. Here we use Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite observations to show that thin mid-level clouds (TMLCs) are ubiquitous in the tropics. Supported by high-resolution regional model simulations, we find that TMLCs are formed by detrainment from convective clouds near the zero-degree isotherm. Calculations using a radiative transfer model indicate that tropical TMLCs have a cooling effect on climate that could be as large in magnitude as the warming effect of cirrus. We conclude that more effort has to be made to understand TMLCs, as their influence on cloud feedbacks, heat and moisture transport, and climate sensitivity could be substantial. PMID:27530236

  7. Ubiquity of organic nitrates from nighttime chemistry in the European submicron aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Friese, E.; Topping, D.; Nemitz, E.; Prevot, A. S. H.; ńijälä, M.; Allan, J.; Canonaco, F.; Canagaratna, M.; Carbone, S.; Crippa, M.; Dall Osto, M.; Day, D. A.; De Carlo, P.; Di Marco, C. F.; Elbern, H.; Eriksson, A.; Freney, E.; Hao, L.; Herrmann, H.; Hildebrandt, L.; Hillamo, R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Laaksonen, A.; McFiggans, G.; Mohr, C.; O'Dowd, C.; Otjes, R.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Pandis, S. N.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Sellegri, K.; Swietlicki, E.; Tiitta, P.; Vermeulen, A.; Wahner, A.; Worsnop, D.; Wu, H.-C.

    2016-07-01

    In the atmosphere nighttime removal of volatile organic compounds is initiated to a large extent by reaction with the nitrate radical (NO3) forming organic nitrates which partition between gas and particulate phase. Here we show based on particle phase measurements performed at a suburban site in the Netherlands that organic nitrates contribute substantially to particulate nitrate and organic mass. Comparisons with a chemistry transport model indicate that most of the measured particulate organic nitrates are formed by NO3 oxidation. Using aerosol composition data from three intensive observation periods at numerous measurement sites across Europe, we conclude that organic nitrates are a considerable fraction of fine particulate matter (PM1) at the continental scale. Organic nitrates represent 34% to 44% of measured submicron aerosol nitrate and are found at all urban and rural sites, implying a substantial potential of PM reduction by NOx emission control.

  8. Social and spatial ubiquity of information and communication technology: a policy perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, Hans; Nijkamp, Peter

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze some fundamental impacts of the process of informatization. Inparticular, we address socio-economic and spatial impacts and discuss possible consequences for policy. Our objective is to discuss issues concerningthe desirability, necessity and possibility of government respo

  9. Homo ludicus. The ubiquity of play and its roles in present society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peppino Ortoleva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades new technologies, the rearrangement of living and labour time and other less visible cultural factors have brought some significant historical modifications to the traditionally separated area of the ludic. New types of games have emerged and the threshold between play and reality has been redefined to include aspects of social life that seemed to be unrelated to playing activities.

  10. Ubiquity and impact of thin mid-level clouds in the tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Igel, Matthew R.; Krejci, Radovan

    2016-08-01

    Clouds are crucial for Earth's climate and radiation budget. Great attention has been paid to low, high and vertically thick tropospheric clouds such as stratus, cirrus and deep convective clouds. However, much less is known about tropospheric mid-level clouds as these clouds are challenging to observe in situ and difficult to detect by remote sensing techniques. Here we use Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite observations to show that thin mid-level clouds (TMLCs) are ubiquitous in the tropics. Supported by high-resolution regional model simulations, we find that TMLCs are formed by detrainment from convective clouds near the zero-degree isotherm. Calculations using a radiative transfer model indicate that tropical TMLCs have a cooling effect on climate that could be as large in magnitude as the warming effect of cirrus. We conclude that more effort has to be made to understand TMLCs, as their influence on cloud feedbacks, heat and moisture transport, and climate sensitivity could be substantial.

  11. Confronting the Ubiquity of Electronic Communication and Social Media: Ethical and Legal Considerations for Psychoeducational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Joseph A.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Most U.S. children and adults use computers and the Internet on a daily basis. The pervasiveness of electronic communication in a variety of contexts, including home and school, raises ethical and legal concerns for school psychologists and those in related fields of practice, because of the risks to privacy and confidentiality, boundaries,…

  12. ON THE UBIQUITY OF MOLECULAR ANIONS IN THE DENSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Wirstroem, E. S.; Charnley, S. B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Buckle, J. V. [Cavendish Astrophysics Group and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Olofsson, A. O. H., E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.gov [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden)

    2013-06-10

    Results are presented from a survey for molecular anions in seven nearby Galactic star-forming cores and molecular clouds. The hydrocarbon anion C{sub 6}H{sup -} is detected in all seven target sources, including four sources where no anions have been previously detected: L1172, L1389, L1495B, and TMC-1C. The C{sub 6}H{sup -}/C{sub 6}H column density ratio is {approx}> 1.0% in every source, with a mean value of 3.0% (and standard deviation 0.92%). Combined with previous detections, our results show that anions are ubiquitous in dense clouds wherever C{sub 6}H is present. The C{sub 6}H{sup -}/C{sub 6}H ratio is found to show a positive correlation with molecular hydrogen number density, and with the apparent age of the cloud. We also report the first detection of C{sub 4}H{sup -} in TMC-1 (at 4.8{sigma} confidence), and derive an anion-to-neutral ratio C{sub 4}H{sup -}/C{sub 4}H =(1.2 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}(= 0.0012% {+-} 0.0004%). Such a low value compared with C{sub 6}H{sup -} highlights the need for a revised radiative electron attachment rate for C{sub 4}H. Chemical model calculations show that the observed C{sub 4}H{sup -} could be produced as a result of reactions of oxygen atoms with C{sub 5}H{sup -} and C{sub 6}H{sup -}.

  13. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexia Jiang

    Full Text Available Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB. In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III. Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be active participants contributing to the bloom dynamics. Our statistical results suggested that salinity, temperature and nitrate may be some of the key environmental factors controlling the composition and dynamics of the marine NAB communities.

  14. CardioML: integrating personal cardiac information for ubiquous diagnosis and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Luís; Queirós, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The latest medical diagnosis devices enable the performance of e-diagnosis making the access to these services easier, faster and available in remote areas. However this imposes new communications and data interchange challenges. In this paper a new XML based format for storing cardiac signals and related information is presented. The proposed structure encompasses data acquisition devices, patient information, data description, pathological diagnosis and waveform annotatio...

  15. ON THE UBIQUITY OF MOLECULAR ANIONS IN THE DENSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from a survey for molecular anions in seven nearby Galactic star-forming cores and molecular clouds. The hydrocarbon anion C6H– is detected in all seven target sources, including four sources where no anions have been previously detected: L1172, L1389, L1495B, and TMC-1C. The C6H–/C6H column density ratio is ∼> 1.0% in every source, with a mean value of 3.0% (and standard deviation 0.92%). Combined with previous detections, our results show that anions are ubiquitous in dense clouds wherever C6H is present. The C6H–/C6H ratio is found to show a positive correlation with molecular hydrogen number density, and with the apparent age of the cloud. We also report the first detection of C4H– in TMC-1 (at 4.8σ confidence), and derive an anion-to-neutral ratio C4H–/C4H =(1.2 ± 0.4) × 10–5(= 0.0012% ± 0.0004%). Such a low value compared with C6H– highlights the need for a revised radiative electron attachment rate for C4H. Chemical model calculations show that the observed C4H– could be produced as a result of reactions of oxygen atoms with C5H– and C6H–.

  16. MORPHOLOGY OF BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS AND UBIQUITY OF 50-NANOMETER BLACK CARBON AEROSOLS IN THE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengfu Fu; Liangjun Xu; Wei Ye; Yiquan Chen; Mingyu Jiang; Xueqin Xu

    2006-01-01

    Different-sized aerosols were collected by an Andersen air sampler to observe the detailed morphology of the black carbon (BC) aerosols which were separated chemically from the other accompanying aerosols, using a Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDX). The results indicate that most BC aerosols are spherical particles of about 50 nm in diameter and with a homogeneous surface. Results also show that these particles aggregate with other aerosols or with themselves to form larger agglomerates in the micrometer range. The shape of these 50-nm BC spherical particles was found to be very similar to that of BC particles released from petroleum-powered vehicular internal combustion engines. These spherical BC particles were shown to be different from the previously reported fullerenes found using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS).

  17. Motivation, Design, and Ubiquity: A Discussion of Research Ethics and Computer Science

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, David R

    2007-01-01

    Modern society is permeated with computers, and the software that controls them can have latent, long-term, and immediate effects that reach far beyond the actual users of these systems. This places researchers in Computer Science and Software Engineering in a critical position of influence and responsibility, more than any other field because computer systems are vital research tools for other disciplines. This essay presents several key ethical concerns and responsibilities relating to research in computing. The goal is to promote awareness and discussion of ethical issues among computer science researchers. A hypothetical case study is provided, along with questions for reflection and discussion.

  18. A novel nutritional predictor links microbial fastidiousness with lowered ubiquity, growth rate, and cooperativeness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphy Zarecki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding microbial nutritional requirements is a key challenge in microbiology. Here we leverage the recent availability of thousands of automatically generated genome-scale metabolic models to develop a predictor of microbial minimal medium requirements, which we apply to thousands of species to study the relationship between their nutritional requirements and their ecological and genomic traits. We first show that nutritional requirements are more similar among species that co-habit many ecological niches. We then reveal three fundamental characteristics of microbial fastidiousness (i.e., complex and specific nutritional requirements: (1 more fastidious microorganisms tend to be more ecologically limited; (2 fastidiousness is positively associated with smaller genomes and smaller metabolic networks; and (3 more fastidious species grow more slowly and have less ability to cooperate with other species than more metabolically versatile organisms. These associations reflect the adaptation of fastidious microorganisms to unique niches with few cohabitating species. They also explain how non-fastidious species inhabit many ecological niches with high abundance rates. Taken together, these results advance our understanding microbial nutrition on a large scale, by presenting new nutrition-related associations that govern the distribution of microorganisms in nature.

  19. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics. A superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-07-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly [non-causal] processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the [non-causal]. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That is, the QM world is sub-luminally, luminally and superluminally local-causal throughout, and the Law of Causality is ubiquitous in the micro-world. Thus, ''probabilistic causality'' is a merely epistemic term.

  20. On the ubiquity of molecular anions in the dense interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Cordiner, M A; Wirström, E S; Olofsson, A O H; Charnley, S B

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from a survey for molecular anions in seven nearby Galactic star-forming cores and molecular clouds. The hydrocarbon anion C6H- is detected in all seven target sources, including four sources where no anions have been previously detected: L1172, L1389, L1495B and TMC-1C. The C6H-/C6H column density ratio is greater than about 1.0% in every source, with a mean value of 3.0% (and standard deviation 0.92%). Combined with previous detections, our results show that anions are ubiquitous in dense clouds wherever C6H is present. The C6H-/C6H ratio is found to show a positive correlation with molecular hydrogen number density, and with the apparent age of the cloud. We also report the first detection of C4H- in TMC-1 (at 4.8-sigma confidence), and derive an anion-to-neutral ratio C4H-/C4H = (1.2 +- 0.4) x 10^-5 (= 0.0012 +- 0.0004%). Such a low value compared with C6H- highlights the need for a revised radiative electron attachment rate for C4H. Chemical model calculations show that the observed...

  1. 中国柑橘黄龙病病原菌两个原噬菌体超变异基因遗传多样性%Genetic Diversity of Two Hypervariable Genes from Prophage Regions of‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭锦; 王雪峰; 苏华楠; 李中安; 周常勇

    2013-01-01

    [目的]通过原噬菌体区域高度变异的基因位点研究柑橘黄龙病病原菌亚洲种(‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’)的种群分化,探讨病原菌种群遗传多样性水平和遗传结构。[方法]基于2种原噬菌体类型(SC1和SC2)对应的超变异基因区域设计2对引物(Lap-TJ-F/Lap-TJ-R1和Lap-TJ-F/Lap-TJ-R2),对中国不同柑橘产区的224个‘Ca. L. asiaticus’株系进行PCR检测和序列分析。[结果]PCR扩增的条带类型呈多态性,具有4种条带类型(SC1-1、SC1-2、SC2-1和SC2-2),西南地区以SC1-1型为主,广东、广西地区以SC2-1型为主,福建、江西、浙江地区没有明显优势的扩增型。分析SC1-1和SC1-2对应序列表明,其差异系由于132 bp的卫星序列和24 bp的小卫星序列2种串联重复序列数不同引起,而SC2-1和SC2-2的差异系由原噬菌体内部基因重排引起。[结论]中国不同地理来源病原菌株系在原噬菌体区域具有较丰富的多态性,对该基因区域研究将有助于揭示中国‘Ca. L. asiaticus’种群的遗传多样性。%[Objective] Hypervariable genomic loci of prophage region were used to study population differentiation and genetic diversity of‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, the putative casual agent of citrus Huanglongbing (HLB). [Method] Two primer sets (Lap-TJ-F/Lap-TJ-R1 and Lap-TJ-F/Lap-TJ-R2), targeted hypervariable genomic regions of two prophage types (SC1 and SC2), respectively, were used for PCR detection and sequence analysis of 224 ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ strains from different citrus producing areas in China.[Result]PCR amplicon polymorphisms and four amplion types (SC1-1, SC1-2, SC2-1 and SC2-2) were observed, SC1-1 and SC2-1 were the predominant types in Southwestern region and Guangdong-Guangxi region, respectively, and no dominant types were found in Fujian-Jiangxi-Zhejiang region. The sequence differences in SC1-1/SC1-2 were mainly caused by different

  2. First Report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in Carrots in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrot (Daucus carota) plants exhibiting symptoms that resembled those of carrot psyllid (Trioza apicalis) damage were observed in commercial fields in southern Finland in August 2008. Carrot psyllid is a serious pest of carrots in northern and central Europe, where it can cause up to 100% yield los...

  3. First report of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' on carrot in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    In March of 2014, carrot plants (Daucus carota L. var. Mascot) exhibiting symptoms of yellowing, purpling, and curling of leaves, proliferation of shoots, formation of hairy secondary roots, general stunting and plant decline were observed in commercial fields in the Gharb region of Morocco. The sym...

  4. Genomics of "Candidatus Synechococcus spongiarium", a Cyanobacterial Sponge Symbiont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaby, Beate M. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany); Copeland, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hentschel, Ute [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-03-21

    Marine sponges (Porifera): ancient metazoans of ecological importance, that produce bioactive secondary metabolites and interact with various microorganisms including cyanobacteria1: Marine Synechococcus spp.: cyanobacteria, important contributors to the global carbon cycle and major primary producers in the oceans2 Ca. S. spongiarum: an ecotype of this genus, widespread and abundant symbiont of various marine sponges around the world3, e.g. Aplysina aerophoba

  5. First report of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum" infecting eggplant in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    In May of 2012, eggplant (Solanum melongena) plants in an experimental research plot located at Zamorano in the Department of Francisco Morazán, Honduras, were observed with symptoms that included leaf chlorosis and cupping, overall stunting, and production of small and malformed fruits. The researc...

  6. Candidatus "Scalindua brodaea", spec. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", spec. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schmid, M.; Walsh, K.; Webb, R.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Verbruggen, M.J.; Hill, T.; Moffett, B.; Fuerst, J.; Schouten, S.; Harris, James; Shaw, P.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply i

  7. Ubiquity of Putative Type III Secretion Genes among Clinical and Environmental Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates in Northern Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Smith-Vaughan, H C; Gal, D; Lawrie, P. M.; Winstanley, C.; Sriprakash, K S; Currie, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase-like type III secretion (TTS1) genes were present in all 116 Northern Australian Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates tested but were not detected in other common environmental Burkholderia species. PCR of TTS1 genes may prove valuable as a diagnostic test.

