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Sample records for candidate tumor suppressor

  1. *612211 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR CANDIDATE 5; TUSC5 [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 612211 FIELD TI 612211 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR CANDIDATE 5; TUSC5 ;;LOST1 FIELD TX CLONING Usi ... significantly inhibited by cold exposure in Zucker lean ... rats. In primary cultured rat brown preadipocytes, ...

  2. Aberrant methylation of candidate tumor suppressor genes in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebeeck, Jasmien; Michels, Evi; Pattyn, Filip; Combaret, Valérie; Vermeulen, Joëlle; Yigit, Nurten; Hoyoux, Claire; Laureys, Geneviève; De Paepe, Anne; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2009-01-18

    CpG island hypermethylation has been recognized as an alternative mechanism for tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In this study, we performed methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to investigate the methylation status of 10 selected tumor suppressor genes in neuroblastoma. Seven of the investigated genes (CD44, RASSF1A, CASP8, PTEN, ZMYND10, CDH1, PRDM2) showed high frequencies (> or =30%) of methylation in 33 neuroblastoma cell lines. In 42 primary neuroblastoma tumors, the frequencies of methylation were 69%, CD44; 71%, RASSF1A; 56%, CASP8; 25%, PTEN; 15%, ZMYND10; 8%, CDH1; and 0%, PRDM2. Furthermore, CASP8 and CDH1 hypermethylation was significantly associated with poor event-free survival. Meta-analysis of 115 neuroblastoma tumors demonstrated a significant correlation between CASP8 methylation and MYCN amplification. In addition, there was a correlation between ZMYND10 methylation and MYCN amplification. The MSP data, together with optimized mRNA re-expression experiments (in terms of concentration and time of treatment and use of proper reference genes) further strengthen the notion that epigenetic alterations could play a significant role in NB oncogenesis. This study thus warrants the need for a global profiling of gene promoter hypermethylation to identify genome-wide aberrantly methylated genes in order to further understand neuroblastoma pathogenesis and to identify prognostic methylation markers. PMID:18819746

  3. AZU-1: A Candidate Breast Tumor Suppressor and Biomarker for Tumor Progression

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    Chen, Huei-Mei; Schmeichel, Karen L; Mian, I. Saira; Lelie`vre, Sophie; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    2000-02-04

    To identify genes misregulated in the final stages of breast carcinogenesis, we performed differential display to compare the gene expression patterns of the human tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells, HMT-3522-T4-2, with those of their immediate premalignant progenitors, HMT-3522-S2. We identified a novel gene, called anti-zuai-1 (AZU-1), that was abundantly expressed in non- and premalignant cells and tissues but was appreciably reduced in breast tumor cell types and in primary tumors. The AZU-1 gene encodes an acidic 571-amino-acid protein containing at least two structurally distinct domains with potential protein-binding functions: an N-terminal serine and proline-rich domain with a predicted immunoglobulin-like fold and a C-terminal coiled-coil domain. In HMT-3522 cells, the bulk of AZU-1 protein resided in a detergent-extractable cytoplasmic pool and was present at much lower levels in tumorigenic T4-2 cells than in their nonmalignant counterparts. Reversion of the tumorigenic phenotype of T4-2 cells, by means described previously, was accompanied by the up-regulation of AZU-1. In addition, reexpression of AZU-1 in T4-2 cells, using viral vectors, was sufficient to reduce their malignant phenotype substantially, both in culture and in vivo. These results indicate that AZU-1 is a candidate breast tumor suppressor that may exert its effects by promoting correct tissue morphogenesis.

  4. Identification of Fat4 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in breast cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Chao; Zhu, Yiwei Tony; Hu, Liping; Zhu, Yi-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Fat, a candidate tumor suppressor in drosophila, is a component of Hippo signaling pathway involved in controlling organ size. We found that a ~3Mbp deletion in mouse chromosome 3 caused tumorigenesis of a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cell line. The expression of Fat4 gene, one member of the Fat family, in the deleted region was inactivated, which resulted from promoter methylation of another Fat4 allele following the deletion of one Fat4 allele. Re-expression of Fat4 in Fat4-deficient ...

  5. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

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    Lu ShihHsin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4 was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503. ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber experiments were utilized to examined the effects of ECRG4 expression on ESCC cells migration, invasion and adhesion. And flow cytometric analysis was used to observe the impact of ECRG4 expression on cell cycle regulation. Finally, the expression levels of cell cycle regulating proteins p53 and p21 in human ESCC cells transfected with ECRG4 gene were evaluated by Western blotting. Results The restoration of ECRG4 expression in ESCC cells inhibited cancer cells migration and invasion (P P > 0.05. Furthermore, ECRG4 could cause cell cycle G1 phase arrest in ESCC (P Conclusion ECRG4 is a candidate tumor suppressor gene which suppressed tumor cells migration and invasion without affecting cell adhesion ability in ESCC. Furthermore, ECRG4 might cause cell cycle G1 phase block possibly through inducing the increased expression of p53 and p21 proteins in ESCC.

  6. NDRG2 is a candidate tumor-suppressor for oral squamous-cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common phenotype of oral cancer. Although patients with OSCC have poor survival rates and a high incidence of metastasis, the molecular mechanisms of OSCC development have not yet been elucidated. This study investigated whether N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) contributes to the carcinogenesis of OSCC, as NDRG2 is reported to be a candidate tumor-suppressor gene in a wide variety of cancers. The down-regulation of NDRG2 mRNA, which was dependent on promoter methylation, was seen in the majority of OSCC cases and in several cases of precancerous leukoplakia with dysplasia. Induction of NDRG2 expression in an HSC-3/OSCC cell line significantly inhibited cell proliferation and decreased colony formation ability on soft agar. The majority of OSCC cell lines showed an activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, and enforced expression of NDRG2 in HSC-3 cells decreased the level of phosphorylated Akt at Serine 473 (p-Akt). Immunohistochemical p-Akt staining was detected in 56.5% of the OSCC tumors, and 80.4% of the tumors were negative for NDRG2 staining. Moreover, positive p-Akt staining was inversely correlated with decreased NDRG2 expression in OSCC tumors with moderate to poor differentiation (p < 0.005). Therefore, NDRG2 is a candidate tumor-suppressor gene for OSCC development and probably contributes to the tumorigenesis of OSCC partly via the modulation of Akt signaling.

  7. The candidate tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 inhibits cancer cells migration and invasion in esophageal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lu ShihHsin; Li Xiaoyan; Zhang Chunpeng; Li Linwei; Zhou Yun

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The esophageal cancer related gene 4 (ECRG4) was initially identified and cloned in our laboratory from human normal esophageal epithelium (GenBank accession no.AF325503). ECRG4 was a new tumor suppressor gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) associated with prognosis. In this study, we investigated the novel tumor-suppressing function of ECRG4 in cancer cell migration, invasion, adhesion and cell cycle regulation in ESCC. Methods Transwell and Boyden chamber e...

  8. Dickkopf-1 is an epigenetically silenced candidate tumor suppressor gene in medulloblastoma1

    OpenAIRE

    Vibhakar, Rajeev; Foltz, Greg; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Field, Lorie; Lee, Hwahyung; Ryu, Gi-Yung; Pierson, Jessica; Davidson, Beverly; Madan, Anup

    2007-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous pediatric brain tumor with significant therapy-related morbidity, its five-year survival rates ranging from 30% to 70%. Improvement in diagnosis and therapy requires better understanding of medulloblastoma pathology. We used whole-genome microarray analysis to identify putative tumor suppressor genes silenced by epigenetic mechanisms in medulloblastoma. This analysis yielded 714 up-regulated genes in immortalized medulloblastoma cell line D283 on treatment w...

  9. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations of DLC-1, a Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene, in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan PENG; Cai-Ping REN; Hong-Mei YI; Liang ZHOU; Xu-Yu YANG; Hui LI; Kai-Tai YAO

    2006-01-01

    The DLC-1 gene, located at the human chromosome region 8p22, behaves like a tumor suppressor gene and is frequently deleted in diverse tumors. The deletion of 8p22 is not an uncommon event in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), therefore we explored the expression levels of the DLC-1 gene in NPCs and NPC cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed the mRNA level of DLC-1 was downregulated. To identify the mechanism of DLC-1 downregulation in NPC, we investigated the methylation status of the DLC-1 gene using methylation-specific PCR, and found that 79% (31 of 39) of the NPC tissues and two DLC-1 nonexpressing NPC cell lines, 6-10B and 5-8F, were methylated in the DLC-1 CpG island. Microsatellite PCR was also carried out, and loss of heterozygosity was found at four microsatellite sites (D8S552, D8S1754, D8S1790 and D8S549) covering the whole DLC-1 gene with ratios of 33% (4 of 12 informative cases), 18% (2 of 11), 5% (1 of 18), and 25% (3 of 12), respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that DLC-1 might be an NPC-related tumor suppressor gene affected by aberrant promoter methylation and gene deletion.

  10. Tumor suppressor and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliette Martin; Jean-Frangois Dufour

    2008-01-01

    A few signaling pathways are driving the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma. Each of these pathways possesses negative regulators. These enzymes, which normally suppress unchecked cell proliferation, are circumvented in the oncogenic process, either the over-activity of oncogenes is sufficient to annihilate the activity of tumor suppressors or tumor suppressors have been rendered ineffective. The loss of several key tumor suppressors has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we systematically review the evidence implicating tumor suppressors in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. A novel tumor-suppressor candidate gene-ndr2 is differentially expressed between osteoarthritis synovium cells and rheumatoid arthritis synovium fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yan-chun; WANG Ji-cun; LIU Xin-ping; YAO Li-bo

    2004-01-01

    To test whether the novel tumor-suppressor candidate gene-ndr2 is also differentially expressed between osteoarthritis synovium cells (OASC) and rheumatoid arthritis synovium fibroblasts (RASF), and whether ndr2 can suppress the growth of RASF in vitro. Methods: Dot blotting, cell culture and gene transfection, cell cycle nalysis techniques were applied to investigate the effect of ndr2 on the cell phenotype and cell cycles. Results: ndr2 is expressed in OASC but absent in RASF. Transient transfection of ndr2 into RASF can suppress the growth of RASF from phenotype observation. Cell cycle analysis showed that apoptotic peaks can be detected in RASF cells transfected with ndr2 gene. Conclusion: Novel tumor suppressor candidate ndr2 is not only differentially expressed between OASC and RASF but also can induce the apoptosis of RASF in vitro.

  12. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of murine myeloid leukemia (ML) by FISH of peripheral blood smear using probe of PU. 1, a candidate ML tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Ban Nobuhiko; Ishida Yuka; Ohmachi Yasushi; Tsuji Satsuki; Kanda Reiko; Shimada Yoshiya

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Murine myeloid leukemia (ML) provides a good animal model to study the mechanisms of radiation-induced leukemia in humans. This disease has been cytogenetically characterized by a partial deletion of chromosome 2 with G-banding. For the rapid diagnosis of ML, this study reports a FISH method using spleen cells and peripheral blood smears from ML mice exposed to gamma rays and neutrons with PU.1, a candidate ML tumor suppressor, as a probe. Results Among mice that were tent...

  13. Inhibition of lung cancer cell growth and induction of apoptosis after reexpression of 3p21.3 candidate tumor suppressor gene SEMA3B

    OpenAIRE

    Tomizawa, Yoshio; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Masashi; Gao, Boning; Yokota, Jun; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry; Lerman, Michael I; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.

    2001-01-01

    Semaphorins SEMA3B and its homologue SEMA3F are 3p21.3 candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), the expression of which is frequently lost in lung cancers. To test the TSG candidacy of SEMA3B and SEMA3F, we transfected them into lung cancer NCI-H1299 cells, which do not express either gene. Colony formation of H1299 cells was reduced 90% after transfection with wild-type SEMA3B compared with the control vector. By contrast, only 30–40% reduction in colony formation was seen after the transfec...

  14. At the double for tumor suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Research on zebrafish reveals how a tumor suppressor works in two different types of cells, and how hypotonic stress promotes tumor formation when the function of this tumor suppressor is lost. PMID:27421119

  15. Candidate Tumor-Suppressor Gene DLEC1 Is Frequently Downregulated by Promoter Hypermethylation and Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

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    Joseph Kwong

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of ovarian tumor growth by chromosome 3p was demonstrated in a previous study. Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1 on 3p22.3 is a candidate tumor suppressor in lung, esophageal, and renal cancers. The potential involvement of DLEC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer remains unknown. In the present study, DLEC1 downregulation was found in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors. Focus-expressed DLEC1 in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in 41% to 52% inhibition of colony formation. No chromosomal loss of chromosome 3p22.3 in any ovarian cancer cell line or tissue was found. Promoter hypermethylation of DLEC1 was detected in ovarian cancer cell lines with reduced DLEC1 transcripts, whereas methylation was not detected in normal ovarian epithelium and DLEC1-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines. Treatment with demethylating agent enhanced DLEC1 expression in 90% (9 of 10 of ovarian cancer cell lines. DLEC1 promoter methylation was examined in 13 high-grade ovarian tumor tissues with DLEC1 downregulation, in which 54% of the tumors showed DLEC1 methylation. In addition, 80% of ovarian cancer cell lines significantly upregulated DLEC1 transcripts after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, our results suggested that DLEC1 suppressed the growth of ovarian cancer cells and that its downregulation was closely associated with promoter hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

  16. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors

  17. The candidate tumor suppressor CST6 alters the gene expression profile of human breast carcinoma cells: Down-regulation of the potent mitogenic, motogenic, and angiogenic factor autotaxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently coined CST6 as a novel candidate tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer. CST6 indeed is expressed in the normal human breast epithelium, but little or not at all in breast carcinomas and breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ectopic expression of CST6 in human breast cancer cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and orthotopic tumor growth. To obtain insights into the molecular mechanism by which CST6 exhibits its pleiotropic effects on tumor cells, we compared global gene expression profiles in mock- and CST6-transfected human MDA-MB-435S cells. Out of 12,625 transcript species, 61 showed altered expression. These included genes for extracellular matrix components, cytokines, kinases, and phosphatases, as well as several key transcription factors. TaqMan PCR assays were used to confirm the microarray data for 7 out of 11 genes. One down-regulated gene product, secreted autotaxin/lyso-phospholipase D, was of particular interest because its down-regulation by CST6 could explain most of CST6's effect on the breast cancer cells. This study thus provides First evidence that CST6 plays a role in the modulation of genes, particularly, genes that are highly relevant to breast cancer progression

  18. Nuclear tumor suppressors in space and time.

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    Barbie, David A; Conlan, Lindus A; Kennedy, Brian K

    2005-07-01

    Numerous studies have identified key binding partners and functional activities of nuclear tumor-suppressor proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein, p53 and BRCA1. Historically, less attention has been given to the subnuclear locations of these proteins. Here, we describe several recent studies that promote the view that regulated association with subcompartments of the nucleus is inherent to tumor-suppressor function. PMID:15936946

  19. Transformation of MCF-10A cells by random mutagenesis with frameshift mutagen ICR191: A model for identifying candidate breast-tumor suppressors

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    Matsui Sei-Ichi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely accepted somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis states that mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in genomes of somatic cells is the cause of neoplastic transformation. Identifying frequent mutations in cancer cells suggests the involvement of mutant genes in carcinogenesis. Results To develop an in vitro model for the analysis of genetic alterations associated with breast carcinogenesis, we used random mutagenesis and selection of human non-tumorigenic immortalized breast epithelial cells MCF-10A in tissue-culture conditions that mimic tumor environment. Random mutations were generated in MCF-10A cells by cultivating them in a tissue-culture medium containing the frameshift-inducing agent ICR191. The first selective condition we used to transform MCF1-10A cells was cultivation in a medium containing mutagen at a concentration that allowed cell replication despite p53 protein accumulation induced by mutagen treatment. The second step of selection was either cell cultivation in a medium with reduced growth-factor supply or in a medium that mimics a hypoxia condition or growing in soft agar. Using mutagenesis and selection, we have generated several independently derived cultures with various degrees of transformation. Gene Identification by Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay Inhibition (GINI analysis has identified the ICR191-induced frameshift mutations in the TP53, smoothelin, Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6 domain family 6 (RASSF6 and other genes in the transformed MCF-10A cells. The TP53 gene mutations resulting in the loss of protein expression had been found in all independently transformed MCF-10A cultures, which form large progressively growing tumors with sustained angiogenesis in nude mice. Conclusion Identifying genes containing bi-allelic ICR191-induced frameshift mutations in the transformed MCF-10A cells generated by random mutagenesis and selection indicates putative breast-tumor suppressors. This

  20. Tumor suppressor identified as inhibitor of inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at NCI have found that a protein, FBXW7, which acts as a tumor suppressor, is also important for the reduction in strength of inflammatory pathways. It has long been recognized that a complex interaction exists between cancer causing mechanisms

  1. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Alexander I; Wei, Jinxiong; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40). Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections. PMID:26379246

  2. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  3. SOCS1 in cancer: An oncogene and a tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaurivage, Claudia; Champagne, Audrey; Tobelaim, William S; Pomerleau, Véronique; Menendez, Alfredo; Saucier, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    The Suppressor Of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) has been extensively investigated in immune cells where it works as a potent inhibitor of inflammation by negative feedback regulation of the cytokine-activated JAK-STAT signaling pathways. SOCS1 is also recognized as a tumor suppressor in numerous cancers and its critical functional relevance in non-immune cells, including epithelial cells, has just begun to emerge. Most notably, conflicting results from clinical and experimental studies suggest that SOCS1 may function as either a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter, in a cell context-dependent manner. Here, we present an overview of the mechanisms underlying SOCS1 function as a tumor suppressor and discuss the emerging evidences of SOCS1 activity as an oncogene. PMID:26811119

  4. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

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    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  5. Tumor suppressor p53 response is blunted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effect of low-dose radiation has been a focus of research interest in recent years because this area has important implications for radiation protection at doses of 0-1 Gy. At present, there is a lack of substantial evidence to indicate harmful effects of these low doses, in contrast, epidemiological data regarding the cancer incidence from areas with high background radiation levels seem to favor a beneficial effect of chronic low-dose radiation. To strengthen these aspects of radiation science, more molecular evidence on the cellular response to low doses is required. In the field of tumor biology, p53 may be one of the best studied molecules. Besides its function as a potent tumor suppressor, p53 is also found to govern G1 and/or G2/M checkpoint response in cells under stressful conditions. One of the mediators of p53 is waf1, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase. By inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis and probably DNA repair, activation of the p53-dependent signal transduction pathway minimizes the inheritance of damaged genetic information thereby maintaining genomic stability. Recently, we and other investigators found that the agents that evoke the p53 pathway are not limited to DNA-damaging agents but also include non-DNA-damaging stressors. Therefore, p53 may also be viewed as a major player in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Acute low dose irradiation (0.1-1 Gy, 1.33 Gy/min) of a human glioblastoma cell line, A-172 (wp53) induced a dose-dependent monophasic accumulation of p53 and wild-type p53 activated factor-1, WAF1. Different from this, chronic γ-irradiation (0.001 Gy/min) produced a clear biphasic response of p53 accumulation with the first peak at 1.5 h (0.09 Gy) and the second peak at 10 h (0.54 Gy). Significantly when the cells were pre-irradiated with chronic γ-irradiation for 24 h (1.44 Gy) or 50 h (3 Gy), they could no longer response to the second acute challenging irradiation to produce a dose-dependent response of

  6. Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by tumor exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Xiaoyu; Poliakov, Anton; Liu, Cunren; Liu, Yuelong; Deng, Zhong-Bin; wang, Jianhua; Cheng, Ziqiang; Shah, Spandan V.; Wang, Gui-Jun; Zhang, Liming; Grizzle, William E.; Mobley, Jim; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) promote tumor progression. The mechanisms of MDSC development during tumor growth remain unknown. Tumor exosomes (T-exosomes) have been implicated to play a role in immune regulation, however the role of exosomes in the induction of MDSCs is unclear. Our previous work demonstrated that exosomes isolated from tumor cells are taken up by bone marrow myeloid cells. Here, we extend those findings showing that exosomes isolated from T-exosomes switch the di...

  7. Some facts and thoughts: p73 as a tumor suppressor gene in the network of tumor suppressors

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    Boominathan Lakshmanane

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The question of whether p73 is a tumor suppressor gene, is not yet answered with full confidence. The lack of spontaneous tumor formation in p73 null mice and infrequent p73 mutations seen in a variety of cancers analyzed would straightaway negate its role as a primary tumor suppressor gene. However, accumulating evidence suggest that p73 gene and its target genes are hypermethylated in the cancer of lymphoid origin. Here I discuss some facts and thoughts that support the idea that p73 could still be a tumor suppressor gene. The tumor suppressor network in which p73 appears to be a participant involves E2F1, JunB, INK4a/p16, ARF/p19, p57kip2 and BRCA1. Knock out of each gene in E2F-1-p73-JunB-p16INK4a network of tumor suppressor proteins result in lymphoma/leukemia formation. Further, I tried to explain why lymphomas are not seen in p73 null mice and why p73 gene is not prone to frequent mutation.

  8. Multiplexed methylation profiles of tumor suppressor genes and clinical outcome in lung cancer

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    Venditti Julio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in DNA methylation of crucial cancer genes including tumor suppressors can occur early in carcinogenesis, being potentially important early indicators of cancer. The objective of this study was to examine a multiplexed approach to assess the methylation of tumor suppressor genes as tumor stratification and clinical outcome prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer. Methods A multicandidate probe panel interrogated DNA for aberrant methylation status in 18 tumor suppressor genes in lung cancer using a methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay (MS-MLPA. Lung cancer cell lines (n = 7, and primary lung tumors (n = 54 were examined using MS-MLPA. Results Genes frequently methylated in lung cancer cell lines including SCGB3A1, ID4, CCND2 were found among the most commonly methylated in the lung tumors analyzed. HLTF, BNIP3, H2AFX, CACNA1G, TGIF, ID4 and CACNA1A were identified as novel tumor suppressor candidates methylated in lung tumors. The most frequently methylated genes in lung tumors were SCGB3A1 and DLC1 (both 50.0%. Methylation rates for ID4, DCL1, BNIP3, H2AFX, CACNA1G and TIMP3 were significantly different between squamous and adenocarcinomas. Methylation of RUNX3, SCGB3A1, SFRP4, and DLC1 was significantly associated with the extent of the disease when comparing localized versus metastatic tumors. Moreover, methylation of HTLF, SFRP5 and TIMP3 were significantly associated with overall survival. Conclusions MS-MLPA can be used for classification of certain types of lung tumors and clinical outcome prediction. This latter is clinically relevant by offering an adjunct strategy for the clinical management of lung cancer patients.

  9. "Ring-fencing" BRCA1 tumor suppressor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan J; Crossan, Gerry P; Hodskinson, Michael R G

    2011-12-13

    BRCA1 is a crucial human breast and ovarian cancer tumor suppressor gene. The article by Drost et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell together with a recent paper in Science now provide a clearer picture of how this large and complex protein suppresses tumorigenesis. PMID:22172717

  10. Enhanced transfection of brain tumor suppressor genes by photochemical internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih H.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2011-03-01

    One of many limitations for cancer gene therapy is the inability of the therapeutic gene to transfect a sufficient number of tumor cells. Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. The utility of PCI for the delivery of a tumor suppressor gene (PAX-6) was investigated in monolayers and spheroids consisting of F98 rat glioma cells.

  11. FOXP3 as X-linked Tumor Suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lizhong; Liu, Runhua; Ribick, Mark; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The FOXP3 gene was initially identified because its mutation caused lethal autoimmune diseases in mouse and human. Mice with heterozygous mutation of Foxp3 succumb to mammary tumor spontaneously, while those with prostate-specific deletion develop prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Somatic mutations, deletion and epigenetic inactivation of FOXP3 are widespread among human breast and prostate cancers. Unlike autosomal tumor suppressor genes that were usually inactivated by mutations in both a...

  12. MyoD is a tumor suppressor gene in Medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Dey, Joyoti; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Pedro, Kyle D.; Thirstrup, Derek; Mecham, Brig; Northcott, Paul A.; Wu, Xiaochong; Shih, David; Tapscott, Stephen J.; LeBlanc, Michael; Taylor, Michael D.; Olson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    While medulloblastoma, a pediatric tumor of the cerebellum, is characterized by aberrations in developmental pathways, the majority of genetic determinants remain unknown. An unbiased Sleeping Beauty transposon screen revealed MyoD as a putative medulloblastoma tumor suppressor. This was unexpected, as MyoD is a muscle differentiation factor and not previously known to be expressed in cerebellum or medulloblastoma. In response to deletion of one allele of MyoD, two other Sonic hedgehog-driven...

  13. Tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vinayak Gourish Naik; Prakruti Adhyaru; Ajit Gudigenavar

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases but its components are not yet entirely clear. A number of genomic lesions accompany the transformation into oral cancer and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature. Tumor supp...

  14. Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes: comparative genomics and network perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Kevin; Liu, Qi; Zhou, Yubo; Tao, Cui; Zhao, Zhongming; Sun, Jingchun; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background Defective tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and hyperactive oncogenes (OCGs) heavily contribute to cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development through genetic variations such as somatic mutations and deletions. Moreover, they usually do not perform their cellular functions individually but rather execute jointly. Therefore, a comprehensive comparison of their mutation patterns and network properties may provide a deeper understanding of their roles in the cancer developm...

  15. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor and stem cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Sage, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells play a critical role during embryonic development and in the maintenance of homeostasis in adult individuals. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor RB controls the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of cells, and accumulating evidence points to a central role for RB activity in the biology of stem and progenitor cells. In this review by Sage, recent studies investigating the role of RB in embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and progenitor cells in plants and mammals is ...

  16. BRCA1 tumor suppressor network: focusing on its tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germline mutations of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are a major cause of familial breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1 plays critical roles in the DNA damage response that regulates activities of multiple repair and checkpoint pathways for maintaining genome stability. The BRCT domains of BRCA1 constitute a phospho-peptide binding domain recognizing a phospho-SPxF motif (S, serine; P, proline; × varies; F, phenylalanine. The BRCT domains are frequently targeted by clinically important mutations and most of these mutations disrupt the binding surface of the BRCT domains to phosphorylated peptides. The BRCT domain and its capability to bind phosphorylated protein is required for the tumor suppressor function of BRCA1. Through its BRCT phospho-binding ability BRCA1 forms at least three mutually exclusive complexes by binding to phosphorylated proteins Abraxas, Bach1 and CTIP. The A, B and C complexes, at lease partially undertake BRCA1's role in mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair that maintain genome stability, thus may play important roles in BRCA1's tumor suppressor function.

  17. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were rep...

  18. High throughput functional genomics: identification of novel genes with tumor suppressor phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig-Hoffmann, Kerstin; Bonin-Debs, Angelika L; Boche, Irene; Gawin, Beate; Gnirke, Andrea; Hergersberg, Christoph; Madeo, Frank; Kazinski, Michael; Klein, Matthias; Korherr, Christian; Link, Dieter; Röhrig, Sascha; Schäfer, Rolf; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2005-01-20

    We have used a combination of high throughput functional genomics, computerized database mining and expression analyses to discover novel human tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). A genome-wide high throughput cDNA phenotype screen was established to identify genes that induce apoptosis or reduce cell viability. TSGs are expressed in normal tissue and frequently act by reduction of growth of transformed cells or induce apoptosis. In agreement with that and thus serving as platform validation, our pro-apoptotic hits included genes for which tumor suppressing activities were known, such as kangai1 and CD81 antigen. Additional genes that so far have been claimed as putative TSGs or associated with tumor inhibitory activities (prostate differentiation factor, hRAS-like suppressor 3, DPH2L1-like and the metastasis inhibitor Kiss1) were confirmed in their proposed TSG-like phenotype by functionally defining their growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic function towards cancer cells. Finally, novel genes were identified for which neither association with cell growth nor with apoptosis were previously described. A subset of these genes show characteristics of TSGs because they (i) reduce the growth or induce apoptosis in tumor cells; (ii) show reduced expression in tumor vs. normal tissue; and (iii) are located on chromosomal (LOH-) loci for which cancer-associated deletions are described. The pro-apoptotic phenotype and differential expression of these genes in normal and malignant tissue make them promising target candidates for the diagnosis and therapy of various tumors. PMID:15455385

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  20. Functional epigenomics approach to identify methylated candidate tumour suppressor genes in renal cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, M.

    2008-01-01

    Promoter region hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing is a frequent cause of tumour suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation in many human cancers. Previously, to identify candidate epigenetically inactivated TSGs in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we monitored changes in gene expression in four RCC cell lines after treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This enabled us to identify HAI-2/SPINT2 as a novel epigenetically inactivated candidate RCC TSG. To identify further candidat...

  1. RB1: a prototype tumor suppressor and an enigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (RB1) was the first tumor suppressor gene to be molecularly defined. RB1 mutations occur in almost all familial and sporadic forms of retinoblastoma, and this gene is mutated at variable frequencies in a variety of other human cancers. Because of its early discovery, the recessive nature of RB1 mutations, and its frequency of inactivation, RB1 is often described as a prototype for the class of tumor suppressor genes. Its gene product (pRB) regulates transcription and is a negative regulator of cell proliferation. Although these general features are well established, a precise description of pRB's mechanism of action has remained elusive. Indeed, in many regards, pRB remains an enigma. This review summarizes some recent developments in pRB research and focuses on progress toward answers for the three fundamental questions that sit at the heart of the pRB literature: What does pRB do? How does the inactivation of RB change the cell? How can our knowledge of RB function be exploited to provide better treatment for cancer patients? PMID:27401552

  2. Cooperation between the Hic1 and Ptch1 tumor suppressors in medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Kimberly J.; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M.; Zhang, Wei; Harcke, Thomas; Devereux, Wendy L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is an embryonal tumor thought to arise from the granule cell precursors (GCPs) of the cerebellum. PATCHED (PTCH), an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, is the best-characterized tumor suppressor in medulloblastoma. However,

  3. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. ► PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. ► HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. ► INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  4. LARG at chromosome 11q23 has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Danny C.T.; Rudduck, Christina; Chin, Koei; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lie, Daniel K.H.; Chua, Constance L.M.; Wong, Chow Yin; Hong, Ga Sze; Gray, Joe; Lee, Ann S.G.

    2008-05-06

    Deletion of 11q23-q24 is frequent in a diverse variety of malignancies, including breast and colorectal carcinoma, implicating the presence of a tumor suppressor gene at that chromosomal region. We show here that LARG, from 11q23, has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor. We examined a 6-Mb region on 11q23 by high-resolution deletion mapping, utilizing both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis and microarray comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). LARG (also called ARHGEF12), identified from the analyzed region, was underexpressed in 34% of primary breast carcinomas and 80% of breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 line. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification on 30 primary breast cancers and six breast cancer cell lines showed that LARG had the highest frequency of deletion compared to the BCSC-1 and TSLC1 genes, two known candidate tumor suppressor genes from 11q. In vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines that underexpress LARG showed that LARG could be reactivated by trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, but not by 5-Aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent. Bisulfite sequencing and quantitative high-throughput analysis of DNA methylation confirmed the lack of CpG island methylation in LARG in breast cancer. Restoration of LARG expression in MCF-7 cells by stable transfection resulted in reduced proliferation and colony formation, suggesting that LARG has functional characteristics of a tumor suppressor gene.

  5. The tumor suppressor kinase LKB1: lessons from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saara Ollila; Tomi P. M(a)kel(a)

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene LKB1 are important in hereditary Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,as well as in sporadic cancers including lung and cervical cancer.LKB1 is a kinase-activating Kinase,and a number of LKB1-dependent phosphorylation cascades regulate fundamental cellular and organismal processes in at least metabolism,polarity,cytoskeleton organization,and proliferation.Conditional targeting approaches are beginning to demonstrate the relevance and specificity of these signaling pathways in development and homeostasis of multiple organs.More than one of the pathways also appear to contribute to tumor growth following Lkb1 deficiencies based on a number of mouse tumor models.Lkb1-dependent activation of AMPK and subsequent inactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling are implicated in several of the models,and other less well characterized pathways are also involved.Conditional targeting studies of Lkb1 also point an important role of LKB1 in epithelial-masenchymal interactions,significantly expanding knowledge on the relevance of LKB1 in human disease.

  6. Mutation detection in tumor suppressor genes using archival tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Henske, Elizabeth Petri

    2006-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, and benign tumors of many organs, including the brain, kidneys, skin, retina, and heart. TSC is caused by mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. The genes follow the two-hit model for tumorigenesis, with germline mutations inactivating one allele and somatic mutations inactivating the remaining wild-type allele. Allelic loss (also called loss of heterozygosity [LOH]) in the 9q34 and 16p13 regions has been found in many tumor types from TSC patients. Cardiac rhabdomyomas are frequently found in infants with TSC. Because rhabdomyomas often spontaneously regress, access to fresh tissue is limited. In this chapter, we present methodology for detection of genetic inactivation of TSC1 and TSC2 in paraffin-embedded archival tissues. The template DNA is obtained either by direct scraping of tissue or after laser capture microdissection. LOH analysis is performed after polymerase chain reaction amplification of microsatellite markers in the 9q34 and 16p13 regions and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mutation detection is performed using single-strand conformation polymorphisms on mutation detection enhancement gels. Finally, variant bands are amplified and analyzed by direct sequencing. PMID:16930013

  7. Identification and characterization of potential tumor suppressor genes for ovarian cancer on chromosome 8p22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequent Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) in specific chromosomal regions of tumors indicates the residence of at least one tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in the corresponding chromosomal region. Chromosome 8p22 is described as LOH hotspot in several epithelial tumors. However, the related genes of this chromosomal band are still very poorly described. The aim of this study was the identification and characterization of potential tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 8p22 in ovarian cancer. Two out of 22 genes of 8p22, hVps37A and TuSC3, turned out to be promising tumor suppressor candidates and were characterized in more detail. It could be shown that hVps37 expression is significantly reduced in primary ovarian tumors relative to normal ovarian epithelials. Furthermore, survival rates of the patients were directly correlated with the hVps37A expression of the corresponding tumors. In-vitro characterization of hVps37A in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in an explanatory model of the clinical observations. As part of the ESCRT-I complex hVps37A is involved in the degradation process of activated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) including the well described oncogenes EGFR and HER2. Consequently, hVps37A knockdown led to a hyperactivation of the MAPK (Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase) pathway secondary to accumulating amounts of the activated EGFR (pEGFR) in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the hVps37-silenced cell lines developed a resistance against the growth inhibitory effect of Cetuximab. In contrast to hVps37A, 29.7% of the tumors analyzed were methylated at the TuSC3 promoter, accompanied with reduced mRNA expression and unfavourable survival rate of the patients. Therefore, promoter methylation turned out to be an independent prognostic factor for ovarian cancer. In-vitro, it could be shown that TuSCS3 resides in the endoplasmatic reticulum and is involved in the N-glycosylation process of integrin-β1 and potentially further proteins. Moreover, reconstitution of

  8. Concomitant presence of anti-tumor effector cells and suppressor cells in the spleen of tumor-bearing mice : the nature of suppressor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hizuta,Akio

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the immunological responsiveness of tumor-bearing hosts to tumor cells, splenic suppressor cells from Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice that inhibited anti-tumor effector cell activity were characterized. In vitro cell-mediated cytoxicity and cytostasis assays were performed to test for the existence of anti-tumor immunity. suppressive activity assayed by cell mixture experiments became apparent with decline of anti-tumor immunity and progressive tumor growth. The cells mediating the suppression were found to be nylon wool column adherent T cells and inhibited T cell dependent cytotoxicity rather than non-T cell dependent cytostasis. In vivo cell transfer experiments demonstrated that intravenous injection of suppressor cells to a host already inoculated with tumor cells mixed with antitumor effector cells resulted in significant enhancement of tumor growth. This inhibition of in vivo neutralization assay be suppressor cells was found in not only allogeneic but also syngeneic tumor system. Splenectomy at the time of tumor resection endowed the host with stronger resistance against subsequent reinoculated tumor than sham-splenectomy did, reflected by prolonged survival times. These results suggest that splenectomy combined with surgical removal of the tumor is a useful treatment of clinical malignancies.

  9. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. PMID:27085853

  10. Tumor Suppressor Function of CYLD in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Masoumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-related proteins posttranslationally modify substrates, and thereby alter the functions of their targets. The ubiquitination process is involved in various physiological responses, and dysregulation of components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases including skin cancer. The ubiquitin pathways activated among skin cancers are highly diverse and may reflect the various characteristics of the cancer type. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the most common types of human skin cancer, are instances where the involvement of the deubiquitination enzyme CYLD has been recently highlighted. In basal cell carcinoma, the tumor suppressor protein CYLD is repressed at the transcriptional levels through hedgehog signaling pathway. Downregulation of CYLD in basal cell carcinoma was also shown to interfere with TrkC expression and signaling, thereby promoting cancer progression. By contrast, the level of CYLD is unchanged in squamous cell carcinoma, instead, catalytic inactivation of CYLD in the skin has been linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. This paper will focus on the current knowledge that links CYLD to nonmelanoma skin cancers and will explore recent insights regarding CYLD regulation of NF-κB and hedgehog signaling during the development and progression of these types of human tumors.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Hongbo; Liu Jing; Guo Dan; Liu Peixiang; Zhao Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Background Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types.The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter,as one of the main regulatory mechanisms,is associated with TGFBI silencing.In this study,we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias.Methods Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia call lines and clinical samples.Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients,bisulfite-converted,and analyzed by the MSP method.Results Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested.Furthermore,a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples.Conclusion The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia,which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  12. Tumor suppressor p53 meets microRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohui Feng; Cen Zhang; Rui Wu; Wenwei Hu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in tumor prevention. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its function through transcription regulation of its target genes to initiate various cellular responses. To maintain its proper function, p53 is tightly regulated by a wide variety of regulators in cells. Thus, p53, its regulators and regulated genes form a complex p53 network which is composed of hundreds of genes and their products. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenously expressed, small non-coding RNA molecules which play a key role in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNAs interact with p53 and its network at multiple levels. p53 regulates the transcription expression and the maturation of a group of miRNAs. On the other hand, miRNAs can regulate the activity and function of p53 through direct repression of p53 or its regulators in cells. These findings have demonstrated that miRNAs are important components in the p53 network, and also added another layer of complexity to the p53 network.

  13. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  14. Cell size checkpoint control by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Chiung Fang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Size control is essential for all proliferating cells, and is thought to be regulated by checkpoints that couple cell size to cell cycle progression. The aberrant cell-size phenotypes caused by mutations in the retinoblastoma (RB tumor suppressor pathway are consistent with a role in size checkpoint control, but indirect effects on size caused by altered cell cycle kinetics are difficult to rule out. The multiple fission cell cycle of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii uncouples growth from division, allowing direct assessment of the relationship between size phenotypes and checkpoint function. Mutations in the C. reinhardtii RB homolog encoded by MAT3 cause supernumerous cell divisions and small cells, suggesting a role for MAT3 in size control. We identified suppressors of an mat3 null allele that had recessive mutations in DP1 or dominant mutations in E2F1, loci encoding homologs of a heterodimeric transcription factor that is targeted by RB-related proteins. Significantly, we determined that the dp1 and e2f1 phenotypes were caused by defects in size checkpoint control and were not due to a lengthened cell cycle. Despite their cell division defects, mat3, dp1, and e2f1 mutants showed almost no changes in periodic transcription of genes induced during S phase and mitosis, many of which are conserved targets of the RB pathway. Conversely, we found that regulation of cell size was unaffected when S phase and mitotic transcription were inhibited. Our data provide direct evidence that the RB pathway mediates cell size checkpoint control and suggest that such control is not directly coupled to the magnitude of periodic cell cycle transcription.

  15. PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroki, Misao [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Ariumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ariumi@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Hijikata, Makoto [Department of Viral Oncology, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori; Dansako, Hiromichi [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Wakita, Takaji [Department of Virology II, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Shimotohno, Kunitada [Research Center for Hepatitis and Immunology, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-8516 (Japan); Kato, Nobuyuki [Department of Tumor Virology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML tumor suppressor protein is required for HCV production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PML is dispensable for HCV RNA replication. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCV could not alter formation of PML-NBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer INI1 and DDX5, PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV life cycle. -- Abstract: PML tumor suppressor protein, which forms discrete nuclear structures termed PML-nuclear bodies, has been associated with several cellular functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and antiviral defense. Recently, it was reported that the HCV core protein colocalizes with PML in PML-NBs and abrogates the PML function through interaction with PML. However, role(s) of PML in HCV life cycle is unknown. To test whether or not PML affects HCV life cycle, we examined the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity of HCV in the culture supernatants as well as the level of HCV RNA in HuH-7-derived RSc cells, in which HCV-JFH1 can infect and efficiently replicate, stably expressing short hairpin RNA targeted to PML. In this context, the level of secreted HCV core and the infectivity in the supernatants from PML knockdown cells was remarkably reduced, whereas the level of HCV RNA in the PML knockdown cells was not significantly affected in spite of very effective knockdown of PML. In fact, we showed that PML is unrelated to HCV RNA replication using the subgenomic HCV-JFH1 replicon RNA, JRN/3-5B. Furthermore, the infectivity of HCV-like particle in the culture supernatants was significantly reduced in PML knockdown JRN/3-5B cells expressing core to NS2 coding region of HCV-JFH1 genome using the trans-packaging system. Finally, we also demonstrated that INI1 and DDX5, the PML-related proteins, are involved in HCV production. Taken together, these findings suggest that PML is required for HCV production.

  16. Tetramer formation of tumor suppressor protein p53: Structure, function, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Rui; Toguchi, Yu; Nomura, Takao; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-11-01

    Tetramer formation of p53 is essential for its tumor suppressor function. p53 not only acts as a tumor suppressor protein by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress, but it also regulates other cellular processes, including autophagy, stem cell self-renewal, and reprogramming of differentiated cells into stem cells, immune system, and metastasis. More than 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations, and most of them are missense mutations that presumably reduce tumor suppressor activity of p53. This review focuses on the role of the tetramerization (oligomerization), which is modulated by the protein concentration of p53, posttranslational modifications, and/or interactions with its binding proteins, in regulating the tumor suppressor function of p53. Functional control of p53 by stabilizing or inhibiting oligomer formation and its bio-applications are also discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 598-612, 2016. PMID:26572807

  17. Oncogene-tumor suppressor gene feedback interactions and their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguda, Baltazar D; del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Chan, Michael W Y

    2015-12-01

    We propose the hypothesis that for a particular type of cancer there exists a key pair of oncogene (OCG) and tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that is normally involved in strong stabilizing negative feedback loops (nFBLs) of molecular interactions, and it is these interactions that are sufficiently perturbed during cancer development. These nFBLs are thought to regulate oncogenic positive feedback loops (pFBLs) that are often required for the normal cellular functions of oncogenes. Examples given in this paper are the pairs of MYC and p53, KRAS and INK4A, and E2F1 and miR-17-92. We propose dynamical models of the aforementioned OCG-TSG interactions and derive stability conditions of the steady states in terms of strengths of cycles in the qualitative interaction network. Although these conditions are restricted to predictions of local stability, their simple linear expressions in terms of competing nFBLs and pFBLs make them intuitive and practical guides for experimentalists aiming to discover drug targets and stabilize cancer networks. PMID:26775863

  18. RASSF6; the Putative Tumor Suppressor of the RASSF Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Iwasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans have 10 genes that belong to the Ras association (RA domain family (RASSF. Among them, RASSF7 to RASSF10 have the RA domain in the N-terminal region and are called the N-RASSF proteins. In contradistinction to them, RASSF1 to RASSF6 are referred to as the C-RASSF proteins. The C-RASSF proteins have the RA domain in the middle region and the Salvador/RASSF/Hippo domain in the C-terminal region. RASSF6 additionally harbors the PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ-binding motif. Expression of RASSF6 is epigenetically suppressed in human cancers and is generally regarded as a tumor suppressor. RASSF6 induces caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis. RASSF6 interacts with mammalian Ste20-like kinases (homologs of Drosophila Hippo and cross-talks with the Hippo pathway. RASSF6 binds MDM2 and regulates p53 expression. The interactions with Ras and Modulator of apoptosis 1 (MOAP1 are also suggested by heterologous protein-protein interaction experiments. RASSF6 regulates apoptosis and cell cycle through these protein-protein interactions, and is implicated in the NF-κB and JNK signaling pathways. We summarize our current knowledge about RASSF6 and discuss what common and different properties RASSF6 and the other C-RASSF proteins have.

  19. FAM172A is a tumor suppressor in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Chunhui; Ye, Lili; Huang, Zonghai; Huang, Shuxin; Liu, Hao; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to elucidate the regulatory role of a novel protein FAM172A in carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Investigation of clinical samples using Western blotting showed that expression of FAM172A is significantly lower in cancerous tissues than in adjacent tissues. Furthermore, we constructed in vitro model for continuous overexpression and silencing of FAM172A with a retroviral vector system. FAM172A suppressed the proliferative and invasive potentials of LOVO cells as shown in MTT test, transwell migration assay, wound healing assay, 3D-culture morphologic study, and xenograft experiment. RT-PCR and Western blotting showed that FAM172A overexpression inhibited expressions of Cyclin D1, CDK2, MMP-2, MMP-9, PERK, elF2α, ATF6, XBP1, and GRP78, while FAM172A silencing induced their expressions. FAM172A might regulate ERS through PERK-elF2α, ATF6-XBP1-GRP78 signal pathway. The results implicated that FAM172A functioned as a tumor suppressor in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26637224

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs tumor suppressor p53 expression/function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Shannon; Kim, Chul; Griner, Nicholas B; Potluri, Prasanth; Scheffler, Immo E; Sen, Sabyasachi; Jerry, D Joseph; Schneider, Sallie; Yadava, Nagendra

    2011-06-10

    Recently, mitochondria have been suggested to act in tumor suppression. However, the underlying mechanisms by which mitochondria suppress tumorigenesis are far from being clear. In this study, we have investigated the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and the tumor suppressor protein p53 using a set of respiration-deficient (Res(-)) mammalian cell mutants with impaired assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our data suggest that normal mitochondrial function is required for γ-irradiation (γIR)-induced cell death, which is mainly a p53-dependent process. The Res(-) cells are protected against γIR-induced cell death due to impaired p53 expression/function. We find that the loss of complex I biogenesis in the absence of the MWFE subunit reduces the steady-state level of the p53 protein, although there is no effect on the p53 protein level in the absence of the ESSS subunit that is also essential for complex I assembly. The p53 protein level was also reduced to undetectable levels in Res(-) cells with severely impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. This suggests that p53 protein expression is differentially regulated depending upon the type of electron transport chain/respiratory chain deficiency. Moreover, irrespective of the differences in the p53 protein expression profile, γIR-induced p53 activity is compromised in all Res(-) cells. Using two different conditional systems for complex I assembly, we also show that the effect of mitochondrial dysfunction on p53 expression/function is a reversible phenomenon. We believe that these findings will have major implications in the understanding of cancer development and therapy. PMID:21502317

  1. BRCA1 and p53 Tumor Suppressor Molecules in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuko Nakanishi; Akari Minami; Yasuko Kitagishi; Yasunori Ogura; Satoru Matsuda

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor molecules play a pivotal role in regulating DNA repair, cell proliferation, and cell death, which are also important processes in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, however, the precise molecular events that control the death of neuronal cells are unclear. Recently, a fundamental role for tumor suppressor molecules in regulating neurons in Alzheimer’s disease was highlighted. Generally, onset of neurod...

  2. Exclusive Association of p53 Mutation with Super-High Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in the p53 Pathway in a Unique Gastric Cancer Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Waraya; Keishi Yamashita; Akira Ema; Natsuya Katada; Shiro Kikuchi; Masahiko Watanabe

    2015-01-01

    Background A comprehensive search for DNA methylated genes identified candidate tumor suppressor genes that have been proven to be involved in the apoptotic process of the p53 pathway. In this study, we investigated p53 mutation in relation to such epigenetic alteration in primary gastric cancer. Methods The methylation profiles of the 3 genes: PGP9.5, NMDAR2B, and CCNA1, which are involved in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway in combination with p53 mutation were examined in 163 primary gastr...

  3. The Liver is a Site for Tumor Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Accumulation and Immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Ilkovitch, Dan; Lopez, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-induced immunosuppression plays a key role in tumor evasion of the immune system. A key cell population recognized as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) contributes and helps orchestrate this immunosuppression. MDSC can interact with T cells, macrophages, and NK cells, to create an environment favorable for tumor progression. In various tumor models their presence at high levels has been reported in the bone marrow, blood, spleen, and tumor. We report for the first time that MDSC a...

  4. Trophoblast expression dynamics of the tumor suppressor gene gastrokine 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlbusch, Fabian B; Ruebner, Matthias; Huebner, Hanna; Volkert, Gudrun; Bartunik, Hannah; Winterfeld, Ilona; Hartner, Andrea; Menendez-Castro, Carlos; Noegel, Stephanie C; Marek, Ines; Wachter, David; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Beckmann, Matthias W; Kehl, Sven; Rascher, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Gastrokines (GKNs) were originally described as stomach-specific tumor suppressor genes. Recently, we identified GKN1 in extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) of human placenta. GKN1 treatment reduced the migration of the trophoblast cell line JEG-3. GKN2 is known to inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells and may interact with GKN1. Recently, GKN2 was detected in the placental yolk sac of mice. We therefore aimed to further characterize placental GKN2 expression. By immunohistochemistry, healthy first-trimester placenta showed ubiquitous staining for GKN2 at its early gestational stage. At later gestational stages, a more differentiated expression pattern in EVT and villous cytotrophoblasts became evident. In healthy third-trimester placenta, only EVT retained strong GKN2 immunoreactivity. In contrast, HELLP placentas showed a tendency of increased levels of GKN2 expression with a more prominent GKN2 staining in their syncytiotrophoblast. Choriocarcinoma cell lines did not express GKN2. Besides its trophoblastic expression, we found human GKN2 in fibrotic villi, in amniotic membrane and umbilical cord. GKN2 co-localized with smooth muscle actin in villous myofibroblasts and with HLA-G and GKN1 in EVT. In the rodent placenta, GKN2 was specifically located in the spongiotrophoblast layer. Thus, the gestational age-dependent and compartment-specific expression pattern of GKN2 points to a role for placental development. The syncytial expression of GKN2 in HELLP placentas might represent a reduced state of functional differentiation of the syncytiotrophoblast. Moreover, the specific GKN2 expression in the rodent spongiotrophoblast layer (equivalent to human EVT) might suggest an important role in EVT physiology. PMID:26070363

  5. Tumor-suppressor activity of RRIG1 in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinoid receptor-induced gene-1 (RRIG1) is a novel gene that has been lost in several types of human cancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether RRIG1 plays a role in breast cancer, such as in the suppression of breast cancer cell growth and invasion. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect RRIG1 expression in breast tissue specimens. Gene transfection was used to restore or knock down RRIG1 expression in breast cancer cell lines for analysis of cell viability, colony formation, and migration/invasion potential. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays were used to detect the changes in gene expression. The RhoA activation assay was used to assess RRIG1-induced inhibition of RhoA activity. The immunohistochemical data showed that RRIG1 expression was reduced in breast cancer tissues compared with normal and atypical hyperplastic breast tissues. RRIG1 expression was inversely correlated with lymph node metastasis of breast cancer but was not associated with the status of hormone receptors, such as estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or HER2. Furthermore, restoration of RRIG1 expression inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. Expression of RRIG1 also reduced phosphorylated Erk1/2 and Akt levels; c-Jun, MMP9, and Akt expressions; and RhoA activity. In contrast, knockdown of RRIG1 expression promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion potential. The data from the current study indicated that RRIG1 expression was reduced or lost in breast cancer and that restoration of RRIG1 expression suppressed breast cancer cell growth and invasion capacity. Future studies will determine the underlying molecular mechanisms and define RRIG1 as a tumor-suppressor gene in breast cancer

  6. A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Akihiro; Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Yutsudo, Masuo, E-mail: yutsudo@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2012-02-01

    The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  7. Control of glutamine metabolism by the tumor suppressor Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, M R; Lane, A N; Robertson, B; Kemp, S; Liu, Y; Hill, B G; Dean, D C; Clem, B F

    2014-01-30

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a tumor suppressor that is dysregulated in a majority of human cancers. Rb functions to inhibit cell cycle progression in part by directly disabling the E2F family of cell cycle-promoting transcription factors. Because the de novo synthesis of multiple glutamine-derived anabolic precursors is required for cell cycle progression, we hypothesized that Rb also may directly regulate proteins involved in glutamine metabolism. We examined glutamine metabolism in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from mice that have triple knock-outs (TKO) of all three Rb family members (Rb-1, Rbl1 and Rbl2) and found that loss of global Rb function caused a marked increase in (13)C-glutamine uptake and incorporation into glutamate and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) intermediates in part via upregulated expression of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and the activity of glutaminase 1 (GLS1). The Rb-controlled transcription factor E2F-3 altered glutamine uptake by direct regulation of ASCT2 mRNA and protein expression, and E2F-3 was observed to associate with the ASCT2 promoter. We next examined the functional consequences of the observed increase in glutamine uptake and utilization and found that glutamine exposure potently increased oxygen consumption, whereas glutamine deprivation selectively decreased ATP concentration in the Rb TKO MEFs but not the wild-type (WT) MEFs. In addition, TKO MEFs exhibited elevated production of glutathione from exogenous glutamine and had increased expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase relative to WT MEFs. Importantly, this metabolic shift towards glutamine utilization was required for the proliferation of Rb TKO MEFs but not for the proliferation of the WT MEFs. Last, addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate to the Rb TKO MEFs reversed the inhibitory effects of glutamine deprivation on ATP, GSH levels and viability. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the Rb/E2F cascade directly

  8. Expansion and functions of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Wang, Li-Zhen; Lin, P Charles

    2016-09-28

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a group of immature myeloid cells accumulated in most cancer patients and mouse tumor models. MDSCs suppress host immune response and concurrently promote tumor angiogenesis, thereby promote tumor growth and progression. In this review, we discuss recent progresses in expansion and activity of tumor MDSCs, and describe new findings about immunosuppressive function of different subtypes of MDSCs in cancer. We also discussed tumor angiogenic activities and pro-tumor invasion/metastatic roles of MDSCs in tumor progression. PMID:26519756

  9. The role of tumor suppressor p53 in the antioxidant defense and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Budanov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is inactivated in most cancers and the critical role of p53 in the suppression of carcinogenesis has been confirmed in many mouse models. The protein product of the tumor suppressor p53 gene works as a transcriptional regulator, activating expression of numerous genes involved in cell death, cell cycle arrest, senescence, DNA-repair and many other processes. In spite of the multiple efforts to characterize the functions of p53, the mechanisms of tumor suppression by p53 a...

  10. Loss of putative tumor suppressor EI24/PIG8 confers resistance to etoposide

    OpenAIRE

    Mork, Christina N.; Faller, Douglas V.; Spanjaard, Remco A.

    2007-01-01

    Expression of p53-target gene EI24/PIG8 is lost in invasive breast cancers, suggesting that EI24/PIG8 is a tumor suppressor that prevents tumor spreading, and partially mediates p53-attributed tumor suppressor activity. EI24/PIG8 also has proapoptotic activity indicating that loss of EI24/PIG8 may modulate sensitivity to chemotherapy. Here it is demonstrated that suppression of EI24/PIG8 in fibroblasts and breast cancer cells significantly inhibits the apoptotic response to etoposide treatmen...

  11. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina;

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... or 3' untranslated regions. Among these, 11 genes had been previously associated with cancer, with 4 genes being known tumor suppressors: DCC, PDZD2, MAGI1, and DACT2. We validated the APA in three out of three cases with quantitative real-time-PCR. Our findings suggest that changes of APA pattern...... in these 16 genes could be involved in the tumorigenesis of SI-NETs. Furthermore, they also point to APA as a new target for both diagnostic and treatment of SI-NETs. The identified genes with APA specific to the SI-NETs could be further tested as diagnostic markers and drug targets for disease prevention...

  12. CREB Targets Define the Gene Expression Signature of Malignancies Having Reduced Levels of the Tumor Suppressor Tristetraprolin

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Fallahi; Amelio, Antonio L.; Cleveland, John L.; Rounbehler, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Tristetraprolin (TTP, ZFP36) functions as a tumor suppressor that impairs the development and disables the maintenance of MYC-driven lymphoma. In addition, other human cancers expressed reduced levels of TTP, suggesting that it may function as a tumor suppressor in several malignancies. To identify genes that may be associated with TTP tumor suppressor functions in human cancer, we analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast cancer, lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamou...

  13. Analysis of losses of heterozygosity of the candidate tumour suppressor gene DMBT1 in melanoma resection specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deichmann, M; Mollenhauer, J; Helmke, B;

    2002-01-01

    Deleted in malignant brain tumours 1 (DMBT1), a candidate tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 10q25.3-q26.1, has recently been identified and found to be deleted in several different types of human tumours. In melanomas, the chromosomal region 10q22-qter is commonly affected by losses, h...... naevi and melanoma cells themselves were negative. All considered, the candidate tumour suppressor gene DMBT1 does not appear to be a major inactivation target in the development of melanomas....

  14. The Nature of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinit; Patel, Sima; Tcyganov, Evgenii; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2016-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major components of the tumor microenvironment. The main feature of these cells is their potent immune suppressive activity. MDSC are generated in the bone marrow and, in tumor-bearing hosts, migrate to peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor to contribute to the formation of the tumor microenvironment. Recent findings have revealed differences in the function and fate of MDSC in the tumor and peripheral lymphoid organs. We review these findings here and, in this context, we discuss the current understanding as to the nature of these differences, the underlying mechanisms, and their potential impact on the regulation of tumor progression. PMID:26858199

  15. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  16. Correlation of primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with tumor suppressor gene p53 in breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topić Brano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation of standard path morphological prognostic parameters, primary tumor size and axillary nodal status with new prognostic factor in breast carcinoma: tumor suppressor gene p53 was analyzed. The studied sample included 65 women who underwent surgery for breast carcinoma at the Surgical Clinic of Clinical Center Banja Luka, from January 1st 1997 till January 1st 1999. Statistical data analysis was performed and correlation of prognostic factors was determined. The majority of authors in this field agree that the primary tumor size and axillary nodal status are the two most important prognostic factors. These factors are the best predictors of prognosis and survival of women who had the tumor and were operated on. Tumor markers were immunohistochemically determined in the last ten years and, according to the majority of authors, are still considered the additional or relative prognostic factors in breast carcinoma. Their prognostic value and significance increase almost daily. Most frequently determined tumor markers are bcl-2, pS2, Ki-67 and p53. There was a positive, directly proportional relationship between primary tumor size and tumor suppressor gene p53, but there was no positive correlation between the axillary nodal status and tumor suppressor gene p53. Significance of determination of new tumor markers as the prognostic factors was emphasized. These markers represent a powerful tool in the early detection and prevention of breast carcinoma.

  17. Tumor suppressor p53 and its gain-of-function mutants in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Juan; Zhang, Cen; Feng, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppression. p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in cancer. As a transcription factor, p53 mainly exerts its role in tumor suppression through transcriptional regulation of its downstream target genes. Thus, p53 and its target genes form a complex p53 signaling pathway to regulate a wide variety of biological processes to prevent tumorigenesis. Recent studies have revealed that in addition to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence, p...

  18. Tumor Induced Hepatic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Can Cause Moderate Liver Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Eggert, Tobias; Medina-Echeverz, José; Kapanadze, Tamar; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous tumors induce the accumulation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) not only in blood and spleens, but also in livers of these animals. Unexpectedly, we observed a moderate increase in serum transaminases in mice with EL4 subcutaneous tumors, which prompted us to study the relationship of hepatic MDSC accumulation and liver injury. MDSC were the predominant immune cell population expanding in livers of all subcutaneous tumor models investigated (RIL175, B16, EL4, CT26 and B...

  19. Subsets of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Tumor Bearing Mice1

    OpenAIRE

    Youn, Je-in; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Collazo, Michelle; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2008-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous group of cells that play a critical role in tumor associated immune suppression. In an attempt to identify a specific subset of MDSC primarily responsible for immunosuppressive features of these cells, 10 different tumor models were investigated. All models showed variable but significant increase in the population of MDSC. Variability of MDSC expansion in vivo matched closely the effect of tumor-cell condition media (TCCM) in vitro....