  8. Snapshot of Viral Infections in Wild Carnivores Reveals Ubiquity of Parvovirus and Susceptibility of Egyptian Mongoose to Feline Panleukopenia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Margarida D.; Ana Margarida Henriques; Sílvia Carla Barros; Teresa Fagulha; Paula Mendonça; Paulo Carvalho; Madalena Monteiro; Miguel Fevereiro; Basto, Mafalda P.; Luís Miguel Rosalino; Tânia Barros; Victor Bandeira; Carlos Fonseca; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2013-01-01

    The exposure of wild carnivores to viral pathogens, with emphasis on parvovirus (CPV/FPLV), was assessed based on the molecular screening of tissue samples from 128 hunted or accidentally road-killed animals collected in Portugal from 2008 to 2011, including Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon, n = 99), red fox (Vulpes vulpes, n = 19), stone marten (Martes foina, n = 3), common genet (Genetta genetta, n = 3) and Eurasian badger (Meles meles, n = 4). A high prevalence of parvovirus DNA (63%...

  9. The Ubiquity of Good Taste: A Spatial Analysis of the Craft Brewing Industry in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Neil; Mclaughlin, Ralph; Moore, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The performance and composition of the U.S. brewing industry has changed dramatically over the past three decades. The industry displays contradictory shifts in both aggregate production volume and number of firms. While aggregate beer production in the US has increased modestly, per capita production has decreased steadily since the early 1980s, dropping 26 percent between 1981 and 2011. However, the number of brewing establishments increased substantially during the same period, expanding f...

  10. Ubiquity of activated sludge ferricyanide-mediated BOD methods: a comparison of sludge seeds across wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Mark A; Welsh, David T; Teasdale, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Many studies have described alternatives to the BOD5 standard method, with substantial decreases in incubation time observed. However, most of these have not maintained the features that make the BOD5 assay so relevant - a high level of substrate bio-oxidation and use of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) sludge as the biocatalyst. Two recently described ferricyanide-mediated (FM)-BOD assays, one for trade wastes and one for WWTP influents and treated effluents, satisfy these criteria and were investigated further here for their suitability for use with diverse biocatalysts. Both FM-BOD assays responded proportionately to increasing substrate concentration with sludges from 11 different WWTPs and temporally (months to years) using sludges from a single WWTP, confirming the broad applicability of both assays. Sludges from four WWTPs were selected as biocatalysts for each FM-BOD assay to compare FM-BOD equivalent values with BOD5 (three different sludge seeds) measurements for 12 real wastewater samples (six per assay). Strong and significant relationships were established for both FM-BOD assays. This study has demonstrated that sludge sourced from many WWTPs may be used as the biocatalyst in either FM-BOD assay, as it is in the BOD5 assay. The industry potential of these findings is substantial given the widespread use of the BOD5 assay, the dramatically decreased incubation period (3-6h) and the superior analytical range of both assays compared to the standard BOD5 assay.

  11. Natural sunlight shapes crude oil-degradingbacterial communities in northern Gulf of Mexico surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando P Bacosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH spill in 2010, an enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Surface waters are characterized by intense sunlight and high temperature during summer. While the oil-degrading bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of natural sunlight on those in oil polluted surface waters remains unexplored to date. In this study, we incubated surface water from the DWH site with amendments of crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both for 36 d under natural sunlight in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bacterial community was analyzed over time for total abundance, density of alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, and community composition via pyrosequencing. Our results showed that, for treatments with oil and/or Corexit, sunlight significantly reduced bacterial diversity and evenness and was a key driver of shifts in bacterial community structure. In samples containing oil or dispersant, sunlight greatly reduced abundance of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus but increased the relative abundances of Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Labrenzia, Sandarakinotalea, Bartonella, and Halomonas. Dark samples with oil were represented by members of Thalassobius, Winogradskyella, Alcanivorax, Formosa, Pseudomonas, Eubacterium, Erythrobacter, Natronocella, and Coxiella. Both oil and Corexit inhibited the Candidatus Pelagibacter with or without sunlight exposure. For the first time, we demonstrated the effects of light in structuring microbial communities in water with oil and/or Corexit. Overall, our findings improve understanding of oil pollution in surface water, and provide unequivocal evidence that sunlight is a key factor in determining bacterial community composition and dynamics in oil polluted marine waters.

  12. Natural Sunlight Shapes Crude Oil-Degrading Bacterial Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Surface Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacosa, Hernando P; Liu, Zhanfei; Erdner, Deana L

    2015-01-01

    Following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in 2010, an enormous amount of oil was observed in the deep and surface waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Surface waters are characterized by intense sunlight and high temperature during summer. While the oil-degrading bacterial communities in the deep-sea plume have been widely investigated, the effect of natural sunlight on those in oil polluted surface waters remains unexplored to date. In this study, we incubated surface water from the DWH site with amendments of crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both for 36 days under natural sunlight in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The bacterial community was analyzed over time for total abundance, density of alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, and community composition via pyrosequencing. Our results showed that, for treatments with oil and/or Corexit, sunlight significantly reduced bacterial diversity and evenness and was a key driver of shifts in bacterial community structure. In samples containing oil or dispersant, sunlight greatly reduced abundance of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus but increased the relative abundances of Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Labrenzia, Sandarakinotalea, Bartonella, and Halomonas. Dark samples with oil were represented by members of Thalassobius, Winogradskyella, Alcanivorax, Formosa, Pseudomonas, Eubacterium, Erythrobacter, Natronocella, and Coxiella. Both oil and Corexit inhibited the Candidatus Pelagibacter with or without sunlight exposure. For the first time, we demonstrated the effects of light in structuring microbial communities in water with oil and/or Corexit. Overall, our findings improve understanding of oil pollution in surface water, and provide unequivocal evidence that sunlight is a key factor in determining bacterial community composition and dynamics in oil polluted marine waters. PMID:26648916

  13. The Microbial Community on Marine Plastic Debris: Life in the "Plastisphere"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Zettler, L. A.; Zettler, E. R.; Mincer, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Plastic debris is an abundant substrate of anthropogenic origin in the marine environment that is receiving increased attention. We documented the bacterial (V6-V4) and eukaryotic (V9) communities on open ocean plastic debris samples using 454 amplicon sequencing of small-subunit rRNA hypervariable regions and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Parametric alpha diversity measures of plastic samples showed considerable species richness comparable to the surrounding seawater with many Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) unique to the plastic substrates. We also found that while all samples contained an OTU assigned to SAR 11 (Candidatus Pelagibacter), considered to be one of most abundant heterotrophic bacteria in the ocean, this was not the most abundant OTU in our samples. Quite surprisingly, the most abundant OTU found in our polypropylene sample was an OTU assigned to the genus Vibrio. Although endemic to the marine environment, the genus Vibrio has several members that are human and animal pathogens. Our samples also included representatives from many protist groups and fungi. Sequences recovered were dominated by heterotrophs including an unidentified sequence related to colonial radiolaria and suctorian ciliates, but many photosynthetic groups including dinoflagellates, diatoms, and green, brown, and red algae were also present. SEM images revealed a complex landscape of microbes on the surface of the plastic; rich bacterial biofilms included diatoms and stalked suctorian ciliates covered with what appeared to be bacterial epibionts. The fact that these communities are distinct from the surrounding surface water suggests that plastic surfaces may serve as a unique new ecological habitat in the open ocean and warrant further investigation. We have proposed the term "Plastisphere" to describe the community of organisms closely associated with plastic debris in aquatic systems.

  14. Origin and Ubiquity of Short-Period Earth-like Planets: Evidence for the Sequential-Accretion Theory of Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, J L; Lin, D N C; Nagasawa, M

    2005-01-01

    The formation of gas giant planets is assumed to be preceded by the emergence of solid cores in the conventional sequential-accretion paradigm. This hypothesis implies that the presence of earth-like planets can be inferred from the detection of gas giants. A similar prediction cannot be made with the gravitational instability (hereafter GI) model which assumes that gas giants (hereafter giants) formed from the collapse of gas fragments analogous to their host stars. We propose an observational test for the determination of the dominant planet-formation channel. Based on the sequential-accretion (hereafter SA) model, we identify several potential avenues which may lead to the prolific formation of a population of close-in earth-mass ($M_\\oplus$) planets (hereafter close-in earths) around stars with 1) short-period or 2) solitary eccentric giants and 3) systems which contain intermediate-period resonant giants. In contrast, these close-in earths are not expected to form in systems where giants originated rapid...

  15. Rest-Frame Optical Emission Lines in z~3.5 Lyman Break selected Galaxies: The Ubiquity of Unusually High [OIII]/Hbeta Ratios at 2 Gyr

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, B P; Gonzalez, V G; Illingworth, G D; Labbe, I; Bouwens, R; Franx, M; van Dokkum, P; Spitler, L

    2014-01-01

    We present K-band spectra of rest-frame optical emission lines for 24 star-forming galaxies at z~3.2-3.7 using MOSFIRE on the Keck 1 telescope. Strong rest-frame optical [O III] and Hbeta emission lines were detected in 18 LBGs. The median flux ratio of [O III]5007 to Hbeta is 5.1+/-0.5, a factor of 5-10x higher than in local galaxies with similar stellar masses. The observed Hbeta luminosities are in good agreement with expectations from the estimated star-formation rates, and none of our sources are detected in deep X-ray stacks, ruling out significant contamination by active galactic nuclei. Combining our sample with a variety of LBGs from the literature, including 49 galaxies selected in a very similar manner, we find a high median ratio of [OIII]/Hbeta = 4.8+0.8-1.7. This high ratio seems to be an ubiquitous feature of z~3-4 LBGs, very different from typical local star-forming galaxies at similar stellar masses. The only comparable systems at z~0 are those with similarly high specific star-formation rate...

  16. Evolutionary Relationships of “Candidatus Endobugula” Bacterial Symbionts and Their Bugula Bryozoan Hosts▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lim-Fong, Grace E.; Regali, Lindsay A.; Haygood, Margo G.

    2008-01-01

    Ribosomal gene sequences were obtained from bryozoans in the genus Bugula and their bacterial symbionts; analyses of host and symbiont phylogenetic trees did not support a history of strict cospeciation. Symbiont-derived compounds known to defend host larvae from predation were only detected in two out of four symbiotic Bugula species.

  17. Assessing transmission of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ haplotypes through seed potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conflicting data has previously been reported concerning the impact of zebra chip disease transmission through seed tubers. These discrepancies may be due to the experimental design of each study, whereby different pathogen haplotypes, insect vector haplotypes, and potato plant varieties were used....

  18. DNA Barcoding for Identification of "Candidatus Phytoplasmas" Using a Fragment of the Elongation Factor Tu Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarova, Olga; Contaldo, Nicoletta; Paltrinieri, Samanta;

    2012-01-01

    /Principal Findings We designed a new set of primers and amplified a 420–444 bp fragment of tuf from all 91 phytoplasmas strains tested (16S rRNA groups -I through -VII, -IX through -XII, -XV, and -XX). Comparison of NJ trees constructed from the tuf barcode and a 1.2 kbp fragment of the 16S ribosomal gene revealed...... for identification of phytoplasmas. Our findings suggest that the tuf barcode performs as well or better than a 1.2 kbp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene and thus provides an easy procedure for phytoplasma identification. The obtained sequences were used to create a publicly available reference database that can be used...... that the tuf tree is highly congruent with the 16S rRNA tree and had higher inter- and intra- group sequence divergence. Mean K2P inter−/intra- group divergences of the tuf barcode did not overlap and had approximately one order of magnitude difference for most groups, suggesting the presence of a DNA...

  19. Hydroxylamine-dependent Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) by “ Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    KAUST Repository

    Oshiki, Mamoru

    2016-04-26

    Although metabolic pathways and associated enzymes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) of “Ca. Kuenenia stuttgartiensis” have been studied, those of other anammox bacteria are still poorly understood. NO2- reduction to NO is considered to be the first step in the anammox metabolism of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”, however, “Ca. Brocadia” lacks the genes that encode canonical NO-forming nitrite reductases (NirS or NirK) in its genome, which is different from “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”. Here, we studied the anammox metabolism of “Ca. Brocadia sinica”. 15N-tracer experiments demonstrated that “Ca. B. sinica” cells could reduce NO2- to NH2OH, instead of NO, with as yet unidentified nitrite reductase(s). Furthermore, N2H4 synthesis, downstream reaction of NO2- reduction, was investigated using a purified “Ca. B. sinica” hydrazine synthase (Hzs) and intact cells. Both the “Ca. B. sinica” Hzs and cells utilized NH2OH and NH4+, but not NO and NH4+, for N2H4 synthesis and further oxidized N2H4 to N2 gas. Taken together, the metabolic pathway of “Ca. B. sinica” is NH2OH-dependent and different from the one of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”, indicating metabolic diversity of anammox bacteria. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Is the striped mealybug, Ferrisia virgata, a vector of huanglongbing bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first report of ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ (Las) present in striped mealybugs feeding on Las-infected periwinkle plants. In November 2010, specimens of a common greenhouse pest, the striped mealybug Ferrisia virgata (Cockerell) (Pseudococcidae; Hemiptera), were collected from Las-infected periw...

  1. [The occurrence of "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemolamae" infections in clinically asymptomatic South American Camelids in Austria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Sonja; Spergser, Joachim; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Stanitznig, Anna; Lambacher, Bianca; Tichy, Alexander; Wittek, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Reports of CMhl infections in South American Camelids in Europe are only available from the United Kingdom and Switzerland. Knowing that CMhl infections can lead to severe disease resulting in death if combined with other diseases or stress, it was the aim of this study to assess prevalence data from camelids in Austria. In comparison to the previous studies a representative number of camelids was investigated nationwide. Data were assessed due to differences in geographical region, age, sex, species, and origin. A relatively high prevalence of 25.8% was recorded. CMhl was detected significantly more often in alpacas (Vicunja pacos) than in llamas (Lama glama) and more frequently in animals younger than 2 years. Additionally regional differences have been observed, which might be due to climatic differences and/or variations in insect vectors. In this study apperantly clinical healthy animals were shown to be infected with CMhl. Camelids infected with CMhl are a pathogen reservoir. The results of this study indicate different risk levels of infection between llamas and alpacas and between younger and older animals. The data presented underline the necessity of further studies on CMhlI infections in South American Camelids.

  2. DNA barcoding for identification of 'Candidatus Phytoplasmas' using a fragment of the elongation factor Tu gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phytoplasmas are bacterial phytopathogens responsible for significant losses in agricultural production worldwide. Several molecular markers are available for identification of groups or strains of phytoplasmas. However, they often cannot be used for identification of phytoplasmas from different groups simultaneously or are too long for routine diagnostics. DNA barcoding recently emerged as a convenient tool for species identification. Here, the development of a universal DNA barcode based on the elongation factor Tu (tuf gene for phytoplasma identification is reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a new set of primers and amplified a 420-444 bp fragment of tuf from all 91 phytoplasmas strains tested (16S rRNA groups -I through -VII, -IX through -XII, -XV, and -XX. Comparison of NJ trees constructed from the tuf barcode and a 1.2 kbp fragment of the 16S ribosomal gene revealed that the tuf tree is highly congruent with the 16S rRNA tree and had higher inter- and intra- group sequence divergence. Mean K2P inter-/intra- group divergences of the tuf barcode did not overlap and had approximately one order of magnitude difference for most groups, suggesting the presence of a DNA barcoding gap. The use of the tuf barcode allowed separation of main ribosomal groups and most of their subgroups. Phytoplasma tuf barcodes were deposited in the NCBI GenBank and Q-bank databases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that DNA barcoding principles can be applied for identification of phytoplasmas. Our findings suggest that the tuf barcode performs as well or better than a 1.2 kbp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene and thus provides an easy procedure for phytoplasma identification. The obtained sequences were used to create a publicly available reference database that can be used by plant health services and researchers for online phytoplasma identification.

  3. Candidatus Phytoplasma malaysianum, a novel taxon associated with virescence and phyllody of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study addressed the taxonomic position and group classification of a phytoplasma responsible for virescence and phyllody symptoms in naturally diseased Madagascar periwinkle plants in western Malaysia. Unique regions in the 16S rRNA gene from the Malaysian periwinkle virescence (MaPV) phytopla...

  4. Novel Candidatus rickettsia species detected in nostril tick from human, Gabon, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Velez, Rogelio; Palomar, Ana M; Oteo, José A; Norman, Francesca F; Pérez-Molina, José A; Portillo, Aránzazu

    2015-02-01

    We report the identification of a nymphal nostril tick (Amblyomma sp.) from a national park visitor in Gabon and subsequent molecular detection and characterization of tickborne bacteria. Our findings provide evidence of a potentially new Rickettsia sp. circulating in Africa and indicate that tick bites may pose a risk to persons visiting parks in the region.

  5. Characterization of an ATP translocase identified in the plant pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATP/ADP translocases allow for the transport of ATP across a lipid bilayer, which is normally impermeable to this molecule due to its size and charge. These transport proteins appear to be unique to mitochondria, plant plastids, and obligate-intracellular bacteria. Of the bacterial ATP/ADP translo...

  6. Metabolic model for the filamentous ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella’ based on genomic and metagenomic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Kristiansen, Rikke; Albertsen, Mads;

    2013-01-01

    acids as triacylglycerols. Utilisation of trehalose and/or polyphosphate stores or partial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids may supply the energy required for anaerobic lipid uptake and storage. Comparing the genome sequence of this isolate with metagenomes from two full-scale wastewater treatment...

  7. Candidatus Competibacter’-lineage genomes retrieved from metagenomes reveal functional metabolic diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Albertsen, Mads; Andresen, Eva Kammer;

    2014-01-01

    anaerobic-‘feast’: aerobic-‘famine’ regime of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) wastewater treatment systems. As they do not contribute to phosphorus (P) removal, but compete for resources with the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO), thought responsible for P removal, their proliferation...... as for denitrification, nitrogen fixation, fermentation, trehalose synthesis and utilisation of glucose and lactate. Genetic comparison of P metabolism pathways with sequenced PAOs revealed the absence of the Pit phosphate transporter in the Competibacter-lineage genomes—identifying a key metabolic difference...... with the PAO physiology. These genomes are the first from any GAO organism and provide new insights into the complex interaction and niche competition between PAOs and GAOs in EBPR systems....

  8. Effect of temperature on denitrifying methanotrophic activity of 'Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, C.; Piai, L.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, B.G.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    The activity of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria at 11-30 degrees C was assessed in short-term experiments. The aim was to determine the feasibility of applying denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in low-temperature anaerobic wastewater treatment. This study showed that biomass enriched at 21 d

  9. Relación entre Bactericera cockerelli y presencia de Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous en lotes comerciales de papa Relation between Bactericera cockerelli and presence of Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous in commercial fields of potato

    OpenAIRE

    Oswaldo Ángel Rubio-Covarrubias; Isidro Humberto Almeyda-León; Mateo Armando Cadena-Hinojosa; René Lobato-Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    La brotación anormal de los tubérculos (sin brotes o brotes ahilados) y el pardeamiento interno de los tubérculos, son síntomas de una enfermedad que está afectando la producción de papa en México, en el suroeste de Estados Unidos y América central. Esta enfermedad ha sido asociada con el psilido de la papa Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. Con el objetivo de dilucidar las causas de esta enfermedad, en 2007 se llevó a cabo un muestreo en 11 lotes comerciales de papa localizados en un transecto alt...

  10. Excitation Emission Matrix Spectra (EEMS) of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced during Microbial Incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, N.; Nelson, N. B.; Parsons, R.

    2013-12-01

    can be linked to this bacterial production. FISH analysis showed percentage abundance of Pelagibacter ubique (SAR 11) and of Alteromonas. On-going and future work will ascertain if specific microbial communities produce CDOM more readily than others, and if these different populations produce varying fluorescence peaks, thus indicating a range of chromophoric groups being produced by bacteria. An additional suite of probes will be used for further FISH analysis to identify percentages of other populations, and seasonal/temporal variations will be investigated.

  11. Genetic transformation of sweet orange to overexpress a CsPR-8 gene aiming for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus resistance

    OpenAIRE

    MOURÃO FILHO F.A.A.; Stipp, L. C.L.; Beltrame, A. B.; Boscariol-Camargo, R. L.; Harakava, R.; B.M.J. Mendes

    2014-01-01

    A strategy to produce HLB-resistant citrus using genetic engineering is the overexpression of genes identified in the citrus genome. Plants respond to pathogen attacks by producing several pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Therefore, individual PR overexpression in transgenic plants can lead to an increased resistance. In this study, we have chosen to use one PR-8 isoform cloned from Citrus sinensis (CsPR-8). The PR-8 is an endochitinase that also has lysozyme activity, to be potentially us...

  12. The giant ciliate Zoothamnium niveum and its thiotrophic epibiont Candidatus Thiobios zoothamnicoli: a model system to study interspecies cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eBright

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Symbioses between chemoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing (thiotrophic bacteria and protists or animals are among the most diverse and prevalent in the ocean. They are extremely difficult to maintain in aquaria and no thiotrophic symbiosis involving an animal host has ever been successfully cultivated. In contrast, we have cultivated the giant ciliate Zoothamnium niveum and its obligate ectosymbiont Cand. Thiobios zoothamnicoli in small flow-through aquaria. This review provides an overview of the host and the symbiont and their phylogenetic relationships. We summarize our knowledge on the ecology, geographic distribution and life cycle of the host, on the vertical transmission of the symbiont, and on the cultivation of this symbiosis. We then discuss the benefits and costs involved in this cooperation compared with other thiotrophic symbioses and outline our view on the evolution and persistence of this byproduct mutualism.

  13. Tissue localization of the endosymbiotic bacterium "Candidatus Blochmannia floridanus" in adults and larvae of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Christina; Dudaczek, Dieter; Hölldobler, Bert; Gross, Roy

    2002-09-01

    The distribution of endosymbiotic bacteria in different tissues of queens, males, and workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus was investigated by light and electron microscopy and by in situ hybridization. A large number of bacteria could be detected in bacteriocytes within the midguts of workers, young virgin queens, and males. Large amounts of bacteria were also found in the oocytes of workers and queens. In contrast, bacteria were not present in oocyte-associated cells or in the spermathecae of mature queens, although occasionally a small number of bacteria could be detected in the testis follicles of males. Interestingly, the number of bacteriocytes in mature queens was strongly reduced and the bacteriocytes contained only very few or no bacteria at all, although the endosymbionts were present in huge amounts in the ovaries of the same animals. During embryogenesis of the deposited egg, the bacteria were concentrated in a ring of endodermal tissue destined to become the midgut in later developmental stages. However, during larval development, bacteria could also be detected in other tissues although to a lesser extent. Only in the last-instar larvae were bacteria found exclusively in the midgut tissue within typical bacteriocytes. Tetracycline and rifampin efficiently cleansed C. floridanus workers of their symbionts and the bacteriocytes of these animals still remained empty several months after treatment had ceased. Despite the lack of their endosymbionts, these adult animals were able to survive without any obvious negative effect under normal cultivation conditions. PMID:12200264

  14. A microdiversity study of anammox bacteria reveals a novel Candidatus Scalindua phylotype in marine oxygen minimum zones

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Woebken, D.; Lam, P.; Kuypers, M.M.M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Kartal, B.; Strous, M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Fuchs, B.M.; Amann, R.

    Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Environmental Microbiology, 10, 3106–3119 specific for the ‘Scalindua 2 cluster’: Probe Sarabica292 (5′-CCG ACC ATC CTC TTA AAC-3′) which should be used together with competitor Comp Sarabica292 (5′- CCG ACC ATC CTC... stream_size 64058 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Environ_Microbiol_10_3106.pdf.txt stream_source_info Environ_Microbiol_10_3106.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 A...

  15. Tissue-associated "Candidatus Mycoplasma corallicola" and Filamentous bacteria on the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Scleractinia)

    OpenAIRE

    Neulinger, Sven; Gärtner, Andrea; Järnegren, J.; Ludvigsen, M; Lochte, Karin; Dullo, Wolf-Christian

    2009-01-01

    The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Scleractinia, Caryophylliidae) is a key species in the formation of cold-water reefs, which are among the most diverse deep-sea ecosystems. It occurs in two color varieties: white and red. Bacterial communities associated with Lophelia have been investigated in recent years, but the role of the associated bacteria remains largely obscure. This study uses catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect the in situ location of sp...

  16. Phylogeny and FISH probe analysis of the “Candidatus Competibacter”-lineage in wastewater treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nittami, Tadashi; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Kanai, Eri;

    for storing carbon as polyhydroxyalkanoates appears key to their success. The novel family was divided into 12 individual clades with new FISH probes designed to cover these. Interestingly, FISH analyses in full-scale EBPR plants reveal that clade members were always found to co-exist in EBPR, indicating...

  17. Distribution of the Primary Endosymbiont (Candidatus Uzinura Diaspidicola Within Host Insects from the Scale Insect Family Diaspididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Dittmar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that armored scale insects harbor endosymbiotic bacteria inside specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Originally, these endosymbionts were thought to be fungal symbionts but they are now known to be bacterial and have been named Uzinura diaspidicola. Bacteriocyte and endosymbiont distribution patterns within host insects were visualized using in situ hybridization via 16S rRNA specific probes. Images of scale insect embryos, eggs and adult scale insects show patterns of localized bacteriocytes in embryos and randomly distributed bacteriocytes in adults. The symbiont pocket was not found in the armored scale insect eggs that were tested. The pattern of dispersed bacteriocytes in adult scale insects suggest that Uzinura and Blattabacteria may share some homologous traits that coincide with similar life style requirements, such as dispersal in fat bodies and uric acid recycling.

  18. Distribution of the Primary Endosymbiont (Candidatus Uzinura Diaspidicola) Within Host Insects from the Scale Insect Family Diaspididae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwell, Matthew E; Flarhety, Meghan; Dittmar, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    It has long been known that armored scale insects harbor endosymbiotic bacteria inside specialized cells called bacteriocytes. Originally, these endosymbionts were thought to be fungal symbionts but they are now known to be bacterial and have been named Uzinura diaspidicola. Bacteriocyte and endosymbiont distribution patterns within host insects were visualized using in situ hybridization via 16S rRNA specific probes. Images of scale insect embryos, eggs and adult scale insects show patterns of localized bacteriocytes in embryos and randomly distributed bacteriocytes in adults. The symbiont pocket was not found in the armored scale insect eggs that were tested. The pattern of dispersed bacteriocytes in adult scale insects suggest that Uzinura and Blattabacteria may share some homologous traits that coincide with similar life style requirements, such as dispersal in fat bodies and uric acid recycling.

  19. Candidatus Phytoplasma hispanicum’, a novel taxon associated with Mexican periwinkle virescence disease of Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexican periwinkle virescence (MPV) phytoplasma was originally discovered in diseased plants of Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) in Yucatán, Mexico. On the basis of results from RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MPV was previously classified as the first know...

  20. Molecular detection of Candidatus Scalindua pacifica and environmental responses of sediment anammox bacterial community in the Bohai Sea, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyue Dang

    Full Text Available The Bohai Sea is a large semi-enclosed shallow water basin, which receives extensive river discharges of various terrestrial and anthropogenic materials such as sediments, nutrients and contaminants. How these terrigenous inputs may influence the diversity, community structure, biogeographical distribution, abundance and ecophysiology of the sediment anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox bacteria was unknown. To answer this question, an investigation employing both 16S rRNA and hzo gene biomarkers was carried out. Ca. Scalindua bacteria were predominant in the surface sediments of the Bohai Sea, while non-Scalindua anammox bacteria were also detected in the Yellow River estuary and inner part of Liaodong Bay that received strong riverine and anthropogenic impacts. A novel 16S rRNA gene sequence clade was identified, putatively representing an anammox bacterial new candidate species tentatively named "Ca. Scalindua pacifica". Several groups of environmental factors, usually with distinct physicochemical or biogeochemical natures, including general marine and estuarine physicochemical properties, availability of anammox substrates (inorganic N compounds, alternative reductants and oxidants, environmental variations caused by river discharges and associated contaminants such as heavy metals, were identified to likely play important roles in influencing the ecology and biogeochemical functioning of the sediment anammox bacteria. In addition to inorganic N compounds that might play a key role in shaping the anammox microbiota, organic carbon, organic nitrogen, sulfate, sulfide and metals all showed the potentials to participate in the anammox process, releasing the strict dependence of the anammox bacteria upon the direct availability of inorganic N nutrients that might be limiting in certain areas of the Bohai Sea. The importance of inorganic N nutrients and certain other environmental factors to the sediment anammox microbiota suggests that these bacteria were active for the in situ N transforming process and maintained a versatile life style well adapted to the varying environmental conditions of the studied coastal ocean.

  1. Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis”: A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel;

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater...

  2. Survey of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in carrot crops affected by the psyllid Trioza apicalis (Hemiptera: Triozidae) in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The carrot psyllid Trioza apicalis Förster (Hemiptera: Triozidae) is a serious insect pest of carrot (Daucus carota L.) in northern Europe, where it can cause up to 100% crop loss. Although it was long believed that T. apicalis causes damage to carrot by injection of toxins into the plant, it was re...

  3. Economic justification for quarantine status – the case study of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soliman, T.A.A.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Werf, van der W.

    2013-01-01

    International agreements on plant health and trade require that regulating a pest should be justified by economic impact assessment. Economic impact assessments are usually qualitative, weakening the objective and transparency of the regulation decision. This study assessed the potential economic im

  4. Tissue localization of the endosymbiotic bacterium "Candidatus Blochmannia floridanus" in adults and larvae of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Christina; Dudaczek, Dieter; Hölldobler, Bert; Gross, Roy

    2002-09-01

    The distribution of endosymbiotic bacteria in different tissues of queens, males, and workers of the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus was investigated by light and electron microscopy and by in situ hybridization. A large number of bacteria could be detected in bacteriocytes within the midguts of workers, young virgin queens, and males. Large amounts of bacteria were also found in the oocytes of workers and queens. In contrast, bacteria were not present in oocyte-associated cells or in the spermathecae of mature queens, although occasionally a small number of bacteria could be detected in the testis follicles of males. Interestingly, the number of bacteriocytes in mature queens was strongly reduced and the bacteriocytes contained only very few or no bacteria at all, although the endosymbionts were present in huge amounts in the ovaries of the same animals. During embryogenesis of the deposited egg, the bacteria were concentrated in a ring of endodermal tissue destined to become the midgut in later developmental stages. However, during larval development, bacteria could also be detected in other tissues although to a lesser extent. Only in the last-instar larvae were bacteria found exclusively in the midgut tissue within typical bacteriocytes. Tetracycline and rifampin efficiently cleansed C. floridanus workers of their symbionts and the bacteriocytes of these animals still remained empty several months after treatment had ceased. Despite the lack of their endosymbionts, these adult animals were able to survive without any obvious negative effect under normal cultivation conditions.