  20. Epigenetic modulation of endogenous tumor suppressor expression in lung cancer xenografts suppresses tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Joshua P; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Rao, Atul S; Druck, Teresa; Semba, Shuho; Han, Shuang-Yin; McCorkell, Kelly A; Lakshman, Thiru V; Collins, Joshua E; Wachsberger, Phyllis; Friedberg, Joseph S; Huebner, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic changes involved in cancer development, unlike genetic changes, are reversible. DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors show antiproliferative effects in vitro, through tumor suppressor reactivation and induction of apoptosis. Such inhibitors have shown activity in the treatment of hematologic disorders but there is little data concerning their effectiveness in treatment of solid tumors. FHIT, WWOX and other tumor suppressor genes are frequently epigenetically inactivated in lung cancers. Lung cancer cell clones carrying conditional FHIT or WWOX transgenes showed significant suppression of xenograft tumor growth after induction of expression of the FHIT or WWOX transgene, suggesting that treatments to restore endogenous Fhit and Wwox expression in lung cancers would result in decreased tumorigenicity. H1299 lung cancer cells, lacking Fhit, Wwox, p16(INK4a) and Rassf1a expression due to epigenetic modifications, were used to assess efficacy of epigenetically targeted protocols in suppressing growth of lung tumors, by injection of 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) in nude mice with established H1299 tumors. High doses of intraperitoneal AZA/TSA suppressed growth of small tumors but did not affect large tumors (200 mm(3)); lower AZA doses, administered intraperitoneally or intratumorally, suppressed growth of small tumors without apparent toxicity. Responding tumors showed restoration of Fhit, Wwox, p16(INKa), Rassf1a expression, low mitotic activity, high apoptotic fraction and activation of caspase 3. These preclinical studies show the therapeutic potential of restoration of tumor suppressor expression through epigenetic modulation and the promise of re-expressed tumor suppressors as markers and effectors of the responses. PMID:17019711

  1. Reduced Inflammation in the Tumor Microenvironment Delays the Accumulation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Limits Tumor Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Bunt, Stephanie K.; YANG, LINGLIN; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Leips, Jeff; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is frequently associated with malignant growth and is thought to promote and enhance tumor progression, although the mechanisms which regulate this relationship remain elusive. We reported previously that interleukin (IL)-1β promoted tumor progression by enhancing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and hypothesized that inflammation leads to cancer through the production of MDSC which inhibit tumor immunity. If inflammation-induced MDSC promote t...

  2. Mutation analysis of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3, a candidate gene in Type 1 diabetes and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gylvin, T; Nolsøe, R; Hansen, T; Nielsen, E M D; Bergholdt, R; Karlsen, A E; Billestrup, N; Borch-Johnsen, K; Pedersen, O; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Nerup, J; Pociot, F

    2004-01-01

    Beta cell loss in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus may result from apoptosis and necrosis induced by inflammatory mediators. The suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 is a natural inhibitor of cytokine signalling and also influences insulin signalling. SOCS3 could therefore be a candidate...

  3. Tumor-expressed iNOS controls induction of functional myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) through modulation of VEGF release1

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Hailemichael, Yared; Clark, Amelia; Ma, Ge; Cannan, David; Ramacher, Marcel; Kato, Masashi; Overwijk, Willem W.; Chen, Shu-hsia; Umansky, Viktor Y.; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is a hallmark of chronic inflammation which is also overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers. While iNOS is a known effector of myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-mediated immunosuppression, its pivotal position at the interface of inflammation and cancer also makes it an attractive candidate regulator of MDSC recruitment. We hypothesized that tumor-expressed iNOS controls MDSC accumulation and acquisition of suppressive activity in melanoma. CD11...

  4. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V.; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/)-ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile.

  5. Identification of myeloid derived suppressor cells in the peripheral blood of tumor bearing dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherger Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a recently described population of immune cells that significantly contribute to the immunosuppression seen in cancer patients. MDSCs are one of the most important factors that limit the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy (e.g. cancer vaccines and MDSC levels are increased in cancer in multiple species. Identifying and targeting MDSCs is actively being investigated in the field of human oncology and is increasingly being investigated in veterinary oncology. The treatment of canine cancer not only benefits dogs, but is being used for translational studies evaluating and modifcying candidate therapies for use in humans. Thus, it is necessary to understand the immune alterations seen in canine cancer patients which, to date, have been relatively limited. This study investigates the use of commercially available canine antibodies to detect an immunosuppressive (CD11blow/CADO48low cell population that is increased in the peripheral blood of tumor-bearing dogs. Results Commercially available canine antibodies CD11b and CADO48A were used to evaluate white blood cells from the peripheral blood cells of forty healthy control dogs and forty untreated, tumor-bearing dogs. Tumor-bearing dogs had a statistically significant increase in CD11blow/CADO48Alow cells (7.9% as compared to the control dogs (3.6%. Additionally, sorted CD11blow/CADO48Alow generated in vitro suppressed the proliferation of canine lymphocytes. Conclusions The purpose of this study was aimed at identifying potential canine specific markers for identifying MDSCs in the peripheral blood circulation of dogs. This study demonstrates an increase in a unique CD11blow/CADO48Alow cell population in tumor-bearing dogs. This immunophenotype is consistent with described phenotypes of MDSCs in other species (i.e. mice and utilizes commercially available canine-specific antibodies. Importantly, CD11blow/CADO48Alow from a tumor environment

  6. MASSIVE PARALLEL DNA PYROSEQUENCING ANALYSIS OF THE TUMOR SUPPRESSOR BRG1/SMARCA4 IN LUNG PRIMARY TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Nieto, Salvador; Cañanda, Andres; Pros, Eva; Pinto, Ana Isabel; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Pisano, David; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The tumor suppressor gene, SMARCA4 (or BRG1), which encodes the ATPase component of the chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF, is commonly inactivated by mutations and deletions in lung cancer cell lines. However, SMARCA4 alterations appear to be rare in lung primary tumors. Ultra-deep sequencing technologies provide a promising alternative to achieve a sensitivity superior to that of current sequencing strategies. Here we used ultra-deep pyrosequencing to screen for mutati...

  7. Tuning of alternative splicing--switch from proto-oncogene to tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunova, Aleksandra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Boyle, Meghan; Mendez, Ivan; Lehker, Michael; Martirosyan, Karen S; Kazansky, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction), dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B. In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene) while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor). We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%). The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins. PMID:23289016

  8. Tuning of Alternative Splicing - Switch From Proto-Oncogene to Tumor Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Shchelkunova, Boris Ermolinsky, Meghan Boyle, Ivan Mendez, Michael Lehker, Karen S. Martirosyan, Alexander V. Kazansky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction, dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B.In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%. The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins.

  9. Tuning of Alternative Splicing - Switch From Proto-Oncogene to Tumor Suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkunova, Aleksandra; Ermolinsky, Boris; Boyle, Meghan; Mendez, Ivan; Lehker, Michael; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Kazansky, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    STAT5B, a specific member of the STAT family, is intimately associated with prostate tumor progression. While the full form of STAT5B is thought to promote tumor progression, a naturally occurring truncated isoform acts as a tumor suppressor. We previously demonstrated that truncated STAT5 is generated by insertion of an alternatively spliced exon and results in the introduction of an early termination codon. Present approaches targeting STAT proteins based on inhibition of functional domains of STAT's, such as DNA-binding, cooperative binding (protein-protein interaction), dimerization and phosphorylation will halt the action of the entire gene, both the proto-oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions of Stat5B. In this report we develop a new approach aimed at inhibiting the expression of full-length STAT5B (a proto-oncogene) while simultaneously enhancing the expression of STAT5∆B (a tumor suppressor). We have demonstrated the feasibility of using steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) with a complimentary sequence to the targeted exon-intron boundary to enhance alternative intron/exon retention (up to 10%). The functional effect of the intron/exon proportional tuning was validated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. The new scheme applies specific steric-blocking splice-switching oligonucleotides and opens an opportunity for anti-tumor treatment as well as for the alteration of functional abilities of other STAT proteins. PMID:23289016

  10. Transducer of ERBB2.1 (TOB1 as a Tumor Suppressor: A Mechanistic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun Seok Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transducer of ERBB2.1 (TOB1 is a tumor-suppressor protein, which functions as a negative regulator of the receptor tyrosine-kinase ERBB2. As most of the other tumor suppressor proteins, TOB1 is inactivated in many human cancers. Homozygous deletion of TOB1 in mice is reported to be responsible for cancer development in the lung, liver, and lymph node, whereas the ectopic overexpression of TOB1 shows anti-proliferation, and a decrease in the migration and invasion abilities on cancer cells. Biochemical studies revealed that the anti-proliferative activity of TOB1 involves mRNA deadenylation and is associated with the reduction of both cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK expressions and the induction of CDK inhibitors. Moreover, TOB1 interacts with an oncogenic signaling mediator, β-catenin, and inhibits β-catenin-regulated gene transcription. TOB1 antagonizes the v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene (AKT signaling and induces cancer cell apoptosis by activating BCL2-associated X (BAX protein and inhibiting the BCL-2 and BCL-XL expressions. The tumor-specific overexpression of TOB1 results in the activation of other tumor suppressor proteins, such as mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 4 (SMAD4 and phosphatase and tensin homolog-10 (PTEN, and blocks tumor progression. TOB1-overexpressing cancer cells have limited potential of growing as xenograft tumors in nude mice upon subcutaneous implantation. This review addresses the molecular basis of TOB1 tumor suppressor function with special emphasis on its regulation of intracellular signaling pathways.

  11. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heyu [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Nan, Xu [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Xuefen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Sun, Lisha [Central Laboratory, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China); Han, Wenlin [Center for Human Disease Genomics, Department of Immunology, Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Li, Tiejun, E-mail: litiejun22@vip.sina.com [Department of Oral Pathology, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

  13. Epigenetic silencing of MAL, a putative tumor suppressor gene, can contribute to human epithelium cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jun

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify new and useful candidate biomarkers in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC, we performed a genome-wide survey and found that Myelin and lymphocyte-associated protein (MAL was a gene that was markedly down-regulated in HNSCC. Hence, we investigated the mechanism of MAL silencing and the effects of MAL on the proliferation, invasion, and apoptotic potential in HNSCC. Results MAL was significantly down-regulated in 91.7% of HNSCC specimens at the mRNA level as compared with adjacent normal tissues (P = 0.0004. Moreover, the relative transcript levels of the MAL gene were remarkably decreased by five-fold in nine HNSCC cell lines as compared with normal head and neck epithelium cells. MAL gene expression was restored in 44%, 67%, and 89% in HNSCC cell lines treated with TSA, 5-Aza-dC, and TSA plus 5-Aza-dC, respectively. Furthermore, bisulfate-treated DNA sequencing demonstrated that the two CpG islands (that is, M1 and M2 located in MAL promoter region were completely methylated in the HNSCC cell lines (CpG methylated ratio was more than 90%, and only one CpG island (that is, M1 was partially methylated in HNSCC tissues (CpG methylated ratio between 20% and 90%. A significant reduction in cell proliferation and a change in the cell cycle profile were also observed in MAL transfectants. Matrigel assay demonstrated that the invasiveness of HNSCC cells significantly decreased. A significant increase in the population of apoptotic cells was observed in MAL transfected cells. The exogenous expression of the MAL gene suppressed malignant phenotypes, while the cell death induced by MAL gene transfer was a result of apoptosis as demonstrated by the induction of cleavage of the poly (that is, ADP-ribose polymerase. Additionally, tumor growth was suppressed in cells expressing MAL as compared with cells not expressing MAL. Conclusion Our data suggest that the epigenetic inactivation of MAL, as a candidate tumor

  14. miR-137 Modulates a Tumor Suppressor Network-Inducing Senescence in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Neault

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Activating K-Ras mutations occurs frequently in pancreatic cancers and is implicated in their development. Cancer-initiating events, such as oncogenic Ras activation, lead to the induction of cellular senescence, a tumor suppressor response. During senescence, the decreased levels of KDM4A lysine demethylase contribute to p53 activation, however, the mechanism by which KDM4A is downregulated is unknown. We show that miR-137 targets KDM4A mRNA during Ras-induced senescence and activates both p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb tumor suppressor pathways. Restoring the KDM4A expression contributed to bypass of miR-137-induced senescence and inhibition of endogenous miR-137 with an miRNA sponge-compromised Ras-induced senescence. miR-137 levels are significantly reduced in human pancreatic tumors, consistent with previous studies revealing a defective senescence response in this cancer type. Restoration of miR-137 expression inhibited proliferation and promoted senescence of pancreatic cancer cells. These results suggest that modulating levels of miR-137 may be important for triggering tumor suppressor networks in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Tumor suppressor genes are frequently methylated in lymph node metastases of breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Metastasis represents a major adverse step in the progression of breast carcinoma. Lymph node invasion is the most relevant prognostic factor; however little is known on the molecular events associated with lymph node metastasis process. This study is to investigate the status and role of methylation in lymph node metastatic tumors. Materials and methods Bisulfite pyrosequencing is used to screen 6 putative tumor suppressor genes (HIN-1, RASSF1A, RIL, CDH13, RARβ2 and E-cadherin in 38 pairs of primary breast tumors and lymph node metastases. Results We found that HIN-1, CDH13, RIL, RASSF1A and RARβ2 were frequently methylated both in primary and metastatic tissues (range: 55.3%~89.5%. E-cadherin was not frequently methylated in either setting (range: 18.4%~23.7%. The methylation status of HIN-1, CDH13, RIL, and RARβ2 in lymph nodes metastasis were correlated with that in primary tumors. The Pearson correlation values ranged from 0.624 to 0.472 (p values HIN-1 methylation and hormone status in metastatic lymph nodes. Hypermethylation of HIN-1 in metastasis lymph nodes was significantly associated with expression of ER (odds ratio, 1.070; P = 0.024 and with PR (odds ratio, 1.046; P = 0.026. Conclusions This study suggests that hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is extended from primary to metastatic tumors during tumor progression.

  16. OPCML is a broad tumor suppressor for multiple carcinomas and lymphomas with frequently epigenetic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cui

    Full Text Available Identification of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs silenced by CpG methylation uncovers the molecular mechanism of tumorigenesis and potential tumor biomarkers. Loss of heterozygosity at 11q25 is common in multiple tumors including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. OPCML, located at 11q25, is one of the downregulated genes we identified through digital expression subtraction.Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed frequent OPCML silencing in NPC and other common tumors, with no homozygous deletion detected by multiplex differential DNA-PCR. Instead, promoter methylation of OPCML was frequently detected in multiple carcinoma cell lines (nasopharyngeal, esophageal, lung, gastric, colon, liver, breast, cervix, prostate, lymphoma cell lines (non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma, nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and primary tumors, but not in any non-tumor cell line and seldom weakly methylated in normal epithelial tissues. Pharmacological and genetic demethylation restored OPCML expression, indicating a direct epigenetic silencing. We further found that OPCML is stress-responsive, but this response is epigenetically impaired when its promoter becomes methylated. Ecotopic expression of OPCML led to significant inhibition of both anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of carcinoma cells with endogenous silencing.Thus, through functional epigenetics, we identified OPCML as a broad tumor suppressor, which is frequently inactivated by methylation in multiple malignancies.

  17. A study on tumor suppressor genes mutations associated with different pathological colorectal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. In Egypt; there is an increasing incidence of the disease, especially among patients ≤40 years age. While CRC have been reported in low incidence rate in developing countries, it is the third most common tumor in male and the fifth common tumor in females in Egypt. Early diagnosis and surgical interference guarantee long survival of most CRC patients. Early diagnosis is impeded by the disease onset at young age and imprecise symptoms at the initial stages of the disease. As in most solid tumors, the malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells is to arise through a multistep process during which they acquire genetic changes involving the activation of proto-oncogenes and the loss of tumor suppressor genes. Recently, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, KLF6, which is mapped to chromosome 10p, was found to be frequently mutated in a number of cancers. There are some evidences suggesting that the disruption of the functional activity of KLF6 gene products may be one of the early events in tumor genesis of the colon. The main objective of the present study was to detect mutational changes of KLF6 tumor suppressor gene and to study the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) markers at chromosome 10p15 (KLF6 locus) in colorectal lesions and colorectal cancer in Egyptian patients. The patients included in this study were 83 presented with different indications for colonoscopic examination. Selecting patients with colorectal pre-cancerous lesions or colorectal cancer was done according to the results of tissue biopsy from lesion and adjacent normal. The patients were classified into three main groups; (G I) Cancerous group, (G II) polyps group including patients with adenomatous polyps (AP), familial adenomatous polyps (FAP) and hyperplastic polyps (HP) and (G III) Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) including patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD

  18. Distinct and Competitive Regulatory Patterns of Tumor Suppressor Genes and Oncogenes in Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Background So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and oncogenes (OCGs) that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs) to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation...

  19. ER functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressors: Modulators of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittremieux, Mart; Parys, Jan B; Pinton, Paolo; Bultynck, Geert

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signals that arise from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the major intracellular Ca(2+)-storage organelle, impact several mitochondrial functions and dictate cell survival and cell death processes. Furthermore, alterations in Ca(2+) signaling in cancer cells promote survival and establish a high tolerance towards cell stress and damage, so that the on-going oncogenic stress does not result in the activation of cell death. Over the last years, the mechanisms underlying these oncogenic alterations in Ca(2+) signaling have started to emerge. An important aspect of this is the identification of several major oncogenes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Mcl-1, PKB/Akt, and Ras, and tumor suppressors, such as p53, PTEN, PML, BRCA1, and Beclin 1, as direct and critical regulators of Ca(2+)-transport systems located at the ER membranes, including IP3 receptors and SERCA Ca(2+) pumps. In this way, these proteins execute part of their function by controlling the ER-mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes, favoring either survival (oncogenes) or cell death (tumor suppressors). Oncogenic mutations, gene deletions or amplifications alter the expression and/or function of these proteins, thereby changing the delicate balance between oncogenes and tumor suppressors, impacting oncogenesis and favoring malignant cell function and behavior. In this review, we provided an integrated overview of the impact of the major oncogenes and tumor suppressors, often altered in cancer cells, on Ca(2+) signaling from the ER Ca(2+) stores. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. PMID:26772784

  20. Homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor Prep1 is required to maintain genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Iotti, Giorgio; Longobardi, Elena; Masella, Silvia; Dardaei, Leila; De Santis, Francesca; Micali, Nicola; Blasi, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Prep1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential in embryonic development and functions in the adult as a tumor suppressor. We show here that Prep1 is involved in maintaining genomic stability and preventing neoplastic transformation. Hypomorphic homozygous Prep1i/i fetal liver cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit increased basal DNA damage and normal DNA damage response after γ-irradiation compared with WT. Cytogenetic analysis shows the presence of numerous chro...

  1. Complement C1q Activates Tumor Suppressor WWOX to Induce Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Qunying; Sze, Chun-I; Lin, Sing-Ru; Lee, Ming-Hui; He, Ruei-Yu; Schultz, Lori; Chang, Jean-Yun; Chen, Shean-Jen; Boackle, Robert J; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Background Tissue exudates contain low levels of serum complement proteins, and their regulatory effects on prostate cancer progression are largely unknown. We examined specific serum complement components in coordinating the activation of tumor suppressors p53 and WWOX (also named FOR or WOX1) and kinases ERK, JNK1 and STAT3 in human prostate DU145 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings DU145 cells were cultured overnight in 1% normal human serum, or in human serum depleted of an indicated co...

  2. Electrochemical sensing of tumor suppressor protein p53-deoxyribonucleic acid complex stability at an electrified interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Černocká, Hana; Ostatná, Veronika; Navrátilová, Lucie; Brázdová, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 828, MAY2014 (2014), s. 1-8. ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00956S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-36108S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Deoxyribonucleic acid-protein binding * Tumor suppressor protein p53 * Electrochemical sensing Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014

  3. Stability of the LATS2 Tumor Suppressor Gene Is Regulated by Tristetraprolin*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun Hee; Vo, Mai-Tram; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Lee, Unn Hwa; Kim, Chae Won; Kim, Hong Kyeung; Ko, Myoung Seok; Lee, Won Hyuck; Cha, Seung Joo; Min, Young Joo; Choi, Dae Hwa; Suh, Ho Seok; Lee, Byung Ju; Park, Jeong Woo; Cho, Wha Ja

    2010-01-01

    LATS2 is a tumor suppressor gene implicated in the control of cell growth and the cell cycle. Here, we investigated the post-transcriptional regulation of LATS2 expression by tristetraprolin (TTP). Our results show that the expression level of LATS2 is inversely correlated with TTP expression in human cancer cell lines. Overexpression of TTP reduced the expression level of LATS2. Conversely, treatment with small interfering RNA against TTP increased the expression level of LATS2 through stabi...

  4. Control of antioxidative response by the tumor suppressor protein PML through regulating Nrf2 activity

    OpenAIRE

    GUO Shuang; Cheng, Xiwen; Lim, Jun-Hee; Yu LIU; Kao, Hung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a consequence of an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ability of the cytoprotective system to detoxify the reactive intermediates. The tumor suppressor promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) functions as a stress sensor. Loss of PML results in impaired mitochondrial complex II activity, increased ROS, and subsequent activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) antioxidative pathway. We also demonstrate that sulforaphane (S...

  5. Tumor suppressor gene alterations in patients with malignant mesothelioma due to environmental asbestos exposure in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Tug Esra; Tug Tuncer; Elyas Halit; Coskunsel Mehmet; Emri Salih

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Environmental asbestos exposure can cause the grave lung and pleura malignancies with a high mortality rate, and it is also associated with increased rate of other organ malignancies. Asbestos exposure can develop genotoxic effects and damage in the pleura and lungs. Objective In this study, we aimed to determine tumor suppressor gene (TSG) loss in genomic DNA which was isolated from pleural fluid and blood samples of patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) due ...

  6. Molecular epidemiology in environmental health: the potential of tumor suppressor gene p53 as a biomarker.

    OpenAIRE

    Semenza, J C; Weasel, L H

    1997-01-01

    One of the challenges in environmental health is to attribute a certain health effect to a specific environmental exposure and to establish a cause-effect relationship. Molecular epidemiology offers a new approach to addressing these challenges. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53 can shed light on past environmental exposure, and carcinogenic agents and doses can be distinguished on the basis of mutational spectra and frequency. Mutations in p53 have successfully been used to establis...

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and anti-tumor T cells: a complex relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Monu, Ngozi R.; Frey, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) are immature myeloid cells that are potent inhibitors of immune cell function and which accumulate under conditions of inflammation, especially cancer. MDSC are suggested to promote the growth of cancer by both enhancement of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis and also inhibition of antitumor immune responses. The presence of deficient and/or defective antitumor adaptive and innate immune responses, coincident with accumulation of MDSC in lymphoid organs...

  8. Human Papillomavirus Carcinogenesis: an Identity Crisis in the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Munger, Karl; Jones, D. Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and need to reprogram host cells to establish long-term persistent infection and/or to produce viral progeny. Cellular changes initiated by the virus trigger cellular defense responses to cripple viral replication, and viruses have evolved countermeasures to neutralize them. Established models have suggested that human papillomaviruses target the retinoblastoma (RB1) and TP53 tumor suppressor networks to usurp cellular replication, which drives car...

  9. Signalling through FOXP3 as an X-linked Tumor Suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Katoh, Hiroto; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The FOXP3 (forkhead box P3) gene is a member of forkhead winged helix family transcription factors and functions as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor. FOXP3 dysfunction is responsible for an X-linked autoimmune syndrome: immune dysregulation, polyendopathy, enterophathy, X-linked syndrome. In addition to its role as an essential transcription factor in regulatory T cells, the FOXP3 gene is an epithelial cell-intrinsic tumor suppressor for breast and prostate cancers. We will fo...

  10. MicroRNA-34a is a potent tumor suppressor molecule in vivo in neuroblastoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tivnan, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system and accounts for 15% of childhood cancer mortalities. With regards to the role of miRNAs in neuroblastoma, miR-34a, mapping to a chromosome 1p36 region that is commonly deleted, has been found to act as a tumor suppressor through targeting of numerous genes associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  11. Grail as a molecular determinant for the functions of the tumor suppressor p53 in tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y-C; Chan, J Y-H; Chiu, Y-L.; Liu, S-T; Lozano, G.; Wang, S-L; Ho, C-L; Huang, S-M

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is a multifunctional tumor suppressor that arrests the cell cycle in response to stress and modulates the DNA repair process or induces apoptosis. The cellular level and activity of p53 are tightly controlled to maintain proper functioning. This study identified a novel p53-binding glycoprotein, gene related to anergy in lymphocytes (Grail), which formed a negative feedback loop (similar to that of Mdm2). Grail physically and functionally interacted with the N-ter...

  12. The retinoblastoma protein tumor suppressor is important for appropriate osteoblast differentiation and bone development

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, Seth D.; Yuan, Tina L.; Miller, Emily S.; Lee, Eunice; Caron, Alicia; Lees, Jacqueline A

    2008-01-01

    Mutation of the Rb tumor suppressor gene is strongly linked to osteosarcoma formation. This observation, and the documented interaction between the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and Runx2, suggests that pRb is important in bone development. To assess this hypothesis, we used a conditional knockout strategy to generate pRb-deficient embryos that survive to birth. Analysis of these embryos shows that Rb-inactivation causes the abnormal development and impaired ossification of several bones, corr...

  13. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151. ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  14. Point Mutations Effects on Charge Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective single-strand or double-strand tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of charge transmission modulations associated with all possible point mutations is performed. We find that in contrast to non-cancerous mutations, mutation hotspots tend to result in significantly weaker {...

  15. Markers for sebaceoma show a spectrum of cell cycle regulators, tumor suppressor genes, and oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sebaceoma is a tumor for which the causative oncogenes are not well-understood. Sebaceomas demonstrate some histopathologic features similar to basal cell carcinoma (BCC, such as palisading borders and basaloid cells with additional features, including foamy cytoplasm and indented nuclei. Aims: We examine multiple cell-cycle, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene markers in sebaceomas, to try to find some suitable biological markers for this tumor, and compare with other published studies. Materials and Methods: We investigated a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC stains that are important for cellular signaling, including a cell cycle regulator, tumor suppressor gene, oncogene, hormone receptor, and genomic stability markers in our cohort of sebaceomas. We collected 30 sebaceomas from three separate USA dermatopathology laboratories. The following IHC panel: Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/CD227, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cyclin D1, human breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA-1, C-erb-2, Bcl-2, human androgen receptor (AR, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27 kip1 , p53, topoisomerase II alpha, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and Ki-67 were tested in our cases. Results: EMA/CD227 was positive in the well-differentiated sebaceomas (13/30. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B was positive in tumors with intermediate differentiation (22/30. The less well-differentiated tumors failed to stain with EMA and AR. Most of the tumors with well-differentiated palisaded areas demonstrated positive staining for topoisomerase II alpha, p27 kip1 , and p53, with positive staining in tumoral basaloid areas (22/30. Numerous tumors were focally positive with multiple markers, indicating a significant degree of variability in the complete group. Conclusions: Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulators, and hormone receptors are variably expressed in sebaceomas. Our results suggest that in these tumors, selected marker staining seems to correlate

  16. Dependence receptor TrkC is a putative colon cancer tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevois, Anne-Laure; Ichim, Gabriel; Coissieux, Marie-May; Lambert, Marie-Pierre; Lavial, Fabrice; Goldschneider, David; Jarrosson-Wuilleme, Loraine; Lepinasse, Florian; Gouysse, Géraldine; Herceg, Zdenko; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Tauszig-Delamasure, Servane; Mehlen, Patrick

    2013-02-19

    The TrkC neurotrophin receptor belongs to the functional dependence receptor family, members of which share the ability to induce apoptosis in the absence of their ligands. Such a trait has been hypothesized to confer tumor-suppressor activity. Indeed, cells that express these receptors are thought to be dependent on ligand availability for their survival, a mechanism that inhibits uncontrolled tumor cell proliferation and migration. TrkC is a classic tyrosine kinase receptor and therefore generally considered to be a proto-oncogene. We show here that TrkC expression is down-regulated in a large fraction of human colorectal cancers, mainly through promoter methylation. Moreover, we show that TrkC silencing by promoter methylation is a selective advantage for colorectal cell lines to limit tumor cell death. Furthermore, reestablished TrkC expression in colorectal cancer cell lines is associated with tumor cell death and inhibition of in vitro characteristics of cell transformation, as well as in vivo tumor growth. Finally, we provide evidence that a mutation of TrkC detected in a sporadic cancer is a loss-of-proapoptotic function mutation. Together, these data support the conclusion that TrkC is a colorectal cancer tumor suppressor. PMID:23341610

  17. Dissecting functions of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor and the related pocket proteins by integrating genetic, cell biology, and electrophoretic techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus; Lukas, J; Holm, K;

    1999-01-01

    The members of the 'pocket protein' family, comprising the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRB) and its relatives, p107 and p130, negatively regulate cell proliferation and modulate fundamental biological processes including embryonic development, differentiation, homeostatic tissue renewal, and...

  18. KLF10, transforming growth factor-β-inducible early gene 1, acts as a tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► KLF10−/− mice exhibited accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. ► KLF10−/− keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. ► KLF10−/− MEFs yielded more colonies than wild-type one with H-Ras transfection. ► KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21WAF1/CIP1 transcription. ► KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21WAF1/CIP1 transcription. -- Abstract: Krüppel-like factor 10 (KLF10) has been suggested to be a putative tumor suppressor. In the present study, we generated KLF10 deficient mice to explore this hypothesis in vivo. KLF10 deficient mice exhibited increased predisposition to skin tumorigenesis and markedly accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. On the other hand, KLF10 deficient keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. In colony formation assays after oncogenic H-Ras transfection, KLF10 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) yielded more colonies than wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21WAF1/CIP1 transcription, which was independent of p53 and Sp1 binding sites in p21WAF1/CIP1 promoter. This study demonstrates that KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21WAF1/CIP1 transcription.

  19. KLF10, transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible early gene 1, acts as a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki-Duk [Center for Agricultural Biomaterials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Comparative Immunology, School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Jung [The Institute of Hankook Life Science, 7-9 Myungryun-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-521 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Cheol-Heui [Center for Agricultural Biomaterials, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Comparative Immunology, School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woon Kyu, E-mail: wklee@inha.ac.kr [Laboratory of Developmental Genetics, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Center for Advanced Medical Education, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon 400-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} mice exhibited accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10{sup -/-} MEFs yielded more colonies than wild-type one with H-Ras transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription. -- Abstract: Krueppel-like factor 10 (KLF10) has been suggested to be a putative tumor suppressor. In the present study, we generated KLF10 deficient mice to explore this hypothesis in vivo. KLF10 deficient mice exhibited increased predisposition to skin tumorigenesis and markedly accelerated papilloma development after DMBA/TPA treatment. On the other hand, KLF10 deficient keratinocytes showed increased proliferation and apoptosis. In colony formation assays after oncogenic H-Ras transfection, KLF10 deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) yielded more colonies than wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, KLF10 dose-dependently activated p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription, which was independent of p53 and Sp1 binding sites in p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} promoter. This study demonstrates that KLF10 is a tumor suppressor and that it targets p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} transcription.

  20. Effect of up-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene p14ARF on apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白元松

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of up-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene p14ARFon apoptosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and its interaction with imatinib.Methods Tumor suppressor gene p14ARFwas transduced into K562 (K562-p14ARF) and 4blast crisis primary CML cells (CML-BC 1-4) using vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G)

  1. Identification of TGFβ signaling, p53, and actin stress fibers as targets of LKB1 tumor suppressor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Vaahtomeri, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a consequence of inactivating mutations of tumor suppressor genes and activating mutations of proto-oncogenes. Most of the mutations compromise cell autonomous and non-autonomous restrains on cell proliferation by modulating kinase signal transduction pathways. LKB1 is a tumor suppressor kinase whose sporadic mutations are frequently found in non-small cell lung cancer and cervical cancer. Germ-line mutations in the LKB1 gene lead to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome with an increased r...

  2. Cyclophosphamide-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cell population is immunosuppressive but not identical to myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by growing TC-1 tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Mikyšková, R. (Romana); Indrová, M. (Marie); Polláková, V. (Veronika); Bieblová, J. (Jana); Šímová, J; Reiniš, M

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) play an important role in tumor escape from antitumor immunity. MDSC accumulate in the lymphoid organs and blood during tumor growth and their mobilization was also reported after cyclophosphamide (CY) administration. In this communication, spleen MDSC accumulating after CY therapy (CY-MDSC) were compared with those expanded in mice bearing human papilloma viruses 16-associated TC-1 carcinoma (TU-MDSC). Although both CY-MDSC and TU-MDSC accelerated grow...

  3. Repression of RNA Polymerase I Transcription by the Tumor Suppressor p53

    OpenAIRE

    Zhai, Weiguo; Comai, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is frequently inactivated in tumors. It functions as a transcriptional activator as well as a repressor for a number of viral and cellular promoters transcribed by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and by RNA Pol III. Moreover, it appears that p53 also suppresses RNA Pol I transcription. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism of Pol I transcriptional inhibition by p53. We show that wild-type, but not mutant, p53 can repress Pol I transcription from a huma...

  4. Tumor suppressor p53: analysis of wild-type and mutant p53 complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Milner, J; Medcalf, E A; Cook, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dominant effect of mutant p53 on tumor progression may reflect the mutant protein binding to wild-type p53, with inactivation of suppressor function. To date, evidence for wild-type/mutant p53 complexes involves p53 from different species. To investigate wild-type/mutant p53 complexes in relation to natural tumor progression, we sought to identify intraspecific complexes, using murine p53. The mutant phenotype p53-246(0) was used because this phenotype is immuno...

  5. Molecular Cloning of a Novel Bovine Homologue of the Drosophila Tumor Suppressor Gene, Lats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pervious studies demonstrate that lats, also known as warts, is a tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila[1,2]. Mutations of lats lead to an increase in cell number and organ size in Drosophila, indicating lats may be involved in organ size control. Furthermore, the high conservation of sequence and tumor suppression function of lats between Drosophila and human suggests that it may be also involved in organ size control of higher animals[3]. So here we isolated the bovine homologue of Drosophila lats. Sequence analysis indicates the bovine LATS1 to be very similar to other lats proteins.

  6. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-18

    In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter is activated by E2F only in cancer cells and therefore may be more cancer cell-specific than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. We show here that the ARF promoter has lower activity in normal growing fibroblasts and shows higher cancer cell-specificity compared to the E2F1 promoter. We also demonstrate that adenovirus expressing HSV

  7. 转移抑制候选基因 MIM%Tumor metastasis suppressor gene MIM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳珂; 王杰军; 于观贞

    2009-01-01

    Tumor metastasis suppressor genes is a kind of genes that only suppresses tumor metastasis without affecting tumorigenesis and tumor growth. MIM ( missing in metastasis ) is a putative tumor metastasis suppressor gene discovered recently, which is thought to be down-regulated generally in some metastatic bladder cancer and prostate cancer cells in comparison with normal bladder and prostate tissue. MIM, localized in chro-mosome 8q24.1, suggests a connection with regulation of cytoskeleton with a proline-rich region and a homology 2 (WH2) domain binding the actin. MIM also has support roles for its multiple-domain. Its potential homo-logue MIM-B is also thought to code a putative tumor metastasis suppressor protein.%转移抑制基因是一类只抑制癌细胞的转移但不影响肿瘤发生和生长的基因.MIM是一种新近发现的肿瘤转移抑制候选基因,所编码的蛋白在转移性膀胱癌和前列腺癌等肿瘤中比其在正常组织中低表达.MIM基因定位于染色体8q24.1上,通过一段富含脯氨酸的序列和具有的WH2结构域结合肌动蛋白,具有调控细胞骨架的作用,其多结构域的特点使其还具备支架作用.MIM可能的同系物MIM-B同样被认为编码一种假定的转移抑制蛋白.

  8. Curdlan blocks the immune suppression by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduces tumor burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Ke; Tian, Jie; Tang, Xinyi; Ma, Jie; Xu, Ping; Tian, Xinyu; Wang, Yungang; Xu, Huaxi; Lu, Liwei; Wang, Shengjun

    2016-08-01

    Tumor-elicited immunosuppression is one of the essential mechanisms for tumor evasion of immune surveillance. It is widely thought to be one of the main reasons for the failure of tumor immunotherapy. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that play an important role in tumor-induced immunosuppression. These cells expand in tumor-bearing individuals and suppress T cell responses via various mechanisms. Curdlan, the linear (1 → 3)-β-glucan from Agrobacterium, has been applied in the food industry and other sectors. The anti-tumor property of curdlan has been recognized for a long time although the underlying mechanism still needs to be explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of curdlan on MDSCs and found that curdlan could promote MDSCs to differentiate into a more mature state and then significantly reduce the suppressive function of MDSCs, decrease the MDSCs in vivo and down-regulate the suppression in tumor-bearing mice, thus leading to enhanced anti-tumor immune responses. We, therefore, increase the understanding of further mechanisms by which curdlan achieves anti-tumor effects. PMID:26832917

  9. Tumor suppressor function of Betaig-H3 gene in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. L.; Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.

    Interaction between cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Using an immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cell model, we showed previously that expression of a list of genes including Betaig-h3 (induced by transforming growth factor-β) DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), p21 cip1, c-fos , Heat shock protein (HSP27) and cytokeratin 14 were differentially expressed in several independently generated, radiation-induced tumor cell lines (TL1-TL5) relative to parental BEP2D cells. Our previous data further demonstrated that loss of tumor suppressor gene(s) as a likely mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis. In the present study, we chose Betaig-h3 and DCC that were downregulated in tumorigenic cells for further study. Restored expression of Betaig-h3 gene, not DCC gene, by transfecting cDNA into tumor cells resulted in a significant reduction in tumor growth. While integrin receptor α5β1 was overexpressed in tumor cells, its expression was corrected to the level found in control BEP2D cells after Betaig-h3 transfection. These data suggest that Betaig-h3 gene is involved in tumor progression by regulating integrin α5β1 receptor. Furthermore, exogenous TGF-β1 induced expression of Betaig-h3 gene and inhibited the growth of both control and tumorigenic BEP2D cells. Therefore, downregulation of Betaig-h3 gene may results from the decreased expression of upstream mediators such as TGF-β. The findings provide strong evidence that the Betaig-h3 gene has tumor suppressor function in radiation-induced tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and suggest a potential target for interventional therapy.

  10. Amplification of Mdmx (or Mdm4) directly contributes to tumor formation by inhibiting p53 tumor suppressor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danovi, Davide; Meulmeester, Erik; Pasini, Diego;

    2004-01-01

    ). Furthermore, the human Mdmx ortholog, Hdmx, was found to be overexpressed in a significant percentage of various human tumors and amplified in 5% of primary breast tumors, all of which retained wild-type p53. Hdmx was also amplified and highly expressed in MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line harboring wild......-type p53, and interfering RNA-mediated reduction of Hdmx markedly inhibited the growth potential of these cells in a p53-dependent manner. Together, these results make Hdmx a new putative drug target for cancer therapy.......Human tumors are believed to harbor a disabled p53 tumor suppressor pathway, either through direct mutation of the p53 gene or through aberrant expression of proteins acting in the p53 pathway, such as p14(ARF) or Mdm2. A role for Mdmx (or Mdm4) as a key negative regulator of p53 function in vivo...

  11. Mutation analysis of novel human liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Liao; Tsai-Ping Li; Mu-Jun Zhao; Jing Zhao; Hai Song; Pascal Pineau; Agnès Marchio; Anne Dejean; Pierre Tiollais; Hong-Yang Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To find the point mutations meaningful for inactivationof liver-related putative tumor suppressor gene (LPTS) gene,a human novel liver-related putative tumor suppressor geneand telomerase inhibitor in hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: The entire coding sequence of LPTS genewas examined for mutations by single strand conformationpolymorphism (SSCP) assay and PCR products directsequencing in 56 liver cancer cell lines, 7 ovarian cancerand 7 head & neck tumor cell lines and 70 pairs of HCCtissues samples. The cDNA fragment coding for the mostfrequent mutant protein was subcloned into GST fusionexpression vector. The product was expressed in E. coliand purified by glutathione-agarose column. Telomericrepeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays wereperformed to study the effect of point mutation totelomerase inhibitory activity.RESULTS: SSCP gels showed the abnormal shifting bandsand DNA sequencing found that there were 5 differentmutations and/or polymorphisms in 12 tumor cell lineslocated at exon2, exon5 and exon7. The main alterationswere A(778)A/G and A(880)T in exon7. The change in siteof 778 could not be found in HCC tissue samples, while themutation in position 880 was seen in 7 (10 %) cases. Themutation in the site of 880 had no effect on telomeraseinhibitory activity.CONCLUSION: Alterations identified in this study arepolymorphisms of LPTS gene. LPTS mutations occur in HCCbut are infrequent and of little effect on the telomeraseinhibitory function of the protein. Epigenetics, such asmethylation, acetylation, may play the key role in inactivationof LPTS.

  12. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b+ Gr-1+ MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  13. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravshan Burikhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice, but not p53−/− or Par-4−/− mice, caused systemic elevation of Par-4, which induced apoptosis of p53-deficient tumor cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced Par-4 secretion by suppressing the expression of its binding partner, UACA, which sequesters Par-4. Thus, normal cells can be empowered by p53 activation to induce Par-4 secretion for the inhibition of therapy-resistant tumors.

  14. Cancer-associated p53 Tetramerization Domain Mutants: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS REVEALS A LOW THRESHOLD FOR TUMOR SUPPRESSOR INACTIVATION*

    OpenAIRE

    Kamada, Rui; Nomura, Takao; Anderson, Carl W; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53, a 393-amino acid transcription factor, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Its inactivation via the mutation of its gene is a key step in tumor progression, and tetramer formation is critical for p53 post-translational modification and its ability to activate or repress the transcription of target genes vital in inhibiting tumor growth. About 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations; most are missense ones that presumably lowe...

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells attenuate Th1 development through IL-6 production to promote tumor progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotake Tsukamoto

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative action between tumor cells and host-derived suppressor cells leads to peripheral tolerance of T cells to tumor antigens. Currently, IL-6 and a soluble form of IL-6 receptor are increasingly attracting attention as the therapeutic targets because their levels rise in various cancer patients. Here, we demonstrated that in tumor-bearing mice, generation of tumor antigen-specific effector Th1 cells was significantly attenuated, and impaired Th1 differentiation was restored by the te...

  16. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamgain Hitesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. Methods We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and mouse melanoma (B16F1 cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Results Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Conclusion Tumor suppressor

  17. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 modulates the roughness of cell surface: combined AFM and SEM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging tools such as scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to produce high-resolution topographic images of biomedical specimens and hence are well suited for imaging alterations in cell morphology. We have studied the correlation of SMAR1 expression with cell surface smoothness in cell lines as well as in different grades of human breast cancer and mouse tumor sections. We validated knockdown and overexpression of SMAR1 using RT-PCR as well as Western blotting in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293, human breast cancer (MCF-7) and mouse melanoma (B16F1) cell lines. The samples were then processed for cell surface roughness studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The same samples were used for microarray analysis as well. Tumors sections from control and SMAR1 treated mice as well as tissues sections from different grades of human breast cancer on poly L-lysine coated slides were used for AFM and SEM studies. Tumor sections from mice injected with melanoma cells showed pronounced surface roughness. In contrast, tumor sections obtained from nude mice that were first injected with melanoma cells followed by repeated injections of SMAR1-P44 peptide, exhibited relatively smoother surface profile. Interestingly, human breast cancer tissue sections that showed reduced SMAR1 expression exhibited increased surface roughness compared to the adjacent normal breast tissue. Our AFM data establishes that treatment of cells with SMAR1-P44 results into increase in cytoskeletal volume that is supported by comparative gene expression data showing an increase in the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins compared to the control cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that tumor suppressor function of SMAR1 might be exhibited through smoothening of cell surface by regulating expression of cell surface proteins. Tumor suppressor protein SMAR1 might be used as a phenotypic differentiation

  18. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons-in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  19. SERS-based nanobiosensing for ultrasensitive detection of the p53 tumor suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenici F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fabio Domenici, Anna Rita Bizzarri, Salvatore Cannistraro Biophysics and Nanoscience Centre, Faculty of Science, Università della Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy Background: One of the main challenges in biomedicine is improvement of detection sensitivity to achieve tumor marker recognition at a very low concentration when the disease is not significantly advanced. A pivotal role in cancer defense is played by the p53 tumor suppressor, therefore its detection with high sensitivity may contribute considerably to early diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present a new analytical method based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which could significantly increase the sensitivity of traditional bioaffinity techniques. p53 molecules were anchored to gold nanoparticles by means of the bifunctional linker 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP. The characteristic vibrational bands of the p53-4-ATP nanoparticle system were then used to identify the p53 molecules when they were captured by a recognition substrate comprising a monolayer of azurin in molecules possessing significant affinity for this tumor suppressor. The Raman signal enhancement achieved by 4-ATP-mediated crosslinking of p53 to 50 nm gold nanoparticles enabled detect of this protein at a concentration down to 5 × 10-13 M. Keywords: surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, p53, ultrasensitive detection, atomic force microscopy

  20. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L.; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons—in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  1. Paracrine Apoptotic Effect of p53 Mediated by Tumor Suppressor Par-4

    OpenAIRE

    Ravshan Burikhanov; Tripti Shrestha-Bhattarai; Nikhil Hebbar; Shirley Qiu; Yanming Zhao; Gerard P. Zambetti; Vivek M. Rangnekar

    2014-01-01

    The guardian of the genome, p53, is often mutated in cancer and may contribute to therapeutic resistance. Given that p53 is intact and functional in normal tissues, we harnessed its potential to inhibit the growth of p53-deficient cancer cells. Specific activation of p53 in normal fibroblasts selectively induced apoptosis in p53-deficient cancer cells. This paracrine effect was mediated by p53-dependent secretion of the tumor suppressor Par-4. Accordingly, the activation of p53 in normal mice...

  2. In vivo analysis of p53 tumor suppressor function using genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Brož, Daniela Kenzelmann; Attardi, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    p53 is a crucial tumor suppressor, as evidenced by the high propensity for p53 mutation during human cancer development. Already more than a decade ago, p53 knockout mice confirmed that p53 is critical for preventing tumorigenesis. More recently, a host of p53 knock-in mouse strains has been generated, with the aim of either more precisely modeling p53 mutations in human cancer or better understanding p53's regulation and downstream activities. In the first category, several mouse strains exp...

  3. Re-Engineered p53 Chimera with Enhanced Homo-Oligomerization That Maintains Tumor Suppressor Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Okal, Abood; Cornillie, Sean; Matissek, Stephan J.; Matissek, Karina J.; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    The use of the tumor suppressor p53 for gene therapy of cancer is limited by the dominant negative inactivating effect of mutant endogenous p53 in cancer cells. We have shown previously that swapping the tetramerization domain (TD) of p53 with the coiled-coil (CC) from Bcr allows for our chimeric p53 (p53-CC) to evade hetero-oligomerization with endogenous mutant p53. This enhances the utility of this construct, p53-CC, for cancer gene therapy. Because domain swapping to create p53-CC could r...

  4. G9a and Glp Methylate Lysine 373 in the Tumor Suppressor p53*

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jing; Dorsey, Jean; Chuikov, Sergei; Xinyue ZHANG; Jenuwein, Thomas; Reinberg, Danny; Berger, Shelley L.

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is regulated by numerous post-translational modifications. Lysine methylation has recently emerged as a key post-translational modification that alters the activity of p53. Here, we describe a novel lysine methylation site in p53 that is carried out by two homologous histone methyltransferases, G9a and Glp. G9a and Glp specifically methylate p53 at Lys373, resulting mainly in dimethylation. During DNA damage, the overall level of p53 modified at Lys373me2 does not inc...

  5. Transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase-2 by tumor suppressor p53 requires nuclear factor-kappaB

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit, Valérie; Moraes, E.; Dar, N A; Taranchon, E.; Bours, Vincent; Hautefeuille, A.; Taniere, P; Chariot, Alain; Scoazec, J Y; Gallo, C. V. D.; Merville, Marie-Paule; Hainaut, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is thought to exert antiapoptotic effects in cancer. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 upregulated Cox-2 in esophageal and colon cancer cell lines by inducing the binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) to its response element in the COX-2 promoter. Inhibition of NF-kappaB prevented p53 induction of Cox-2 expression. Cooperation between p53 and NF-kappaB was required for activation of COX-2 promoter in response to daunomycin, a DNA-dama...

  6. The False Paradigm of RUNX3 Function as Tumor Suppressor in Gastric Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Lotem; Ditsa Levanon; Varda Negreanu; Yoram Groner

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a major cause of cancer mortality. GC studies that aim to identify relevant oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are essential for devising effective new therapies. A decade ago, RUNX3, a gene that resides on human chromosome 1p36.1, was claimed to be a major TSG in GC. Since then, hundreds of studies involving thousands of GC patients have attempted to verify and extend the RUNX3 TSG paradigm. However, RUNX3 is not recognized as TSG and not listed in the “Cancer...

  7. Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4 is a potential tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jason PW

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4, a member of the Id gene family is also a dominant negative regulator of basic helix loop helix (bHLH transcription factors. Some of the functions of Id4 appear to be unique as compared to its other family members Id1, Id2 and Id3. Loss of Id4 gene expression in many cancers in association with promoter hypermethylation has led to the proposal that Id4 may act as a tumor suppressor. In this study we provide functional evidence that Id4 indeed acts as a tumor suppressor and is part of a cancer associated epigenetic re-programming. Methods Data mining was used to demonstrate Id4 expression in prostate cancer. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP analysis was performed to understand molecular mechanisms associated with Id4 expression in prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 cells was determined by cell cycle analysis (3H thymidine incorporation and FACS, expression of androgen receptor, p53 and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p27 and p21 by a combination of RT-PCR, real time-PCR, western blot and immuno-cytochemical analysis. Results Id4 expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Id4 expression was also down-regulated in prostate cancer line DU145 due to promoter hyper-methylation. Ectopic Id4 expression in DU145 prostate cancer cell line led to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation due in part by an S-phase arrest. In addition to S-phase arrest, ectopic Id4 expression in PC3 cells also resulted in prolonged G2/M phase. At the molecular level these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR, p21, p27 and p53 expression in DU145 cells. Conclusion The results suggest that Id4 acts directly as a tumor suppressor by influencing a hierarchy of cellular processes at multiple levels that leads to a decreased cell proliferation and change in morphology that is possibly mediated through induction of previously

  8. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine;

    2016-01-01

    ) were developed, and all detected mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Overall, canonical miRNAs were downregulated in spliceosome mutated samples compared to wild-type (P = 0.002), and samples from spliceosome mutated patients clustered together in hierarchical cluster analyses. Among the...... most downregulated miRNAs were several tumor-suppressor miRNAs, including several let-7 family members, miR-423, and miR-103a. Finally, we observed that the predicted targets of the most downregulated miRNAs were involved in apoptosis, hematopoiesis, and acute myeloid leukemia among other cancer- and...

  9. A Novel Function for the Tumor Suppressor p16INK4a

    OpenAIRE

    Plath, Thomas; Detjen, Katharina; Welzel, Martina; von Marschall, Zofia; Murphy, Derek; Schirner, Michael; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Rosewicz, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p16INK4a inhibits the kinase activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4–6/cyclin D complexes and subsequent phosphorylation of critical substrates necessary for transit through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Recent studies suggested that control of the G1/S boundary might not be the sole biological function of p16INK4a. We hypothesized that p16INK4a might influence hitherto unknown critical features of a malignant epithelial phenotype, such as anchorage dependence. H...

  10. Snail transcription factor negatively regulates maspin tumor suppressor in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maspin, a putative tumor suppressor that is down-regulated in breast and prostate cancer, has been associated with decreased cell motility. Snail transcription factor is a zinc finger protein that is increased in breast cancer and is associated with increased tumor motility and invasion by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We investigated the molecular mechanisms by which Snail increases tumor motility and invasion utilizing prostate cancer cells. Expression levels were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Cell motility and invasion assays were performed, while Snail regulation and binding to maspin promoter was analyzed by luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Snail protein expression was higher in different prostate cancer cells lines as compared to normal prostate epithelial cells, which correlated inversely with maspin expression. Snail overexpression in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells inhibited maspin expression and led to increased migration and invasion. Knockdown of Snail in DU145 and C4-2 cancer cells resulted in up-regulation of maspin expression, concomitant with decreased migration. Transfection of Snail into 22Rv1 or LNCaP cells inhibited maspin promoter activity, while stable knockdown of Snail in C4-2 cells increased promoter activity. ChIP analysis showed that Snail is recruited to the maspin promoter in 22Rv1 cells. Overall, this is the first report showing that Snail can negatively regulate maspin expression by directly repressing maspin promoter activity, leading to increased cell migration and invasion. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of Snail may be useful to re-induce expression of maspin tumor suppressor and prevent prostate cancer tumor progression

  11. Tumor Suppressor RARRES1 Regulates DLG2, PP2A, VCP, EB1, and Ankrd26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad J. Sahab, Michael D. Hall, Lihua Zhang, Amrita K. Cheema, Stephen W. Byers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic Acid Receptor Responder (RARRES1 initially identified as a novel retinoic acid receptor regulated gene in the skin is a putative tumor suppressor of unknown function. RARRES1 was knocked down in immortalized human prostatic epithelial cell line PWR-1E cells and differential protein expression was identified using differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI mass spectrometry and western Blot analysis excluding highly abundant proteins routinely identified in almost all proteomics projects. Knock-down of RARRES1: 1- down-regulates PP2A, an enzyme involved in the negative regulation of the growth hormone-stimulated signal transduction pathways; 2- down-regulates Valosin-containing protein causing impaired autophagy; 3- up-regulates the tumor suppressor disks large 2; 4- up-regulates Ankrd26 that belongs to the POTE family of genes that are highly expressed in cancer patients with poor outcome; and 5- down-regulates EB1, a protein that is involved in spindle dynamics and chromosome alignment during mitosis.

  12. Homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor Prep1 is required to maintain genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Giorgio; Longobardi, Elena; Masella, Silvia; Dardaei, Leila; De Santis, Francesca; Micali, Nicola; Blasi, Francesco

    2011-07-19

    Prep1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential in embryonic development and functions in the adult as a tumor suppressor. We show here that Prep1 is involved in maintaining genomic stability and preventing neoplastic transformation. Hypomorphic homozygous Prep1(i/i) fetal liver cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit increased basal DNA damage and normal DNA damage response after γ-irradiation compared with WT. Cytogenetic analysis shows the presence of numerous chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidy in very early-passage Prep1(i/i) MEFs. In human fibroblasts, acute Prep1 down-regulation by siRNA induces DNA damage response, like in Prep1(i/i) MEFs, together with an increase in heterochromatin-associated modifications: rapid increase of histone methylation and decreased transcription of satellite DNA. Ectopic expression of Prep1 rescues DNA damage and heterochromatin methylation. Inhibition of Suv39 activity blocks the chromatin but not the DNA damage phenotype. Finally, Prep1 deficiency facilitates cell immortalization, escape from oncogene-induced senescence, and H-Ras(V12)-dependent transformation. Importantly, the latter can be partially rescued by restoration of Prep1 level. The results show that the tumor suppressor role of Prep1 is associated with the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:21715654

  13. Cancer-associated splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2/p38: pathological implication in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2, also named as MSC p38 was first found as a component for a macromolecular tRNA synthetase complex, it was recently discovered to dissociate from the complex and work as a potent tumor suppressor. Upon DNA damage, AIMP2 promotes apoptosis through the protective interaction with p53. However, it was not demonstrated whether AIMP2 was indeed pathologically linked to human cancer. In this work, we found that a splicing variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2 is highly expressed by alternative splicing in human lung cancer cells and patient's tissues. AIMP2-DX2 compromised pro-apoptotic activity of normal AIMP2 through the competitive binding to p53. The cells with higher level of AIMP2-DX2 showed higher propensity to form anchorage-independent colonies and increased resistance to cell death. Mice constitutively expressing this variant showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. The expression ratio of AIMP2-DX2 to normal AIMP2 was increased according to lung cancer stage and showed a positive correlation with the survival of patients. Thus, this work identified an oncogenic splicing variant of a tumor suppressor, AIMP2/p38, and suggests its potential for anti-cancer target.

  14. TSGene 2.0: an updated literature-based knowledgebase for tumor suppressor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Kim, Pora; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) are a major type of gatekeeper genes in the cell growth. A knowledgebase with the systematic collection and curation of TSGs in multiple cancer types is critically important for further studying their biological functions as well as for developing therapeutic strategies. Since its development in 2012, the Tumor Suppressor Gene database (TSGene), has become a popular resource in the cancer research community. Here, we reported the TSGene version 2.0, which has substantial updates of contents (e.g. up-to-date literature and pan-cancer genomic data collection and curation), data types (noncoding RNAs and protein-coding genes) and content accessibility. Specifically, the current TSGene 2.0 contains 1217 human TSGs (1018 protein-coding and 199 non-coding genes) curated from over 9000 articles. Additionally, TSGene 2.0 provides thousands of expression and mutation patterns derived from pan-cancer data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. A new web interface is available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/TSGene/. Systematic analyses of 199 non-coding TSGs provide numerous cancer-specific non-coding mutational events for further screening and clinical use. Intriguingly, we identified 49 protein-coding TSGs that were consistently down-regulated in 11 cancer types. In summary, TSGene 2.0, which is the only available database for TSGs, provides the most updated TSGs and their features in pan-cancer. PMID:26590405

  15. EZH2 Inhibition Blocks Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth through Upregulation of Epithelial Tumor Suppressor Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Henar; Gelato, Kathy A; Lesche, Ralf; Beckmann, Georg; Koehr, Silke; Otto, Saskia; Steigemann, Patrick; Stresemann, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by marked heterogeneous genomic instability including frequent genetic alterations in epigenetic enzymes. In particular, the histone methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma. EZH2 is the catalytic component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), a master transcriptional regulator of differentiation. EZH2 catalyzes methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 and its deregulation in cancer has been reported to contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes, resulting in a more undifferentiated state, and thereby contributing to the multiple myeloma phenotype. In this study, we propose the use of EZH2 inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We demonstrate that EZH2 inhibition causes a global reduction of H3K27me3 in multiple myeloma cells, promoting reexpression of EZH2-repressed tumor suppressor genes in a subset of cell lines. As a result of this transcriptional activation, multiple myeloma cells treated with EZH2 inhibitors become more adherent and less proliferative compared with untreated cells. The antitumor efficacy of EZH2 inhibitors is also confirmed in vivo in a multiple myeloma xenograft model in mice. Together, our data suggest that EZH2 inhibition may provide a new therapy for multiple myeloma treatment and a promising addition to current treatment options. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 287-98. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26590165

  16. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  17. HACE1 is a putative tumor suppressor gene in B-cell lymphomagenesis and is down-regulated by both deletion and epigenetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzelfen, Abdelilah; Alcantara, Marion; Kora, Hafid; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Mareschal, Sylvain; Bohers, Elodie; Maingonnat, Catherine; Ruminy, Philippe; Adriouch, Sahil; Boyer, Olivier; Dubois, Sydney; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1, HACE1, located on chromosome 6q, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and is downregulated in many human tumors. Here, we report HACE1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene down-regulated by a combination of deletion and epigenetic mechanisms. HACE1 deletions were observed in 40% of B-cell lymphoma tumors. Hypermethylation of the HACE1 promoter CpG177 island was found in 60% (68/111) of cases and in all tested B-cell lymphoma lines. Using HDAC inhibitors, we observed predominantly inactive chromatin conformation (methylated H3 histones H3K9me2) in HACE1 gene promoter region. We demonstrated in Ramos and Raji cells that down-regulation of HACE1 expression was associated with a significant decrease in apoptosis and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. Our experiments indicate that HACE1 can act as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in most B-cell lymphomas and can be downregulated by deacetylation of its promoter region chromatin, which makes HACE1 a potential target for HDAC inhibitors. PMID:27107267

  18. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  19. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  20. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, Yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b(+) Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  1. Spontaneous squamous cell carcinoma induced by the somatic inactivation of retinoblastoma and Trp53 tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cruz, Ana Belén; Santos, Mirentxu; Lara, M Fernanda; Segrelles, Carmen; Ruiz, Sergio; Moral, Marta; Lorz, Corina; García-Escudero, Ramón; Paramio, Jesús M

    2008-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) represent the most aggressive type of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Although little is known about the causal alterations of SCCs, in organ-transplanted patients the E7 and E6 oncogenes of human papillomavirus, targeting the p53- and pRb-dependent pathways, have been widely involved. Here, we report the functional consequences of the simultaneous elimination of Trp53 and retinoblastoma (Rb) genes in epidermis using Cre-loxP system. Loss of p53, but not pRb, produces spontaneous tumor development, indicating that p53 is the predominant tumor suppressor acting in mouse epidermis. Although the simultaneous inactivation of pRb and p53 does not aggravate the phenotype observed in Rb-deficient epidermis in terms of proliferation and/or differentiation, spontaneous SCC development is severely accelerated in doubly deficient mice. The tumors are aggressive and undifferentiated and display a hair follicle origin. Detailed analysis indicates that the acceleration is mediated by premature activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor/Akt pathway, resulting in increased proliferation in normal and dysplastic hair follicles and augmented tumor angiogenesis. The molecular characteristics of this model provide valuable tools to understand epidermal tumor formation and may ultimately contribute to the development of therapies for the treatment of aggressive squamous cancer. PMID:18245467

  2. The influence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells on angiogenesis and tumor growth after cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Su, Xiaosan; Yang, Liu; Qiao, Fei; Fang, Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Qian; Wang, Yiyin; Yin, Yanfeng; Chen, Rui; Hong, Zhipeng

    2016-06-01

    While myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been reported to participate in the promotion of angiogenesis and tumor growth, little is known about their presence and function during perioperative period. Here, we demonstrated that human MDSCs expressing CD11b(+) , CD33(+) and HLA-DR(-) significantly increased in lung cancer patients after thoracotomy. CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs isolated 24 hr after surgery from lung cancer patients were more efficient in promoting angiogenesis and tumor growth than MDSCs isolated before surgical operation in allograft tumor model. In addition, CD11b(+) CD33(+) HLA-DR(-) MDSCs produced high levels of MMP-9. Using an experimental lung metastasis mouse model, we demonstrated that the numbers of metastases on lung surface and Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs at postoperative period were enhanced in proportion to the degree of surgical manipulation. We also examined that syngeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) significantly inhibited the induction and proliferation of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) MDSCs and further prevented lung metastasis formation in the mice undergoing laparotomy. Taken together, our results suggest that postoperatively induced MDSCs were qualified with potent proangiogenic and tumor-promotive ability and this cell population should be considered as a target for preventing postoperative tumor metastasis. PMID:26756887

  3. Ephrin-A1 inhibits NSCLC tumor growth via induction of Cdx-2 a tumor suppressor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor formation is a complex process which involves constitutive activation of oncogenes and suppression of tumor suppressor genes. Receptor EphA2 and its ligand ephrin-A1 form an important cell communication system with its functional role in cell-cell interaction and tumor growth. Loss of cell-cell adhesion is central to the cellular transformation and acquisition of metastatic potential. Claudins, the integrated tight junction (TJ) cell-cell adhesion proteins located on the apico-lateral portion of epithelial cells, functions in maintaining cell polarity. There is extensive evidence implicating Eph receptors and ephrins in malignancy, but the mechanisms how these molecular players affect TJ proteins and regulate tumor growth are not clear. In the present study we hypothesized that EphA2 signaling modulates claudin-2 gene expression via induction of cdx-2, a tumor suppressor gene in NSCLC cells. The expression of EphA2, claudin-2 was determined in various NSCLC cell lines by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. The claudin-2 expression was also analyzed by immunofluorescence analysis. EphA2 and erk1/erk2 phosphorylation in ephrin-A1 activated cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. The cell proliferation and tumor colony formation were determined by WST-1 and 3-D matrigel assays respectively. NSCLC cells over expressed receptor EphA2 and claudin-2. Ephrin-A1 treatment significantly down regulated the claudin-2 and EphA2 expression in NSCLC cells. The transient transfection of cells with vector containing ephrin-A1 construct (pcDNA-EFNA1) decreased the expression of claudin-2, EphA2 when compared to empty vector. In addition ephrin-A1 activation increased cdx-2 expression in A549 cells. In contrast over-expression of EphA2 with plasmid pcDNA-EphA2 up regulated claudin-2 mRNA expression and decreased cdx-2 expression. The transient transfection of cells with vector containing cdx-2 construct (pcMV-cdx-2) decreased

  4. Negative Regulation of the Stability and Tumor Suppressor Function of Fbw7 by the Pin1 Prolyl Isomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Min, Sang-Hyun; Lau, Alan W.; Lee, Tae Ho; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Shuo; Huang, Pengyu; Shaik, Shavali; Lee, Daniel Yenhong; Finn, Greg; Balastik, Martin; Chen, Chun-Hau; Luo, Manli; Tron, Adriana E.; DeCaprio, James A.; Zhou, Xiao Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Fbw7 is the substrate recognition component of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box)-type E3 ligase complex and a well-characterized tumor suppressor that targets numerous oncoproteins for destruction. Genomic deletion or mutation of FBW7 has been frequently found in various types of human cancers, however, little is known about the upstream signaling pathway(s) governing Fbw7 stability and cellular functions. Here we report that Fbw7 protein destruction and tumor suppressor function are negatively reg...