  5. Vector competence of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, for the recently recognized Lyme borreliosis spirochete Candidatus Borrelia mayonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Marc C; Hojgaard, Andrias; Hoxmeier, J Charles; Replogle, Adam J; Respicio-Kingry, Laurel B; Sexton, Christopher; Williams, Martin A; Pritt, Bobbi S; Schriefer, Martin E; Eisen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    A novel species within the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex, provisionally named Borrelia mayonii, was recently found to be associated with Lyme borreliosis in the Upper Midwest of the United States. Moreover, B. mayonii was detected from host-seeking Ixodes scapularis, the primary vector of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto in the eastern United States. We therefore conducted a study to confirm the experimental vector competence of I. scapularis for B. mayonii (strain MN14-1420), using colony ticks originating from adults collected in Connecticut and CD-1 white mice. Larvae fed on mice 10 weeks after needle-inoculation with B. mayonii acquired spirochetes and maintained infection through the nymphal stage at an average rate of 12.9%. In a transmission experiment, 40% of naïve mice exposed to a single infected nymph developed viable infections, as compared with 87% of mice fed upon by 2-3 infected nymphs. Transmission of B. mayonii by one or more feeding infected nymphs was uncommon up to 48h after attachment (one of six mice developed viable infection) but occurred frequently when nymphs were allowed to remain attached for 72-96h or feed to completion (11 of 16 mice developed viable infection). Mice infected via tick bite maintained viable infection with B. mayonii, as determined by ear biopsy culture, for at least 28 weeks. Our results demonstrate that I. scapularis is capable of serving as a vector of B. mayonii. This finding, together with data showing that field-collected I. scapularis are infected with B. mayonii, indicate that I. scapularis likely is a primary vector to humans of this recently recognized Lyme borreliosis spirochete. PMID:26922324

  6. Rest-frame Optical Emission Lines in z ˜ 3.5 Lyman-break-selected Galaxies: The Ubiquity of Unusually High [OIII]/Hβ Ratios at 2 Gyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, B. P.; Oesch, P. A.; González, V. G.; Illingworth, G. D.; Labbé, I.; Bouwens, R.; Franx, M.; van Dokkum, P.; Spitler, L.

    2016-03-01

    We present K-band spectra of rest-frame optical emission lines for 24 star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 3.2-3.7 using MOSFIRE on the Keck I telescope. Strong rest-frame optical [O iii] and Hβ emission lines were detected in 18 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs). The median flux ratio of [O iii]λ5007 to Hβ is {5.1}-0.5+0.5. This is a factor of 5-10 times higher than in local galaxies with similar stellar masses. None of our sources are detected in deep X-ray stacks, ruling out significant contamination by active galactic nuclei. Combining our sample with a variety of LBGs from the literature, including 49 galaxies selected in a very similar manner, we find a high median ratio of [O iii]/Hβ = {4.8}-1.7+0.8. This high ratio seems to be a ubiquitous feature of z ˜ 3-4 LBGs, very different from typical local star-forming galaxies at similar stellar masses. The only comparable systems at z ˜ 0 are those with similarly high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), though ˜5 times lower stellar masses. High SSFRs may result in a higher ionization parameter, higher electron density, or harder ionizing radiation, which, combined different elemental abundances, result in a much higher [O iii]/Hβ line ratio. This implies a strong relation between a global property of a galaxy, the SSFR, and the local conditions of ISM in star-forming regions. Partially based on data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope operated by AURA, Inc. for NASA under contract NAS5-26555. Partially based on observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  7. High-temperature EBPR process: the performance, analysis of PAOs and GAOs and the fine-scale population study of Candidatus "Accumulibacter phosphatis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ying Hui; Chua, Adeline Seak May; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Ngoh, Gek Cheng; Shoji, Tadashi; Michinaka, Atsuko

    2014-11-01

    The applicability of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process for the removal of phosphorus in warm climates is uncertain due to frequent reports of EBPR deterioration at temperature higher than 25 °C. Nevertheless, a recent report on a stable and efficient EBPR process at 28 °C has inspired the present study to examine the performance of EBPR at 24 °C-32 °C, as well as the PAOs and GAOs involved, in greater detail. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated for EBPR in parallel at different temperatures, i.e., SBR-1 at 28 °C and SBR-2 first at 24 °C and subsequently at 32 °C. Both SBRs exhibited high phosphorus removal efficiencies at all three temperatures and produced effluents with phosphorus concentrations less than 1.0 mg/L during the steady state of reactor operation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed Accumulibacter-PAOs comprised 64% of the total bacterial population at 24 °C, 43% at 28 °C and 19% at 32 °C. Based on fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), the abundance of Competibacter-GAOs at both 24 °C and 28 °C was rather low (<10%), while it accounted for 40% of the total bacterial population at 32 °C. However, the smaller Accumulibacter population and larger population of Competibacter at 32 °C did not deteriorate the phosphorus removal performance. A polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1)-based qPCR analysis on all studied EBPR processes detected only Accumulibacter clade IIF. The Accumulibacter population shown by 16S rRNA and ppk1 was not significantly different. This finding confirmed the existence of single clade IIF in the processes and the specificity of the clade IIF primer sets designed in this study. Habitat filtering related to temperature could have contributed to the presence of a unique clade. The clade IIF was hypothesised to be able to perform the EBPR activity at high temperatures. The clade's robustness most likely helps it to fit the high-temperature EBPR sludge best and allows it not only to outcompete other Accumulibacter clades but coexist with GAOs without compromising EBPR activity. PMID:25046374

  8. Carbon and sulfur cycling below the chemocline in a meromictic lake and the identification of a novel taxonomic lineage in the FCB superphylum, Candidatus Aegiribacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinity L Hamilton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mahoney Lake in British Columbia is an extreme meromictic system with unusually high levels of sulfate and sulfide present in the water column. As is common in strongly stratified lakes, Mahoney Lake hosts a dense, sulfide-oxidizing phototrophic microbial community where light reaches the chemocline. Below this ‘plate’, the euxinic hypolimnion is anoxic, eutrophic, saline, and rich in sulfide, polysulfides, elemental sulfur, and other sulfur intermediates. While much is known regarding microbial communities in sunlit portions of euxinic systems, the composition and genetic potential of organisms living at aphotic depths have rarely been studied. Metagenomic sequencing of samples from the hypolimnion and the underlying sediments of Mahoney Lake indicate that multiple taxa contribute to sulfate reduction below the chemocline and that the hypolimnion and sediments each support distinct populations of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB different from the SRB populations observed in the chemocline. After assembling and binning the metagenomic datasets, we recovered near-complete genomes of dominant populations, including two Deltaproteobacteria. One of the deltaproteobacterial genomes encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the sulfur-disproportionating genus Dissulfuribacter and the other encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the fatty acid- and aromatic acid-degrading genus Syntrophus. We also recovered two near-complete genomes of Firmicutes species. Analysis of concatenated ribosomal protein trees suggests these genomes are most closely related to extremely alkaliphilic genera Alkaliphilus and Dethiobacter. Our metagenomic data indicate that these Firmicutes contribute to carbon cycling below the chemocline. Lastly, we recovered a nearly complete genome from the sediment metagenome which represents a new genus within the FCB (Fibrobacteres, Chlorobi, Bacteroidetes super phylum. Consistent with the geochemical data, we found little or no evidence for organisms capable of sulfide oxidation in the aphotic zone below the chemocline. Instead, comparison of functional genes below the chemocline are consistent with recovery of multiple populations capable of reducing oxidized sulfur. Our data support previous observations that at least some of the sulfide necessary to support the dense population of phototrophs in the chemocline is supplied from sulfate reduction in the hypolimnion and sediments. These studies provide key insights

  9. First report of ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris’ subgroup 16SrI-A associated with a disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of little leaf, witches’-broom, and abnormally small and deformed potatoes, suggestive of possible phytoplasmal infection, were observed in diseased potato (Solanum tuberosum var. Hannibal arba Kestrel) in the Vilnius region of Lithuania. DNA extracted from symptomatic leaves and shoots we...

  10. High-temperature EBPR process: the performance, analysis of PAOs and GAOs and the fine-scale population study of Candidatus "Accumulibacter phosphatis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ying Hui; Chua, Adeline Seak May; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Ngoh, Gek Cheng; Shoji, Tadashi; Michinaka, Atsuko

    2014-11-01

    The applicability of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process for the removal of phosphorus in warm climates is uncertain due to frequent reports of EBPR deterioration at temperature higher than 25 °C. Nevertheless, a recent report on a stable and efficient EBPR process at 28 °C has inspired the present study to examine the performance of EBPR at 24 °C-32 °C, as well as the PAOs and GAOs involved, in greater detail. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated for EBPR in parallel at different temperatures, i.e., SBR-1 at 28 °C and SBR-2 first at 24 °C and subsequently at 32 °C. Both SBRs exhibited high phosphorus removal efficiencies at all three temperatures and produced effluents with phosphorus concentrations less than 1.0 mg/L during the steady state of reactor operation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) revealed Accumulibacter-PAOs comprised 64% of the total bacterial population at 24 °C, 43% at 28 °C and 19% at 32 °C. Based on fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH), the abundance of Competibacter-GAOs at both 24 °C and 28 °C was rather low (temperature could have contributed to the presence of a unique clade. The clade IIF was hypothesised to be able to perform the EBPR activity at high temperatures. The clade's robustness most likely helps it to fit the high-temperature EBPR sludge best and allows it not only to outcompete other Accumulibacter clades but coexist with GAOs without compromising EBPR activity.

  11. Candidatus Phytoplasma palmicola’, a novel taxon associated with a lethal yellowing-type disease (LYD) of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, the taxonomic position and group classification of the phytoplasma associated with a lethal yellowing-type disease (LYD) of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) in Mozambique were addressed. Pairwise sequence similarity values based on alignment of near full-length 16SrRNA genes (1530 bp) reve...

  12. Characterization of Xiphinema americanum group species (Nematoda: Dorylaimida) and co-evolution of bacteria from the genus ‘Candidatus Xiphinematobacter’ with these nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Xiphinema americanum group contains over two-dozen different species of nematode. They are economically important because they vector nepoviruses, which cause damage to several crops. Taxonomic differentiation among species of the X. americanum complex is problematic because many of the species ...

  13. Seed transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus in periwinkle and dodder resulted in low bacterial titer and very mild disease in periwinkle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is the most widely-distributed of three species of Liberibacter that are associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), a lethal disease of citrus worldwide. In addition to citrus, periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) and dodder (Cuscuta pentagona) are two experime...

  14. First report of sweet cherry virescence disease in China and its association with infection by a ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma ziziphi’-related strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) is a deciduous tree originating in the Black Sea/Caspian Sea region where Asia and Europe converge. Being highly valued for its timber and fruit, sweet cherry has been cultivated and naturalized on all continents. Over the past decade, the area of sweet cherry culti...

  15. Genome Sequence of Candidatus Riesia pediculischaeffi, Endosymbiont of Chimpanzee Lice, and Genomic Comparison of Recently Acquired Endosymbionts from Human and Chimpanzee Lice

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Bret M.; Allen, Julie M; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Reed, David L

    2014-01-01

    The obligate-heritable endosymbionts of insects possess some of the smallest known bacterial genomes. This is likely due to loss of genomic material during symbiosis. The mode and rate of this erosion may change over evolutionary time: faster in newly formed associations and slower in long-established ones. The endosymbionts of human and anthropoid primate lice present a unique opportunity to study genome erosion in newly established (or young) symbionts. This is because we have a detailed ph...

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Candidatus Methanomethyllophilus sp. 1R26m -Enriched from Bovine Rumen, a Methanogenic Archaeon Belonging to the Methanomassiliicoccales Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noel, Samantha Joan; Højberg, Ole; Urich, T.;

    2016-01-01

    Olsenella scatoligenes SK9K4(T) is a strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from pig feces that produces the malodorous compounds 3-methylindole (skatole) and 4-methylphenol (p-cresol). Here, we report the 2.47 Mbp draft genome sequence of SK9K4(T), exploring pathways for the synthesis of skatole...... and p-cresol from the amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, respectively....

  17. Carbon and Sulfur Cycling below the Chemocline in a Meromictic Lake and the Identification of a Novel Taxonomic Lineage in the FCB Superphylum, Candidatus Aegiribacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Bovee, Roderick J; Sattin, Sarah R; Mohr, Wiebke; Gilhooly, William P; Lyons, Timothy W; Pearson, Ann; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Mahoney Lake in British Columbia is an extreme meromictic system with unusually high levels of sulfate and sulfide present in the water column. As is common in strongly stratified lakes, Mahoney Lake hosts a dense, sulfide-oxidizing phototrophic microbial community where light reaches the chemocline. Below this "plate," the euxinic hypolimnion is anoxic, eutrophic, saline, and rich in sulfide, polysulfides, elemental sulfur, and other sulfur intermediates. While much is known regarding microbial communities in sunlit portions of euxinic systems, the composition and genetic potential of organisms living at aphotic depths have rarely been studied. Metagenomic sequencing of samples from the hypolimnion and the underlying sediments of Mahoney Lake indicate that multiple taxa contribute to sulfate reduction below the chemocline and that the hypolimnion and sediments each support distinct populations of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) that differ from the SRB populations observed in the chemocline. After assembling and binning the metagenomic datasets, we recovered near-complete genomes of dominant populations including two Deltaproteobacteria. One of the deltaproteobacterial genomes encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the sulfur-disproportionating genus Dissulfuribacter and the other encoded a 16S rRNA sequence that was most closely related to the fatty acid- and aromatic acid-degrading genus Syntrophus. We also recovered two near-complete genomes of Firmicutes species. Analysis of concatenated ribosomal protein trees suggests these genomes are most closely related to extremely alkaliphilic genera Alkaliphilus and Dethiobacter. Our metagenomic data indicate that these Firmicutes contribute to carbon cycling below the chemocline. Lastly, we recovered a nearly complete genome from the sediment metagenome which represents a new genus within the FCB (Fibrobacteres, Chlorobi, Bacteroidetes) superphylum. Consistent with the geochemical data, we found little or no evidence for organisms capable of sulfide oxidation in the aphotic zone below the chemocline. Instead, comparison of functional genes below the chemocline are consistent with recovery of multiple populations capable of reducing oxidized sulfur. Our data support previous observations that at least some of the sulfide necessary to support the dense population of phototrophs in the chemocline is supplied from sulfate reduction in the hypolimnion and sediments. These studies provide key insights regarding the taxonomic and functional diversity within a euxinic environment and highlight the complexity of biogeochemical carbon and sulfur cycling necessary to maintain euxinia. PMID:27199928

  18. Use of digital PCR to improve early detection of CLas infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing is a devastating disease of citrus caused by the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Huanglongbing has devastated the Florida citrus industry and is threatening citrus in Texas and California. Detection of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus infections as early as possible is ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-05-0051 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-05-0051 ref|YP_903576.1| nicotinate (nicotinamide) nucleotide adenylyltransferase [Candidatus Ruth...adenylyltransferase [Candidatus Ruthia magnifica str. Cm (Calyptogena magnifica)] YP_903576.1 1.1 34% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-06-0046 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-06-0046 ref|YP_903576.1| nicotinate (nicotinamide) nucleotide adenylyltransferase [Candidatus Ruth...adenylyltransferase [Candidatus Ruthia magnifica str. Cm (Calyptogena magnifica)] YP_903576.1 1.1 34% ...

  1. Suspended sludge and biofilm shaped different anammox communities in two pilot-scale one-stage anammox reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bingyu; Zhang, Liang; Guo, Jianhua; Zhang, Shujun; Yang, Anming; Peng, Yongzhen

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and diversity of anammox bacteria was investigated in two pilot-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactors treating high ammonium wastewater. Reactor A was inoculated with nitrifying sludge, while Reactor B was inoculated with suspended anammox sludge with the dominant anammox bacteria of Candidatus 'Kuenenia'. After 180days' operation, the predominate anammox bacteria was Candidatus 'Brocadia' (65%) in the biofilm, while Candidatus 'Kuenenia' (86%) outcompeted with other anammox bacteria in suspended sludge in Reactor A. Candidatus 'Kuenenia' were dominated in suspended sludge through the entire experiment in Reactor B. In contrast, the predominated species shifted from Candidatus 'Kuenenia' (89%) into Candidatus 'Brocadia' (66%) in the biofilm of Reactor B. This study indicated that Candidatus 'Brocadia' preferred to grow in the biofilm, while Candidatus 'Kuenenia' would dominant over other anammox bacteria in the suspended sludge. Further studies are required to identify the internal factors affecting the distribution of anammox bacteria. PMID:27023382

  2. Hemoplasma prevalence and hematological abnormalities associated with infection in three different cat populations from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pires dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three hemoplasma species are recognized in domestic cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis, ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’. We report the prevalence and hematological abnormalities of hemoplasma infection in 369 domestic cats from three different populations (blood donors, hospitalized cats and shelter cats from Southern Brazil. Complete blood counts were performed at the time of blood collection, and DNA was extracted and tested by conventional PCR for each hemoplasma species. A total of 79 samples (21.40% were positive for at least one species. The most prevalent hemoplasma was ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’, with 50/369 (13.55% positive cats, followed by ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’, 10/369 (2.71%, and Mycoplasma haemofelis, 8/369 (2.16%. Mycoplasma haemofelis and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ coinfection was observed in 4/369 (1.08%, whereas ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’ in 5/369 (1.35%. Three cats (0.81% were infected with all three hemoplasmas. There was no association between infection and the different populations. Anemia was associated with Mycoplasma haemofelis and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’, but not with ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’. Male cats and cats with outdoor access were more likely to be infected. Although ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ is believed to cause minimal or no hematological alterations, the infected cats studied herein were more likely to be anemic.

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12057-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |pid:none) Candidatus Endobugula sertula BryS... 57 2e-06 DQ176595_1( DQ176595 |pid:none) Monascus pilosus ...monacolin K biosy... 57 2e-06 DQ889941_1( DQ889941 |pid:none) Candidatus Endobugu...51142 circu... 56 3e-06 EF032014_5( EF032014 |pid:none) Candidatus Endobugula sertula BryS... 56 3e-06 CP001

  4. 'Candidatus Phytoplasmas pruni', a novel taxon associated with X-disease of stone fruits, Prunus spp.: multilocus characterization based on 16S rRNA, secY, and ribosomal protein genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-disease is one of the most serious diseases known in peach (Prunus persica). Based on RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, peach X-disease phytoplasma strains from eastern and western United States and eastern Canada were classified in 16S rDNA RFLP group 16SrIII, subgroup A. Phylogenetic a...

  5. Metabolic Interplay between the Asian citrus psyllid and its Profftella symbiont: An Achilles’ heel of the citrus greening insect vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), the bacterial pathogen associated with citrus greening disease, is transmitted by Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid. Interactions among D. citri and its microbial endosymbionts, including ‘Candidatus Profftella armatura’, are likely to impact tra...

  6. Dicty_cDB: SSJ472 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _4( DQ889941 |pid:none) Candidatus Endobugula sertula isol... 32 5.1 EF032014_8( ...EF032014 |pid:none) Candidatus Endobugula sertula BryS... 32 6.7 protein update 2009. 2. 1 PSORT psg: 0.75 g

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-0194 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yltransferase [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] gb|ACQ67332.1| UDP-3-O-(3-hydroxym...yristoyl)-glucosamine N-acyltransferase [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] YP_002923480.1 0.58 29% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-11-0019 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available (LIV-II) (LIVCS family) [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] gb|ACQ67379.1| branched...-chain amino acid transport system II (LIV-II) (LIVCS family) [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] YP_002923527.1 4.1 29% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-0381 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yltransferase [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] gb|ACQ67332.1| UDP-3-O-(3-hydroxym...yristoyl)-glucosamine N-acyltransferase [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] YP_002923480.1 0.76 28% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1371 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ndent protein export [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] gb|ACQ68339.1| twin-arginin...e translocase subunit, sec-independent protein export [Candidatus Hamiltonella defensa 5AT (Acyrthosiphon pisum)] YP_002924487.1 0.89 24% ...

  11. Steve Jobs and the User Psyche

    OpenAIRE

    Denning, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2043155.2043157 Peter J. Denning reflects on a meeting he had with Steve Jobs in 1988. Published in ACM Ubiquity.Ubiquity Commentary

  12. 78 FR 1166 - Service Rules for the Advanced Wireless Services in the H Block-Implementing Section 6401 of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ..., capacity, and ubiquity of the nation's wireless networks keeps pace with the skyrocketing demand for mobile... additional spectrum for mobile use will help ensure that the speed, capacity, and ubiquity of the nation's wireless networks keeps pace with the skyrocketing demand for mobile service. DATES: Submit comments on...

  13. Description of new filamentous toxic Cyanobacteria (Oscillatoriales) colonizing the sulfidic periphyton mat in marine mangroves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi-Rontani, Chantal; Jean, Maïtena R N; Gonzalez-Rizzo, Silvina; Bolte-Kluge, Susanne; Gros, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    In this multidisciplinary study, we combined morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic approaches to identify three dominant water bloom-forming Cyanobacteria in a tropical marine mangrove in Guadeloupe (French West Indies). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences place these marine Cyanobacteria in the genera Oscillatoria (Oscillatoria sp. clone gwada, strain OG) or Planktothricoides ('Candidatus Planktothricoides niger' strain OB and 'Candidatus Planktothricoides rosea' strain OP; both provisionally novel species within the genus Planktothricoides). Bioassays showed that 'Candidatus Planktothricoides niger' and 'Candidatus Planktothricoides rosea' are toxin-producing organisms. This is the first report of the characterization of Cyanobacteria colonizing periphyton mats of a tropical marine mangrove. We describe two novel benthic marine species and provide new insight into Oscillatoriaceae and their potential role in marine sulfide-rich environments such as mangroves.

  14. Comparison of Candiatus Liberibacter solanacearum genomic sequences isolated from carrot psyllids in Scandinavia and potato psyllids from Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fastidious prokaryote Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso), transmitted by the tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), is associated with the Zebra Chip disease of potato. Plants infected with Liberibacter may experience significant yield losses and these plants also serve as poten...

  15. Ultrastructure of the salivary glands and bacteria-like structures in the gut and other organs of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae), vector of huanglongbing disease bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera, Liviidae) is the principal vector of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las), the bacterium associated with huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, currently the most serious citrus disease worldwide. Liberibacter asiaticus is transmitted i...

  16. Metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses of Accumulibacter phosphatis enriched floccular and granular biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, Jeremy J; Dutilh, Bas E; Skennerton, Connor T; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Hastie, Marcus L; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Tyson, Gene W; Bond, Philip L

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous in nature, forming diverse adherent microbial communities that perform a plethora of functions. Here we operated two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors enriched with Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) performing enhanced biological phosphorus remova

  17. AcEST: BP914789 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ification GTPase OS=Polaribacter ... 33 7.4 tr|A0MS26|A0MS26_9GAMM BryC OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula PE=...... 33 9.7 tr|A0MS25|A0MS25_9GAMM BryB OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula PE=... 33...y: 418 KSYNSK 435 KSY + Sbjct: 78 KSYTGE 83 >tr|A0MS26|A0MS26_9GAMM BryC OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula PE...r|A0MS25|A0MS25_9GAMM BryB OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula PE=4 SV=1 Length = 5521 Score = 33.1 bits (74),

  18. High-throughput screening of tick-borne pathogens in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelet, Lorraine; Delannoy, Sabine; Devillers, Elodie;

    2014-01-01

    was conducted on 7050 Ixodes ricinus nymphs collected from France, Denmark, and the Netherlands using a powerful new high-throughput approach. This advanced methodology permitted the simultaneous detection of 25 bacterial, and 12 parasitic species (including; Borrelia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia......, Bartonella, Candidatus Neoehrlichia, Coxiella, Francisella, Babesia, and Theileria genus) across 94 samples. We successfully determined the prevalence of expected (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia helvetica, Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Babesia divergens, Babesia...

  19. Hemoplasma prevalence and hematological abnormalities associated with infection in three different cat populations from Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Pires dos Santos; Francisco de Oliveira Conrado; Joanne Belle Messick; Alexander Welker Biondo; Simone Tostes de Oliveira; Ana Marcia Sá Guimaraes; Naíla Cannes do Nascimento; Viviane Pedralli; Camila Serina Lasta; Félix Hilário Diaz González

    2014-01-01

    Three hemoplasma species are recognized in domestic cats: Mycoplasma haemofelis, ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis’. We report the prevalence and hematological abnormalities of hemoplasma infection in 369 domestic cats from three different populations (blood donors, hospitalized cats and shelter cats) from Southern Brazil. Complete blood counts were performed at the time of blood collection, and DNA was extracted and tested by conventional PCR for each...

  20. AcEST: DK960171 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r|Q5QGY3|Q5QGY3_9GAMM BryA OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula Align length 36 Score (bit) 32.7 E-value 9.2 Rep...r|Q5QGY3|Q5QGY3_9GAMM BryA OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula GN=... 33 9.2 tr|A2CLL5|A2CLL5_9GAMM BryA OS=Candidatus Endobug...ula sertula GN=... 33 9.2 tr|A2CLL4|A2CLL4_9GAMM BryD OS=Candidatus Endobug...ula sertula GN=... 33 9.2 >tr|Q5QGY3|Q5QGY3_9GAMM BryA OS=Candidatus Endobugula sertula GN=bryA PE=...GVEALRRALQTGHGQLMVTMGEPVWMKEPRR 3625 >tr|A2CLL5|A2CLL5_9GAMM BryA OS=Candidatus Endobug

  1. Muusika valib Tristan Priimägi / Tristan Priimägi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Priimägi, Tristan, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Roy Ayers "Virgin Ubiquity - Unreleased Recordings 1976-1981", "Ibadan People", "A Journey to the Dawn", The Matthew Herbert Big Band "Goodbye Swingtime", Amp Fiddler "Waltz of a Ghetto Fly"

  2. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YHL002W, YNR006W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available for degradation; has Ubiquitin Interaction Motifs which bind ubiquitin (Ubi4p) Rows with this prey as prey ...ns destined for degradation; has Ubiquitin Interaction Motifs which bind ubiquiti

  3. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a clinical fellow in the department of neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). " ... early [HIV] infection." Valcour is a professor of neurology at UCSF. "Additionally, the ubiquity of symptoms in ...

  4. Genetic Diversity Affects the Daily Transcriptional Oscillations of Marine Microbial Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, Irina N; Robidart, Julie C; DeLong, Edward F; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Marine microbial communities are genetically diverse but have robust synchronized daily transcriptional patterns at the genus level that are similar across a wide variety of oceanic regions. We developed a microarray-inspired gene-centric approach to resolve transcription of closely-related but distinct strains/ecotypes in high-throughput sequence data. Applying this approach to the existing metatranscriptomics datasets collected from two different oceanic regions, we found unique and variable patterns of transcription by individual taxa within the abundant picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, the alpha Proteobacterium Pelagibacter and the eukaryotic picophytoplankton Ostreococcus. The results demonstrate that marine microbial taxa respond differentially to variability in space and time in the ocean. These intra-genus individual transcriptional patterns underlie whole microbial community responses, and the approach developed here facilitates deeper insights into microbial population dynamics.

  5. Gclust Server: 32698 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available egulatory X) domain-containing protein that interacts with Cdc48p, has a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, interacts with ubiquity...lated proteins in vivo, and is required for degradation of a ubiquitylated model subs...interacts with Cdc48p, has a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, interacts with ubiquity...lated proteins in vivo, and is required for degradation of a ubiquitylated model substrate Number of S

  6. NOVEL APPLICATIONS FOR EMERGING MARKETS USING TELEVISION AS A UBIQUITOUS DEVICE

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Arpan

    2013-01-01

    According to Mark Weiser, who is known as the father of ubiquitous computing, the most profound technologies are those that disappear and disappearance of technology is the fundamental requirement for ubiquity. Ubiquitous computing is more about computing for the purpose of communication and for the purpose of information access anytime everywhere. As we enter the ubiquitous computing era, the main aspect of ubiquity will be how these computing devices disseminate information to end-users. As...

  7. Diagnóstico molecular da infecção por hemoplasmas em gatos domésticos naturalmente infectados da cidade de Belém, Pará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinerey K.S. Aragão-de-Sousa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' e 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' são os agentes causadores da micoplasmose felina, que podem causar anemia aguda ou crônica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a ocorrência de hemoplasmas em gatos domésticos de Belém, Pará. Para isso, 201 gatos foram divididos em três grupos: Grupo A foi composto por 101 gatos de rua capturados pelo Centro de Controle de Zoonoses, o grupo B foi composto por 62 gatos domiciliados e saudáveis e o grupo C foi composto por 38 gatos domiciliados que apresentavam alguma afecção clínica. Foram coletadas amostras de sangue para a realização de Reação em Cadeia pela Polimerase (PCR para detectar o DNA destes agentes, os quais foram sequenciados e alinhados. A análise estatística foi realizada para detectar a associação entre a infecção, o sexo dos animais e os grupos experimentais. O DNA de pelo menos uma das espécies de hemoplasmas pesquisados foi detectado em 19,9% (40/201 das amostras, sendo o DNA de 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' encontrado em 7,96% (16/201 das amostras, M. haemofelis em 1,49% (3/201 das amostras, enquanto que o DNA de 'Candidatus M. turicensis' foi detectado em 12,93% (26/201 das amostras. O DNA destes três agentes foi detectado em gatos dos grupos A e C, enquanto que no grupo B foi detectado apenas 'Candidatus M. turicensis' e 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' Foi detectada a influência do sexo sobre a infecção hemoplasmas apenas entre 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' e machos. Estes resultados mostraram que os hemoplasmas circulam entre os gatos domésticos em Belém e 'Candidatus M. turicensis' e 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' foram mais comuns do que M. haemofelis, especialmente em gatos vadios.