  5. Evidence that selenium binding protein 1 is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ansong

    Full Text Available Selenium-Binding Protein 1 (SBP1, SELENBP1, hSP56 is a selenium-associated protein shown to be at lower levels in tumors, and its lower levels are frequently predictive of a poor clinical outcome. Distinguishing indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is a major challenge in disease management. Associations between SBP1 levels, tumor grade, and disease recurrence following prostatectomy were investigated by duplex immunofluorescence imaging using a tissue microarray containing tissue from 202 prostate cancer patients who experienced biochemical (PSA recurrence after prostatectomy and 202 matched control patients whose cancer did not recur. Samples were matched by age, ethnicity, pathological stage and Gleason grade, and images were quantified using the Vectra multispectral imaging system. Fluorescent labels were targeted for SBP1 and cytokeratins 8/18 to restrict scoring to tumor cells, and cell-by-cell quantification of SBP1 in the nucleus and cytoplasm was performed. Nuclear SBP1 levels and the nuclear to cytoplasm ratio were inversely associated with tumor grade using linear regression analysis. Following classification of samples into quartiles based on the SBP1 levels among controls, tumors in the lowest quartile were more than twice as likely to recur compared to those in any other quartile. Inducible ectopic SBP1 expression reduced the ability of HCT-116 human tumor cells to grow in soft agar, a measure of transformation, without affecting proliferation. Cells expressing SBP1 also demonstrated a robust induction in the phosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor at serine 15. These data indicate that loss of SBP1 may play an independent contributing role in prostate cancer progression and its levels might be useful in distinguishing indolent from aggressive disease.

  6. Tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1 alters tumorigenic growth properties and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Yoshinori

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of cDNA or genomic clones of the tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1 gene into the non-small cell lung cancer line, A549, reverses tumorigenic growth properties of these cells. These results and the observation that TSLC1 is down-regulated in a number of tumors suggest that TSLC1 functions as a critical switch mediating repression of tumorigenesis. Results To investigate this mechanism, we compared growth properties of A549 with the TSLC1-containing derivative. We found a G1/S phase transition delay in 12.2. Subtractive hybridization, quantitative PCR, and TranSignal Protein/DNA arrays were used to identify genes whose expression changed when TSLC1 was up-regulated. Members of common G1/S phase regulatory pathways such as TP53, MYC, RB1 and HRAS were not differentially expressed, indicating that TSLC1 may function through an alternative pathway(s. A number of genes involved in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis were differentially expressed, notably genes in the Ras-induced senescence pathway. We examined expression of several of these key genes in human tumors and normal lung tissue, and found similar changes in expression, validating the physiological relevance of the A549 and 12.2 cell lines. Conclusion Gene expression and cell cycle differences provide insights into potential downstream pathways of TSLC1 that mediate the suppression of tumor properties in A549 cells.

  7. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  8. A Pathologic Link between Wilms Tumor Suppressor Gene, WT1, and IFI16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne K-H. Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wilms tumor gene (WT1 is mutated or deleted in patients with heredofamilial syndromes associated with the development of Wilms tumors, but is infrequently mutated in sporadic Wilms tumors. By comparing the microarray profiles of syndromic versus sporadic Wilms tumors and WT1-inducible Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells, we identified interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16, a transcriptional modulator, as a differentially expressed gene and a candidate WT1 target gene. WT1 induction in Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells led to strong induction of IFI16 expression and its promoter activity was responsive to the WT1 protein. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IFI16 and WT1 colocalized in WT1-replete Wilms tumors, but not in normal human midgestation fetal kidneys, suggesting that the ability of WT1 to regulate IFI16 in tumors represented an aberrant pathologic relationship. In addition, endogenous IFI16 and WT1 interacted in vivo in two Wilms tumor cell lines. Furthermore, IFI16 augmented the transcriptional activity of WT1 on both synthetic and physiological promoters. Strikingly, short hairpin RNA (shRNA-mediated knockdown of either IFI16 or WT1 led to decreased growth of Wilms tumor cells. These data suggest that IFI16 and WT1, in certain cellular context including sporadic Wilms tumors, may support cell survival.

  9. Cdh11 acts as a tumor suppressor in a murine retinoblastoma model by facilitating tumor cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellone N Marchong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01. Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8 (p = 0.01 and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016, compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003. In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers, while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121. Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and beta-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death.

  10. PTEN Tumor Suppressor Network in PI3K-Akt Pathway Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    The PI3K-Akt pathway is a major survival pathway activated in cancer. Efforts to develop targeted therapies have not been fully successful, mainly because of extensive internal intrapathway or external interpathway negative feedback loops or because of networking between pathway suppressors. The PTEN tumor suppressor is the major brake of the pathway and a common target for inactivation in somatic cancers. This review will highlight the networking of PTEN with other inhibitors of the pathway, relevant to cancer progression. PTEN constitutes the main node of the inhibitory network, and a series of convergences at different levels in the PI3K-Akt pathway, starting from those with growth factor receptors, will be described. As PTEN exerts enzymatic activity as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP(3)) phosphatase, thus opposing the activity of PI3K, the concerted actions to increase the availability of PIP(3) in cancer cells, relying either on other phosphoinositide enzymes or on the intrinsic regulation of PTEN activity by other molecules, will be discussed. In particular, the synergy between PTEN and the circle of its direct interacting proteins will be brought forth in an attempt to understand both the activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway and the connections with other parallel oncogenic pathways. The understanding of the interplay between the modulators of the PI3K-Akt pathway in cancer should eventually lead to the design of therapeutic approaches with increased efficacy in the clinic. PMID:21779440

  11. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Interact with Tumors in Terms of Myelopoiesis, Tumorigenesis and Immunosuppression: Thick as Thieves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sevko, Viktor Umansky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor progression is often associated with chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment, which is mediated by numerous cytokines, chemokines and growth factors produced by cancer and stroma cells. All these mediators support tumor development and immunosuppression in autocrine and/or paracrine ways. Neutralization of chronic inflammatory conditions can lead to the restoration of anti-tumor immune responses. Among stroma cells infiltrating tumors, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs represent one of the most important players mediating immunosuppression. These cells may not only inhibit an anti-tumor immunity but also directly stimulate tumorigenesis as well as tumor growth and expansion. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of generation, migration to the tumor site and activation of MDSC is necessary for the development of new strategies of tumor immunotherapy.

  12. The tumor suppressor gene RBM5 inhibits lung adenocarcinoma cell growth and induces apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The loss of tumor suppressor gene (TSG function is a critical step in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer. RBM5 (RNA-binding motif protein 5, also named H37/LUCA-15 gene from chromosome 3p21.3 demonstrated tumor suppressor activity. However, the role of RBM5 played in the occurrence and development of lung cancer is still not well understood. Method Paired non-tumor and tumor tissues were obtained from 30 adenocarcinomas. The expression of RBM5 mRNA and protein was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. A549 cell line was used to determine the apoptotic function of RBM5 in vitro. A549 cells were transiently transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5. AnnexinV analysis was performed by flow cytometry. Expression of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PAPP proteins in A549 lung cancer cells and the A549 xenograft BALB/c nude mice model was determined by Western blot. Tumor suppressor activity of RBM5 was also examined in the A549 xenograft model treated with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 plasmid carried by attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a. Result The expression of RBM5 mRNA and protein was decreased significantly in adenocarcinoma tissues compared to that in the non-tumor tissues. In addition, as compared to the vector control, a significant growth inhibition of A549 lung cancer cells was observed when transfected with pcDNA3.1-RBM5 as determined by cell proliferation assay. We also found that overexpression of RBM5 induced both early and late apoptosis in A549 cells using AnnexinV/PI staining as determined by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was decreased, whereas the expression of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-9 and PARP proteins was significantly increased in the RBM5 transfected cells; similarly, expression of decreased Bcl-2 and increased cleaved caspase-3 proteins was also examined in the A549 xenograft model. More importantly, we showed that accumulative and stable overexpression of RBM5 in the A549 xenograft BALB

  13. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He-xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-fang; Su, Li-ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  14. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Gui; Hu, Lei; Zang, Ming De; Wang, He-Xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-Fang; Su, Li-Ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-03-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  15. Activation of tumor suppressor p53 gene expression by magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hwa; Thomas, James L; Chen, Jian-Zhou; Jan, Jeng-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Yin

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan is a natural biodegradable polysaccharide that has been used to enhance gene delivery, owing to the ease with which chitosan nanoparticles enter the nucleus of cells. To study the effects of nuclear delivery of telomeric gene sequences, which contain thymine, we formed magnetic thymine-imprinted chitosan nanoparticles (TIPs) by the precipitation of chitosan, mixed with thymine and magnetic nanoparticles (to aid in separations). The mean size of the TIPS was 116 ± 18 nm; the dissociation constant for thymine was 21.8 mg mL(-1). We then treated human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) with TIPs nanoparticles bearing bound thymine or a bound telomeric DNA sequence. The expression of the tumor suppressor p53 gene increased when TIPs were applied and decreased when telomere-bound TIPs were applied. PMID:26693943

  16. Analysis of tumor suppressor genes based on gene ontology and the KEGG pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    Full Text Available Cancer is a serious disease that causes many deaths every year. We urgently need to design effective treatments to cure this disease. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs are a type of gene that can protect cells from becoming cancerous. In view of this, correct identification of TSGs is an alternative method for identifying effective cancer therapies. In this study, we performed gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the TSGs and non-TSGs. Some popular feature selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR and incremental feature selection (IFS, were employed to analyze the enrichment features. Accordingly, some GO terms and KEGG pathways, such as biological adhesion, cell cycle control, genomic stability maintenance and cell death regulation, were extracted, which are important factors for identifying TSGs. We hope these findings can help in building effective prediction methods for identifying TSGs and thereby, promoting the discovery of effective cancer treatments.

  17. Control of antioxidative response by the tumor suppressor protein PML through regulating Nrf2 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuang; Cheng, Xiwen; Lim, Jun-Hee; Liu, Yu; Kao, Hung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a consequence of an imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ability of the cytoprotective system to detoxify the reactive intermediates. The tumor suppressor promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) functions as a stress sensor. Loss of PML results in impaired mitochondrial complex II activity, increased ROS, and subsequent activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) antioxidative pathway. We also demonstrate that sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant, regulates Nrf2 activity by controlling abundance and subcellular distribution of PML and that PML is essential for SFN-mediated ROS increase, Nrf2 activation, antiproliferation, antimigration, and antiangiogenesis. Taking the results together, we have uncovered a novel antioxidative mechanism by which PML regulates cellular oxidant homeostasis by controlling complex II integrity and Nrf2 activity and identified PML as an indispensable mediator of SFN activity. PMID:24943846

  18. Crosstalk between tumor suppressors p53 and PKCδ: Execution of the intrinsic apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashzeveg, Nurmaa; Yoshida, Kiyotsugu

    2016-07-28

    p53 and PKCδ are tumor suppressors that execute apoptotic mechanisms in response to various cellular stresses. p53 is a transcription factor that is frequently mutated in human cancers; it regulates apoptosis in transcription-dependent and -independent ways in response to genotoxic stresses. PKCδ is a serine/threonine protein kinase and mutated in human cancers. Available evidence shows that PKCδ activates p53 by direct and/or indirect mechanisms. Moreover, PKCδ is also implicated in the transcriptional regulation of p53 in response to DNA damage. Recent findings demonstrated that p53, in turn, binds onto the PKCδ promoter and induces its expression upon DNA damage to facilitate apoptosis. Both p53 and PKCδ are associated with the apoptotic mechanisms in the mitochondria by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins to provide mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. This review discusses the crosstalk between p53 and PKCδ in the context of apoptotic cell death and cancer therapy. PMID:27130668

  19. PTEN: a default gate-keeping tumor suppressor with a versatile tail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN controls a variety of biological processes including cell proliferation, growth, migration, and death. As a master cellular regulator, PTEN itself is also subjected to deliberated regulation to ensure its proper function. Defects in PTEN regulation have a profound impact on carcinogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss recent advances concerning PTEN regulation and how such knowledge facilitates our understanding and further exploration of PTEN biology. The carboxyl-tail of PTEN, which appears to be associated with multiple types of posttranslational regulation, will be under detailed scrutiny. Further, a comparative analysis of PTEN and p53 suggests while p53 needs to be activated to suppress tumorigenesis (a dormant gatekeeper), PTEN is probably a constitutive surveillant against cancer development, thus a default gatekeeper.

  20. Generation and characterization of mice carrying a conditional allele of the Wwox tumor suppressor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Ludes-Meyers

    Full Text Available WWOX, the gene that spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, is inactivated in multiple human cancers and behaves as a suppressor of tumor growth. Since we are interested in understanding WWOX function in both normal and cancer tissues we generated mice harboring a conditional Wwox allele by flanking Exon 1 of the Wwox gene with LoxP sites. Wwox knockout (KO mice were developed by breeding with transgenic mice carrying the Cre-recombinase gene under the control of the adenovirus EIIA promoter. We found that Wwox KO mice suffered from severe metabolic defect(s resulting in growth retardation and all mice died by 3 wk of age. All Wwox KO mice displayed significant hypocapnia suggesting a state of metabolic acidosis. This finding and the known high expression of Wwox in kidney tubules suggest a role for Wwox in acid/base balance. Importantly, Wwox KO mice displayed histopathological and hematological signs of impaired hematopoiesis, leukopenia, and splenic atrophy. Impaired hematopoiesis can also be a contributing factor to metabolic acidosis and death. Hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia was also observed affecting the KO mice. In addition, bone metabolic defects were evident in Wwox KO mice. Bones were smaller and thinner having reduced bone volume as a consequence of a defect in mineralization. No evidence of spontaneous neoplasia was observed in Wwox KO mice. We have generated a new mouse model to inactivate the Wwox tumor suppressor gene conditionally. This will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of Wwox in adult mice and will allow investigating neoplastic transformation in specific target tissues.

  1. Expression of arf tumor suppressor in spermatogonia facilitates meiotic progression in male germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Churchman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian Cdkn2a (Ink4a-Arf locus encodes two tumor suppressor proteins (p16(Ink4a and p19(Arf that respectively enforce the anti-proliferative functions of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb and the p53 transcription factor in response to oncogenic stress. Although p19(Arf is not normally detected in tissues of young adult mice, a notable exception occurs in the male germ line, where Arf is expressed in spermatogonia, but not in meiotic spermatocytes arising from them. Unlike other contexts in which the induction of Arf potently inhibits cell proliferation, expression of p19(Arf in spermatogonia does not interfere with mitotic cell division. Instead, inactivation of Arf triggers germ cell-autonomous, p53-dependent apoptosis of primary spermatocytes in late meiotic prophase, resulting in reduced sperm production. Arf deficiency also causes premature, elevated, and persistent accumulation of the phosphorylated histone variant H2AX, reduces numbers of chromosome-associated complexes of Rad51 and Dmc1 recombinases during meiotic prophase, and yields incompletely synapsed autosomes during pachynema. Inactivation of Ink4a increases the fraction of spermatogonia in S-phase and restores sperm numbers in Ink4a-Arf doubly deficient mice but does not abrogate γ-H2AX accumulation in spermatocytes or p53-dependent apoptosis resulting from Arf inactivation. Thus, as opposed to its canonical role as a tumor suppressor in inducing p53-dependent senescence or apoptosis, Arf expression in spermatogonia instead initiates a salutary feed-forward program that prevents p53-dependent apoptosis, contributing to the survival of meiotic male germ cells.

  2. Promoter hypermethylation of KLF4 inactivates its tumor suppressor function in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ting Yang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The KLF4 gene has been shown to be inactivated in cervical carcinogenesis as a tumor suppressor. However, the mechanism of KLF4 silencing in cervical carcinomas has not yet been identified. DNA methylation plays a key role in stable suppression of gene expression. METHODS: The methylation status of the KLF4 promoter CpG islands was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing (BSQ in tissues of normal cervix and cervical cancer. KLF4 gene expression was detected by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot. KLF4 promoter methylation in cervical cancer cell line was determined by BSQ and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR. Cell proliferation ability was detected by cell growth curve and MTT assay. RESULTS: The methylated allele was found in 41.90% of 24 cervical cancer tissues but only in 11.11% of 11 normal cervix tissues (P<0.005. KLF4 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervix tissues (P<0.01 and KLF4 mRNA expression showed a significant negative correlation with the promoter hypermethylation (r = -0.486, P = 0.003. Cervical cancer cell lines also showed a significant negative correlation between KLF4 expression and hypermethylation. After treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza, the expression of KLF4 in the cervical cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein levels was drastically increased, the cell proliferation ability was inhibited and the chemosensitivity for cisplatin was significantly increased. CONCLUSION: KLF4 gene is inactivated by methylation-induced silencing mechanisms in a large subset of cervical carcinomas and KLF4 promoter hypermethylation inactivates the gene's function as a tumor suppressor in cervical carcinogenesis.

  3. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer

  4. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  5. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl, E-mail: kmunger@rics.bwh.harvard.edu

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  6. DLC1 tumor suppressor gene inhibits migration and invasion of multiple myeloma cells through RhoA GTPase pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ullmannová-Benson, Veronika; Guan, M.; Zhou, X. G.; Tripathi, V.; Yang, V.; Zimonjic, D. B.; Popescu, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2009), s. 383-390. ISSN 0887-6924 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : multiple myeloma * tumor suppressor gene * promoter methylation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 8.296, year: 2009

  7. In vivo RNAi screening for the identification of oncogenes and tumor suppressors in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Ying

    splicing factors or epigenetic regulators for AML maintenance, we used a pool-based shRNA in vivo screens in a mouse model of human CEBPA mutated AML. Through these approaches, we found the splicing factor RBM25, and the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 are of functional importance in AML progression......-apoptotic isoform BCL‐xL, and consequently RBM25 knockdown cells are partially resistant to ABT‐263 mediated inhibition of BCL‐xL. All in all, the newly identified tumor suppressor gene RBM25 has great clinical values as a potential predictive biomarker. By systematical analysis of SUV39H1 using in vivo murine AML...... models and in vitro human leukemic cell lines, we demonstrated that low expression of Suv39H1 leads to ablated tumor progression and the growth inhibition of leukemic cells. This might take place via partial differentiation of the leukemic cells. Thus, we provide evidence for a role of SUV39H1 as a tumor...

  8. Enhancement of the RAD51 Recombinase Activity by the Tumor Suppressor PALB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dray, Eloise; Etchin, Julia; Wiese, Claudia; Saro, Dorina; Williams, Gareth J.; Hammel, Michal; Yu, Xiong; Galkin, Vitold E.; Liu, Dongqing; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Sy, Shirley M-H.; Egelman, Edward; Chen, Junjie; Sung, Patrick; Schild, D.

    2010-08-24

    Homologous recombination mediated by the RAD51 recombinase helps eliminate chromosomal lesions, such as DNA double-stranded breaks induced by radiation or arising from injured DNA replication forks. The tumor suppressors BRCA2 and PALB2 act together to deliver RAD51 to chromosomal lesions to initiate repair. Here we document a new function of PALB2 in the enhancement of RAD51's ability to form the D-loop. We show that PALB2 binds DNA and physically interacts with RAD51. Importantly, while PALB2 alone stimulates D-loop formation, a cooperative effect is seen with RAD51AP1, an enhancer of RAD51. This stimulation stems from PALB2's ability to function with RAD51 and RAD51AP1 to assemble the synaptic complex. Our results help unveil a multi-faceted role of PALB2 in chromosome damage repair. Since PALB2 mutations can cause breast and other tumors or lead to Fanconi anemia, our findings are important for understanding the mechanism of tumor suppression in humans.

  9. Prkar1a is an osteosarcoma tumor suppressor that defines a molecular subclass in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Sam D; Di Grappa, Marco A; Beristain, Alexander G; McKee, Trevor D; Wai, Daniel H; Paderova, Jana; Kashyap, Meenakshi; Hu, Pingzhao; Maiuri, Tamara; Narala, Swami R; Stambolic, Vuk; Squire, Jeremy; Penninger, Josef; Sanchez, Otto; Triche, Timothy J; Wood, Geoffrey A; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Khokha, Rama

    2010-09-01

    Some cancers have been stratified into subclasses based on their unique involvement of specific signaling pathways. The mapping of human cancer genomes is revealing a vast number of somatic alterations; however, the identification of clinically relevant molecular tumor subclasses and their respective driver genes presents challenges. This information is key to developing more targeted and personalized cancer therapies. Here, we generate a new mouse model of genomically unstable osteosarcoma (OSA) that phenocopies the human disease. Integrative oncogenomics pinpointed cAMP-dependent protein kinase type I, alpha regulatory subunit (Prkar1a) gene deletions at 11qE1 as a recurrent genetic trait for a molecularly distinct subclass of mouse OSA featuring RANKL overexpression. Using mouse genetics, we established that Prkar1a is a bone tumor suppressor gene capable of directing subclass development and driving RANKL overexpression during OSA tumorigenesis. Finally, we uncovered evidence for a PRKAR1A-low subset of human OSA with distinct clinical behavior. Thus, tumor subclasses develop in mice and can potentially provide information toward the molecular stratification of human cancers. PMID:20697156

  10. Tumor suppressor BTG1 promotes PRMT1-mediated ATF4 function in response to cellular stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; van Emst, Liesbeth; Levers, Marloes; Palit, Sander A.L.; Rodenbach, Caroline; Poelmans, Geert; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are frequently exposed to physiological stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient limitation. Escape from stress-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms used by malignant cells to survive unfavorable conditions. B-cell Translocation Gene 1 (BTG1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and recurrently mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Moreover, low BTG1 expression levels have been linked to poor outcome in several solid tumors. How loss of BTG1 function contributes to tumor progression is not well understood. Here, using Btg1 knockout mice, we demonstrate that loss of Btg1 provides a survival advantage to primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) under stress conditions. This pro-survival effect involves regulation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4), a key mediator of cellular stress responses. We show that BTG1 interacts with ATF4 and positively modulates its activity by recruiting the protein arginine methyl transferase PRMT1 to methylate ATF4 on arginine residue 239. We further extend these findings to B-cell progenitors, by showing that loss of Btg1 expression enhances stress adaptation of mouse bone marrow-derived B cell progenitors. In conclusion, we have identified the BTG1/PRMT1 complex as a new modifier of ATF4 mediated stress responses. PMID:26657730

  11. [NEGATIVE REGULATORS OF TUMOR SUPPRESSOR P53 IN THE CONTEXT OF ANTICANCER THERAPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, O Yu; Fedorova, O A; Petukhov, A V; Daks, A A; Vasilieva, E A; Grigorieva, T A; Ivanov, G S; Barlev, N A

    2015-01-01

    P53 protein is considered to be the major tumor suppressor in human cells. Cancer cells do not survive if the p53-mediated signaling pathways function properly. However, about half of all malignancies still express wild type p53. One of the explanations to this is that p53 is suppressed by overexpression of p53-specific E3-ubiquitin ligases: Mdm2, MdmX, Pirh2 and Cop1. Pharmacological inhibition of protein-protein interactions between p53 and these negative regulators is a promising therapeutic approach to treat cancers retaining wild type p53. To date, a series of chemical inhibitors of p53 interactions with Mdm2 and MdmX E3-ubiquitin ligases have been discovered and characterized. Several of them are in the early stages of clinical trials. Despite this fact, their clinical efficacy may be hampered by a number of reasons, including tumor-specific expression of multiple isoforms of the target E3-ligases, which become inert to treatment with small molecules. This and other biochemical mechanisms of possible resistance of tumor cells with wild type p53 to small molecules against its negative regulators will be discussed in this review. PMID:26995961

  12. Down-regulation of SFRP1 as a putative tumor suppressor gene can contribute to human hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    down-regulation of SFRP1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene, triggered by the epigenetic and/or genetic events, could contribute to the oncogenesis of HCC

  13. miR-126 Functions as a Tumor Suppressor in Osteosarcoma by Targeting Sox2

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    Chenglin Yang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is the most common malignant bone tumor in children and young adults, the early symptoms and signs of which are non-specific. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs provides a new avenue for the early diagnosis and treatment of OS. miR-126 has been reported to be highly expressed in vascularized tissues, and is recently widely studied in cancers. Herein, we explored the expression and significance of miR-126 in OS. Using TaqMan RT-PCR analysis, we analyzed the expression of miR-126 in 32 paired OS tumor tissues and 4 OS cell lines and found that miR-126 was consistently under-expressed in OS tissues and cell lines compared with normal bone tissues and normal osteoblast cells (NHOst, respectively. As miR-126 is significantly decreased in OS tissues and cell lines, we sought to compensate for its loss through exogenous transfection into MG-63 cells with a miR-126 mimic. Ectopic expression of miR-126 inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced apoptosis of MG-63 cells. Moreover, bioinformatic prediction suggested that the sex-determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2 is a target gene of miR-126. Using mRNA and protein expression analysis, luciferase assays and rescue assays, we demonstrate that restored expression of Sox2 dampened miR-126-mediated suppression of tumor progression, which suggests the important role of miR-126/Sox2 interaction in tumor progression. Taken together, our data indicate that miR-126 functions as a tumor suppressor in OS, which exerts its activity by suppressing the expression of Sox2.

  14. Tumor suppressors Sav/Scrib and oncogene Ras regulate stem cell transformation in adult Drosophila Malpighian Tubules

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Xiankun; Singh, Shree Ram; Hou, David; Steven X Hou

    2010-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that tumors might originate from a few transformed cells that share many properties with normal stem cells. However, it remains unclear how normal stem cells are transformed into cancer stem cells. Here, we demonstrated that mutations causing the loss of tumor suppressor Sav or Scrib or activation of the oncogene Ras transform normal stem cells into cancer stem cells through a multistep process in the adult Drosophila Malpighian Tubules (MTs). In wild-t...

  15. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms tumor suppressor WT1 requires association with the inducible chaperone Hsp70

    OpenAIRE

    Maheswaran, Shyamala; Englert, Christoph; Zheng, Gang; Lee, Sean Bong; Wong, Jenise; Harkin, D Paul; Bean, James; Ezzell, Robert; Garvin, A. Julian; McCluskey, Robert T.; DeCaprio, James A.; Haber, Daniel A.

    1998-01-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor WT1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is expressed in glomerular podocytes during a narrow window in kidney development. By immunoprecipitation and protein microsequencing analysis, we have identified a major cellular protein associated with endogenous WT1 to be the inducible chaperone Hsp70. WT1 and Hsp70 are physically associated in embryonic rat kidney cells, in primary Wilms tumor specimens and in cultured cells with inducible expression of WT1. Co...

  16. Increased circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells correlate with clinical cancer stage, metastatic tumor burden, and doxorubicin–cyclophosphamide chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Montero, C Marcela; Salem, Mohamed Labib; Nishimura, Michael I.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is an important mechanism of tumor immune evasion. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) has also been shown in non-tumor bearing animals to cause transient surges in MDSC. Knowledge of MDSC is primarily based on preclinical work, and to date only few published studies have involved cancer patients. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that circulating MDSC levels correlate with clinical cancer stage, CTX-based chemotherapy, and m...

  17. HIF-1α regulates function and differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Condamine, Thomas; Lu, Lily; Cotter, Matthew J.; Youn, Je-in; Cheng, Pingyan; Cho, Hyun-Il; Celis, Esteban; Quiceno, David G.; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a major component of the immune-suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. We demonstrate that although MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organs and the tumor site share similar phenotype and morphology, these cells display profound functional differences. MDSC from peripheral lymphoid organs suppressed antigen-specific CD8+ T cells but failed to inhibit nonspecific T cell function. In sharp contrast, tumor MDSC su...

  18. The human LIS1 is downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and plays a tumor suppressor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → LIS1 mRNA and protein levels are decreased in 70% HCC tissues. → Downregulation of LIS1 expression induces oncogenic transformation of QSG7701 and NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. → LIS1 downregulation leads to mitotic errors including spindle and chromosome defects. → Ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. → Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and progression of HCC. -- Abstract: The human lissencephaly-1 gene (LIS1) is a disease gene responsible for Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome (MDL). LIS1 gene is located in the region of chromosome 17p13.3 that is frequency deleted in MDL patients and in human liver cancer cells. However, the expression and significance of LIS1 in liver cancer remain unknown. Here, we investigated the expression of LIS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the mRNA and protein levels of LIS1 were downregulated in about 70% of HCC tissues, and this downregulation was significantly associated with tumor progression. Functional studies showed that the reduction of LIS1 expression in the normal human liver cell line QSG7701 or the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 by shRNA resulted in colony formation in soft agar and xenograft tumor formation in nude mice, demonstrating that a decrease in the LIS1 level can promote the oncogenic transformation of cells. We also observed that the phenotypes of LIS1-knockdown cells displayed various defective mitotic structures, suggesting that the mechanism by which reduced LIS1 levels results in tumorigenesis is associated with its role in mitosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of LIS1 could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation and colony formation. Our results suggest that LIS1 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in the development and

  19. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  20. High frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in advanced breast tumors associated with aggressiveness of the tumor

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    S Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The product of Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor, regulates the expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF and transforming growth factor (TGF systems, both of which are implicated in breast tumorigenesis and are known to facilitate angiogenesis. In the present study, WT1 allelic integrity was examined by Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH studies in infiltrating breast carcinoma (n=60, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS (n=10 and benign breast disease (n=5 patients, to determine its possible association with tumor progression. Methods: LOH at the WT1 locus (11p13 as determined by PCR-RFLP for Hinf1 restriction site and was subsequently examined for its association with intratumoral expression of various growth factors i.e. TGF-β1, IGF-II, IGF-1R and angiogenesis (VEGF and Intratumoral micro-vessel density in breast carcinoma. Results: Six of 22 (27.2% genetically heterozygous of infiltrating breast carcinoma and 1 of 4 DCIS cases showed loss of one allele at WT1 locus. Histologically, the tumors with LOH at WT1 were Intraductal carcinoma (IDC and were of grade II and III. There was no correlation in the appearance of LOH at WT1 locus with age, tumor stage, menopausal status, chemotherapy status and lymph node metastasis. The expression of factor IGF-II and its receptor, IGF-1R was significantly higher in carcinoma having LOH at WT1 locus. A positive correlation was observed between the TGF-β1, VEGF expression and IMD scores in infiltrating carcinoma. Conclusions: The current study indicates that the high frequency of loss of allelic integrity at Wilms′ tumor suppressor gene-1 locus in high-graded breast tumors is associated with aggressiveness of the tumor.

  1. H2.0-like homeobox 1 acts as a tumor suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Shuai; Lei, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    H2.0-like homeobox 1 (HLX1) is a homeobox transcription factor gene expressed primarily in cytotrophoblast cell types in the early pregnancy human placenta and involved in the development of enteric nervous system. However, the biological function of HLX1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In the present study, semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time RT-PCR, western blot, and immunohistochemical staining were used to examine the expression level of HLX1 in a total of 125 cases of HCC tissues and their matched adjacent nontumorous tissues (ANLTs), and its correlation with clinical features of HCC patients was analyzed. Our findings showed that the expression level of HLX1 was significantly reduced in HCCs compared to ANLTs. Besides, it was also remarkably downregulated in HCC cell lines compared to normal liver cell line. We further found that the HLX1 level was significantly associated with the tumor size (p = 0.016), tumor number (p = 0.004), vascular invasion (p = 0.031), Edmondson-Steiner grade (p = 0.041), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (p < 0.001), and Barcelona clinic liver cancer (BCLC) stage (p = 0.008). Moreover, HLX1 was an independent risk factor for overall survival (OS, p = 0.020) and disease-free survival (DFS, p = 0.024) of HCC patients. In vitro experiments showed that overexpression of HLX1 markedly suppressed the invasion, migration, proliferation, and colony formation of HCC cells; in contrast, downregulation of HLX1 significantly promoted the invasion, migration, proliferation, and colony formation of HCC cells. In vivo study indicated that overexpression of HLX1 significantly inhibited the tumorigenic capacity of HCC cells in nude mice. Based on these findings, we suggest that HLX1 acts as a tumor suppressor in HCC. PMID:26631039

  2. The Drosophila Netrin receptor frazzled/DCC functions as an invasive tumor suppressor

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    Duman-Scheel Molly

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity at 18q, which includes the Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC gene, has been linked to many human cancers. However, it is unclear if loss of DCC is the specific underlying cause of these cancers. The Drosophila imaginal discs are excellent systems in which to study DCC function, as it is possible to model human tumors through the generation of somatic clones of cells bearing multiple genetic lesions. Here, these attributes of the fly system were utilized to investigate the potential tumor suppressing functions of the Drosophila DCC homologue frazzled (fra during eye-antennal disc development. Results Most fra loss of function clones are eliminated during development. However, when mutant clone cells generated in the developing eye were rescued from death, partially differentiated eye cells were found outside of the normal eye field, and in extreme cases distant sites of the body. Characterization of these cells during development indicates that fra mutant cells display characteristics of invasive tumor cells, including increased levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, and Mmp-1, changes in cadherin expression, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and loss of polarity. Mutation of fra promotes basement membrane degradation and invasion which are repressed by inhibition of Rho1 signaling. Although inhibition of JNK signaling blocks invasive phenotypes in some metastatic cancer models in flies, blocking JNK signaling inhibits fra mutant cell death, thereby enhancing the fra mutant phenotype. Conclusions The results of this investigation provide the first direct link between point mutations in fra/DCC and metastatic phenotypes in an animal model and suggest that Fra functions as an invasive tumor suppressor during Drosophila development.

  3. Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in gastric cancer: associations with demographic and clinicopathological characteristics

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    Binnur Bagci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastric cancer (GC is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Despite the declining prevalence in Western countries, it is still a major health problem in Turkey and Asian countries. In the current study, we investigated the hypermethylation status of 25 TSGs in GC. Furthermore, the association between hypermethylation status of these TSGs and some demographic and clinicopathological characteristics were investigated. Methods: Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples obtained from 27 patients with GC and genomic DNA isolated from these tissues. To compare the methylation status of 25 TSGs, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS and ndash;MLPA technique was used. Results were evaluated in terms of age, gender, positive lymph node status, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, mortality and five-years of survival, retrospectively. Results: Tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation was detected 16 (59.3% of 27 GC tissues. Patients with hypermethylation-detected and patients with no hypermethylation-detected in their TSGs were classified as group 1 and group 2, respectively. The mean age of group 1 was 66.38+/-7.43 and the mean age of group 2 was found as 58.18+/-11.12 (p= 0.03. Hypermethylation was detected in 12 of 25 TSGs in patients with GC. Hypermethylation was detected as 51.8% for WT1, 40.7% for ESR1, 18.5% for CDH13, 14.8% for MSH6 and CD44, 7.4% for TP73 and PAX5 genes in the tumor tissues of patients with GC. Mean positive lymph node number was 8.81+/-5.38 in group 1 and 4.81+/-3.21 in group 2 (p= 0.037. Lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, mortality and five-years of mean survival were not statistically different between group 1 and group 2 (p>0.05 for all comparisons. Conclusions: Hypermethylation frequency of certain tumor suppressor genes may increase with advancing age and with positive lymph nodes in gastric cancer patients. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2185-2192

  4. Hsf1 Is Required for the Nuclear Translocation of p53 Tumor Suppressor

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    Qiang Li

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the p53 tumor suppressor is most frequently inactivated by genetic mutations, exclusion from the nucleus is also seen in human tumors. We have begun to examine p53 nuclear importation by isolating a series of mutant cells in which the temperature-sensitive murine p53Val135 mutant is sequestered in the cytoplasm. We previously showed that that three of them (ALTR12, ALTR19, and ALTR25 constituted a single complementation group. Here, we found that ALTR12 cells are more sensitive to heat stress than either ALTR19 or ALTR25 and that there was a complete lack of induction of Hsp70 in response to heat shock. Western blot analysis showed no expression of the Hsf1 transcription factor, and neither heat shock nor azetidine could induce p53 nuclear localization in ALTR12 cells but did in parental A1–5 cells. Suppression of Hsf1 in A1–5 cells with quercetin or an Hsf1 siRNA reduced p53 nuclear importation and inhibited p53-mediated activation of a p21 reporter. Most convincingly, p53 nuclear importation could be restored in ALTR12 cells by introducing an exogenous Hsf1 gene. Collectively, our result suggests that Hsf1 is required for p53 nuclear importation and activation and implies that heat shock factors play a role in the regulation of p53.

  5. Tumor-suppressor genes, cell cycle regulatory checkpoints, and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms "tumor suppressor′s genes," "skin," and "cell cycle regulatory checkpoints." We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses.

  6. Effect of tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 on growth inhibition of MG63 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qin; Yang Lin; Wenjian Chen; Wentao Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to establish the osteosarcoma cell sublines which stably expressing tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) gene and evaluate its effect on growth inhibition of human osteosarcoma cell line MG63. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pCI-TSLC1 was stably transfected into MG63 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. The positive clones were developed by selection by G418. Biological characteristics of one of the 6 cell lines which highly expressing TSLC1, namely, the M8T were studied. Cell growth was analyzed with MTT assay. 2 × 107 cells suspended in 0.2 mL phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected into the two flanks of 5-6-week-old female BALB/C nu/nu athymic nude mice. The volumes of subcutaneous of tumor growth were evaluated and calculated by the formula V= Length × Width × Height × 0.5 once a week. Results: The M8T cell subline which stably expressing TSLC1 was characterized by Western blot. The genetic stability and purity of M8T cells were stable. TSLC1 significantly suppressed the growth of M8T cells in vitro. Moreover, the tumorigenicity of M8T cells was suppressed in vivo. Conclusion: The osteosarcoma cell sublines M8T which stably expressing TSLC1 had been successfully established. The ability of growth and metastasis of M8T was significantly suppressed both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. The tumor suppressor PP2A Abeta regulates the RalA GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablina, Anna A; Chen, Wen; Arroyo, Jason D; Corral, Laura; Hector, Melissa; Bulmer, Sara E; DeCaprio, James A; Hahn, William C

    2007-06-01

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric enzyme family that regulates numerous signaling pathways. Biallelic mutations of the structural PP2A Abeta subunit occur in several types of human tumors; however, the functional consequences of these cancer-associated PP2A Abeta mutations in cell transformation remain undefined. Here we show that suppression of PP2A Abeta expression permits immortalized human cells to achieve a tumorigenic state. Cancer-associated Abeta mutants fail to reverse tumorigenic phenotype induced by PP2A Abeta suppression, indicating that these mutants function as null alleles. Wild-type PP2A Abeta but not cancer-derived Abeta mutants form a complex with the small GTPase RalA. PP2A Abeta-containing complexes dephosphorylate RalA at Ser183 and Ser194, inactivating RalA and abolishing its transforming function. These observations identify PP2A Abeta as a tumor suppressor gene that transforms immortalized human cells by regulating the function of RalA. PMID:17540176

  8. KCTD11 Tumor Suppressor Gene Expression Is Reduced in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

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    Francesca Zazzeroni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men in the United States. A genetic contribution to prostate cancer risk has been documented, but knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer initiation is still not well understood. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH of chromosomal regions is crucial in tumor progression. In human prostate cancer, several chromosomal regions demonstrating a high frequency of LOH have been previously identified. KCTD11 (REN is a tumor suppressor gene mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2, whose expression is frequently lost in human medulloblastoma and in several other cancer types. KCTD11 acts as a negative regulator of the Hedgehog (Hh signaling. Here, we demonstrated that KCTD11 LOH is a common genetic lesion in human prostate adenocarcinoma. Indeed, nuclear KCTD11 protein expression is strongly reduced in primary prostate cancer, and this event correlated with overexpression of proteins acting into the Hedgehog pathway. Low levels of KCTD11 mRNA have been also observed in prostatic cancer cells, and ectopic overexpression of KCTD11 led to growth arrest. Our study demonstrates and supports that KCTD11, as well as negatively regulated downstream effectors belonging to Hh signaling, plays a role in prostate cancer pathogenesis. This could be suitable to characterize new diagnostic and therapeutic markers.

  9. KCTD11 tumor suppressor gene expression is reduced in prostate adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzeroni, Francesca; Nicosia, Daniela; Tessitore, Alessandra; Gallo, Rita; Verzella, Daniela; Fischietti, Mariafausta; Vecchiotti, Davide; Ventura, Luca; Capece, Daria; Gulino, Alberto; Alesse, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men in the United States. A genetic contribution to prostate cancer risk has been documented, but knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer initiation is still not well understood. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomal regions is crucial in tumor progression. In human prostate cancer, several chromosomal regions demonstrating a high frequency of LOH have been previously identified. KCTD11 (REN) is a tumor suppressor gene mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2, whose expression is frequently lost in human medulloblastoma and in several other cancer types. KCTD11 acts as a negative regulator of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Here, we demonstrated that KCTD11 LOH is a common genetic lesion in human prostate adenocarcinoma. Indeed, nuclear KCTD11 protein expression is strongly reduced in primary prostate cancer, and this event correlated with overexpression of proteins acting into the Hedgehog pathway. Low levels of KCTD11 mRNA have been also observed in prostatic cancer cells, and ectopic overexpression of KCTD11 led to growth arrest. Our study demonstrates and supports that KCTD11, as well as negatively regulated downstream effectors belonging to Hh signaling, plays a role in prostate cancer pathogenesis. This could be suitable to characterize new diagnostic and therapeutic markers. PMID:25045667

  10. YB1 binds to and represses the p16 tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Ozawa, Yuichi; Harada, Masanori; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Niida, Hiroyuki; Morita, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kenji; Suda, Takafumi; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2013-11-01

    Y box binding protein 1 (YB1) has multiple functions associated with drug resistance, cell proliferation and metastasis through transcriptional and translational regulation. Increased expression of YB1 is closely related to tumor growth and aggressiveness. We showed that YB1 protein levels were decreased through replicative and premature senescence and were correlated with increased expression levels of p16(INK) (4A) tumor suppressor gene. Depletion of YB1 was associated with increased levels of p16 in human and murine primary cells. Forced expression of YB1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in decreased expression of p16 and increased cell proliferation. Senescence-associated expression of β-galactosidase was repressed in YB1-over-expressing cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that YB1 directly associates with the p16 promoter. Taken together, all our findings indicate that YB1 directly binds to and represses p16 transcription, subsequently resulting in the promotion of cell growth and prevention of cellular senescence. PMID:24165022

  11. Effects of Tumor Suppressor Gene TCF21 on the Proliferation, Migration and Apoptosis of A549 Cells

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    Song HU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective TCF21, a newly discovered gene, exhibits tumor suppressor function in a variety of tumors. This study aims to observe the effects of TCF21 on the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells. Methods TCF21 was overexpressed in A549 cells via lentiviral transfection. Fluorescence-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to analyze the expression of the target gene. Transwell, proliferation assay, and flow cytometry were applied to detect the effect of TCF21 overexpression on the migration, proliferation, and apoptosis of A549 cells after transfection. Results The proliferation and migration of A549 cells were inhibited, and the apoptotic rate was increased by overexpressing TCF21. Conclusion The tumor suppressor gene, TCF21, significantly inhibits the proliferation and migration, as well as facilitates early apoptosis of A549 cells.

  12. Phosphorylation of ETS1 by Src family kinases prevents its recognition by the COP1 tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gang; Zhang, Qing; Huang, Ying; Song, Jiaxi; Tomaino, Ross; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Lim, Elgene; Liu, Wenbin; Bronson, Roderick T; Bowden, Michaela; Brock, Jane; Krop, Ian E; Dillon, Deborah A; Gygi, Steven P; Mills, Gordon B; Richardson, Andrea L; Signoretti, Sabina; Yaffe, Michael B; Kaelin, William G

    2014-08-11

    Oncoproteins and tumor suppressors antagonistically converge on critical nodes governing neoplastic growth, invasion, and metastasis. We discovered that phosphorylation of the ETS1 and ETS2 transcriptional oncoproteins at specific serine or threonine residues creates binding sites for the COP1 tumor suppressor protein, which is an ubiquitin ligase component, leading to their destruction. In the case of ETS1, however, phosphorylation of a neighboring tyrosine residue by Src family kinases disrupts COP1 binding, thereby stabilizing ETS1. Src-dependent accumulation of ETS1 in breast cancer cells promotes anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. These findings expand the list of potential COP1 substrates to include proteins whose COP1-binding sites are subject to regulatory phosphorylation and provide insights into transformation by Src family kinases. PMID:25117710

  13. Identification of new mutations in the NF2 tumor suppressor gene in schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, M.; Welling, B.; Prior, T.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a severe genetic disorder with an incidence of approximately 1 in 40,000 individuals and is characterized by the formation of multiple benign nervous system tumors. The clinical hallmark of NF2 is the bilateral occurrence of schwannomas on the eighth cranial nerve (vestibular schwannomas). Recently, it has been shown that loss or inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene located in chromosome band 22q12 is the molecular cause of NF2 tumorigenesis. Also, mutations in the NF2 gene have now been identified in patients with sporadic vestibular schwannomas (unilateral schwannomas). We have completed the screening of 80% of the NF2 coding sequence of DNA from 13 sporadic schwannomas and 2 schwannomas from NF2 patients. Using heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing, we found 13 novel mutations located in 7 different exons with a small cluster (46% of the mutations) located in the central portion of the gene. All of the mutations were unique to single patients. In three tumors, both NF2 alleles were mutated. The types of mutations found include: small deletions ranging from 1 to 30 base pairs, nonsense mutations, a single missense mutation and a splice donor site alteration. It appears that small deletions are the most common type of NF2 gene mutation. We also have developed a dosage test based on quantitative PCR and hybridization with specific probes to detect the loss of heterozygosity. We found that 7 out of 15 schwannomas (47%) show loss of heterozygosity. We are currently extending the analysis to all of the NF2 exons and DNA from 60 additional schwannomas.

  14. A kinase shRNA screen links LATS2 and the pRB tumor suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschöp, Katrin; Conery, Andrew R.; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Harlow, Ed; Dyson, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    pRB-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation is a complex process that depends on the action of many proteins. However, little is known about the specific pathways that cooperate with the Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the variables that influence pRB's ability to arrest tumor cells. Here we describe two shRNA screens that identify kinases that are important for pRB to suppress cell proliferation and pRB-mediated induction of senescence markers. The results reveal an unexpected effect of LATS2, a component of the Hippo pathway, on pRB-induced phenotypes. Partial knockdown of LATS2 strongly suppresses some pRB-induced senescence markers. Further analysis shows that LATS2 cooperates with pRB to promote the silencing of E2F target genes, and that reduced levels of LATS2 lead to defects in the assembly of DREAM (DP, RB [retinoblastoma], E2F, and MuvB) repressor complexes at E2F-regulated promoters. Kinase assays show that LATS2 can phosphorylate DYRK1A, and that it enhances the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate the DREAM subunit LIN52. Intriguingly, the LATS2 locus is physically linked with RB1 on 13q, and this region frequently displays loss of heterozygosity in human cancers. Our results reveal a functional connection between the pRB and Hippo tumor suppressor pathways, and suggest that low levels of LATS2 may undermine the ability of pRB to induce a permanent cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. PMID:21498571

  15. A kinase shRNA screen links LATS2 and the pRB tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschöp, Katrin; Conery, Andrew R; Litovchick, Larisa; Decaprio, James A; Settleman, Jeffrey; Harlow, Ed; Dyson, Nicholas

    2011-04-15

    pRB-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation is a complex process that depends on the action of many proteins. However, little is known about the specific pathways that cooperate with the Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the variables that influence pRB's ability to arrest tumor cells. Here we describe two shRNA screens that identify kinases that are important for pRB to suppress cell proliferation and pRB-mediated induction of senescence markers. The results reveal an unexpected effect of LATS2, a component of the Hippo pathway, on pRB-induced phenotypes. Partial knockdown of LATS2 strongly suppresses some pRB-induced senescence markers. Further analysis shows that LATS2 cooperates with pRB to promote the silencing of E2F target genes, and that reduced levels of LATS2 lead to defects in the assembly of DREAM (DP, RB [retinoblastoma], E2F, and MuvB) repressor complexes at E2F-regulated promoters. Kinase assays show that LATS2 can phosphorylate DYRK1A, and that it enhances the ability of DYRK1A to phosphorylate the DREAM subunit LIN52. Intriguingly, the LATS2 locus is physically linked with RB1 on 13q, and this region frequently displays loss of heterozygosity in human cancers. Our results reveal a functional connection between the pRB and Hippo tumor suppressor pathways, and suggest that low levels of LATS2 may undermine the ability of pRB to induce a permanent cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. PMID:21498571

  16. Hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene PRDM1/Blimp-1 supports a pathogenetic role in EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRDM1/Blimp-1 is a tumor suppressor gene in the activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Its inactivation contributes to pathogenesis in this setting by impairing terminal B-cell differentiation induced by constitutive nuclear factor-κB activation. The role of PRDM1 in Burkitt lymphoma (BL) lymphomagenesis is not known. Here we identified hypermethylation of the promoter region and exon 1 of PRDM1 in all six Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines and 12 of 23 (52%) primary EBV-positive BL or BL-related cases examined, but in none of the EBV-negative BL cell lines or primary tumors that we assessed, implying a tumor suppressor role for PRDM1 specifically in EBV-associated BL. A direct induction of PRDM1 hypermethylation by EBV is unlikely, as PRDM1 hypermethylation was not observed in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines. Treatment of EBV-positive BL cells with 5′ azacytidine resulted in PRDM1 induction associated with PRDM1 demethylation, consistent with transcriptional silencing of PRDM1 as a result of DNA methylation. Overexpression of PRDM1 in EBV-positive BL cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest. Our results expand the spectrum of lymphoid malignancies in which PRDM1 may have a tumor suppressor role and identify an epigenetic event that likely contributes to the pathogenesis of BL

  17. Prognostic value of tumor suppressors in osteosarcoma before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary bone cancers are among the deadliest cancer types in adolescents, with osteosarcomas being the most prevalent form. Osteosarcomas are commonly treated with multi-drug neoadjuvant chemotherapy and therapy success as well as patient survival is affected by the presence of tumor suppressors. In order to assess the prognostic value of tumor-suppressive biomarkers, primary osteosarcoma tissues were analyzed prior to and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We constructed a tissue microarray from high grade osteosarcoma samples, consisting of 48 chemotherapy naïve biopsies (BXs) and 47 tumor resections (RXs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We performed immunohistochemical stainings of P53, P16, maspin, PTEN, BMI1 and Ki67, characterized the subcellular localization and related staining outcome with chemotherapy response and overall survival. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to analyze chemotherapy response and Kaplan-Meier-analysis as well as the Cox proportional hazards model was applied for analysis of patient survival. No significant associations between biomarker expression in BXs and patient survival or chemotherapy response were detected. In univariate analysis, positive immunohistochemistry of P53 (P = 0.008) and P16 (P16; P = 0.033) in RXs was significantly associated with poor survival prognosis. In addition, presence of P16 in RXs was associated with poor survival in multivariate regression analysis (P = 0.003; HR = 0.067) while absence of P16 was associated with good chemotherapy response (P = 0.004; OR = 74.076). Presence of PTEN on tumor RXs was significantly associated with an improved survival prognosis (P = 0.022). Positive immunohistochemistry (IHC) of P16 and P53 in RXs was indicative for poor overall patient survival whereas positive IHC of PTEN was prognostic for good overall patient survival. In addition, we found that P16 might be a marker of osteosarcoma chemotherapy resistance. Therefore, our study supports the use of tumor RXs to

  18. MicroRNA-34a is a potent tumor suppressor molecule in vivo in neuroblastoma

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tivnan, Amanda

    2011-01-25

    ABSTRACT Background Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system and accounts for 15% of childhood cancer mortalities. With regards to the role of miRNAs in neuroblastoma, miR-34a, mapping to a chromosome 1p36 region that is commonly deleted, has been found to act as a tumor suppressor through targeting of numerous genes associated with cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods A synthetic miR-34a (or negative control) precursor molecule was transfected into NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc neuroblastoma cells. Quantitative PCR was used to verify increased miR-34a levels in NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc cell lines prior to in vitro and in vivo analysis. In vitro analysis of the effects of miR-34a over expression on cell growth, cell cycle and phosphoprotein activation in signal transduction pathways was performed. Neuroblastoma cells over expressing miR-34a were injected retroperitoneally into immunocompromised CB17-SCID mice and tumor burden was assessed over a 21 day period by measuring bioluminescence (photons\\/sec\\/cm2). Results Over expression of miR-34a in both NB1691luc and SK-N-ASluc neuroblastoma cell lines led to a significant decrease in cell number relative to premiR-negative control treated cells over a 72 hour period. Flow cytometry results indicated that miR-34a induced cell cycle arrest and subsequent apoptosis activation. Phosphoprotein analysis highlighted key elements involved in signal transduction, whose activation was dysregulated as a result of miR-34a introduction into cells. As a potential mechanism of miR-34a action on phosphoprotein levels, we demonstrate that miR-34a over-expression results in a significant reduction of MAP3K9 mRNA and protein levels. Although MAP3K9 is a predicted target of miR-34a, direct targeting could not be validated with luciferase reporter assays. Despite this fact, any functional effects of reduced MAP3K9 expression as a result of miR-34a would be expected to

  19. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  20. Role of human papillomavirus and tumor suppressor genes in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manvikar, Vardendra; Kulkarni, Rama; Koneru, Anila; Vanishree, M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high and is associated with many deaths in both Western and Asian countries. Several risk factors for the development of oral cancer are now well known, including smoking, drinking and consumption of smokeless tobacco products. Genetic predisposition to oral cancer has been found in certain cases, but its components are not yet entirely clear. In accordance with the multi-step theory of carcinogenesis, the natural history of oral cancer seems to gradually evolve through transitional precursor lesions from normal epithelium to a full-blown metastatic phenotype. A number of genomic lesions accompany this transformation and a wealth of related results has appeared in recent literature and is being summarized here. Furthermore, several key genes have been implicated, especially well-known tumor suppressors such as the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, TP53 and RB1 and oncogenes such as the cyclin family, epidermal growth factor receptor and RAS. Viral infections, particularly oncogenic human papillomavirus subtypes and Epstein-Barr virus, can have a tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia and their role is discussed, along with potential therapeutic interventions. A brief explanatory theoretical model of oral carcinogenesis is provided and potential avenues for further research are highlighted. PMID:27194871

  1. SUSD2 is frequently downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in RCC and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingying; Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Pingzhang; Li, Ting; Hu, Fengzhan; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jun; Xu, Tao; Han, Wenling

    2016-07-01

    Sushi domain containing 2 (SUSD2) is type I membrane protein containing domains inherent to adhesion molecules. There have been few reported studies on SUSD2, and they have mainly focused on breast cancer, colon cancer, and HeLa cells. However, the expression and function of SUSD2 in other cancers remain unclear. In the present study, we conducted an integrated bioinformatics analysis based on the array data from the GEO database and found a significant downregulation of SUSD2 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and lung cancer. Western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) confirmed that SUSD2 was frequently decreased in RCC and lung cancer tissues compared with the corresponding levels in normal adjacent tissues. The restoration of SUSD2 expression inhibited the proliferation and clonogenicity of RCC and lung cancer cells, whereas the knockdown of SUSD2 promoted A549 cell growth. Our findings suggested that SUSD2 functions as a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in RCC and lung cancer. PMID:26815503

  2. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jiang; Jianchun Wu; Chen He; Wending Yang; Honglin Li

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdkl activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chkl and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  3. Transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase-2 by tumor suppressor p53 requires nuclear factor-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, V; de Moraes, E; Dar, N A; Taranchon, E; Bours, V; Hautefeuille, A; Tanière, P; Chariot, A; Scoazec, J-Y; de Moura Gallo, C V; Merville, M-P; Hainaut, P

    2006-09-21

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is thought to exert antiapoptotic effects in cancer. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 upregulated Cox-2 in esophageal and colon cancer cell lines by inducing the binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) to its response element in the COX-2 promoter. Inhibition of NF-kappaB prevented p53 induction of Cox-2 expression. Cooperation between p53 and NF-kappaB was required for activation of COX-2 promoter in response to daunomycin, a DNA-damaging agent. Pharmacological inhibition of Cox-2 enhanced apoptosis in response to daunomycin, in particular in cells containing active p53. In esophageal cancer, there was a correlation between Cox-2 expression and wild-type TP53 in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and in adenocarcinoma, but not in squamous cell carcinoma (P<0.01). These results suggest that p53 and NF-kappaB cooperate in upregulating Cox-2 expression, promoting cell survival in inflammatory precursor lesions such as BE. PMID:16682957

  4. Isolation of a rice gene homologous to the human putative tumor suppressor gene QM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    QM gene was originally isolated from human by Dowdy et al during a search for a wilms′ tumor suppressor gene. Researches of QM gene focused mainly on animals and yeasts, little was known about plant QM gene. For better understanding of QM gene in rice, a QM homologous fragment was used as a probe to screen rice (Oryza sativa subsp. indica c.v. Guanglu′ ai 4) genomic DNA library,and two clones were obtained. One of them, OSQM2, encoded a highly basic protein of 184 amino acids, the sequence was about 3.1 kb long with a very special promoter region compared with other known QM genes. Seven potential G boxes could be found between -690 and -230. G box, which contains a ACGT core motif, had been reported in many plants to act as a cis acting DNA element in the regulation of genes in a variety of environmental conditions, such as ABA regulated gene expression, red light, UV light, anaerobiosis, and wounding etc. Two closely linked DRE related motifs (dehydration responsive element) could also be found between -182 and 173, which had a CCGAC conserved sequence and had been identified in many cold and drought responsive genes in Arabidopsis. Six MYC recognition sequences with the conserved motif NCANNTGN were also presented, which might be essential for ABA and drought responsive expression of the plant genes.