  8. Epitheliocystis Distribution and Characterization in Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) from the Headwaters of Two Major European Rivers, the Rhine and Rhone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Soto, Maricruz; Vaughan, Lloyd; Segner, Helmut; Wahli, Thomas; Vidondo, Beatriz; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike

    2016-01-01

    We present a first description of the distribution and characterization of epitheliocystis infections in brown trout (Salmo trutta) from the upper catchments of two major European rivers, the Rhine and the Rhone. Overall, epitheliocystis was widely distributed, with 70% of the Rhine and 67% of the Rhone sites harboring epitheliocystis positive brown trout. The epitheliocystis agents Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis and Candidatus Clavichlamydia salmonicola could be identified in both catchments, although their relative proportions differed from site to site. Additionally, in two rivers in the Rhine catchment, a new species of Candidatus Similichlamydia was identified. Based on the histology, infection intensity, and severity of pathological changes were significantly more pronounced in mixed chlamydial infections, whereas single infections showed only low numbers of cysts and mild pathology. Infections could be found over a wide range of temperatures, which showed no correlation to infection prevalence or intensity. PMID:27148070

  9. Occurrence of novel verrucomicrobial species, endosymbiotic and associated with parthenogenesis in Xiphinema americanum-group species (Nematoda, Longidoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandekerckhove, T T; Willems, A; Gillis, M; Coomans, A

    2000-11-01

    Numerous micro-organisms have been described as cytoplasmic symbionts of eukaryotes. Many so-called obligate endosymbionts rely exclusively on maternal (vertical or transovarial) transmission to maintain themselves, rendering them dependent on the host sex ratio, which they would tend to manipulate to their own advantage. The latter phenomenon is often associated with the presence of Wolbachia pipientis (alpha-Proteobacteria) in arthropods and nematodes. A potentially similar situation was discovered involving members of a new clade of Verrucomicrobia, another main line of descent in the Bacteria. Nematode species of the Xiphinema americanum group (Nematoda, Longidoridae), viz. Xiphinema americanum, Xiphinema rivesi and Xiphinema brevicollum, each harbour their own specific verrucomicrobial endosymbionts. They are exclusively maternally inherited and their hosts reproduce by thelytokous (mother-to-daughter) parthenogenesis, males being extremely rare. A new genus, 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter' gen. nov., along with three new candidate verrucomicrobial species, 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter americani' sp. nov., 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter rivesi' sp. nov. and 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter brevicolli' sp. nov., are described on the basis of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) epifluorescence microscopy and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. These are the first endosymbiotic species described among the Verrucomicrobia. They share a mean 16S rDNA similarity of about 93%, whereas similarity to their closest relative, clone WCHD3-88, is less than 87%. Thus, the endosymbionts form a homogeneous clade for which the new candidate genus 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter' gen. nov. is proposed. The type species is 'Candidatus Xiphinematobacter brevicolli' sp. nov.

  10. Molecular evidence for ammonia oxidation bacteria in the sediments of shallow lake: A case study in Yangcheng Lake%浅水湖泊(阳澄湖)沉积物氨氧化菌的分子证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚平; 阮晓红

    2012-01-01

    选择长江三角洲中型浅水湖泊--阳澄湖,应用分子生物学方法鉴定淡水系统底质中的厌氧氨氧化细菌和好氧氨氧化细菌.试验设计三组厌氧氨氧化特异性巢式引物,对沉积物细菌的16S rRNA进行特异性扩增.其中,引物对AMX368f-AMX820r从底质中扩增出了anammox特异性序列,系统发育分析表明样品序列分别与Candidatus brocadia fulgida、Candidatus brocadia anammoxidans和Candidatus scalindua属近似.应用amoA基因特异性探针在底质中扩增出的好氧氨氧化菌序列,均属于Betaproteobacteria.本研究提供了阳澄湖中好氧氨氧化菌与厌氧氨氧化菌共存的分子证据.%Sediment samples were collected from Yangcheng Lake, a middle size shallow lake in Yangtze River Delta. Molecular biology methods were adopted to detect the anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) and aerobic ammonia oxidation bacteria in the samples. Three pairs of nest PCR primers were designed to amplify the 16S rRNA from the sediment samples. The specified sequences of anammox were amplified by the primer pairs AMX368f- AMX820r, and analyses of phylogenetics showed that these sequences were similar to Candidatus brocadia fulgida, Candidatus brocadia anammoxidans and Candidatus scalindua. The sequences amplified by the amoA gene specified primer from the sediment samples belonged to the Betaproteobacteria class. This study provided the molecular evidence for coexistence of anammox and aerobic-ammonia-oxidation in Yangcheng Lake.

  11. Diagnóstico molecular da infecção por hemoplasmas em gatos domésticos naturalmente infectados da cidade de Belém, Pará

    OpenAIRE

    Sinerey K.S. Aragão-de-Sousa; Francisco D. Sampaio-Junior; Luciane O. Sousa; Rafaelle C. Santos; Evonnildo C Gonçalves; Alessandra Scofield; Gustavo Góes-Cavalcante

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma haemofelis, 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' e 'Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis' são os agentes causadores da micoplasmose felina, que podem causar anemia aguda ou crônica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a ocorrência de hemoplasmas em gatos domésticos de Belém, Pará. Para isso, 201 gatos foram divididos em três grupos: Grupo A foi composto por 101 gatos de rua capturados pelo Centro de Controle de Zoonoses, o grupo B foi composto por 62 gatos domiciliados e saudáveis...

  12. Tolerance of the trifoliate citrus hybrid US-897 (Citrus reticulata Blanco x Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) to Huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus in most citrus-producing countries worldwide. The disease, presumably caused by phloem-limited bacteria of the genus Candidatus Liberibacter, affects all known citrus species and citrus relatives with little known resistance. Typical disease s...

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Shewanella sp. Strain UCD-FRSP16_17 and Nine Vibrio Strains Isolated from Abalone Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Ashley; Agbonavbare, Vivian; Carlin, Dylan A; Carruthers, Griselda M; Chac, Adam; Doroud, Ladan; Farris, Samuel J; Gudzeva, Melanya; Jospin, Guillaume; Kintner, John A; Knauss, Jonathon P; Lor, Yi; Pechacek, Randi; Rohner, Eden S; Simmons, Sierra M V; Verescshagina, Mayya; Wirawan, Christian S; Zagal, Leonel; Coil, David A

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences for nine strains of Vibrio (V. cyclitrophicus, V. splendidus, V. tasmaniensis, and three unidentified) and one Shewanella strain. Strains were isolated from red (Haliotis rufescens) and white (Haliotis sorenseni) abalone, with and without exposure to "Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis," the causative agent of abalone withering syndrome. PMID:27635000

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06960-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 36 0.72 16 ( CU469464 ) Candidatus Phytoplasma mali strain AT complete ch... 30 0.74 15 ( CP000727 ) Clostr...idium botulinum A str. Hall, complete genome. 34 0.79 15 ( CU074304 ) Pig DNA seq

  15. Dicty_cDB: VSD442 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available atural-host Pachypsylla celtidis ATP synthase alpha subunit (atpA) gene, partial cds; ATP synthase gamma sub... from strain CLIB 210 of Kluyveromyces lactis. 46 0.86 1 AF267217 |AF267217.1 Candidatus Carsonella ruddii n

  16. Use of the entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae, Cordyceps bassiana and Isaria fumosorosea to control Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psylidae) in Persian lime under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a destructive insect pest in the citriculture, because it is an efficient vector of the proteobacteria, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), ‘Ca. L. Africanus’ (Laf), and ‘Ca. L. Americanus’ (Lam). These bacteria c...

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Shewanella sp. Strain UCD-FRSP16_17 and Nine Vibrio Strains Isolated from Abalone Feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Ashley; Agbonavbare, Vivian; Carlin, Dylan A.; Carruthers, Griselda M.; Chac, Adam; Doroud, Ladan; Farris, Samuel J.; Gudzeva, Melanya; Jospin, Guillaume; Kintner, John A.; Knauss, Jonathon P.; Lor, Yi; Pechacek, Randi; Rohner, Eden S.; Simmons, Sierra M. V.; Verescshagina, Mayya; Wirawan, Christian S.; Zagal, Leonel

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequences for nine strains of Vibrio (V. cyclitrophicus, V. splendidus, V. tasmaniensis, and three unidentified) and one Shewanella strain. Strains were isolated from red (Haliotis rufescens) and white (Haliotis sorenseni) abalone, with and without exposure to “Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis,” the causative agent of abalone withering syndrome. PMID:27635000

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15400-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 34 2.3 2 ( CU469464 ) Candidatus Phytoplasma mali strain AT complete ch... 34... 2.5 16 ( AZ524051 ) 226PbF06 Pb MBN #21 Plasmodium berghei genomic 3'... 36 2.5 2 ( AC129992 ) Rattus norve

  19. PROCENTAJE DE PSILIDOS PORTADORES DE Canidatus Liberibacter asiaticus Y SU RELACION CON LA INCIDENCIA DE HLB EN CINCO HUERTAS COMERCIALES DE LIMON MEXICANO {Citrus aurantifolia (Christm) Swingle} EN EL ESTADO DE COLIMA MEXICO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri) were individually analyzed by qPCR to detect Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). The psyllids were collected in Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) trees in five commercial orchards in Tecomán and Manzanillo, Colima with severe symptoms of classical mott...

  20. NuPsyllid project update: Release and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this NIFA-CAPS is to create attractive options for management of huanglongbing (HLB) by replacing the wild type insect vector (Asian citrus psyllid) with a population that is unable to transmit the bacterial causative agent (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (clas). Achieving this out...

  1. Developing resistance to HLB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) disease of citrus is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) a bacterium that is transmitted among citrus trees by its insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP). HLB has had negative impact on citrus production in the far east for over one hundred years, but not c...

  2. Variations in Zebra Chip disease expression and tuber biochemistry in response to vector density

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined effects of the number of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso)-positive psyllids feeding on potatoes to Lso titers, zebra chip disease (ZC) symptom severity, and levels of amino acids, carbohydrates, and phenolics in tubers harvested weeks later. Red La Soda and Russet Nor...

  3. Examining the role of tuber biochemistry in the development of zebra chip in stored potato tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebra chip disease (ZC), associated with infection by the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), is an emerging problem for potato growers in the United States, Mexico, and New Zealand. Although potato tubers exhibiting ZC symptoms will be rejected by processors, it remains possible...

  4. Early detection of HLB with metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most devastating of all citrus diseases and poses a serious threat to the U.S. citrus industry. Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) is a bacterium associated with, and believed to cause, HLB disease of citrus. Confirmation of CLas infection is crucial for regulatory a...

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02594-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DL172026 ) Methods for Identifying the Target of a Compound ... 42 0.049 2 ( DJ377761 ) Identification of E...e cDNA clone:VS... 670 0.0 2 ( CU469464 ) Candidatus Phytoplasma mali strain AT complete ch... 34 0.015 11 (

  6. Verrucomicrobia subdivision 1 strains display a difference in the colonization of the leek (Allium porrum) rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; van Overbeek, Leonard Simon

    2011-01-01

    Strains CHC12 and CHC8, belonging to, respectively, Luteolibacter and Candidatus genus Rhizospheria (Verrucomicrobia subdivision 1), were recently isolated from the leek rhizosphere. The key question addressed in this study was: does attraction to and colonization of the rhizosphere occur in the sam

  7. Verrucomicrobia subdivision 1 strains display a difference in colonization in the colonization of the leek (Allium porrum) rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes da Rocha, U.; Elsas, van J.D.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Strains CHC12 and CHC8, belonging to, respectively, Luteolibacter and Candidatus genus Rhizospheria (Verrucomicrobia subdivision 1), were recently isolated from the leek rhizosphere. The key question addressed in this study was: does attraction to and colonization of the rhizosphere occur in the sam

  8. Disrupting mating behavior of Diaphorina citri (Liviidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severe economic damage from citrus greening disease, caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ bacteria, has stimulated development of methods to reduce mating and reproduction in populations of its insect vector, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae). Male D. citri find mating partners by walk...

  9. Evidence for anaerobic ammonium oxidation process in freshwater sediments of aquaculture ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu; Ruan, Yun-jie; Xu, Xiang-hua; Li, Ji; Ma, Shi-jie; Zheng, Pei-hui

    2016-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process, which can simultaneously remove ammonium and nitrite, both toxic to aquatic animals, can be very important to the aquaculture industry. Here, the presence and activity of anammox bacteria in the sediments of four different freshwater aquaculture ponds were investigated by using Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene sequencing, quantitative PCR assays and (15)N stable isotope measurements. Different genera of anammox bacteria were detected in the examined pond sediments, including Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia and Candidatus Anammoxoglobus, with Candidatus Brocadia being the dominant anammox genus. Quantitative PCR of hydrazine synthase genes showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 5.6 × 10(4) to 2.1 × 10(5) copies g(-1) sediment in the examined ponds. The potential anammox rates ranged between 3.7 and 19.4 nmol N2 g(-1) sediment day(-1), and the potential denitrification rates varied from 107.1 to 300.3 nmol N2 g(-1) sediment day(-1). The anammox process contributed 1.2-15.3% to sediment dinitrogen gas production, while the remainder would be due to denitrification. It is estimated that a total loss of 2.1-10.9 g N m(-2) per year could be attributed to the anammox process in the examined ponds, suggesting that this process could contribute to nitrogen removal in freshwater aquaculture ponds.

  10. Potato tuber chemistry of promising germplasm exhibiting tolerance to zebra chip disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term sustainable management of zebra chip (ZC) disease of potato requires development of tolerant or resistant germplasm. To this end, 283 potato varieties and breeding clones were infected with the ZC putative causal agent ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) by potato psyllid vector i...

  11. The link between independent acquisition of intracellular gamma-endosymbionts and concerted evolution in Tremblaya princeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eLópez-Madrigal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many insect species establish mutualistic symbiosis with intracellular bacteria that complement their unbalanced diets. The betaproteobacterium Candidatus Tremblaya maintains an ancient symbiosis with mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae, which are classified in subfamilies Phenacoccinae and Pseudococcinae. Most Phenacoccinae mealybugs have Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola as their unique endosymbiont, while most Pseudococcinae mealybugs show a nested symbiosis (a bacterial symbiont placed inside another one where every Candidatus Tremblaya princeps cell harbors several cells of a gammaproteobacterium. Genomic characterization of the endosymbiotic consortium from Planococcus citri, composed by Ca. Tremblaya princeps and Candidatus Moranella endobia, unveiled several atypical features of the former’s genome, including the concerted evolution of paralogous loci. Its comparison with the genome of Ca. Tremblaya phenacola PAVE, single endosymbiont of Phenacoccus avenae, suggests that the atypical reductive evolution of Ca. Tremblaya princeps could be linked to the acquisition of Ca. Moranella endobia, which possess an almost complete set of genes encoding proteins involved in homologous recombination. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed comparative genomics between Ca. Tremblaya phenacola and Ca. Tremblaya princeps and searched for the co-occurrence of concerted evolution and homologous recombination genes in endosymbiotic consortia from four unexplored mealybug species, Dysmicoccus boninsis, Planococcus ficus, Pseudococcus longispinus and Pseudococcus viburni. Our results support a link between concerted evolution and nested endosymbiosis.

  12. The link between independent acquisition of intracellular gamma-endosymbionts and concerted evolution in Tremblaya princeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Madrigal, Sergio; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés; Gil, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Many insect species establish mutualistic symbiosis with intracellular bacteria that complement their unbalanced diets. The betaproteobacterium “Candidatus Tremblaya” maintains an ancient symbiosis with mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), which are classified in subfamilies Phenacoccinae and Pseudococcinae. Most Phenacoccinae mealybugs have “Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola” as their unique endosymbiont, while most Pseudococcinae mealybugs show a nested symbiosis (a bacterial symbiont placed inside another one) where every “Candidatus Tremblaya princeps” cell harbors several cells of a gammaproteobacterium. Genomic characterization of the endosymbiotic consortium from Planococcus citri, composed by “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” and “Candidatus Moranella endobia,” unveiled several atypical features of the former's genome, including the concerted evolution of paralogous loci. Its comparison with the genome of “Ca. Tremblaya phenacola” PAVE, single endosymbiont of Phenacoccus avenae, suggests that the atypical reductive evolution of “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” could be linked to the acquisition of “Ca. Moranella endobia,” which possess an almost complete set of genes encoding proteins involved in homologous recombination. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed comparative genomics between “Ca. Tremblaya phenacola” and “Ca. Tremblaya princeps” and searched for the co-occurrence of concerted evolution and homologous recombination genes in endosymbiotic consortia from four unexplored mealybug species, Dysmicoccus boninsis, Planococcus ficus, Pseudococcus longispinus, and Pseudococcus viburni. Our results support a link between concerted evolution and nested endosymbiosis. PMID:26161080

  13. Variation in susceptibility to potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae),among Solanum verrucosum germplasm accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae) is a key pest of potato and the vector of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum," the pathogen associated with zebra chip disease. Development of potato cultivars with genetic resistance to potato psyllid would enable cost-effecti...

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12038-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 ( CU469464 ) Candidatus Phytoplasma mali strain AT complete ch... 34 0.005 19 ( DW248180 ) pOP-EON00464_EST_C_1_pSK_SK EON (Oil... Palm Embryoi... 54 0.013 1 ( EY410093 ) pOP-EO07491_EST_C_1_pSK_SK EO (Oil

  15. Within-orchard edge effects of the azimuth of the sun on Diaphorina citri adults in mature orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) has been considered the most devastating disease of citrus. The bacterium and vector associated with HLB in Florida are ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Diaphorina citri (Asian citrus psyllid), respectively. D. citri is positively phototropic, and higher populations have b...

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Bactericera cockerelli and its comparison with three other psylloidea species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato-tomato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) is an important pest of potatoes, tomato and peppers. A toxin secreted by nymphs results in serious phytotoxemia in some host plants. Over the past few years, B. cockerelli was shown to transmit “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum”, the putative bacte...

  17. Rare Branched Fatty Acids Characterize the Lipid Composition of the Intra-Aerobic Methane Oxidizer "

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, D.M.; Zhu, B.L.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Ettwig, K.F.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2012-01-01

    The recently described bacterium "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" couples the oxidation of the important greenhouse gas methane to the reduction of nitrite. The ecological significance of "Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera" is still underexplored, as our ability to identify the presence of this bact

  18. Rickettsiae in Gulf Coast Ticks, Arkansas, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Trout, Rebecca; Steelman, C Dayton; Szalanski, Allen L.; Williamson, Phillip C

    2010-01-01

    To determine the cause of spotted fever cases in the southern United States, we screened Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) collected in Arkansas for rickettsiae. Of the screened ticks, 30% had PCR amplicons consistent with Rickettsia parkeri or Candidatus Rickettsia amblyommii.

  19. Whole plant destructive screening for huanglongbing susceptibility with conetainer seedlings exposed to no-choice Asian citrus psyllid inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) and is vectored by the Asian Citrus Psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri). HLB is devastating the Florida citrus industry, with production reduced by 60 percent in the last 12 years, and HLB is considered the greatest threat to...

  20. Repellency of Selected Psidium guajava cultivars to the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiatic huanglongbing (HLB)(also known as citrus greening disease) is the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide. It is caused by a bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri. Considerable research has been conducted toward...

  1. Internal extracellular bacteria of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), the Asian citus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal bacteria were isolated and cultured from the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), the insect which transmits the plant-infecting bacteria, Candidatus Liberibacter, known to infect and kill citrus trees, known as citrus greening disease. The bacteria from Di...

  2. Ultrastructure of the salivary glands, alimentary canal and bacteria-like organisms in the Asian citrus psyllid, vector of citrus huanglongbing-disease bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea) are known as vectors of some economically important viral and bacterial plant pathogens. The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera, Liviidae) is the principal vector of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), the putative bacterial causal ...

  3. Characterization of a recombinant Cathepsin B-Like cysteine peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A putative target control of citrus huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) spread by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae). Among the control strategies for H...

  4. A graft-based chemotherapy method for screening effective molecules and rescuing Huanglongbing (HLB)-affected citrus plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB), the most devastating disease of citrus worldwide, is associated with three species of fastidious and phloem-limited a-Proteobacteria in the genus of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’. We previously reported a regeneration-based chemical screening system using periwinkle cuttings. In ...

  5. Use of a fragment of the tuf gene for phytoplasma 16Sr group/subgroup differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Contaldo, Nicoletta; Canel, Alessandro; Makarova, Olga;

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of RFLP analyses on a 435 bp fragment of the tuf gene for preliminary identification of phytoplasmas from a number of phytoplasma ribosomal groups and/or 'Candidatus. Phytoplasma' was verified. The strains employed belong to thirteen 16Sr DNA groups and 22 different subgroups and w...

  6. Potato psyllid genome and metagenome project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) is a Hemipteran pest of solanaceous plants and limits potato and tomato production by the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum. Genomic information on the potato psyllid is limited but is vital in developing appropriate management strategi...

  7. The potato psyllid genome project

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) is a Hemipteran pest of solanaceous plants and limits potato and tomato production by the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum. Genomic information on the potato psyllid is limited but is vital in developing appropriate management strategi...

  8. Intestinal Endocellular Symbiotic Bacterium of the Macaque Louse Pedicinus obtusus: Distinct Endosymbiont Origins in Anthropoid Primate Lice and the Old World Monkey Louse▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Fukatsu, Takema; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Koga, Ryuichi; Nikoh, Naruo; KATO,Takuya; HAYAMA, Shin-ichi; Takefushi, Haruo; Tanaka, Ichirou

    2009-01-01

    A symbiotic bacterium of the macaque louse, Pedicinus obtusus, was characterized. The symbiont constituted a gammaproteobacterial lineage distinct from the symbionts of anthropoid primate lice, localized in the midgut epithelium and the ovaries and exhibiting AT-biased genes and accelerated molecular evolution. The designation “Candidatus Puchtella pedicinophila” was proposed for it.

  9. Hemoplasmas in wild canids and felids in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marcos Rogerio; Adania, Cristina Harumi; Allegretti, Silmara Marques; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

    2011-06-01

    Hemotropic mycoplasmas, epicellular erythrocytic bacterial parasites lacking a cell wall, are the causative agents of infectious anemia in numerous mammalian species. The presence of hemotropic mycoplasmas in blood samples of neotropical and exotic wild canids and felids from Brazilian zoos were recorded using molecular techniques. Blood samples were collected from 146 Brazilian wild felids, 19 exotic felids, 3 European wolves (Canis lupus), and from 97 Brazilian wild canids from zoos in the Brazilian states of São Paulo and Mato Grosso and the Federal District. Using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), this work found 22 (13%) wild felids positive to Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum [4 jaguars (Panthera onca); 3 pumas (Puma concolor); 10 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis); 2 jaguarondis (Puma yagouaroundi); and 3 little spotted cats (Leopardus tigrinus)]. Only one little spotted cat (Leopardus tigrinus) was positive to Mycoplasma haemofelis, and none was positive to Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis. Two bush dogs (Speothos venaticus) were positive for a Mycoplasma sp. closely related to Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum, and two European wolves were positive for a Mycoplasma sp. closely related to Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum. This is the first study regarding the molecular detection of hemotropic mycoplasmas in wild canids. PMID:22946419

  10. Flavor of oranges as impacted by abscission zone formation for trees affected by huanglongbing disease and Lasiodiploida infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees affected by Huanglongbing (HLB) exhibit excessive fruit drop, which is exacerbated by secondary infection of the abscission zone by the fungus Lasiodiplodia. ‘Hamlin’ orange trees, both healthy and affected by HLB, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, determined by Polymerase chain reactio...

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06086-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ne) Candidatus Phytoplasma mali stra... 37 1.5 AY180958_1( AY180958 |pid:none) Avian infectious...one) Mycoplasma mobile 163K complete ... 34 9.5 AY189157_1( AY189157 |pid:none) Avian infectious

  12. Gender differences and effect of photophase on Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) feeding behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), thought to be primarily a phloem-feeding insect, transmits the presumptive pathogen for Huanglongbing, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. Because this bacterium is restricted to the phloem and bacterial transmission is the res...

  13. Stylet penetration of Cacopsylla pyri; an electrical penetration graph (EPG) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Civolani, S.; Leis, M.; Grandi, G.; Garzo, E.; Pasqualini, E.; Musacchi, S.; Chicca, M.; Castaldelli, G.; Rossie, M.; Tjallingii, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed information on plant penetration activities by pear psylla Cacopsylla pyri L. (Hemiptera Psyllidae) is essential to study phytoplasma transmission of “Candidatus Phytoplasma pyri” responsible of pear decline disease (PD) and to trace and evaluate resistant traits in new pear tree selections

  14. Simultaneous Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane and Ammonium Oxidation Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luesken, F.A.; Sánchez. J.; Van Alen, T.A.; Sanabria, J.; Op den Camp, H.J.; Jetten, M.S.; Kartal, B.

    2011-01-01

    itrite-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (n-damo) and ammonium (anammox) are two recently discovered processes in the nitrogen cycle that are catalyzed by n-damo bacteria, including "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera," and anammox bacteria, respectively. The feasibility of coculturing anamm

  15. Evolutionary relationships among primary endosymbionts of the mealybug subfamily phenacoccinae (hemiptera: Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwell, Matthew E; Hardy, Nate B; Gullan, Penny J; Dittmar, Katharina

    2010-11-01

    Mealybugs (Coccoidea: Pseudococcidae) are sap-sucking plant parasites that harbor bacterial endosymbionts within specialized organs. Previous studies have identified two subfamilies, Pseudococcinae and Phenacoccinae, within mealybugs and determined the primary endosymbionts (P-endosymbionts) of the Pseudococcinae to be Betaproteobacteria ("Candidatus Tremblaya princeps") containing Gammaproteobacteria secondary symbionts. Here, the P-endosymbionts of phenacoccine mealybugs are characterized based on 16S rRNA from the bacteria of 20 species of phenacoccine mealybugs and four outgroup Puto species (Coccoidea: Putoidae) and aligned to more than 100 published 16S rRNA sequences from symbiotic and free-living bacteria. Phylogenetic analyses recovered three separate lineages of bacteria from the Phenacoccinae, and these are considered to be the P-endosymbionts of their respective mealybug hosts, with those from (i) the mealybug genus Rastrococcus belonging to the Bacteroidetes, (ii) the subterranean mealybugs, tribe Rhizoecini, also within Bacteroidetes, in a clade sister to cockroach endosymbionts (Blattabacterium), and (iii) the remaining Phenacoccinae within the Betaproteobacteria, forming a well-supported sister group to "Candidatus Tremblaya princeps." Names are proposed for two strongly supported lineages: "Candidatus Brownia rhizoecola" for P-endosymbionts of Rhizoecini and "Candidatus Tremblaya phenacola" for P-endosymbionts of Phenacoccinae excluding Rastrococcus and Rhizoecini. Rates of nucleotide substitution among lineages of Tremblaya were inferred to be significantly faster than those of free-living Betaproteobacteria. Analyses also recovered a clade of Gammaproteobacteria, sister to the P-endosymbiont lineage of aphids ("Candidatus Buchnera aphidicola"), containing the endosymbionts of Putoidae, the secondary endosymbionts of pseudococcine mealybugs, and the endosymbionts of several other insect groups.

  16. Assessment of bacterial endosymbiont diversity in Otiorhynchus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae larvae using a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsch Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weevils of the genus Otiorhynchus are regarded as devastating pests in a wide variety of horticultural crops worldwide. So far, little is known on the presence of endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp.. Investigation of endosymbiosis in this genus may help to understand the evolution of different reproductive strategies in these weevils (parthenogenesis or sexual reproduction, host-symbiont interactions, and may provide a future basis for novel pest management strategy development. Here, we used a multitag 454 pyrosequencing approach to assess the bacterial endosymbiont diversity in larvae of four economically important Otiorhynchus species. Results High-throughput tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing of a bacterial 16S rDNA fragment was used to characterise bacterial communities associated with different Otiorhynchus spp. larvae. By sequencing a total of ~48,000 PCR amplicons, we identified 49 different operational taxonomic units (OTUs as bacterial endosymbionts in the four studied Otiorhynchus species. More than 90% of all sequence reads belonged either to the genus Rickettsia or showed homology to the phylogenetic group of “Candidatus Blochmannia” and to endosymbionts of the lice Pedicinus obtusus and P. badii. By using specific primers for the genera Rickettsia and “Candidatus Blochmannia”, we identified a new phylogenetic clade of Rickettsia as well as “Candidatus Nardonella” endosymbionts in Otiorhynchus spp. which are closely related to “Candidatus Blochmannia” bacteria. Conclusions Here, we used multitag 454 pyrosequencing for assessment of insect endosymbiotic communities in weevils. As 454 pyrosequencing generates only quite short sequences, results of such studies can be regarded as a first step towards identifying respective endosymbiotic species in insects. In the second step of our study, we analysed sequences of specific gene regions for a more detailed phylogeny of selected endosymbiont genera

  17. Co-occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation processes in subtropical acidic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Han; Wang, Yong-Feng; Chan, Ho-Wang; Wu, Ruo-Nan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two new processes of recent discoveries linking the microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. In this study, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of anammox bacteria and pmoA gene of n-damo bacteria were used to investigate their distribution and diversity in natural acidic and re-vegetated forest soils. The 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved featured at least three species in two genera known anammox bacteria, namely Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, Candidatus Brocadia fulgida, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis while the pmoA gene amplified was affiliated with two species of known n-damo bacteria Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera and a newly established Candidatus Methylomirabilis sp. According to the results, the diversity of anammox bacteria in natural forests was lower than in re-vegetated forests, but no significant difference was observed in n-damo community between them. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that both anammox and n-damo bacteria were more abundant in the lower layer (10-20 cm) than the surface layer (0-5 cm). The abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.21 × 10(5) to 3.90 × 10(6) gene copies per gram dry soil, and n-damo bacteria quantities were between 1.69 × 10(5) and 5.07 × 10(6) gene copies per gram dry soil in the two different layers. Both anammox and n-damo bacteria are reported for the first time to co-occur in acidic forest soil in this study, providing a more comprehensive information on more defined microbial processes contributing to C and N cycles in the ecosystems. PMID:27178181

  18. Distribution and activity of anaerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria in natural freshwater wetland soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-dong; Wu, Hong-sheng; Gao, Zhi-qiu; Cheng, Hai-xiang; Li, Ji; Liu, Xu; Ren, Qian-qi

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process plays a significant role in the marine nitrogen cycle. However, the quantitative importance of this process in nitrogen removal in wetland systems, particularly in natural freshwater wetlands, is still not determined. In the present study, we provided the evidence of the distribution and activity of anammox bacteria in a natural freshwater wetland, located in southeastern China, by using (15)N stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The potential anammox rates measured in this wetland system ranged between 2.5 and 25.5 nmol N2 g(-1) soil day(-1), and up to 20% soil dinitrogen gas production could be attributed to the anammox process. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that anammox bacteria related to Candidatus Brocadia, Candidatus Kuenenia, Candidatus Anammoxoglobus and two novel anammox clusters coexisted in the collected soil cores, with Candidatus Brocadia and Candidatus Kuenenia being the dominant anammox genera. Quantitative PCR of hydrazine synthase genes showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.3 × 10(5) to 2.2 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil in the examined soil cores. Correlation analyses suggested that the soil ammonium concentration had significant influence on the activity of anammox bacteria. On the basis of (15)N tracing technology, it is estimated that a total loss of 31.1 g N m(-2) per year could be linked the anammox process in the examined wetland. PMID:26621804

  19. Spectral characterization and surface complexation modeling of low molecular weight organics on hematite nanoparticles: Role of electrolytes in the binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Given the ubiquity of organic-metal oxide interfaces in environmental and medical systems, it is incumbent to obtain mechanistic details at the molecular level from experimental procedures that mimic real systems and conditions. We report herein the adsorption pH envelopes (range 9-5) and isotherms...