  5. Molecular epidemiology in environmental health: the potential of tumor suppressor gene p53 as a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, J C; Weasel, L H

    1997-01-01

    One of the challenges in environmental health is to attribute a certain health effect to a specific environmental exposure and to establish a cause-effect relationship. Molecular epidemiology offers a new approach to addressing these challenges. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53 can shed light on past environmental exposure, and carcinogenic agents and doses can be distinguished on the basis of mutational spectra and frequency. Mutations in p53 have successfully been used to establish links between dietary aflatoxin exposure and liver cancer, exposure to ultraviolet light and skin cancer, smoking and cancers of the lung and bladder, and vinyl chloride exposure and liver cancer. In lung cancer, carcinogens from tobacco smoke have been shown to form adducts with DNA. The location of these adducts correlates with those positions in the p53 gene that are mutated in lung cancer, confirming a direct etiologic link between exposure and disease. Recent investigations have also explored the use of p53 as a susceptibility marker for cancer. Furthermore, studies in genetic toxicology have taken advantage of animals transgenic for p53 to screen for carcinogens in vivo. In this review, we summarize recent developments in p53 biomarker research and illustrate applications to environmental health. PMID:9114284

  6. Accumulation of a tumor suppressor p53 protein in rat muscle during a space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Wang, X.; Ohnishi, K. [Department of Biology, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara (Japan); Ohira, Y. [Department of Physiology and Biomechanics Kanoya (Japan); Nagaoka, S. [Space Experiment Department, National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-12-06

    We previously reported that the space environment consisting of microgravity and space radiation induced an increased level of p53 protein, a tumor suppressor gene product, in rat skin. Here, we report the increase of p53 protein in the muscles of rats that traveled into space. Rats were divided into three groups. The first group remained on earth (VC), and did not show any change in p53 protein level. The second group made a 14-day flight into space on the Second Spacelab Life Science (SLS-2) Mission (F). The third group was experimentally subjected to the same kinds of stress as those in the second group without making a space flight (SC). F and SC rats were sacrificed on day zero (F-0, SC-0) and day nine (F-9, SC-9) after return from space. F-0 rats showed a 1.5-fold increase in p53 protein level compared with that of SC-0 rats, whereas, F-9 rats showed a 1.35-fold increase in p53 protein compared with that of SC-9 rats. These results suggest that the accumulation of cellular p53 protein induced by space environments occurs not only in rat skin cells, but also in rat muscle cells.

  7. Accumulation of a tumor suppressor p53 protein in rat muscle during a space flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported that the space environment consisting of microgravity and space radiation induced an increased level of p53 protein, a tumor suppressor gene product, in rat skin. Here, we report the increase of p53 protein in the muscles of rats that traveled into space. Rats were divided into three groups. The first group remained on earth (VC), and did not show any change in p53 protein level. The second group made a 14-day flight into space on the Second Spacelab Life Science (SLS-2) Mission (F). The third group was experimentally subjected to the same kinds of stress as those in the second group without making a space flight (SC). F and SC rats were sacrificed on day zero (F-0, SC-0) and day nine (F-9, SC-9) after return from space. F-0 rats showed a 1.5-fold increase in p53 protein level compared with that of SC-0 rats, whereas, F-9 rats showed a 1.35-fold increase in p53 protein compared with that of SC-9 rats. These results suggest that the accumulation of cellular p53 protein induced by space environments occurs not only in rat skin cells, but also in rat muscle cells

  8. Regulation of the activity of the tumor suppressor PTEN by thioredoxin in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human Thioredoxin-1 (hTrx-1) is a small redox protein with a molecular weight of 12 kDa that contains two cysteine residues found in its catalytic site. HTrx-1 plays an important role in cell growth, apoptosis, and cancer patient prognosis. Recently, we have demonstrated that hTrx-1 binds to the C2 domain of the human tumor suppressor, PTEN, in a redox dependent manner. This binding leads to the inhibition of PTEN lipid phosphatase activity in mammalian tissue culture systems. In this study, we show that over-expression of hTrx-1 in Drosophila melanogaster promotes cell growth and proliferation during eye development as measured by eye size and ommatidia size. Furthermore, hTrx-1 rescues the small eye phenotype induced by the over-expression of PTEN. We demonstrate that this rescue of the PTEN-induced eye size phenotype requires cysteine-218 in the C2 domain of PTEN. We also show that hTrx-1 over-expression results in increased Akt phosphorylation in fly head extracts supporting our observations that the hTrx-1-induced eye size increase results from the inhibition of PTEN activity. Our study confirms the redox regulation of PTEN through disulfide bond formation with the hTrx-1 in Drosophila and suggests conserved mechanisms for thioredoxins and their interactions with the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase signaling pathway in humans and fruit flies

  9. Expression of the Arf tumor suppressor gene is controlled by Tgfβ2 during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Anderson, Natalie E.; Zheng, Yanbin; McCalla-Martin, Amy C.; Treanor, Louise M.; Zhao, Yi D.; Garfin, Phillip M.; He, Tong-Chuan; Mary, Michelle N.; Thornton, J. Derek; Anderson, Colleen; Gibbons, Melissa; Saab, Raya; Baumer, Shannon H.; Cunningham, John M.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Arf tumor suppressor (also known as Cdkn2a) acts as an oncogene sensor induced by `abnormal' mitogenic signals in incipient cancer cells. It also plays a crucial role in embryonic development: newborn mice lacking Arf are blind due to a pathological process resembling severe persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), a human eye disease. The cell-intrinsic mechanism implied in the oncogene sensor model seems unlikely to explain Arf regulation during embryo development. Instead, transforming growth factor β2 (Tgfβ2) might control Arf expression, as we show that mice lacking Tgfβ2 have primary vitreous hyperplasia similar to Arf-/- mice. Consistent with a potential linear pathway, Tgfβ2 induces Arf transcription and p19Arf expression in cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs); and Tgfβ2-dependent cell cycle arrest in MEFs is maintained in an Arf-dependent manner. Using a new model in which Arf expression can be tracked by β-galactosidase activity in ArflacZ/+ mice, we show that Tgfβ2 is required for Arf transcription in the developing vitreous as well as in the cornea and the umbilical arteries, two previously unrecognized sites of Arf expression. Chemical and genetic strategies show that Arf promoter induction depends on Tgfβ receptor activation of Smad proteins; the induction correlates with Smad2 phosphorylation in MEFs and Arf-expressing cells in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that Smads bind to genomic DNA proximal to Arf exon 1β. In summary, Tgfβ2 and p19Arf act in a linear pathway during embryonic development. We present the first evidence that p19Arf expression can be coupled to extracellular cues in normal cells and suggest a new mechanism for Arf control in tumor cells. PMID:19465598

  10. Catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-19 is essential for tumor suppressor and anti-angiogenic activities in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chan, K.C.; Ko, J.M.; Lung, H.L.; Sedláček, Radislav; Zhang, Z.F.; Luo, D.Z.; Feng, Z.B.; Chen, S.; Chen, H.; Chan, K.W.; Tsao, S.W.; Chua, D.T.; Zabarovsky, E.R.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Lung, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 129, č. 8 (2011), s. 1826-1837. ISSN 0020-7136 Grant ostatní: Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region(CN) HKU661708M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : MMP19 * nasopharyngeal carcinoma * tumor suppressor gene * angiogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.444, year: 2011

  11. Deconstructing the ßcatenin destruction complex: mechanistic roles for the tumor suppressor APC in regulating Wnt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, David M.; Pronobis, Mira I.; Poulton, John S; Waldmann, Jon D.; Stephenson, Elise M.; Hanna, Shahnaz; Peifer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Negatively regulating signaling by targeting key effectors for ubiquitina­tion/destruction is essential for development and oncogenesis. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling, provides a paradigm. APC mutations occur in most colon cancers. Acting in the “destruction complex” with Axin, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and casein kinase, APC targets ßcatenin (ßcat) for phosphorylation and recognition by an E3 ubiquitin-ligase. Despit...

  12. The DnaJ domain of polyomavirus large T antigen is required to regulate Rb family tumor suppressor function.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Q.; Denis, D; Ratnofsky, M; Roberts, T.M.; DeCaprio, J A; Schaffhausen, B

    1997-01-01

    Tumor suppressors of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene family regulate cell growth and differentiation. Polyomavirus large T antigens (large T) bind Rb family members and block their function. Mutations of large T sequences conserved with the DnaJ family affect large T binding to a cellular DnaK, heat shock protein 70. The same mutations abolish large T activation of E2F-containing promoters and Rb binding-dependent large T activation of cell cycle progression. Cotransfection of a cellul...

  13. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1: MDSC and ROS in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head ...

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta acts as a neuroblastoma tumor suppressor by destabilizing the aurora kinase a oncogene

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meehan, Maria

    2012-02-05

    Abstract Background Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta (PTPRD) is a member of a large family of protein tyrosine phosphatases which negatively regulate tyrosine phosphorylation. Neuroblastoma is a major childhood cancer arising from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system which is known to acquire deletions and alterations in the expression patterns of PTPRD, indicating a potential tumor suppressor function for this gene. The molecular mechanism, however, by which PTPRD renders a tumor suppressor effect in neuroblastoma is unknown. Results As a molecular mechanism, we demonstrate that PTPRD interacts with aurora kinase A (AURKA), an oncogenic protein that is over-expressed in multiple forms of cancer, including neuroblastoma. Ectopic up-regulation of PTPRD in neuroblastoma dephosphorylates tyrosine residues in AURKA resulting in a destabilization of this protein culminating in interfering with one of AURKA\\'s primary functions in neuroblastoma, the stabilization of MYCN protein, the gene of which is amplified in approximately 25 to 30% of high risk neuroblastoma. Conclusions PTPRD has a tumor suppressor function in neuroblastoma through AURKA dephosphorylation and destabilization and a downstream destabilization of MYCN protein, representing a novel mechanism for the function of PTPRD in neuroblastoma.

  15. The novel RASSF6 and RASSF10 candidate tumour suppressor genes are frequently epigenetically inactivated in childhood leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Eamonn R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras-assocation family (RASSF of tumour suppressor genes (TSGs contains 10 members that encode proteins containing Ras-assocation (RA domains. Several members of the RASSF family are frequently epigenetically inactivated in cancer, however, their role in leukaemia has remained largely uninvestigated. Also, RASSF10 is a predicted gene yet to be experimentally verified. Here we cloned, characterised and demonstrated expression of RASSF10 in normal human bone marrow. We also determined the methylation status of CpG islands associated with RASSF1–10 in a series of childhood acute lymphocytic leukaemias (ALL and normal blood and bone marrow samples. Results COBRA and bisulphite sequencing revealed RASSF6 and RASSF10 were the only RASSF members with a high frequency of leukaemia-specific methylation. RASSF6 was methylated in 94% (48/51 B-ALL and 41% (12/29 T-ALL, whilst RASSF10 was methylated in 16% (8/51 B-ALL and 88% (23/26 T-ALL. RASSF6 and RASSF10 expression inversely correlated with methylation which was restored by treatment with 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5azaDC. Conclusion This study shows the hypermethylation profile of RASSF genes in leukaemias is distinct from that of solid tumours and represents the first report of inactivation of RASSF6 or RASSF10 in cancer. These data show epigenetic inactivation of the candidate TSGs RASSF6 and RASSF10 is an extremely frequent event in the pathogenesis of childhood leukaemia. This study also warrants further investigation of the newly identified RASSF member RASSF10 and its potential role in leukaemia.

  16. Epigenetic identification of ZNF545 as a functional tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma via activation of p53 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu; Zhan, Qian; Xu, Hongying; Li, Lili; Li, Chen; Xiao, Qian; Xiang, Shili; Hui, Tianli; Xiang, Tingxiu; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-06-10

    The KRAB-zinc-finger protein ZNF545 was recently identified as a potential suppressor gene in several tumors. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ZNF545 in tumorigenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression and roles of ZNF545 in multiple myeloma (MM). ZNF545 was frequently downregulated in MM tissues compared with non-tumor bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 expression was silenced by promoter methylation in MM cell lines, and could be restored by demethylation treatment. ZNF545 methylation was detected in 28.3% of MM tissues, compared with 4.3% of normal bone marrow tissues. ZNF545 transcriptionally activated the p53 signaling pathway but had no effect on Akt in MM, whereas ectopic expression of ZNF545 in silenced cells suppressed their proliferation and induced apoptosis. We therefore identified ZNF545 as a novel tumor suppressor inhibiting tumor growth through activation of the p53 pathway in MM. Moreover, tumor-specific methylation of ZNF545 may represent an epigenetic biomarker for MM diagnosis, and a potential target for specific therapy. PMID:27150632

  17. Distinct and competitive regulatory patterns of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and oncogenes (OCGs that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we developed a novel computational framework for identifying target genes of TSGs and OCGs using TFs as bridges through the integration of protein-protein interactions and gene expression data. We applied this pipeline to ovarian cancer and constructed a three-layer regulatory network. In the network, the top layer was comprised of modulators (TSGs and OCGs, the middle layer included TFs, and the bottom layer contained target genes. Based on regulatory relationships in the network, we compiled TSG and OCG profiles and performed clustering analyses. Interestingly, we found TSGs and OCGs formed two distinct branches. The genes in the TSG branch were significantly enriched in DNA damage and repair, regulating macromolecule metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis, while the genes in the OCG branch were significantly enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. Remarkably, their specific targets showed a reversed functional enrichment in terms of apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway: the target genes regulated by OCGs only were enriched in anti-apoptosis and the target genes regulated by TSGs only were enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first comprehensive investigation of the interplay of TSGs and OCGs in a regulatory network modulated by TFs. Our application in ovarian cancer revealed distinct regulatory patterns of TSGs and OCGs, suggesting a competitive

  18. MTUS1 tumor suppressor and its miRNA regulators in fibroadenoma and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Murat; Kaplan, Mehmet; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Ozcan, Onder; Celik, Ozgur Ilhan; Bozgeyik, Esra; Yumrutas, Onder

    2016-08-10

    Breast cancer is major public health problem predominantly effects female population. Current therapeutic approaches to deal with breast cancer are still lack of effectiveness. Thus, identifying/developing novel strategies to fight against breast cancer is very important. The frequent deletions at 8p21.3-22 chromosomal location nearby D8S254 marker enabled the discovery of a novel tumor suppressor gene, MTUS1. Subsequently, MTUS1 was demonstrated to be less expressed in a variety cancer types including breast cancer. Also, it is obvious that gene expression is widely regulated by miRNAs. Here, we aimed to report differential expression of MTUS1 and its regulatory miRNAs in breast cancer and fibroadenoma tissues. Dynamic analysis of MTUS1 expression levels and its miRNAs regulators were attained by Fluidigm 96×96 Dynamic Array Expression chips and reactions were performed in Fluidigm BioMark™ HD System qPCR. Consequently, MTUS1 mRNA levels were significantly diminished in breast cancer tissues and elevated in fibroadenoma tissues. Also, among MTUS1 targeting miRNAs, miR-183-5p was identified to be overexpressed in breast cancer and down-regulated in fibroadenoma tissues. Also, expression levels of MTUS1 and miR-183-5p were well correlated with clinical parameters. In particular, MTUS1 expression was found to be diminished and miR-183-5p expression was elevated with the advancing stage. In conclusion, as a potential therapeutic target, miR-183-5p can be a chief regulator of MTUS1 and MTUS1-miR-183-5p axis may have significant influence in the pathology of breast cancer. PMID:27155522

  19. Interaction of hepatitis B virus with tumor suppressor gene p53: its significance and biological function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with tumor suppressor p53 and its role in the hepatocarcinogenesis have been studied by PCR-directed sequencing, gel shift assays and in situ ultraviolet cross-linking assay. The biological function of the interaction of HBV with p53 gene was investigated by co-transfection of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene, p53 and HBV DNA, and quantitative PCR. Among the 16 primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PHC) samples, 13 were HBV-DNA positive,10 HBxAg positive and 9 p53 protein positive. The p53 gene point mutation was found in 5 samples, one of which had a G to T substitution located at codon 249. After analyzing the HBV genome by a computer program, a p53 response element binding sequence was found in HBV genome at upstream of enhancer I, from 1047 to 1059 nucleotides. This sequence could specifically bind to p53 protein, increase p53 protein accumulation in the PHC cells and stimulate the transactivating activity of p53 and HBV replication .The results also revealed that HBxAg could combine with p53 protein to form a complex in the cells and enhance CAT expression. Immunocytochemical staining showed that p53 protein complex was located in the cytoplasm and the process of p53 entry to nuclei was, in part, blocked. From our results, we conclude that the mutation of p53 gene at codon 249 is infrequent in HBV-associated PHC, the DNA-protein binding between HBV and p53, and the protein-protein binding between HBxAg and p53 might lead to the reduction or inactivation of p53 protein, which in turn resulting in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis.

  20. Regulation of hematopoietic expression of the tumor suppressor gene WT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, W.J.; Patmasiriwat, P.; Stellrecht, C.M. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Understanding the regulation of WT1 in the hematopoietic system is important since this gene is expressed in fetal spleen and immature leukemias and likely plays a role in hematopoiesis. Because WT1 is downregulated in differentiated leukemia cells and is upregulated in fetal spleen and immature leukemia cells, WT1 expression may be a marker for progenitor cells and useful for the identification of residual blast cells. Using a quantitative RT-PCR assay, we compared WT1 expression in leukemic and differentiating K562 cells. To determine the molecular mechanism for the modulation of WT1 expression, we have identified hematopoietic-specific regulatory elements and characterized their interactions with hematopoietic-specific transcription factors. We observed co-expression of WT1 and GATA-1 RNA in K562 cells and in mouse spleen, so we evaluated their potential interactions. We found that the activity of the 3{prime} WT1 enhancer is correlated with GATA-1 expression. We have demonstrated by footprint analysis and gel shift competition, as well as transactivation studies, that this functional activity is mediated via binding at a 3{prime} GATA binding site. Sequence analysis reveals additional hematopoietic elements within the 3{prime} enhancer and promoter. We have examined two non-consensus GATA binding sites 5{prime} of the WT1 minimal promoter and observed that GATA-1 can also transactivate the WT1 promoter. The transactivation of WT1 regulatory elements by GATA-1 implies that GATA-1, a hematopoietic transcription factor, may play a role in the regulation of WT1 during hematopoiesis. Elucidating the role of tumor suppressor genes such as WT1 in normal developmental processes will aid understanding their roles in the development of cancer.

  1. BAX and tumor suppressor TRP53 are important in regulating mutagenesis in spermatogenic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guogang; Vogel, Kristine S; McMahan, C Alex; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2010-12-01

    During the first wave of spermatogenesis, and in response to ionizing radiation, elevated mutant frequencies are reduced to a low level by unidentified mechanisms. Apoptosis is occurring in the same time frame that the mutant frequency declines. We examined the role of apoptosis in regulating mutant frequency during spermatogenesis. Apoptosis and mutant frequencies were determined in spermatogenic cells obtained from Bax-null or Trp53-null mice. The results showed that spermatogenic lineage apoptosis was markedly decreased in Bax-null mice and was accompanied by a significantly increased spontaneous mutant frequency in seminiferous tubule cells compared to that of wild-type mice. Apoptosis profiles in the seminiferous tubules for Trp53-null were similar to control mice. Spontaneous mutant frequencies in pachytene spermatocytes and in round spermatids from Trp53-null mice were not significantly different from those of wild-type mice. However, epididymal spermatozoa from Trp53-null mice displayed a greater spontaneous mutant frequency compared to that from wild-type mice. A greater proportion of spontaneous transversions and a greater proportion of insertions/deletions 15 days after ionizing radiation were observed in Trp53-null mice compared to wild-type mice. Base excision repair activity in mixed germ cell nuclear extracts prepared from Trp53-null mice was significantly lower than that for wild-type controls. These data indicate that BAX-mediated apoptosis plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis in seminiferous tubule cells obtained from neonatal mice, whereas tumor suppressor TRP53 plays a significant role in regulating spontaneous mutagenesis between postmeiotic round spermatid and epididymal spermatozoon stages of spermiogenesis. PMID:20739667

  2. Tumor suppressor gene alterations in patients with malignant mesothelioma due to environmental asbestos exposure in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emri Salih

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental asbestos exposure can cause the grave lung and pleura malignancies with a high mortality rate, and it is also associated with increased rate of other organ malignancies. Asbestos exposure can develop genotoxic effects and damage in the pleura and lungs. Objective In this study, we aimed to determine tumor suppressor gene (TSG loss in genomic DNA which was isolated from pleural fluid and blood samples of patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM due to environmental asbestos exposure. Design and patients Prospective study of period from 2001 to 2003 in 17 patients with MPM. Methods A total of 12 chromosomal regions were researched by comparing genomic DNA samples isolated from blood and pleural effusion (using PCR, and polyacrilamid gel electrophoresis denaturizing, on 2 different chromosomes which have 9 different polymorphic determinants at 6q and 3 different polymorphic determinants at 9p using molecular genetic methods on 13 patients clinico-pathologically diagnosed MPM. Results Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH was determined at D6S275 in one patient, at D6S301 in another, at D6S474 in 2, at ARG1 in 2, at D6S1038 in 2 and at D6S1008 in 3 patients. In 7 (54% of the13 patients, we found LOH in at least one site. No LOH was determined at any informative loci in 6 patients. Of the 13 patients, no investigated markers were determined at 9p. Conclusion In this study, genomic DNA samples obtained from MPM patients with asbestos exposure revealed that they contained important genotoxic damage. We found no other study on this subject at molecular level in pleural effusion either in Turkey or in the med-line literature. We believe that this study will provide important support for other research into molecular-genetic variations, both on this subject and other malignancies, and may also constitute a base for early diagnosis and gene therapy research in the future.

  3. Effect of hydroxyurea on the promoter occupancy profiles of tumor suppressor p53 and p73

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Xin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor and its related protein, p73, share a homologous DNA binding domain, and mouse genetics studies have suggested that they have overlapping as well as distinct biological functions. Both p53 and p73 are activated by genotoxic stress to regulate an array of cellular responses. Previous studies have suggested that p53 and p73 independently activate the cellular apoptotic program in response to cytotoxic drugs. The goal of this study was to compare the promoter-binding activity of p53 and p73 at steady state and after genotoxic stress induced by hydroxyurea. Results We employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, the NimbleGen promoter arrays and a model-based algorithm for promoter arrays to identify promoter sequences enriched in anti-p53 or anti-p73 immunoprecipitates, either before or after treatment with hydroxyurea, which increased the expression of both p53 and p73 in the human colon cancer cell line HCT116-3(6. We calculated a model-based algorithm for promoter array score for each promoter and found a significant correlation between the promoter occupancy profiles of p53 and p73. We also found that after hydroxyurea treatment, the p53-bound promoters were still bound by p73, but p73 became associated with additional promoters that that did not bind p53. In particular, we showed that hydroxyurea induces the binding of p73 but not p53 to the promoter of MLH3, which encodes a mismatch repair protein, and causes an up-regulation of the MLH3 mRNA. Conclusion These results suggest that hydroxyurea exerts differential effects on the promoter-binding functions of p53 and p73 and illustrate the power of model-based algorithm for promoter array in the analyses of promoter occupancy profiles of highly homologous transcription factors.

  4. Insights into the biology and prevention of tumor metastasis provided by the Nm23 metastasis suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Natascia; Nakayama, Joji; Collins, Joshua W; Steeg, Patricia S

    2012-12-01

    Metastatic disease is the major cause of death among cancer patients. A class of genes, named metastasis suppressors, has been described to specifically regulate the metastatic process. The metastasis suppressor genes are downregulated in the metastatic lesion compared to the primary tumor. In this review, we describe the body of research surrounding the first metastasis suppressor identified, Nm23. Nm23 overexpression in aggressive cancer cell lines reduced their metastatic potential in vivo with no significant reduction in primary tumor size. A complex mechanism of anti-metastatic action is unfolding involving several known Nm23 enzymatic activities (nucleotide diphosphate kinase, histidine kinase, and 3'-5' exonuclease), protein-protein interactions, and downstream gene regulation properties. Translational approaches involving Nm23 have progressed to the clinic. The upregulation of Nm23 expression by medroxyprogesterone acetate has been tested in a phase II trial. Other approaches with significant preclinical success include gene therapy using traditional or nanoparticle delivery, and cell permeable Nm23 protein. Recently, based on the inverse correlation of Nm23 and LPA1 expression, a LPA1 inhibitor has been shown to both inhibit metastasis and induce metastatic dormancy. PMID:22706779

  5. Tumor suppressor microRNA-31 inhibits gastric carcinogenesis by targeting Smad4 and SGPP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoming, W; Zhen, Y; Tengteng, Z; Jisheng, H

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the function of microRNA-31 (miR-31) in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer (GC) and to explore the possible mechanisms involved in it. A quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to evaluate miR-31 expression in GC cell lines. After transfecting GC cells with miR-31 precursors, Alamar blue and apoptosis assays were used to measure the respective proliferation and apoptosis rates. SGPP2 and Smad4 expression were determined by real-time RT-PCR and western blot assays after miR-31 transfection. Animal assay was used to further investigate miR-31 in the pathogenesis of GC. miR-31 was significantly reduced in GC tissues and GC cell lines, and that the reduced miR-31 was associated with distant metastasis and GC clinical pathological stages, miR-31 was lower at stages III/IV than that at stage II. SGPP2 and Smad4 were proven to be the direct target of miR-31. SGPP2 and Smad4 at mRNA and protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-31 in human GC tissues and cancer cell lines. Increased miR-31 significantly repressed SGPP2 and Smad4 at transcriptional and translational levels. Functional studies showed that increasing miR-31 inhibited GC cell proliferation, promoted apoptosis and attenuated cell migration, which were also linked to downregulation of STAT3. In vivo, miR-31 inhibited GC cell growth in tumor-bearing mice. This study has revealed miR-31 as a tumor suppressor and has identified SGPP2 and Smad4 as novel targets of miR-31, linking to STAT3 for regulating cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration in GC. Therefore, miR-31 could be a useful biomarker for monitoring GC development and progression, and also could have a therapeutic potential by targeting SGPP2, Smad4 and STAT3 for GC therapy. PMID:26494556

  6. MicroRNA-133a functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting IGF-1R in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Kai; Liu, Songyang; Ji, Bai; Wang, Yingchao; Liu, Yahui

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs and have critical roles in tumorigenesis and metastasis. A growing body of evidence showed that microRNA-133a (miR-133a) was downregulated and played tumor suppressor roles in gastric, colorectal, bladder, and lung cancer. However, the role and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-133a in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression of miR-133a in HCC tissues and HCC cell lines. We find that miR-133a was downregulated in HCC tissues and cell lines and that miR-133a expression negatively correlated with tumor differentiation (P cells significantly suppressed proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 stage and cell apoptosis in vitro, and decreased tumor size and weight in a nude mouse HepG2 xenograft model. Using bioinformatics method and dual luciferase assays identified insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) as a direct target of miR-133a in HCC cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-133a inhibited activation AKT and ERK signal pathway, which contributed to suppression of HCC cell growth. These findings suggest that miR-133a may act as a tumor suppressor and inhibited survival of HCC cells by targeting IGF-1R. PMID:26156803

  7. Putative tumor-suppressor gene regions responsible for radiation lymphomagenesis in F1 mice with different p53 status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regions of allelic loss on chromosomes in many tumors of human and some experimental animals are generally considered to harbor tumor-suppressor genes involved in tumorigenesis. Allelotype analyses have greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanism of radiation lymphomagenesis. Previously, we and others found frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosomes 4, 11, 12, 16 and 19 in radiation-induced lymphomas from several F1 hybrid mice. To examine possible contributions of individual tumor-suppressor genes to tumorigenesis in p53 heterozygous deficiency, we investigated the genome-wide distribution and status of LOH in radiation-induced lymphomas from F1 mice with different p53 status. In this study, we found frequent LOH (more than 20%) on chromosomes 4 and 12 and on chromosomes 11, 12, 16 and 19 in radiation-induced lymphomas from (STS/A X MSM/Ms)F1 mice and (STS/A X MSM/Ms)F1-p53KO/+ mice, respectively. Low incidences of LOH (10-20%) were also observed on chromosomes 11 in mice with wild-type p53, and chromosomes 1, 2, 9, 17 and X in p53 heterozygous-deficient mice. The frequency of LOH on chromosomes 9 and 11 increased in the (STS/A X MSM/Ms)F1-p53KO/+ mice. Preferential losses of the STS-derived allele on chromosome 9 and wild-type p53 allele on chromosome 11 were also found in the p53 heterozygous-deficient mice. Thus, the putative tumor-suppressor gene regions responsible for lymphomaganesis might considerably differ due to the p53 status. (author)

  8. The growth arrest-specific transcript 5 (GAS5): a pivotal tumor suppressor long noncoding RNA in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chenhui; Shi, Xuefei; Zhu, Qingqing; Li, Qian; Liu, Yafang; Yao, Yanwen; Song, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which refer to a group of RNAs with length more than 200 nucleotides and limited protein-coding potential, play a widespread role in regulating biological processes, such as cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. LncRNAs are dysregulated in multiple cancers, playing an either oncogenic or tumor-suppressive role. LncRNA GAS5 is a recently identified tumor suppressor involved in several cancers, like breast cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. The low-expression pattern confers tumor cells elevated capacity of proliferation and predicts poorer prognosis. Existing studies mirror that lncRNA GAS5 promises to be a novel diagnostic biomarker, therapy target, as well as prognostic biomarker. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge about this vital lncRNA, from its discovery, characteristics, and biological function to molecular mechanism in various neoplasms. PMID:26634743

  9. Mast Cells Mobilize Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Treg Cells in Tumor Microenvironment via IL-17 Pathway in Murine Hepatocarcinoma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuoshun Yang; Biao Zhang; Dapeng Li; Meng Lv; Chunmei Huang; Guan-Xin Shen; Bo Huang

    2010-01-01

    Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regu...

  10. UV irradiation leads to transient changes in phosphorylation and stability of tumor suppressor protein p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidtmann, K; Landsberg, G

    1996-12-01

    Tumor suppressor protein p53 is thought to play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the genome. DNA damage caused by genotoxic drugs, UV or gamma-irradiation leads to accumulation of p53 and activation of its DNA binding and transcriptional activities and subsequently to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. We investigated whether the apparent activation of p53 might be due to post-translational modification. The rat fibroblast cell lines REF52, 208F, and rat1 were irradiated with W-A and the synthesis, stability and phosphorylation state of p53 were investigated by pulse chase experiments, SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping. The three cell lines exhibited different sensitivities and biological responses to UV irradiation, REF52 cells responded with a growth arrest whereas 208F and rat1 cells underwent apoptosis. The fate of p53 was similar in all cases. Both the stability of p53 and its phosphorylation increased instantaneously but transiently. However, the amount of p53 that accumulated after UV treatment was much higher in 208F and rat1 than in REF52 cells. Interestingly, p53 that was synthesized early after irradiation was stable for more than 14 h whereas molecules synthesized 8 or more hours post irradiation were increasingly susceptible to degradation. Moreover, between 14 and 20 h after treatment, the rate of synthesis of p53 decreased to a level lower than in untreated cells suggesting negative feed back control. The expression of different p53-responsive genes, waf1/cip1, Gadd45, and bax was investigated by protein analyses. Surprisingly, p21(waf1) was expressed only in REF52 cells but not in the others. Furthermore, UV irradiation led only to a moderate increase of p21(waf1) expression. Expression of Gadd45 and box was detectable in both cell types but its expression did not change significantly upon UV treatment. Our results suggest i) that both cell types share a common pathway which upon UV irradiation results in enhanced

  11. Functional Analysis of In-frame Indel ARID1A Mutations Reveals New Regulatory Mechanisms of Its Tumor Suppressor Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Guan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available AT-rich interactive domain 1A (ARID1A has emerged as a new tumor suppressor in which frequent somatic mutations have been identified in several types of human cancers. Although most ARID1A somatic mutations are frame-shift or nonsense mutations that contribute to mRNA decay and loss of protein expression, 5% of ARID1A mutations are in-frame insertions or deletions (indels that involve only a small stretch of peptides. Naturally occurring in-frame indel mutations provide unique and useful models to explore the biology and regulatory role of ARID1A. In this study, we analyzed indel mutations identified in gynecological cancers to determine how these mutations affect the tumor suppressor function of ARID1A. Our results demonstrate that all in-frame mutants analyzed lost their ability to inhibit cellular proliferation or activate transcription of CDKN1A, which encodes p21, a downstream effector of ARID1A. We also showed that ARID1A is a nucleocytoplasmic protein whose stability depends on its subcellular localization. Nuclear ARID1A is less stable than cytoplasmic ARID1A because ARID1A is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nucleus. In-frame deletions affecting the consensus nuclear export signal reduce steady-state protein levels of ARID1A. This defect in nuclear exportation leads to nuclear retention and subsequent degradation. Our findings delineate a mechanism underlying the regulation of ARID1A subcellular distribution and protein stability and suggest that targeting the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system can increase the amount of the ARID1A protein in the nucleus and restore its tumor suppressor functions.

  12. Functional expression of NF1 tumor suppressor protein: association with keratin intermediate filaments during the early development of human epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peltonen Sirkku

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NF1 refers to type 1 neurofibromatosis syndrome, which has been linked with mutations of the large NF1 gene. NF1 tumor suppressor protein, neurofibromin, has been shown to regulate ras: the NF1 protein contains a GTPase activating protein (GAP related domain which functions as p21rasGAP. Our studies have previously demonstrated that the NF1 protein forms a high affinity association with cytokeratin 14 during the formation of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes in cultured keratinocytes. Methods The expression of NF1 protein was studied in developing human epidermis using western transfer analysis, indirect immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and in situ hybridization. Results The expression of NF1 protein was noted to be highly elevated in the periderm at 8 weeks estimated gestational age (EGA and in the basal cells at 8–14 weeks EGA. During this period, NF1 protein was associated with cytokeratin filaments terminating to desmosomes and hemidesmosomes. NF1 protein did not display colocalization with α-tubulin or actin of the cytoskeleton, or with adherens junction proteins. Conclusions These results depict an early fetal period when the NF1 tumor suppressor is abundantly expressed in epidermis and associated with cytokeratin filaments. This period is characterized by the initiation of differentiation of the basal cells, maturation of the basement membrane zone as well as accentuated formation of selected cellular junctions. NF1 tumor suppressor may function in the regulation of epidermal histogenesis via controlling the organization of the keratin cytoskeleton during the assembly of desmosomes and hemidesmosomes.

  13. The Tumor Suppressor Roles of miR-433 and miR-127 in Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs provides a new and powerful tool for studying the mechanism, diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. Currently, the methylation epigenetic silencing of miRNAs with tumor suppressor features by CpG island hypermethylation is emerging as a common hallmark of different tumors. Here we showed that miR-433 and miR-127 were significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer (GC tissues compared with the adjacent normal regions in 86 paired samples. Moreover, the lower level of miR-433 and miR-127 was associated with pM or pTNM stage in clinical gastric cancer patients. The restored expression of miR-433 and miR-127 in GC cells upon 5-Aza-CdR and TSA treatment suggested the loss of miR-433 and miR-127 was at least partly regulated by epigenetic modification in GC. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of miR-433 and miR-127 in gastric cancer cell lines HGC-27 inhibits cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell migration and invasion by directly interacting with the mRNA encoding oncogenic factors KRAS and MAPK4 respectively. Taken together, our results showed that miR-433 and miR-127 might act as tumor suppressors in GC, and it may provide novel diagnostic and therapeutic options for human GC clinical operation in the near future.

  14. SIGNALING TO THE P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR THROUGH PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY GENOTOXIC AND NON-GENOTOXIC STRESSES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2002-07-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is post-translational modified at {approx}18 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review the posttranslational modifications to p53 and the pathways that produce them in response to both genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses.

  15. Activation of the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Specific Cervical Cancer Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgo, Ryan J.; Braden, Wesley A.; Wells, Susanne I.; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2009-01-01

    High-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) encodes two oncoproteins, E6 and E7, which are vital to viral replication and contribute to the development of cervical cancer. HPV16 E7 can target over 20 cellular proteins, but is best known for inactivating the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor. RB functions by restraining cells from entering S-phase of the cell cycle, thus preventing aberrant proliferation. While it is well established that HPV16 E7 facilitates the degradation of the RB protein, th...

  16. Arthritis suppressor genes TIA-1 and TTP dampen the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, cyclooxygenase 2, and inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Kristine; Kedersha, Nancy; Shen, Lily; Blackshear, Perry J.; Anderson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    TIA-1 and TTP are AU-rich element-binding proteins that prevent the pathological overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). TIA-1 inhibits the translation of TNF-α transcripts, whereas TTP promotes the degradation of TNF-α transcripts. Here we show that TIA-1 and TTP function as arthritis suppressor genes: TIA-1–/– mice develop mild arthritis, TTP–/– mice develop severe arthritis, and TIA-1–/–TTP–/– mice develop very severe arthritis. Peritoneal macrophages derived from all three geno...

  17. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Jones, Virginia [Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Katiyar, Santosh K., E-mail: skatiyar@uab.edu [Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16{sup INK4a} and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin

  18. Grape seed proanthocyanidins reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes in human skin cancer cells by targeting epigenetic regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) have been shown to have anti-skin carcinogenic effects in in vitro and in vivo models. However, the precise epigenetic molecular mechanisms remain unexplored. This study was designed to investigate whether GSPs reactivate silenced tumor suppressor genes following epigenetic modifications in skin cancer cells. For this purpose, A431 and SCC13 human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were used as in vitro models. The effects of GSPs on DNA methylation, histone modifications and tumor suppressor gene expressions were studied in these cell lines using enzyme activity assays, western blotting, dot-blot analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that treatment of A431 and SCC13 cells with GSPs decreased the levels of: (i) global DNA methylation, (ii) 5-methylcytosine, (iii) DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and (iv) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels of DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b in these cells. Similar effects were noted when these cancer cells were treated identically with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. GSPs decreased histone deacetylase activity, increased levels of acetylated lysines 9 and 14 on histone H3 (H3-Lys 9 and 14) and acetylated lysines 5, 12 and 16 on histone H4, and reduced the levels of methylated H3-Lys 9. Further, GSP treatment resulted in re-expression of the mRNA and proteins of silenced tumor suppressor genes, RASSF1A, p16INK4a and Cip1/p21. Together, this study provides a new insight into the epigenetic mechanisms of GSPs and may have significant implications for epigenetic therapy in the treatment/prevention of skin cancers in humans. -- Highlights: ►Epigenetic modulations have been shown to have a role in cancer risk. ►Proanthocyanidins decrease the levels of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. ►Proanthocyanidins inhibit histone deacetylase activity in skin cancer cells. ►Proanthocyanidins reactivate tumor suppressor genes in skin cancer

  19. Ex vivo generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells that model the tumor immunosuppressive environment in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dufait, Inès; Schwarze, Julia Katharina; Liechtenstein, Therese; Leonard, Wim; Jiang, Heng; Escors, David; Ridder, Mark De; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of cells that accumulate in tumor-bearing subjects and which strongly inhibit anti-cancer immune responses. To study the biology of MDSC in colorectal cancer (CRC), we cultured bone marrow cells in conditioned medium from CT26 cells, which are genetically modified to secrete high levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. This resulted in the generation of high numbers of CD11b+ Ly6G+ granulocytic and CD11...

  20. The retinoblastoma protein: a master tumor suppressor acts as a link between cell cycle and cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Engel BE; Cress WD; Santiago-Cardona PG

    2014-01-01

    Brienne E Engel,1 W Douglas Cress,1 Pedro G Santiago-Cardona2 1Molecular Oncology Program, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Biochemistry, Ponce School of Medicine, Ponce, Puerto Rico, USA Abstract: RB1 was the first tumor suppressor gene discovered. Over 4 decades of work have revealed that the Rb protein (Rb) is a master regulator of biological pathways influencing virtually every aspect of intrinsic cell fate including cell growth, cell-cy...

  1. The Tumor Suppressor RASSF1A Prevents Dephosphorylation of the Mammalian STE20-like Kinases MST1 and MST2*

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Cai; Zhang, Xiaoying; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2011-01-01

    The RASSF1A tumor suppressor protein interacts with the pro-apoptotic mammalian STE20-like kinases MST1 and MST2 and induces their autophosphorylation and activation, but the mechanism of how RASSF1A activates MST1/2 is unclear. Okadaic acid treatment and PP2A knockdown promoted MST1/2 phosphorylation. Data from dephosphorylation assays and reduced activation of MST1/2 seen after RASSF1A depletion suggest that dephosphorylation of MST1/2 on Thr-183 and Thr-180 by PP2A is prevented by RASSF1A,...

  2. PHF21B as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Barros Filho, Mateus de Camargo; Kuasne, Hellen; Dos Reis, Patricia Pintor; da Costa Prando, Erika; Muñoz, Juan José Augusto Moyano; Roffé, Martín; Hajj, Glaucia Noeli Maroso; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo; Rainho, Claudia Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2015-01-01

    methylation in nine HNSCC and breast carcinoma cell lines. Additionally, PHF21B expression levels were evaluated in colon cancer HCT116 cells as well as in its counterpart DKO (double knockout of DNMT1 and DNMT3B). The higher expression levels of PHF21B gene detected in DKO cells were inversely correlated...

  3. The wip1 phosphatase (PPM1D) antagonizes activation of the CHK2 tumor suppressor kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA checkpoints are signal transduction pathways that sense DNA damage and coordinate various responses such as cell cycle arrests, DNA repair or cell death. These pathways are particularly well conserved in eukaryotes and the family of the 'Checkpoint Kinases 2' genes (or CHK2) plays a major role in them. This family includes the Rad53 protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its Chk2 human homologue. Rad53 plays a central part in DNA checkpoint: rad53d mutants (whose RAD53 gene has been deleted) are hypersensitive to all genotoxic stresses. Mice Chk2-1- cells are defective in the G1, the intra-S, and the G2/M checkpoints. Mutations in CHK2 have been associated to many forms o f cancer, either sporadic or hereditary which demonstrates Chk2 tumor suppressor function. Chk2 proteins are characterized by several conserved elements: (i) an N-terminal domain with a series of SQ/TQ motifs, preferential phosphorylation sites for the ATM/ATR kinases, (ii) an FHA domain (ForkHead Associated) that binds specifically to phosphorylated residues within TXXY motifs (with the Y residue depending on the FHA domain and conferring an extra specificity) and (iii) a kinase domain including an activation loop. The Chk2 protein is activated by phosphorylation of its threonine T68, mainly by ATM, upon DNA double-strand breaks. This phosphorylation allows for the homo-dimerization of Chk2 through the binding of phospho-T68 from one molecule to the FHA domain of another molecule. It results in trans auto-phosphorylations, especially at threonines T383 and T387 in the activation T-loop. Fully active Chk2 becomes monomeric and, diffusing through the whole nucleus, phosphorylates its targets (CDC25 A and CDC25C/cell cycle arrest; p53, E2F, PML/apoptosis; BRCA2/DNA repair). Chk2/Rad53 inactivation occurs in two cases: once the DNA lesions have been repaired (it is called recovery) or, under certain conditions, in the presence of unrepaired DNA damage (it is then called adaptation

  4. Truncated Isoforms of lncRNA ANRIL Are Overexpressed in Bladder Cancer, But Do Not Contribute to Repression of INK4 Tumor Suppressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle J. Hoffmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The INK4/ARF locus at chromosome 9p21 encoding p14ARF, p15INK4B and p16INK4A is a major tumor suppressor locus, constituting an important barrier for tumor growth. It is frequently inactivated in cancers, especially in urothelial carcinoma (UC. In addition to deletions and DNA hypermethylation, further epigenetic mechanisms might underlie its repression. One candidate factor is the long noncoding RNA ANRIL, which recruits Polycomb proteins (PcG to regulate expression of target genes in cis and trans. We observed ANRIL overexpression in many UC tissues and cell lines mainly resulting from upregulation of 3’-truncated isoforms. However, aberrant ANRIL expression was neither associated with repression of INK4/ARF genes nor with proliferation activity or senescence. We wondered whether truncated ANRIL isoforms exhibit altered properties resulting in loss of function in cis. We excluded delocalization and performed RNA immunoprecipitation demonstrating interaction between full length or truncated ANRIL and PcG protein CBX7, but not SUZ12 of PRC2. Our data indicate that ANRIL in UC cells may not interact with PRC2, which is central for initializing gene repression. Thus, tissue-specific binding activities between ANRIL and PcG proteins may determine the regulatory function of ANRIL. In conclusion, ANRIL does not play a major role in repression of the INK4/ARF locus in UC.

  5. Loss of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor correlates with improved outcome in patients with lung adenocarcinoma treated with surgery and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Matthew J; Ishak, Charles A; Passos, Daniel T; Warner, Andrew; Palma, David A; Howlett, Christopher J; Driman, David K; Dick, Frederick A

    2015-12-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor pathway is frequently inactivated in human cancer, enabling unrestrained proliferation. Most cancers, however, maintain expression of a wild-type (WT) retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB). It is generally in a hyperphosphorylated state (ppRB) because of mutations in upstream regulators such as p16 and cyclin D. Hyperphosphorylated ppRB is considered inactive, although data are emerging that suggest it can retain some function. To test the clinical relevance of pRB status, we obtained archival tissue sections from 91 cases of lung adenocarcinoma resected between 2003 and 2008. All cases received platinum doublet chemotherapy, and the median survival was 5.9 years. All cases were assessed for pRB and ppRB using immunohistochemistry and quantified based on intensity of signal and proportion of positive cells. pRB expression was lost in 15% of lung adenocarcinoma cases. In tumors that did not express pRB, the survival rate was significantly improved (hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.69; P = .01) in comparison to tumors that express pRB. pRB status was found to be an independent predictor of overall survival on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-0.73; P = .01) along with increased stage and age. pRB status did not alter baseline levels of apoptotic or proliferative markers in these tumors, but the DNA damage response protein 53BP1 was higher in cancers with high levels of pRB. In summary, loss of pRB expression is associated with improved survival in patients treated with surgical resection and chemotherapy. This may be useful in classifying patients at greatest benefit for aggressive treatment regimes. PMID:26475095

  6. The epigenetic modifier CHD5 functions as a novel tumor suppressor for renal cell carcinoma and is predominantly inactivated by promoter CpG methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenfang; Li, Lili; Huang, Xin; Jin, Jie; Huang, Suming; Zhang, Qian; Tao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common urological cancer with steadily increasing incidence. A series of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified methylated in RCC as potential epigenetic biomarkers. We identified a 1p36.3 TSG candidate CHD5 as a methylated target in RCC through epigenome study. As the role of CHD5 in RCC pathogenesis remains elusive, we further studied its expression and molecular functions in RCC cells. We found that CHD5 was broadly expressed in most normal genitourinary tissues including kidney, but frequently silenced or downregulated by promoter CpG methylation in 78% of RCC cell lines and 44% (24/55) of primary tumors. In addition, CHD5 mutations appear to be rare in RCC tumors through genome database mining. In methylated/silenced RCC cell lines, CHD5 expression could be restored with azacytidine demethylation treatment. Ectopic expression of CHD5 in RCC cells significantly inhibited their clonogenicity, migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that CHD5, as a chromatin remodeling factor, suppressed the expression of multiple targets including oncogenes (MYC, MDM2, STAT3, CCND1, YAP1), epigenetic master genes (Bmi-1, EZH2, JMJD2C), as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition and stem cell markers (SNAI1, FN1, OCT4). Further chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the binding of CHD5 to target gene promoters. Thus, we demonstrate that CHD5 functions as a novel TSG for RCC, but is predominantly inactivated by promoter methylation in primary tumors. PMID:26943038

  7. DESC1, a novel tumor suppressor, sensitizes cells to apoptosis by downregulating the EGFR/AKT pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hoi Yan; Ko, Josephine Mun-Yee; Yu, Valen Zhuoyou; Ip, Joseph Chok Yan; Dai, Wei; Cal, Santiago; Lung, Maria Li

    2016-06-15

    Esophageal cancer is ranked as the eighth most common cancer and the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. To identify candidate tumor suppressor genes related to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) development, a cDNA microarray analysis was performed using paired tumor and nontumor tissue samples from ESCC patients. Differentially expressed in squamous cell carcinoma 1 (DESC1), which belongs to the Type II transmembrane serine protease family, was frequently downregulated in ESCC. This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism for the tumor suppressive function of DESC1 in ESCC. We show that DESC1 reduced cell viability and sensitized cells to apoptosis, when cells were under apoptotic stimuli. The proapoptotic effect of DESC1 was mediated through downregulating AKT1 activation and the restoration of AKT activation by the introduction of the constitutively active AKT, myr-AKT, abolished the apoptosis-sensitizing effect of DESC1. DESC1 also reduced EGFR protein level, which was abrogated when the proteolytic function of DESC1 was lost, suggesting that DESC1 cleaved EGFR and downregulated the EGFR/AKT pathway to favor apoptosis. The transmembrane localization and the structural domains provide an opportunity for DESC1 to interact with the extracellular environment. The importance of such interaction was highlighted by the finding that DESC1 reduced cell colony formation ability in three-dimensional culture. In line with this, DESC1 reduced tumor growth kinetics in the in vivo orthotopic tumorigenesis assay. Taken together, our novel findings suggest how DESC1 may suppress ESCC development by sensitizing cells to apoptosis under an apoptotic stimulus through downregulating the EGFR/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:26856390

  8. The BRCA1 Tumor Suppressor Binds to Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors to Stimulate Apoptotic Calcium Release*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, Serena C.; Garcia, M. Iveth; Wagner, Larry E.; Rodriguez, Ana M.; Chintapalli, Sree V.; Snyder, Russell R.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Henderson, Beric R.; Brodie, Kirsty M.; Yule, David I.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Boehning, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is a ubiquitously expressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident calcium channel. Calcium release mediated by IP3Rs influences many signaling pathways, including those regulating apoptosis. IP3R activity is regulated by protein-protein interactions, including binding to proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death. Here we show that the IP3R binds to the tumor suppressor BRCA1. BRCA1 binding directly sensitizes the IP3R to its ligand, IP3. BRCA1 is recruited to the ER during apoptosis in an IP3R-dependent manner, and, in addition, a pool of BRCA1 protein is constitutively associated with the ER under non-apoptotic conditions. This is likely mediated by a novel lipid binding activity of the first BRCA1 C terminus domain of BRCA1. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation by which BRCA1 can act as a proapoptotic protein. PMID:25645916

  9. Retinoid-induced expression and activity of an immediate early tumor suppressor gene in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Streb

    Full Text Available Retinoids are used clinically to treat a number of hyper-proliferative disorders and have been shown in experimental animals to attenuate vascular occlusive diseases, presumably through nuclear receptors bound to retinoic acid response elements (RARE located in target genes. Here, we show that natural or synthetic retinoids rapidly induce mRNA and protein expression of a specific isoform of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 12 (AKAP12β in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC as well as the intact vessel wall. Expression kinetics and actinomycin D studies indicate Akap12β is a retinoid-induced, immediate-early gene. Akap12β promoter analyses reveal a conserved RARE mildly induced with atRA in a region that exhibits hyper-acetylation. Immunofluorescence microscopy and protein kinase A (PKA regulatory subunit overlay assays in SMC suggest a physical association between AKAP12β and PKA following retinoid treatment. Consistent with its designation as a tumor suppressor, inducible expression of AKAP12β attenuates SMC growth in vitro. Further, immunohistochemistry studies establish marked decreases in AKAP12 expression in experimentally-injured vessels of mice as well as atheromatous lesions in humans. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for retinoids in the induction of an AKAP tumor suppressor that blocks vascular SMC growth thus providing new molecular insight into how retiniods may exert their anti-proliferative effects in the injured vessel wall.

  10. miR-339-5p regulates the p53 tumor-suppressor pathway by targeting MDM2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, M D; Djodji Damas, Nkerorema; Lees, M;

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many key cancer-relevant pathways and may themselves possess oncogenic or tumor-suppressor functions. Consequently, miRNA dysregulation has been shown to be a prominent feature in many human cancers. The p53 tumor suppressor acts as a negative regulator of cell...... proliferation in response to stress and represents the most commonly lost and mutated gene in human cancers. The function of p53 is inhibited by the MDM2 oncoprotein. Using a high-throughput screening approach, we identified miR-339-5p as a regulator of the p53 pathway. We demonstrate that this regulation...... occurs via the ability of miR-339-5p to target directly the 3'-untranslated region of MDM2 mRNA, reducing MDM2 expression and thus promoting p53 function. Consequently, overexpression of miR-339-5p positively impacts on p53-governed cellular responses such as proliferation arrest and senescence, whereas...

  11. Negative regulation of the stability and tumor suppressor function of Fbw7 by the Pin1 prolyl isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sang-Hyun; Lau, Alan W; Lee, Tae Ho; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Shuo; Huang, Pengyu; Shaik, Shavali; Lee, Daniel Yenhong; Finn, Greg; Balastik, Martin; Chen, Chun-Hau; Luo, Manli; Tron, Adriana E; Decaprio, James A; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Wei, Wenyi; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-06-29

    Fbw7 is the substrate recognition component of the Skp1-Cullin-F-box (SCF)-type E3 ligase complex and a well-characterized tumor suppressor that targets numerous oncoproteins for destruction. Genomic deletion or mutation of FBW7 has been frequently found in various types of human cancers; however, little is known about the upstream signaling pathway(s) governing Fbw7 stability and cellular functions. Here we report that Fbw7 protein destruction and tumor suppressor function are negatively regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 interacts with Fbw7 in a phoshorylation-dependent manner and promotes Fbw7 self-ubiquitination and protein degradation by disrupting Fbw7 dimerization. Consequently, overexpressing Pin1 reduces Fbw7 abundance and suppresses Fbw7's ability to inhibit proliferation and transformation. By contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated Fbw7 expression, which subsequently reduces Mcl-1 abundance, sensitizing cancer cells to Taxol. Thus, Pin1-mediated inhibition of Fbw7 contributes to oncogenesis, and Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy. PMID:22608923

  12. Negative Regulation of the Stability and Tumor Suppressor Function of Fbw7 by the Pin1 Prolyl Isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sang-Hyun; Lau, Alan W.; Lee, Tae Ho; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Wei, Shuo; Huang, Pengyu; Shaik, Shavali; Lee, Daniel Yenhong; Finn, Greg; Balastik, Martin; Chen, Chun-Hau; Luo, Manli; Tron, Adriana E.; DeCaprio, James A.; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Wei, Wenyi; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fbw7 is the substrate recognition component of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box)-type E3 ligase complex and a well-characterized tumor suppressor that targets numerous oncoproteins for destruction. Genomic deletion or mutation of FBW7 has been frequently found in various types of human cancers, however, little is known about the upstream signaling pathway(s) governing Fbw7 stability and cellular functions. Here we report that Fbw7 protein destruction and tumor suppressor function are negatively regulated by the prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 interacts with Fbw7 in a phoshorylation-dependent manner and promotes Fbw7 self-ubiquitination and protein degradation by disrupting Fbw7 dimerization. Consequently, over-expressing Pin1 reduces Fbw7 abundance and suppresses Fbw7’s ability to inhibit proliferation and transformation. By contrast, depletion of Pin1 in cancer cells leads to elevated Fbw7 expression, which subsequently reduces Mcl-1 abundance, sensitizing cancer cells to Taxol. Thus, Pin1-mediated inhibition of Fbw7 contributes to oncogenesis and Pin1 may be a promising drug target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:22608923

  13. ERK5/BMK1 Is a Novel Target of the Tumor Suppressor VHL: Implication in Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Arias-González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5, also known as big mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 1, is implicated in a wide range of biologic processes, which include proliferation or vascularization. Here, we show that ERK5 is degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system, in a process mediated by the tumor suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene, through a prolyl hydroxylation-dependent mechanism. Our conclusions derive from transient transfection assays in Cos7 cells, as well as the study of endogenous ERK5 in different experimental systems such as MCF7, HMEC, or Caki-2 cell lines. In fact, the specific knockdown of ERK5 in pVHL-negative cell lines promotes a decrease in proliferation and migration, supporting the role of this MAPK in cellular transformation. Furthermore, in a short series of fresh samples from human clear cell renal cell carcinoma, high levels of ERK5 correlate with more aggressive and metastatic stages of the disease. Therefore, our results provide new biochemical data suggesting that ERK5 is a novel target of the tumor suppressor VHL, opening a new field of research on the role of ERK5 in renal carcinomas.

  14. A defined chromosome 6q fragment (at D6S310) harbors a putative tumor suppressor gene for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theile, M; Seitz, S; Arnold, W; Jandrig, B; Frege, R; Schlag, P M; Haensch, W; Guski, H; Winzer, K J; Barrett, J C; Scherneck, S

    1996-08-15

    Recent evidence obtained by cytogenetic and molecular studies indicates that in breast cancer chromosome 6q is often affected by genetic changes suggesting the existence of putative tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). However the function of gene(s) on this chromosome in breast cancer suppression is not understood. To substantiate further the presence of breast cancer related TSGs at 6q and to define their location, we first performed microcell-mediated transfer of chromosome 6 to CAL51 breast cancer cells for studying possible suppression of malignant phenotype and secondly, we analysed DNAs from 46 primary breast cancers for loss of constitutive heterozygosity (LOH) using 24 poly-morphic microsatellite markers. The chromosome transfer resulted in loss of tumorigenicity and reversion of other neoplastic properties of the microcell hybrids. Polymorphism analysis of single hybrids revealed that they harbored only a small donor chromosome fragment defined by the marker D6S310 (6q23.3-q25) and flanked by D6S292 and D6S311. The LOH data suggest that four tumor suppressor gene loci mapped to the central and distal portion of 6q may be independently deleted in breast cancer. One of these regions corresponds to the region identified by chromosome transfer. PMID:8761288

  15. TRIM31 is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and serves as a potential tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yue; Bai, Xue; Peng, Yang; He, Ping

    2014-06-01

    The present study aims to investigate expression pattern and biological roles of TRIM31 in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We examined TRIM31 expression in 116 NSCLC tissues and 20 corresponding normal lung tissues by immumohistochemistry. We found TRIM31 downregulation in 47 out of 116 (40.5 %) cancer samples, which correlated with tumor status (p=0.0132), advanced p-TNM stage (p=0.001), and nodal metastasis (p=0.0382). TRIM31 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TRIM31 plasmid was performed in H157 and H1299 cells. TRIM31 overexpression inhibited cell growth rate and colony formation ability in both cell lines. In addition, expression of cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and cyclin E were decreased after TRIM31 transfection. In conclusion, TRIM31 might serve as a tumor suppressor in non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:24566900

  16. Identification of MSRA gene on chromosome 8p as a candidate metastasis suppressor for human hepatitis B virus-positive hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) still remains very dismal, which is mainly due to metastasis. In our previous studies, we found that chromosome 8p deletions might contribute to metastasis of HCC. In this study, we aimed to identify the candidate metastatic suppressor gene on chromosome 8p. Oligo-nucleotide microarrays which included 322 genes on human chromosome 8p were constructed to analyze the difference in gene expression profiles between HCC tissues with and without metastasis. The leading differentially expressed genes were identified and selected for further analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Recombinant expression plasmid vectors for each target gene were constructed and transfected into HCC cells and its in vitro effects on proliferation and invasion of HCC cells were also investigated. Sixteen leading differentially expressed genes were identified from the HCC tissues with metastasis compared with those without metastasis (p < 0.01, q < 16 %). Among of the 10 significantly down-regulated genes in HCC with metastasis, methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MSRA) had the lowest p value and false discovery rate (FDR), and was considered as a potential candidate for metastasis suppressor gene. Real-time PCR and Western blotting confirmed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of MSRA were significantly decreased in HCC with metastasis compared with those without metastasis (p < 0.001), and MSRA mRNA level in HCCLM6 cells (with high metastatic potential) was also much lower than that of other HCC cell lines. Transfection of a recombinant expression plasmid vector and overexpression of MSRA gene could obviously inhibit cell colony formation (4.33 ± 2.92 vs. 9.17 ± 3.38, p = 0.008) and invasion (7.40 ± 1.67 vs. 17.20 ± 2.59, p= 0.0001) of HCCLM6 cell line. MSRA gene on chromosome 8p might possess metastasis suppressor activity in HCC

  17. Genetic analysis of tumorigenesis: a conserved region in the human and Chinese hamster genomes contains genetically identified tumor-suppressor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regional chromosome homologies were found in a comparison of human 11p with Chinese hamster 3p. By use of probes that recognize six genes of human 11p (INS, CAT, HBBC, CALC, PTH, and HRAS), the corresponding genes were localized by in situ hybridization on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. INS and CAT were located close to the centromere on 3p, whereas HBBC, CALC, and PTH were at 3q3-4 and HRAS at 3q4. Extensive prior data from chromosome studies of tumorigenic and tumor-derived Chinese hamster cells have suggested the presence of a tumor-suppressor gene on 3p. Two tumor-suppressor genes have been described on human 11p, one linked to CAT and one to INS. The present study raises the possibility that the Chinese hamster suppressor may be closely linked to INS or CAT

  18. Understanding the Significance of Mutations in Tumor Suppressor Genes Identified Using Next-Generation Sequencing: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorscher, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of tumors has been heralded as a promising tool to identify ‘actionable’ abnormalities susceptible to therapies targeting these mutated genes. Inhibiting the oncoprotein expressed from a single dominant mutated gene (oncogene) forms the basis for the success of most of the targeted gene therapies approved in the last several years. The well over 20 FDA-approved kinase inhibitors for cancer treatment are examples [Janne et al.: Nat Rev Drug Discov 2009;8: 709–723]. These and other similar agents in development might prove effective therapies for tumors originating from tissues other than those for which these drugs are currently approved. Finding such mutations in tumors of patients through NGS is being aggressively pursued by patients and their oncologists. For identified mutated tumor suppressor genes (TSG) the challenge is really the opposite. Rather than inhibiting the action of an oncoprotein, targeting would involve restoring the activity of the wild-type (WT) TSG function [Knudson: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1971;249: 912–915]. Here, a case is reported that illustrates the implications of a mutated TSG (BRIP1) identified by NGS as potentially actionable. In such cases, measuring allelic mutation frequency potentially allows for the identification of tumors where the loss of heterozygosity of a TSG exists. Without substantial loss of expression of the WT TSG product, it would seem very unlikely that ‘replacing’ a WT TSG product that is not a lost product would be a useful therapy. PMID:27462233

  19. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S A; Evans, D G; Goodship, J; Coakham, H.; STRACHAN, T

    1994-01-01

    We have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely ...