  20. Size-frequency and rank-frequency relations,power laws and exponentials: a unified approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Power laws, such as Zipf's law, and exponential relations, leading to straight lines in logarithmic or semi-logarithmic scales, are presented in a unified setting. It is shown that the class of size-frequency power laws is larger than the class of rank-frequency power laws. Their ubiquity in all fields of science is illustrated.

  1. Critical Inquiry for the Social Good: Methodological Work as a Means for Truth-Telling in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Aaron M.; Pickup, Austin

    2016-01-01

    This article questions the ubiquity of the term "critical" in methodological scholarship, calling for a renewed association of the term with projects concerned with social justice, truth-telling, and overt articulations of the social good. Drawing on Michel Foucault's work with parrhesia (or truth-telling) and Aristotle's articulation of…

  2. Playing with History: A Look at Video Games, World History and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Cason E.

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquity of video games in today's society presents unique challenges and opportunities for librarians and faculty. A significant subset of video games use historical periods as a setting, some with greater adherence to history than others. Many students are playing these games and bringing preconceived ideas of the historical period to the…

  3. Libraries in the post-scarcity era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Bodó

    2015-01-01

    In the digital era where, thanks to the ubiquity of electronic copies, the book is no longer a scarce resource, libraries find themselves in an extremely competitive environment. Several different actors are now in a position to provide low cost access to knowledge. One of these competitors are shad

  4. Inside poverty and development in Africa : critical reflections on pro-poor policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.M.E.M.; Leliveld, A.H.M.; Foeken, D.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    When discussing development issues in Africa, it is not sufficient to simply stress the ubiquity of failure, malnutrition, disease, predatory states and war, one also has to recognize that important aspects in the lives of millions of ordinary people have been transformed over the last five decades.

  5. Genomics-Guided Discovery of Traits Contributing to Interactions of Pseudomonas fluorescens with Other Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and the production of structurally diverse, bioactive secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity di...

  6. Cosmopolitan Speakers and Their Cultural Cartographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros i Solé, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Language learners' increased mobility and the ubiquity of virtual intercultural encounters has challenged traditional ideas of "cultures". Moreover, representations of cultures as consumable life-choices has meant that learners are no longer locked into standard and static cultural identities. Language learners are better defined as…

  7. Cell Phones in the Classroom: Teachers' Perspectives of Inclusion, Benefits, and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin M.; O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Bolton, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Historically viewed as a disruption by teachers, cell phones have been banned from 69% of classrooms (Common Sense Media, 2009). The increased ubiquity and instructional features of cell phones have prompted some teachers to re-evaluate the ban and consider the benefits associated with allowing cell phones in the classroom. This study surveyed 79…

  8. "Education at Our School Is Not Free": The Hidden Costs of Fee-Free Schooling in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy P.; Abbott, Pamela; Mupenzi, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    As primary school enrolment rates in Rwanda near ubiquity, completion rates remain low and repetition rates remain high. This study investigates the impact of the "hidden costs" of schooling in the context of Rwanda's fee-free education policy. Using a social-science case study, focus groups and interviews were undertaken with 200…

  9. Molecular and physiological analysis of the role of osmolyte transporters BetL, Gbu, and OpuC in growth of Listeria monocytogenes at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Sleator, R.D.; Wouters, J.A.; Hill, C.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous food-borne pathogen found widely distributed in nature as well as an undesirable contaminant in a variety of fresh and processed foods. This ubiquity can be at least partly explained by the ability of the organism to grow at high osmolarity and reduced temperat

  10. Identification of the ubiquitous Coriolis momentum pinch in JET tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisen, H.; Camenen, Y.; Salmi, A.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Maslov, M.; Tala, T.; Beurskens, M.; Giroud, C.

    2012-01-01

    A broad survey of the experimental database of neutral beam heated plasmas in the JET tokamak has established the theoretically expected ubiquity, in rotating plasmas, of a convective transport mechanism which has its origin in the vertical particle drift resulting from the Coriolis force. This inwa

  11. A Relational Scaffolding Model of Hybrid Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Jens O.; Tuckermann, Harald

    Two fundamental trends with important implications for today's management of organizations build the impetus for this paper. The first is the ubiquity of computer-mediated communication (CMC). The second is the revived interest for social relations and social networks at the workplace and its focus on relational processes in organizations.

  12. The Nature of Music from a Biological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    Music, as language, is a universal human trait. Throughout human history and across all cultures, people have produced and enjoyed music. Despite its ubiquity, the musical capacity is rarely studied as a biological function. Music is typically viewed as a cultural invention. In this paper, the evidence bearing on the biological perspective of the…

  13. Automated Detection of Financial Events in News Text

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P. Hogenboom (Frederik)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractToday’s financial markets are inextricably linked with financial events like acquisitions, profit announcements, or product launches. Information extracted from news messages that report on such events could hence be beneficial for financial decision making. The ubiquity of news, how

  14. Using National Education Accounts to Help Address the Global Learning Crisis. Global Views. Policy Paper 2011-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gaag, Jacques; Abetti, Pauline

    2011-01-01

    This policy brief outlines how national education accounts (NEAs) are created, and why they are a vast improvement over current financial tracking systems in the education sector. Examples from the health sector illustrate the benefits of national accounts for improving public services, and their ubiquity highlights the poor state of affairs of…

  15. "I'm Ambivalent about It": The Dilemmas of PowerPoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrea; Arford, Tammi; Lubitow, Amy; Smollin, Leandra M.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing ubiquity of PowerPoint in the university classroom raises complex questions about pedagogy and the creation of dynamic and effective learning environments. Though much of the sociological teaching literature has focused on engagement and active learning, very little of this work has addressed the presence of PowerPoint in sociology…

  16. Language and Content "Integration": The Affordances of Additional Languages as a Tool within a Single Curriculum Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Russell

    2016-01-01

    "Language across the curriculum" has been pivotal in establishing a knowledge base on the role of language for accessing opportunities afforded by the curriculum. Yet, the ubiquity of language "within" all facets of human activity--not least of all the more abstract domains of thinking and relating with others--can easily…

  17. Familiarity Overrides Complexity in Rhythm Perception: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of American and Turkish Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Erin E.; Soley, Gaye; Ullal, Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of dancing and synchronized movement to music, relatively few studies have examined cognitive representations of musical rhythm and meter among listeners from contrasting cultures. We aimed to disentangle the contributions of culture-general and culture-specific influences by examining American and Turkish listeners' detection…

  18. Learning Potentials of the Ubiquitous Internet: Using Mobile Devices to Support the Individual, Social and Physical Context of the Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Pedersen, Nicholai Friis; Aaen, Janus Holst

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the key learning potentials of the ubiquitous internet. Rather than focusing on mobile technology or the mobility of the learner, the paper emphasises the ubiquity of internet access as a paramount catalyst for new learning in the digital age. From a sociocultural perspective the paper discusses different ways…

  19. Siim Nestor kuulas, nautis ja õppis funk'i / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2003-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Roy Ayers Ubiquity "A Tear To A Smile", The Undisputed Truth "Face to Face With the Truth", Love Unlimited "In Heat", Gloria Scotti "What Am I Gonna Do", Bohannon "Summertime Groove", "Nice and Soulful", "One Way featuring Al Hudson", Cameo "Ugly Ego", The Gap Band "The Gap Band"

  20. Making Practice Public: Teacher Learning in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Ann; Pointer Mace, Desiree

    2010-01-01

    We propose that the advent and ubiquity of new media tools and social networking resources provide a means for professional, networked learning to "scale up." We preface our discussion with a review of research that has led us to argue for professional learning communities, document the policies and practices of professional development…

  1. A Context-Aware Paradigm for Information Discovery and Dissemination in Mobile Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Doug

    2011-01-01

    The increasing power and ubiquity of mobile wireless devices is enabling real-time information delivery for many diverse applications. A crucial question is how to allocate finite network resources efficiently and fairly despite the uncertainty common in highly dynamic mobile ad hoc networks. We propose a set of routing protocols, Self-Balancing…

  2. Museums, Environments, Information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern digital media already permeate the physical world. The portability of information devices and the ubiquity of networks allow us to access information practically anyplace, creating digital overlays on reality. This also allows us to bring information we routinely archive in museums and collec

  3. Semiflexible filamentous composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.M.; Heussinger, C.; Storm, C.; Barkema, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the ubiquity of composite filamentous networks in nature, we investigate models of biopolymer networks that consist of interconnected floppy and stiff filaments. Numerical simulations carried out in three dimensions allow us to explore the microscopic partitioning of stresses and strains

  4. Opportunistic data dissemination in mobile phone sensor networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Türkes, Okan

    2013-01-01

    Situated communication technologies in emergencies are subject to decay or fail because of their inadequate services. With the advances in tiny-sensor technologies and ubiquity of smart phones, public awareness on urgent situations can be raised in more efficient and distributed ways. We center on o

  5. Sequence Classification: 889256 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ulatory X) domain-containing protein that regulates Glc7p phosphatase activity and interacts with Cdc48p; interacts with ubiquity...lated proteins in vivo and is required for degradation of a ubiquitylated model substrate; Shp1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319413 ...

  6. Hybrid fiber coax networks: a viable option for telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, D

    1998-11-01

    Cable companies have improved their networks to the degree that they are viable alternatives to currently deployed networks. A detailed look at these cable networks shows them to be superior in bandwidth (capacity), speed, flexibility, and ubiquity. The services that can be provided by these networks are ideal to numerous advanced applications, including telemedicine. PMID:9848059

  7. Exploring sensor data management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Sander

    2006-01-01

    The increasing availability of cheap, small, low-power sensor hardware and the ubiquity of wired and wireless networks has led to the prediction that `smart evironments' will emerge in the near future. The sensors in these environments collect detailed information about the situation people are in,

  8. Scaffolding Java Programming on a Mobile Phone for Novice Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbogo, Chao; Blake, Edwin; Suleman, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of mobile phones provides an opportunity to use them as a resource for construction of programs beyond the classroom. However, limitations of mobile phones impede their use as typical programming environments. This research proposes that programming environments on mobile phones should include scaffolding techniques specifically…

  9. Design and Implementation of BusinessApp, a MALL Application to Make Successful Business Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Martínez, Cristina; Yanes, Lourdes Pomposo; Pareja-Lora, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Little by little, (or, simply, MALL) is taking force in the field of education, as it supports language blended learning and language learning ubiquity. The study presented here belongs in the Social Ontology-based Cognitively Augmented Language Learning Mobile Environment (SO-CALL-ME) research project, whose final aim is to design and create…

  10. Design Characteristics of Virtual Learning Environments: State of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Daniel; Strohmeier, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Virtual learning environments constitute current information systems' category for electronically supported training and development in (higher) education(al) and vocational training settings. Frequently expected advantages of using virtual learning environments refer, for instance, to the efficiency, individuality, ubiquity, timeliness and…

  11. Gustatory Habituation in "Drosophila" Relies on "Rutabaga" (Adenylate Cyclase)-Dependent Plasticity of GABAergic Inhibitory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Pushkar; Rodrigues, Veronica; VijayRaghavan, K.; Ramaswami, Mani

    2012-01-01

    In some situations, animals seem to ignore stimuli which in other contexts elicit a robust response. This attenuation in behavior, which enables animals to ignore a familiar, unreinforced stimulus, is called habituation. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, it is generally poorly understood in terms of the underlying neural circuitry. Hungry…

  12. Investigating Students' Behavioural Intention to Adopt and Use Mobile Learning in Higher Education in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtebe, Joel S.; Raisamo, Roope

    2014-01-01

    Recent penetration of mobile technologies and its services in East Africa has provided a new platform for institutions to widen access to education through mobile learning. Mobile technologies provide learners with flexibility and ubiquity to learn anytime and anywhere via wireless Internet. However, far too little research has been conducted to…

  13. Guests and Hosts--The Global Market in International Higher Education: Reflections on the Japan-UK Axis in Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Taking as a starting point the present ubiquity of international student mobility, contrasting paradigms of international study are offered through a critical examination of two nations. The UK is presented as a leading host nation and provider of international higher education, significant revenue from which is central to the prosperity of the…

  14. Afro-Mestizo Speech from Costa Chica, Guerrero: From Cuaji to Cuijla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Traces the history of Africans in Mexico and the Costa Chica and compares elements of the regional speech as described in a 1958 study with data collected on-site in 1991-1992. Findings indicate that the successful introduction of public education coupled with the ubiquity of the mass media have reduced or eliminated the more distinctively…

  15. Programming Model and Protocols for Reconfigurable Distributed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Arad, Cosmin Ionel

    2013-01-01

    Distributed systems are everywhere. From large datacenters to mobile devices, an ever richer assortment of applications and services relies on distributed systems, infrastructure, and protocols. Despite their ubiquity, testing and debugging distributed systems remains notoriously hard. Moreover, aside from inherent design challenges posed by partial failure, concurrency, or asynchrony, there remain significant challenges in the implementation of distributed systems. These programming challeng...

  16. Words That Move: The Importance of Struggling Readers' Understanding of Polysemy for Reading Development and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzillai, Mirit Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Children's evolving understanding of polysemy represents a unique aspect of semantic knowledge that is rarely addressed in reading theory or intervention. The ubiquity of words with multiple meanings in written language, however, underscores its importance for the development of fluent reading and comprehension. Early struggling readers'…

  17. Reimagining Game Design: Exploring the Design of Constructible Authentic Representations for Science Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Nathan Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Video games have recently become a popular space for educational design due to their interactive and engaging nature and the ubiquity of the gaming experience among youth. Though many researchers argue video games can provide opportunities for learning, educational game design has focused on the classroom rather than the informal settings where…

  18. Invisible XML

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pemberton, S.

    2013-01-01

    What if you could see everything as XML? XML has many strengths for data exchange, strengths both inherent in the nature of XML markup and strengths that derive from the ubiquity of tools that can process XML. For authoring, however, other forms are preferred: no one writes CSS or Javascript in XML.

  19. "I'm Not Dead Yet": A Comparative Study of Indigenous Language Revitalization in the Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gary N.; Johnson, Henry; Sallabank, Julia

    2015-01-01

    At the outset of the twenty-first century, the survival of many minority and indigenous languages is threatened by globalization and the ubiquity of dominant languages such as English in the worlds of communication and commerce. In a number of cases, these negative trends are being resisted by grassroots activists and governments. Indeed, there…

  20. On a mixed Khintchine problem in Diophantine approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrap, Stephen George; Yusupova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    We establish a `mixed' version of a fundamental theorem of Khintchine within the field of simultaneous Diophantine approximation. Via the notion of ubiquity we are able to make significant progress towards the completion of the metric theory associated with mixed problems in this setting. This in...