  20. TRIM26 functions as a novel tumor suppressor of hepatocellular carcinoma and its downregulation contributes to worse prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the one of the most common malignancies worldwide and its prognosis is extremely poor. Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play crucial roles in cancer cell biology but the function of tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26) has not been investigated. We demonstrated that low expression level of TRIM26 in tumor samples was significantly correlated with worse prognosis in HCC patients. We also demonstrated its expression level was associated with several clinicopathologic features such as AFP level and T stage of HCC patients. Furthermore, we validated that TRIM26 was significantly downregulated in HCC tissue compared with normal liver tissue. To further clarify the functional role of TRIM26 in HCC, We confirmed that TRIM26 silencing can promote cancer cell proliferation, colony forming, migration and invasion in vitro with HCC cell lines HepG2 and Bel-7402. Then we utilized bioinformatic tool to predict gene influenced by TRIM26, showing TRIM26 could modulate gene sets about cancer cell metabolism. In conclusion, we proved that TRIM26 is a novel tumor suppressor modulating multiple metabolism-related pathways in HCC. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the function of TRIM26 in cancer biology. Our findings provide useful insight into the mechanism of HCC origin and progression. Moreover, TRIM26 may represent a novel therapeutic target for HCC. - Highlights: • TRIM26 is down-regulated in liver cancer samples and functions as a novel tumor suppressor. • Down-regulation of TRIM26 is associated with worse prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). • Knockdown of TRIM26 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of HCC cells. • TRIM26 may function in abnormal metabolic progress of HCC

  1. miR-137 acts as a tumor suppressor in papillary thyroid carcinoma by targeting CXCL12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Su; Jin, Meishan; Li, Ye; Ren, Peiyou; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that aberrantly expressed microRNAs (miRs) are extensively involved in tumorigenesis. microRNA-137 (miR-137) has been reported as a tumor suppressor in various types of cancer. However, the biological function and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-137 in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) remain largely unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of miR-137 and its functional significance in PTC. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay showed that miR-137 expression was significantly downregulated in human PTC tissues, and its expression was significantly negatively correlated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and lymph node metastasis. Functional assays showed that forced expression of miR-137 in PTC cells significantly inhibited proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in vitro. Importantly, on the basis of bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay, we found that miR-137 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (also known as SDF-1) (CXCL12). qRT-PCR and western blot analysis further verified the results and demonstrated that miR-137 could downregulate CXCL12 expression in PTC cells. We also confirmed that CXCL12 expression was increased in PTC tissues and was inversely correlated with miR-137. In addition, our results also showed that downregulation of CXCL12 mimicked the effects of miR-137 overexpression, and upregulation of CXCL12 partially reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-137 in PTC cells. These results showed that miR-137 may function as a tumor suppressor in PTC by targeting CXCL12, suggesting that miR-137 may act as a potential target for PTC treatment. PMID:26847706

  2. MicroRNA dependent regulation of DNMT-1 and tumor suppressor gene expression by Interleukin-6 in human malignant cholangiocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconi, Chiara; Huang, Nianyuan; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Although the inflammation-associated cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been implicated in cholangiocarcinoma growth, the relationship between IL-6 and oncogenic changes is unknown. IL-6 can increase expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT-1) and epigenetically regulate the expression of several genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs). DNMT-1 up-regulation occurs in hepatobiliary cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. To understand the potential regulation of DNMT-1 by IL-6 dependent miRNAs, we examined the expression of a group of miRNAs which have sequence complementarity to the 3′-UTR of DNMT-1, namely miR-148a, miR-152 and miR-301. The expression of these miRNAs was decreased in cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the expression of all three miRNAs was decreased in IL-6 over-expressing malignant cholangiocytes in vitro and in tumor cell xenografts. There was a concomitant decrease in expression of the methylation-sensitive tumor suppressor genes Rassf1a, and p16INK4a. Using luciferase reporter constructs, DNMT-1 was verified as a target for miR-148a and miR-152. Precursors to miR-148a and miR-152 decreased DNMT-1 protein expression, increased Rassf1a and p16INK4a expression and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion These data indicate that IL-6 can regulate the activity of DNMT-1 and expression of methylation-dependent tumor suppressor genes by modulation of miR-148a and miR-152, and provide a link between this inflammation-associated cytokines and oncogenesis in cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20146264

  3. TRIM26 functions as a novel tumor suppressor of hepatocellular carcinoma and its downregulation contributes to worse prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi, E-mail: wangyichenben@163.com [Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China); He, Du, E-mail: hdu1234@163.com [Department of Oncology, The Central Hospital of Enshi Autonomous of Prefecture, Enshi Clinical College of Wuhan University, Enshi, Hubei, 445000 (China); Yang, Liang, E-mail: yliang0689@163.com [Department of Oncology, Qianjiang Central Hospital, Qianjiang, Hubei, 433100 (China); Wen, Bo, E-mail: tjwb001@126.com [Department of Urology, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China); Dai, Jinfen, E-mail: brilliant_510@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); Zhang, Qian, E-mail: anny9655@126.com [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071 (China); Kang, Jian, E-mail: 984190619@qq.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); He, Weiyang, E-mail: 996114664@qq.com [Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430071 (China); Ding, Qianshan, E-mail: iamdqs@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430060 (China); He, De, E-mail: 18938027146@126.com [Department of General Surgery, The Affiliated Baoan Hospital of Southern Medical University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, 518101 (China)

    2015-07-31

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the one of the most common malignancies worldwide and its prognosis is extremely poor. Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play crucial roles in cancer cell biology but the function of tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26) has not been investigated. We demonstrated that low expression level of TRIM26 in tumor samples was significantly correlated with worse prognosis in HCC patients. We also demonstrated its expression level was associated with several clinicopathologic features such as AFP level and T stage of HCC patients. Furthermore, we validated that TRIM26 was significantly downregulated in HCC tissue compared with normal liver tissue. To further clarify the functional role of TRIM26 in HCC, We confirmed that TRIM26 silencing can promote cancer cell proliferation, colony forming, migration and invasion in vitro with HCC cell lines HepG2 and Bel-7402. Then we utilized bioinformatic tool to predict gene influenced by TRIM26, showing TRIM26 could modulate gene sets about cancer cell metabolism. In conclusion, we proved that TRIM26 is a novel tumor suppressor modulating multiple metabolism-related pathways in HCC. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the function of TRIM26 in cancer biology. Our findings provide useful insight into the mechanism of HCC origin and progression. Moreover, TRIM26 may represent a novel therapeutic target for HCC. - Highlights: • TRIM26 is down-regulated in liver cancer samples and functions as a novel tumor suppressor. • Down-regulation of TRIM26 is associated with worse prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). • Knockdown of TRIM26 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of HCC cells. • TRIM26 may function in abnormal metabolic progress of HCC.

  4. Regulation of a senescence checkpoint response by the E2F1 transcription factor and p14ARF tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Itahana, Koji; Acosta, Meileen; Campisi, Judith

    1999-11-05

    Normal cells do not divide indefinitely due to a process known as replicative senescence. Human cells arrest growth with a senescent phenotype when they acquire one or more critically short telomere as a consequence of cell division. Recent evidence suggests that certain types of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, or oncogenic forms of Rasor Raf can also elicit a senescence response. We show here that E2F1, a multifunctional transcription factor that binds the retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor and can either promote or suppress tumorigenesis, induces a senescent phenotype when overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts. Normal human cells stably arrested proliferation and expressed several markers of replicative senescence in response to E2F1. This activity of E2F1 was independent of its pRb binding activity, but dependent on its ability to stimulate gene expression. The E2F1 target gene critical for the senescence response appeared to be the p14ARF tumor suppressor. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts overexpressed p14ARF, and ectopic expression of p14ARF in presenescent cells induced a phenotype similar to that induced by E2F1. Consistent with a critical role for p14ARF, cells with compromised p53 function were immune to senescence induction by E2F1, as were cells deficient in p14ARF. Our findings support the idea that the senescence response is a critical tumor suppressive mechanism, provide an explanation for the apparently paradoxical roles of E2F1 in oncogenesis, and identify p14ARF as a potentially important mediator of the senescent phenotype.

  5. TCF7L1 Modulates Colorectal Cancer Growth by Inhibiting Expression of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene EPHB3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Matthew; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Jain, Sidharth; Katari, Manpreet; DasGupta, Ramanuj

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway leading to accumulation of β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC). Nuclear CTNNB1 acts as a transcriptional coactivator with TCF/LEF transcription factors, promoting expression of a broad set of target genes, some of which promote tumor growth. However, it remains poorly understood how CTNNB1 interacts with different transcription factors in different contexts to promote different outcomes. While some CTNNB1 target genes are oncogenic, others regulate differentiation. Here, we found that TCF7L1, a Wnt pathway repressor, buffers CTNNB1/TCF target gene expression to promote CRC growth. Loss of TCF7L1 impaired growth and colony formation of HCT116 CRC cells and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We identified a group of CTNNB1/TCF target genes that are activated in the absence of TCF7L1, including EPHB3, a marker of Paneth cell differentiation that has also been implicated as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Knockdown of EPHB3 partially restores growth and normal cell cycle progression of TCF7L1-Null cells. These findings suggest that while CTNNB1 accumulation is critical for CRC progression, activation of specific Wnt target genes in certain contexts may in fact inhibit tumor growth. PMID:27333864

  6. Tumor suppressor REIC/DKK-3 and co-chaperone SGTA: Their interaction and roles in the androgen sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuiko; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Udagawa, Chihiro; Rungsuriyawiboon, Oumaporn; Azakami, Daigo; Michishita, Masaki; Ariyoshi, Yuichi; Ueki, Hideo; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Watanabe, Masami; Omi, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    REIC/DKK-3 is a tumor suppressor, however, its intracellular physiological functions and interacting molecules have not been fully clarified. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we found that small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA), known as a negative modulator of cytoplasmic androgen receptor (AR) signaling, is a novel interacting partner of REIC/DKK-3. Mammalian two-hybrid and pull-down assay results indicated that the SGTA-REIC/DKK-3 interaction involved the N-terminal regions of both REIC/DKK-3 and SGTA and that REIC/DKK-3 interfered with the dimerization of SGTA, which is a component of the AR complex and a suppressor of dynein motor-dependent AR transport and signaling. A reporter assay in human prostate cancer cells that displayed suppressed AR signaling by SGTA showed recovery of AR signaling by REIC/DKK-3 expression. Considering these results and our previous data that REIC/DKK-3 interacts with the dynein light chain TCTEX-1, we propose that the REIC/DKK-3 protein interferes with SGTA dimerization, promotes dynein-dependent AR transport and then upregulates AR signaling. PMID:26658102

  7. The growth and tumor suppressors NORE1A and RASSF1A are targets for calpain-mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Kuznetsov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NORE1A and RASSF1A are growth and tumour suppressors inactivated in a variety of cancers. Methylation of NORE1A and RASSF1A promoters is the predominant mechanism for downregulation of these proteins; however, other mechanisms are likely to exist. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a proteolysis of NORE1A and RASSF1A by calpains as alternative mechanism of their downregulation. Extracts of H358 cell line, a human bronchoalveolar carcinoma, and H460, a large cell carcinoma, were capable of proteolysis of NORE1A protein in the calpain-dependent manner. Likewise, RASSF1A tumor suppressor was proteolyzed by the H358 cell extract. Addition of calpain inhibitor to H358 and H460 cells growing in tissue culture resulted in re-expression of endogenous NORE1A. A survey of 10 human lung tumours revealed that three of them contain an activity capable of inducing NORE1A degradation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, degradation by calpains is a novel mechanism for downregulation of NORE1A and RASSF1A proteins and might be the mechanism allowing cancer cells to escape growth suppression.

  8. TR4 nuclear receptor functions as a tumor suppressor for prostate tumorigenesis via modulation of DNA damage/repair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Lee, Soo Ok; Lee, Yi-Fen; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Yang, Dong-Rong; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays important roles in metabolism, fertility and aging. The linkage of TR4 functions in cancer progression, however, remains unclear. Using three different mouse models, we found TR4 could prevent or delay prostate cancer (PCa)/prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia development. Knocking down TR4 in human RWPE1 and mouse mPrE normal prostate cells promoted tumorigenesis under carcinogen challenge, suggesting TR4 may play a suppressor role in PCa initiation. Mechanism dissection in both in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies found that knocking down TR4 led to increased DNA damage with altered DNA repair system that involved the modulation of ATM expression at the transcriptional level, and addition of ATM partially interrupted the TR4 small interfering RNA-induced tumorigenesis in cell transformation assays. Immunohistochemical staining in human PCa tissue microarrays revealed ATM expression is highly correlated with TR4 expression. Together, these results suggest TR4 may function as a tumor suppressor to prevent or delay prostate tumorigenesis via regulating ATM expression at the transcriptional level. PMID:24583925

  9. Role of natural antisense transcripts pertaining to tumor suppressor genes in human carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overlapping transcripts in opposite orientations can potentially form perfect sense-antisense duplex RNA. Recently, several studies have revealed the extent of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and their role in important biological phenomena also in higher organisms. In order to test the hypothesis that the function of NATs in man might represent an essential element in the regulation of gene expression, especially at transcriptional level, in this study we planned to look for, systematically examine, and characterize NATs belonging in the human genome to the tumour suppressor class of genes, so to identify physiological (and potentially pathological) modulators in this gene class

  10. MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF FUNCTIONAL RESCUE MEDIATED BY P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR MUTATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Y. Morris; Ye, Xiang; Lu, Qiang; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Yang, Wei; Senear, Donald F.; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    We have utilized both molecular dynamics simulations and solution biophysical measurements to investigate the rescue mechanism of mutation N235K, which plays a key role in the recently identified global suppressor motif of K235/Y239/R240 in the human p53 DNA-binding domain (DBD). Previous genetic analysis indicates that N235K alone rescues five out of six destabilized cancer mutants. However, the solution biophysical measurement shows that N235K generates only a slight increase to the stabili...

  11. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Fredrik K; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-08-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  12. [Current status of p53 tumor suppressor gene as a possible molecular marker of cancer of the prostate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña González, J A; Morote Robles, J; de Torres Ramírez, I M; Martínez Cuenca, E

    1998-04-01

    Diagnosis of prostate cancer has increased over the last few years both in localized and in more advanced stages. At present, several groups are working in the search and evaluation of alternative tumoral markers as the current ones do not cover all the Urologist's needs. In this context, a number of studies on the mutation of the tumour suppressor gen p53 in both localized and metastatic prostate cancer are being carried out. When a noxa acts on the DNA, protein p53 inhibits the cell cycle allowing the repair systems to operate and, if the damage is significant enough, cell apoptosis. The loss of this control mechanism secondary to the synthesis of anomalous proteins can result in the proliferation of neoplastic cells. A revision of the most representative papers in the literature is presented here, addressing the surrounding controversy and the resulting future possibilities. PMID:9658641

  13. The NF2 tumor suppressor gene product, merlin, mediates contact inhibition of growth through interactions with CD44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H.L.

    2002-03-01

    The neurofibromatosis-2 (NF2) gene encodes merlin, an ezrin-radixin-moesin-(ERM)-related protein, that functions as a tumor suppressor. I found that merlin plays a critical role in the establishment and maintenance of contact inhibition of growth. At high cell density, merlin is activated and blocks profileration with corresponding changes in cell cycle parameters. Merlin interfered with growth factor receptor or Ras-dependent signal transduction of MAP kinase and the step of interference was located downstream of Ras and Raf and upstream of MEK. Merlins growth inhibiting function depended on interaction with a specific domain of the cytoplasmic tail of CD44. In addition merlin activity and phosphorylation status depended on the extracellular ligand associated with the N-terminus of CD44. At high cell densities, in the presence of the extracellular ligand HA, merlin was dephosphorylated and bound directly to a basic amino acid motif in the cytoplasmic tail of CD44. Ezrin and moesin, which are also known to bind to the same basic amino acid motif in CD44 were absent within this growth inhibitory complex. Alternatively in logarithmically growing cells, merlin was inactive, phosphorylated and in a complex with ezrin and moesin. This growth permissive complex was also associated with the cytoplasmic tail of CD44. My data provide not only significant clues about how merlin functions as a tumor suppressor but revealed the existence of a novel molecular switch that, under the influence of ligands in the microenvironment, controls a cell decision to proliferate or growth arrest. (orig.)

  14. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 functions as a tumor suppressor through modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiao; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yinghua; Chen, Keling; Bao, Pingqian; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jiaxiang; Zhou, Zongguang; Sun, Xiaofeng; Li, Yuan

    2014-06-28

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood and is associated with serious morbidity and mortality. The effective treatment of neuroblastoma remains one of the major challenges in pediatric oncology. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of adult and pediatric tumors. WIF-1 has been identified as an important Wnt antagonist which inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling by directly binding to Wnt proteins. However, the expression and function of WIF-1 in neuroblastoma remains unknown. The present study showed that WIF-1 was downregulated with high level promoter methylation in neuroblastoma cells, and was significantly upregulated after exposure to demethylating agent. This finding suggests that downregulation of WIF-1 was associated with its promoter methylation in neuroblastoma. To further study the potential function of WIF-1 in neuroblastoma, we constructed a plasmid that over-expressed WIF-1 and transfected the plasmid into one neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH. We found that restoration of WIF-1 inhibited the growth and proliferation of neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Moreover, Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity and target genes expression were reduced by WIF-1 restoration. These results provide support that WIF-1 is downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor by antagonizing Wnt/β-catenin signaling in neuroblastoma, suggesting a potential role as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. PMID:24561119

  15. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Qiu, Yongming, E-mail: qiuzhoub@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China); Mao, Qing, E-mail: maoq@netease.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127 (China); Shanghai Institute of Head Trauma, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

  16. Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copp& #233; , Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-10-24

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

  17. Absence of mutations in the coding sequence of the potential tumor suppressor 3pK in metastatic melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houben Roland

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of Ras or Raf contributes to tumorigenesis of melanoma. However, constitutive Raf activation is also a characteristic of the majority of benign melanocytic nevi and high intensity signaling of either Ras or Raf was found to induce growth inhibition and senescence rather than transformation. Since the chromosome 3p kinase (3pK is a target of the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway which antagonizes the function of the oncogene and anti-differentiation factor Bmi-1, 3pK may function as a tumor suppressor in tumors with constitutive Ras/Raf activation. Consequently, we tested whether inactivating 3pK mutations are present in melanoma. Methods 30 metastatic melanoma samples, which were positive for activating mutations of either BRaf or NRas, were analyzed for possible mutations in the 3pk gene. The 10 coding exons and their flanking intron sequences were amplified by PCR and direct sequencing of the PCR products was performed. Results This analysis revealed that besides the presence of some single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 3pk gene, we could not detect any possible loss of function mutation in any of these 30 metastatic melanoma samples selected for the presence of activating mutations within the Ras/Raf/Mek/Erk signaling pathway. Conclusion Hence, in melanoma with constitutively active Ras/Raf inactivating mutations within the 3pk gene do not contribute to the oncogenic phenotype of this highly malignant tumor.

  18. Transcriptomic analysis comparing tumor-associated neutrophils with granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and normal neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi G Fridlender

    Full Text Available The role of myeloid cells in supporting cancer growth is well established. Most work has focused on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC that accumulate in tumor-bearing animals, but tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN are also known to be capable of augmenting tumor growth. However, little is known about their evolution, phenotype, and relationship to naïve neutrophils (NN and to the granulocytic fraction of MDSC (G-MDSC.In the current study, a transcriptomics approach was used in mice to compare these cell types. Our data show that the three populations of neutrophils are significantly different in their mRNA profiles with NN and G-MDSC being more closely related to each other than to TAN. Structural genes and genes related to cell-cytotoxicity (i.e. respiratory burst were significantly down-regulated in TAN. In contrast, many immune-related genes and pathways, including genes related to the antigen presenting complex (e.g. all six MHC-II complex genes, and cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-1-α/β, were up-regulated in G-MDSC, and further up-regulated in TAN. Thirteen of the 25 chemokines tested were markedly up-regulated in TAN compared to NN, including striking up-regulation of chemoattractants for T/B-cells, neutrophils and macrophages.This study characterizes different populations of neutrophils related to cancer, pointing out the major differences between TAN and the other neutrophil populations.

  19. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance

  20. A Novel Mutation in the Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Gene Identified in a Patient Presenting with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Ku, Yun Hyi; Ahn, Chang Ho; Jung, Chan-Hyeon; Lee, Jie Eun; Kim, Lee-Kyung; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Cho, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    Background Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited, multisystemic tumor syndrome caused by mutations in the VHL gene. To date, more than 1,000 germline and somatic mutations of the VHL gene have been reported. We present a novel mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene that presented with gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods A 30-year-old woman presented with gestational diabetes mellitus. She sequentially showed multiple pancreatic cysts, spinal cord hemangiob...

  1. Δ122p53, a mouse model of Δ133p53α, enhances the tumor-suppressor activities of an attenuated p53 mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Slatter, T L; Hung, N. Van; Bowie, S; Campbell, H.; Rubio, C; Speidel, D; Wilson, M.; Baird, M.; Royds, J. A.; Braithwaite, A W

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests the Δ133p53α isoform may function as an oncogene. It is overexpressed in many tumors, stimulates pathways involved in tumor progression, and inhibits some activities of wild-type p53, including transactivation and apoptosis. We hypothesized that Δ133p53α would have an even more profound effect on p53 variants with weaker tumor-suppressor capability. We tested this using a mouse model heterozygous for a Δ133p53α-like isoform (Δ122p53) and a p53 mutant with weak tumor-...

  2. Mast cells mobilize myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment via IL-17 pathway in murine hepatocarcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoshun Yang

    Full Text Available Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs and regulatory T (Treg cells. Our data showed that mast cells mobilized the infiltration of MDSCs to tumor and induced the production of IL-17 by MDSCs; MDSCs-derived IL-17 indirectly attracted Treg cells, enhanced their suppressor function, and induced the IL-9 production by Treg cells; in turn, IL-9 strengthened the survival and protumor effect of mast cells in tumor microenvironment. Our findings disclose a closed loop among mast cells, MDSCs and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment, which provides a new insight into the paralleled developments of inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. Based on these findings, we propose that targeting tumor inflammation might be a potential strategy to reverse the immunosuppression of tumor microenvironment, thus facilitating cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Mast cells mobilize myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment via IL-17 pathway in murine hepatocarcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhuoshun; Zhang, Biao; Li, Dapeng; Lv, Meng; Huang, Chunmei; Shen, Guan-Xin; Huang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T (Treg) cells. Our data showed that mast cells mobilized the infiltration of MDSCs to tumor and induced the production of IL-17 by MDSCs; MDSCs-derived IL-17 indirectly attracted Treg cells, enhanced their suppressor function, and induced the IL-9 production by Treg cells; in turn, IL-9 strengthened the survival and protumor effect of mast cells in tumor microenvironment. Our findings disclose a closed loop among mast cells, MDSCs and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment, which provides a new insight into the paralleled developments of inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. Based on these findings, we propose that targeting tumor inflammation might be a potential strategy to reverse the immunosuppression of tumor microenvironment, thus facilitating cancer immunotherapy. PMID:20111717

  4. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  5. Ampullary Cancers Harbor ELF3 Tumor Suppressor Gene Mutations and Exhibit Frequent WNT Dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Gingras

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small-molecule inhibitors of β-catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis.

  6. Urinary Bladder Transitional Cell Carcinogenesis Is Associated with Down-Regulation of NF1 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Vivo and in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Vesa; Boström, Peter J.; Söderström, Karl-Ove; Hirvonen, Outi; Tuukkanen, Juha; Nurmi, Martti; Laato, Matti; Peltonen, Juha

    1999-01-01

    The NF1 gene product (neurofibromin) is known to act as a tumor suppressor protein by inactivating ras. The best documented factors involved in urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) are ras proto-oncogene activation and p53 suppressor gene mutations. This is the first study reporting alterations in NF1 gene expression in TCC. We examined NF1 gene expression in a total of 29 surgical urinary bladder TCC specimens representing grades 1 to 3 and in three cell lines, RT4, 5637, and T2...

  7. Sinks, suppressors and antigen presenters: how lymphodepletion enhances T cell-mediated tumor immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Khong, Hung T.; Antony, Paul A.; Douglas C Palmer; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2005-01-01

    Lymphodepletion followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of autologous, tumor-reactive T cells boosts antitumor immunotherapeutic activity in mouse and in humans. In the most recent clinical trials, lymphodepletion together with ACT has an objective response rate of 50% in patients with solid metastatic tumors. The mechanisms underlying this recent advance in cancer immunotherapy are beginning to be elucidated and include: the elimination of cellular cytokine ‘sinks’ for homeostatic γC-cytoki...

  8. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort

  9. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  10. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis

  11. The epigenetic modifier PRDM5 functions as a tumor suppressor through modulating WNT/β-catenin signaling and is frequently silenced in multiple tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-sheng Shu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PRDM (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ domain containing proteins are zinc finger proteins involved in multiple cellular regulations by acting as epigenetic modifiers. We studied a recently identified PRDM member PRDM5 for its epigenetic abnormality and tumor suppressive functions in multiple tumorigeneses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that PRDM5 was broadly expressed in human normal tissues, but frequently silenced or downregulated in multiple carcinoma cell lines due to promoter CpG methylation, including 80% (4/5 nasopharyngeal, 44% (8/18 esophageal, 76% (13/17 gastric, 50% (2/4 cervical, and 25% (3/12 hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, but not in any immortalized normal epithelial cell lines. PRDM5 expression could be restored by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine demethylation treatment in silenced cell lines. PRDM5 methylation was frequently detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSP in multiple primary tumors, including 93% (43/46 nasopharyngeal, 58% (25/43 esophageal, 88% (37/42 gastric and 63% (29/46 hepatocellular tumors. PRDM5 was further found a stress-responsive gene, but its response was impaired when the promoter was methylated. Ectopic PRDM5 expression significantly inhibited tumor cell clonogenicity, accompanied by the inhibition of TCF/β-catenin-dependent transcription and downregulation of CDK4, TWIST1 and MDM2 oncogenes, while knocking down of PRDM5 expression lead to increased cell proliferation. ChIP assay showed that PRDM5 bound to its target gene promoters and suppressed their transcription. An inverse correlation between the expression of PRDM5 and activated β-catenin was also observed in cell lines. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PRDM5 functions as a tumor suppressor at least partially through antagonizing aberrant WNT/β-catenin signaling and oncogene expression. Frequent epigenetic silencing of PRDM5 is involved in multiple tumorigeneses, which could serve as a tumor biomarker.

  12. Array CGH identifies distinct DNA copy number profiles of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in chromosomal- and microsatellite-unstable sporadic colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassmann, Silke; Weis, Roland; Makowiec, Frank; Roth, Jasmine; Danciu, Mihai; Hopt, Ulrich; Werner, Martin

    2007-03-01

    DNA copy number changes represent molecular fingerprints of solid tumors and are as such relevant for better understanding of tumor development and progression. In this study, we applied genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify gene-specific DNA copy number changes in chromosomal (CIN)- and microsatellite (MIN)-unstable sporadic colorectal cancers (sCRC). Genomic DNA was extracted from microdissected, matching normal colorectal epithelium and invasive tumor cells of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues of 22 cases with colorectal cancer (CIN = 11, MIN = 11). DNA copy number changes were determined by aCGH for 287 target sequences in tumor cell DNAs, using pooled normal DNAs as reference. aCGH data of tumor cell DNAs was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for three genes on serial tissues as those used for aCGH. aCGH revealed DNA copy number changes previously described by metaphase CGH (gains 7, 8q, 13q, and 20q; losses 8p, 15q, 18q, and 17p). However, chromosomal regions 20q, 13q, 7, and 17p were preferentially altered in CIN-type tumors and included DNA amplifications of eight genes on chromosome 20q (TOP1, AIB1, MYBL2, CAS, PTPN1, STK15, ZNF217, and CYP24), two genes on chromosome 13q (BRCA2 and D13S25), and three genes on chromosome 7 (IL6, CYLN2, and MET) as well as DNA deletions of two genes on chromosome 17p (HIC1 and LLGL1). Finally, additional CIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were identified for EXT1 (8q24.11) and MYC (8q24.12) as well as DNA deletions for MAP2K5 (15q23) and LAMA3 (18q11.2). In contrast, distinct MIN-tumor-associated DNA amplifications were detected for E2F5 (8p22-q21.3), GARP (11q13.5-q14), ATM (11q22.3), KAL (Xp22.3), and XIST (Xq13.2) as well as DNA deletions for RAF1 (3p25), DCC (18q21.3), and KEN (21q tel). aCGH revealed distinct DNA copy number changes of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in CIN- and MIN-type sporadic colorectal carcinomas. The identified candidate

  13. The Neurofibromatosis 2 Tumor Suppressor Gene Product, Merlin, Regulates Human Meningioma Cell Growth by Signaling through YAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Striedinger

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of schwannomas and meningiomas. Several studies have examined the ability of the NF2 gene product, merlin, to function as a tumor suppressor in diverse cell types; however, little is known about merlin growth regulation in meningiomas. In Drosophila, merlin controls cell proliferation and apoptosis by signaling through the Hippo pathway to inhibit the function of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. The Hippo pathway is conserved in mammals. On the basis of these observations, we developed human meningioma cell lines matched for merlin expression to evaluate merlin growth regulation and investigate the relationship between NF2 status and Yes-associated protein (YAP, the mammalian homolog of Yorkie. NF2 loss in meningioma cells was associated with loss of contact-dependent growth inhibition, enhanced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation due to increased S-phase entry. In addition, merlin loss in both meningioma cell lines and primary tumors resulted in increased YAP expression and nuclear localization. Finally, siRNA-mediated reduction of YAP in NF2-deficient meningioma cells rescued the effects of merlin loss on cell proliferation and S-phase entry. Collectively, these results represent the first demonstration that merlin regulates cell growth in human cancer cells by suppressing YAP.

  14. Expression level of novel tumor suppressor gene FATS is associated with the outcome of node positive breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; GU Lin; ZHAO Lu-jun; ZHANG Xi-feng; QIU Li; LI Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently, we reported the identification of a previously uncharacterized and evolutionarily conserved gene, fragile-site associated tumor suppressor (FATS), at a frequently deleted region in irradiation (IR)-induced tumors.However, the role of FATS in breast cancer development and its clinical significance has not been defined. The aim of this study was to determine the role of FA7S in breast cancer development and to evaluate its clinical significance in breast cancer.Methods The expression level of FATS mRNA was determined in 106 breast carcinomas and 23 paired normal breast tissues using quantitative real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The relationship between FATS expression and clinicopathological parameters were also analyzed.Results The mRNA level of FATS was down-regulated in breast cancer compared with paired normal tissues. Low expression of FATS was correlated with high nuclear grade. There was a tendency to a favorable outcome for patients with high expression of FATS (P=0.346). However, low expression of FATS was associated with poor outcome of breast cancer patients with node positive (P=0.011). Furthermore, the mRNA level of FATS showed an independent value in predicting the outcome of breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes.Conclusion FATS is involved in the carcinogenesis and development of breast cancer and could be a potential biomarker and prognostic factor for breast cancer therapy.

  15. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  16. Advances in the Research of Tumor Suppressor Gene ARHI%抑癌基因ARHI研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐海灵

    2011-01-01

    ARHI (aplasia ras homologue member I)/NOEY2 is a novel maternally imprinted tumor suppressor gene discovered in 1999. It is located in human chromosome Ip31. The ARHI gene encodes a 26 kDa small GTP-binding protein. It is a member of ras/ rap superfamily, which has 50%-60% homology and share similar GTP/GDP-binding domains with the ras/rap superfamily. Unlike other members, however, it acts as a tumor suppressor gene and is the first reported tumor suppressor gene in the ras/rap family. The ARHI gene encodes protein that is widely expressed in most types of human tissues, but it often reduced or absent in human ovarian, breast, pancreas, and liver cancer, and other tumors, which suggests that it is closely related to the occurrence and development of tumors. Affecting cyclin D1, ARHI is a negative regulator of the cell cycle and blocks the cell growth at the G1 phase. ARHI induces cell apopto-sis through the caspase and calpain cell signal transduction pathway. In addition, the ARHI gene functions as a tumor suppressor gene by inhibiting the activation of STAT3. It also regulates autophagy and tumor dormancy. Studies have shown that the loss of ARHI expression can occur through genetic events and epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA aberrant methylation, loss of heterozygosity, low-level expression of acetylation histone, and gene mutation. This issue needs further research. Further studies on the ARHI gene will provide new ideas and theories for the early diagnosis and treatment of tumors.%ARHI(aplasia ras homologue member I)/NOEY2是1999年新发现的一个母源性抑癌印迹基因,位于人染色体1p31,编码一个相对分子量为26kD的小GTP结合蛋白.ARHI属ras/rap超家族成员,与该家族成员有50%~60%的同源性并且两者具有相似的GTP/GDP结合域,但与该家族其它成员不同,ARHI发挥抑癌基因作用,是该家族第一个被报道的肿瘤抑制基因.ARHI基因编码的蛋白在人类多种组织表达,而该基因在人卵

  17. The Oncogenic STP Axis Promotes Triple-Negative Breast Cancer via Degradation of the REST Tumor Suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L. Karlin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Defining the molecular networks that drive breast cancer has led to therapeutic interventions and improved patient survival. However, the aggressive triple-negative breast cancer subtype (TNBC remains recalcitrant to targeted therapies because its molecular etiology is poorly defined. In this study, we used a forward genetic screen to discover an oncogenic network driving human TNBC. SCYL1, TEX14, and PLK1 (“STP axis” cooperatively trigger degradation of the REST tumor suppressor protein, a frequent event in human TNBC. The STP axis induces REST degradation by phosphorylating a conserved REST phospho-degron and bridging REST interaction with the ubiquitin-ligase βTRCP. Inhibition of the STP axis leads to increased REST protein levels and impairs TNBC transformation, tumor progression, and metastasis. Expression of the STP axis correlates with low REST protein levels in human TNBCs and poor clinical outcome for TNBC patients. Our findings demonstrate that the STP-REST axis is a molecular driver of human TNBC.

  18. Tumor suppressor gene NGX6 induces changes in protein expression profiles in colon cancer HT-29 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Yuan Luo; Xiaoyan Wang; Shourong Shen; Haibo yu; Jing Yang; Zheng Su

    2012-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma-associated gene 6 (NGX6;syn.transmembrane protein 8B,TMEM8B) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene.The underlying mechanisms by which the gene inhibits tumor development are not completely known.To further understand the function of the gene's protein product NGX6,in the present study,we employed two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis to analyze the protein expression profiles of colon cancer HT-29 cells stably transfected with the gene NGX6.The differentially expressed proteins were selected and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled with time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.The results showed that 12 proteins were down-regulated and 4 were up-regulated in NGX6-transfected HT-29 cells,compared with vector-transfected HT-29 cells.The MS results were verified by western blot.Bioinformatic analysis showed that these proteins are involved in cell proliferation,metastasis,apoptosis,cytoskeletal structure,metabolism,and signal transduction,suggesting that NGX6 may inhibit colon cancer through the regulation of these biological processes.

  19. Mutational myriad of tumor suppressor p53 in Filipino breast cancer: results and perspectives in molecular pathology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p53 tumor suppressor is by far the most widely mutated gene in human cancers. p53 encodes a 53-kDa phosphoprotein, transcription-activator whose targets include genes and gene products that orchestrate genomic stability, cellular response to DNA damage, cell cycle progression apoptosis and aging (senescence). Analysis of the p53 gene profile has previously resulted in identifying several cancer-causative factors in the human setting, as well as, in creating a unique molecular profile of a tumor useful in the design of tailored-therapies for individual cancer patients. Our results in screening for p53 abnormalities in 140 Filipino patients with primary breast lesions confined from 1997-1998 in 5 major hospitals in Manila reveal that p53 plays an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer in at least 48% of all cases. Two methods of p53 analysis are employed, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and polymerase chain reaction-temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (PCR-TTGE). Inter-comparisons of method exhibit 63.3% concordance in 21 fresh breast carcinoma samples, with ELISA demonstrating 14% false-positives and 10% false-negatives. Only mutations in exon 7 (p=0.063) in the tumor samples how significant correlation with abnormal cellular elevation of p53. PCR-TTGE screening in a large series of 140 patients show that most genetic lesions are localized in exons 5 (41% of the total cases) and 6 (27% of the total cases). No mutations are, however, detected in the transactivation (exons 2-4) and oligomerization (exons 10-11) domains. Invasive carcinomas (stages II and III) are characterized with more frequent and diverse genetic alterations compared with benign tumors, most significantly at exon 5B (p=0.066) and at independently multiple sites (p=0.066). Earlier-onset cases (age of diagnosis < 50 yrs), known to be more clinico-pathologically aggressive, are diagnosed harboring more frequent p53 mutations centered at exon 7 (p=0

  20. OncomiR or Tumor Suppressor? The Duplicity of MicroRNAs in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoronos, Alexander A; Engelman, Donald M; Slack, Frank J

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are short, noncoding RNAs whose dysregulation has been implicated in most, if not all, cancers. They regulate gene expression by suppressing mRNA translation and reducing mRNA stability. To this end, there is a great deal of interest in modifying miRNA expression levels for the treatment of cancer. However, the literature is fraught with inconsistent accounts as to whether various miRNAs are oncogenic or tumor suppressive. In this review, we directly examine these inconsistencies and propose several mechanisms to explain them. These mechanisms include the possibility that specific miRNAs can simultaneously produce competing oncogenic and tumor suppressive effects by suppressing both tumor suppressive mRNAs and oncogenic mRNAs, respectively. In addition, miRNAs can modulate tumor-modifying extrinsic factors, such as cancer-immune system interactions, stromal cell interactions, oncoviruses, and sensitivity to therapy. Ultimately, it is the balance between these processes that determines whether a specific miRNA produces a net oncogenic or net tumor suppressive effect. A solid understanding of this phenomenon will likely prove valuable in evaluating miRNA targets for cancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3666-70. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325641

  1. Functional characterization of human Cd33+ And Cd11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cell subsets induced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells co-cultured with a diverse set of human tumor cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Arger Nicholas; Bingham Brigid; Russell Sarah M; Megiel Carolina; Lechner Melissa G; Woo Tammy; Epstein Alan L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In cancer patients, MDSC accumulation correlates with increased tumor burden, but the mechanisms of MDSC induction remain poorly understood. Methods This study examined the ability of human tumor cell lines to induce MDSC from healthy donor PBMC using in vitro co-culture methods. These human MDSC were then characterized for morphology, p...

  2. Mutational Analysis of p27 (CDKN1 B and p18 (CDKN2C in Sporadic Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors Argues against Tumor-Suppressor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lindberg

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs arise sporadically or are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MENi syndrome or von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. About 90% of patients with familial MENi display detectable MEN1 gene (menin mutations. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 (CDKN1 B is a downstream target of menin and has been recently shown to be responsible for the multiple endocrine neoplasia-like syndrome in rats, where affected animals develop multiple tumors and hyperplasia in endocrine tissues, including the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. A germline nonsense truncation mutation of p27 has been recently described in a suspected MENi family without MENi mutation, raising the possibility that p27 mutation could be responsible for MENi phenotype. Somatic MENi mutations occur at low frequency in sporadic PETs; here, we subjected p27 to mutational analysis in 27 sporadic PETs. As an additional menin target, analysis of the p18(CDKN2C gene was included. In the p27 gene, one common polymorphism (V1 09G and one novel polymorphism (g/a in the noncoding part of exon 2 were identified. Three known polymorphisms were found in the p18 gene. These data suggest that p27 and p18 are unlikely to present classic tumor-suppressor genes in sporadic PETs.

  3. The tumor suppressor gene KCTD11REN is regulated by Sp1 and methylation and its expression is reduced in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancarelli, M Michela; Zazzeroni, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Lucia; Capece, Daria; Po, Agnese; Murgo, Simona; Di Camillo, Raffaello; Rinaldi, Christian; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Gulino, Alberto; Alesse, Edoardo

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of several human cancers is loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 17p13. The same chromosomal region is also frequently hypermethylated in cancer. Although loss of 17p13 has been often associated with p53 genetic alteration or Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene hypermethylation, other tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) located in this region have critical roles in tumorigenesis. A novel TSG mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2 is KCTD11REN (KCTD11). We have recently demonstrated that KCTD11 expression is frequently lost in human medulloblastoma (MB), in part by LOH and in part by uncharacterized epigenetic events. Using a panel of human 177 tumor samples and their normal matching samples representing 18 different types of cancer, we show here that the down-regulation of KCTD11 protein level is a specific and a diffusely common event in tumorigenesis. Additionally, in order to characterize the regulatory regions in KCTD11 promoter, we identified a CpG island and several Sp1 binding sites on this promoter, and demonstrated that Sp1 transcription factor and DNA methylation contribute, at least in part, to regulate KCTD11 expression. Our findings identify KCTD11 as a widely down-regulated gene in human cancers, and provide a basis to understand how its expression might be deregulated in tumor cells. PMID:20591193

  4. The tumor suppressor gene KCTD11REN is regulated by Sp1 and methylation and its expression is reduced in tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Christian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A hallmark of several human cancers is loss of heterozygosity (LOH of chromosome 17p13. The same chromosomal region is also frequently hypermethylated in cancer. Although loss of 17p13 has been often associated with p53 genetic alteration or Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1 gene hypermethylation, other tumor suppressor genes (TSGs located in this region have critical roles in tumorigenesis. A novel TSG mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2 is KCTD11REN (KCTD11. We have recently demonstrated that KCTD11 expression is frequently lost in human medulloblastoma (MB, in part by LOH and in part by uncharacterized epigenetic events. Using a panel of human 177 tumor samples and their normal matching samples representing 18 different types of cancer, we show here that the down-regulation of KCTD11 protein level is a specific and a diffusely common event in tumorigenesis. Additionally, in order to characterize the regulatory regions in KCTD11 promoter, we identified a CpG island and several Sp1 binding sites on this promoter, and demonstrated that Sp1 transcription factor and DNA methylation contribute, at least in part, to regulate KCTD11 expression. Our findings identify KCTD11 as a widely down-regulated gene in human cancers, and provide a basis to understand how its expression might be deregulated in tumor cells.

  5. Isolation and characterization of novel RECK tumor suppressor gene splice variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Winnischofer, Sheila Maria Brochado; Demasi, Marcos Angelo Almeida; Filho, Renato Astorino; Carreira, Ana Claudia Oliveira; Wei, Beiyang; de Assis Ribas, Thais; Konig, Michelle Silberspitz; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Stetler-Stevenson, William; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and lethal of the central nervous system glial-derived tumors. RECK suppresses tumor invasion by negatively regulating at least three members of the matrix metalloproteinase family: MMP-9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP. A positive correlation has been observed between the abundance of RECK expression in tumor samples and a more favorable prognosis for patients with several types of tumors. In the present study, novel alternatively spliced variants of the RECK gene: RECK-B and RECK-I were isolated by RT-PCR and sequenced. The expression levels and profiles of these alternative RECK transcripts, as well as canonical RECK were determined in tissue samples of malignant astrocytomas of different grades and in a normal tissue RNA panel by qRT-PCR. Our results show that higher canonical RECK expression, accompanied by a higher canonical to alternative transcript expression ratio, positively correlates with higher overall survival rate after chemotherapeutic treatment of GBM patients. U87MG and T98G cells over-expressing the RECK-B alternative variant display higher anchorage-independent clonal growth and do not display modulation of, respectively, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Our findings suggest that RECK transcript variants might have opposite roles in GBM biology and the ratio of their expression levels may be informative for the prognostic outcome of GBM patients. PMID:26431549

  6. Different prognostic roles of tumor suppressor gene BAP1 in cancer: A systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Claudio; Veronese, Nicola; Yachida, Shinichi; Cheng, Liang; Nottegar, Alessia; Stubbs, Brendon; Solmi, Marco; Capelli, Paola; Pea, Antonio; Barbareschi, Mattia; Fassan, Matteo; Wood, Laura D; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-10-01

    Biallelic inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) has been demonstrated in several cancers, but its prognostic role has not been completely explained. We aimed to investigate the risk associated with loss of BAP1 (BAP1-) for all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and recurrence of disease in subjects with cancer. PubMed and SCOPUS were searched from database inception until 09/15/2015 without language restrictions. Prospective studies reporting data on prognostic parameters in subjects with cancer, comparing participants with presence of BAP1 (BAP1+) vs. BAP1- were included. Data were summarized using risk ratios (RR) for number of deaths/recurrences and hazard ratios (HR) for time-dependent risk related to BAP1- adjusted for potential confounders. From 261 hits, 12 studies (including 13 cohorts) with 3,447 participants (BAP1-: n = 697; BAP1+: n = 2,750), with a median follow-up over 60 months, were meta-analyzed. Compared to BAP1+, BAP1- significantly increased all-cause mortality, cancer-specific mortality and risk of recurrence in all the tumor types analyzed, except for mesothelioma, in which the presence of BAP1 mutations correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BAP1 mutated colorectal and renal carcinomas are associated with high-tumor grading (P < 0.0001), and that BAP1 mutated is more common in women than in men (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, on the basis of our meta-analysis, we have demonstrated a peculiar role of BAP1 in influencing the prognosis in cancer. Thus, BAP1 could be considered as an important potential target for personalized medicine. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223342

  7. miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in gallbladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letelier, Pablo; García, Patricia; Leal, Pamela; Álvarez, Héctor; Ili, Carmen; López, Jaime; Castillo, Jonathan; Brebi, Priscilla; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The development of miRNA-based therapeutics represents a new strategy in cancer treatment. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the differential expression of microRNAs in gallbladder cancer (GBC) and to assess the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in GBC cell behavior. A profile of miRNA expression was determined using DharmaconTM microarray technology. Differential expression of five microRNAs was validated by TaqMan reverse transcription quantitative-PCR in a separate cohort of 8 tumors and 3 non-cancerous samples. Then, we explored the functional role of miR-1 and miR-145 in tumor cell behavior by ectopic in vitro expression in the GBC NOZ cell line. Several miRNAs were found to be aberrantly expressed in GBC; most of these showed a significantly decreased expression compared to non-neoplastic tissues (Q valueanalysis revealed that the most deregulated miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, miR-143 and miR-145) collectively targeted a number of genes belonging to signaling pathways such as TGF-β, ErbB3, WNT and VEGF, and those regulating cell motility or adhesion. The ectopic expression of miR-1 and miR-145 in NOZ cells significantly inhibited cell viability and colony formation (P<0.01) and reduced gene expression of VEGF-A and AXL. This study represents the first investigation of the miRNA expression profile in gallbladder cancer, and our findings showed that several miRNAs are deregulated in this neoplasm. In vitro functional assays suggest that miR-1 and miR-145 act as tumor suppressor microRNAs in GBC. PMID:24966896

  8. Evolution and origin of merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor-suppressor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omelyanchuk Leonid V

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 tumor suppressor gene, belongs to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM subgroup of the protein 4.1 superfamily, which links cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. While merlin's functional activity has been examined in mammalian and Drosophila models, little is understood about its evolution, diversity, and overall distribution among different taxa. Results By combining bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that merlin homologs are present across a wide range of metazoan lineages. While the phylogenetic tree shows a monophyletic origin of the ERM family, the origin of the merlin proteins is robustly separated from that of the ERM proteins. The derivation of merlin is thought to be in early metazoa. We have also observed the expansion of the ERM-like proteins within the vertebrate clade, which occurred after its separation from Urochordata (Ciona intestinalis. Amino acid sequence alignment reveals the absence of an actin-binding site in the C-terminal region of all merlin proteins from various species but the presence of a conserved internal binding site in the N-terminal domain of the merlin and ERM proteins. In addition, a more conserved pattern of amino acid residues is found in the region containing the so-called "Blue Box," although some amino acid substitutions in this region exist in the merlin sequences of worms, fish, and Ciona. Examination of sequence variability at functionally significant sites, including the serine-518 residue, the phosphorylation of which modulates merlin's intra-molecular association and function as a tumor suppressor, identifies several potentially important sites that are conserved among all merlin proteins but divergent in the ERM proteins. Secondary structure prediction reveals the presence of a conserved α-helical domain in the central to C-terminal region of the merlin proteins of various species. The

  9. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong-Kook [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Henry, Jon C. [Department of Surgery, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Jiang, Jinmai [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Esau, Christine [Regulus Therapeutics, Carlsbad, CA (United States); Gusev, Yuriy [Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States); Lerner, Megan R. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Postier, Russell G. [Department of Surgery, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Brackett, Daniel J. [Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Schmittgen, Thomas D., E-mail: Schmittgen.2@osu.edu [College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  10. The tumor suppressors p53, p63, and p73 are regulators of microRNA processing complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmanane Boominathan

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors p53, p73, and p63 are known to function as transcription factors. They promote either growth arrest or apoptosis, depending upon the DNA damage. A number of microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to function as transcriptional targets of p53 and they appear to aid p53 in promoting growth arrest and apoptosis. However, the question of p53/p63/p73 regulating the miRNA processing complex has not been addressed in depth so far. Comparative/computational genomic analysis was performed using Target scan, Mami, and Diana software to identify miRNAs that regulate the miRNA processing complex. Here, I present evidence for the first time that the tumor suppressors p53, p63, and p73 function as both positive and negative regulators of the miRNA processing components. Curated p53-dependent miRNA expression data was used to identify p53-miRs that target the components of the miRNA-processing complex. This analysis suggests that most of the components (mRNAs' 3'UTR of the miRNA processing complex are targeted by p53-miRs. Remarkably, this data revealed the conserved nature of p53-miRs in targeting a number of components of the miRNA processing complex. p53/p73/p63 appears to regulate the major components of the miRNA processing, such as Drosha-DGCR8, Dicer-TRBP2, and Argonaute proteins. In particular, p53/p73/p63 appears to regulate the processing of miRNAs, such as let-7, miR-200c, miR-143, miR-107, miR-16, miR-145, miR-134, miR-449a, miR-503, and miR-21. Interestingly, there seems to be a phenotypic similarity between p63(-/- and dicer(-/- mice, suggesting that p63 and dicer could regulate each other. In addition, p63, p73, and the DGCR8 proteins contain a conserved interaction domain. Further, promoters of a number of components of the miRNA processing machinery, including dicer and P2P-R, contain p53-REs, suggesting that they could be direct transcriptional targets of p63/p73/p53. Together, this study provides mechanistic insights into

  11. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. → miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. → miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a β2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G2/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the β2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The β2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  12. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic

  13. Altered microRNA Expression Profiles and Regulation of INK4A/CDKN2A Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Breast Cancer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutful Kabir, Farruk Mohammad; DeInnocentes, Patricia; Bird, Richard Curtis

    2015-12-01

    microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of cancer versus normal cells may reveal the characteristic regulatory features that can be correlated to altered gene expression in both human and animal models of cancers. In this study, the comprehensive expression profiles of the 277 highly characterized miRNAs from the canine genome were evaluated in spontaneous canine mammary tumor (CMT) models harboring defects in a group of cell cycle regulatory and potent tumor suppressor genes of INK4/CDKN2 family including p16/INK4A, p14ARF, and p15/INK4B. A large number of differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in three CMT cell lines to potentially target oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and cancer biomarkers. A group of the altered miRNAs were identified by miRNA target prediction tools for regulation of the INK4/CDKN2 family tumor suppressor genes. miRNA-141 was experimentally validated for INK4A 3'-UTR target binding in the CMT cell lines providing an essential mechanism for the post-transcriptional regulation of the INK4A tumor suppressor gene in CMT models. A well-recognized group of miRNAs including miR-21, miR-155, miR-9, miR-34a, miR-143/145, and miR-31 were found to be altered in both CMTs and human breast cancer. These altered miRNAs might serve as potential targets for advancing the development of future therapeutic reagents. These findings further strengthen the validity and use of canine breast cancers as appropriate models for the study of human breast cancers. PMID:26095675

  14. Truncation of the Catalytic Domain of the Cylindromatosis Tumor Suppressor Impairs Lung Maturation1

    OpenAIRE

    Trompouki, Eirini; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Kosmidis, Stylianos K; Dollé, Pascal; Qian, Jun; Dimitris L. Kontoyiannis; Cardoso, Wellington V.; Mosialos, George

    2009-01-01

    Cyld encodes a 956-amino acid deubiquitinating enzyme (CYLD), which is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Mutations that truncate and inactivate the carboxyl-terminal deubiquitinating domain of CYLD underlie the development of skin appendage tumors in humans, whereas down-regulation of Cyld expression has been associated with the development of various types of human malignancies including lung cancer. To establish an animal model of human...

  15. The tumor suppressor PP2A Aβ regulates the RalA GTPase

    OpenAIRE

    Sablina, Anna A; Chen, Wen; Arroyo, Jason D; Corral, Laura; Hector, Melissa; Bulmer, Sara E; DeCaprio, James A.; Hahn, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric enzyme family that regulates numerous signaling pathways. Biallelic mutations of the structural PP2A Aβ subunit occur in several types of human tumors; however, the functional consequences of these cancer-associated PP2A Aβ mutations in cell transformation remain undefined. Here we show that suppression of PP2A Aβ expression permits immortalized human cells to achieve a tumorigenic state. Cancer-associated Aβ mutants fail ...

  16. Molecular analysis of the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene in schwannomatosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, L. B.; Jones, D; Davis, K.; Kronn, D; Short, M. P.; Gusella, J; MacCollin, M

    1997-01-01

    Patients with multiple schwannomas without vestibular schwannomas have been postulated to compose a distinct subclass of neurofibromatosis (NF), termed "schwannomatosis." To compare the molecular-genetic basis of schwannomatosis with NF2, we examined the NF2 locus in 20 unrelated schwannomatosis patients and their affected relatives. Tumors from these patients frequently harbored typical truncating mutations of the NF2 gene and loss of heterozygosity of the surrounding region of chromosome 22...

  17. KCTD11 Tumor Suppressor Gene Expression Is Reduced in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Zazzeroni; Daniela Nicosia; Alessandra Tessitore; Rita Gallo; Daniela Verzella; Mariafausta Fischietti; Davide Vecchiotti; Luca Ventura; Daria Capece; Alberto Gulino; Edoardo Alesse

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men in the United States. A genetic contribution to prostate cancer risk has been documented, but knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer initiation is still not well understood. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomal regions is crucial in tumor progression. In human prostate cancer, several chromosomal regions demonstrating a high frequency of LOH have been previously identified. KCTD11 (REN) is a tum...

  18. The nuclear bile acid receptor FXR controls the liver derived tumor suppressor histidine-rich glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschle, Ulrich; Birkel, Manfred; Hambruch, Eva; Hornberger, Martin; Kinzel, Olaf; Perović-Ottstadt, Sanja; Schulz, Andreas; Hahn, Ulrike; Burnet, Michael; Kremoser, Claus

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear bile acid receptor Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is strongly expressed in liver and intestine, controls bile acid and lipid homeostasis and exerts tumor-protective functions in liver and intestine. Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an abundant plasma protein produced by the liver with the proposed function as a pattern recognition molecule involved in the clearance of immune complexes, necrotic cells and pathogens, the modulation of angiogenesis, the normalization of deranged endothelial vessel structure in tumors and tumor suppression. FXR recognition sequences were identified within a human HRG promoter fragment that mediated FXR/FXR-agonist dependent reporter gene activity in vitro. We show that HRG is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in human hepatoma cells, human upcyte® primary hepatocytes and 3D human liver microtissues in vitro and in mouse liver in vivo. Prolonged administration of the potent nonsteroidal FXR agonist PX20606 increases HRG levels in mouse plasma. Finally, daily oral administration of this FXR agonist for seven days resulted in a significant increase of HRG levels in the plasma of healthy human male volunteers during a clinical Phase I safety study. HRG might serve as a surrogate marker indicative of liver-specific FXR activation in future human clinical studies. Furthermore, potent FXR agonists might be beneficial in serious health conditions where HRG is reduced, for example, in hepatocellular carcinoma but also other solid cancers, liver failure, sepsis and pre-eclampsia. PMID:25363753

  19. Cyclophosphamide-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cell population is immunosuppressive but not identical to myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by growing TC-1 tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikyšková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Polláková, Veronika; Bieblová, Jana; Šímová, Jana; Reiniš, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 5 (2012), s. 374-384. ISSN 1524-9557 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP301/11/P220; GA ČR GA301/09/1024; GA ČR GA301/07/1410 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : myeloid-derived suppressor cells * cyclophosphamide * all-trans-retinoic acid * IL-12 * HPV16 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.463, year: 2012

  20. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  1. The effect of age at exposure on the inactivating mechanisms and relative contributions of key tumor suppressor genes in radiation-induced mouse T-cell lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunaoshi, Masaaki [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Amasaki, Yoshiko; Hirano-Sakairi, Shinobu; Blyth, Benjamin J. [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Morioka, Takamitsu [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kaminishi, Mutsumi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shang, Yi [Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Radiation Effect Accumulation and Prevention Project, Fukushima Project Headquarters, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tachibana, Akira [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Ibaraki University, Bunkyo 2-1-1, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); and others

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • T-cell lymphoma incidence, latency and weight did not change with age at exposure. • Lymphomas had frequent loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 4, 11 and 19. • These lesions targeted the Cdkn2a, Ikaros and Pten tumor suppressor genes. • Age at exposure may influence which tumor suppressor genes are lost in each tumor. • The mechanisms of tumor suppressor gene loss were different at each locus. - Abstract: Children are considered more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults, yet any differences in genomic alterations associated with age-at-exposure and their underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed genome-wide DNA copy number and mutation of key tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphomas arising after weekly irradiation of female B6C3F1 mice with 1.2 Gy X-rays for 4 consecutive weeks starting during infancy (1 week old), adolescence (4 weeks old) or as young adults (8 weeks old). Although T-cell lymphoma incidence was similar, loss of heterozygosity at Cdkn2a on chromosome 4 and at Ikaros on chromosome 11 was more frequent in the two older groups, while loss at the Pten locus on chromosome 19 was more frequent in the infant-irradiated group. Cdkn2a and Ikaros mutation/loss was a common feature of the young adult-irradiation group, with Ikaros frequently (50%) incurring multiple independent hits (including deletions and mutations) or suffering a single hit predicted to result in a dominant negative protein (such as those lacking exon 4, an isoform we have designated Ik12, which lacks two DNA binding zinc-finger domains). Conversely, Pten mutations were more frequent after early irradiation (60%) than after young adult-irradiation (30%). Homozygous Pten mutations occurred without DNA copy number change after irradiation starting in infancy, suggesting duplication of the mutated allele by chromosome mis-segregation or mitotic recombination. Our findings demonstrate that while deletions on chromosomes 4 and 11 affecting Cdkn2

  2. A kinase shRNA screen links LATS2 and the pRB tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Tschöp, Katrin; Conery, Andrew R.; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Harlow, Ed; Dyson, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    pRB-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation is a complex process that depends on the action of many proteins. However, little is known about the specific pathways that cooperate with the Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the variables that influence pRB's ability to arrest tumor cells. Here we describe two shRNA screens that identify kinases that are important for pRB to suppress cell proliferation and pRB-mediated induction of senescence markers. The results reveal an unexpected effect of L...

  3. Detection of Tumor Suppressor Gene and Oncogene in SO-Rb_(50) Human Retinoblastoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common malignant'cancer of eye. So-Rb_(50) is the first Rb cell line established in China in 1988. It has passed to the 387th passage now. We collected cells of the 327th passage of SO-Rb_(50), purified its genomic DNA and detected it with Rb and c-myc cDNA probes respectively (normal human white blood cells DNA was the control). We found the Rb gene was deleted while c-myc gene was amplified three times. This provides a basis for further study of the regulation of tumor ...

  4. A mutation in the neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor-suppressor gene, giving rise to widely different clinical phenotypes in two unrelated individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourn, D.; Carter, S.A.; Goodship, J.; Strachan, T. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)); Evans, G.R.; Coakham, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have sought mutations in the recently identified neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene in a large panel of NF2 patients, using PCR-based SSCP and heteroduplex analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of appropriate PCR products. Two unrelated NF2 patients were found to have identical nonsense mutations caused by a C-to-T transition in a CpG dinucleotide that is a potential mutational hot spot in the NF2 tumor-suppressor gene. Unexpectedly, the two individuals had widely different clinical phenotypes, representing the severe Wishart and mild Gardner clinical subtypes. Analysis of DNA samples from different tissues of the mildly affected patient suggests that he is a somatic mosaic for the mutation. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Evolutionary history of the reprimo tumor suppressor gene family in vertebrates with a description of a new reprimo gene lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Ignacio A; Zavala, Kattina; Hoffmann, Federico G; Vandewege, Michael W; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Amigo, Julio D; Owen, Gareth I; Opazo, Juan C

    2016-10-10

    Genes related to human diseases should be natural targets for evolutionary studies, since they could provide clues regarding the genetic bases of pathologies and potential treatments. Here we studied the evolution of the reprimo gene family, a group of tumor-suppressor genes that are implicated in p53-mediated cell cycle arrest. These genes, especially the reprimo duplicate located on human chromosome 2, have been associated with epigenetic modifications correlated with transcriptional silencing and cancer progression. We demonstrate the presence of a third reprimo lineage that, together with the reprimo and reprimo-like genes, appears to have been differentially retained during the evolutionary history of vertebrates. We present evidence that these reprimo lineages originated early in vertebrate evolution and expanded as a result of the two rounds of whole genome duplications that occurred in the last common ancestor of vertebrates. The reprimo gene has been lost in birds, and the third reprimo gene lineage has been retained in only a few distantly related species, such as coelacanth and gar. Expression analyses revealed that the reprimo paralogs are mainly expressed in the nervous system. Different vertebrate lineages have retained different reprimo paralogs, and even in species that have retained multiple copies, only one of them is heavily expressed. PMID:27432065

  6. Underexpression of LKB1 tumor suppressor is associated with enhanced Wnt signaling and malignant characteristics of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhang, Keqiang; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Xiwei; Liu, Xiyong; Li, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yong; Cheng, Qingbao; Hu, Zhenli; Guo, Chao; Hu, Shuya; Mu, Bing; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Li, Jie; Smith, Lynne; Yang, Lu; Liu, Qi; Chu, Peiguo; Chang, Vincent; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy. In this study, we identified the presence of gene deletion and missense mutation leading to inactivation or underexpression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor and excluded the involvement of LKB1 gene hypermethylation in ICC tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LKB1 was underexpressed in a portion of 326 ICC tissues compared to their adjacent normal tissues. By statistical analysis underexpression of LKB1 in ICC tissues significantly correlated with poor survival and malignant disease characteristics in ICC patients. Moreover, we showed that knockdown of LKB1 significantly enhanced growth, migration, and invasion of three LKB1-competent ICC cell lines. Global transcriptional profiling analysis identified multiple malignancy-promoting genes, such as HIF-1α, CD24, Talin1, Vinculin, Wnt5, and signaling pathways including Hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, and cell adhesion as novel targets of LKB1 underexpression in ICC cells. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 gene expression dramatically enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ICC cells, while an inverse correlation between LKB1 and nuclear β-catenin was observed in ICC tissues. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for ICC carcinogenesis in which LKB1 underexpression enhances multiple signaling pathways including Wnt/β-catenin to promote disease progression. PMID:26056085

  7. miR-370 targeted FoxM1 functions as a tumor suppressor in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungang, Wu; Xiaoyu, Li; Pang, Taizhong; Wenming, Li; Pan, Xinliang

    2014-03-01

    microRNAs, a family of small non-coding RNAs, involve in the pathogenesis of several types of cancers, including laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). MiR-370 is frequently aberrant expressed in various types of human cancer including LSCC. However, the role for miR-370 in LSCC remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that miR-370 was down-regulated in human LSCC tissues. Furthermore, there was an inverse relationship between Forkhead Box ml (FoxM1), which was up-regulated and miR-370 expression in LSCC tissues. FoxM1 was subsequently predicted by bioinformatics and verified to be a target of miR-370 by Luciferase reporter assay. Restored expression of miR-370 in Hep2 cells significantly inhibited cell proliferation. In conclusion, our results suggest that miR-370 may function as a tumor suppressor in LSCC through downregulation of FoxM1, suggesting that miR-370 could serve as a novel potential maker for LSCC therapy. PMID:24055400

  8. Deconstructing the ßcatenin destruction complex: mechanistic roles for the tumor suppressor APC in regulating Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David M; Pronobis, Mira I; Poulton, John S; Waldmann, Jon D; Stephenson, Elise M; Hanna, Shahnaz; Peifer, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Negatively regulating signaling by targeting key effectors for ubiquitination/destruction is essential for development and oncogenesis. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling, provides a paradigm. APC mutations occur in most colon cancers. Acting in the "destruction complex" with Axin, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and casein kinase, APC targets ßcatenin (ßcat) for phosphorylation and recognition by an E3 ubiquitin-ligase. Despite 20 years of work, the internal workings of the destruction complex and APC's role remain largely mysterious. We use both Drosophila and colon cancer cells to test hypotheses for APC's mechanism of action. Our data are inconsistent with current models suggesting that high-affinity ßcat-binding sites on APC play key roles. Instead, they suggest that multiple ßcat-binding sites act additively to fine-tune signaling via cytoplasmic retention. We identify essential roles for two putative binding sites for new partners--20-amino-acid repeat 2 and conserved sequence B--in destruction complex action. Finally, we demonstrate that APC interacts with Axin by two different modes and provide evidence that conserved sequence B helps ensure release of APC from Axin, with disassembly critical in regulating ßcat levels. Using these data, we suggest a new model for destruction complex action in development, which also provides new insights into functions of truncated APC proteins in cancer. PMID:21471006

  9. Heixuedian (heix), a potential melanotic tumor suppressor gene, exhibits specific spatial and temporal expression pattern during Drosophila hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Midoun, Samira Zohra; Xu, Zhiliang; Hong, Ling

    2015-02-15

    The Drosophila heixuedian (heix) is the ortholog of human UBIAD1 gene (a.k.a TERE1). The protein product of UBIAD1/heix has multiple enzymatic activities, including the vitamin K2 and the non-mitochondrial CoQ10 biosynthesis. However, the expression pattern of UBIAD1/Heix during metazoan development has not been systematically studied. In this paper, we found that loss of function of heix resulted in pathological changes of larval hematopoietic system, including lymph gland hypertrophy, hemocyte overproliferation and aberrant differentiation, and melanin mass formation. Overexpression of heix cDNA under the tubulin Gal4 driver rescued the above hematopoietic defects. Interestingly, Heix was specifically expressed in plasmatocyte/macrophage lineage in srp driven EGFP positive cells on the head mesoderm during embryogenesis, while it was highly expressed in crystal cells in the primary lobes of the third instar larval lymph gland. Using qRT-PCR analysis, loss of function of heix caused aberrant activation of multiple hemocyte proliferation-related as well as immune-related pathways, including JAK/STAT pathway, Ras/MAPK pathway, IMD pathway and Toll pathway. These data suggested that heix is a potential melanotic tumor suppressor gene and plays a pivotal role in both hemocytes proliferation and differentiation in Drosophila. PMID:25530181

  10. Structure-function analysis of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein – is the whole a sum of its parts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Frederick A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biochemical analysis of the retinoblastoma protein's function has received considerable attention since it was cloned just over 20 years ago. During this time pRB has emerged as a key regulator of the cell division cycle and its ability to block proliferation is disrupted in the vast majority of human cancers. Much has been learned about the regulation of E2F transcription factors by pRB in the cell cycle. However, many questions remain unresolved and researchers continue to explore this multifunctional protein. In particular, understanding how its biochemical functions contribute to its role as a tumor suppressor remains to be determined. Since pRB has been shown to function as an adaptor molecule that links different proteins together, or to particular promoters, analyzing pRB by disrupting individual protein interactions holds tremendous promise in unraveling the intricacies of its function. Recently, crystal structures have reported how pRB interacts with some of its molecular partners. This information has created the possibility of rationally separating pRB functions by studying mutants that disrupt individual binding sites. This review will focus on literature that investigates pRB by isolating functions based on binding sites within the pocket domain. This article will also discuss the prospects for using this approach to further explore the unknown functions of pRB.

  11. Sumoylation of the Tumor Suppressor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Regulates Arsenic Trioxide-Induced Collagen Synthesis in Osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Xiao Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Promyelocytic leukemia (PML protein is a tumor suppressor that fuses with retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARα to contribute to the initiation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. Arsenic trioxide (ATO upregulates expression of TGF-β1, promoting collagen synthesis in osteoblasts, and ATO binds directly to PML to induce oligomerization, sumoylation, and ubiquitination. However, how ATO upregulates TGF-β1 expression is uncertain. Thus, we suggested that PML sumoylation is responsible for regulation of TGF-β1 protein expression. Methods: Kunming mice were treated with ATO, and osteoblasts were counted under scanning electron microscopy. Masson's staining was used to quantify collagen content. hFOB1.19 cells were transfected with siRNA against UBC9 or RNF4, and then treated with ATO or FBS. TGF-β1, PML expression, and sumoylation were quantified with Western blot, and collagen quantified via immunocytochemistry. Results: ATO enhanced osteoblast accumulation, collagen synthesis, and PML-NB formation in vivo. Knocking down UBC9 in hFOB1.19 cells inhibited ATO- and FBS-induced PML sumoylation, TGF-β1 expression, and collagen synthesis. Conversely, knocking down RNF4 enhanced ATO- and FBS-induced PML sumoylation, TGF-β1 expression, and collagen synthesis. Conclusion: These data suggest that PML sumoylation is required for ATO-induced collagen synthesis in osteoblasts.

  12. The tumor suppressor Smad4/DPC4 is regulated by phosphorylations that integrate FGF, Wnt, and TGF-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demagny, Hadrien; Araki, Tatsuya; De Robertis, Edward M

    2014-10-23

    Smad4 is a major tumor suppressor currently thought to function constitutively in the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-signaling pathway. Here, we report that Smad4 activity is directly regulated by the Wnt and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways through GSK3 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation sites. FGF activates MAPK, which primes three sequential GSK3 phosphorylations that generate a Wnt-regulated phosphodegron bound by the ubiquitin E3 ligase β-TrCP. In the presence of FGF, Wnt potentiates TGF-β signaling by preventing Smad4 GSK3 phosphorylations that inhibit a transcriptional activation domain located in the linker region. When MAPK is not activated, the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways remain insulated from each other. In Xenopus embryos, these Smad4 phosphorylations regulate germ-layer specification and Spemann organizer formation. The results show that three major signaling pathways critical in development and cancer are integrated at the level of Smad4. PMID:25373906

  13. The Tumor Suppressor Smad4/DPC4 Is Regulated by Phosphorylations that Integrate FGF, Wnt, and TGF-β Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadrien Demagny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Smad4 is a major tumor suppressor currently thought to function constitutively in the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β-signaling pathway. Here, we report that Smad4 activity is directly regulated by the Wnt and fibroblast growth factor (FGF pathways through GSK3 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK phosphorylation sites. FGF activates MAPK, which primes three sequential GSK3 phosphorylations that generate a Wnt-regulated phosphodegron bound by the ubiquitin E3 ligase β-TrCP. In the presence of FGF, Wnt potentiates TGF-β signaling by preventing Smad4 GSK3 phosphorylations that inhibit a transcriptional activation domain located in the linker region. When MAPK is not activated, the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways remain insulated from each other. In Xenopus embryos, these Smad4 phosphorylations regulate germ-layer specification and Spemann organizer formation. The results show that three major signaling pathways critical in development and cancer are integrated at the level of Smad4.

  14. The induction of a tumor suppressor gene (p53) expression by low-dose radiation and its biological meaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I report the induced accumulation of wild-type p53 protein of a tumor suppressor gene within 12 h in various organs of rats exposed to X-ray irradiation at low doses (10-50 cGy). The levels of p53 in some organs of irradiated rats were increased about 2- to 3-fold in comparison with the basal p53 levels in non-irradiated rats. Differences in the levels of p53 induction after low-dose X-ray irradiation were observed among the small intestine, bone marrow, brain, liver, adrenal gland, spleen, hypophysis and skin. In contrast, there was no obvious accumulation of p53 protein in the testis and ovary. Thus, the induction of cellular p.53 accumulation by low-dose X-ray irradiation in rats seems to be organ-specific. I consider that cell type, and interactions with other signal transduction pathways of the hormone system, immune system and nervous system may contribute to the variable induction of p53 by low-dose X-ray irradiation. I discussed the induction of p53 by radiation and its biological meaning from an aspect of the defense system for radiation-induced cancer. (author)

  15. STAT5A is regulated by DNA damage via the tumor suppressor p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Utpal K; Cass, Jamaica; Raptis, Leda; Craig, Andrew W; Bourdeau, Véronique; Varma, Sonal; SenGupta, Sandip; Elliott, Bruce E; Ferbeyre, Gerardo

    2016-06-01

    Here we report that the STAT5A transcription factor is a direct p53 transcriptional target gene. STAT5A is well expressed in p53 wild type cells but not in p53-null cells. Inhibition of p53 reduces STAT5A expression. DNA damaging agents such as doxorubicin also induced STAT5A expression in a p53 dependent manner. Two p53 binding sites were mapped in the STAT5A gene and named PBS1 and PBS2; these sites were sufficient to confer p53 responsiveness in a luciferase reporter gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that PBS2 has constitutive p53 bound to it, while p53 binding to PBS1 required DNA damage. In normal human breast lobules, weak p53 staining correlated with regions of intense STAT5A staining. Interestingly, in a cohort of triple negative breast tumor tissues there was little correlation between regions of p53 and STAT5A staining, likely reflecting a high frequency of p53 mutations that stabilize the protein in these tumors. We thus reveal an unexpected connection between cytokine signaling and p53. PMID:26876578

  16. Beyond a tumor suppressor: Soluble E-cadherin promotes the progression of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qi-Ping; Kuang, Jing-Ya; Yang, Qing-Kai; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Yu, Shi-Cang

    2016-06-15

    E-cadherin (E-cad) plays important roles in tumorigenesis as well as in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. This protein exists in two forms: a membrane-tethered form and a soluble form. Full-length E-cad is membrane tethered. As a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, E-cad mainly mediates adherens junctions between cells and is involved in maintaining the normal structure of epithelial tissues. Soluble E-cad (sE-cad) is the extracellular fragment of the protein that is cleaved from the membrane after proteolysis of full-length E-cad. The production of sE-cad undermines adherens junctions, causing a reduction in cell aggregation capacity; furthermore, sE-cad can diffuse into the extracellular environment and the blood. As a paracrine/autocrine signaling molecule, sE-cad activates or inhibits multiple signaling pathways and participates in the progression of various types of cancer, such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and lung cancer, by promoting invasion and metastasis. This article briefly reviews the role of sE-cad in tumorigenesis and tumor progression and its significance in clinical therapeutics. PMID:26704932

  17. How the Rb tumor suppressor structure and function was revealed by the study of Adenovirus and SV40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCaprio, James A

    2009-02-20

    The review recounts the history of how the study of the DNA tumor viruses including polyoma, SV40 and Adenovirus brought key insights into the structure and function of the Retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Knudsen's model of the two-hit hypothesis to explain patterns of hereditary and sporadic retinoblastoma provided the foundation for the tumor suppressor hypothesis that ultimately led to the cloning of the Rb gene. The discovery that SV40 and Adenovirus could cause tumors when inoculated into animals was startling not only because SV40 had contaminated the poliovirus vaccine and Adenovirus was a common cause of viral induced pneumonia but also because they provided an opportunity to study the genetics and biochemistry of cancer. Studies of mutant forms of these viruses led to the identification of the E1A and Large T antigen (LT) oncogenes and their small transforming elements including the Adenovirus Conserved Regions (CR), the SV40 J domain and the LxCxE motif. The immunoprecipitation studies that initially revealed the size and ultimately the identity of cellular proteins that could bind to these transforming elements were enabled by the widespread development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies against E1A and LT. The identification of Rb as an E1A and LT interacting protein quickly led to the cloning of p107, p130, p300, CBP, p400 and TRRAP and the concept that viral transformation was due, at least in part, to the perturbation of the function of normal cellular proteins. In addition, studies on the ability of E1A to transactivate the Adenovirus E2 promoter led to the cloning of the heterodimeric E2F and DP transcription factor and recognition that Rb repressed transcription of cellular genes required for cell cycle entry and progression. More recent studies have revealed how E1A and LT combine the activity of Rb and the other cellular associated proteins to perturb expression of many genes during viral infection and tumor formation. PMID:19150725

  18. Regulation of the PML tumor suppressor in drug-induced senescence of human normal and cancer cells by JAK/STAT-mediated signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubáčková, Soňa; Nováková, Zora; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Košař, Martin; Dobrovolná, Jana; Dušková, Pavlína; Hanzlíková, Hana; Vančurová, Markéta; Barath, P.; Bartek, J.; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 15 (2010), s. 3085-3099. ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390501; GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PML tumor suppressor * cellular senescence * JAK-STAT signaling pathway Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.999, year: 2010

  19. Arsenite induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of tumor suppressor P53 in human skin keratinocytes as a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis associated with arsenic exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Komissarova, Elena V.; Rossman, Toby G

    2009-01-01

    Arsenite is an environmental pollutant. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with elevated cancer risk, especially in skin. Arsenite alone does not cause skin cancer in animals, but arsenite can enhance the carcinogenicity of solar UV. Arsenite is not a significant mutagen at non-toxic concentrations, but it enhances the mutagenicity of other carcinogens. The tumor suppressor protein P53 and nuclear enzyme PARP-1 are both key players in DNA damage response. This labor...

  20. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MARSIT, CARMEN J.; E. Andres Houseman; Nelson, Heather H; Karl T Kelsey

    2008-01-01

    Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, ...

  1. Apical Membrane Localization of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor Protein and Subcellular Distribution of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex in Polarized Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is implicated in the majority of hereditary and sporadic colon cancers. APC is known to function as a tumor suppressor through downregulation of β-catenin as part of a high molecular weight complex known as the β-catenin destruction complex. The molecular composition of the intact complex and its site of action in the cell are still not well understood. Reports on the subcellular localization of APC in various cell systems have differed significant...

  2. Self-association of the APC tumor suppressor is required for the assembly, stability, and activity of the Wnt signaling destruction complex

    OpenAIRE

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Roberts, David M.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling through its activity in the destruction complex with Axin, GSK3β, and CK1 that targets β-catenin/Armadillo (β-cat/Arm) for proteosomal degradation. The destruction complex forms macromolecular particles we termed the destructosome. Whereas APC functions in the complex through its ability to bind both β-cat and Axin, we hypothesize that APC proteins play an additional role in destructosome...

  3. A novel tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 interacts directly with TMPRSS11A (ECRG1) to inhibit cancer cell growth in esophageal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou Yun; Zhang Chun-peng; Li Xiao-yan; Li Yuan-yuan; Li Lin-wei; Lu Shih-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The esophageal carcinoma related gene 4 (ECRG4) was initially identified and cloned from human normal esophageal epithelium in our laboratory (GenBank accession no.AF325503). ECRG4 has been described as a novel tumor suppressor gene associated with prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods In this study, binding affinity assay in vitro and co-immunoprecipitation experiment in vivo were utilized to verify the physical interaction between ECRG4 and tran...

  4. The p75NTR tumor suppressor induces cell cycle arrest facilitating caspase mediated apoptosis in prostate tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a death receptor which belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor super-family of membrane proteins. This study shows that p75NTR retarded cell cycle progression by induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 and a reduction in the S phase of the cell cycle. The rescue of tumor cells from cell cycle progression by a death domain deleted (ΔDD) dominant-negative antagonist of p75NTR showed that the death domain transduced anti-proliferative activity in a ligand-independent manner. Conversely, addition of NGF ligand rescued retardation of cell cycle progression with commensurate changes in components of the cyclin/cdk holoenzyme complex. In the absence of ligand, p75NTR-dependent cell cycle arrest facilitated an increase in apoptotic nuclear fragmentation of the prostate cancer cells. Apoptosis of p75NTR expressing cells occurred via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway leading to a sequential caspase-9 and -7 cascade. Since the death domain deleted dominant-negative antagonist of p75NTR rescued intrinsic caspase associated apoptosis in PC-3 cells, this shows p75NTR was integral to ligand independent induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the ability of ligand to ameliorate the p75NTR-dependent intrinsic apoptotic cascade indicates that NGF functioned as a survival factor for p75NTR expressing prostate cancer cells

  5. TNF{alpha} induced FOXP3-NF{kappa}B interaction dampens the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3 in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Weina; Zhang, Cun; Qin, Xin; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Meng; Shu, Zhen; Xu, Tianjiao; Xu, Yujin; Wang, Weihua [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, School of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: Zhangw90@fmmu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, School of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Yingqi, E-mail: Zhangyqh@fmmu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, School of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FOXP3 inhibition of cell proliferation is p21-dependent under basal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation induced by TNF{alpha} inhibits the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between p65 and FOXP3 inhibits p21 transcription activation. -- Abstract: Controversial roles of FOXP3 in different cancers have been reported previously, while its role in gastric cancer is largely unknown. Here we found that FOXP3 is unexpectedly upregulated in some gastric cancer cells. To test whether increased FOXP3 remains the tumor suppressor role in gastric cancer as seen in other cancers, we test its function in cell proliferation both at basal and TNF{alpha} mimicked inflammatory condition. Compared with the proliferation inhibitory role observed in basal condition, FOXP3 is insufficient to inhibit the cell proliferation under TNF{alpha} treatment. Molecularly, we found that TNF{alpha} induced an interaction between FOXP3 and p65, which in turn drive the FOXP3 away from the promoter of the well known target p21. Our data here suggest that although FOXP3 is upregulated in gastric cancer, its tumor suppressor role has been dampened due to the inflammation environment.

  6. TNFα induced FOXP3–NFκB interaction dampens the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3 in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► FOXP3 inhibition of cell proliferation is p21-dependent under basal conditions. ► Inflammation induced by TNFα inhibits the tumor suppressor role of FOXP3. ► Interaction between p65 and FOXP3 inhibits p21 transcription activation. -- Abstract: Controversial roles of FOXP3 in different cancers have been reported previously, while its role in gastric cancer is largely unknown. Here we found that FOXP3 is unexpectedly upregulated in some gastric cancer cells. To test whether increased FOXP3 remains the tumor suppressor role in gastric cancer as seen in other cancers, we test its function in cell proliferation both at basal and TNFα mimicked inflammatory condition. Compared with the proliferation inhibitory role observed in basal condition, FOXP3 is insufficient to inhibit the cell proliferation under TNFα treatment. Molecularly, we found that TNFα induced an interaction between FOXP3 and p65, which in turn drive the FOXP3 away from the promoter of the well known target p21. Our data here suggest that although FOXP3 is upregulated in gastric cancer, its tumor suppressor role has been dampened due to the inflammation environment.

  7. EC5S ubiquitin complex is recruited by KSHV latent antigen LANA for degradation of the VHL and p53 tumor suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Liang Cai

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular protein degradation pathways can be utilized by viruses to establish an environment that favors their propagation. Here we report that the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA directly functions as a component of the EC5S ubiquitin complex targeting the tumor suppressors von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and p53 for degradation. We have characterized a suppressor of cytokine signaling box-like motif within LANA composed of an Elongin B and C box and a Cullin box, which is spatially located at its amino and carboxyl termini. This motif is necessary for LANA interaction with the Cul5-Elongin BC complex, to promote polyubiquitylation of cellular substrates VHL and p53 in vitro via its amino- and carboxyl-terminal binding domain, respectively. In transfected cells as well as KSHV-infected B lymphoma cells, LANA expression stimulates degradation of VHL and p53. Additionally, specific RNA interference-mediated LANA knockdown stabilized VHL and p53 in primary effusion lymphoma cells. Thus, manipulation of tumor suppressors by LANA potentially provides a favorable environment for progression of KSHV-infected tumor cells.

  8. Nerve growth factor receptor negates the tumor suppressor p53 as a feedback regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Peng; Luo, Shiwen; Zhang, Minhong; Hu, Guohui; Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Yiwei; Cao, Bo; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Zeng, Shelya X; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer develops and progresses often by inactivating p53. Here, we unveil nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR, p75NTR or CD271) as a novel p53 inactivator. p53 activates NGFR transcription, whereas NGFR inactivates p53 by promoting its MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and by directly binding to its central DNA binding domain and preventing its DNA-binding activity. Inversely, NGFR ablation activates p53, consequently inducing apoptosis, attenuating survival, and reducing clonogenic capability of cancer cells, as well as sensitizing human cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that induce p53 and suppressing mouse xenograft tumor growth. NGFR is highly expressed in human glioblastomas, and its gene is often amplified in breast cancers with wild type p53. Altogether, our results demonstrate that cancers hijack NGFR as an oncogenic inhibitor of p53. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15099.001 PMID:27282385

  9. [TUMOR SUPPRESSOR p63 REGULATES EXPRESSION OF UBIQUITIN LIGASE Pirh2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daks, A A; Petukhov, A V; Shuvalov, O Yu; Vasilieva, E A; Melino, G; Barlev, N A; Fedorova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor p63 is a member of the p53 protein family. Due to the high degree of structural similarity p53, p63, and p73 are known to have overlapping functions relating to cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and tumor transformation. Furthermore, p63 plays crucial role in epidermal tissue development and differentiation. Pirh2 (product of RCHY1 gene) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase modifying all three members of the p53 family resulting in their subsequent proteasomal degradation. Our results demonstrate that p63, similar to p53, is able to regulate expression levels of Pirh2. Importantly, Pirh2 expression is activated only by transcriptionally active isoform of p63--TAp63, but not the N-terminally truncated ΔNp63. PMID:26995965

  10. Fbxw7 Tumor Suppressor: A Vital Regulator Contributes to Human Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Ge, Ming-Hua; Ling, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Rapidly accumulating data indicate that F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 7 (Fbxw7) is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancers and regulates a network of crucial oncoproteins. These studies have generated important new insights into tumorigenesis and may soon enable therapies targeting the Fbxw7 pathway. We searched PubMed, Embase, and ISI Web of Science databases (1973-2015, especially recent 5 years) for articles published in the English language using the key words "Fbxw7," "Fbw7," "hCDC4," and "Sel-10," and we reviewed recent developments in the search for Fbxw7. Fbxw7 coordinates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of several critical cellular regulators, thereby controlling essential processes, such as cell cycle, differentiation, and apoptosis. Fbxw7 contains 3 isoforms (Fbxw7α, Fbxw7β, and Fbxw7γ), and they are differently regulated in subtract recognition. Besides those, Fbxw7 activity is controlled at different levels, resulting in specific and tunable regulation of the abundance and activity of its substrates in a variety of human solid tumor types, including glioma malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, osteosarcoma, melanoma as well as colorectal, lung, breast, gastric, liver, pancreatic, renal, prostate, endometrial, and esophageal cancers. Fbxw7 is strongly associated with tumorigenesis, and the mechanisms and consequences of Fbxw7 deregulation in cancers may soon enable the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:26886596

  11. MiR-145 functions as a tumor suppressor targeting NUAK1 in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dysregulation of micro (mi)RNAs is associated with cancer development. The miRNA miR-145 is downregulated in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC); however, its precise role in tumor progression has not yet been elucidated. Novel (nua) kinase family (NUAK)1 functions as an oncogene in various cancers and is a putative target of miR-145 regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of NUAK1 by miR-145 in ICC. We found that miR-145 level was significantly decreased in ICC tissue and cell lines, which corresponded with an increase in NUAK1 expression. NUAK1 was found to be a direct target of miR-145 regulation. The overexpression of miR-145 in ICC cell lines inhibited proliferation, growth, and invasion by suppressing NUAK1 expression, which was associated with a decrease in Akt signaling and matrix metalloproteinase protein expression. Similar results were observed by inhibiting NUAK1 expression. These results demonstrate that miR-145 can prevent ICC progression by targeting NUAK1 and its downstream effectors, and can therefore be useful for clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy of ICC. - Highlights: • MiR-145 suppresses ICC proliferation and invasion abilities. • We demonstrated that miR-145 directly targets NUAK1 in ICC. • MiR-145 expression in ICC was associated with Akt signaling and MMPs expression

  12. miR-193a-3p is a potential tumor suppressor in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marissa; Kirschner, Michaela B; Cheng, Yuen Yee; Hanh, Jacky; Weiss, Jocelyn; Mugridge, Nancy; Wright, Casey M; Linton, Anthony; Kao, Steven C; Edelman, J James B; Vallely, Michael P; McCaughan, Brian C; Cooper, Wendy; Klebe, Sonja; Lin, Ruby C Y; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2015-09-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an asbestos-induced cancer with poor prognosis that displays characteristic alterations in microRNA expression. Recently it was reported that the expression of a subset of microRNAs can distinguish between MPM and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, the functional importance of these changes has yet to be investigated. We compared expression of miR-192, miR-193a-3p and the miR-200 family in normal pleura and MPM tumor specimens and found a statistically significant reduction in the levels of miR-193a-3p (3.1-fold) and miR-192 (2.8-fold) in MPM. Transfection of MPM cells with a miR-193a-3p mimic resulted in inhibition of growth and an induction of apoptosis and necrosis in vitro. The growth inhibitory effects of miR-193a-3p were associated with a decrease in MCL1 expression and were recapitulated by RNAi-mediated MCL1 silencing. Targeted delivery of miR-193a-3p mimic using EDV minicells inhibited MPM xenograft tumour growth, and was associated with increased apoptosis. In conclusion, miR-193a-3p appears to have importance in the biology of MPM and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26125439

  13. BEX1 acts as a tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Oscar; Li, Tianfeng; Su, Xianwei; Sun, Jianmin; Kabir, Nuzhat N; Levander, Fredrik; Zhao, Hui; Lu, Gang; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U

    2015-08-28

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease of the myeloid lineage. About 35% of AML patients carry an oncogenic FLT3 mutant making FLT3 an attractive target for treatment of AML. Major problems in the development of FLT3 inhibitors include lack of specificity, poor response and development of a resistant phenotype upon treatment. Further understanding of FLT3 signaling and discovery of novel regulators will therefore help to determine additional pharmacological targets in FLT3-driven AML. In this report, we identified BEX1 as a novel regulator of oncogenic FLT3-ITD-driven AML. We showed that BEX1 expression was down-regulated in a group of AML patients carrying FLT3-ITD. Loss of BEX1 expression resulted in poor overall survival (hazard ratio, HR = 2.242, p = 0.0011). Overexpression of BEX1 in mouse pro-B and myeloid cells resulted in decreased FLT3-ITD-dependent cell proliferation, colony and tumor formation, and in increased apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. BEX1 localized to the cytosolic compartment of cells and significantly decreased FLT3-ITD-induced AKT phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 or STAT5 phosphorylation. Our data suggest that the loss of BEX1 expression in FLT3-ITD driven AML potentiates oncogenic signaling and leads to decreased overall survival of the patients. PMID:26046670

  14. MiR-145 functions as a tumor suppressor targeting NUAK1 in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xinkui; Sun, Daoyi; Chai, Hao; Shan, Wengang [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Yue [Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Pu, Liyong [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cheng, Feng, E-mail: docchengfeng@njmu.edu.cn [Liver Transplantation Center, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory of Living Donor Liver Transplantation, Ministry of Public Health, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-09-18

    The dysregulation of micro (mi)RNAs is associated with cancer development. The miRNA miR-145 is downregulated in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC); however, its precise role in tumor progression has not yet been elucidated. Novel (nua) kinase family (NUAK)1 functions as an oncogene in various cancers and is a putative target of miR-145 regulation. In this study, we investigated the regulation of NUAK1 by miR-145 in ICC. We found that miR-145 level was significantly decreased in ICC tissue and cell lines, which corresponded with an increase in NUAK1 expression. NUAK1 was found to be a direct target of miR-145 regulation. The overexpression of miR-145 in ICC cell lines inhibited proliferation, growth, and invasion by suppressing NUAK1 expression, which was associated with a decrease in Akt signaling and matrix metalloproteinase protein expression. Similar results were observed by inhibiting NUAK1 expression. These results demonstrate that miR-145 can prevent ICC progression by targeting NUAK1 and its downstream effectors, and can therefore be useful for clinical diagnosis and targeted therapy of ICC. - Highlights: • MiR-145 suppresses ICC proliferation and invasion abilities. • We demonstrated that miR-145 directly targets NUAK1 in ICC. • MiR-145 expression in ICC was associated with Akt signaling and MMPs expression.

  15. Interaction of the BMPR-IA tumor suppressor with a developmentally relevant splicing factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inactivation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling via mutation of the BMPR-IA TGF-β superfamily type I receptor causes familial juvenile polyposis, an inherited gastrointestinal cancer predisposition syndrome. In an effort to provide new insight into the mechanism(s) of BMP-mediated tumor suppression, we employed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify novel proteins that interact with the intracellular domain of BMPR-IA. 30/31 interacting clones encoded SAP49, a splicing factor that has been shown to be required for normal development in Caenorhabditis elegans. The remaining interacting clone was FKBP12.6, a known TGF-β type I receptor interactor. The interaction between BMPR-IA and SAP49 was confirmed via coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. Mutational analysis demonstrated that the GS domain of the receptor and the conserved proline-rich domain of SAP49 were required for the interaction. Co-localization studies suggested that the interaction may occur at the inner leaflet of the nuclear membrane. These data suggest that BMPR-IA may interact with and modulate the activity of a developmentally relevant splicing factor

  16. Truncation of the Catalytic Domain of the Cylindromatosis Tumor Suppressor Impairs Lung Maturation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompouki, Eirini; Tsagaratou, Ageliki; Kosmidis, Stylianos K; Dollé, Pascal; Qian, Jun; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Cardoso, Wellington V; Mosialos, George

    2009-01-01

    Cyld encodes a 956-amino acid deubiquitinating enzyme (CYLD), which is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Mutations that truncate and inactivate the carboxyl-terminal deubiquitinating domain of CYLD underlie the development of skin appendage tumors in humans, whereas down-regulation of Cyld expression has been associated with the development of various types of human malignancies including lung cancer. To establish an animal model of human CYLD inactivation and characterize the biological role of CYLD in vivo, we generated mice carrying a homozygous deletion of Cyld exon 9 (CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice) using a conditional approach. Deletion of exon 9 would cause a carboxyl-terminal truncation of CYLD and inactivation of its deubiquitinating activity. In accordance with previous studies, fibroblasts from CyldΔ9/Δ9 embryos had hyperactive nuclear factor κB and c-Jun kinase pathways compared with control fibroblasts. CyldΔ9/Δ9 newborn mice were smaller than wild-type littermates with a short and kinky tail and nomajor developmental defects. However, CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice died shortly after birth from apparent respiratory dysfunction. Histological examination of E18.5 CyldΔ9/Δ9 lungs demonstrated an immature phenotype characterized by hyperplasic mesenchyme but apparently normal epithelial, smooth muscle. and endothelial structures. Our study identifies an important role of CYLD in lung maturation, which may underlie the development of many cases of lung cancer. PMID:19412431

  17. Truncation of the Catalytic Domain of the Cylindromatosis Tumor Suppressor Impairs Lung Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Trompouki

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyld encodes a 956-amino acid deubiquitinating enzyme (CYLD, which is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Mutations that truncate and inactivate the carboxyl-terminal deubiquitinating domain of CYLD underlie the development of skin appendage tumors in humans, whereas down-regulation of Cyld expression has been associated with the development of various types of human malignancies including lung cancer. To establish an animal model of human CYLD inactivation and characterize the biological role of CYLD in vivo, we generated mice carrying a homozygous deletion of Cyld exon 9 (CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice using a conditional approach. Deletion of exon 9 would cause a carboxyl-terminal truncation of CYLD and inactivation of its deubiquitinating activity. In accordance with previous studies, fibroblasts from CyldΔ9/Δ9 embryos had hyperactive nuclear factor κB and c-Jun kinase pathways compared with control fibroblasts. CyldΔ9/Δ9 newborn mice were smaller than wild-type littermates with a short and kinky tail and nomajor developmental defects. However, CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice died shortly after birth from apparent respiratory dysfunction. Histological examination of E18.5 CyldΔ9/Δ9 lungs demonstrated an immature phenotype characterized by hyperplasic mesenchyme but apparently normal epithelial, smooth muscle. and endothelial structures. Our study identifies an important role of CYLD in lung maturation, which may underlie the development of many cases of lung cancer.

  18. LGR6 is a high affinity receptor of R-spondins and potentially functions as a tumor suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Gong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: LGR6 (leucine-rich repeat containing, G protein-coupled receptor 6 is a member of the rhodopsin-like seven transmembrane domain receptor superfamily with the highest homology to LGR4 and LGR5. LGR6 was found as one of the novel genes mutated in colon cancer through total exon sequencing and its promoter region is hypermethylated in 20-50% of colon cancer cases. In the skin, LGR6 marks a population of stem cells that can give rise to all cell lineages. Recently, we and others demonstrated that LGR4 and LGR5 function as receptors of R-spondins to potentiate Wnt/β-catenin signaling. However, the binding affinity and functional response of LGR6 to R-spondins, and the activity of colon cancer mutants of LGR6 have not been determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that LGR6 also binds and responds to R-spondins 1-3 with high affinity to enhance Wnt/β-catenin signaling through increased LRP6 phosphorylation. Similar to LGR4 and LGR5, LGR6 is not coupled to heterotrimeric G proteins or to β-arrestin following R-spondin stimulation. Functional and expression analysis of three somatic mutations identified in colon cancer samples indicates that one mutant fails to bind and respond to R-spondin (loss-of-function, but the other two have no significant effect on receptor function. Overexpression of wild-type LGR6 in HeLa cells leads to increased cell migration following co-treatment with R-spondin1 and Wnt3a when compared to vector control cells or cells overexpressing the loss-of-function mutant. CONCLUSIONS: LGR6 is a high affinity receptor for R-spondins 1-3 and potentially functions as a tumor suppressor despite its positive effect on Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  19. Menin: a tumor suppressor that mediates postsynaptic receptor expression and synaptogenesis between central neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichole Flynn

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factors (NTFs support neuronal survival, differentiation, and even synaptic plasticity both during development and throughout the life of an organism. However, their precise roles in central synapse formation remain unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that excitatory synapse formation in Lymnaea stagnalis requires a source of extrinsic NTFs and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK activation. Here we show that NTFs such as Lymnaea epidermal growth factor (L-EGF act through RTKs to trigger a specific subset of intracellular signalling events in the postsynaptic neuron, which lead to the activation of the tumor suppressor menin, encoded by Lymnaea MEN1 (L-MEN1 and the expression of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. We provide direct evidence that the activation of the MAPK/ERK cascade is required for the expression of nAChRs, and subsequent synapse formation between pairs of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, we show that L-menin activation is sufficient for the expression of postsynaptic excitatory nAChRs and subsequent synapse formation in media devoid of NTFs. By extending our findings in situ, we reveal the necessity of EGFRs in mediating synapse formation between a single transplanted neuron and its intact presynaptic partner. Moreover, deficits in excitatory synapse formation following EGFR knock-down can be rescued by injecting synthetic L-MEN1 mRNA in the intact central nervous system. Taken together, this study provides the first direct evidence that NTFs functioning via RTKs activate the MEN1 gene, which appears sufficient to regulate synapse formation between central neurons. Our study also offers a novel developmental role for menin beyond tumour suppression in adult humans.

  20. miR-422a is an independent prognostic factor and functions as a potential tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gui-Xi; Qu, Ai-Lin; Yang, Yong-Mei; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Shou-Cai; Wang, Chuan-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of miR-422a in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and to further explore the prognostic value and function of miR-422a in CRC carcinogenesis. METHODS: miR-422a expression was analyzed in 102 CRC tissues and paired normal mucosa adjacent to carcinoma by quantitative real-time PCR. The relationship of miR-422a expression with clinicopathological parameters was also analyzed. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox multivariate analysis were performed to estimate the potential role of miR-422a. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were used for in vitro functional analysis of miR-422a. RESULTS: The levels of miR-422a were dramatically reduced in CRC tissues compared with normal mucosa (P < 0.05), and significantly correlated with local invasion (P = 0.004) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox regression multivariate analyses revealed that miR-422a expression (HR = 0.568, P = 0.015) and clinical TNM stage (HR = 2.942, P = 0.003) were independent prognostic factors for overall survival in CRC patients. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that overexpression of miR-422a inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion of SW480 and HT-29 cells. CONCLUSION: Down-regulation of miR-422a may serve as an independent prognosis factor in CRC. MiR-422a functions as a tumor suppressor and regulates progression of CRC. PMID:27350737

  1. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) facilitate distant metastasis of malignancies by shielding circulating tumor cells (CTC) from immune surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiaofei; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms of distant metastasis of malignancies largely remain unknown. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) derived from the primary cancer initiate distant metastasis by entering and traversing the bloodstream. Current methods to detect CTC are based on the notion that CTC do not express the common leukocyte antigen CD45. However, these methods neglect the fact that CTC can directly adhere to platelets and immune cells and therefore appear to be CD45-positive. The potential effects of interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells have been largely overlooked, despite the fact that most CTC are killed by immune effector cells and only those that evade immune surveillance result in clonal expansion and metastatic lesions. It is crucial to define the characteristics that allow a select CTC population to escape immune surveillance; particularly, it must be determined whether interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells provide a protective effect on CTC survival. If interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells offer a selective advantage to those CTC cells, the next consideration is which characteristics of a CTC-immune cell population allow sufficient protection to facilitate immune evasion. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a large heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that accumulate during cancer progression to induce extensively systemic and local immunosuppression, a phenomenon that has been demonstrated to facilitate cancer distant metastasis. We hypothesize, therefore, that CTC populations interacting with adhesive immune cells will have different biological behavior than CTC populations alone. Further, we hypothesize that CTC can create a defensive shield consisting of adhesive MDSC, which allows evasion of immune surveillance and therefore facilitates distant metastatic lesions. This possibility highlights the importance of direct interactions between CTC and adhesive immune cells and suggests the potential target that

  2. Retroviral insertional mutagenesis in telomerase-immortalized hepatocytes identifies RIPK4 as novel tumor suppressor in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, D; Cornils, K; Schulze, K; Fehse, B; Lohse, A W; Brümmendorf, T H; Wege, H

    2015-01-15

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving alterations in various cellular pathways. The critical genetic events driving the evolution of primary liver cancer, specifically hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), are still poorly understood. However, telomere stabilization is acknowledged as prerequisite for cancer progression in humans. In this project, human fetal hepatocytes were utilized as a cell culture model for untransformed, proliferating human liver cells, with telomerase activation as first oncogenic hit. To elucidate critical downstream genetic events driving further transformation of immortalized liver cells, we used retroviral insertional mutagenesis as an unbiased approach to induce genetic alterations. Following isolation of hyperproliferating, provirus-bearing cell clones, we monitored cancer-associated growth properties and characterized changes toward a malignant phenotype. Three transformed clones with the ability to form colonies in soft agar were expanded. As proof-of-principle for our experimental setup, we identified a transforming insertion on chromosome 8 within the pleiomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1), resulting in a 20-fold increase in PLAG1 expression. Upregulation of PLAG1 has already been described to promote human hepatoblastoma development. In a separate clone, a transforming insertion was detected in close proximity to the receptor-interacting serine-threonine kinase 4 (RIPK4) with an approximately eightfold suppression in RIPK4 expression. As validation for this currently unknown driver in hepatocarcinogenesis, we examined RIPK4 expression in human HCC samples and confirmed a significant suppression of RIPK4 in 80% of the samples. Furthermore, overexpression of RIPK4 in transformed human fetal hepatocytes resulted in an almost complete elimination of anchorage-independent growth. On the basis of these data, we propose RIPK4 as a novel putative tumor suppressor in human hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24413083

  3. Tumor suppressor BLU inhibits proliferation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of cell cycle, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and the cyclin D1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor suppressor genes function to regulate and block tumor cell proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the tumor suppression of BLU/ZMYND10 gene on a frequently lost human chromosomal region, an adenoviral vector with BLU cDNA insert was constructed. BLU was re-expressed in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by transfection or viral infection. Clonogenic growth was assayed; cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry-based DNA content detection; c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and cyclin D1 promoter activities were measured by reporter gene assay, and phosphorylation was measured by immunoblotting. The data for each pair of groups were compared with Student t tests. BLU inhibits clonogenic growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, arrests cell cycle at G1 phase, downregulates JNK and cyclin D1 promoter activities, and inhibits phosphorylation of c-Jun. BLU inhibits growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by regulation of the JNK-cyclin D1 axis to exert tumor suppression

  4. Protection against HPV-16-Associated Tumors Requires the Activation of CD8+ Effector Memory T Cells and the Control of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Mariana O; Sales, Natiely S; Silva, Jamile R; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S

    2016-08-01

    Active anticancer immunotherapeutic approaches have been shown to induce cellular or humoral immune responses in patients, but, thus far, the observed outcomes did not ensure their recommendation for clinical use. The induction of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells, although required for the clearance of most solid tumors, was shown to be insufficient for the development of a successful immunotherapeutic approach. The suppressive immune environment triggered by tumors, including the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), is detrimental to the development of antitumor immune responses and precludes the generation of more promising clinical outcomes. In this work, we characterized the CD8(+) T-cell population specifically involved in the control of tumor growth and the role of MDSCs after administration of an antitumor therapeutic DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)-associated tumors. Activation of cytotoxic high-avidity CD8(+) T cells with an effector memory phenotype was found in mice grafted with tumor cells expressing the HPV-16 oncoproteins. In addition, MDSC antibody depletion further enhanced the immunotherapeutic effects of the vaccine, resulting in the complete eradication of tumor cells. Collectively, the current results indicate that the simultaneous control of MDSCs and activation of high-avidity tumor-specific effector memory CD8(+) T cells are key features for tumor protection by immunotherapeutic approaches and deserve further testing under clinical conditions. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1920-30. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27222537

  5. Galectin-3 mediates cross-talk between K-Ras and Let-7c tumor suppressor microRNA.

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    Ran Levy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Galectin-3 (Gal-3 and active (GTP-bound K-Ras contribute to the malignant phenotype of many human tumors by increasing the rate of cell proliferation, survival, and migration. These Gal-3-mediated effects result from a selective binding to K-Ras.GTP, causing increased nanoclustering in the cell membrane and leading to robust Ras signaling. Regulation of the interactions between Gal-3 and active K-Ras is not fully understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To gain a better understanding of what regulates the critical interactions between these two proteins, we examined the role of Gal-3 in the regulation of K-Ras by using Gal-3-knockout mouse embryonic-fibroblasts (Gal-3-/- MEFs and/or Gal-3/Gal-1 double-knockout MEFs. We found that knockout of Gal-3 induced strong downregulation (∼60% of K-Ras and K-Ras.GTP. The downregulation was somewhat more marked in the double-knockout MEFs, in which we also detected robust inhibition(∼50% of ERK and Akt activation. These additional effects are probably attributable to inhibition of the weak interactions of K-Ras.GTP with Gal-1. Re-expression of Gal-3 reversed the phenotype of the Gal-3-/- MEFs and dramatically reduced the disappearance of K-Ras in the presence of cycloheximide to the levels seen in wild-type MEFs. Furthermore, phosphorylation of Gal-3 by casein kinase-1 (CK-1 induced translocation of Gal-3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane, leading to K-Ras stabilization accompanied by downregulation of the tumor suppressor miRNA let-7c, known to negatively control K-Ras transcription. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a novel cross-talk between Gal-3-mediated downregulation of let 7c microRNA (which in turn negatively regulates K-Ras transcription and elucidates the association among Gal-3 let-7c and K-Ras transcription/translation, cellular compartmentalization and activity.

  6. Nuclear location of tumor suppressor protein maspin inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells without affecting proliferation of normal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maspin, which is classified as a tumor suppressor protein, is downregulated in many types of cancer. Several studies have suggested potential anti-proliferative activity of maspin as well as sensitizing activity of maspin for therapeutic cytotoxic agents in breast cancer tissue culture and animal models. All of the experimental data gathered so far have been based on studies with maspin localized cytoplasmically, while maspin in breast cancer tumor cells may be located in the cytoplasm, nucleus or both. In this study, the effect of maspin cytoplasmic and nuclear location and expression level on breast cancer proliferation and patient survival was studied. Tissue sections from 166 patients with invasive ductal breast cancer were stained by immunohistochemistry for maspin and Ki-67 protein. The localization and expression level of maspin were correlated with estimated patient overall survival and percent of Ki-67-positive cells. In further studies, we created constructs for transient transfection of maspin into breast cancer cells with targeted cytoplasmic and nuclear location. We analyzed the effect of maspin location in normal epithelial cell line MCF10A and three breast cancer cell lines - MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and SKBR-3 - by immunofluorescence and proliferation assay. We observed a strong positive correlation between moderate and high nuclear maspin level and survival of patients. Moreover, a statistically significant negative relationship was observed between nuclear maspin and Ki-67 expression in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Spearman’s correlation analysis showed a negative correlation between level of maspin localized in nucleus and percentage of Ki-67 positive cells. No such differences were observed in cells with cytoplasmic maspin. We found a strong correlation between nuclear maspin and loss of Ki-67 protein in breast cancer cell lines, while there was no effect in normal epithelial cells from breast. The anti-proliferative effect of nuclear

  7. Genetic and Epigenetic Tumor Suppressor Gene Silencing Are Distinct Molecular Phenotypes Driven by Growth Promoting Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Marsit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genetic and epigenetic alterations characterize human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but the biological processes that create or select these alterations remain incompletely investigated. Our hypothesis posits that a roughly reciprocal relationship between the propensity for promoter hypermethylation and a propensity for genetic deletion leads to distinct molecular phenotypes of lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we examined promoter hypermethylation of 17 tumor suppressor genes, as a marker of epigenetic alteration propensity, and deletion events at the 3p21 region, as a marker of genetic alteration. To model the complex biology between these somatic alterations, we utilized an item response theory model. We demonstrated that tumors exhibiting LOH at greater than 30% of informative alleles in the 3p21 region have a significantly reduced propensity for hypermethylation. At the same time, tumors with activating KRAS mutations showed a significantly increased propensity for hypermethylation of the loci examined, a result similar to what has been observed in colon cancer. These data suggest that NSCLCs have distinct epigenetic or genetic alteration phenotypes acting upon tumor suppressor genes and that mutation of oncogenic growth promoting genes, such as KRAS, is associated with the epigenetic phenotype.

  8. Reductions in Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Lung Metastases using AZD4547 Treatment of a Metastatic Murine Breast Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: AZD4547, a small-molecule inhibitor targeting the tyrosine kinase of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs, is currently under phase II clinical study for human subjects having breast cancer, while the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The aim of this study is to explore the potential mechanism by which AZD4547 inhibits breast tumor lung metastases at the level of the tumor microenvironment. Methods: First, through in vitro experiments, we investigated the efficacy of the FGFRs inhibitor AZD4547 on 4T1 tumor cells for their proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Second, by in vivo animal experiments, we evaluated the effects of AZD4547 on tumor growth and lung metastases in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. Finally, we examined the impact of AZD4547 on the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in lung, spleens, peripheral blood and tumor. Results: Through this study we found that AZD4547 could efficiently suppress tumor 4T1 cells through restraining their proliferation, blocking migration and invasion, and inducing apoptosis in vitro. In animal model we also demonstrated that AZD4547 was able to inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases, consistent with the decreased MDSCs accumulation in the tumor and lung tissues, respectively. Moreover, the reduced number of MDSCs in peripheral blood and spleens were also observed in the AZD4547-treated mice. Importantly, through the AZD4547 treatment, the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were significantly increased in tumor and spleens. Conclusion: Our studies showed that AZD4547 can inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation, induce its apoptosis and block migration and invasion in vitro and suppress tumor growth and lung metastases by modulating the tumor immunologic microenvironment in vivo.

  9. Primary microcephaly gene MCPH1 shows signatures of tumor suppressors and is regulated by miR-27a in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Thejaswini Venkatesh

    Full Text Available Mutations in the MCPH1 (microcephalin 1 gene, located at chromosome 8p23.1, result in two autosomal recessive disorders: primary microcephaly and premature chromosome condensation syndrome. MCPH1 has also been shown to be downregulated in breast, prostate and ovarian cancers, and mutated in 1/10 breast and 5/41 endometrial tumors, suggesting that it could also function as a tumor suppressor (TS gene. To test the possibility of MCPH1 as a TS gene, we first performed LOH study in a panel of 81 matched normal oral tissues and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC samples, and observed that 14/71 (19.72% informative samples showed LOH, a hallmark of TS genes. Three protein truncating mutations were identified in 1/15 OSCC samples and 2/5 cancer cell lines. MCPH1 was downregulated at both the transcript and protein levels in 21/41 (51.22% and 19/25 (76% OSCC samples respectively. A low level of MCPH1 promoter methylation was also observed in 4/40 (10% tumor samples. We further observed that overexpression of MCPH1 decreased cellular proliferation, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, cell invasion and tumor size in nude mice, indicating its tumor suppressive function. Using bioinformatic approaches and luciferase assay, we showed that the 3'-UTR of MCPH1 harbors two non-overlapping functional seed regions for miR-27a which negatively regulated its level. The expression level of miR-27a negatively correlated with the MCPH1 protein level in OSCC. Our study indicates for the first time that, in addition to its role in brain development, MCPH1 also functions as a tumor suppressor gene and is regulated by miR-27a.

  10. Moringa oleifera Gold Nanoparticles Modulate Oncogenes, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Caspase-9 Splice Variants in A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Anand, Krishnan; Gengan, Robert M; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP's) facilitate cancer cell recognition and can be manufactured by green synthesis using nutrient rich medicinal plants such as Moringa oleifera (MO). Targeting dysregulated oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes is crucial for cancer therapeutics. We investigated the antiproliferative effects of AuNP synthesized from MO aqueous leaf extracts (MLAuNP ) in A549 lung and SNO oesophageal cancer cells. A one-pot green synthesis technique was used to synthesise MLAuNP . A549, SNO cancer cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to MLAuNP and CAuNP to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay); apoptosis was measured by phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, mitochondrial depolarization (ΔΨm) (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7, -9 activity, and ATP levels (luminometry). The mRNA expression of c-myc, p53, Skp2, Fbw7α, and caspase-9 splice variants was determined using qPCR, while relative protein expression of c-myc, p53, SRp30a, Bax, Bcl-2, Smac/DIABLO, Hsp70, and PARP-1 were determined by Western blotting. MLAuNP and CAuNP were not cytotoxic to PBMCs, whilst its pro-apoptotic properties were confirmed in A549 and SNO cells. MLAuNP significantly increased caspase activity in SNO cells while MLAuNP significantly increased PS externalization, ΔΨm, caspase-9, caspase-3/7 activities, and decreased ATP levels in A549 cells. Also, p53 mRNA and protein levels, SRp30a (P = 0.428), Bax, Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 24 kDa fragment levels were significantly increased. Conversely, MLAuNP significantly decreased Bcl-2, Hsp70, Skp2, Fbw7α, c-myc mRNA, and protein levels and activated alternate splicing with caspase-9a splice variant being significantly increased. MLAuNP possesses antiproliferative properties and induced apoptosis in A549 cells by activating alternate splicing of caspase-9. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2302-2314, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26923760

  11. Tumor-suppressor NFκB2 p100 interacts with ERK2 and stabilizes PTEN mRNA via inhibition of miR-494.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Xu, J; Gao, G; Li, J; Huang, H; Jin, H; Zhu, J; Che, X; Huang, C

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed that nuclear factor κB2 (nfκb2) gene encoding p100 is genetically deleted or mutated in human cancers, implicating NFκB2 as a potential tumor suppressor. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the antitumorigenic action of p100 remains poorly understood. Here we report that p100 inhibits cancer cell anchorage-independent growth, a hallmark of cellular malignancy, by stabilizing the tumor-suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) mRNA via a mechanism that is independent of p100's inhibitory role in NFκB activation. We further demonstrate that the regulatory effect of p100 on PTEN expression is mediated by its downregulation of miR-494 as a result of the inactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2), in turn leading to inhibition of c-Jun/activator protein-1-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we identify that p100 specifically interacts with non-phosphorylated ERK2 and prevents ERK2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Moreover, the death domain at C-terminal of p100 is identified as being crucial and sufficient for its interaction with ERK2. Taken together, our findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the understanding of the tumor-suppressive role for NFκB2 p100. PMID:26686085

  12. DNA lesions induced by UV A1 and B radiation in human cells: Comparative analyses in the overall genome and in the p53 tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Synold, Timothy W.; Chen, Hsiu-Hua; Chang, Cheng; Xi, Bixin; Riggs, Arthur D.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2005-01-01

    The UV components of sunlight (UVA and UVB) are implicated in the etiology of human skin cancer. The underlying mechanism of action for UVB carcinogenicity is well defined; however, the mechanistic involvement of UVA in carcinogenesis is not fully delineated. We investigated the genotoxicity of UVA1 versus UVB in the overall genome and in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in normal human skin fibroblasts. Immuno-dot blot analysis identified the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine-dimer (CPD) as a dist...

  13. A label-free electrochemical test for DNA-binding activities of tumor suppressor protein p53 using immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němcová, Kateřina; Havran, Luděk; Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Pivoňková, Hana; Fojta, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 668, č. 2 (2010), s. 166-170. ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040701; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P476; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1560; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : electrochemical analysis * label-free detection * tumor suppressor protein p53 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.310, year: 2010

  14. Methylation profiling of 48 candidate genes in tumor and matched normal tissues from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Wu, Yepeng; Li, Shengyun; Yan, Jinhua; Peng, Limin; Xiao, Zhi; Wang, Shouman; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Yi, Wenjun; Xia, Kun; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Gene-specific methylation alterations in breast cancer have been suggested to occur early in tumorigenesis and have the potential to be used for early detection and prevention. The continuous increase in worldwide breast cancer incidences emphasizes the urgent need for identification of methylation biomarkers for early cancer detection and patient stratification. Using microfluidic PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology, we analyzed methylation status of 48 candidate genes in paired tumor and normal tissues from 180 Chinese breast cancer patients. Analysis of the sequencing results showed 37 genes differentially methylated between tumor and matched normal tissues. Breast cancer samples with different clinicopathologic characteristics demonstrated distinct profiles of gene methylation. The methylation levels were significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, with basal-like and luminal B tumors having the lowest and the highest methylation levels, respectively. Six genes (ACADL, ADAMTSL1, CAV1, NPY, PTGS2, and RUNX3) showed significant differential methylation among the 4 breast cancer subtypes and also between the ER +/ER- tumors. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we identified a panel of 13 hypermethylated genes as candidate biomarkers that performed a high level of efficiency for cancer prediction. These 13 genes included CST6, DBC1, EGFR, GREM1, GSTP1, IGFBP3, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SFRP1, SFRP2, SOX17, TNFRSF10D, and WRN. Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer prediction and patient stratification. The novel gene panel might be a valuable biomarker for early detection of breast cancer. PMID:25636590

  15. Cisplatin-induced renal toxicity via tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, DNA damage, xanthine oxidase, histological changes, oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats: protective effect of ginseng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; Hussien, Hend M

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent successfully used in the treatment of a wide range of solid tumors, while its usage is limited due to its nephrotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of ginseng to ameliorate the renal nephrotoxicity, damage in kidney genomic DNA, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, histological changes and oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in rats. Cisplatin caused renal damage, including DNA fragmentation, upregulates gene expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6. Cisplatin increased the levels of kidney TBARS, xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, serum urea and creatinine. Cisplatin decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GST, GPX, CAT and SOD), ATPase and the levels of GSH. A microscopic examination showed that cisplatin caused kidney damage including vacuolization, severe necrosis and degenerative changes. Ginseng co-treatment with cisplatin reduced its renal damage, oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and induced DNA repair processes. Also, ginseng diminished p53 activation and improved renal cell apoptosis and nephrotoxicity. It can be concluded that, the protective effects of ginseng against cisplatin induced-renal damage was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress and the preservation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25640527

  16. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways

  17. The long non-coding RNA H19-derived miR-675 modulates human gastric cancer cell proliferation by targeting tumor suppressor RUNX1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • H19 regulates gastric cancer cell proliferation phenotype via miR-675. • MiR-675 modulates cell proliferation of gastric cancer cells by targeting tumor suppressor RUNX1. • The H19/miR-675/RUNX1 axis plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. - Abstract: The lncRNA H19 has been recently shown to be upregulated and play important roles in gastric cancer tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism of H19 and its mature product miR-675 in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we found that miR-675 was positively expressed with H19 and was a pivotal mediator in H19-induced gastric cancer cell growth promotion. Subsequently, the tumor suppressor Runt Domain Transcription Factor1 (RUNX1) was confirmed to be a direct target of miR-675 using a luciferase reporter assay and Western blotting analyses. A series of rescue assays indicated that RUNX1 mediated H19/miR-67-induced gastric cancer cell phenotypic changes. Moreover, the inverse relationship between the expression of RUNX1 and H19/miR-675 was also revealed in gastric cancer tissues and gastric cancer cell lines. Taken together, our study demonstrated that the novel pathway H19/miR-675/RUNX1 regulates gastric cancer development and may serve as a potential target for gastric cancer therapy

  18. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N; Wong, H Y; El-Salem, M; Szallasi, A; Marzec, M; Gimotty, P; Rook, A H; Vonderheid, E C; Odum, Niels; Wasik, M A

    2006-01-01

    To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-express......To understand better T-cell lymphomagenesis, we examined promoter CpG methylation and mRNA expression of closely related genes encoding p16, p15, and p14 tumor suppressor genes in cultured malignant T-cells that were derived from cutaneous, adult type, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK......)-expressing T-cell lymphomas. p16 gene was epigenetically silenced in all but one of the 10 malignant T-cell lines examined, p15 gene silenced in roughly half of the lines, and p14 was the least frequently affected. Extensive methylation of the p16 promoter was seen in six out of 10 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma...... patient samples and corresponded with lack of p16 protein expression in the cases examined. Treatment of cultured T-cells with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2-deoxy-cytidine, resulted in reversal of the p16 gene silencing. However, expression of p16 protein was delayed in relationship to p16...

  19. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C interact with p73: Interplay between a viral oncoprotein and cellular tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Kumar, Amit [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Kundu, Chanakya N. [School of Biotechnology, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar (India); Verma, Subhash C. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Nevada, School of Medicine, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Choudhuri, Tathagata, E-mail: tatha@ils.res.in [Division of Infectious Disease Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Nalco Square, Chandrasekharpur, Bhubaneswar 751023 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati, Santiniketan, Bolpur (India)

    2014-01-05

    The p73 protein has structural and functional homology with the tumor suppressor p53, which plays an important role in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and DNA repair. The p73 locus encodes both a tumor suppressor (TAp73) and a putative oncogene (ΔNp73). p73 May play a significant role in p53-deficient lymphomas infected with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). EBV produces an asymptomatic infection in the majority of the global population, but it is associated with several human B-cell malignancies. The EBV-encoded Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is thought to disrupt the cell cycle checkpoint by interacting directly with p53 family proteins. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, induces apoptosis through p53 and p73 signaling such that the lowΔNp73 level promotes the p73-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which EBV infection counters p73α-induced apoptosis through EBNA3C. - Highlights: • EBV-encoded EBNA3C suppresses doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in B-cell lymphomas. • EBNA3C binds to p73 to suppress its apoptotic effect. • EBNA3C maintains latency by regulating downstream mitochondrial pathways.

  20. Global assessment of promoter methylation in a mouse model of cancer identifies ID4 as a putative tumor-suppressor gene in human leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYu; ChunhuiLiu; JeffVandeusen; BrianBecknell; ZunyanDai; Yue-ZhongWu; AparnaRaval; Te-HuiLiu; WeiDing; CharleneMao; ShujunLiu; LauraTSmith; StephenLee; LauraRassenti; GuidoMarcucci; JohnByrd; MichaelACaligiuri; ChristophPlass

    2005-01-01

    DNA methylation is associated with malignant transformation, but limitations imposed by genetic variability, tumor heterogeneity, availability of paired normal tissues and methodologies for global assessment of DNA methylation have limited progress in understanding the extent of epigenetic events in the initiation and progression of human cancer and in identifying genes that undergo methylation during cancer. We developed a mouse model of T/natural killer acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is always preceded by polyclonal lymphocyte expansion to determine how aberrant promoter DNA methylation and consequent gene silencing might be contributing to leukemic transformation. We used restriction landmark genomic scanning with this mouse model of preleukemia reproducibly progressing to leukemia to show that specific genomic methylation is associated with only the leukemic phase and is not random. We also identified Idb4 as a putative tumor-suppressor gene that is methylated in most mouse and human leukemias but in only a minority of other human cancers.

  1. Up-regulation of the proapoptotic caspase 2 splicing isoform by a candidate tumor suppressor, RBM5

    OpenAIRE

    Fushimi, Kazuo; Ray, Payal; Kar, Amar; Wang, Lei; Sutherland, Leslie C.; Jane Y Wu

    2008-01-01

    Similar to many genes involved in programmed cell death (PCD), the caspase 2 (casp-2) gene generates both proapoptotic and antiapoptotic isoforms by alternative splicing. Using a yeast RNA–protein interaction assay, we identified RBM5 (also known as LUCA-15) as a protein that binds to casp-2 pre-mRNA. In both transfected cells and in vitro splicing assay, RBM5 enhances the formation of proapoptotic Casp-2L. RBM5 binds to a U/C-rich sequence immediately upstream of the previously identified In...

  2. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cell Function is Independent of IFNγ and IL-4Rα

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Pratima; Parker, Katherine H.; Horn, Lucas; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and experimental animals where they exert a profound immune suppression and are a significant obstacle to immunotherapy. IFNγ and IL-4Rα have been implicated as essential molecules for MDSC development and immunosuppressive function. If IFNγ and IL-4Rα are critical regulators of MDSC, then they are potential targets for preventing MDSC accumulation or inhibiting MDSC function. Because data supporting a role for IFNγ a...

  3. Tumor-Derived G-CSF Facilitates Neoplastic Growth through a Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell-Dependent Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Waight, Jeremy D.; Hu, Qiang; Miller, Austin; Liu, Song; Abrams, Scott I.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are induced under diverse pathologic conditions, including neoplasia, and suppress innate and adaptive immunity. While the mechanisms by which MDSC mediate immunosuppression are well-characterized, details on how they develop remain less understood. This is complicated further by the fact that MDSC comprise multiple myeloid cell types, namely monocytes and granulocytes, reflecting diverse stages of differentiation and the proportion of these subpopulati...

  4. Oncogenic activation of c-Abl in non-small cell lung cancer cells lacking FUS1 expression: inhibition of c-Abl by the tumor suppressor gene product Fus1

    OpenAIRE

    J. Lin; Sun, T.; Ji, L.; Deng, W; Roth, J; Minna, J; Arlinghaus, R.

    2007-01-01

    In lung cancer, frequent loss of one allele of chromosome 3p is seen in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), providing evidence of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in this chromosomal region. The mechanism of Fus1 tumor suppressor activity is unknown. We have found that a Fus1 peptide inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinase in vitro (IC50 35 μM). The inhibitory Fus1 sequence was derived from a region that was deleted in a mutant FUS1 gene (FUS1 (1–80)) detected in some lu...

  5. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at ...

  6. Radiation of different human melanoma cell lines increased expression of RHOB. Level of this tumor suppressor gene in different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous results of our group show that a correlation exists between intrinsic radiosensitivity of human melanoma cells and cell death by apoptosis. RhoB is a small GTPase that regulates cytoskeletal organization. Besides, is related to the process of apoptosis in cells exposed to DNA damage as radiation. Also, RhoB levels decrease in a wide variety of tumors with the tumor stage, being considered a tumor suppressor gene due to its antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of RhoB in different human melanoma cell lines in relation to melanocytes, and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on the expression of RhoB. We used the A375, SB2 and Meljcell lines, and the derived from melanocytes Pig1. It was found for all three tumor lines RhoB expression levels significantly lower than those of Pig1 (p <0.05), as assessed by semiquantitative RT-PCR . When tumor cells were irradiated to a dose of 2Gyinduction was observed at 3 hours RhoB irradiation. RhoB expression increased in all lines relative to non-irradiated control, showing a greater induction ( p< 0.05) for the more radiosensitive line SB2, consistent with apoptosis in response to radiation. The results allow for the first time in melanoma demonstrate that RhoB, as well as in other tumor types, has a lower expression in tumor cells than their normal counterparts. Moreover, induction in the expression of RhoB in irradiated cells may be associated with the process of radiation-induced apoptosis. The modulation of RhoB could be a new tool to sensitize radioresistant melanoma. (author)

  7. The p53 target gene desmocollin 3 acts as a novel tumor suppressor through inhibiting EGFR/ERK pathway in human lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tiantian; Chen, Yuan; Yang, Linlin; Knösel, Thomas; Huber, Otmar; Pacyna-Gengelbach, Manuela; Petersen, Iver

    2012-12-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that confer strong cell-cell adhesion. Altered expression of desmocollin 3 (DSC3), a member of the desmosomal cadherin family, was found in various cancers; however, its functional involvement in carcinogenesis has not yet been elucidated. Expression/localization of DSC3 was analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Methylation status of DSC3 was examined by demethylation tests, methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing. It turned out that downregulation of DSC3 in lung cancer cells was associated with DNA hypermethylation. In primary lung tumors, DSC3 was a potential diagnostic marker for lung squamous cell carcinoma, and DSC3 DNA hypermethylation was correlated with poor clinical outcome. To investigate the effect of the tumor suppressor gene p53 on DSC3, transient transfection with a wild-type p53-expression vector was performed. Overexpression of p53 resulted in an increased expression of DSC3 in a DSC3-unmethylated lung cancer cell line H2170, but not in H1299, a DSC3-methylated cell line. However, combination of p53 transfection with demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment led to increased expression of DSC3 in H1299 cells. Furthermore, functional studies after stable transfection of a DSC3 expression vector showed that ectopic expression of DSC3 inhibited cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, migration, as well as invasion, and most interestingly led to reduced phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2. Taken together, our data suggested that DSC3 acts as a novel tumor suppressor gene through inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in lung cancer cells. PMID:22941060

  8. Tumor suppressor p53 biology, its role in radioresponse and the analysis of p53 mutation/expression among Filipino breast cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation remains one of the most effective tools for the treatment of breast cancer. It combines properties of a potent DNA-damaging agent and high degree of spatial specificity to the target tissue. Nonetheless, there remain considerable differences in the outcome for treatment of tumors of differing histological type treated by radiotherapy. The identification of predictive indicators of radiosensitivity is crucial for selecting patients suited for preoperative radiotherapy as well as those unwarranted for postoperative treatments. To improve prognostication, numerous genes involved in the breast carcinogenesis have been studied and thus far over the last decade several multi-center researches converge on the role of tumor suppressor p53 in tumor biology. The p53 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 17 and encodes a 53-kd nuclear protein, p-53, also referred to as 'the guardian of the genome', it orchestrates multiple cellular processes such as cell growth control, DNA repair and programmed cell death. During radiotherapy, genotoxic damage induces p53 overexpression in order to control the rate of proliferating damaged cells, repair damage or induce the apoptotic pathway. Its molecular inactivation in a tumor cell, typically by a point mutation, leads to chemo/radio resistance due to the inability of the molecule to trigger p53-dependent programmed cell death

  9. Simultaneous down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes RBSP3/CTDSPL, NPRL2/G21 and RASSF1A in primary non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The short arm of human chromosome 3 is involved in the development of many cancers including lung cancer. Three bona fide lung cancer tumor suppressor genes namely RBSP3 (AP20 region),NPRL2 and RASSF1A (LUCA region) were identified in the 3p21.3 region. We have shown previously that homozygous deletions in AP20 and LUCA sub-regions often occurred in the same tumor (P < 10-6). We estimated the quantity of RBSP3, NPRL2, RASSF1A, GAPDH, RPN1 mRNA and RBSP3 DNA copy number in 59 primary non-small cell lung cancers, including 41 squamous cell and 18 adenocarcinomas by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction based on TaqMan technology and relative quantification. We evaluated the relationship between mRNA level and clinicopathologic characteristics in non-small cell lung cancer. A significant expression decrease (≥2) was found for all three genes early in tumor development: in 85% of cases for RBSP3; 73% for NPRL2 and 67% for RASSF1A (P < 0.001), more strongly pronounced in squamous cell than in adenocarcinomas. Strong suppression of both, NPRL2 and RBSP3 was seen in 100% of cases already at Stage I of squamous cell carcinomas. Deregulation of RASSF1A correlated with tumor progression of squamous cell (P = 0.196) and adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05). Most likely, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms might be responsible for transcriptional inactivation of RBSP3 in non-small cell lung cancers as promoter methylation of RBSP3 according to NotI microarrays data was detected in 80% of squamous cell and in 38% of adenocarcinomas. With NotI microarrays we tested how often LUCA (NPRL2, RASSF1A) and AP20 (RBSP3) regions were deleted or methylated in the same tumor sample and found that this occured in 39% of all studied samples (P < 0.05). Our data support the hypothesis that these TSG are involved in tumorigenesis of NSCLC. Both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms contribute to down-regulation of these three genes representing two tumor suppressor clusters in 3p21

  10. Expression profiles of oncomir miR-21 and tumor suppressor let-7a in the progression of opisthorchiasis-associated cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwat, N; Chusorn, P; Loilome, W; Techasen, A; Puetkasichonpasutha, J; Pairojkul, C; Khuntikeo, N; Yongvanit, P

    2012-01-01

    Altered miRNA expression could be a determinant of cancer development and/or progression. We aimed to study the role of oncomir miR-21 and tumor suppressor let-7a in the genesis of Opisthorchiasis-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The results showed that miR-21 was up-regulated while let-7a was down-regulated during cholangiocarcinogenesis in the hamster model and also in human CCA samples. The expression level of miR-21 had an inverse correlation with the mRNA level of its target RECK, a metastasis suppressor, in human CCA. Knockdown of miR-21 of KKU100 CCA cells significantly increased the mRNA level of RECK and suppressed the wound-induced migration of CCA cells. Our data suggest that miR-21 is one key molecule playing crucial roles in the CCA growth and metastasis. Manipulation of miRNA expression offers a potential avenue of CCA therapy. PMID:23480766

  11. Deficiency of Kruppel-like factor KLF4 in myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibits tumor pulmonary metastasis in mice accompanied by decreased fibrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y; Ou, L; Han, S; Li, M; Pena, M M O; Pena, E A; Liu, C; Nagarkatti, M; Fan, D; Ai, W

    2014-01-01

    The importance of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) bearing monocyte markers in tumor metastasis has been well established. Recently, it was reported that these cells possess phenotypic plasticity and differentiate into fibrocytes, very distinct cells that are precursors of tumorigenic myofibroblasts. However, the importance of this transdifferentiation in tumor metastasis has not been explored. Here, we describe the role of MDSC-derived fibrocytes in tumor metastasis that is regulated by Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), a transcription factor that is critical to monocyte differentiation and to promotion of cancer development. Using mouse metastasis models of melanoma and breast cancer, we found that KLF4 knockout was associated with significantly reduced pulmonary metastasis, which was accompanied by decreased populations of MDSCs, fibrocytes and myofibroblasts in the lung. Cause-effect studies by adoptive transfer revealed that KLF4 deficiency in MDSCs led to significantly reduced lung metastasis that was associated with fewer MDSC-derived fibrocytes and myofibroblasts. Mechanistically, KLF4 deficiency significantly compromised the generation of fibrocytes from MDSCs in vitro. During this process, KLF4 expression levels were tightly linked with those of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), deficiency of which resulted in no metastasis in mice as has been previously reported. In addition, KLF4 bound directly to the FSP-1 promoter as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation and overexpression of KLF4 increased the FSP-1 promoter activities. Taken together, our results suggest that MDSCs not only execute their immunosuppressive function to promote metastatic seeding as reported before, but also boost metastatic tumor growth after they adopt a fibrocyte fate. Therefore, KLF4-mediated fibrocyte generation from MDSCs may represent a novel mechanism of MDSCs contributing to tumor metastasis and supports the feasibility of inhibiting KLF4 or

  12. Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) functions as a tumor suppressor in colon cancer and is up-regulated upon heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is involved in the complex process of cellular stress response. However, its exact role in cancer is discussed controversially because both tumor suppressive and oncogenic effects have been described. Here we followed-up on our previous observation that inhibition of Hsp90 may increase ATF3 expression and sought to determine the role of ATF3 in colon cancer. Regulation of ATF3 was determined in cancer cells using signaling inhibitors and a heat-shock protein-90 (Hsp90) antagonist. Human HCT116 cancer cells were stably transfected with an ATF3-shRNA or a luciferase-shRNA expression plasmid and alterations in cell motility were assessed in migration assays. The impact of ATF3 down-regulation on cancer growth and metastasis were investigated in a subcutaneous tumor model, a model of hepatic tumor growth and in a model of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Human colon cancer tissues were analyzed for ATF3 expression. The results show that therapeutic Hsp90 inhibition substantially up-regulates the expression of ATF3 in various cancer cells, including colon, gastric and pancreatic cancer. This effect was evident both in vitro and in vivo. RNAi mediated knock-down of ATF3 in HCT116 colon cancer cells significantly increased cancer cell migration in vitro. Moreover, in xenogenic mouse models, ATF3 knock-down promoted subcutaneous tumor growth and hepatic metastasis, as well as peritoneal carcinomatosis. Importantly, ATF3 expression was lower in human colon cancer specimens, as compared to corresponding normal surrounding tissues, suggesting that ATF3 may represent a down-regulated tumor suppressor in colon cancer. In conclusion, ATF3 down-regulation in colon cancer promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Considering that blocking Hsp90 induces ATF3 expression, Hsp90 inhibition may represent a valid strategy to treat metastatic colon cancer by up-regulating this anti-metastatic transcription factor

  13. The tumor suppressor gene KCTD11REN is regulated by Sp1 and methylation and its expression is reduced in tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldi Christian; Di Camillo Raffaello; Murgo Simona; Po Agnese; Capece Daria; Ciccocioppo Lucia; Zazzeroni Francesca; Mancarelli M Michela; Ferretti Elisabetta; Gulino Alberto; Alesse Edoardo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A hallmark of several human cancers is loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 17p13. The same chromosomal region is also frequently hypermethylated in cancer. Although loss of 17p13 has been often associated with p53 genetic alteration or Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) gene hypermethylation, other tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) located in this region have critical roles in tumorigenesis. A novel TSG mapping on human chromosome 17p13.2 is KCTD11REN (KCTD11). We have recently de...

  14. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  15. Restoration of tumor suppressor gene function by gene replacement or small molecule strategies for the treatment of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza

    2011-01-01

    as potential therapeutic strategies for SCLC. However, as mutant p53 proteins tend to accumulate in SCLC cells, reintroduction of wild-type p53 may not be effective due to dominant-negative effects of the mutant protein. Therefore, a more effective approach would be to reactivate the endogenous......Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with no current satisfactory treatments. Identification of new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies are therefore in great demand for the improvement or replacement of current available treatment regimes. Molecular mechanisms...... altered in SCLC include loss of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), making restoration of normal TSG function a potential therapeutic strategy. One of the TSGs most frequently inactivated in SCLC is the transcription factor p53 (>90%). The majority of the mutations found in the p53 gene are in the DNA binding...

  16. The Cell Death Inhibitor ARC Is Induced in a Tissue-Specific Manner by Deletion of the Tumor Suppressor Gene Men1, but Not Required for Tumor Development and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M McKimpson

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a genetic disorder characterized by tissue-specific tumors in the endocrine pancreas, parathyroid, and pituitary glands. Although tumor development in these tissues is dependent upon genetic inactivation of the tumor suppressor Men1, loss of both alleles of this gene is not sufficient to induce these cancers. Men1 encodes menin, a nuclear protein that influences transcription. A previous ChIP on chip analysis suggested that menin binds promoter sequences of nol3, encoding ARC, which is a cell death inhibitor that has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. We hypothesized that ARC functions as a co-factor with Men1 loss to induce the tissue-restricted distribution of tumors seen in MEN1. Using mouse models that recapitulate this syndrome, we found that biallelic deletion of Men1 results in selective induction of ARC expression in tissues that develop tumors. Specifically, loss of Men1 in all cells of the pancreas resulted in marked increases in ARC mRNA and protein in the endocrine, but not exocrine, pancreas. Similarly, ARC expression increased in the parathyroid with inactivation of Men1 in that tissue. To test if ARC contributes to MEN1 tumor development in the endocrine pancreas, we generated mice that lacked none, one, or both copies of ARC in the context of Men1 deletion. Studies in a cohort of 126 mice demonstrated that, although mice lacking Men1 developed insulinomas as expected, elimination of ARC in this context did not significantly alter tumor load. Cellular rates of proliferation and death in these tumors were also not perturbed in the absence of ARC. These results indicate that ARC is upregulated by loss Men1 in the tissue-restricted distribution of MEN1 tumors, but that ARC is not required for tumor development in this syndrome.

  17. Tumor suppressor miR-149-5p is associated with cellular migration, proliferation and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Li, Yifan; Liu, Jiaju; Yang, Shangqi; Gui, Yaoting; Mao, Xiangming; Nie, Guohui; Lai, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have recently explored the role of microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) in the tumorigenesis of various types of cancer. miRNAs have been reported to be involved in numerous cell processes, including cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration, thus suggesting that miRNAs may have an important role in cancer progression. Downregulation of miR-149-5p has been detected in RCC tissues by microarray profiling; however, its expression and function in RCC has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of miR‑149‑5p in RCC tissues and paired normal tissues. In order to determine whether miR-149-5p was able to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis or migration, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, flow cytometric and wound healing assays were conducted. The results demonstrated that miR‑149‑5p was significantly downregulated in RCC tissues compared with in normal tissues (P<0.05). The restoration of miR-149-5p expression using synthetic mimics suppressed cell proliferation and migration, and promoted cell apoptosis. These results indicated that miR‑149‑5p may act as a tumor suppressor in RCC. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to identify miR‑149‑5p as a tumor suppressor in RCC. Future studies will be focused on the potential role of miR‑149‑5p as a biomarker for the early detection and prognostic prediction of RCC, and as a therapeutic target in RCC. In addition, further exploration regarding the pathways underlying the effects of miR‑149‑5p in RCC is required. PMID:27121091

  18. Control of the proper cell cycle progression by products of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases. Use of pharmacological inhibitors mimicking the action of cell cycle regulators for cancer therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wesierska-Gadek, J.; Maurer, M.; Komina, O.; Kramer, M.P.; Wandl, S.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Schmid, G.

    Kerala : Research Signpost, 2008 - (Yoshida, K.), s. 31-74 ISBN 978-81-308-0274-9 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/0511 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cyclin-dependent kinase * tumor suppressor genes * malignant cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. A p53-dependent tumor suppressor network is induced by selective miR-125a-5p inhibition in multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leotta, Marzia; Biamonte, Lavinia; Raimondi, Lavinia; Ronchetti, Domenica; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Botta, Cirino; Leone, Emanuela; Pitari, Maria Rita; Neri, Antonino; Giordano, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Amodio, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of deregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) is emerging as a novel approach to disclose the regulation of tumor suppressor or tumor promoting pathways in tumor cells. Targeting aberrantly expressed miRNAs is therefore a promising strategy for cancer treatment. By miRNA profiling of primary plasma cells from multiple myeloma (MM) patients, we previously reported increased miR-125a-5p levels associated to specific molecular subgroups. On these premises, we aimed at investigating the biological effects triggered by miR-125a-5p modulation in MM cells. Expression of p53 pathway-related genes was down-regulated in MM cells transfected with miR-125a-5p mimics. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed specific p53 targeting at 3'UTR level by miR-125a-5p mimics. Interestingly, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) affected the miR-125a-5p/p53 axis, since adhesion of MM cells to BMSCs strongly up-regulated miR-125a-5p levels, while reduced p53 expression. Moreover, ectopic miR-125a-5p reduced, while miR-125-5p inhibitors promoted, the expression of tumor suppressor miR-192 and miR-194, transcriptionally regulated by p53. Lentiviral-mediated stable inhibition of miR-125a-5p expression in wild-type p53 MM cells dampened cell growth, increased apoptosis and reduced cell migration. Importantly, inhibition of in vitro MM cell proliferation and migration was also achieved by synthetic miR-125a-5p inhibitors and was potentiated by the co-expression of miR-192 or miR-194. Taken together, our data indicate that miR-125a-5p antagonism results in the activation of p53 pathway in MM cells, underlying the crucial role of this miRNA in the biopathology of MM and providing the molecular rationale for the combinatory use of miR-125a inhibitors and miR-192 or miR-194 mimics for MM treatment. PMID:24819167

  20. DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine inhibits myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by tumor growth and cyclophosphamide treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mikyšková, R; Indrová, M. (Marie); Vlková, V. (Veronika); Bieblová, J. (Jana); Šímová, J; Paračková, Z. (Zuzana); Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.; Rossowska, J.; Reiniš, M

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent one of the key players mediating immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in the TME, lymphoid organs, and blood during tumor growth. Their mobilization was also reported after CY therapy. DNMTi 5AC has been intensively studied as an antitumor agent. In this study, we examined, using two different murine tumor models, the modulatory effects of 5AC on TU-MDSCs and CY-MDSCs tumor growth and CY therapy. Indeed, the percentage of MDSCs in the TME and spleens of 5AC-treated mice b...

  1. Wnt inhibitory factor-1 functions as a tumor suppressor through modulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiao; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yinghua; Chen, Keling; Bao, Pingqian; Wang, Yi; Wang, Jiaxiang; Zhou, Zongguang; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood and is associated with serious morbidity and mortality. The effective treatment of neuroblastoma remains one of the major challenges in pediatric oncology. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of adult and pediatric tumors. WIF-1 has been identified as an important Wnt antagonist which inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling by directly binding to Wnt proteins. However, the expre...

  2. DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine inhibits myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by tumor growth and cyclophosphamide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikysková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Vlková, Veronika; Bieblová, Jana; Símová, Jana; Paracková, Zuzana; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elzbieta; Rossowska, Joanna; Reinis, Milan

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent one of the key players mediating immunosuppression. These cells accumulate in the TME, lymphoid organs, and blood during tumor growth. Their mobilization was also reported after CY therapy. DNMTi 5AC has been intensively studied as an antitumor agent. In this study, we examined, using two different murine tumor models, the modulatory effects of 5AC on TU-MDSCs and CY-MDSCs tumor growth and CY therapy. Indeed, the percentage of MDSCs in the TME and spleens of 5AC-treated mice bearing TRAMP-C2 or TC-1/A9 tumors was found decreased. The changes in the MDSC percentage were accompanied by a decrease in the Arg-1 gene expression, both in the TME and spleens. CY treatment of the tumors resulted in additional MDSC accumulation in the TME and spleens. This accumulation was subsequently inhibited by 5AC treatment. A combination of CY with 5AC led to the highest tumor growth inhibition. Furthermore, in vitro cultivation of spleen MDSCs in the presence of 5AC reduced the percentage of MDSCs. This reduction was associated with an increased percentage of CD11c(+) and CD86(+)/MHCII(+) cells. The observed modulatory effect on MDSCs correlated with a reduction of the Arg-1 gene expression, VEGF production, and loss of suppressive capacity. Similar, albeit weaker effects were observed when MDSCs from the spleens of tumor-bearing animals were cultivated with 5AC. Our findings indicate that beside the direct antitumor effect, 5AC can reduce the percentage of MDSCs accumulating in the TME and spleens during tumor growth and CY chemotherapy, which can be beneficial for the outcome of cancer therapy. PMID:24389335

  3. Novel and natural knockout lung cancer cell lines for the LKB1/STK11 tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Carretero, J.; Medina, P.P. (Pedro P.); Pio, R. (Rubén); Montuenga, L M; Sanchez-Cespedes, M.

    2004-01-01

    Germline mutations of the LKB1 gene are responsible for Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), an autosomal dominant inherited disorder bestowing an increased risk of cancer. We have recently demonstrated that LKB1 inactivating mutations are not confined to PJS, but also appear in lung adenocarcinomas of sporadic origin, including primary tumors and lung cancer cell lines. To accurately determine the frequency of inactivating LKB1 gene mutations in lung tumors we have sequenced the complete coding reg...

  4. The putative tumor suppressor microRNA-497 modulates gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion by repressing eIF4E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MiR-497 expression was down-regulated in GC patients and GC cell lines. • MiR-497 inhibited cell proliferation and invasion of GC cells in vitro. • MiR-497 modulated eIF4E expression in GC cells. • Restoration of miR-497 decreased tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has shown that microRNAs are involved in multiple processes in gastric cancer (GC) development and progression. Aberrant expression of miR-497 has been frequently reported in cancer studies; however, the role and mechanism of its function in GC remains unknown. Here, we reported that miR-497 was frequently downregulated in GC tissues and associated with aggressive clinicopathological features of GC patients. Further in vitro observations showed that the enforced expression of miR-497 inhibited cell proliferation by blocking the G1/S transition and decreased the invasion of GC cells, implying that miR-497 functions as a tumor suppressor in the progression of GC. In vivo study indicated that restoration of miR-497 inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Luciferase assays revealed that miR-497 inhibited eIF4E expression by targeting the binding sites in the 3′-untranslated region of eIF4E mRNA. qRT-PCR and Western blot assays verified that miR-497 reduced eIF4E expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. A reverse correlation between miR-497 and eIF4E expression was noted in GC tissues. Taken together, our results identify a crucial tumor suppressive role of miR-497 in the progression of GC and suggest that miR-497 might be an anticancer therapeutic target for GC patients

  5. FOXA2 functions as a suppressor of tumor metastasis by inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human lung cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunneng Tang; Guangwen Shu; Xinwang Yuan; Naihe Jing; Jianguo Song

    2011-01-01

    The forkhead box transcription factor A2(FOXA2)is an important regulator in animal development and body homeostasis.However,whether FOXA2 is involved in transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1)-mediated epithelialto-mesenchymal transition(EMT)and tumor metastasis remains unknown.The present study showed that in human lung cancer cell lines,the abundance of FOXA2 positively correlates with epithelial phenotypes and negatively correlates with the mesenchymal phenotypes of cells,and TGF-β1 treatment decreased FOXA2 protein level.Consistently,knockdown of FOXA2 promoted EMT and invasion of lung cancer cells,whereas overexpression of FOXA2 reduced the invasion and suppressed TGF-β1-induced EMT.in addition,knockdown of FOXA2 induced slug expression,and ectopic expression of FOXA2 inhibited slug transcription.Furthermore,we identified that FOXA2 can bind to slug promoter through a conserved binding site,and that the DNA-binding region and transactivation region Ⅱ of FOXA2 are required for repression of the slug promoter.These data demonstrate that FOXA2 functions as a suppressor of tumor metastasis by inhibition of EMT.

  6. Myb-binding protein 1A (MYBBP1A is essential for early embryonic development, controls cell cycle and mitosis, and acts as a tumor suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Mori

    Full Text Available MYBBP1A is a predominantly nucleolar transcriptional regulator involved in rDNA synthesis and p53 activation via acetylation. However little further information is available as to its function. Here we report that MYBBP1A is developmentally essential in the mouse prior to blastocyst formation. In cell culture, down-regulation of MYBBP1A decreases the growth rate of wild type mouse embryonic stem cells, mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and of human HeLa cells, where it also promotes apoptosis. HeLa cells either arrest at G2/M or undergo delayed and anomalous mitosis. At mitosis, MYBBP1A is localized to a parachromosomal region and gene-expression profiling shows that its down-regulation affects genes controlling chromosomal segregation and cell cycle. However, MYBBP1A down-regulation increases the growth rate of the immortalized NIH3T3 cells. Such Mybbp1a down-regulated NIH3T3 cells are more susceptible to Ras-induced transformation and cause more potent Ras-driven tumors. We conclude that MYBBP1A is an essential gene with novel roles at the pre-mitotic level and potential tumor suppressor activity.

  7. Transcription factor C/EBP-β induces tumor-suppressor phosphatase PHLPP2 through repression of the miR-17-92 cluster in differentiating AML cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Y; Hanse, E A; Stedman, K; Benson, J M; Lowman, X H; Subramanian, S; Kelekar, A

    2016-07-01

    PHLPP2, a member of the PH-domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) family, which targets oncogenic kinases, has been actively investigated as a tumor suppressor in solid tumors. Little is known, however, regarding its regulation in hematological malignancies. We observed that PHLPP2 protein expression, but not its mRNA, was suppressed in late differentiation stage acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes. MicroRNAs (miR or miRNAs) from the miR-17-92 cluster, oncomir-1, were shown to inhibit PHLPP2 expression and these miRNAs were highly expressed in AML cells that lacked PHLPP2 protein. Studies showed that miR-17-92 cluster regulation was, surprisingly, independent of transcription factors c-MYC and E2F in these cells; instead all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a drug used for terminally differentiating AML subtypes, markedly suppressed miR-17-92 expression and increased PHLPP2 protein levels and phosphatase activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the effect of ATRA on miR-17-92 expression is mediated through its target, transcription factor C/EBPβ, which interacts with the intronic promoter of the miR-17-92 gene to inhibit transactivation of the cluster. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for upregulation of the phosphatase activity of PHLPP2 through C/EBPβ-mediated repression of the miR-17-92 cluster in terminally differentiating myeloid cells. PMID:26868909

  8. NLRX1 Acts as an Epithelial-Intrinsic Tumor Suppressor through the Modulation of TNF-Mediated Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Tattoli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial Nod-like receptor protein NLRX1 protects against colorectal tumorigenesis through mechanisms that remain unclear. Using mice with an intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-specific deletion of Nlrx1, we find that NLRX1 provides an IEC-intrinsic protection against colitis-associated carcinogenesis in the colon. These Nlrx1 mutant mice have increased expression of Tnf, Egf, and Tgfb1, three factors essential for wound healing, as well as increased epithelial proliferation during the epithelial regeneration phase following injury triggered by dextran sodium sulfate. In primary intestinal organoids lacking Nlrx1, stimulation with TNF resulted in exacerbated proliferation and expression of the intestinal stem cell markers Olfm4 and Myb. This hyper-proliferation response was associated with increased activation of Akt and NF-κB pathways in response to TNF stimulation. Together, these results identify NLRX1 as a suppressor of colonic tumorigenesis that acts by controlling epithelial proliferation in the intestine during the regeneration phase following mucosal injury.

  9. Asporin Is a Fibroblast-Derived TGF-β1 Inhibitor and a Tumor Suppressor Associated with Good Prognosis in Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Maris

    2015-09-01

    survival (hazard ratio = 0.58; 95% CI 0.37-0.91; p = 0.017. Although these data highlight the potential of asporin to serve as a prognostic marker, confirmation of the clinical value would require a prospective study on a much larger patient cohort.Our data show that asporin is a stroma-derived inhibitor of TGF-β1 and a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. High asporin expression is significantly associated with less aggressive tumors, stratifying patients according to the clinical outcome. Future pre-clinical studies should consider options for increasing asporin expression in TNBC as a promising strategy for targeted therapy.

  10. Expression level and methylation status of three tumor suppressor genes, DLEC1, ITGA9 and MLH1, in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Kordiak, Jacek; Antczak, Adam; Migdalska-Sęk, Monika; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Górski, Paweł; Nawrot, Ewa; Kiszałkiewicz, Justyna M; Domańska-Senderowska, Daria; Brzeziańska-Lasota, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, lung cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world. There is a need to develop biomarkers of diagnostic and/or prognostic value and to translate findings in basic science research to clinical application. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) represent potential useful markers for disease detection, progression and treatment target. We tried to elucidate the role of three 3p21.3 TSGs: DLEC1, ITGA9 and MLH1, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We assessed their expression pattern by qPCR in 59 NSCLC tissues and in the matched macroscopically unchanged lung tissues. Additionally, we analyzed gene promoter methylation status by methylation-specific PCR in NSCLC samples. We did not find significant correlations between gene expression and methylation. In case of DLEC1 and ITGA9, expression levels were decreased in 71-78 % of tumor samples and significantly different between tumor and normal tissues (P = 0.0001). It could point to their diagnostic value. ITGA9 could also be regarded as a diagnostic marker differentiating NSCLC subtypes, as its expression level was significantly lower in squamous cell carcinoma (P = 0.001). The simultaneous down-regulation of DLEC1 and ITGA9 was observed in 52.5 % of NSCLCs. MSPs revealed high frequencies of gene promoter methylation in NSCLCs: 84 % for DLEC1 and MLH1 and 57 % for ITGA9. Methylation indexes reflected moderate gene methylation levels: 34 % for ITGA9, 27 % for MLH1 and 26 % for DLEC1. However, frequent simultaneous methylation of the studied genes in more than 50 % of NSCLCs suggests the possibility of consider them as a panel of epigenetic markers. PMID:27287342

  11. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) by mutation or decreased expression in hepatocellular carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-cheng; CHEN Zhi; CHEN Feng; CHEN Xiao-hong; JIN Han-yin; XU Xiao-yan

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim: The Krüppel-like transcription factor KLF6 is a novel tumor-suppressor gene. It was inactivated in human prostate cancer and other tumors tissue, as the result of frequent mutation and loss of heterozygosity (LOH). However,there is no data reporting the levels of KLF6 both mRNA and protein in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). We therefore detected mutations and expression of KLF6 in HCC tissues and further observed the effect of it on cell growth in HCC cell lines. Methods:We analyzed the exon-2 of KLF6 gene by direct DNA sequencing, and detected the expression of KLF6 by RT-PCR and Western blot in 23 HCC tissues and corresponding nontumorous tissues. Loss of growth suppressive effect of the HCC-derived KLF6 mutant was characterized by in vitro growth curves plotted, flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: KLF6 mutations were found in 2 of 23 HCC tissues and one of mutations was missense. Expression of KLF6 mRNA or protein was down-regulated in 8 (34.7%) or 9 (39.1%) of 23 HCC tissues. Wild-type KLF6 (wtKLF6) inhibited cellular proliferation and prolonged G1-S transition by inducing the expression of p21WAF 1 following stable transfection into cultured HepG2 cells, but tumor-derived KLF6 mutant (mKLF6) had no effects. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that KLF6 may be involved in pathogenesis of HCC.

  12. Epigenetic silencing of the 3p22 tumor suppressor DLEC1 by promoter CpG methylation in non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhaohui

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactivaion of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs by promoter CpG methylation frequently occurs in tumorigenesis, even in the early stages, contributing to the initiation and progression of human cancers. Deleted in lung and esophageal cancer 1 (DLEC1, located at the 3p22-21.3 TSG cluster, has been identified frequently silenced by promoter CpG methylation in multiple carcinomas, however, no study has been performed for lymphomas yet. Methods We examined the expression of DLEC1 by semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT-PCR, and evaluated the promoter methylation of DLEC1 by methylation-specific PCR (MSP and bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS in common lymphoma cell lines and tumors. Results Here we report that DLEC1 is readily expressed in normal lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes and PBMCs, but reduced or silenced in 70% (16/23 of non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines, including 2/6 diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL, 1/2 peripheral T cell lymphomas, 5/5 Burkitt, 6/7 Hodgkin and 2/3 nasal killer (NK/T-cell lymphoma cell lines. Promoter CpG methylation was frequently detected in 80% (20/25 of lymphoma cell lines and correlated with DLEC1 downregulation/silencing. Pharmacologic demethylation reversed DLEC1 expression in lymphoma cell lines along with concomitant promoter demethylation. DLEC1 methylation was also frequently detected in 32 out of 58 (55% different types of lymphoma tissues, but not in normal lymph nodes. Furthermore, DLEC1 was specifically methylated in the sera of 3/13 (23% Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Conclusions Thus, methylation-mediated silencing of DLEC1 plays an important role in multiple lymphomagenesis, and may serve as a non-invasive tumor marker for lymphoma diagnosis.

  13. Loss of a putative tumor suppressor locus after gamma-ray-induced neoplastic transformation of HeLa x Skin fibroblast human cell hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nontumorigenic HeLa x skin fibroblast hybrid cell line, CGL1, can be induced to re-express HeLa tumor-associated cell surface antigen, p75-IAP (intestinal alkaline phosphatase), with resulting neoplastic transformation, by exposure to γ radiation. This has allowed the human hybrid system to be developed into a quantitative in vitro model for radiation-induced neoplastic transformation of human cells. Recently, several γ-ray-induced IAP-expression mutants (GIMs) of the nontumorigenic HeLa x skin fibroblast hybrid CGL1 were isolated and all were tumorigenic when injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Control cell lines which were negative for p75-IAP (CONs) were also isolated from irradiated populations, and none were found to be tumorigenic. We have now begun to investigate the molecular basis of radiation-induced neoplastic transformation in this system by studying the potential genetic linkage between p75/IAP expression, tumorigenicity and damage to a putative tumor suppressor locus on fibroblast chromosome 11. Previous analysis of rare spontaneous segregants has indicated that this locus is involved in the regulation of tumorigenicity and in the expression of the HeLa tumor-associated cell surface marker intestinal alkaline phosphatase (p75-IAP) in this system. Therefore, analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism and chromosome painting have been performed for chromosome 11, and for chromosome 13 as a control, for the p75/IAP-positive GIM and p75/IAP-negative CON cell lines. We report that in five of eight of the GIMs large-scale damage to the fibroblast chromosome 11's is evident (four GIMs have lost one complete copy of a fibroblast chromosome 11 heavily damaged). None of the CONs, however (0/5), have lost a complete copy of either fibroblast chromosome 11. No large-scale damage to the control chromosome 13's was detected in the GIMs or CONs. 49 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. The processed isoform of the translation termination factor eRF3 localizes to the nucleus to interact with the ARF tumor suppressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • So far, eRF3 has been thought to function exclusively in the cytoplasm. • eRF3 is a nucleo-cutoplasmic shuttling protein. • eRF3 has a leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES). • Removal of NES by proteolytic cleavage allows eRF3 to translocate to the nucleus. • The processed eRF3 (p-eRF3) interacts with a nuclear tumor suppressor ARF. - Abstract: The eukaryotic releasing factor eRF3 is a multifunctional protein that plays pivotal roles in translation termination as well as the initiation of mRNA decay. eRF3 also functions in the regulation of apoptosis; eRF3 is cleaved at Ala73 by an as yet unidentified protease into processed isoform of eRF3 (p-eRF3), which interacts with the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). The binding of p-eRF3 with IAPs leads to the release of active caspases from IAPs, which promotes apoptosis. Although full-length eRF3 is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 localizes in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. We here focused on the role of p-eRF3 in the nucleus. We identified leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES) at amino acid residues 61–71 immediately upstream of the cleavage site Ala73. Thus, the proteolytic cleavage of eRF3 into p-eRF3 leads to release an amino-terminal fragment containing NES to allow the relocalization of eRF3 into the nucleus. Consistent with this, p-eRF3 more strongly interacted with the nuclear ARF tumor suppressor than full-length eRF3. These results suggest that while p-eRF3 interacts with IAPs to promote apoptosis in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 also has some roles in regulating cell death in the nucleus

  15. Tumor suppressor PTEN affects tau phosphorylation: deficiency in the phosphatase activity of PTEN increases aggregation of an FTDP-17 mutant Tau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant hyperphosphorylation of tau protein has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Although a number of protein kinases have been shown to phosphorylate tau in vitro and in vivo, the molecular mechanisms by which tau phosphorylation is regulated pathophysiologically are largely unknown. Recently, a growing body of evidence suggests a link between tau phosphorylation and PI3K signaling. In this study, phosphorylation, aggregation and binding to the microtubule of a mutant frontal temporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 tau in the presence of tumor suppressor PTEN, a major regulatory component in PI3K signaling, were investigated. Results Phosphorylation of the human mutant FTDP-17 tau, T40RW, was evaluated using different phospho-tau specific antibodies in the presence of human wild-type or phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN. Among the evaluated phosphorylation sites, the levels of Ser214 and Thr212 phospho-tau proteins were significantly decreased in the presence of wild-type PTEN, and significantly increased when the phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN was ectopically expressed. Fractionation of the mutant tau transfected cells revealed a significantly increased level of soluble tau in cytosol when wild-type PTEN was expressed, and an elevated level of SDS-soluble tau aggregates in the presence of the mutant PTEN. In addition, the filter/trap assays detected more SDS-insoluble mutant tau aggregates in the cells overexpressing the mutant PTEN compared to those in the cells overexpressing wild-type PTEN and control DNA. This notion was confirmed by the immunocytochemical experiment which demonstrated that the overexpression of the phosphatase activity null mutant PTEN caused the mutant tau to form aggregates in the COS-7 cells. Conclusion Tumor suppressor PTEN can alleviate the phosporylation of the mutant FTDP-17 tau at specific sites, and the phosphatase activity

  16. Genistein inhibits proliferation of colon cancer cells by attenuating a negative effect of epidermal growth factor on tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soy consumption is associated with a lower incidence of colon cancer which is believed to be mediated by one of its of components, genistein. Genistein may inhibit cancer progression by inducing apoptosis or inhibiting proliferation, but mechanisms are not well understood. Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells plays an important role in colon cancer progression and is mediated by loss of tumor suppressor FOXO3 activity. The aim of this study was to assess if genistein exerts anti-proliferative properties by attenuating the negative effect of EGF on FOXO3 activity. The effect of genistein on proliferation stimulated by EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 was examined in human colonic cancer HT-29 cells. EGF-induced FOXO3 phosphorylation and translocation were assessed in the presence of genistein. EGF-mediated loss of FOXO3 interactions with p53 (co-immunoprecipitation) and promoter of p27kip1 (ChIP assay) were examined in presence of genistein in cells with mutated p53 (HT-29) and wild type p53 (HCT116). Silencing of p53 determined activity of FOXO3 when it is bound to p53. Genistein inhibited EGF-induced proliferation, while favoring dephosphorylation and nuclear retention of FOXO3 (active state) in colon cancer cells. Upstream of FOXO3, genistein acts via the PI3K/Akt pathway to inhibit EGF-stimulated FOXO3 phosphorylation (i.e. favors active state). Downstream, EGF-induced disassociation of FOXO3 from mutated tumor suppressor p53, but not wild type p53, is inhibited by genistein favoring FOXO3-p53(mut) interactions with the promoter of the cell cycle inhibitor p27kip1 in colon cancer cells. Thus, the FOXO3-p53(mut) complex leads to elevated p27kip1 expression and promotes cell cycle arrest. These novel anti-proliferative mechanisms of genistein suggest a possible role of combining genistein with other chemoreceptive agents for the treatment of colon cancer

  17. Gata-3 Negatively Regulates the Tumor-Initiating Capacity of Mammary Luminal Progenitor Cells and Targets the Putative Tumor Suppressor Caspase-14 ▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse; Sutherland, Kate D.; Vaillant, François; Gyorki, David E; Wu, Di; Holroyd, Sheridan; Breslin, Kelsey; Ward, Teresa; Shi, Wei; Bath, Mary L.; Deb, Siddhartha; Fox, Stephen B.; Smyth, Gordon K; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Visvader, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor Gata-3 is a definitive marker of luminal breast cancers and a key regulator of mammary morphogenesis. Here we have explored a role for Gata-3 in tumor initiation and the underlying cellular mechanisms using a mouse model of “luminal-like” cancer. Loss of a single Gata-3 allele markedly accelerated tumor progression in mice carrying the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter-driven polyomavirus middle T antigen (MMTV-PyMT mice), while overexpression of Gata-3 curtailed tum...

  18. LRIG1, a 3p tumor suppressor, represses EGFR signaling and is a novel epigenetic silenced gene in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Changhua, E-mail: chkoukou@hotmail.com [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Zhou, Tian [Department of Gastroenterology, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Han, Xilin; Zhuang, Huijie [Department of Oncological Surgery, The Central Hospital of Xuzhou City, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221000 (China); Qian, Haixin, E-mail: qianhaixin@hotmail.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China)

    2015-08-21

    Downregulation of LRIG1 was found in many types of cancer. However, data concerning the possible mechanism of LRIG1 reduction in cancers were not reported yet. To analyze the regulation and function of LRIG1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), 6 cell lines, 46 paired tissues from primary CRC cases were employed in this study. In CRC cell lines, under-expression of LRIG1 was correlated with promoter region hypermethylation, and restoration of LRIG1 was induced by 5-Aza-2'-deoxyazacytidine treatment. Subsequently, we ectopically expressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 low-expressing HCT-116 cells and suppressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 high-expressing LoVo cells. We found that over-expression of LRIG1 inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation and tumor growth, while knockdown of LRIG1 promotes cell proliferation and colony formation. Decreased and increased EGFR/AKT signaling pathway may partially explain the lower and higher rates of proliferation in CRC cells transfected with LRIG1 cDNA or shRNA. In clinical samples, we compared the methylation, mRNA and protein expression of LRIG1 in samples of CRC tissues. A significant increase in LRIG1 methylation was identified in CRC specimens compared to adjacent normal tissues and that it was negatively correlated with its mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, LRIG1 is frequently methylated in human CRC and consequent mRNA and protein downregulation may contribute to tumor growth by activating EGFR/AKT signaling. - Highlights: • Promoter methylation of LRIG1 occurred in colorectal cancer cells and tumors. • Restoration of LRIG1 inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. • Overexpression or knockdown of LRIG1 regulates EGFR/AKT and downstream apoptosis. • Methylation of LRIG1 correlates with its mRNA and protein downregulation. • LRIG1 was firstly identified as an epigenetic target in cancer.

  19. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarmenBlanco Aparicio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  20. RhoB Acts as a Tumor Suppressor That Inhibits Malignancy of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Gao, Yu; Fan, Yang; Pang, Haigang; Gong, Huijie; Shen, Donglai; Gu, Liangyou; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological role of RhoB in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The expression of RhoB was examined in specimens of patients and cell lines by Western blot and Immunohistochemistry. The correlation between RhoB expression and clinicopathologic variables was also analyzed. The effects of RhoB on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis, and invasion/migration were detected by over-expression and knockdown of RhoB level in ccRCC cells via plasmids and RNAi. The results showed that RhoB was low-expressed in ccRCC surgical specimens and cell lines compared with adjacent normal renal tissues and normal human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell lines (HKC), and its protein expression level was significantly associated with the tumor pathologic parameter embracing tumor size(P = 0.0157), pT stage(P = 0.0035), TNM stage(P = 0.0024) and Fuhrman tumor grade(P = 0.0008). Further, over-expression of RhoB remarkably inhibited the cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis, and aslo reduced the invasion and migration ability of ccRCC cells. Interestingly, up-regulation of RhoB could induce cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and led to cell cycle regulators(CyclineB1,CDK1) and pro-apoptotic protein(casp3,casp9) aberrant expression. Moreover, knockdown of RhoB in HKC cells promoted cell proliferation and migration. Taken together, our study indicates that RhoB expression is decreased in ccRCC carcinogenesis and progression. Up-regulation of RhoB significantly inhibits ccRCC cell malignant phenotype. These findings show that RhoB may play a tumor suppressive role in ccRCC cells, raising its potential value in futural therapeutic target for the patients of ccRCC. PMID:27384222

  1. A study of tumor suppressor gene expression and promoter methylation for the identification of prognostic markers in glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vaitkienė Grigaitė, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. This study attempted to identify the genes potentially regulated by promoter methylation in GBM. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of COX7A1, SPINT1, AREG, NPTX2, and KRT81 in glioblastomas and human brain tissue and investigated if there were any associations between the expression and methylation of these genes. Moreover, we aimed to determine the methylation frequency of 11 genes (AREG, CASP8, CD81, DcR...

  2. LRIG1, a 3p tumor suppressor, represses EGFR signaling and is a novel epigenetic silenced gene in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downregulation of LRIG1 was found in many types of cancer. However, data concerning the possible mechanism of LRIG1 reduction in cancers were not reported yet. To analyze the regulation and function of LRIG1 in colorectal cancer (CRC), 6 cell lines, 46 paired tissues from primary CRC cases were employed in this study. In CRC cell lines, under-expression of LRIG1 was correlated with promoter region hypermethylation, and restoration of LRIG1 was induced by 5-Aza-2'-deoxyazacytidine treatment. Subsequently, we ectopically expressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 low-expressing HCT-116 cells and suppressed LRIG1 in LRIG1 high-expressing LoVo cells. We found that over-expression of LRIG1 inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation and tumor growth, while knockdown of LRIG1 promotes cell proliferation and colony formation. Decreased and increased EGFR/AKT signaling pathway may partially explain the lower and higher rates of proliferation in CRC cells transfected with LRIG1 cDNA or shRNA. In clinical samples, we compared the methylation, mRNA and protein expression of LRIG1 in samples of CRC tissues. A significant increase in LRIG1 methylation was identified in CRC specimens compared to adjacent normal tissues and that it was negatively correlated with its mRNA and protein expression. In conclusion, LRIG1 is frequently methylated in human CRC and consequent mRNA and protein downregulation may contribute to tumor growth by activating EGFR/AKT signaling. - Highlights: • Promoter methylation of LRIG1 occurred in colorectal cancer cells and tumors. • Restoration of LRIG1 inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. • Overexpression or knockdown of LRIG1 regulates EGFR/AKT and downstream apoptosis. • Methylation of LRIG1 correlates with its mRNA and protein downregulation. • LRIG1 was firstly identified as an epigenetic target in cancer

  3. A conditional mouse mutant in the tumor suppressor SdhD gene unveils a link between p21(WAF1/Cip1 induction and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Africa Millán-Uclés

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial complex II (MCII; succinate dehydrogenase, Sdh genes cause familiar pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma tumors. Several mechanisms have been proposed to account for Sdh-mutation-induced tumorigenesis, the most accepted of which is based on the constitutive expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α at normal oxygen tension, a theory referred to as "pseudo-hypoxic drive". Other molecular processes, such as oxidative stress, apoptosis, or chromatin remodeling have been also proposed to play a causative role. Nevertheless, the actual contribution of each of these mechanisms has not been definitively established. Moreover, the biological factors that determine the tissue-specificity of these tumors have not been identified. In this work, we made use of the inducible SDHD-ESR mouse, a conditional mutant in the SdhD gene, which encodes the small subunit of MCII, and that acts as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. The analysis of the Hif1α pathway in SDHD-ESR tissues and in two newly derived cell lines after complete SdhD loss -a requirement for hereditary paraganglioma type-1 tumor formation in humans- partially recapitulated the "pseudo-hypoxic" response and rendered inconsistent results. Therefore, we performed microarray analysis of adrenal medulla and kidney in order to identify other early gene expression changes elicited by SdhD deletion. Our results revealed that each mutant tissue displayed different variations in their gene expression profiles affecting to different biological processes. However, we found that the Cdkn1a gene was up-regulated in both tissues. This gene encodes the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/Cip1, a factor implicated in cell cycle, senescence, and cancer. The two SDHD-ESR cell lines also showed accumulation of this protein. This new and unprecedented evidence for a link between SdhD dysfunction and p21(WAF1/Cip1 will open new avenues for the study of the mechanisms that cause

  4. Tumor suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) prevents the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and inhibits tumor growth by modulating the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in ovarian cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvilová, K.; Horak, P.; Esner, M.; Souček, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 6 (2015), s. 1330-1340. ISSN 0020-7136 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE * ER STRESS * CARCINOMA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.085, year: 2014

  5. Arsenite induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of tumor suppressor P53 in human skin keratinocytes as a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis associated with arsenic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenite is an environmental pollutant. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with elevated cancer risk, especially in skin. Arsenite alone does not cause skin cancer in animals, but arsenite can enhance the carcinogenicity of solar UV. Arsenite is not a significant mutagen at non-toxic concentrations, but it enhances the mutagenicity of other carcinogens. The tumor suppressor protein P53 and nuclear enzyme PARP-1 are both key players in DNA damage response. This laboratory demonstrated earlier that in cells treated with arsenite, the P53-dependent increase in p21WAF1/CIP1 expression, normally a block to cell cycle progression after DNA damage, is deficient. Here we show that although long-term exposure of human keratinocytes (HaCaT) to a nontoxic concentration (0.1 μM) of arsenite decreases the level of global protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, it increases poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 protein and PARP-1 protein abundance. We also demonstrate that exposure to 0.1 μM arsenite depresses the constitutive expression of p21 mRNA and P21 protein in HaCaT cells. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 is reported to block its activation, DNA binding and its functioning as a transcription factor. Our results suggest that arsenite's interference with activation of P53 via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation may play a role in the comutagenic and cocarcinogenic effects of arsenite.

  6. MicroRNA-373 (miR-373) post-transcriptionally regulates large tumor suppressor, homolog 2 (LATS2) and stimulates proliferation in human esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LATS2 is a member of the LATS tumor suppressor family. It has been implicated in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis. Frequent loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of LATS2 has been reported in human esophageal cancer. But, the LATS2 gene expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal cancer remain unclear. The present study has shown that LATS2 protein expression was mediated by miR-373 at the post-transcriptional level and inversely correlated with miR-373 amounts in esophageal cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the direct inhibition of LATS2 protein was mediated by miR-373 and manipulated the expression of miR-373 to affect esophageal cancer cells growth. Moreover, this correlation was supported by data collected ex vivo, in which esophageal cancer tissues from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients were analyzed. Finally, by miRNA microarray analysis, four miRNAs including miR-373 were over-expressed in ESCC samples. Our findings reveal that miR-373 would be a potential oncogene and it participates in the carcinogenesis of human esophageal cancer by suppressing LATS2 expression.

  7. An evolutionarily conserved interaction of tumor suppressor protein Pdcd4 with the poly(A)-binding protein contributes to translation suppression by Pdcd4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehler, Olesja; Singh, Priyanka; Haas, Astrid; Ulrich, Diana; Müller, Jan P; Ohnheiser, Johanna; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) has been implicated in the translational regulation of specific mRNAs, however, the identities of the natural Pdcd4 target mRNAs and the mechanisms by which Pdcd4 affects their translation are not well understood. Pdcd4 binds to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4A and inhibits its helicase activity, which has suggested that Pdcd4 suppresses translation initiation of mRNAs containing structured 5'-untranslated regions. Recent work has revealed a second inhibitory mechanism, which is eIF4A-independent and involves direct RNA-binding of Pdcd4 to the target mRNAs. We have now identified the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a novel direct interaction partner of Pdcd4. The ability to interact with PABP is shared between human and Drosophila Pdcd4, indicating that it has been highly conserved during evolution. Mutants of Pdcd4 that have lost the ability to interact with PABP fail to stably associate with ribosomal complexes in sucrose density gradients and to suppress translation, as exemplified by c-myb mRNA. Overall, our work identifies PABP as a novel functionally relevant Pdcd4 interaction partner that contributes to the regulation of translation by Pdcd4. PMID:25190455

  8. Niclosamide inhibits colon cancer progression through downregulation of the Notch pathway and upregulation of the tumor suppressor miR-200 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Mohammed A; Zhang, Zhenxing; Na, Heya; Ribeiro, Ailton L L; Zhang, Yu; Niang, Bachir; Hamid, Abdu Salim; Zhang, Hua; Xu, Lijie; Zuo, Yunfei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is among the most frequent causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Thus, there is a need for the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of CRC. Accumulating evidence has revealed that niclosamide, an anthelminthic drug, exerts antitumor activity in several types of cancer, including colon cancer. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the effects of this drug remain elusive. Previous studies have shown that the aberrant Notch signaling pathway contributes to the carcinogenesis of colon cancer. Herein, we examined the effects of niclosamide on the growth, migration and apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and the role of the Notch signaling pathway. By performing MTT, wound-healing and Transwell migration assays, we observed that niclosamide suppressed the growth and migration of colon cancer cells, and flow cytometry demonstrated that cell apoptosis was induced. This was associated with the decreased protein expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3 and Hey1, and the increased expression of the tumor suppressor microRNA (miR or miRNA)‑200 family members (miR‑200a, miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-141 and miR-429) that are typically downregulated in colon cancer. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that niclosamide potentially inhibits the progression of colon cancer by downregulating Notch signaling and by upregulating the miR-200 family members. PMID:27460529

  9. Ergosterol purified from medicinal mushroom Amauroderma rude inhibits cancer growth in vitro and in vivo by up-regulating multiple tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangmin; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Ding, Yinrun; Du, William W; Sdiri, Mouna; Yang, Burton B

    2015-07-10

    We have previously screened thirteen medicinal mushrooms for their potential anti-cancer activities in eleven different cell lines and found that the extract of Amauroderma rude exerted the highest capacity in inducing cancer cell death. The current study aimed to purify molecules mediating the anti-cancer cell activity. The extract of Amauroderma rude was subject to fractionation, silica gel chromatography,and HPLC. We purified a compound and identified it as ergosterol by EI-MS and NMR,which was expressed at the highest level in Amauroderma rude compared with other medicinal mushrooms tested. We found that ergosterol induced cancer cell death,which was time and concentration dependent. In the in vivo experiment, normal mice were injected with murine cancer cell line B16 that is very aggressive and caused mouse death severely. We found that treatment with ergosterol prolonged mouse survival. We found that ergosterol-mediated suppression of breast cancer cell viability occurred through apoptosis and that ergosterol up-regulated expression of the tumor suppressor Foxo3. In addition, the Foxo3 down-stream signaling molecules Fas, FasL,BimL, and BimS were up-regulated leading to apoptosis in human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Our results suggest that ergosterol is the main anti-cancer ingredient in Amauroderma rude, which activated the apoptotic signal pathway. Ergosterol may serve as a potential lead for cancer therapy. PMID:26098777

  10. Regulation of the p27Kip1 tumor suppressor by miR-221 and miR-222 promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Sage, Carlos; Nagel, Remco; Egan, David A; Schrier, Mariette; Mesman, Elly; Mangiola, Annunziato; Anile, Corrado; Maira, Giulio; Mercatelli, Neri; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Agami, Reuven

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent post-transcriptional regulators of protein coding genes. Patterns of misexpression of miRNAs in cancer suggest key functions of miRNAs in tumorigenesis. However, current bioinformatics tools do not entirely support the identification and characterization of the mode of action of such miRNAs. Here, we used a novel functional genetic approach and identified miR-221 and miR-222 (miR-221&222) as potent regulators of p27Kip1, a cell cycle inhibitor and tumor suppressor. Using miRNA inhibitors, we demonstrate that certain cancer cell lines require high activity of miR-221&222 to maintain low p27Kip1 levels and continuous proliferation. Interestingly, high levels of miR-221&222 appear in glioblastomas and correlate with low levels of p27Kip1 protein. Thus, deregulated expression of miR-221&222 promotes cancerous growth by inhibiting the expression of p27Kip1. PMID:17627278

  11. Wnt/Wingless Pathway Activation Is Promoted by a Critical Threshold of Axin Maintained by the Tumor Suppressor APC and the ADP-Ribose Polymerase Tankyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenghan; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Yang, Eungi; Thorne, Curtis A; Nojima, Hisashi; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-05-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction directs metazoan development and is deregulated in numerous human congenital disorders and cancers. In the absence of Wnt stimulation, a multiprotein "destruction complex," assembled by the scaffold protein Axin, targets the key transcriptional activator β-catenin for proteolysis. Axin is maintained at very low levels that limit destruction complex activity, a property that is currently being exploited in the development of novel therapeutics for Wnt-driven cancers. Here, we use an in vivo approach in Drosophila to determine how tightly basal Axin levels must be controlled for Wnt/Wingless pathway activation, and how Axin stability is regulated. We find that for nearly all Wingless-driven developmental processes, a three- to fourfold increase in Axin is insufficient to inhibit signaling, setting a lower-limit for the threshold level of Axin in the majority of in vivo contexts. Further, we find that both the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks) have evolutionarily conserved roles in maintaining basal Axin levels below this in vivo threshold, and we define separable domains in Axin that are important for APC- or Tnks-dependent destabilization. Together, these findings reveal that both APC and Tnks maintain basal Axin levels below a critical in vivo threshold to promote robust pathway activation following Wnt stimulation. PMID:26975665

  12. Self-association of the APC tumor suppressor is required for the assembly, stability, and activity of the Wnt signaling destruction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; Roberts, David M; McCartney, Brooke M

    2014-11-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling through its activity in the destruction complex with Axin, GSK3β, and CK1 that targets β-catenin/Armadillo (β-cat/Arm) for proteosomal degradation. The destruction complex forms macromolecular particles we termed the destructosome. Whereas APC functions in the complex through its ability to bind both β-cat and Axin, we hypothesize that APC proteins play an additional role in destructosome assembly through self-association. Here we show that a novel N-terminal coil, the APC self-association domain (ASAD), found in vertebrate and invertebrate APCs, directly mediates self-association of Drosophila APC2 and plays an essential role in the assembly and stability of the destructosome that regulates β-cat degradation in Drosophila and human cells. Consistent with this, removal of the ASAD from the Drosophila embryo results in β-cat/Arm accumulation and aberrant Wnt pathway activation. These results suggest that APC proteins are required not only for the activity of the destructosome, but also for the assembly and stability of this macromolecular machine. PMID:25208568

  13. The tumor suppressor APC differentially regulates multiple β-catenins through the function of axin and CKIα during C. elegans asymmetric stem cell divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Austin T; Phillips, Bryan T

    2014-06-15

    The APC tumor suppressor regulates diverse stem cell processes including gene regulation through Wnt-β-catenin signaling and chromosome stability through microtubule interactions, but how the disparate functions of APC are controlled is not well understood. Acting as part of a Wnt-β-catenin pathway that controls asymmetric cell division, Caenorhabditis elegans APC, APR-1, promotes asymmetric nuclear export of the β-catenin WRM-1 by asymmetrically stabilizing microtubules. Wnt function also depends on a second β-catenin, SYS-1, which binds to the C. elegans TCF POP-1 to activate gene expression. Here, we show that APR-1 regulates SYS-1 levels in asymmetric stem cell division, in addition to its known role in lowering nuclear levels of WRM-1. We demonstrate that SYS-1 is also negatively regulated by the C. elegans homolog of casein kinase 1α (CKIα), KIN-19. We show that KIN-19 restricts APR-1 localization, thereby regulating nuclear WRM-1. Finally, the polarity of APR-1 cortical localization is controlled by PRY-1 (C. elegans Axin), such that PRY-1 controls the polarity of both SYS-1 and WRM-1 asymmetries. We propose a model whereby Wnt signaling, through CKIα, regulates the function of two distinct pools of APC - one APC pool negatively regulates SYS-1, whereas the second pool stabilizes microtubules and promotes WRM-1 nuclear export. PMID:24762815

  14. Mouse SLX4 is a tumor suppressor that stimulates the activity of the nuclease XPF-ERCC1 in DNA crosslink repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodskinson, Michael R G; Silhan, Jan; Crossan, Gerry P; Garaycoechea, Juan I; Mukherjee, Shivam; Johnson, Christopher M; Schärer, Orlando D; Patel, Ketan J

    2014-05-01

    SLX4 binds to three nucleases (XPF-ERCC1, MUS81-EME1, and SLX1), and its deficiency leads to genomic instability, sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, and Fanconi anemia. However, it is not understood how SLX4 and its associated nucleases act in DNA crosslink repair. Here, we uncover consequences of mouse Slx4 deficiency and reveal its function in DNA crosslink repair. Slx4-deficient mice develop epithelial cancers and have a contracted hematopoietic stem cell pool. The N-terminal domain of SLX4 (mini-SLX4) that only binds to XPF-ERCC1 is sufficient to confer resistance to DNA crosslinking agents. Recombinant mini-SLX4 enhances XPF-ERCC1 nuclease activity up to 100-fold, directing specificity toward DNA forks. Mini-SLX4-XPF-ERCC1 also vigorously stimulates dual incisions around a DNA crosslink embedded in a synthetic replication fork, an essential step in the repair of this lesion. These observations define vertebrate SLX4 as a tumor suppressor, which activates XPF-ERCC1 nuclease specificity in DNA crosslink repair. PMID:24726326

  15. MicroRNA-1976 functions as a tumor suppressor and serves as a prognostic indicator in non-small cell lung cancer by directly targeting PLCE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Hu, Jing; Huang, Zhao; Yang, Lijing; Chen, Min

    2016-05-13

    Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide and non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) is responsible for over 80% of lung cancer-related deaths. Identifying novel molecular biomarker that can inhibit the progression of lung cancer will facilitate the development of new treatment strategies. Phospholipase C epsilon 1 (PLCE1) is a susceptibility gene in NSCLC. Nevertheless, the role of PLCE1 in NSCLC tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. Herein, we demonstrated that miR-1976 is a tumor-suppressor miRNA in NSCLC progression. We found that expression of miR-1976 was decreased obviously in NSCLC tissues. Down-regulation of miR-1976 was associated with TNM stage and postoperative survival. Overexpression of miR-1976 inhibited the growth and metastasis of NSCLC cells. The PLCE1 was a direct target of miR-1976 and promoted the growth and metastasis of NSCLC cells. Further study showed that PLCE1 could reverse the inhibitory effect of miR-1976 on growth and metastasis of NSCLC cells. Taken together, our data highlight the pivotal role of miR-1976 in the progression of NSCLC. Thus, miR-1976 may be a potential prognostic marker and of treatment relevance for NSCLC progression intervention. PMID:27063799

  16. MicroRNA-193b-3p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting the MYB oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, E; Van der Meulen, J; Van Peer, G; Boice, M; Mestdagh, P; Van de Walle, I; Lammens, T; Goossens, S; De Moerloose, B; Benoit, Y; Van Roy, N; Clappier, E; Poppe, B; Vandesompele, J; Wendel, H-G; Taghon, T; Rondou, P; Soulier, J; Van Vlierberghe, P; Speleman, F

    2015-04-01

    The MYB oncogene is a leucine zipper transcription factor essential for normal and malignant hematopoiesis. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), elevated MYB levels can arise directly through T-cell receptor-mediated MYB translocations, genomic MYB duplications or enhanced TAL1 complex binding at the MYB locus or indirectly through the TAL1/miR-223/FBXW7 regulatory axis. In this study, we used an unbiased MYB 3'untranslated region-microRNA (miRNA) library screen and identified 33 putative MYB-targeting miRNAs. Subsequently, transcriptome data from two independent T-ALL cohorts and different subsets of normal T-cells were used to select miRNAs with relevance in the context of normal and malignant T-cell transformation. Hereby, miR-193b-3p was identified as a novel bona fide tumor-suppressor miRNA that targets MYB during malignant T-cell transformation thereby offering an entry point for efficient MYB targeting-oriented therapies for human T-ALL. PMID:25231743

  17. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation. PMID:24740923

  18. A novel tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 interacts directly with TMPRSS11A (ECRG1 to inhibit cancer cell growth in esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The esophageal carcinoma related gene 4 (ECRG4 was initially identified and cloned from human normal esophageal epithelium in our laboratory (GenBank accession no.AF325503. ECRG4 has been described as a novel tumor suppressor gene associated with prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC. Methods In this study, binding affinity assay in vitro and co-immunoprecipitation experiment in vivo were utilized to verify the physical interaction between ECRG4 and transmembrane protease, serine 11A (TMPRSS11A, also known as ECRG1, GenBank accession no. AF 071882. Then, p21 protein expression, cell cycle and cell proliferation regulations were examined after ECRG4 and ECRG1 co-transfection in ESCC cells. Results We revealed for the first time that ECRG4 interacted directly with ECRG1 to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce cell cycle G1 phase block in ESCC. Binding affinity and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that ECRG4 interacted directly with ECRG1 in ESCC cells. Furthermore, the ECRG4 and ECRG1 co-expression remarkably upregulatd p21 protein level by Western blot (P Conclusions ECRG4 interacts directly with ECRG1 to upregulate p21 protein expression, induce cell cycle G1 phase block and inhibit cancer cells proliferation in ESCC.

  19. A novel tumor suppressor gene ECRG4 interacts directly with TMPRSS11A (ECRG1) to inhibit cancer cell growth in esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The esophageal carcinoma related gene 4 (ECRG4) was initially identified and cloned from human normal esophageal epithelium in our laboratory (GenBank accession no. AF325503). ECRG4 has been described as a novel tumor suppressor gene associated with prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In this study, binding affinity assay in vitro and co-immunoprecipitation experiment in vivo were utilized to verify the physical interaction between ECRG4 and transmembrane protease, serine 11A (TMPRSS11A, also known as ECRG1, GenBank accession no. AF071882). Then, p21 protein expression, cell cycle and cell proliferation regulations were examined after ECRG4 and ECRG1 co-transfection in ESCC cells. We revealed for the first time that ECRG4 interacted directly with ECRG1 to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce cell cycle G1 phase block in ESCC. Binding affinity and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that ECRG4 interacted directly with ECRG1 in ESCC cells. Furthermore, the ECRG4 and ECRG1 co-expression remarkably upregulatd p21 protein level by Western blot (P < 0.001), induced cell cycle G1 phase block by flow cytometric analysis (P < 0.001) and suppressed cell proliferation by MTT and BrdU assay (both P < 0.01) in ESCC cells. ECRG4 interacts directly with ECRG1 to upregulate p21 protein expression, induce cell cycle G1 phase block and inhibit cancer cells proliferation in ESCC

  20. Negative regulation of TLR4 via targeting of the proinflammatory tumor suppressor PDCD4 by the microRNA miR-21.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheedy, FJ

    2009-11-29

    The tumor suppressor PDCD4 is a proinflammatory protein that promotes activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB and suppresses interleukin 10 (IL-10). Here we found that mice deficient in PDCD4 were protected from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced death. The induction of NF-kappaB and IL-6 by LPS required PDCD4, whereas LPS enhanced IL-10 induction in cells lacking PDCD4. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with LPS resulted in lower PDCD4 expression, which was due to induction of the microRNA miR-21 via the adaptor MyD88 and NF-kappaB. Transfection of cells with a miR-21 precursor blocked NF-kappaB activity and promoted IL-10 production in response to LPS, whereas transfection with antisense oligonucleotides to miR-21 or targeted protection of the miR-21 site in Pdcd4 mRNA had the opposite effect. Thus, miR-21 regulates PDCD4 expression after LPS stimulation.

  1. The role of p53 tumor suppressor gene in the suppression of teratogenesis. Mechanism of suppression in the embryonic stage by p53-dependent apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review described the relationships between radiation-induced teratogenesis in the embryonic stage and p53-dependent apoptosis together with recent authors' findings. The p53 tumor suppressor gene in the embryonic and fetal stages: Thymocytes deficient of p53 gene are markedly resistant to radiation. While the survival rate of wild type cells decreased at 1 Gy irradiation, that of the deficient cells hardly changed even at 20 Gy. Starting from these facts, the role of p53 gene in the teratogenesis has been investigated with use of radiation-irradiated wild type and p53-deficient knock-out mice and of mdm2/p53 double knock-out mice. Types of malformation yielded were described. The relationships between radiation-induced teratogenesis and p53 in mouse fetus: Authors performed the following experiment in the p53 knock-out mice to elucidate how p53 participated in the radiation-induced teratogenesis: X-ray at 1 and 2 Gy (250 kVp, 12 mA, 0.5 mm Cu + 1.0 mm Al) was irradiated to the recipient mice at 3.5 days (early nidation) or 9.5 days (organogenesis) of gestation. Malformation in the alive and dead fetuses was observed at 18.5 days and classified according to the p53 genotype. The teratogenesis due to chemicals and radiation in p53 gene deficient mice was discussed. (K.H.)

  2. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 10q23 and mutation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 tumor suppressor gene in Korean hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jei-Jun; Rho, Jin-Woo; Lee, Tae-Jin; Yun, Sung-Su; Kim, Hong-Jin; Choi, Joon-Hyuk; Jeong, Daewon; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Lee, Tae-Yoon

    2007-10-01

    Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the 10q23 chromosomal region was analyzed in 18 tissue samples from Korean hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. LOH at the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) region (D10S215, AFMa086wg9 and D10S541) was found in 8 of the 18 (44.4%) HCCs. LOH (20%) and microsatellite instability (26.7%) were also frequently found at the D10S2177 locus, which is located on the telomere side of the PTEN region. LOH was found in other loci, such as AFM280we1 and D10S2281. The presence of LOH in regions other than the PTEN region on chromosome 10q23 suggested the presence of additional tumor suppressor gene(s). PTEN mutation was found in only a subset of HCCs: A single base insertion at the end of the 5'-end splice signal (AG-GUAAGUU) in intron 5 and a silent mutation in exon 6 (codon 188, CTG-Val to CTA). Our data collectively suggest that the genetic alterations of chromosome 10q23, including the PTEN gene, could be important in hepatocarcinogenesis in the Korean population. PMID:17786367

  3. miRs-134 and -370 function as tumor suppressors in colorectal cancer by independently suppressing EGFR and PI3K signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Daly, Sherien M.; Abba, Mohammed L.; Patil, Nitin; Allgayer, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Growth factor receptor signalling plays a central and critical role in colorectal cancer. Most importantly, the EGFR signalling cascade involving PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Raf/MEK/ERK pathways are particularly relevant, since they are commonly activated in several cancer entities, including colorectal cancer. In this study, we show that miRs-134 and -370 are both capable of regulating these pathways by targeting EGFR and PIK3CA. In three different colorectal cancer cell lines (DLD1, HCT-116 and RKO), suppression of EGFR and PIK3CA through the enhanced expression of miR-134 or -370 led to a suppression of the key molecules of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-134 or -370 resulted in a significant reduction of cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and in-vivo tumor growth and metastasis. Concurrent experiments with small interfering RNAs targeting the prime targets show that our selected miRNAs exert a greater functional influence and affect more downstream molecules than is seen with silencing of the individual proteins. Taken together, these data indicate that miRs-134 and -370 are potential tumour suppressor miRNAs and could play a fundamental role in suppressing colorectal cancer tumorigenesis through their ability to co-ordinately regulate EGFR signalling cascade by independently targeting EGFR and PIK3CA. PMID:27095166

  4. hSAGEing: an improved SAGE-based software for identification of human tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hong Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression is a powerful method of analyzing gene expression for the entire transcriptome. There are currently many well-developed SAGE tools. However, the cross-comparison of different tissues is seldom addressed, thus limiting the identification of common- and tissue-specific tumor markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To improve the SAGE mining methods, we propose a novel function for cross-tissue comparison of SAGE data by combining the mathematical set theory and logic with a unique "multi-pool method" that analyzes multiple pools of pair-wise case controls individually. When all the settings are in "inclusion", the common SAGE tag sequences are mined. When one tissue type is in "inclusion" and the other types of tissues are not in "inclusion", the selected tissue-specific SAGE tag sequences are generated. They are displayed in tags-per-million (TPM and fold values, as well as visually displayed in four kinds of scales in a color gradient pattern. In the fold visualization display, the top scores of the SAGE tag sequences are provided, along with cluster plots. A user-defined matrix file is designed for cross-tissue comparison by selecting libraries from publically available databases or user-defined libraries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The hSAGEing tool provides a combination of friendly cross-tissue analysis and an interface for comparing SAGE libraries for the first time. Some up- or down-regulated genes with tissue-specific or common tumor markers and suppressors are identified computationally. The tool is useful and convenient for in silico cancer transcriptomic studies and is freely available at http://bio.kuas.edu.tw/hSAGEing.

  5. Stability of the tumor suppressor merlin depends on its ability to bind paxillin LD3 and associate with β1 integrin and actin at the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa Manetti

    2012-08-01

    The NF2 gene encodes a tumor suppressor protein known as merlin or schwannomin whose loss of function causes Neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2. NF2 is characterized by the development of benign tumors, predominantly schwannomas, in the peripheral nervous system. Merlin links plasma membrane receptors with the actin cytoskeleton and its targeting to the plasma membrane depends on direct binding to the paxillin scaffold protein. Exon 2 of NF2, an exon mutated in NF2 patients and deleted in a mouse model of NF2, encodes the merlin paxillin binding domain (PBD1. Here, we sought to determine the role of PBD1 in regulation of merlin stability and association with plasma membrane receptors and the actin cytoskeleton in Schwann cells. Using a fluorescence-based pulse-chase technique, we measured the half-life of Halo-tagged merlin variants carrying PBD1, exon 2, and exons 2 and 3 deletions in transiently transfected Schwann cells. We found that PBD1 alone was necessary and sufficient to increase merlin's half-life from approximately three to eleven hours. Merlin lacking PBD1 did not form a complex with surface β1 integrins or associate with the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, direct binding studies using purified merlin and paxillin domains revealed that merlin directly binds paxillin LD3 (leucine-aspartate 3 domain as well as the LD4 and LD5 domains. Together these results demonstrate that a direct interaction between merlin PBD1 and the paxillin LD3–5 domains targets merlin to the plasma membrane where it is stabilized by its association with surface β1 integrins and cortical actin.

  6. The Human Homolog of Drosophila Headcase Acts as a Tumor Suppressor through Its Blocking Effect on the Cell Cycle in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is heterogeneous and extremely complex. Thus, for individual molecular targeted therapy, novel molecular markers are needed. The abnormal expression of the human homolog of Drosophila headcase (HECA homo has been found in pancreatic, colorectal, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Studies of oral squamous cell carcinoma have also demonstrated that the HECA homo protein can be negatively controlled by the Wnt-pathway and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 and can slow cell division by interacting with cyclins and CDKs. However, the role of HECA in HCC has not been reported elsewhere. Here, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the downregulation of HECA homo protein occurred in 71.0% (66/93 of HCC cases and was positively correlated with a poorly differentiated grade, high serum AFP level, liver cirrhosis and large tumor size. The expression of HECA homo was detected in five live cell lines. In vitro, the overexpression of HECA homo in HepG2, Huh-7 and MHCC-97H cells could inhibit cell proliferation and colony formation and induce G1 phase arrest. In contrast, the downregulation of HECA homo could promote cell proliferation, colony formation and the cell cycle process. However, neither the overexpression nor downregulation of HECA homo in the three cell lines could affect cell migration or invasion. Collectively, HECA homo is regularly expressed in normal live cells, and the HECA homo protein level is heterogeneously altered in HCC, but the downregulation of HECA homo is more common and positively correlated with several malignant phenotypes. The HECA homo protein can slow cell proliferation to some extent primarily through its blocking effect on the cell cycle. Hence, the HECA homo protein may act as a tumor suppressor in HCC and might be a potential molecular marker for diagnostic classification and targeted therapy in HCC.

  7. MiR-125b promotes proliferation and migration of type II endometrial carcinoma cells through targeting TP53INP1 tumor suppressor in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies have identified that miR-125b was overexpressed in type II endometrial carcinoma (EC) cells compared with type I using microRNAs microarray. Although recent studies have shown the important role of miR-125b in several tumors and overexpression of miR-125b in advanced EC, its function in this disease has not yet been defined. In the present study, we tried to confirm the result of microRNAs microarray and further investigated the functions of miR-125b in EC, and tried to find new downstream targets of miR-125b. Differential expression of miR-125b was detected between type II EC cells (KLE, AN3CA) with ER negative and type I EC cells (ishikawa, RL95-2) with ER positive by qRT-PCR and northern blotting. The effects of miR-125b of on proliferation, migration, and target protein expression were evaluated by CCK8 assay, wound healing assay, transwell migration assay, western blotting, and Tumorigenicity assays in nude mice. In addition, luciferase reporter plasmid was constructed to demonstrate the direct target of miR-125b. MiR-125b was overexpressed in type II EC cells compared with type I. Exogenous miR-125b expression increased proliferation and migration of ishikawa cells and abrogating expression of miR-125b suppressed proliferation, and migration of AN3CA cells in vitro. In addition, in vivo tumor formation assay confirmed that forced miR-125b expression promoted proliferation potential of ishikawa cells, and tumor suppressor gene Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) was identified to be the direct target of miR-125b. TP53INP1 was newly identified to be the direct downstream target of miR-125b. MiR-125b, which was overexpressed in type II EC cells compared with type I, contributes to malignancy of type II EC possibly through down-regulating TP53INP1

  8. Hypermethylation of XIAP-associated factor 1, a putative tumor suppressor gene from the 17p13.2 locus, in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Do-Sun; Cho, Kyucheol; Ryu, Byung-Kyu; Lee, Min-Goo; Kang, Min-Ju; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Chi, Sung-Gil

    2003-11-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) is the most potent member of the IAP family that exerts antiapoptotic effects by interfering with the activities of caspases. Recently, XIAP-associated factor 1 (XAF1) and two mitochondrial proteins, Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2, have been identified to negatively regulate the caspase-inhibiting activity of XIAP. To explore the candidacy of XAF1, Smac/DIABLO, and HtrA2 as a tumor suppressor in gastric tumorigenesis, we investigated the expression and mutation status of the genes in 123 gastric tissues and 15 cancer cell lines. Whereas Smac/DIABLO and HtrA2 transcripts were normally expressed in all cancer specimens we examined, XAF1 transcript was not expressed or present at extremely low levels in 40% (6 of 15) of cancer cell lines and in 23% (20 of 87) of primary carcinomas. Abnormal reduction of XAF1 expression showed a strong correlation with stage and grade of tumors, and a tumor-specific down-regulation of XAF1 was observed in 45% (9 of 20) of matched sets. Unlike XAF1, XIAP expression exhibited no detectable alteration in cancers. Whereas loss of heterozygosity within the XAF1 region or somatic mutations of the gene was not detected, expression of XAF1 transcript was reactivated in all nonexpressor cell lines after 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment. The 5' upstream region of the XAF1 gene encompasses no gastric cell-rich region that rigorously satisfies the formal criteria for CpG islands. However, bisulfite DNA sequencing analysis for 34 CpG sites in the promoter region revealed a strong association between hypermethylation and gene silencing. Moreover, transcriptional silencing of XAF1 was tightly associated with hypermethylation of seven CpGs located in the 5' proximal region (nucleotides -23 to -234). Additionally, loss or abnormal reduction of XAF1 expression was found to inversely correlate with p53 mutations, suggesting that epigenetic inactivation of XAF1 and mutational alteration of p53 might be mutually exclusive

  9. TEP1, the yeast homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1, is linked to the phosphatidylinositol pathway and plays a role in the developmental process of sporulation

    OpenAIRE

    Heymont, Jennifer; Berenfeld, Ludmilla; Collins, Jennifer; Kaganovich, Alexandra; Maynes, Bradford; Moulin, Aaron; Ratskovskaya, Irina; Poon, Pak P.; Johnston, Gerald C.; Kamenetsky, Margarita; DeSilva, John; Sun, Hong; Petsko, Gregory A; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2000-01-01

    PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 (PTEN, phosphatase deleted on chromosome ten; MMAC1, mutated in multiple advanced cancers; TEP1, tensin-like phosphatase) is a major human tumor suppressor gene whose suppressive activity operates on the phosphatidylinositol pathway. A single homologue of this gene, TEP1 (YNL128w), exists in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains deleted for TEP1 exhibit essentially no phenotype in haploids; however, diploids exhibit resistance to...

  10. Systems analysis of the prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1 supports roles in DNA repair and luminal cell differentiation [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/35m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available NKX3.1 is a homeobox transcription factor whose function as a prostate tumor suppressor remains insufficiently understood because neither the transcriptional program governed by NKX3.1, nor its interacting proteins have been fully revealed. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we have established an extensive NKX3.1 interactome which contains the DNA repair proteins Ku70, Ku80, and PARP, thus providing a molecular underpinning to previous reports implicating NKX3.1 in DNA repair. Transcriptomic profiling of NKX3.1-negative prostate epithelial cells acutely expressing NKX3.1 revealed a rapid and complex response that is a near mirror image of the gene expression signature of human prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN. Pathway and network analyses suggested that NKX3.1 actuates a cellular reprogramming toward luminal cell differentiation characterized by suppression of pro-oncogenic c-MYC and interferon-STAT signaling and activation of tumor suppressor pathways. Consistently, ectopic expression of NKX3.1 conferred a growth arrest depending on TNFα and JNK signaling. We propose that the tumor suppressor function of NKX3.1 entails a transcriptional program that maintains the differentiation state of secretory luminal cells and that disruption of NKX3.1 contributes to prostate tumorigenesis by permitting luminal cell de-differentiation potentially augmented by defects in DNA repair.

  11. Expression of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and tumor-associated carbonic anhydrases Ⅸ and Ⅻ in normal and neoplastic colorectal mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti J. Kivela; Abdul Waheed; William S. Sly; Hannu Rajaniemi; Silvia Pastorekova; Jaromir Pastorek; Seppo Parkkila; Juha Saarnio; Tuomo J. Karttunen; Jyrki Kivela; Anna-Kaisa Parkkila; Maria Bartosova; Vojtech Mucha; Michal Novak

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze possible relationships between CA Ⅸ/ CA Ⅻ and pVHL expression in normal and neoplastic colorectal mucosa.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of 42 tissue specimens obtained from 17 cancer patients was performed to evaluate the distribution and semi-quantitatively assess the levels of CA Ⅸ, CA Ⅻ and pVHL. VHL mRNAs from 14fresh-frozen tumors was amplified by RT-PCR and subjected to sequencing. CA9 and CA12 mRNA levels were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in comparison with VEGF as an indicator of hypoxia that uncouples the pVHL control.RESULTS: Tumor tissues were associated with a borderline increase of CA Ⅸ staining signal and slight but significant decrease of CA Ⅻ immunoreactivity, whereas no association was found for pVHL. Sequence analysis of RT-PCR-amplified VHL mRNAs revealed no deletions/ mutations, suggesting that they were VHL-competent. We did not observe any correlation between pVHL andCA Ⅸ/CA Ⅻ proteins as well as between VEGF and CA9mRNAs, but the tumor-associated changes in mRNA levels of VEGF and CA12showed a significant inverse relationship. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that CA9 and CA12 are regulated by different intratumoral factors and that lack of apparent relationship between the levels of CA Ⅸ/CA Ⅻ and pVHL cannot be fully assigned to uncoupling of negative regulatory function of pVHL by tumor hypoxia signified by induced VEGF transcription. The interplay between the functional pVHL and CA Ⅸ/CA Ⅻ in colorectal tumors seems rather complex and is not evident merely at the expression levels.

  12. MicroRNA-34a is a tumor suppressor in choriocarcinoma via regulation of Delta-like1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choriocarcinoma is a gestational trophoblastic tumor which causes high mortality if left untreated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non protein-coding RNAs which inhibit target gene expression. The role of miRNAs in choriocarcinoma, however, is not well understood. In this study, we examined the effect of miR-34a in choriocarcinoma. MiR-34a was either inhibited or ectopically expressed transiently in two choriocarcinoma cell lines (BeWo and JEG-3) respectively. Its actions on cell invasion, proliferation and colony formation at low cell density were examined. The miR-34a putative target Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1) was identified by adoption of different approaches including: in-silico analysis, functional luciferase assay and western blotting. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify changes in the expression of matrix proteinase in the treated cells. To nullify the effect of miR-34a ectopic expression, we activated Notch signaling through force-expression of the Notch intracellular domain in the miR-34a force-expressed cells. In addition, we studied the importance of DLL1 in BeWo cell invasion through ligand stimulation and antibody inhibition. Furthermore, the induction in tumor formation of miR-34a-inhibited BeWo cells in SCID mice was investigated. Transient miR-34a force-expression significantly suppressed cell proliferation and invasion in BeWo and JEG-3 cells. In silicon miRNA target prediction, luciferase functional assays and Western blotting analysis demonstrated that miR-34a regulated DLL1 expression in both cell lines. Although force-expression of miR-34a suppressed the expression of DLL1 and NOTCH1, the extent of suppression was higher in DLL1 than NOTCH1 in both cell lines. MiR-34a-mediated DLL1 suppression led to reduced matrix metallopeptidase 9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator expression. The effect of miR-34a on cell invasion was partially nullified by Notch signaling activation. DLL1 ligand stimulated while

  13. The FBXO4 Tumor Suppressor Functions as a Barrier to BrafV600E-Dependent Metastatic Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric K.; Lian, Zhaorui; D'Andrea, Kurt; Letrero, Richard; Sheng, WeiQi; Liu, Shujing; Diehl, J. Nathaniel; Pytel, Dariusz; Barbash, Olena; Schuchter, Lynn; Amaravaradi, Ravi; Xu, Xiaowei; Herlyn, Meenhard; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin D1–cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6) dysregulation is a major contributor to melanomagenesis. Clinical evidence has revealed that p16INK4A, an allosteric inhibitor of CDK4/6, is inactivated in over half of human melanomas, and numerous animal models have demonstrated that p16INK4A deletion promotes melanoma. FBXO4, a specificity factor for the E3 ligase that directs timely cyclin D1 proteolysis, has not been studied in melanoma. We demonstrate that Fbxo4 deficiency induces Braf-driven melanoma and that this phenotype depends on cyclin D1 accumulation in mice, underscoring the importance of this ubiquitin ligase in tumor suppression. Furthermore, we have identified a substrate-binding mutation, FBXO4 I377M, that selectively disrupts cyclin D1 degradation while preserving proteolysis of the other known FBXO4 substrate, TRF1. The I377M mutation and Fbxo4 deficiency result in nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1, a key transforming neoplastic event. Collectively, these data provide evidence that FBXO4 dysfunction, as a mechanism for cyclin D1 overexpression, is a contributor to human malignancy. PMID:24019069

  14. Regulation of APC and AXIN2 expression by intestinal tumor suppressor CDX2 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Coskun, Mehmet; Bzorek, Michael; Kristensen, Michael Holmsgaard; Danielsen, Erik Thomas; Jørgensen, Steffen; Olsen, Jørgen; Engel, Ulla; Holck, Susanne; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2013-06-01

    Wnt signaling is often constitutively active in colorectal cancer cells. The expression of the intestinal specific transcription factor CDX2 is found to be transiently decreased in invasive cells at the tumor/stroma interface. A recent ChIP-Seq study has indicated that several Wnt signaling-related genes are regulated by CDX2. The aim was to investigate the role of decreased CDX2 level on the expression of APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β in migrating colon cancer cells at the invasive front. CDX2-bound promoter and enhancer regions from APC, AXIN2 and GSK3β were analyzed for gene regulatory activity and the expression pattern of APC and GSK3β at the invasive front was evaluated by immunohistochemical procedures. Transfection of intestinal and non-intestinal cell lines demonstrated that CDX2 activated APC and AXIN2 promoter activities via intestinal cell-specific enhancer elements. Suppressed CDX2 expression was associated with endogenous downregulation of APC and AXIN2 expression in Caco-2 cells but did not affect GSK3β expression. Furthermore, elevated levels of nuclear β-catenin and reduced levels of cytoplasmic APC were correlated to a low CDX2 expression in migrating colon cancer cells in vivo. These results suggest that a low CDX2 level has influence on the Wnt signaling in invasive colon cancer cells possibly promoting cellular migration. PMID:23393221

  15. WISP3 (CCN6 Is a Secreted Tumor-Suppressor Protein that Modulates IGF Signaling in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina G. Kleer

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is the most lethal form of locally advanced breast cancer. We have found that WISP3 is lost in 80% of human IBC tumors and that it has growth- and angiogenesis-inhibitory functions in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. WISP3 is a cysteine-rich, putatively secreted protein that belongs to the CCN family. It contains a signal peptide at the N-terminus and four highly conserved motifs. Here, for the first time, we investigate the function of WISP3 protein in relationship to its structural features. We found that WISP3 is secreted into the conditioned media and into the lumens of normal breast ducts. Once secreted, WISP3 was able to decrease, directly or through induction of other molecule(s, the IGF-1-induced activation of the IGF-IR, and two of its main downstream signaling molecules, IRS1 and ERK-1/2, in SUM149 IBC cells. Furthermore, WISP3 containing conditioned media decreased the growth rate of SUM149 cells. This work sheds light into the mechanism of WISP3 function by demonstrating that it is secreted and that, once in the extracellular media, it induces a series of molecular events that leads to modulation of IGF-IR signaling pathways and cellular growth in IBC cells.

  16. Rh2E2, a novel metabolic suppressor, specifically inhibits energy-based metabolism of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Dong, Hang; Liang, Xu; Bai, Li-Ping; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Guo, Yue; Kong, Ah Ng Tony; Wang, Rui; Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Hsiao, Wendy Wen Luen; Chan, Ka Man; Wang, Jingrong; Chan, Rick Wai Kit; Guo, Jianru; Zhang, Wei; Yen, Feng Gen; Zhou, Hua; Leung, Elaine Lai Han; Yu, Zhiling; Liu, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Energy metabolism in cancer cells is often increased to meet their higher proliferative rate and biosynthesis demands. Suppressing cancer cell metabolism using agents like metformin has become an attractive strategy for treating cancer patients. We showed that a novel ginsenoside derivative, Rh2E2, is as effective as aspirin in preventing the development of AOM/DSS-induced colorectal cancer and suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in a LLC-1 xenograft. A sub-chronic and acute toxicity LD50 test of Rh2E2 showed no harmful reactions at the maximum oral dosage of 5000 mg/kg body weight in mice. Proteomic profiling revealed that Rh2E2 specifically inhibited ATP production in cancer cells via down-regulation of metabolic enzymes involving glycolysis, fatty acid β-oxidation and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, leading to specific cytotoxicity and S-phase cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Those findings suggest that Rh2E2 possesses a novel and safe anti-metabolic agent for cancer patients by specific reduction of energy-based metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:26799418

  17. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. ► Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. ► Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. ► Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. ► This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40–16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40–16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53 gene expression levels compared to cell lines without p53 sequestration. Our data reveal the characteristic cytoplasmic

  18. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestl, Erin E., E-mail: egestl@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Anne Boettger, S., E-mail: aboettger@wcupa.edu [Department of Biology, West Chester University, 750 S Church Street, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  19. A mutation screening of oncogenes, tumor suppressor gene TP53 and nuclear encoded mitochondrial complex I genes in oncocytic thyroid tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelisti, Cecilia; de Biase, Dario; Kurelac, Ivana; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Caria, Paola; Vanni, Roberta; Romeo, Giovanni; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Bonora, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background Thyroid neoplasias with oncocytic features represent a specific phenotype in non-medullary thyroid cancer, reflecting the unique biological phenomenon of mitochondrial hyperplasia in the cytoplasm. Oncocytic thyroid cells are characterized by a prominent eosinophilia (or oxyphilia) caused by mitochondrial abundance. Although disruptive mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the most significant hallmark of such tumors, oncocytomas may be envisioned as heterogeneous neoplasm...

  20. Mutational pattern of TP53 tumor suppressor gene in human lung cells exposed to air pollution PM2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental exposure to fine airborne particulate matter (PM 2.5) is thought to be responsible for cardiopulmonary diseases, including lung cancer. However, the mechanisms of action potentially involved in PM2.5 toxicity are not yet fully described. Mutations in the TP53 gene are the most common alterations in human solid tumors. TP53 mutational patterns have sometimes been linked to carcinogen exposure. The purpose of this study was to determine the mutations that alter the functionality of this transcription factor in a model of human epithelial lung cells (A549) exposed to the fine particulate fraction (PM2.5) of an atmospheric aerosol sampled under urban and industrial influences. PM2.5 was collected in Dunkerque City by cascade impaction. Its physicochemical characterization revealed the presence of many inorganic and organic compounds, including some that are known for their toxicity. The search for mutations altering the functionality of the P53 protein was performed 72 h after exposure of A549 cells to PM2.5 at its lethal concentration at 50% (LC50, 118.60 μg/mL = 31.63 μg/cm2 ), using the Functional Analysis of Separated Alleles in Yeast (FASAY). Sixteen mutations altering P53 function were detected after A549 cells exposure to the collected PM2.5: eight deletions of one or two nucleotides and eight nucleotide substitutions, mainly transitions A > G and G > A. These mutations are described in the literature as possibly caused by endogenous mechanisms, such as oxidative stress. This kind of alteration can be induced by metal content of the PM2.5, as well as by metabolic activation of the organic compounds coated onto its surface. Involvement of oxidative stress in TP53 mutations was confirmed by the detection of an oxidative DNA adduct, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in A549 cells exposed to the collected PM. (authors)

  1. The tumor suppressor gene TRC8/RNF139 is disrupted by a constitutional balanced translocation t(8;22(q24.13;q11.21 in a young girl with dysgerminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorio Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNF139/TRC8 is a potential tumor suppressor gene with similarity to PTCH, a tumor suppressor implicated in basal cell carcinomas and glioblastomas. TRC8 has the potential to act in a novel regulatory relationship linking the cholesterol/lipid biosynthetic pathway with cellular growth control and has been identified in families with hereditary renal (RCC and thyroid cancers. Haploinsufficiency of TRC8 may facilitate development of clear cell-RCC in association with VHL mutations, and may increase risk for other tumor types. We report a paternally inherited balanced translocation t(8;22 in a proposita with dysgerminoma. Methods The translocation was characterized by FISH and the breakpoints cloned, sequenced, and compared. DNA isolated from normal and tumor cells was checked for abnormalities by array-CGH. Expression of genes TRC8 and TSN was tested both on dysgerminoma and in the proposita and her father. Results The breakpoints of the translocation are located within the LCR-B low copy repeat on chromosome 22q11.21, containing the palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR involved in recurrent and non-recurrent translocations, and in an AT-rich sequence inside intron 1 of the TRC8 tumor-suppressor gene at 8q24.13. TRC8 was strongly underexpressed in the dysgerminoma. Translin is underexpressed in the dysgerminoma compared to normal ovary. TRC8 is a target of Translin (TSN, a posttranscriptional regulator of genes transcribed by the transcription factor CREM-tau in postmeiotic male germ cells. Conclusion A role for TRC8 in dysgerminoma may relate to its interaction with Translin. We propose a model in which one copy of TRC8 is disrupted by a palindrome-mediated translocation followed by complete loss of expression through suppression, possibly mediated by miRNA.

  2. The tumor suppressor p53 guides GluA1 homeostasis through Nedd4-2 during chronic elevation of neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Kathryn A; Zhu, Jiuhe; Tsai, Nien-Pei

    2015-10-01

    Chronic activity perturbation in neurons can trigger homeostatic mechanisms to restore the baseline function. Although the importance and dysregulation of neuronal activity homeostasis has been implicated in neurological disorders such as epilepsy, the complete signaling by which chronic changes in neuronal activity initiate the homeostatic mechanisms is unclear. We report here that the tumor suppressor p53 and its signaling are involved in neuronal activity homeostasis. Upon chronic elevation of neuronal activity in primary cortical neuron cultures, the ubiquitin E3 ligase, murine double minute- 2 (Mdm2), is phosphorylated by the kinase Akt. Phosphorylated Mdm2 triggers the degradation of p53 and subsequent induction of a p53 target gene, neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated gene 4-like (Nedd4-2). Nedd4-2 encodes another ubiquitin E3 ligase. We identified glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluA1), subunit of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors as a novel substrate of Nedd4-2. The regulation of GluA1 level is known to be crucial for neuronal activity homeostasis. We confirmed that, by pharmacologically inhibiting Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation or genetically reducing Nedd4-2 in a mouse model, the GluA1 ubiquitination and down-regulation induced by chronically elevated neuronal activity are both attenuated. Our findings demonstrate the first direct function of p53 in neuronal homeostasis and elucidate a new mechanism by which cortical neurons respond to chronic activity perturbation. PMID:26250624

  3. Metallothionein 1G functions as a tumor suppressor in thyroid cancer through modulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MT1G inactivation mediated by promoter methylation has been reported in thyroid cancer. However, the role of MT1G in thyroid carcinogenesis remains unclear. The aim of this study is to examine the biological functions and related molecular mechanisms of MT1G in thyroid cancer. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) was performed to analyze promoter methylation of MT1G and its relationship with clinicopathological characteristics of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) patients. Conventional and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were used to evaluate mRNA expression. The functions of ectopic MT1G expression were determined by cell proliferation and colony formation, cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as cell migration and invasion assays. MT1G expression was frequently silenced or down-regulated in thyroid cancer cell lines, and was also significantly decreased in primary thyroid cancer tissues compared with non-malignant thyroid tissues. Promoter methylation, along with histone modification, contributes to MT1G inactivation in thyroid tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data showed that MT1G hypermethylation was significantly positively associated with lymph node metastasis in PTC patients. Importantly, restoring MT1G expression in thyroid cancer cells dramatically suppressed cell growth and invasiveness, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through inhibiting phosphorylation of Akt and Rb. We have for the first time revealed that MT1G appears to be functional tumor suppressor involved in thyroid carcinogenesis mainly through modulating the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway and partially through regulating the activity of Rb/E2F pathway in this study

  4. Solvent effects on structural and thermochemical properties of p53 tumor-suppressor gene: a molecular modeling approach in drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Shiva; Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Mivehchi, Houri; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Farhangi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumor-suppressor protein is a cellular phosphoprotein and a negative regulator of cell growth. Most p53 mutations occur in exons 5-8 within the DNA-binding domain. Therefore, p53 can potentially be targeted with novel drugs designed to bind to a mutation and restore its stability or wild-type conformation. For the current study, Hartree-Fock calculations were used to investigate the solvent-induced effects of five different solvent media (acetone, ethanol, methanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and water) on the thermochemical parameters and relative energies, and on the multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus nuclei, of GAT. To understand how the solvent affects the mutation region (the "hot spot") of p53, the relative energies of GAT in selected solvent media were determined. Some biological evidence suggested the structural stabilities of hot spots of GAT have the optimum temperature and solvent type for mutation. All the authors' findings are in accordance with common biological phenomena. Another important objective of this study was to compare the hydration Gibbs free energies of CUA and GAT in water using two different approaches where the solvent was treated as a continuum of the constant at different levels of Hartree-Fock theory. The Gibbs hydration energy values obtained in water with the polarized continuum model directly applied on the isolated CUA and GAT sequences were compared with those determined from the hydrated models with four, six, and eight water molecule clusters around the hot spots uracil and adenine. The clustered structures of water molecules around the hot spots of GAT (in DNA level) and CUA (in transcriptional level) were found to be energetically favored. The results of this study provide a reliable insight into the nature of mutation processes, which is of utmost importance for the study of biochemical structures, and provide a basis for drug design. PMID:21976981

  5. CK2 Phosphorylates and Inhibits TAp73 Tumor Suppressor Function to Promote Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Genes and Phenotype in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Lu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC and genes have been linked to cancer development and therapeutic resistance, but the signaling mechanisms regulating CSC genes and phenotype are incompletely understood. CK2 has emerged as a key signal serine/threonine kinase that modulates diverse signal cascades regulating cell fate and growth. We previously showed that CK2 is often aberrantly expressed and activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC, concomitantly with mutant (mt tumor suppressor TP53, and inactivation of its family member, TAp73. Unexpectedly, we observed that classical stem cell genes Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4, are overexpressed in HNSCC with inactivated TAp73 and mtTP53. However, the potential relationship between CK2, TAp73 inactivation, and CSC phenotype is unknown. We reveal that inhibition of CK2 by pharmacologic inhibitors or siRNA inhibits the expression of CSC genes and side population (SP, while enhancing TAp73 mRNA and protein expression. Conversely, CK2 inhibitor attenuation of CSC protein expression and the SP by was abrogated by TAp73 siRNA. Bioinformatic analysis uncovered a single predicted CK2 threonine phosphorylation site (T27 within the N-terminal transactivation domain of TAp73. Nuclear CK2 and TAp73 interaction, confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation, was attenuated by CK2 inhibitor, or a T27A point-mutation of this predicted CK2 threonine phospho-acceptor site of TAp73. Further, T27A mutation attenuated phosphorylation, while enhancing TAp73 function in repressing CSC gene expression and SP cells. A new CK2 inhibitor, CX-4945, inhibited CSC related SP cells, clonogenic survival, and spheroid formation. Our study unveils a novel regulatory mechanism whereby aberrant CK2 signaling inhibits TAp73 to promote the expression of CSC genes and phenotype.

  6. A mitotic function for the high-mobility group protein HMG20b regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Daniels, M J; Garnett, M J; Venkitaraman, A R

    2011-07-28

    The inactivation of BRCA2, a suppressor of breast, ovarian and other epithelial cancers, triggers instability in chromosome structure and number, which are thought to arise from defects in DNA recombination and mitotic cell division, respectively. Human BRCA2 controls DNA recombination via eight BRC repeats, evolutionarily conserved motifs of ∼35 residues, that interact directly with the recombinase RAD51. How BRCA2 controls mitotic cell division is debated. Several studies by different groups report that BRCA2 deficiency affects cytokinesis. Moreover, its interaction with HMG20b, a protein of uncertain function containing a promiscuous DNA-binding domain and kinesin-like coiled coils, has been implicated in the G2-M transition. We show here that HMG20b depletion by RNA interference disturbs the completion of cell division, suggesting a novel function for HMG20b. In vitro, HMG20b binds directly to the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and exhibits the highest affinity for BRC5, a motif that binds poorly to RAD51. Conversely, the BRC4 repeat binds strongly to RAD51, but not to HMG20b. In vivo, BRC5 overexpression inhibits the BRCA2-HMG20b interaction, recapitulating defects in the completion of cell division provoked by HMG20b depletion. In contrast, BRC4 inhibits the BRCA2-RAD51 interaction and the assembly of RAD51 at sites of DNA damage, but not the completion of cell division. Our findings suggest that a novel function for HMG20b in cytokinesis is regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and separate this unexpected function for the BRC repeats from their known activity in DNA recombination. We propose that divergent tumor-suppressive pathways regulating chromosome segregation as well as chromosome structure may be governed by the conserved BRC motifs in BRCA2. PMID:21399666

  7. Glioblastoma, brain metastases and soft tissue sarcoma of extremities: Candidate tumors for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10B-concentration ratios between human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), sarcoma (S3) and melanoma (MV3) xenografted in nu/nu mice and selected normal tissues were investigated to test for preferential 10B-accumulation. Animals received BSH, BPA or both compounds sequentially. Mean 10B-concentration ratios between tumor and normal tissues above 2 were found indicating therapeutic ratios. In addition to glioblastoma, brain metastases and soft tissue sarcoma appear to be promising targets for future BNCT research. - Highlights: • BSH leads to high 10B concentration ratios between sarcoma, muscle and brain as well as between glioblastoma and brain. • The 10B concentration in tumors is quite low as is the 10B concentration ratio between tumors and blood. • BPA-f leads to 10B accumulation in tumors relative to blood and advantageous absolute 10B concentrations in tumors. • The 10B concentration ratios between tumors and brain and sarcoma and muscle, are modest. • The advantage of the sequential injection of both compounds is an enhanced intratumoral 10B concentration

  8. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing; Shen, Chengwu [Department of Pharmacy, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Wang, Lin [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Research Center for Medicinal Biotechnology, Shandong Academy of Medicinal Sciences, Jinan 250012 (China); Ma, Quanping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Fourth People’s Hospital of Jinan, Jinan 250031 (China); Xia, Pingtian; Qi, Mei; Yang, Muyi [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Han, Bo, E-mail: boh@sdu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4.

  9. Metformin inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer cells: Involvement of the tumor suppressor miR30a and its target gene SOX4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Metformin inhibits TGF-β-induced EMT in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • Metformin upregulates tumor suppressor miR30a and downregulates SOX4 in PCa cells. • SOX4 is a target gene of miR30a. - Abstract: Tumor metastasis is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic patients treated with metformin have lower PCa risk and better prognosis. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of metformin on EMT in PCa cells and the possible microRNA (miRNA)-based mechanisms. MiRNAs have been shown to regulate various processes of cancer metastasis. We herein showed that metformin significantly inhibits proliferation of Vcap and PC-3 cells, induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibits invasiveness and motility capacity of Vcap cells. Metformin could inhibit TGF-β-induced EMT in Vcap cells, as manifested by inhibition of the increase of N-cadherin (p = 0.013), Vimentin (p = 0.002) and the decrease of E-cadherin (p = 0.0023) and β-catenin (p = 0.034) at mRNA and protein levels. Notably, we demonstrated significant upregulation of miR30a levels by metformin (P < 0.05) and further experiments indicated that miR30a significantly inhibits proliferation and EMT process of Vcap cells. Interestingly, we identified that SOX4, a previously reported oncogenic transcriptional factor and modulator of EMT, is a direct target gene of miR30a. Finally, we screened the expression of miR30a and SOX4 in 84 PCa cases with radical prostatectomy. Of note, SOX4 overexpression is significantly associated with decreased levels of miR30a in PCa cases. In all, our study suggested that inhibition of EMT by metformin in PCa cells may involve upregulation of miR30a and downregulation of SOX4

  10. Prevalence of the Prefoldin Subunit 5 Gene Deletion in Canine Mammary Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Hennecke; Julia Beck; Kirsten Bornemann-Kolatzki; Stephan Neumann; Hugo Murua Escobar; Ingo Nolte; Susanne Conradine Hammer; Marion Hewicker-Trautwein; Johannes Junginger; Franz-Josef Kaup; Bertram Brenig; Ekkehard Schütz

    2015-01-01

    Background A somatic deletion at the proximal end of canine chromosome 27 (CFA27) was recently reported in 50% of malignant mammary tumors. This region harbours the tumor suppressor gene prefoldin subunit 5 (PFDN5) and the deletion correlated with a higher Ki-67 score. PFDN5 has been described to repress c-MYC and is, therefore, a candidate tumor-suppressor and cancer-driver gene in canine mammary cancer. Aim of this study was to confirm the recurrent deletion in a larger number of tumors. Me...

  11. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS) is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model for the human counterpart, providing additional evidence towards

  12. 视肉膜母细胞瘤(RB)抑癌基因治疗原理及策略%Principles and Strategies for Approaching Retinoblastoma (RB) Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐洪基; 缪庆; 胡诗学; 刘秉慈

    1999-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) gene was the first tumor suppressor gene identified.It encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein which is differentially phosphorylated during the cell cycle.And the RB gene apparently plays a key role in cell growth regulation.Mutations in RB are seen in virtually all cases of retinoblastoma,and loss of RB gene function has been implicated in the progression of many common human cancers.A number of studies have indicated that replacement of the normal RB gene in RB-defective tumor cells could suppress their tumorigenic activity in nude mice.Preclinical studies also demonstrated that treatment of established human xenograft tumors in nude mice by recombinant adenovirus vectors expressing RB protein resulted in regression of the treated tumor.These studies make the emerging RB gene therapy even more attraction.

  13. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1SAG expression is up-regulated in the presence of salivary gland tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, F J; van der Wal, J E; Ligtenberg, A J M;

    2004-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG) is encoded by the gene Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) and represents the salivary variant of DMBT1 (DMBT1(SAG)). While SAG is a bona fide anti-caries factor, DMBT1 was proposed as a candidate tumor-suppressor for brain, digestive tract, and lung cancer. Though...

  14. Association of the hypermethylation status of PTEN tumor suppressor gene with the risk of breast cancer among Kurdish population from Western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Kheirollah; Payandeh, Mehrdad; Rahimi, Zohreh

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer with high morbidity and mortality among women worldwide. Aberrant hypermethylation in promoter regions of the tumor suppressor genes such as PTEN gene is a key event in the progression and development of breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate an association between PTEN gene methylation status with the risk of breast cancer in an Iranian population. We studied 255 individuals, including 103 patients with breast cancer, 102 first-degree female relatives of patients (mother, sister, or daughter of patients), and 50 healthy individuals as a control group. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the PTEN promoter methylation status was detected using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method with specific methylated and unmethylated primers. In some samples, direct DNA sequencing was used to confirm the results obtained by the MSP method. The frequency of PTEN-methylated (MM) genotype was 6 % in the healthy control group, 23.3 % in relatives of patients, and 41.7 % in patients (χ (2) = 24.62, p < 0.001). There were significant differences in the frequency of PTEN-methylated genotype between healthy control compared to that in patients (χ (2) = 15.1, p < 0.001) and also compared to that in relatives of patients (χ (2) = 6.9, p = 0.009). In the presence of PTEN MM genotype, there was a 3.1-fold susceptibility to breast cancer compared to the UU genotype (p < 0.001). Also, in the presence of PTEN M allele, the risk of breast cancer was 2.71-fold compared to the presence of U allele (p < 0.001). Our findings indicated increased frequency of hypermethylation of PTEN promoter in the studied patients and their relatives that could be considered as one of the epigenetic factors affecting the risk of breast cancer in Iranians. PMID:26715274

  15. The important tumor suppressor role of PER1 in regulating the cyclin–CDK–CKI network in SCC15 human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Juan; Li, Han-Xue; Yang, Kai; Chen, Dan; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that the abnormal expression of the circadian clock gene PER1 is closely related to the development and progression of cancer. However, the exact molecular mechanism by which the abnormal expression of PER1 induces carcinogenesis is unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the alterations in downstream cell cycle genes, cell cycle distribution, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and in vivo tumorigenicity in SCC15 oral squamous cell carcinoma cells after PER1 downregulation. Materials and methods A stable SCC15 cell line was established to constitutively express shRNA targeting PER1. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analyses were conducted to estimate PER1 mRNA and protein expression. The expression of PER1, P53, CyclinD1, CyclinE, CyclinA2, CyclinB1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, P16, P21, WEE1, and CDC25 mRNA was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Cell cycle distribution, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. The in vivo tumorigenicity of SCC15 cells was evaluated in female BALB/c nu/nu mice. Results PER1 downregulation resulted in significantly increased mRNA expression levels of CyclinD1, CyclinE, CyclinB1, CDK1, and WEE1 (P<0.05), and significantly decreased mRNA expression levels of P53, CyclinA2, P16, P21, and CDC25 (P<0.05) compared to control cells. Additionally, PER1 downregulation led to significantly fewer cells in S phase (P<0.05), but significantly more cells in G2/M phase (P<0.05) compared to the control group. After PER1 downregulation, the cell proliferation index was significantly higher (P<0.05), and the apoptotic index was significantly lower (P<0.05). The in vivo tumorigenicity of SCC15 cells was significantly enhanced by PER1 downregulation (P<0.05). Conclusion PER1 is an important tumor suppressor gene which acts by regulating the Cyclin-CDK-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor regulatory network. An in

  16. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • RNAi screen identified genetic enhancers for the C. elegans homolog of EAF2. • EAF2 and RBBP4 proteins physically bind to each other and alter transcription. • Overexpression of EAF2 and RBBP4 induces the cell death in prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: The tumor suppressor EAF2 is regulated by androgen signaling and associated with prostate cancer. While EAF2 and its partner ELL have been shown to be members of protein complexes involved in RNA polymerase II transcriptional elongation, the biologic roles for EAF2 especially with regards to the development of cancer remains poorly understood. We have previously identified the eaf-1 gene in Caenorhabditiselegans as the ortholog of EAF2, and shown that eaf-1 interacts with the ELL ortholog ell-1 to control development and fertility in worms. To identify genetic pathways that interact with eaf-1, we screened RNAi libraries consisting of transcription factors, phosphatases, and chromatin-modifying factors to identify genes which enhance the effects of eaf-1(tm3976) on fertility. From this screen, we identified lin-53, hmg-1.2, pha-4, ruvb-2 and set-6 as hits. LIN-53 is the C. elegans ortholog of human retinoblastoma binding protein 4/7 (RBBP 4/7), which binds to the retinoblastoma protein and inhibits the Ras signaling pathway. We find that lin-53 showed a synthetic interaction with eaf-1(tm3976) where knockdown of lin-53 in an eaf-1(tm3976) mutant resulted in sterile worms. This phenotype may be due to cell death as the treated worms contain degenerated embryos with increased expression of the ced-1:GFP cell death marker. Further we find that the interaction between eaf-1 and lin-53/RBBP4/7 also exists in vertebrates, which is reflected by the formation of a protein complex between EAF2 and RBBP4/7. Finally, overexpression of either human EAF2 or RBBP4 in LNCaP cells induced the cell death while knockdown of EAF2 in LNCaP enhanced cell proliferation, indicating an important role of EAF2 in

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